Podcasts about agricultural

Cultivation of plants and animals to provide useful products

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Latest podcast episodes about agricultural

Worry Less, Wag More: The Behavior Vets Podcast
Lauren Tsao (MS, CDBC, CPDT-KA) Investigates Fenced Yards and their Impact on Dog Activity and Adoption

Worry Less, Wag More: The Behavior Vets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 62:39


In this episode, Lauren shares the findings from her research on dog activity in fenced yards and the impact of fenced yard requirements on dog adoptions. It is so common for shelters to require a fenced yard for dogs for various reasons, most commonly for very active dogs. But do fenced yards really make a difference on dog activity levels? Are shelters unnecessarily limiting the pool of potential adopters with a fenced yard requirement? We discuss:How dog activity levels sync with human activityOwner perceptions of their dog's activity level compared with the resultsHow important are fenced yards for highly active dogs?The potential impact of fenced yard requirements on dog adoptionsA better understanding of activity levels in dogs can increase the success of adoptionsLauren's bio: Lauren Tsao, BS, CDBC, CPDT-KA is one of Mississippi's only Certified Professional Dog Trainers - Knowledge Assessed (CPDT-KA) and Certified Dog Behavior Consultants (CDBC). She founded Faithfully Yours Dog Training, LLC in 2014 to help dog owners live stress-free lives with their faithful companions after adopting a project dog of her own. Through her business she provides training and behavioral consultations for a variety of animal species both in-person on her beautiful 11-acre farm in Mississippi and virtually to anyone in the world.Lauren has an Associate of Arts with a concentration in Psychology and a Bachelor of Science in Psychology. She is currently completing her Master's degree in Agricultural and Life Sciences with a concentration in Applied Animal Behavior and Welfare at Virginia Tech. Her research focuses on dog activity levels and animal shelter policy.Her expert opinion has been featured by Honest Kitchen, 4Knines, SuperTalk MS, WLBT/FOX40, and more. Additionally, Lauren is available to serve as an expert witness for dog bite and dog aggression legal cases.Links:Lauren's Thesis: The Great Outdoors: Fenced Yards and Their Impact on Companion Dog Activity and Adoption Faithfully Yours Dog Training, LLCFaithfully Yours Dog Training FacebookApplied Animal Behavior and Welfare Program at Virginia Tech

KFMA Podcast
Agricultural Land Value Trends with Robin Reid

KFMA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 25:20


Robin Reid joins us on the KFMA podcast to discuss recent trends in agricultural land values. Robin is an Extension Ag Economist with K-State and has spent much time devoted to research around agricultural land values, historical trends, and much more.  Associated Links: https://agmanager.info/land-leasing/land-buying-valuing/kansas-land-values-book-2021 https://agmanager.info/land-leasing/land-buying-valuing https://agmanager.info/farm-management/land-rental-rates/local-land-lease-information https://agmanager.info/farm-management/land-buying-valuing/land-use-value-research  

Where We Live
How Connecticut helps keep the history of agricultural fairs alive

Where We Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 49:00


Agricultural fairs or "country fairs" originated in New England, according to the International Association of Fairs & Expositions. The idea was "initiated" by Elkanah Watson in 1811. IAFE explains that Watson, a "New England patriot and farmer," organized the Berkshire Agricultural Society and hosted a fair in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. "It was not a market, and was more than just an exhibit of animals." Prizes of up to $70 were awards for "the best exhibits of oxen, cattle, swine and sheep." This hour, we hear how those traditions are carried on in Connecticut. 1 of 4Marla Calico2 of 4"Famous" fritters can be found at the Southington Apple Harvest Festival.John Atashian3 of 4Garlic & Harvest Festival-goers grab garlic-infused bites from hundreds of vendors.Connecticut Garlic & Harvest Festival4 of 4Tammi Worsham (right), chair of the Backyard Beekeeper Association's outreach committee, hosts a booth at the 3rd annual Honey Harvest Festival at the Bartlett Arboretum & Gardens. Plus, we'll preview three harvest festivals in our state, including the Southington Apple Harvest Festival and the Garlic & Harvest Festival in Bethlehem. For a full list of this year's agricultural fairs in Connecticut, click here. Beyond The Big E, here are the fairs and festivals coming up in our state: Harwinton Fair (Sept. 30-Oct. 2) Southington Apple Harvest Festival (Sept. 30-Oct. 2 and Oct. 7-9) South Windsor Apple Festival (Oct. 1) Portland Agricultural Fair (Oct. 7-9) Riverton Fair (Oct. 7-9) Garlic & Harvest Festival in Bethlehem (Oct. 8-9) Glastonbury Apple Harvest & Music Festival (Oct. 14-16) Mystic Apple Festival (Oct. 22-23) GUESTS: Marla Calico: President & CEO, International Association of Fairs & Expositions David Lapreay: Event Coordinator, Southington Apple Harvest Festival; Director of Recreation, Youth & Senior Services, Town of Southington Paul Travaglino: Co-Chair, Honey Harvest Festival; Advisory Committee Member, Bartlett Arboretum Dave Harkness: Co-Founder and Event Coordinator, Connecticut Garlic & Harvest Festival in Bethlehem Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

