Podcasts about Conservation

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 3,580PODCASTS
  • 12,938EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 6DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 14, 2021LATEST

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Conservation

Show all podcasts related to conservation

Latest podcast episodes about Conservation

Minnesota Bound Podcast - MN Bound Podcast
Minnesota's Ruffed Grouse

Minnesota Bound Podcast - MN Bound Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 33:11


Ron Schara has a chat with Minnesota Department of Resources' Forest Habitat Supervisor Ted Dick about everything Ruffed Grouse. Supported by: Thousand Hills Lifetime Grazed – (https://thousandhillslifetimegrazed.com/,) North Dakota Tourism (https://www.legendarynd.com/,) Kinetico (https://www.kinetico.com/,) Voyageur Saunas (https://www.voyageursaunas.com/) & Minnesota Propane Association (https://propane.com/) - “Clean American Energy” 

The Flush Podcast - Stories from the field
America's 2021 Quail Hunting Forecast

The Flush Podcast - Stories from the field

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 74:00


Tim Caughran & Andy Edwards from Quail Forever join the show to help us break down the 2021 quail hunting forecast across America. Drought, fires, & arctic winter blasts had an impact on bird numbers, but prospects for this season are still good across much of the country.  We break down each state and highlight hot spots to help you plan for your hunting season. Presented by Grain Belt Beer (https://www.grainbelt.com/,) North Dakota Tourism (https://www.legendarynd.com/,) Chief Upland (https://chiefupland.com/,) Federal Ammunition (https://www.federalpremium.com/,) Huron Chamber & Visitor's Bureau (http://www.huronsd.com/,) & OnX Maps (https://www.onxmaps.com/)

Getty Art + Ideas
The Recovery and Conservation of a Stolen de Kooning

Getty Art + Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 42:01


“We hear the security guards talking to one another on the walkie-talkie, saying that there's a man on the line saying that he has a stolen painting. And I wish somebody could've seen us, because we just stopped our conversation and Jill's eyes got big, and she said, ‘Oh, my gosh, are we gonna remember this moment for the rest of our lives.'” On the day after Thanksgiving in 1985, two thieves casually entered the University of Arizona Museum of Art (UAMA). They strolled out minutes later with Willem de Kooning's painting Woman-Ochre. Without security cameras or solid leads, the trail to find the stolen painting quickly went cold. In 2017, however, the artwork turned up in an unlikely place: a small antique shop in Silver City, New Mexico. After more than 30 years, the work was finally returned to the UAMA, but it was badly damaged, due to the way it was torn from its frame during the heist and how it was subsequently stored and handled. The UAMA turned to the Getty Museum and Conservation Institute to help conserve the painting. In this episode, UAMA curator of exhibitions Olivia Miller and Getty Museum senior conservator of paintings Ulrich Birkmaier discuss Woman-Ochre's theft, recovery, and conservation, as well as its place in de Kooning's oeuvre and the UAMA's collection. The treatment is still in progress, and the restored artwork is scheduled to be on view at the Getty Center from June 7 to August 28, 2022. For images, transcripts, and more, visit https://blogs.getty.edu/iris/podcast-the-recovery-and-conservation-of-a-stolen-de-kooning/ or http://www.getty.edu/podcasts/

We Will Not Be Tamed
Episode 86: Texas Freshwater Fisheries Center Celebrates 25 Years of Conservation Outreach

We Will Not Be Tamed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021


For nearly a quarter-century, the Edwin L. Cox, Jr., Texas Freshwater Fisheries Center (TFFC) in Athens has brought together avid anglers, curious school children, dedicated conservation professionals, and many generous... The post Episode 86: Texas Freshwater Fisheries Center Celebrates 25 Years of Conservation Outreach appeared first on Texas Parks and Wildlife Foundation.

Un Jour dans l'Histoire
Un Jour dans l'Histoire - La conservation de l’environnement et de la faune au Congo belge : Une fausse protection ? - 13/10/2021

Un Jour dans l'Histoire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 35:09


A* Violette Pouillard, chargée de recherches au FWO, Université de Gand, et au FNRS, ULB.

Impact: The Conservation Photography Podcast
Episode 086: How This Filmmaker Goes Beyond Premieres for Conservation Impact - An Interview with Gunjan Menon

Impact: The Conservation Photography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 60:05


Back Country Pa
Conservation & Hunting W. Jason Crighton From The Conservation Unfiltered Podcast

Back Country Pa

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 88:48


On This episode Cody & Ethan get Jason Crighton on the phone to talk about Hunting and Conservation. Jason is the host of The Conservation Unfiltered podcast  - We talk about how our Hunting season are going so far & even touch on some good butchering tips - Different ways that Hunters, and Fisherman play a huge role in todays Conservation Efforts along with some of the organizations that Jason is apart of and ones that you could join!

Save What You Love with Mark Titus
Guido Rahr - CEO Wild Salmon Center

Save What You Love with Mark Titus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 63:04


Guido Rahr is the president and CEO of the Wild Salmon Center a non-profit responsible for securing protection of 3 million acres of salmon habitat across the Pacific rim – and one of the key partners in the coalition to protect Bristol Bay.'Guido's also the subject of the book, Stronghold – One Man's Quest to Save the World's Wild Salmon  – suggesting that each one of us can contribute to the great song of saving what we love. We talk about Guido's work and adventures chronicled in the book. Mostly, Guido is wildly curious – from snakes and frogs and birds to our shared love of salmon - and his curiosity is infectious.

Ducks Unlimited Podcast
Ep. 17 – APEX Ammunition Talks High-Performance Waterfowl Loads

Ducks Unlimited Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 43:58


APEX Ammunition hit the market in the turkey woods several years back, but the owners had a vision to move these high-performance loads into the waterfowling community. APEX Ammunition CEO Jason Lonsberry joins host Chris Jennings on the DU Podcast to talk about their multiple ammunition offerings for duck and goose hunters, and the pair discuss the technical aspects of TSS, blends, and APEX's S3 Steel loads. www.ducks.org/DUPodcast

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers
626: Digging into the Fossil Record to Understand our Planet's Past and Aid Present Conservation Efforts - Dr. Michael Archer

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 63:01


Dr. Michael Archer is a Professor of Paleobiology in the School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of New South Wales in Australia. Mike is a paleontologist who is fascinated with understanding the continuity of life over billions of years. He spends his free time watching Sci-Fi movies, including classics like Jurassic Park (one of his all-time favorites). Mike received his undergraduate education from Princeton University in Geology and Biology. He was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to study in Australia and remained there to earn his PhD in Zoology from the University of Western Australia. Mike has since worked at the Western Australian, Queensland, and Australian Museums, and he joined the faculty at the University of New South Wales in 1978. Mike has received many awards and honors, including being named one of the Top 100 Most Influential People in Sydney in 2008, receipt of the Riversleigh Society Medal, the TH Huxley Award from the Australian Museum, and the Australian Centennial Medal from the Federal Government of Australia. He is a Member of the Australia Institute of Biology, as well as a Fellow of the Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales, the World Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Australian College of Educators, The Australian Academy of Science, the Royal Society of New South Wales, and Australia 21. In this interview, Mike tells us more about his journey through life and science.

