Podcasts about Conservation

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  • 4,431PODCASTS
  • 16,444EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
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  • Jun 22, 2022LATEST

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    Best podcasts about Conservation

    Show all podcasts related to conservation

    Latest podcast episodes about Conservation

    Drury Outdoors 100% Wild Podcast
    Jimmie Powell & Son Fish Their Way Across the USA! EP – 271

    Drury Outdoors 100% Wild Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 78:30


    The ultimate father-son experience: catch a fish in all 50 states during the span of a summer. That's exactly what Jimmie Powell and his son, Isaac did in 2021. Hear about how they did it, but more importantly, how the adventure changed them both.   See ‘em in action on the Powell Project on Facebook. Want to be on the show? Leave us a Question of the Day by clicking here and you could win a DeerCast hat! Join the 100% Wild Rack Pack!  It's a Facebook group just for you and other 100% Wild podcasters!

    Your Mountain
    Permanent Wildlife Funding Nears and 70,000 Acres of New Public Access

    Your Mountain

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 50:54


    After a month away from recording due to Nephi building a house and Dave completing a fellowship in Europe, the guys are back. They discuss Recoving America's Wildlife Act, the major Congressional hurdle it cleared, and when it might become law. They also discuss a land acquisition by the Bureau of Land Management in Wyoming that creates access to 70,000 of public land, and the controversy surrounding the purchase. Other topics include: hunting draw results, Nephi moving, why soccer is a boring, and more. Tune in, and if you have ideas for future episodes, shoot us a note at: yourmountain@itsyourmountain.com 

    Ducks Unlimited Podcast
    Ep. 22 - FNBO Supports DU

    Ducks Unlimited Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 13:45


    Chris Lee, Integrated Marketing Manager for FNBO, joins host Chris Jennings to talk about how the DU Visa Card is benefitting wetlands conservation. Lee discusses how the owners of the largest privately owned bank are strong supporters of DU's wetland conservation mission and how the DU Visa Card program provides funding. Offering 1.5% cash back on all purchases and a portion of every purchase going directly to DU's conservation mission, it's easy to see why both parties are excited about this partnership. Visit ducks.org/visa to learn more.

    Drink Beer, Think Beer With John Holl
    Ep. 142 - Nate Schweber author of "This America of Ours"

    Drink Beer, Think Beer With John Holl

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 58:12


    "I've known Nate Schweber going on 20 years now, we've been colleagues, friends, and even co-authors. I can say without a doubt that he is one of the hardest working reporters I've ever met, he has a keen eye for detail, enjoys a good drink, and knows how to rock with the best of them.  He's a raconteur, with endless curiosity and compassion, and great passion. My life is better because I know him.  His chords are familiar to listeners of this show as it has opened up every episode since we started, and was even part of the old After Two Beers show I did for All About Beer. We've been to breweries and crime scenes together, we've had adventures and even wrote a book together – Indiana Breweries – which was released in 2011 and has since gone on to sell tens of copies.  He lives in Brooklyn these days, but he grew up in Missoula, Montana and has always had a passion for outdoor reporting. A previous book, Fly Fishing Yellowstone is a must for any angler looking for the story of trout in the historic park, not just the fish but tales of the streams and its history.  His latest book tells a remarkable story about conservation, activism, and journalism, with belts of sold drinking thrown in here and again. It's called This America of Ours: Bernard and Avis DeVoto and the Forgotten Fight to Save the Wild. It will be published on July 5, 2022 and I can't say this enough: pre-order a copy now.  It tells the story of a husband and wife team that took on special interests and politicians like Joe McCarthy and worked to protect land that should have been protected, and along the way, they strike up a friendship with a woman who would alter the course of cooking in America.  It's suspenseful, meticulously researched, frightening with bits of levity, and historically important with mirrors to today. It is one of the most engaging books I've read in a long time, and I'm not just saying all of this because he showed up at my house with a bottle of gin.  But, of course, that's where we start."-John HollThis Episode is sponsored by:Cigar City Brewing Co.Jai Low IPA. Vibrant aromas of nectarine, orange zest, and lime leaf greet the nose, melding seamlessly with peach-like esters and a light, bready malt aroma. Citrus flavors of clementine and tangerine dance on the palate with a snappy bitterness, with bread crust-like malt, and sparkling carbonation providing balance to this moderate-bodied IPA. Lear more at CigarCityBrewing.com  Stomp StickersStomp is a proud member of the brewers association that produces a wide variety of printed brewery products such as beer labels, keg collars, coasters, beer boxes and much more. Stomp's website features an easy-to-use design tool, low quantity orders, fast turn times, and free domestic shipping. Visit StompStickers.com and use code BEEREDGE15 for 15% off your first order. For more Drink Beer, Think Beer or to check out Beer Edge follow us on Twitter @thebeeredge and visit All About Beer. Host: John Holl Guest: Nate Schweber Sponsors: Cigar City Brewing, Stomp Stickers, The Craft Brewery Cookbook,  All About Beer and The Beer Edge Tags: Beer, Gin, Politics, National Parks, Conservation, History, Travel

    RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan
    Our Changing World - Karioi and the grey-faced petrel

    RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 12:12


    Claire Concannon visits Raglan to chat with the Karioi project team. With extenstive predator-trapping, bird-monitoring and education programmes, the team are working with the community to help turn the tide on biodiversity loss in their area.

    National Wildlife Federation Outdoors
    Crispin Powley talks Bass Fishing, Conservation and a Look to the Future.