AgriTalk PM
AgriTalk-September 30, 2022 PM

AgriTalk PM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 40:57


Ben Brown is a Sr. Research Associate, Agricultural and Applied Economics department at the University of Missouri and he joins us to dissect the Quarterly Grain Stocks Report released today.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Italian Wine Podcast
Ep. 1106 Sara La Cagnina Question | #everybodyneedsabitofscienza

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 8:49


Welcome to Episode 1106, where the professore takes questions from the wine community and answers them in his inimitable way! These shows are generally in the Italian language. Today's question comes from our very own Sara La Cagnina! If you want to learn more about the Professore: The one who checks all the facts and regulates when we mistakenly type "Verdicchio" in place of "Vermentino.” Attilio Scienza is a full professor at the University of Milan in the Department of Agricultural and Food Sciences where he teaches courses on genetic improvements to the vine; he also teaches Viticulture in the Master's program of the University of Turin in Asti. He has been the lead for many national research projects in the field of physiology, agricultural techniques, and vine genetics. As the author of over 350 publications on vine and viticulture in national and international journals, you can bet he knows his stuff! To find out more about Attilio Scienza visit: vinitalyinternational.com/wordpress/via-faqs/ winenews.it/en/an-italian-profe…l-be-one-of_307764/ If you want to learn more about Stevie Kim, the Scienza wrangler: Stevie hosts Clubhouse sessions each week (visit Italian Wine Club & Wine Business on Clubhouse), these recorded sessions are then released on the podcast to immortalize them! She often also joins Professor Scienza in his shows to lend a hand keeping our Professor in check! You can also find her taking a hit for the team when she goes “On the Road”, all over the Italian countryside, visiting wineries and interviewing producers, enjoying their best food and wine – all in the name of bringing us great Pods! To find out more about Stevie Kim visit: Facebook: @steviekim222 Instagram: @steviekim222 Website: vinitalyinternational.com/wordpress/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, Cin Cin!

Off-Farm Income
OFI 1502: Pake McNally | Agricultural Artwork | Creative Income | Re-Cap Episode