District of Conservation
EP 221: Rep. Dan Newhouse on the 30X30 Alternative & Congressional Western Caucus Priorities

District of Conservation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 26:52


In Episode 221 of District of Conservation, Gabriella interviews Congressional Western Caucus Chairman and Congressman Dan Newhouse (R-WA). Rep. Newhouse took the helms of the caucus in January and is a fourth-term congressman representing Washington State's Fourth Congressional District. Rep. Newhouse discusses their 30X30 alternative, Western Caucus priorities, how they are challenging the Biden administration, their new podcast, and much more. Follow Rep. Newhouse online and on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube. Follow the Congressional Western Caucus online and on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube. SHOW NOTES America the Beautiful / 30x30 Western Conservation Principles | Gabriella's Write-up at IWF A Voice for Rural America Podcast --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/district-of-conservation/support

Great Outdoors from WGN Radio 720
In search of silver maples and the magic of fall

Great Outdoors from WGN Radio 720

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021


This week on The Great Outdoors, Charlie spends a little bit of time talking about the majestic time of year that is Fall. With the leaves changing colors and the weather cooling down, we should all take this time to appreciate all that mother nature has to offer. In part two of the show, Charlie […]

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
The Nature of Phenology 10/9/21: Cotton-grass

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 3:55


Producers: Hazel Stark & Joe Horn Host: Hazel Stark There are several species of cotton-grass in Maine, but you know you're looking at one if you see what looks like an unkempt cotton ball at the end of a stem that can be up to three feet tall. Standing taller than most of their low-growing bog neighbors, its top-heavy form bobs and sways in the breeze looking like something out of The Lorax. Photos, a full transcript, references, contact information, and more available at thenatureofphenology.wordpress.com Hazel Stark lives in Gouldsboro, is Co-Founder and Naturalist Educator at Maine Outdoor School, L3C, and is a Registered Maine Guide. She loves taking a closer look at nature through the lens of her camera, napping in beds of moss, and taking hikes to high points to see what being tall is all about. She has an MS in Resource Management and Conservation and is a lifelong Maine outdoorswoman. Hazel can be reached by emailing naturephenology@gmail.com The post The Nature of Phenology 10/9/21: Cotton-grass first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

Speak Your Piece: a podcast about Utah's history
Season 3, Ep. 11: West Side Environmental Racism, Past and Present

Speak Your Piece: a podcast about Utah's history

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 49:25


Date: September 20, 2021 (Season 3, Episode 11; 49:26 minutes long). Click here for the Utah Dept. of Culture & Community Engagement version of this Speak Your Piece episode which includes topics discussed in time, photos of guest speakers and additional resources and readings.Podcast Content:  Former Utah State University (USU) grad student Emma Jones and USU Assistant Professor of Environment and Society Dr. Mariya Shcheglovitova, shares the history and science related to the Home Owners' Loan Corporations' (HOLC) “redlining" of Salt Lake City; and their investigations of spatial distribution of environmental hazards contained in both the city's original west side (Pioneer Park neighborhood) and in expanded west side communities (Poplar Grove, West Pointe, Rose Park, Glendale, South Salt Lake, etc.), where most of Salt Lake City's communities of color reside.This podcast is all about how examining the past (history) along with geographical and public health data (science) can help a community like Salt Lake City see evidence concerning contemporary health and social problems, how such evidence can play a part in solving these problems, and point municipal and community leaders towards better city and development practices. “Scholars have found that race is the most significant predictor of environmental pollution exposure…Crowder and Downey (2010) [and they have] found that Black and Latinx households experience higher levels of proximate industrial pollution compared to White households.” This is an excerpt from Emma Jones' capstone project. Jones and Shcheglovitova anticipate their research to be used in further investigations regarding spatial patterns and terrestrial pollution in SLC. Their research connects the study of spatial distribution of terrestrial pollution to both historic and present-day planning practices which they believe perpetuate housing segregation and disinvestment in communities of color. Bottom line: Jones and Shcheglovitova documents the existence of environmental racism in SLC. Their identification of spatial patterns led them to create an interactive map accessible in Salt Lake West Side Stories -- post 35 (see within a link to Jones' complete paper).Bio: Emma Nathel Jones has a Bachelors of Science in Conservation and Restoration Ecology with an emphasis in GIS and a minor in Landscape Architecture. During their time at Utah State they worked on a variety of research projects concerning sustainable energy development and sustainable agriculture as a part of the Undergraduate Research Fellowship. They are currently pursuing a Masters in City and Metropolitan Planning at the University of Utah.  Bio: Dr. Mariya Shcheglovitova is a human geographer with interests that span environmental and social justice, urban political ecology, cultural geography, and environmental history. She completed her PhD at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County where she worked on a project investigating present-day and historic intersections of street tree planting programs, waste management, and housing segregation. Do you have a question or comment, or a proposed guest for “Speak Your Piece?” Write us at “ask a historian” – askahistorian@utah.gov

The Lookfar Podcast: Voices from the Wild
Lilian Pintea - Using Data to Connect Communities to Conservation

The Lookfar Podcast: Voices from the Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 45:41


Dr. Lilian Pintea of the Jane Goodall Institute joins us this week on The Lookfar Podcast: Voices from the Wild. From his upbringing in rural Moldova and Romania to his studies at Moscow State University and the University of Minnesota, Lilian has long been passionate about wild animals and their habitats. As Vice President for Conservation Science at the Jane Goodall Institute, Lilian has spent nearly twenty years applying satellite imagery and other remote sensing and data integration technologies to Dr. Goodall's community-led conservation work in Gombe National Park, Tanzania and throughout the chimpanzee range in Africa.

The Fowl Life
E167 - Ben Cassidy - Hunting Conservation - Fowl Thoughts Presented by SCI

The Fowl Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 58:55


Chad talks hunting conservation and hunting rights with Ben Cassidy is Director of Government Affairs for Safari Club International. Safari Club International is a US organization composed of hunters dedicated to protecting the freedom to hunt all across the globe.

District of Conservation
EP 220: Biden Administration Reignites Debate on Controversial National Monument Designations

District of Conservation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 20:21


In Episode 220 of District of Conservation, Gabriella revisits national monument designations in wake of the Biden administration's decision to restore three sites to pre-Trump levels. Learn about the response from Utah, what the Antiquities Act allows, and how national monuments can, ironically, keep sportsmen and women out if few stakeholders are involved. SHOW NOTES White House Fact Sheet - October 7th | January 2021 Executive Order Utah Delegation Letter Challenging Biden Administration EP 140: Understanding National Monument Designations Antiquities Act of 1906 | Brookings Institution, AEI pieces on presidential authority RMEF, NWTF on national monument shortcomings AZ Game and Fish Department --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/district-of-conservation/support

Ducks Unlimited Podcast
Ep. 16 – Collector's Series: Colin McNair, Market Update

Ducks Unlimited Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 31:38


Colin McNair, decoy specialist at Copley Fine Art Auctions, returns to the show to chat with host Katie Burke about the last year of auctions and health of the decoy market. Katie and Colin also express their excitement for the return of decoys shows and the reuniting of the decoy community. They speak on the difference between the silent bidder and the social one and how they both play important roles in the wealth of collectible decoys. Please subscribe, rate, and review the DU Podcast and contact the DU Podcast via email at DUPodcast@ducks.org with recommendations or questions.  www.ducks.org/DUPodcast

Public Health On Call
381 - How the Pandemic Has Opened Our Eyes to Our Relationship with Nature

Public Health On Call

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 14:39


During the pandemic, many found solace outdoors on hikes and in city parks. Dr. Mamie Parker, ecologist, activist, and the first Black Head of Fisheries for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service talks with Josh Sharfstein about how getting back in touch with nature offers an opportunity to see just how connected we are to the earth, how much we depend on a healthy environment for our own physical and mental well-being, and how critical it is for us to take action on conservation.

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting
Wisconsin Sportsman - Waterfowl Hunting and Conservation in Wisconsin

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 76:34


In this episode, Josh is joined by Wisconsin Waterfowl Association members Bruce Russ (Executive Director), Peter Ziegler (Project Director), Todd Schaller (Volunteer Director), and George Ermert (Volunteer Director). If you haven't heard of the Wisconsin Waterfowl Association, they're doing a ton of great work benefiting waterfowl and wetland habitat in the state of Wisconsin. The guys give a forecast for the 2021 Wisconsin waterfowl season and highlight the work of the Wisconsin Waterfowl Association. Find out more about WWA at wisducks.org.  Wisconsin Sportsmen is Powered by Simplecast

Snake Talk
Jeff Corwin on the Role of Media in Conservation

Snake Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 70:16


Dr. Jenkins sits down with Jeff Corwin to discuss the fascinating topic of Media, Snakes, and Conservation.  They go through the early years when Chris and Jeff took Herpetology together in the 1990s and discuss how Jeff's interest in both snakes and media developed over time.  Jeff talks about his most successful shows, the genesis of each and what happened behind the scenes.  They also discuss the importance of media in the conservation of snakes.  Finally, Jeff talks about the project he is currently working on.Connect with Jeff on Facebook or Instagram.Connect with Chris on Facebook, Instagram or at The Orianne Society.Shop Snake Talk merch.