    National Wildlife Federation Outdoors

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 76:03


    Aaron and Bill sit down with lifelong hunter and professional angler Crispin Powley. Crispin is a husband and father who spends hundreds of days afield each year and has hunted waterfowl in 30 states and three countries. He also runs an outdoors ministry at his local church.   Show notes: 3:44 – Bill shares a little background on Crispin and how they met. 5:00 – Crispin, Bill and Aaron share what they have been doing outside recently. Also, Aaron shares a fun update on recent lead-free landscapes field work from our sporting team. 9:10 - Crispin shares a little background on his upbringing. 11:46 – Crispin talks about how he got into the outdoor industry. 16:40 - Crispin chats about his role at Stratus and what it was like to work with so many famous people. 23:47 – Crispin tells us about his transition to working with GSM. Also, what does that stand for? 33:20 – Crispin talks about expanding past bass fishing. What other species are they after? 35:45 - Crispin's shares his top fishing spots (then and now). Can you believe it?! 47:25 – Short break for a message from our partner podcast, Artemis Sportswomen. Be sure to follow NWF Outdoors on social media for more great content!! 50:00 - Crispin talks about his conservation realm and explains how the industry is looking at current conservation challenges. 57:26 - Crispin talks about what happened on Kentucky Lake regarding bass fishing over the past decade. 1:07:38 – Crispin shares some words of wisdom regarding the future of bass fishing and conservation. 1:11:43 – Parting words. 

    2 Guys and a River
    Episode 260: Dave Kumlien on the Yellowstone Flooding and Its Effect on Fishing

    2 Guys and a River

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022


    The Yellowstone Flood of 2022 is not yet over, and already it is the most catastrophic flooding event of the Yellowstone River in recorded history. Major flooding on the Yellowstone River and its tributaries wiped out stretches of highway in Yellowstone National Park and in Paradise Valley to the north. Three inches of rain which … Continue reading "Episode 260: Dave Kumlien on the Yellowstone Flooding and Its Effect on Fishing" The post Episode 260: Dave Kumlien on the Yellowstone Flooding and Its Effect on Fishing appeared first on 2 Guys and A River.

    Herpetological Highlights
    114 Not All Retics Are The Same

    Herpetological Highlights

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 31:34


    A phylogenetic paper focused episode looking at the longest snake of them all: Reticulated pythons. Are all reticulated pythons part of one big happy whole, or do the hundreds of islands they inhabit mean pythons represent just as many sub-species? Species of the Bi-week is a wonderfully lemon-soaked lizard. Become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/herphighlights Full reference list available here: http://www.herphighlights.podbean.com Main Paper References: Murray-Dickson G, Ghazali M, Ogden R, Brown R, Auliya M. 2017. Phylogeography of the reticulated python (Malayopython reticulatus ssp.): Conservation implications for the worlds' most traded snake species. PLOS ONE 12:e0182049. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0182049. Species of the Bi-Week: Pavón-Vázquez CJ, Esquerré D, Fitch AJ, Maryan B, Doughty P, Donnellan SC, Keogh JS. 2022. Between a rock and a dry place: phylogenomics, biogeography, and systematics of ridge-tailed monitors (Squamata: Varanidae: Varanus acanthurus complex). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 173:107516. DOI: 10.1016/j.ympev.2022.107516. Other Links/Mentions: Tom's appearance on BBC Springwatch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PCP2w5CVbkY Music: Intro/outro – Treehouse by Ed Nelson Species Bi-week theme – Mike Mooney Other Music – The Passion HiFi, www.thepassionhifi.com

    Canine Conversations
    Leveraging Terrier Instincts with Miriam Ritchie

    Canine Conversations

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 68:17


    In this episode of K9 Conservationists, Kayla speaks with Miriam Ritchie from the New Zealand Department of Conservation about leveraging your dog's instincts to conduct a job. Science Highlight: Impact of weather conditions on cheetah monitoring with scat detection dogs Patreon Questions: Taylor: Are they hunting the rodents? Does that affect her selection? Taylor: How has the welcome been with this project? Megan: How do you introduce the rodents in training? Do you use wild caught, captive bred, or domestic animals in training? Links Mentioned in the Episode: The success of using trained dogs to locate sparse rodents in pest-free sanctuaries Where to find Miriam Ritchie: Instagram You can support the K9 Conservationists Podcast by joining our Patreon at patreon.com/k9conservationists. K9 Conservationists Website | Merch | Support Our Work | Facebook | Instagram | TikTok

    Big Ideas - ABC RN
    Why environmentalists and conservationists can be a problem for the environment

    Big Ideas - ABC RN

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 54:06


    Queensland Chief Scientist Hugh Possingham is very annoyed with his fellow scientists as well as environmentalist and conservationists: They are too conservative, don't debate respectfully, are too obsessed with growing their own organisations and can't compromise a bit.

    Impact: The Conservation Photography Podcast
    7 types of photo stories every conservation nonprofit needs

    Impact: The Conservation Photography Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 58:13


    #101: Conservation nonprofit organizations who aren't investing in photographers and filmmakers to tell their stories are missing out BIG TIME. Here's 7 kinds of visual stories you can create for nonprofits that'll help build trust, stoke community spirit, and ramp up fundraising. If you want to collaborate with a nonprofit but aren't sure what to make - or how to show how valuable your visual stories are to their mission and fundraising - this episode will pave the way for you. 

    District of Conservation
    EP 282: An Update on Happy the Elephant & Interior Dept. Erases Litigation Website

    District of Conservation

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 11:32


    In Episode 282 of District of Conservation, Gabriella discusses a positive update on Happy the Asian elephant's situation and the Department of Interior revoking a Trump-era secretarial order offering transparency on "sue and settle" lawsuits. SHOW NOTES NSSF: NY Court Rules Happy the Elephant Isn't Human EP 278: Should Happy the Elephant Have Human Rights? (ft. Theresa McMahan of Protect the Harvest) Townhall: Biden Administration Shouldn't Negotiate Away Public Lands Access for Hunters and Anglers E&E News: Interior order erases litigation website --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/district-of-conservation/support

    Science Weekly
    Seagrass meadows: can we rewild one of the world's best carbon sinks?