Off-Farm Income

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 42:57


On today's re-cap episode we are going way back into the archives, all the way to episode #18.  I am going to replay an interview I did with Pake McNally over seven years ago when he had just taken over a blacksmith shop and was building that business with aspirations of having his own cattle herd.  On tomorrow's ag business episode I am having him back on the show to catch up, see what's changed and get a glimpse into what his life looks like now.  I thought letting you hear the "before interview" would help prepare you for the "after interview. The original show notes are below. If you are interested in this business don't forget your safety glasses! KEY IDEAS: ADVICE FROM PAKE MCNALLY: READ YOUR ART: In Pake's free time he finds magazines to read that inspire his artistic ideas.  He looks at car magazines and other things that give him ideas.  He and Nevada Miller both do the same thing to give them ideas, they look at magazines and journals about their interests and receive inspiration. PRACTICE: When Pake is not looking for inspiration in reading materials, he is tinkering and experimenting with cheap or free materials that he has found and can afford to practice with. MAKE MISTAKES: Pake tells you not to be afraid to make mistakes.  The only way to get better is to "fail forward."  Experiment, make mistakes and learn from them. EDUCATE YOURSELF: Don't ever stop learning.  Pake is always reading, experimenting and doing whatever he can to keep learning. STAY HUNGRY: Do not allow yourself to become complacent.  Pursue something that interests you, and if that interest fades find something else that interests you. PAKE MCNALLY'S PERSONAL HABIT THAT IS CONTRIBUTING TO HIS SUCCESS: TINKER, EXPERIMENT AND SEEK KNOWLEDGE: When Pake gets home from the shop in the evening it is automatic for him to pick up experimental materials, a magazine or a Youtube video that is going to help him grown in his craft. BEST BUSINESS ADVICE THAT PAKE MCNALLY HAS RECEIVED: SAY NO: Of course you want to say "yes" at some point.  That day is coming.  But one thing that is consistent across all genres of entrepreneurs is the inability or at least struggle with saying "no". Pake was reminded early by Tom Smith, a blacksmith and mentor to Pake, that he would have to be able to say "no."  If Pake says yes to everything the quality of his work will suffer, both because he would not have time to do his best work and because he would take projects that do not interest him. BOOK RECOMMENDATION: More Places You Can Listen to Off-Farm Income And Matt Brechwald:        

Ann Delisi's Essential Cooking
Accessing Michigan's Agricultural Diversity With Abby Olitzky

Ann Delisi's Essential Cooking

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 33:04


Ann Delisi and Chef James Rigato talk with Abby Olitzky, operator of Spencer, a wine shop and restaurant in Ann Arbor. discussing engaging with the farming communities in Michigan, sourcing fresh produce year-round and more.

FlowNews24
Peter Gooday Assistant Secretary at @ABARES on Rising Farm Debt - and land prices - but a small few holding almost half the debt

FlowNews24

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 6:08


The Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES) latest report on farm debt shows it is tracking upwards with farmer confidence with positive growing conditions - but the data relates largely to a period before the Reserve Bank of Australia started increasing the cash rate and, thereby, interest rates to contain inflation. Read the report here: https://www.agriculture.gov.au/abares/research-topics/surveys/farm-debt

Beat the Often Path
Ep. 105 - Dr. Klein Ileleji: Solar Dehydrating Made Easy

Beat the Often Path

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 48:41


Dr. Klein Ileleji is the CEO of JUA Technologies International, and he has dedicated his life to agriculture and engineering. Discover how his curiosity led him down multiple career paths, ultimately leading him on a journey from his home in Nigeria around the world. He is a professor of Agricultural and Biological Engineering at Purdue University and the co-founder of JUA Technologies, a company that makes solar-powered food dryers for small farmers in the developing world. He distilled his decades of experience into a meaningful product to combat food insecurity, and he has my deep admiration for that.  ➡️ Watch this episode on YouTube ➡️ Episode Highlights: beattheoftenpath.com ➡️ https://juatechnology.com

The Top Story
Developing countries benefit from China's agricultural technologies

The Top Story

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 7:15


China's agricultural technology and smart devices are helping farmers in many Asian countries. China has also redoubled efforts to expand agricultural cooperation with African countries.

The Business of Agriculture Podcast
260 - Finding Fairness In Farm Transition

The Business of Agriculture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 40:45


You've likely heard the horror stories about unhealthy Agricultural family business succession. Dysfunctional relationships, favoritism, squandered wealth, sibling rivalry — Elaine Froese, the Farm Family Coach, has seen it all. The sad part: it's all preventable. Elaine joins me to discuss strategies to successful business succession. She shares valuable information and tips on how to run a family operation like the business it is. Sponsored by Pattern Ag pattern.ag

Tipp FM Radio
Ag Report With Jim Finn 24/Sep

Tipp FM Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 46:24


Ag Report with Jim Finn on the latest news and views from the Agricultural world. Tune on Saturday from 9 am.