Wait Five Minutes: The Floridian Podcast
Welcome to the Conservation Season

Wait Five Minutes: The Floridian Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 9:34


This is the prologue to the Conservation Season, where we'll spend all autumn talking about the nature of Florida and the experts fighting to protect it.  Get your WFM Merch at Cast & Clay Co. on Etsy! Go to the Wait Five Minutes website for more!   Featuring clips from: Michelle Nijhuis, Author Neil Maher, Professor Max Chesnes, Journalist Toni Westland, Ranger

BeProvided Conservation Radio
The Elusive (AND Adorable!) Bobcat

BeProvided Conservation Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 52:39


We are used to seeing birds, squirrels and deer in our suburban neighborhoods. But what about other animals that are exploring our yards as we sleep? I am Marcia Sivek and this is BeProvided Conservation Radio. You may be surprised to that animals like bobcats, coyotes and even mountain lions may roam our yards at night. AND it doesn't matter if you live in the country or city according to my guest today, Sarah Killingsworth. Sarah is a wildlife photographer and educator in Northern California.  Listen in as Sarah explains her observations of the elusive bobcats we have as quiet unexpected neighbors.

Minnesota Bound Podcast - MN Bound Podcast

Photojournalist Ben Elling talks about his impressions documenting a long-format story for Minnesota Bound the proposed copper-nickel mine on the edge of the BWCA. Supported by: Thousand Hills Lifetime Grazed – (https://thousandhillslifetimegrazed.com/,) North Dakota Tourism (https://www.legendarynd.com/,) Kinetico (https://www.kinetico.com/,) Voyageur Saunas (https://www.voyageursaunas.com/,) Minnesota Propane (https://propane.com/) - “Clean American Energy” & The Minnesota DNR (https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/wmas)

The Flush Podcast - Stories from the field

Dylan Waller joins Travis Frank to break down their ptarmigan and dusky grouse hunt in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado.  Blizzard conditions in the high mountain terrain had a major impact on this hunt.  Dylan and Travis explain their journey, the hunt through brutal conditions, disappearing birds, alpine tundra habitat, a bird most hunters avoid, preparing your body for high altitude hunting, first aid, dogs, bird biology, and the success of bagging all 10 species of Colorado's upland game birds. Presented by Grain Belt Beer (https://www.grainbelt.com/,) North Dakota Tourism (https://www.legendarynd.com/,) Chief Upland (https://chiefupland.com/,) Federal Ammunition (https://www.federalpremium.com/,) Huron Chamber & Visitor's Bureau (http://www.huronsd.com/,) & OnX Maps (https://www.onxmaps.com/)

Nature Reliance Media
#84 All people should Hug a Hunter and/or Shooter

Nature Reliance Media

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 44:51


In this podcast, we dig into why anyone who enjoys wildlife should thank a hunter or shooter.  It has a lot to do with the conservation, the PR Act, and the DJ Act.  If you don't know what those are, you should, and that is why this podcast was put together!  Thanks for joining us!Details of PR Act:  fws.gov/laws/lawsdigest/fawild.htmlDetails of DJ Act:  https://www.fws.gov/laws/lawsdigest/fasport.html4H for Youth Development:  https://4-h.org/Kentucky Master Naturalist:  https://naturalist.ca.uky.edu/Let us know what you think by sending us a message:  podcast@naturereliance.org  =====Follow us at www.naturereliance.org =====Support:Shop our affiliation companies by obtaining discount codes here Subscribe to our newsletter for Giveaways, HUGE discounts, and newsletter-only content here:  https://bit.ly/3t8rupO Check Out Our Gear For Sale=====

Duck Season Somewhere
Wetlands Management for Waterfowl: Fall Considerations

Duck Season Somewhere

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 67:37


Waterfowl season is fast approaching the Deep South and preparing for the upcoming season is perfect timing to consider next year's habitat management. Natural Resources Conservation Services Wildlife Biologist, Kevin Nelms, joins Ramsey Russell for another highly informative Wetlands Management for Waterfowl discussion. Fall disturbances, how and when to flood, invertebrates and other seasonal topics are talked about. Scroll back to hear parts 1-3 of this ongoing series of you've not yet heard them. A link to Wetlands Management for Waterfowl Handbook (PDF) is also attached.   Related Links: Wetland Management for Waterfowl (PDF)   Please subscribe, rate and review Duck Season Somewhere podcast in iTunes. Share your favorite episodes with friends! Business inquiries and comments contact Ramsey Russell ramsey@getducks.com   Podcast Sponsors: BOSS Shotshells Benelli Shotguns Kanati Waterfowl Taxidermy GunDog Outdoors Mojo Outdoors Tom Beckbe Flash Back Decoys GetDucks USHuntList   It's really duck season somewhere for 365 days per year. Follow Ramsey Russell's worldwide duck hunting adventures as he chases real duck hunting experiences all year long: Instagram @ramseyrussellgetducks YouTube @GetDucks Facebook @GetDucks.com  

Drury Outdoors 100% Wild Podcast
Early Season with Old Man Winter, Terry Drury EP - 230

Drury Outdoors 100% Wild Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 53:51


Old Man Winter drops by to visit with Matt and Tim this week. The guys discuss go in-depth on the affect thermals have on your scent, and get some behind-the-scenes intel on how Terry hunts the early season!  Want to be on the show? Leave us a Question of the Day by clicking here and you could win a DeerCast hat! Join the 100% Rack Pack!  It's a Facebook group just for you and other 100% Wild podcasters!

The Hawk's Call
Raptor Conservation Culture and Outreach in Veracruz, Mexico

The Hawk's Call

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 32:46


Last week we learned about the founding of the Veracruz River of Raptors, and this week we hear from Elisa Peresbarbosa Rojas, Pronatura Veracruz Executive Director, and Kashmir Wolf, Pronatura Veracruz Monitoring Coordinator, about the count site's current community education and conservation outreach efforts. Learn more about the Pronatura Veracruz River of Raptors: https://veracruzrioderapaces.org/  Follow Pronatura Veracruz: www.facebook.com/PronaturaVeraruz, www.twitter.com/pronatura_ver, www.instagram.com/pronatura_veracruz Visit www.hawkmountain.org to learn more about our science, education, and stewardship, or to plan a visit! If you would like to sponsor a future podcast episode, please reach out to info@hawkmountain.org. Thank you for listening!

Charlottesville Community Engagement
October 6, 2021: Charlottesville awarded $153K for flood study from RGGI funds; Transit updates from the regional partnership