    Science Weekly

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 16:13


    They support an incredible array of biodiversity and may also be some of the world's most effective carbon sinks. But vast swathes of seagrass meadows have been lost in the last century, and they continue to vanish at the rate of a football pitch every half hour. Madeleine Finlay makes a trip out of the Guardian office to visit a rewilding project in Hampshire. She speaks to marine biologist Tim Ferrero about the challenges of replanting seagrass meadows and what hope it offers.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    District of Conservation
    EP 281: POMA Conference in Kalispell and Helping Montana Flood Relief Efforts

    District of Conservation

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 15:49


    In Episode 281 of District of Conservation, Gabriella recaps her trip to Kalispell, MT for Professional Outdoor Media Association's annual Business Conference and how listeners can chip in to help Montana flooding relief efforts. SHOW NOTES Join Professional Outdoor Media Association CNBC: ‘Yellowstone' boom pits lifetime Montana residents against wealthy newcomers Montana Free Press: Montana's fastest-growing city last year? It wasn't Bozeman. Montana Nonprofits Supporting Flood Relief Efforts --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/district-of-conservation/support

    Break It Down Show
    Robert Fisher – Biodiversity, Urbanization and Conservation

    Break It Down Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 67:57


    Robert Fisher – Biodiversity, Urbanization and Conservation - Dr. Robert Fisher is a conservation biologist with the US Geological Survey's Western Ecological Research Center and works as part of a large integrated team. His focus has been on how natural systems are responding to the Anthropocene, and what types of resiliency they have or lack as it relates to maintaining ecological integrity and biodiversity. Find out about Robert's work at: Additionally, Robert notes that through understanding individual species and community responses to perturbations through modern monitoring techniques, he and his team can determine appropriate management experiments or options to possibly recover resiliency. Biology nerds this is an ep for you, and hey, why not non-biology nerds as well. Please support the Break It Down Show by doing a monthly subscription to the show  All of the money you invest goes directly to supporting the show!   For the  of this episode head to  Haiku Robert Fisher here Focusing on the systems Of Mother Nature   ​Similar episodes: Andrews and Wilson  Anna Simons  Janeshia A. Ginyard  Join us in supporting Save the Brave as we battle PTSD.  Executive Producer/Host: Pete A Turner  Producer: Damjan Gjorgjiev  Writer: Dragan Petrovski  The Break It Down Show is your favorite best, new podcast, featuring 5 episodes a week with great interviews highlighting world-class guests from a wide array of shows.

    NOW Charleston
    Juneteenth + Charleston's Emancipation Day; Black River conservation; Gun law lapses, proposed fixes

    NOW Charleston

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 8:57


    Subscribe to NOW Charleston on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or via RSS.Follow the podcast on Twitter and Instagram.Juneteenth, Febteenth, and Emancipation Day in Charleston - Charleston County Public LibraryThe History of Emancipation Day in Charleston - Charleston County Public LibraryNearly half of states now recognize Juneteenth as an official holiday - Pew ResearchJuneteenth is at risk of losing its meaning - AxiosSupporters want 70-mile park network along SC's Black River - APPublic input sought on planned state park, water trail project for Black River  - SC DNRLoopholes and Missing Data: The Gaps in the Gun Background Check System - NYTUS Attorney Corey Ellis says ‘blood in the streets' justifies federal gun crackdown - P&CFOLLOW:twitter.com/nowcharlestoninstagram.com/nowcharlestonWE WANT YOUR FEEDBACK:sam@nowchs.com843-474-1319INFO AND SHOW NOTES:nowchs.com

    Ducks Unlimited Podcast
    Ep. 21 - Collector's Series: Jon Deeter

    Ducks Unlimited Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 15:32


    Jon Deeter, owner of at Guyette and Deeter, Inc. decoy auction house, returns to the show to chat with host Katie Burke about their Spring auction at the North American Decoy Collectors Show, the largest sporting collector show in the country. Jon and Katie talk about the importance of this show not only in terms of the auction, but to decoy collecting in general. Jon gives us some insight into the catalog for this sale and how it was selected. He also talks about Guyette and Deeter Inc's upcoming venture into antique waterfowling shotguns. www.ducks.org/DUPodcast

    Duck Season Somewhere
    Gaining Perspective From Half-Century "Studying Ducks" [Part 1]

    Duck Season Somewhere

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 74:17


    A self-started Wisconsin duck hunter, Dr. Richard Kaminski left dental school to "study ducks." And study ducks he did--for about a half-century. Beginning with graduate research studies at Delta Marsh, ending recently as Director of James C. Kennedy Waterfowl and Wetlands Conservation Center, leaving in his wake numerous waterfowl biologists among state, federal and non-governmental organizations integral to delivering the North American Waterfowl Management Plan. Between cups of coffee nd black lab fetches, he and Ramsey discuss the previous night's family duck recipe and Kaminski's duck hunting origins before slogging headlong into waterfowl-related topics researched extensively during his career: hemi-marsh, moist-soil management, soybean nutrition, forested wetlands, habitat complexes and more. Until Ramsey finally asks, "What happened to US duck hunting in the 25 years since I last attended your classroom?!"    Podcast Sponsors: BOSS Shotshells Benelli Shotguns Tetra Hearing Kanati Waterfowl Taxidermy Mojo Outdoors Tom Beckbe Flash Back Decoys Voormi GetDucks USHuntList   It really is duck season somewhere for 365 days per year. Follow Ramsey Russell's worldwide duck hunting adventures as he chases real duck hunting experiences year-round: Instagram @ramseyrussellgetducks YouTube @GetDucks Facebook @GetDucks.com   Please subscribe, rate and review Duck Season Somewhere podcast. Share your favorite episodes with friends! Business inquiries and comments contact Ramsey Russell ramsey@getducks.com

    Blood Origins
    Episode 232 - Nathan And Sean || Professional Hunting - A Tool For Holistic Conservation In Cape York, Australia

    Blood Origins

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 39:00


    Barry Howlett and Sean Kilkenny, two of the Aussies most knowledgeable about the hunting industry in Australia, join Robbie to discuss an issue that's happening right NOW in the hunting world. An amendment to the Meat Industry Act in the state of Victoria caused an uproar when it was sensationalized to mean that sharing meat is now illegal in the state. Barry and Sean tackle the subject, then get into the social license of hunters and what effect perceptions about us as hunters has on our sporting lifestyle. See more from Blood Origins: https://bit.ly/BloodOrigins_Subscribe Music: Migration by Ian Post (Winter Solstice), licensed through artlist.io Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    The Broken Arrow Podcast
    Ron Rohrbaugh: Conservation and Indiana (nothing to do with the episode but you'll get it)

    The Broken Arrow Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 124:21


    A very special Father's Day episode with one of the greatest fathers.  Join us as we sit down with Ron Rohrbaugh and discuss his family and his upcoming great adventure.  It's a "Sure Enough Mountain Man" trek the whole family is undertaking and we can't help but be jealous.  We also discuss his recent endeavor into writing young adult books, upcoming hunting adventures and more!  Enjoy!