Agrifood Brief
Agrifood Podcast: Von der Leyen's pony, organic awards, Ukrainian bread

Agrifood Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 25:54


This week, EURACTIV's agrifood team discusses the agenda of the EU agriculture ministers' meeting in Brussels, including industrial emissions and carnivores - and what this has to do with Ursula von der Leyen's pony. Yaroslave Bukhta also reports from on the ground at the EU's newly introduced organic awards, and our flavour of the week is a very special traditional Ukrainian bread called korovai. 

Redeemer Broadcasting : A Plain Answer
A Plain Answer: The New Anti-Agricultural Movement - Dr. E. Calvin Beisner

Redeemer Broadcasting : A Plain Answer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 27:49


Srijan Foundation Talks
Vrikshayurveda - Indian Natural Agricultural System | Ravi Singh Chaudhary SrijanTalks

Srijan Foundation Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 62:49


Vrikshayurveda - Indian Natural Agricultural System | Ravi Singh Chaudhary SrijanTalks

The Health Ranger Report
Investigative journalist Karl Grossman reveals the secrets of Plum Island and the USDA's agricultural bioweapons research

The Health Ranger Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 71:28 Very Popular


For more updates, visit: http://www.brighteon.com/channel/hrreport NaturalNews videos would not be possible without you, as always we remain passionately dedicated to our mission of educating people all over the world on the subject of natural healing remedies and personal liberty (food freedom, medical freedom, the freedom of speech, etc.). Together, we're helping create a better world, with more honest food labeling, reduced chemical contamination, the avoidance of toxic heavy metals and vastly increased scientific transparency. ▶️ Every dollar you spend at the Health Ranger Store goes toward helping us achieve important science and content goals for humanity: https://www.healthrangerstore.com/ ▶️ Sign Up For Our Newsletter: https://www.naturalnews.com/Readerregistration.html ▶️ Brighteon: https://www.brighteon.com/channels/hrreport ▶️ Join Our Social Network: https://brighteon.social/@HealthRanger ▶️ Check In Stock Products at: https://PrepWithMike.com

Italian Wine Podcast
Ep. 1098 Scienza In The Mensa Hamburgers | #everybodyneedsabitofscienza

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 18:20


Welcome to Episode 1098, a special #everybodyneedsabitofscienza! This is one of several episodes we like to sporadically add to the lineup. “Scienza in the Mensa” Today Stevie, the Professore and Pizza Burger boy (Mattia Rizzi) will be doing a wine pairing with McDonalds! If you want to learn more about the Professore: The one who checks all the facts and regulates when we mistakenly type "Verdicchio" in place of "Vermentino.” Attilio Scienza is a full professor at the University of Milan in the Department of Agricultural and Food Sciences where he teaches courses on genetic improvements to the vine; he also teaches Viticulture in the Master's program of the University of Turin in Asti. He has been the lead for many national research projects in the field of physiology, agricultural techniques, and vine genetics. As the author of over 350 publications on vine and viticulture in national and international journals, you can bet he knows his stuff! To find out more about Attilio Scienza visit: vinitalyinternational.com/wordpress/via-faqs/ winenews.it/en/an-italian-profe…l-be-one-of_307764/ If you want to learn more about Stevie Kim, the Scienza wrangler: Stevie hosts Clubhouse sessions each week (visit Italian Wine Club & Wine Business on Clubhouse), these recorded sessions are then released on the podcast to immortalize them! She often also joins Professor Scienza in his shows to lend a hand keeping our Professor in check! You can also find her taking a hit for the team when she goes “On the Road”, all over the Italian countryside, visiting wineries and interviewing producers, enjoying their best food and wine – all in the name of bringing us great Pods! To find out more about Stevie Kim visit: Facebook: @steviekim222 Instagram: @steviekim222 Website: vinitalyinternational.com/wordpress/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, Cin Cin!