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 15:15


In today’s subscriber-supported Public Service Announcement:The Charlottesville Area Tree Stewards continues to offer classes and events this fall and winter to increase your awareness of our wooden neighbors and to prepare for the future. On October 19, there’s a free class on the Selection, Planting, and Care of Trees from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. (register) In early November, there is a three part class on Winter Invasive Plant Identification and Treatment. Information on all the classes and the group can be found at www.charlottesvilleareatreestewards.org. On today’s show:Updates on regional transportation studies and issues from the Regional Transit PartnershipA 250-unit apartment complex is in the works along Rio Road in Albemarle CountyMaterials are available for the October 12 Cville Plans Together hearingCharlottesville has been awarded $153,000 in RGGI money for flood mitigation along Moores CreekThe percent positivity for COVID-19 has further dropped to 8.3 percent, but the number of new cases reported increased by 3,919. Another 50 new deaths were reported over night for a cumulative total of 12,999 since the pandemic began. There are another 100 cases reported in the Blue Ridge Health District today. Plans have been submitted in Albemarle County for a 250-unit apartment complex on Rio Road. According to the application for a rezoning prepared by Collins Engineering, the Heritage on Rio would consist of seven buildings and a clubhouse on 8.23 acres of land. The properties are all zoned R-6 and the application is for a rezoning to Planned Residential Development (PRD). There are currently four single family homes that would be removed to make way for the development. “At just over half a mile from the Route 29/ Rio Road intersection, the proposed community would be within walking distance to many conveniences, including the numerous retail shops and offices in the Berkmar Crossing commercial area, several grocery stores, the Northside Library, and the large number of destinations surrounding the Rio/ 29 Intersection, including CVS Drugstore, Fashion Square Mall, Rio Hill Shopping Center, and Albemarle Square Shopping Center,” reads the application. The developer is G W Real Estate Partners.  The project will also have to go before the county’s Architectural Review Board because Rio Road is an entrance corridor. Materials are now available for the October 12 public hearing for the Charlottesville Comprehensive Plan, one of three tasks the firm Rhodeside & Harwell is conducting for the city as part of the Cville Plans Together initiative. The City Council and Planning Commission will hold a joint hearing on October 12, but now they’ll also hold a two hour discussion on the plan update the day before from noon to 2 p.m. The draft Comprehensive Plan and the Future Land Use Map are available for review now. The document is 118 pages long and this is the first time the entire draft has been put together with its eleven chapters and several appendices. Take a look at the materials here. The professionalization of fire and EMS calls in Albemarle County reached a new stage Monday when the Ivy and Pantops stations began 24-hour service and two other milestones were met.“An ambulance moved to the East Rivanna station to implement cross-staffing, and a daytime fire engine went into service at the Pantops station on Mondays,” wrote Abbey Stumpf, Albemarle’s public safety information officer, in a press release this morning. The Pantops fire engine will be the first to operate out of a station that was built on land donated to the county earlier this century. For the past 18 months, Albemarle has been implementing an initiative to hire more personnel funded in part through a $1.9 million grant from the Federal Emergency Management Agency as well as investments approved by the Board of Supervisors. In all, Albemarle has hired 22 public safety workers in the past 18 months. Earlier this year, Virginia joined the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, a multi-state program that places caps on the amount of carbon emissions for many industries. If companies exceed their limits, they have to purchase credits. Revenues go to state governments for programs such as the Virginia Community Flood Preparedness Fund, which is to receive 45 percent of the RGGI funds. So far, Virginia has received $142 million over three auctions. Charlottesville will receive $153,500 from the fund to pay for a plan to prepare the Moores Creek Watershed for the floodings. That’s part of $7.8 million in grants announced yesterday by Governor Ralph Northam. The funds are distributed by the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, an agency that is also working on a master plan for coastal resilience in Virginia. Most of the funding is going to localities either on the coast or much closer. However, Charlottesville is not the westernmost recipient. The city of Winchester will receive $65,040 for a resilience plan and Buchanan County will receive $387,500 for “plans and capacity building” and that’s enough money for them to hire a consultant. Charlottesville will use the money to create a two-dimensional hydraulic model for the Moores Creek watershed within city limits. Andrea Henry, the city’s water resources protection administrator.  "2D modeling has the ability to identify drainage issues for our inlets, pipes, ditches, and streams across the entire City using the same methodology and analyses for a variety of storm scenarios," said Henry.  "We can use the results of this model to predict when our streets, sidewalks, homes, businesses, and critical infrastructure will be susceptible to flooding with the types of storms we see now and may see in the future due to our changing climate."Speaking of the draft Comprehensive Plan, water resources protection is covered in Goal 3 of Chapter 7, Environment, Climate, and Food Equity. “Charlottesville will be an environmental leader, with healthy air, water, and ecosystems, as well as ample, high-quality, and accessible open space and natural areas, and a preserved and enhanced tree canopy,” reads the community vision statement for the chapter. “The Rivanna River and other waterbodies will be celebrated and protected, and  environmentally-sound community access will be enhanced.”Read the rest of the recipients here. You’re listening to Charlottesville Community Engagement. In today’s second Substack-fueled shout-out, Code for Charlottesville is seeking volunteers with tech, data, design, and research skills to work on community service projects. Founded in September 2019, Code for Charlottesville has worked on projects with the Legal Aid Justice Center, the Charlottesville Fire Department, and the Charlottesville Office of Human Rights. Visit codeforcville.org to learn about those projects. We are now six days into Try Transit Month, an effort to encourage people to consider using fixed-route or on-demand service to get around the community. It has now been 13 days since the Jefferson Area Regional Transit Partnership met on September 23 Since October 2017, the advisory body run by the Thomas Jefferson Planning District has served as a clearinghouse for different providers. Karen Davis is the interim director of Jaunt and she stated one of the biggest challenges facing all bus fleets. “The driver shortage continues,” Davis said. “Jaunt is going to move to match [University Transit Service] and [Charlottesville Area Transit’s] recruiting and retaining bonus programs to try to entice more people into the door.Jim Foley, the director of pupil transportation for Albemarle County, could not give an update at the meeting because he was driving a school bus. Becca White, the director of Parking and Transportation at UVA, said ridership is rebounding following the pandemic. “We are up to about 8,000 riders a day on our system,” White said. “Three thousand of those are employees and the rest are students.”That’s down from pre-COVID levels of around 12,000 to 15,000 a day while school was in session.“During the height of COVID it was 3,000 to 4,000 passengers a day.” White said. One of the steps UTS has taken to make efficient use of their drivers has been to eliminate bus trips on McCormick Road through the heart of Grounds during the day. White said that might be one reason numbers have not rebounded as high. “We need to concentrate our transit trips from the end points in given the limited resources that we have,” White said. The free trolley-style bus operated by Charlottesville Area Transit has returned to McCormick Road. CAT has been fare-free since the beginning of the pandemic. CAT Director Garland Williams said he is hoping to keep it that way by applying for a Transit Ridership Incentive Program grant. “We applied for the TRIPS grant program with the state to keep CAT zero-fare for an additional three years,” Williams said.Williams said the planned route changes will not take place until January due to the driver shortage. Under the new alignment, Route 11 will go to the Center at Belvedere and there have been requests to make that change sooner. Williams said that would present problems. “If we were to make the adjustment to the Center now prior to making all of the adjustments, we would run the risk of individuals who are using the 11 missing their connections because it does take longer to get to the Center and get back,” Williams said. Williams said the timing will be correct when the changes are made. On September 1, the Afton Express began operation from Staunton to Charlottesville with a month of fare-free ridership. The service is operated by Brite, the transit service in the Staunton-Augusta-Waynesboro They’re now charging $3 each way. For the first three weeks, the service only carried about a dozen to 18 passengers each day, according to RideShare manager Sara Pennington.“We’re still looking to creep those numbers up but is still nice and early,” Pennington said. Pennington also discussed what the regional services are doing for Try Transit month. One thing is the usage of the hash tag ion Twitter #Busorbust.Albemarle County and the TJPDC are continuing work on a transit expansion study. The latest milestone is publication of a market and service analysis FourSquare ITP and Michael Baker International. (market and service analysis)“Ripe for service expansion, the US-29 corridor is the second busiest transit corridor in the region,” reads an overview of the study areas. “The Albemarle County Comprehensive Plan, adopted in 2015, outlines goals for increasing the supply of affordable housing for households with incomes between zero percent and 80 percent of area median income, through rezoning and incentives to developers.” The study also covers Pantops and Monticello. There will be a stakeholder meeting on October 22 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. and a public meeting on October 21st from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. “Those will be going over the new alternatives or the draft alternatives that they are working on for each of the study areas,” said Lucinda Shannon, the TJPDC’s transportation manager. The TJPDC is also conducting a regional transit vision study.  There’s a stakeholder meeting for that tomorrow at 9 a.m. The meeting can be watched live on their YouTube page. (watch)“And that’s going to be asking people to identify community goals around Charlottesville and what the community values and what they want to see,” Shannon said. You can also offer your views as part of a survey that’s on the project website. Before we go, let’s look at the draft Comprehensive Plan one more time. Transit is embedded in many chapters of the plan, including the land use chapter. But take a look at Chapter 6 and goals 5 and goals 6. Williams’ attempts to help CAT become fare-free are specifically embedded in Strategy 13.2:“Ensure that transit is  financially accessible to all residents and those  who work in the city, including low-income populations, the elderly, and those with disabilities.” This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Ducks Unlimited Podcast
Ep. 15 – 7 Tips from Guides