    Dugongs And Seadragons
    S2E24 – Dugongs and Sea Dragons Awesome Con 2022 Special!!!

    Dugongs And Seadragons

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 66:39


    Join us for our full length Awesome Con 2022 special featuring some of the regular crew and some special guests!   Please support Dugongs & Sea Dragons on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/DugongsAndSeadragons

    Thinking Ahead with Carter Phipps
    Darryl Jones: Roads, Wildlife, and the Future of Conservation

    Thinking Ahead with Carter Phipps

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 57:48


    Why did the leopard cross the road? Well, because he had to. He might have been searching for food, or a mate, or a new territory. But if he made it safely to the other side, it just might be because someone built him a bridge. And today's guest on Thinking Ahead might have had a hand in that effort.One of the many great challenges of this century, to my mind, is finding a way for nature to thrive alongside humans. The rise of Modernity has made an enormous difference for human thriving but has put tremendous pressure on the natural world, a pressure that we have only recently started to make the effort to mitigate. But with population growth falling, technology improving, wealth increasing, and knowledge of natural ecosystems becoming more sophisticated, there are tremendous opportunities ahead of us to find better ways to coexist with the wild. And one of the people working to do just that is Darryl Jones, a world expert on building wildlife crossings to help animals migrate safely as their territories become divided and circumscribed by human roads. His new book, A Clouded Leopard in the Middle of the Road, documents the rise of one of the newest ecological areas of study, known as Road Ecology, and shares some of the extraordinary success stories he's been involved in, from the United States to Africa to Europe to Australia. In this episode, he explains the groundbreaking public-private cross-disciplinary partnerships that make such projects possible, and shares his personal passion for making roadkill a thing of the past. 

    Great Outdoors from WGN Radio 720
    Wildlife funding and shotguns

    Great Outdoors from WGN Radio 720

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022


    Funding for wildlife takes a big step forward and the move to lighter gauge shotguns for waterfowl. Is it the right thing?

    Wet Fly Swing Fly Fishing Podcast
    WFS 332 - Upper Missouri Watershed Alliance with Sherry Meador

    Wet Fly Swing Fly Fishing Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 39:24


    Show Notes: https://wetflyswing.com/332 Presented By: Trxstle Sponsors: https://wetflyswing.com/sponsors Sherry Meador, Board Chair for the Upper Missouri Watershed Alliance (UMOWA), sheds light on their organization's conservation mission. Sherry helps us understand how the Upper Missouri River watershed is threatened by a silent invasion of noxious weeds that degrades the water quality, reduces native biological diversity, and negatively impact the population of many wild species like elk, deer, swans, variety of ducks, other plants, and of course our fish. We discover how we can help prevent the spread of these invasive weeds, how we can contribute to the water and streambanks restoration projects, and how we can get involved in ways we can and become more aware of the overall health of this river. There's more to it than I could describe so here's Sherry from UMOWA.org to enlighten us about it. Upper Missouri Watershed Alliance Show Notes with Sherry Meador 02:50 - Sherry and I connected through John Smigaj from Trxstle. John was on the podcast at WFS 310. 03:30 - Sherry had been involved with the noxious weed project on the Smith River. UMOWA board started in 2014 and Sherry joined 6 years ago. 04:50 - The Missouri River is the longest river in the country. It starts at 3 forks which is about 75 miles upriver from the dams of Helena down to the great falls but they're primarily focused on the primary fishing area between Holter Dam and Cascade. 08:55 - UMOWA was established by a group of guides and fly fishers. It was established to get baseline data and to get the river back to the high quality or what was considered a good level. They collect water quality samples 3 times a year. 10:10 - They will have the river's health summary report available on their website for us to see this summer 11:25 - They're done a couple of restoration projects on banks where they're trying to get the plants back there to get less erosion - read more here 11:40 - They also work on noxious weeds which are on the land but goes up to the habitat. They work with land owners by the river, trying to get them involved in this project. Noxious weeds are silent invasive and a threat to the watershed. Read more about this project here 12:30 - They educate anglers about the importance of washing their boat and waders to prevent spreading invasive species along the river. They provide boat washing stations that are open to the public and at no charge. 13:30 - The highest amount of angler days recorded was 180,000 a year 16:20 - UMOWA is an all-volunteer board. They have 8 members. John Smigaj is also one of them. 16:30 - UMOWA is in need of enough funding. They are to the point of getting the to the next level because there's so much integration they need to do with the Department of Environmental Quality and Dep. of Natural Resource. 19:00 - You can help UMOWA's mission by checking their website to understand more about their projects, spreading the word about their mission, and sign up for their newsletter. 21:40 - Sherry kind of retired as an attorney. For the past 5 years, she hasn't been working much as an attorney and into some other projects. She describes what her job looked like when she was practicing law. 26:10 - You can also support Montana Watershed Coordination Council - they are doing similar work on watersheds in Montana. UMOWA works with Pat Barnes from Trout Unlimited. Sun River Water Shed Group is a smaller watershed group but also doing some great work out there. 28:40 - They also do some river clean-up where everybody can also volunteer. They have a big event on August 20th this year at the New Brewery in Craig. There's going to be a raffle too where people can win a Ro drift boat. Upper Missouri Conclusion with Sherry Meador So there you go.. If you want to take part in UMOWA's movement, you can reach out to them via website at UMOWA.org - they always welcome new ideas and volunteers. Conservation topics may not always be the most interesting topics out there but it should be our responsibility as anglers to be aware of the things that destroy our rivers and their habitats. So if you want to enjoy these rivers at their best quality, there are many ways to contribute like spreading the word, donating, volunteering, or at the least, be a more disciplined angler - keep the fish wet, wash your boats and your waders after use. Show Notes: https://wetflyswing.com/332

    KSL Outdoors Show
    Where In Alaska Is Jim?

    KSL Outdoors Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 17:13


    Tim and Russ connect with Jim Angle via satellite phone. Jim is trekking his way through Alaska and shares an update on his trip so far. Tim makes his weekly connection with Roger Eggett from The Cabin's at Bear River Lodge and Tracks Powersports. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    KSL Outdoors Show
    Oh Deer It's Dry

    KSL Outdoors Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 17:57


    Tim and Russ connect with DWR Big Game Coordinator Dax Mangus to talk about a recent video of a bear encounter and how drought conditions will affect the deer population. Tim and Bob Grove talk about little known spots around the state on this week's Road Trip segment. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    KSL Outdoors Show
    Stompin' Around Tooele

    KSL Outdoors Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 19:27


    This week's KSL 100th Anniversary Tour took Tim out to Tooele County where he connected with the Director of Parks and Recreation Cory Bullock to discuss the great hiking trails you will discover in that part of the state. Navi takes us to some fishing spots in the high country for this week's Fishbytes See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    KSL Outdoors Show
    I'll Call Ya From The Boat

    KSL Outdoors Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 18:19


    Navi checks in from Park City for some R&R enjoying the biking trails. Tim and Russ talk about satellite phones on house boats at Lake Powell. News of the Week features the recent Yellowstone flood. Bob Grove joins this conversation with the mayor of West Yellowstone Tavis Watts. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
    The Nature of Phenology 6/18/22: Browntail Moth Caterpillars

    WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 5:02


    Producers: Hazel Stark & Joe Horn Host: Hazel Stark This species is named for the brown tails of the adult moth, which is otherwise white. The fuzzy brown abdomen can be hard to see hidden underneath the white wings, but you can often see it if you look closely. The caterpillar form of this species is what we first need to learn to identify, however, due to the toxin present in its hairs that can cause an irritating and long-lasting, poison ivy-like rash on contact or respiratory distress if inhaled. About the host/writers: Joe Horn lives in Gouldsboro, is Co-Founder of Maine Outdoor School, L3C, and is a Registered Maine Guide and Carpenter. He is passionate about fishing, cooking, and making things with his hands. He has both an MBA in Sustainability and an MS focused in Environmental Education. Joe can be reached by emailing naturephenology@gmail.com Hazel Stark lives in Gouldsboro, is Co-Founder and Naturalist Educator at Maine Outdoor School, L3C, and is a Registered Maine Guide. She loves taking a closer look at nature through the lens of her camera, napping in beds of moss, and taking hikes to high points to see what being tall is all about. She has an MS in Resource Management and Conservation and is a lifelong Maine outdoorswoman. Hazel can be reached by emailing naturephenology@gmail.com The post The Nature of Phenology 6/18/22: Browntail Moth Caterpillars first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

    Pace Brothers - Into The Wilderness Podcast
    #208 Lloyd Morse: Food sourcing and the joy of venison

    Pace Brothers - Into The Wilderness Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 57:36


    In the early part of 2022 I headed north of Inverness in Scotland to join Lloyd Morse and Sam Thompson in search of deer; deer which was destined for the plate of customers in The Palmerston restaurant in Edinburgh—recently named one of the top 100 places to eat in the UK. The is an episode about food sourcing and the delight of being enthused by the raw ingredients of a meal, from a man not afraid to say it as it is. I got to eat some of the best sika venison of my life, but for you, dear listener, you will just have to hear about that and head to The Palmerston yourself. The Palmerston Buy the latest Modern Huntsman For more visit Byron Pace

    Minnesota Bound Podcast - MN Bound Podcast
    Ladies, learn how to be more successful in the field and on the Sporting Clays course.

    Minnesota Bound Podcast - MN Bound Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 37:45


    Laura Schara talks with Kate Ahnstorm Owner of Virginia Shooting Sports and Pro Staffer for Syren Shotguns.Supported by: Minnesota Historical Society (https://www.mnhs.org/fortsnelling,) Oreo (https://www.oreo.com) & Ritz (https://www.ritzcrackers.com,) Hewitt Docks, Lifts & Pontoon Legs (https://www.hewittrad.com/,) Kinetico (https://www.kinetico.com/,) Minnesota Propane Association “Clean American Energy” (https://propane.com/) & Star Bank (https://www.starbank.net/)