Ducks Unlimited Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 29:02


Waterfowl guides hunt every day, they've seen it all. John Pollmann, DU Magazine freelance contributor, joins Chris Jennings to talk about learning special tips and tactics from lifelong waterfowl guides. Pollmann goes into detail about specific tactics some guides use to decoy ducks and geese, as well as sharing some personal stories about hunting with guides. www.ducks.org/DUPodcast

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Parks Weather: forecasts for National Parks, huts and trails

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 10:15


NIWA and the Department of Conservation have teamed up to create detailed weather forecasts of the country's National Parks, huts and most popular trails. Anyone who's been out in the bush knows how rugged and remote trails can be and how fast the weather can change. NIWA and DOC hope to improve people's ability to safely plan trips into the great outdoors, and have put safety at the heart of the forecast. Parks Weather focuses first and foremost on the risk of hazards such as heavy rain, extreme temperatures, strong winds and snow. The website launched several months ago with 49 sites, concentrating on the Great Walks and locations in the country's 13 National Parks. It's now rolled out an additional 22 sites, as chosen by DOC - based on the areas with the highest risk of severe weather, and with the greatest number of visitors. There are now over 70 locations, with hopes that more will be added in future. Kathryn speaks to Nava Fedaeff, a forecaster at NIWA who has been working on the project this year.

District of Conservation
EP 219: The Brewing Wolf War, REEF Act, Fishermen Sound Alarm on Offshore Wind Turbines

District of Conservation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 22:30


In Episode 219 of District of Conservation, Gabriella explores the brewing wolf war out West, the REEF Act, and why fishermen need to have their concerns about offshore wind projects, like Vineyard Wind, heard. SHOW NOTES Yellowstone IG Post on Wolves and Press Release | Sportsmen's Alliance Response REEF Act Vineyard Wind | Time Magazine Article | Offshore Wind Effects on Fisheries | Commercial fishermen concerns --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/district-of-conservation/support

Adams on Agriculture
What's Ahead for U.S. Conservation Programs?

Adams on Agriculture

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 3:51


As the Build Back Better reconciliation package is negotiated in Congress, more details on funding for conservation programs are coming to light.

American Ag Network
What's Ahead for U.S. Conservation Programs?

American Ag Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 1:59


As the Build Back Better reconciliation package is negotiated in Congress, more details on funding for conservation programs are coming to light.

The River Rambler
Episode 55 - Kirk Blaine

The River Rambler

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 36:54


Today I'm talk with Kirk Blaine of Native Fish Society all about the draft for the Rogue's South Coast Multi-Species Conservation and Management Plan. We discuss how it got started back in 2018, data and monitoring issues in previous drafts, concerns with the current draft, the upcoming meeting on 15th, and how easy it will be to testify online. I encourage you to register to testify before the 12th and go to NativeFishSociety.org for even more information.

Mongabay Newscast
Mongabay Reports: In search of the ‘forest ghost,' South America's giant armadillo

Mongabay Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 7:50


Since 2010, the Giant Armadillo Project has been researching the world's largest armadillo, an animal that despite its size and range across almost every country in South America, is one of the world's least recognized animals. These researchers have made key findings, like the fact that their burrows, which can be up to 5 meters long, serve as shelter for at least 70 other species, including birds, reptiles and mammals. The species is categorized as vulnerable to extinction, especially due to the advance of agribusiness. This episode features the popular article, "In search of the 'forest ghost,' South America's cryptic giant armadillo," by Suzana Camargo: https://news.mongabay.com/2020/09/in-search-of-the-forest-ghost-south-americas-cryptic-giant-armadillo/ Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to have access to our latest episodes at your fingertips. If you enjoy this series, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay. Photo Credit: Peering inside a giant armadillo burrow, image courtesy of the Giant Armadillo Project.

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast
Marking 30 years since the historic ban on mining in Antarctica

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 10:13


Thirty years ago Bob Hawke brought together international leaders to secure a ban on mining in Antarctica. And while the ex-Prime Minister is no longer around, in recent years, his granddaughter has taken up the fight, joining the board of the Antarctic Science Foundation and she shares why we should all care for this frozen continent.

The Landscape Photography Show
Conservation Through Photography

The Landscape Photography Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 54:47


Eric Bennett, Sapna Reddy, and Phil Monson speak in a panel discussion recorded from The Outsiders Conference in April 2021 on the message of conservation through photography and the voice we all have.

Full Story
The quest to find Australia's favourite bird

Full Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 27:27


The Guardian/Birdlife Australia bird of the year poll is in full swing and the once-crowded field of 50 is rapidly narrowing with each day of voting. Which warbler will reign supreme? We hear from journalists, comedians and a former prime minister about the bird they're supporting. They also discuss their wildest feathered encounters and the race to save some native species from extinction

Thrive Culture: Success Engineering
S4E14 Fernando Mateos-González, Nomadic Mercenary Biologist: Leading Rainforest Expeditions, Cobras, and Inflatable Bananas...

Thrive Culture: Success Engineering

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 53:51


Dr. Fernando Mateos-González has a Phd in animal behavioral ecology, and has followed his passion all over the world!He has led expeditions into the heart of the Peruvian Amazon and helped shoot scenes for the BBC's Attenborough series “Seven Worlds, One Planet”. He has explored the vast expanses of the Yukon wilderness underneath the northern lights, and sailed on one of the largest wooden ships in the world. He has stories for days, from quitting his post-doctorate to go to the jungle,  to biking across South Africa, and sailing across the Mediterranean in an inflatable banana... You'll love this episode!Resources:Website: https://www.bioblogia.net/p/english.htmlhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/fernandomateosgonzalez/https://twitter.com/Bioblogohttps://www.instagram.com/bioblogo/I would love it if you left a review for the show! Simply write, either your favorite episode or the top insights that you have gained.Write a reviewIf you're interested in joining the SPI Pro community for an amazing group of entrepreneurs to help grow your business, check out the link below...SPI Pro Community

Ducks Unlimited Podcast
Ep. 14 – Wader Built to Last: Chêne Gear

Ducks Unlimited Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 42:22


Last summer, Chêne Gear announced their new waders. Rumors spread throughout the industry about these new waders. Jeff Jones, Chief Product Officer for Chêne Gear joins host Chris Jennings to talk about this exciting new product for waterfowlers. Jones and Jennings get into the weeds about the technical aspects of these new waders and much more. Please subscribe, rate, and review the DU Podcast and contact the DU Podcast via email at DUPodcast@ducks.org with recommendations or questions. www.ducks.org/DUPodcast

District of Conservation
EP 218: USCCA Reality Check Campaign with Beth Alcazar and Chris Cheng

District of Conservation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 32:38


In Episode 218 of District of Conservation, Gabriella speaks with Beth Alcazar and Chris Cheng about their involvement in U.S. Concealed Carry Association's (USCCA) "Reality Check" campaign. Get to know them today! Beth is an Associate Editor at Concealed Carry Magazine and firearms instructor. Chris is a competitive shooter, Silicon Valley tech worker, and winner of Season 4 of The History Channel's Top Shot program. SHOW NOTES Order "Shoot to Win" by Chris Cheng Asian Pacific American Gun Owners Association Connect with Chris online: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, Medium Connect with Beth online: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/district-of-conservation/support

Ingrained
Episode 26: Water Planning in the Sacramento Valley

Ingrained

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 25:19


Water has long been a contentious subject in California.  As the nation's most populous state, leading the nation in farm production and a state dedicated to environmental protection, it's easy to understand why. The severe, ongoing drought only puts a greater focus on water. While there's hope for a wet fall and winter, Sacramento Valley water managers and other stakeholders are doing what they can to prepare for all outcomes. Teamwork and coordination are invaluable, especially during difficult times. “We are really fortunate in the Sacramento River Basin,” said Northern California Water Association President David Guy. “We have a real cohesive set of leaders that work very well together. Our managers and counsel work well together. That's critical, particularly as we head into these next years that could be very challenging. I think every river system in the valley works together. We realize we're all invested in the same types of actions and need to do the same types of things to be able to make sure that we have water supplies for the farms, cities and refuges.” Guy said he hopes more robust scenario planning this fall will further bring the region together, to be unified and best prepared for whatever 2022 holds for our water supply.  While the drought took its toll in our region, including a 100,000 acre reduction in rice planting, the familiar fall activities of harvest and the Pacific Flyway wildlife migration are welcomed. This year has been an uphill battle for those safeguarding water for all who need it and for future generations. “It's a daily, weekly, monthly and annual balancing act,” remarked Thad Bettner, General Manager of the Glenn-Colusa Irrigation District, the largest water district in the Sacramento Valley. “We're always making those sorts of decisions about how best to manage and use our supplies. A lot of environmental assets sit in our backyard, so we want to make sure we are meeting those needs as well. As a district, we're very transparent in all of the things that we do and we'd love to have other partners come alongside us in helping us make these key decisions.”  Harvest of America's sushi rice is nearing its peak, with growers reporting good quality and production from the fields they were able to plant. Grower Don Bransford in Colusa said he planted about 25 percent less acreage this year due to the water cutbacks. Bransford has long  been a leader in this region on key issues, and water is no exception.  He said planning and coordination for 2022 must be a priority. “The challenges are great, as they were this year,” he said. “There obviously is not enough water to go around, so the environment was shorted and farming acreage had to be reduced because of the curtailments. Urban areas had a little better supply situation, so they have not experienced what agriculture has. Moving forward, I believe we have huge challenges in this coming year.” Those who know and love the Sacramento Valley understand the need to preserve this unique and essential part of California. “We are all very proud of our little communities in the Sacramento Valley, many of which are dependent on a viable rice industry,” Bransford said. “What other commodity can you grow that has over 200 wildlife species inhabiting a growing crop, and then once that crop is harvested, then you have the migratory waterfowl moving in for a winter feast. Here we have land that's producing food and habitat – and they coexist wonderfully.” Michael Anderson: This past year is ranking up there in the top five of our driest years, and you pair it with last year, 2020, which was also dry, and now you're looking at the second driest since '76, '77. Very extreme pair of drought years there. Jim Morris: California state climatologist, Michael Anderson, describing our greater climate variability, which has contributed to this highly disappointing year for rain and snowfall. Michael Anderson: We're a lot warmer now than we were in '76, '77. April, May and June, that was the warmest and the driest in 125 years of record. The narrative of climate change for California is that we see a warming in temperatures, more rain, less snow, and more extremes. And we're seeing that play out in this last decade. Jim Morris: Drought impacts are being felt far and wide, including 100,000 fewer acres of rice planted here in the Sacramento Valley. What lies ahead for 2022? Only time will tell, but there's already a lot of thought being put into water management for the next year. Welcome to Ingrained, the California Rice Podcast. I'm your host, Jim Morris, proud to have worked with California farmers and ranchers for more than 30 years to help tell their stories. This year has been extremely dry with significant impacts. There is widespread hope that fall and winter will be wet, but of course that's far from guaranteed. So I think it would be helpful to hear from regional leaders about this critical subject. Jim Morris: David Guy is president of the Northern California Water Association. He's been NCWA's president for 11 years. He also served eight years as their executive director. We spent time together a long time ago at the California Farm Bureau, and he and his family were in Yosemite living in the park from 2007 to 2010 as David was CEO of the nonprofit, Yosemite Association. And I will be forever jealous of that opportunity you had. So looking ahead, David, what can water managers do to prepare for the possibility of another dry year? David Guy: Well, I think that as we look forward to 2022, there's still some work that has to be done on 2021. And I think the Pacific Flyway programs that are underway right now with the Rice Commission, with the water suppliers, with the conservation organizations are really, I think, stage setting for next year. The birds are so important and the species are so important. We'll be doing some more of that in the floodplain later in the winter for fish. And then as we start to go into the fall, obviously we need to start thinking about precipitation. And if there is going to be any precipitation this fall or early winter, we want to be able to capture that precipitation. David Guy: So I think that's what the water managers in the Sacramento Valley and throughout the state do really well. So I think we want to pull as much water into storage as we can. I think we want to be able to recharge groundwater as much as we can, and we want to be able to get water out on the ground for birds and fish as much as we can. So I think there's going to be a real concerted effort to help make sure that we utilize our water this fall and winter the best we can because everything we do this fall and winter will set the stage for next year. Jim Morris: To effectively do the most with such a precious resource, you need a lot of people with common goals. How would you describe the cohesiveness of water management in our region? David Guy: Well, I think we're real fortunate in the Sacramento River basin and we have a real cohesive set of leaders that work very well together and our managers and council and everybody else work really well together, and I think that's critical particularly as we head into these next years that could be very challenging. I think every river system in the valley works together. We realize that we're all invested in the same types of actions and that we need to do the same types of things to be able to make sure that we have water supplies for the farms, cities, refuges. So we're going to be doing some scenario planning this year in the fall to start planning for 2022 in a way that we've really never done before, and I think that will even further bring the region together, hopefully to unify around some planning for next year, and then the actions that will be necessary. Jim Morris: Northern California Water Association has a ridgetop to river mouth holistic water management approach. For someone not fully immersed in the water world, what does that mean? David Guy: Well, I think is what it really means is that the water obviously starts in the mountains and then it flows down through the valley. And the bottom line is this really calls on the managers in this region to manage the water the best they can. And they already manage water in this way. A lot of our agencies manage water from ridgetop to river mouth. And I think the other couple things that it does is water obviously flows from one area to the other, and we try to utilize that water the best we can and sometimes that water's used multiple times as it goes through the system and we want to be able to continue that. David Guy:The other thing of course, that it really allows is that we know that salmon, for example, which is a big part of the region, you need to address every salmon life stage for them to be successful, and that means from the ridgetop to the river mouth. And then of course, we can't control what goes on in the ocean, but we can sure help influence what goes on from the ridgetop to the river mouth. And I think that's really just calling on the best of our managers to do what they really do well. Jim Morris: There is some criticism that comes up on how much water is used by farms and ranches, and my belief on this is it's really not an either or that that water can help in many different ways. And taking rice, for example, that water is used to grow a crop that's America sushi rice. It also helps rural communities and our economy, and it also helps the Pacific Flyway migration of millions of birds. And now salmon are benefiting from rice farming too. So when you look at the collaboration, the multiple uses of water, what thoughts do you have about how effective that is going on right now in the Sacramento Valley? David Guy: The Sacramento Valley does this better than anybody. Quite honestly, they use water for cities and rural communities. We get water out for the farms. We get water out for the refuges. And quite honestly, it's a lot of the same water. It's a lot of synchronized water management that happens in the region. So yeah, I find that when people want to say that one use is being used at the sacrifice of others, that's usually just a false choice. So we find that you can do all of that. You just have to be creative and you just have to get the leaders in the region to want to embrace that. David Guy: And we do that in the Sacramento better than anybody. This last year, for example, most agriculture in the state really received zero surface water. And there were some areas that received maybe about 50 percent of their supplies, and I think to their credit, these water suppliers utilize that water to their benefit and they not only use the water for the farms, but they're now working to use that water for the birds and will be using it for water for the salmon later in the year. And I think there's a sequence there that could actually work well in the Sacramento Valley as well. Jim Morris: And I'm glad you mentioned those surface water cutbacks because there was an incredible news cycle this past year, and maybe that was lost, but there were very significant, huge reductions in the amount of surface water available in our region. We've had dry years before and certainly will again. So what can be learned from our most recent dry year this year? David Guy: Well, I think we just have to call on everybody's creativity and working together. I think that's what we've learned. We have a program, our dry year task force, where we've worked with state and federal agencies, and I think having that communication is just essential. We're going to be doing this scenario planning going into next year and really focusing on what are the scenarios that we may see in 2022? And let's be honest, some of those scenarios are fairly ugly for the region and some of those scenarios may involve a wet 2022, which we're all hoping for, but the bottom line is we have to be prepared for all of those scenarios and I think having the managers thinking about that together, I think we'll be really effective. David Guy: I think there's also to a lot of actions that can be taken in the meantime that are not as high profile, but again, some of the things we talked about moving water into storage, moving water out on the floodplain, moving water out into the refuges, I think those are the kind of things that are happening and are really important as we head into 2022. Jim Morris: Moving water out on the floodplains, that is a growing area of emphasis in our region, and talk a little bit about that. What does that look like and how does it help? David Guy: Well, I think we've seen in the last 50 years in California, that we've used the same formula. How much water do we put into the Delta and who has to give up that water to flow into the Delta? Well, that path has led to declines in fish. That path has led to declines in water supply reliability. So I think a lot of people are saying, "Why don't we try something different?" Well, fortunately the scientists over at the University of California have been pointing to the floodplain for some time now and saying, "This is where we can get the best benefit for fish and wildlife." So I think there's a real concerted effort, big coalition, the Floodplain Forward Coalition, is working on how do we reactivate our floodplain? And of course, there's a whole lot of things that have gone into that, but I think we've seen that there's been success with waterfowl on the Pacific Flyway. David Guy: We've seen that there's been success with spring run salmon on Butte Creek. And a big part of both of those efforts is this idea of reactivating the floodplain. So, we think that's the new approach and the best part about it is that we can do that in synchronicity with the farming and all the things that we do in the region, and we can also do it probably with a lot less water than just putting a bunch of water into the Delta that doesn't seem to be providing any benefits for anything. Jim Morris: And it's interesting when you talk about reactivating the floodplain, it may sound like this incredible amount of water, but really it's a shallow amount of water that does get a lot of benefit from it. And we've seen that in the rice fields of the Sacramento Valley. So some of the issues in this past year we've had include voluntary agreements, water transfers, and groundwater. They came up a lot and those are pretty big topics. How do you feel those issues or maybe others may fit into 2022. David Guy:Groundwater of course is the resource that people go to when they don't have surface water, and I think that will continue. Obviously there's a concerted effort through the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act and the plans that are coming early next year to really manage our groundwater basin sustainably. So I think there's a real concerted effort at the local level to do that. So we'll hopefully get that in place and people can start taking