    The Dishcast with Andrew Sullivan
    David Goodhart On Overvaluing Smarts

    The Dishcast with Andrew Sullivan

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 87:35


    David Goodhart is a British journalist. In 1995 he founded Prospect, the center-left political magazine, where he served as editor for 15 years, and then became the director of Demos, the cross-party think tank. His book The Road to Somewhere coined the terms “Anywheres” and “Somewheres” to help us understand populism in the contemporary West. We also discuss his latest book, Head Hand Heart: The Struggle for Dignity and Status in the 21st Century.You can listen to the episode right away in the audio player above (or click the dropdown menu to add the Dishcast to your podcast feed). For two clips of our convo — on why elites favor open borders, and why smart people are overvalued — head over to our YouTube page. Early in the episode, David discusses how his adolescent schooling in Marxism was “a bit like how people sometimes talk about the classics as a sort of intellectual gymnasium — learning how to argue.” Which brings to mind the following note from a listener:I feel compelled to tell you how much I enjoyed listening to your episode with Roosevelt Montás. I’m a retired lawyer in my 60s, and although I had a decent education growing up, my experience did not involve a full immersion in the classics. Hearing you two talk was like sitting in a dorm room in college — except the people talking are older, wiser, actually know what they were talking about. What a treat. I’m a pretty regular listener of the Dishcast, and this was the best yet in my opinion.Much of this week’s episode with David centers on how our capitalist society ascribes too much social and moral value to cognitive ability. That theme was also central to our episode last year with Charles Murray, who emphasizes in the following clip the “unearned gift” of high IQ:The following listener was a big fan of the episode (which we transcribed last week):I must tell you that your conversation with Charles Murray was the single best podcast I’ve ever heard. So deep, broad, and thought provoking. Thank you both for your willingness to explore “unacceptable” ideas so thoughtfully and carefully.I have read two of Charles’ books — Human Diversity and Facing Reality — and, among other things, I am stunned by how ordinary a person he seems to be. That sounds odd. What I mean to say is that, while few people could analyze and assemble so much data and present it so compellingly, his conclusions are what the average person “already knows.” I suspect that most people couldn’t plow through Human Diversity, but given a brief synopsis, they would say “duh.”When you mentioned your deep respect for black culture in America, you touched on something I wish had been more developed in Charles’ books: the option we have of celebrating human diversity rather than resigning ourselves to it or denying it. I would like to develop that idea a bit further:Conservation biologists understand (celebrate) the value of genetic diversity in nonhuman species, because each population potentially brings to the species genes that will allow it to flourish under some future environmental challenge, whether that be disease outbreak, climate change, competition from invasive species, etc. Humans too, as living organisms, have faced and will undoubtedly continue to face many unforeseen challenges, whether environmental, cultural, economic, etc. Hopefully, we will continue to rise to these challenges, but we have no way of knowing which genes from which populations will carry the critical traits that will allow us to do so. So, all the better that races DO differ and ARE diverse — in the aggregate, on average. Population differences are GOOD for a species because they confer resilience!Oh, and for the record, I tend to be center-left, with most of my friends leaning further to the left, so the ideas you presented are forbidden fruits. I cannot discuss them with anyone other than my husband, who can hardly bear to listen because they are so taboo in our circle.Here’s another clip with Charles, bringing Christianity into the mix:This next listener strongly dissents:Charles Murray, and you as well, seem to believe that you can magically separate out the effects of culture and poverty, and determine the effect of “race” on intelligence, which you define as IQ. The problem is, everything you’ve discussed here is nonsense.First, you assume that the term “race” describes a shorthand for people who share a common genetic background, and I suspect this is garbage. Most American Blacks have multi-ethnic backgrounds, with skin melanin being the main shared genetic feature. So, there’s little reason to believe that there’s a correlation between melanin content and other genetic features.Second, you assume that IQ describes general intelligence, that G factor Murray talks about. But intelligence is clearly multi-dimensional. My wife and youngest daughter have a facility with Scrabble, and general word enumeration games, that is way beyond me, and they’re better writers than I am. On the other hand, I have a general facility with mathematics that they can’t match (though my oldest daughter might be able to). And that’s just two dimensions; I’d bet there are many more, encompassing things like artistic talent, architectural design and talents in other arenas. You yourself are an excellent writer and interviewer, but I’ve read your writings for years, and I’d bet your understanding of statistics is elementary at best.Finally, you have no answer to the remarkable changes in IQ in Ashkenazi Jews over the past century. Supposedly IQ is supposed to represent an innate and unchangeable measurement of intelligence. And if you believe that average IQ of an ethnic group is a meaningful measurement, then you have to explain the changes in average IQ among American Jews over the past century. Goddard in the early 20th century claimed that 83% of tested Jews were feebleminded, while today, the great grandchildren of those feebleminded Jews now have IQs 1/2 to a full standard deviation above their co-nationalists. There’s an obvious answer here: IQ tests simply don’t test anything fundamental, but instead test how integrated into American culture the tested subjects were at the time.These are serious challenges to the idea that specific ethnic groups have unchangeable intellectual talents: some of your ethnic groups are non-homogeneous genetically, your definition of intelligence is simplistic, and there’s clear evidence that social integration greatly overwhelms any inter-group average differences. It is obvious that some people are more talented in one area than another, and that a significant amount of these differences are determined genetically. But when you move from the case of individuals to trying to correlate American racial groups with intelligence, I truly believe you’re just making a big mistake. Many Blacks in this country have grown up with the expectations that they simply can’t succeed on their own. I find it impossible to believe that we can filter out the effect of being raised with the expectation of failure. I work in tech, and it seems that a seriously disproportionate number of Blacks at my Gang of Five company come from the Caribbean — where, of course, Blacks are a majority and don’t face the same expectations of failure. We had a panel discussion on race and all the panelists came from the Caribbean, and all had stories of parental expectations that you’d expect from a stereotypical Asian-American family today.That said, right now, the Woke are acting more patronizing (and in my view, racist) than anything since the ‘60s. At this point, the Woke (I refuse to apply this label to the whole Left) treat Blacks as incredibly fragile beings who can’t handle any discussions of problems that aren’t laid at the feet of white people’s racism. It’s pretty disgusting.Instead of going point for point with my reader, here’s a comprehensive list of Dish coverage on the subject from the blog days. Another listener recommends a related guest for the Dishcast:After ruminating on some of your recent podcasts, I’d like to suggest a future guest: Paige Harden, author of The Genetic Lottery: Why DNA Matters for Social Equality and professor of behavioral psychology at the University of Texas-Austin. I imagine you’ve read her profile in The New Yorker. Since your conversation with Briahna Joy Gray, the tension between matters of structure and personal agency have been echoing in my head.When I listen to other guests of yours, other podcast hosts, other conservatives, I see everywhere the tension between structure and personal agency. And having read Harden’s book this fall, I’ve been thinking of her work more and more as a bridge between these seemingly divergent world views. She swims in the same research waters as Charles Murray and Robert Plomin — but she (a) is explicitly clear that this research has, as of yet, no value in studying ethnic groups and (b) treats environmental factors differently than they do. On the latter, Harden makes some compelling arguments about the interplay between environment and expression of individuals’ genes (and thus abilities). It’s easy to see the corollaries in personal ability and responsibility (both with strong roots in genetics) versus the leftist tendency to dismiss people’s actions vis a vis blaming structural inequalities.Harden sometimes trades in some language verging on woke, for lack of a better term, but her more nuanced philosophical references are to John Rawls, not neo-Marxists. She’s really quite convincing. Also, I’ve always appreciated that you ask your guests to reflect on their upbringing and how they got where they are. Having read that New Yorker piece and her book, I think hers is an interesting story in and of itself.It is indeed. Harden is a great idea for a guest. I’ll confess that I felt I needed to read her book thoroughly to engage her, and didn’t have the time so put it off. Thanks for the reminder.A reader responds to a quote we posted last week praising Mike Pence for standing up to Trump after the assault on the Capitol:Pence had innumerable chances over years to expose Trump for exactly what he was. Besides one forceful speech since, there hasn’t been much else from the MAGA-excommunicated, nearly-executed veep. How about a live appearance before the Jan 6 Commission, Mr Vice President? Probably not. While I agree that Mike Pence may have saved the republic on Jan 6, he only did so with a gun to his head — with an actual gallows erected for him, while the Capitol was being stormed and people were dying. Better