some of those actions as soon as possible to protect the groundwater for future uses. The voluntary agreements, I think are really just essential for the region. We need stability in that Bay Delta process. And without that stability, we're just going to keep having supplies in Northern California threaten in various regulatory processes. So we need that stability and I think there's some interest in the Administration in moving that forward. So I think 2022's got a lot in store, but I think we're going to be prepared for the year no matter what it looks like with respect to precipitation. Jim Morris: And you mentioned the word stability. How does that factor in when we look at the water rights system that is in place? David Guy: I think the water rights system in California works quite well and it works very well in the Sacramento River basin. It's painful for some, because some get their waters curtailed and other there don't, but I think everybody knows how that works. I think people have certain expectations. They've built their business models around that. So in our view, the water system works really well. We're going to continue to work with the State Water Board to make that process even better, but I really think that making the water rights system obviously work is really important. And we know there's going to be critics and some academics and others who are going to want to suggest that we have to rewrite our water rights system, and obviously that would destabilize California water immensely. So we need to make the water right system work, and then we need to be able to put water into storage and let the managers do what they do best, which is obviously a big part of the water rights system as well. Jim Morris: I am really impressed when I see the meetings in the Sacramento Valley. There are members of the environmental community, there's urban representatives, agriculture, water officials, of course. So what is your assessment on the willingness to find water solutions in our valley? David Guy: You're right, Jim. I mean, we have an amazing group of folks who are working hard out on the ground to really implement solutions. And again, they're for cities, they're for rural communities, they're for farms and ranches, they're for the environment. And I don't think anybody's done that better than the Sacramento Valley. Kudos to the leaders and the rice community in the valley for really step up and doing all the work that you've done. I think as we go forward, we're going to continue to work with that group and I think that work is really proving fruitful. David Guy: Unfortunately, we also know there's a group of litigators that are sitting out there, who their business model is not to solve problems. Their business model is to file lawsuits and to try to disrupt what we're doing in the Sacramento River Basin. So unfortunately we're going to need to be part of that process as well, to make sure that they can't in fact disrupt the Sacramento River Basin. And in the meantime, let's keep working with those who show up and get their nails dirty and want to work out on the ground, because that's how this is going to get better. Jim Morris: What is at stake here? I've spent my entire life in the Sacramento Valley. Absolutely love it. But I think for a lot of people that are driving on I-5 or Highway 99, and they're just heading from one place to the next and don't understand the full beauty and importance of it. So what's at stake here in making sure this region stays whole? David Guy: Well, Jim, you started off by mentioning my time in Yosemite and of course, I just have wonderful memories of Yosemite and our national park system is beyond equal in this world. But I think the Sacramento Valley is on that level as far as the grandeur and as what it is, it's just so vast and big, but we have what? 2 million acres of farmland, some of the best farmland in the world. We have seven national wildlife refuges, 50 state wildlife areas, four runs of salmon. We have cities and rural communities that really sparkle and have wonderful people in them, and I think it's water that really brings this region together in a special way, and I think that's what's at stake and I hope that we can all roll up our sleeves, continue to work together to make sure that we have water for this region for all of those purposes. It's not and/or. It's how do we do both? And I think that's what this region really excels at. Jim Morris: I'm in Willows at the headquarters of Glenn-Colusa Irrigation District, the largest water district in the Sacramento Valley, covering 175,000 acres, much of it farmland. There are communities and several wildlife refuges here, as well. There were fields that went unplanned this year, including rice, the underground water table has been pressured, and they've had to deal with severe surface water cutbacks. Thad Bettner has been head of this water district since 2006. Of course, that's included several dry years. And as we get through this year, Thad, how taxing has it been? Thad Bettner: I have to say that you have been here for 15 years and doing this water thing for over 30. I would say this has probably been the most challenging year I've ever experienced in my career. I look back and I've talked to other people about the COVID year of last year and how challenging that was, but honestly this year has been even more challenging than that. So just given the constraints, the challenging hydrologic conditions, the internal needs that we have for trying to meet water for our growers, for the environment, for the refuges that we serve, and then also the concerns about trying to protect salmon in the river, and just trying to balance all those competing needs has been very challenging this year. The good thing is we've kind of gotten through it. We're here in the fall, so that's good news, but certainly, we have another challenging year ahead of us going into next year. Jim Morris: What are some lessons that might be learned from this year as we head into a potentially dry 2022, which could magnify all of these impacts? Thad Bettner: I think certainly the challenge is just from a surface water standpoint, how do we manage the system to one, get water where it's needed for people, for the different crops that we grow, for certainly protecting fish and I'm not minimizing them at all by same fish. Thirdly, but just, I think in terms of just the environment, it's broader than just fisheries. We have birds that we're trying to manage for right now, et cetera. So I think the broader environmental needs are very significant. And then the other thing we're facing here in the Sacramento Valley is a lot of these groundwater sustainability plans are getting adopted in January. So we'll also be going into next year, once those plans are adopted, actually starting to implement them. So how we also manage our water supply for the benefit of maintaining our sustainable groundwater system here in the Sacramento Valley is going to be vitally important as well. Jim Morris: How important is coordination and cooperation among all of the stakeholders? Thad Bettner: It's very important. I mean, honestly I spend most of my day just working with other agencies, other managers, groundwater folks, talking to different regulatory agencies about operations, talking to our environmental partners on restoration projects, and then just trying to meet our own internal staff needs. We have about 75 employees here in the district. So just trying to make sure that just as an entity, as a company, we continue to have good bonds internally. So it's been most of our days, just trying to foster sorts of relationships. Jim Morris: Longer term, it would be great, I think to have more water storage like Sites Reservoir, and how would that help in the long term for all Californians? Thad Bettner: We've been an advocate for Sites for decades. It's right next to our district and certainly parts of our facilities would be used both to fill and drain sites. I think one of the most significant benefits of Sites, not just of the water supply, it would provide to those folks who are investing in the project, but the project would provide just a lot more flexibility to some of our backbone infrastructure like Shasta, like Oroville, which I'm sure everybody has heard are historic lows this year. So having additional storage up in sites could help some of these dry years to provide more water into the system and ultimately provide more water for environmental benefits. Jim Morris: The purpose is not to try to get Sites filled in a dry year, but when we have those abundant rainfall years, to take advantage of that in a better way than we're doing now. Thad Bettner: One of the things about the Sacramento Valley that a lot of folks don't recognize at least on the Sacramento River, is that it's really more of a rain-driven watershed than a snow-fed watershed. So, under climate change, a lot of the forecasts are saying actually that more rainfall will fall in the Sacramento River system, which could lead to more runoff, which, again, Sites Reservoir would be relying on those really wet years, high runoff years to fill Sites and then draw that water out of storage in the dryer years. Jim Morris: What responsibility do you feel you're trying to have as much reasonable water to all the needs here in your district, but you also have to safeguard this resource for down the road? What kind of a balancing act is that? Thad Bettner: Well, I would say it's a daily, weekly, monthly, and annually balancing act. I mean, we're always making those sorts of decisions about how best to manage and use our supplies and also looking for just broader from... A lot of these assets, like environmental assets sit in our backyard. So how do we make sure we're also providing and meeting those needs as well? So I would say for us as a district, we're very transparent in all the things that we do and would love to have other partners come alongside us and helping us make some of these key decisions. Jim Morris: It's harvest time in rice country, including here in Colusa, the largest rice growing county in America. I'm visiting with grower Don Bransford, who in addition to farming is extremely active in his community and with statewide service. Don, first of all, how is harvest going this year and how has the drought impacted your farm? Don Bransford: Well, so far harvest is going pretty well. This has been one of those years where we've had a few more breakdowns than we'd like, but we're progressing well and the moisture's holding up. As far as the drought goes, we fallowed about 25 percent of our ground due to our reductions in supply, according to our contracts. Jim Morris: Thanks for taking time during such a busy time. It is windy today, but the harvesters and the bankout wagons are going and things are looking great. So how important is it when we look ahead to 2022, that there is some planning and coordination in terms of water? Don Bransford: I think the planning and coordination is extremely important. For this cropping year, we started planning in early February for the potential of a drought. We worked with the regulators, NGOs and other water districts to see how we might adapt our systems to meet a lot of needs of the environment, the farms and the urban areas. So it was a challenge. Jim Morris: What kind of pressures are there on water supplies? It's always challenging in California, but it seems lately to be exceptionally so. There will always be discussion, debate, and dispute. So what kind of challenges from a farming perspective, do you see on the water supply? Don Bransford: The challenges are great as they were this year. There obviously is not enough water to go around. So the environment was shorted. Farming acreage had to be reduced because of the curtailments. Urban areas had a little better supply situation. So they have not experienced what agriculture has, but moving forward, I believe we have huge challenges in this coming year. A number of wells were used to make up for deficient supplies. I think moving into the new year, there's going to be concern about how much groundwater's available, which puts more pressure on surface supplies. And then you have urban areas who were able to get through this past year with... Their supplies are short. Don Bransford: We've been contacted by a number of urban districts about the potential for water transfers. And then obviously, those growers south of the Delta that have contracts are most likely going to be very short of water. It's going to be tremendously challenging. We are going to start planning and actually this next month up here in the north state, we're going to work with NGOs, the state and federal regulators and the other irrigation districts to figure out how to best use every drop of water that we have available and hopefully some of that water can be used two or three times to achieve or meet needs of any number of demands. Jim Morris: This is a really special area. The communities, Colusa, I love Gridley, Biggs, Marysville, Yuba City, Richvale, on and on. The farms, the environment, the unique communities, how important is it to have these discussions and try to maintain this special thing that we have in the Sacramento Valley? Don Bransford: I think it's very important. We are all very proud of our little communities in the Sacramento Valley, many of which are dependent on a viable rice industry. We're here at harvest this year and the wildlife are everywhere. I mean, where else... What other commodity can you grow which has over 200 species of wildlife inhabiting a growing crop? And then once that crop is harvested, then you have the migratory waterfowl moving in for a winter feast. Just this morning, I also saw some sandhill cranes. They arrive about this time every year. In the same fields, the geese have started to move into the fields at night to forage the rice that's left behind by harvesters. About 50 percent of the feed for all migrating waterfowl are located in these rice fields. These fields are ecosystems and the only way to replace those ecosystems would be to build wetlands, which would cost hundreds of millions of dollars, but here we have land that's producing food and habitat and they coexist wonderfully. Jim Morris: Another sign of fall in our valley, the ducks and geese are coming back. I'm at the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge in Willows, a great place for your family to visit. If we are fortunate to have abundant rain and snow in the coming months, perhaps everyone can exhale a bit, but at the moment, next year looks like it will be a major test. Hopefully with collaboration, cooperation, and creativity, we will persevere. Thank you to our interviewees, David Guy, Thad Bettner, Don Bransford, and Michael Anderson. We will, of course, keep you updated on this issue as we get farther into fall and winter. You can go to podcast.calrice.org to find out more. Please subscribe and spread the word. And thanks for listening.

Great Outdoors from WGN Radio 720
‘Officially extinct': The status of the Ivory Bill Woodpecker

Great Outdoors from WGN Radio 720

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021


This week on the Great Outdoors, Charlie Potter gives us a grave message about the Ivory Bill Woodpecker and the impact that it will have on the ecosystem.

District of Conservation
EP 217: Tracy Stone-Manning Confirmed as BLM Director

District of Conservation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 7:25


In Episode 217 of District of Conservation, Gabriella briefs listeners on the news of Tracy Stone-Manning's confirmation to lead the Bureau of Land Management. SHOW NOTES WashEx article Daily Caller Matt Foldi x NatResources GOP tweet Field & Stream article U.S. Senate Vote Tally: 50-45 Your Mountain Podcast --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/district-of-conservation/support

The Garden Path Podcast
Conservation Compatible Forestry at Wetland Preserve | Ben Williams

The Garden Path Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 78:54


Louann and Ben Williams of Wetland Preserve All photos courtesy of Wetland Preserve, LLC. Sign up for the podcast newsletter —> HERE! Show Notes +Wetland Preserve, LLC website +Press about Wetland Preserve +@WetlandPreserve on Instagram +@WetlandPreserveFl on Facebook +St. John’s River Keeper +North Florida Prescribed Burn Association +Little Hoover Commission: Wildfire Preparedness and Forest Management […] The post Conservation Compatible Forestry at Wetland Preserve | Ben Williams appeared first on The Garden Path Podcast.

Ducks Unlimited Podcast
Ep. 13 – Drought Update from the Klamath Basin

Ducks Unlimited Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 41:37


Intense drought and constrained water supplies are causing unprecedented dry conditions in the Klamath Basin in 2021, resulting in minimal habitat for fall migrating waterfowl. DU regional biologists Amelia Raquel and Chris Colson provide an update on the dire conditions, but look forward with optimism to partner-drive solutions and silver linings emerging from the drought. www.ducks.org/DUPodcast

Drury Outdoors 100% Wild Podcast
Bucks, Ducks, and a Troll w/ Jim Ronquest EP - 229

Drury Outdoors 100% Wild Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 54:11


World champion duck caller, conservationist, and media personality Jim Ronquest hops on this week to talk about ducks, bucks, and…turkeys. Matt tells us about a game of Twister in the blind that led to his Kansas kill and the boys get trolled in the Question of the Day! Follow Jim on Instagram!    Want to be on the show? Leave us a Question of the Day by clicking here and you could win a DeerCast hat! Join the 100% Wild Crew!  It's a Facebook group just for you and other 100% Wild podcasters! Watch every episode of the podcast on DeerCast

BardsFM
BardsFM, Seventh Pillar: Stewardship and Conservation - 20210929

BardsFM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 54:56


God provide all things. Xpedition Coffee: A coffee for whole body health. >>> https://bardsfm.com/coffee/ MY PILLOW promo code: BARDS Go to https://www.frankspeech.com or https://www.mypillow.com/, scroll down the page and click on the Radio Listeners Square and use the promo code BARDS. or... Call 1-800-975-2939. Use promo code BARDS. Newsletter sign-up: https://bardsofwarfilm.com "Coming Home" by Brian Kahanek: https://briankahanek.com/music