late than never, but he really cut it close, no?Liz Cheney and Mitt Romney are the profiles in courage here, along with all those Capitol police. Pence doesn’t deserve this lionization … at least not yet.Points taken. But to be honest, any mainstream Republican who opposed the attempted coup is a hero in my book. Another reader quotes me and dissents:The early Biden assurance that inflation was only a blip has become ridiculous, as Janet Yellen herself has conceded. No, Biden isn’t responsible for most of it. But some of it? Yep. A massive boost to demand when supply is crippled is dumb policy making. And imagine how worse it would be if Biden had gotten his entire package. Larry Summers was right — again.European countries did not have stimulus like we did, yet they are experiencing similar levels of inflation. This would indicate that inflation is a world-wide phenomenon and not tied to our particular stimulus packages. Also, Larry Summers has been pretty much wrong on everything — here’s a synopsis from 2013 (or just google “larry summers wrong on everything” and see the articles that pop up). Money quote:And Summers has made a lot of errors in the past 20 years, despite the eminence of his research. As a government official, he helped author a series of ultimately disastrous or wrongheaded policies, from his big deregulatory moves as a Clinton administration apparatchik to his too-tepid response to the Great Recession as Obama's chief economic adviser. Summers pushed a stimulus that was too meek, and, along with his chief ally, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, he helped to ensure that millions of desperate mortgage-holders would stay underwater by failing to support a "cramdown" that would have allowed federal bankruptcy judges to have banks reduce mortgage balances, cut interest rates, and lengthen the terms of loans. At the same time, he supported every bailout of financial firms. All of this has left the economy still in the doldrums, five years after Lehman Brothers' 2008 collapse, and hurt the middle class. Yet in no instance has Summers ever been known to publicly acknowledge a mistake.Sorry, but the EU provided a Covid stimulus of $2.2 trillion. And Summers was clearly right in this case, and Janet Yellen wrong. Another reader also pushes back on the passage I wrote above:I have a bone to pick with you when you discuss the Biden economic policy. Your contention is that the American Rescue Plan was “dumb policy making” because it exacerbated inflation. Fair enough — but if we are going to discuss the economy, then we need to have a full exploration of the policy choices and their implications. Yes, we have had six months of multi-decade high inflation, but we also have had about a year of near-record lows in unemployment and record-high job creation. Before you dismiss that as simply due to the reopening of the economy post-COVID, it’s worth noting that the American economic recovery has vastly outperformed all prognostications, as well as other Western economies. So in sum, the result of Biden’s policy is high inflation, high growth, high job creation, low unemployment. Let’s be clear then: when you criticize the ARP as too big and thus causing inflation, you are advocating for stable prices at the cost of a low growth, high unemployment environment. It’s a fair argument, I suppose. But after having lived through the weak economic recovery engineered by Larry Summers during the Obama administration, one that choked the early careers of many millennials, I’m not sure Biden’s choice was particularly egregious. But what we may well be about to get is stagflation — as interest rates go up even as inflation continues. It’s possible we fucked up both times: in 2009 with too little stimulus and in 2020 too much. I understand why those decisions were taken and the reasons were sane. But they were still wrong. Tim Noah has been doing great work lately on these questions of inflation and recession, including an interview with Summers. This next reader defends Biden’s record on the economy and beyond:The pragmatic counter-argument to your criticism of Biden is this: his economic program, while inflationary, produced unprecedented job growth after a recession, reductions by 50% in child poverty, more than five new business startups, and increases in business investment and personal bank balances of more than 20%. It’s among the reasons the American economy is outperforming China’s for the first time in two generations.Biden’s signature foreign policy achievements in Central Europe have led to the enlargement of NATO and awakened Europe to its responsibilities to its own security, all of which will contain Russia over the long term. This precedent, coupled with the Aussie-Brit nuclear deal, opens real possibilities for containing China’s potential regional expansion in Asia. At home, Biden’s Justice Department, like Gerald Ford’s, is fumigating the fetid stench of politics it inherited. The Biden White House has re-opened the doors to governors and mayors who need help from Washington in a disaster, regardless of partisan affiliation or views of Dear Leader; and it is laying the groundwork for a much-needed affordable-housing boom in our cities. Your hopes for a politics of dynamic centrism, which I share, does not take into account that as many as 10 million of our fellow citizens are prone to political violence due to the real-world influence of Great Replacement Theory, according to Professor Robert Pape of the University of Chicago. There is no comparable threat from the illiberalism on the left — which is a problem, nonetheless. In the wake of Trump’s loss in 2020, leading Republicans, including the governors of Florida and Texas, are competing for those constituents. That’s a movement my fellow classical liberals and I — stretching from the center-left to the center-right — can and should live without. Bill Buckley wouldn’t have sucked up to them. In the real world, the GOP wooing of the violent right poses an existential threat to our quality of life. It’s why I am voting straight Democratic in 2022. And it is why I would gladly vote for Biden, again in 2024, if he sought re-election.Happy to air your perspective. This next reader is bracing himself for Trump 2024:I know it gives you a warm feeling all over to write a column about the revolt against the woke, but it won’t be wokism that propels Republicans into office in 2022 and returns Trump to power in 2024 — something I agree will be a disaster for the republic. Trump’s return to power feels inevitable to me today. The January 6th hearings will make no difference to Trump supporters.Don’t get me wrong; I think wokism is annoying and stupid, but it is not the threat to the nation that you believe it is, and it never was. Wokism has destroyed the left and that is the real tragedy. Instead of a populist left railing against the rich, we have a bourgeois left railing against heterosexual white men, leaving the working class in the thrall of an American Orban. The working class now feels that the left and Democrats have failed them; and they are right, they have.Americans will vote for Republican for one reason: inflation. It should be no surprise that inflation is out of control, but both Biden and Trump spent billions helping people who were unable to work during Covid (the right policy) without raising taxes (the wrong policy). Now, to fight inflation we need to raise taxes and that is impossible; there aren’t the votes in the Senate. American tax policy is insane. You can have low taxes, or you can solve social problems like helping people who can’t work because of a pandemic, an inadequate public health system still unprepared for the next pandemic, homelessness and addiction, and crime. But you can’t have both. It really isn’t that complicated.Grateful as always for the counterpoints, and you can always send your own to dish@andrewsullivan.com. Another dissenter gets historical:I agree wholeheartedly with your clarion condemnation of the odious Trump. But you are wide of the historical mark when you state that Trump is “the first real tyrannical spirit to inhabit the office since Andrew Jackson.” Jackson was authoritarian in character. He was a product of the trauma of the Revolution and he brought his military identity to the White House. But he was not a tyrant or dictator. (There is more historical evidence for Lincoln as dictatorial than Jackson.) More appropriate — if non-American — comparisons for Trump would be Henry VIII, Wilhelm II, Mussolini and Nixon.Mind you, an interesting Dishcast guest would be Jon Meacham to discuss US presidents with authoritarian tendencies: Adams Sr., Polk, Andrew Johnson, Teddy R and Wilson. All expressed some form of authoritarianism, but sometimes the presidency and the nation derived benefitAnother digs deeper into the Jackson comparison:I suggest you interview W.H. Brands, who wrote a biography of Andrew Jackson. There are many ways to judge a history book, but to me an important criterion is, did I learn anything I did not already know?  Reading this book I did.I am only going to mention one of a good number events in Jackson’s life that Brands brings to the forefront. After the Battle of New Orleans, Gen. Jackson had ordered that a curfew remain in effect and that the city was to remain under martial law. For good reason: while the British offensive on one flank was a disaster, they had relative success on the other flank, and their remaining commander could have ended the truce and ordered another attack. But the British never did a follow-up attack. One New Orleans business man then took Andrew Jackson to court, claiming he endured an unnecessary economic loss on account of the military curfew. The court ruled in the businessman’s favor. AND, incredibly, Andrew Jackson paid the fine! Now stop and think, what must have been on Old Hickory’s mind. Here he risks life and limb to save the city from British domination, and he’s fined. Andrew could think, why should I pay?  I’ve got the Army in my control, I’m not just a commander whom soldiers fear, but also one that has the adulation and respect of my soldiers and the populace at large.   To me, that episode reveals that Jackson was hardly the tyrant he is portrayed to be by most modernists steeped in presentism. He should never be placed in the same sentence as Trump unless the word “contrast” or “opposite” is used. Let's keep Old Hickory away from any such comparisons and let his image remain on that $20 bill!Well I learned something from that email — so many thanks. Meacham is a good idea too. Get full access to The Weekly Dish at andrewsullivan.substack.com/subscribe

    Appointed: A Canadian Senator Bringing Margins to the Centre
    A Conservation with Dr. Elizabeth Sheehy: Bill C-5, Judicial Discretion, and Mandatory Minimum Penalties

    Appointed: A Canadian Senator Bringing Margins to the Centre

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 32:55


    Click here to access to Bill C-5.Click here to read more on Bill C-22Click here to check out Dr. Sheehy's book Defending Battered Women on Trial.Click here to read Justice Arbour's Inquiry into certain events at the Prison for Women in Kingston also known as the Arbour ReportClick here to read R v LuxtonClick here to read more about R v NaslundClick here to access the Injustices and Miscarriages of Justice Experienced by 12 Indigenous Women reportClick here to read more about the inquest in Renfrew CountyClick here to access more information on the Portapique Inquiry Click here to read Bonnie Moonie's story 

    BioScience Talks
    Social Justice and Conservation Education

    BioScience Talks

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 38:10


    In this episode, we're joined by Dr. Robert Montgomery, Associate Professor of Biodiversity and Sustainability, Senior Research Fellow in Lady Margaret Hall College, and Senior Researcher in the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, at Oxford University. He's here to talk about his recent BioScience article, Integrating Social Justice into Higher Education Conservation Science. The abstract of the article follows.Because biodiversity loss has largely been attributed to human actions, people, particularly those in the Global South, are regularly depicted as threats to conservation. This context has facilitated rapid growth in green militarization, with fierce crackdowns against real or perceived environmental offenders. We designed an undergraduate course to assess student perspectives on biodiversity conservation and social justice and positioned those students to contribute to a human heritage-centered conservation (HHCC) initiative situated in Uganda. We evaluated changes in perspectives using pre- and postcourse surveys and reflection instruments. Although the students started the course prioritizing biodiversity conservation, even when it was costly to human well-being, by the end of the course, they were recognizing and remarking on the central importance of social justice within conservation. We present a framework for further integration of HHCC approaches into higher education courses so as to conserve the integrity of coupled human and natural systems globally.

    The Big 550 KTRS
    MO Conservation: Beware of bears

    The Big 550 KTRS

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 10:00


    Dan Zarlenga, media specialist with the Missouri Department of Conservation, with some tips on being aware of native bears that can wander into more populated areas. Find out more about bears at https://mdc.mo.gov/

    Virginia Water Radio
    Episode 630 (6-20-22): A Sampler of Shrubs from Soggy Spaces

    Virginia Water Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022


    CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:49).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-16-22.