FlowNews24
Sean Hickey, agricultural analyst from @ProFarmer_Aus on the latest in #Australia #grains and #canola markets| @RuralBank

FlowNews24

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 5:22


Sean from Pro Farmer Australia (www.profarmergrain.com.au) updates FlowFM listeners for Friday's Country Viewpoint program on the latest developments for grain and canola growers in domestic and international markets

Shaye Ganam
Inflation and food cost

Shaye Ganam

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 3:47


Dr. Michael von Massow, associate professor, the Department of Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of Guelph 

Surviving Hard Times
Diving Deep Into Horticulture: Optimizing Controlled Agricultural Environments To Improve Plant Production

Surviving Hard Times

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 42:59


Joining us today to discuss his horticultural work is Daniel Wells. Daniel is an Associate Professor in Auburn University's Department of Horticulture where he teaches and focuses his research on “improving controlled environment agriculture in the southeast.”   Daniel grew up on an agricultural research station, where he was exposed to this field at a young age. Since then, he has been delving into the world of hydroponics, aquaponics, and plant nutrition with a hunger to learn more…  In this episode, Daniel discusses: The research projects he has been working on. The unique environmental challenges that the southeast United States has when it comes to horticulture. The difference between hydroponics and soil-grown farming techniques. What contributes to the nutritional value of plant produce.   The intricacies that exist within the field of horticulture certainly inform our food production methods as we know them. So how can we ensure that we are able to continue growing crops efficiently and sustainably? Tune in now to find out! Want to find out more about Daniel and his research efforts? Visit agriculture.auburn.edu now! Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/3bO8R6q

Over The Farm Gate
Agricultural shows: Do they have a future?

Over The Farm Gate

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 50:29


In this week's episode of Over The Farmgate, we are looking at agricultural shows. After two pandemic years, some smaller shows have folded, and others are in a precarious financial position. Those which remain have the daunting task of having to appeal to their traditional rural audience and an urban population, increasingly disconnected from farming. We explore what the future for shows is in the modern world.

Idaho Reports
Episode: Ready for Dairy Research with Mark McGuire

Idaho Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 11:38


On Tuesday morning, the Idaho State Board of Land Commissioners approved $6 million for a Minidoka County property and $17.2 million for construction costs for the University of Idaho's Center for Agriculture, Food and the Environment. The planned facility would be the largest research dairy in the United States. Mark McGuire, Director of the Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station & Associate Dean of Research at the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, joins the podcast this week to discuss the landmark step in the decades-long CAFE project.

Highlights from The Hard Shoulder
Agricultural innovations for the environment at the Ploughing Championships

Highlights from The Hard Shoulder

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 10:48


Many listeners are taking steps to reduce their carbon footprints, whether it's recycling more at home or purchasing an electric car. We have been told in the Programme for Government that Ireland is committed to halving greenhouse gasses by 2030, and reaching net zero by 2050, at the latest. One sector that tends to have the finger pointed at them for attributing to the climate crisis is agriculture. We sent our reporter Josh Crosbie to the National Ploughing Championships to see what solutions are being developed.

The Conversation
The Conversation: Hawaiʻi Agricultural Conference resumes; UH play examines being Asian in 2022

The Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 50:51


Hawaiʻi Foodservice Alliance talks food insecurities, upcoming Ag conference; HPR reporter Kuʻuwehi Hiraishi breaks down the impact of Hawaiian language influencers on social media; Manu Minute features the song - or is it the cackle? - of the Erckel's francolin; and the director of UH's new theatre production discusses what it means to be Asian in 2022

Agricultural Law Podcast
223. Bayer's Roundup Victories; Stay of Dicamba Litigation Challenged; and Mistrial Declared in Blue Bell CEOs Trial

Agricultural Law Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 19:26


Bayer wins a fifth consecutive state court roundup products liability trial, the legal challenge to the EPA's 2020 5-year dicamba registration approval may finally move ahead, and the criminal trial of Blue Bell ice cream's former CEO ends in a mistrial. Hosted by Ethan Durand, Research Assistant—With Brook Duer, Staff Attorney—Produced & Written by Ethan Durand Penn State Center for Agricultural and Shale Law https://aglaw.psu.edu/ Follow us on Twitter: @AgShaleLaw Like us on Facebook: Penn State Center for Agricultural and Shale Law This material is based upon work supported by the National Agricultural Library, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. 

Australia Wide
"I cannot see how we in Australia can use electricity to run our agricultural sector" – Is the switch to electric vehicles a long way off for farming?

Australia Wide

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 30:00


Machinery dealers in Western Australia are raising concerns that switching to electric vehicles on the land will prove unworkable in remote and regional areas.

Audio Mises Wire
The Enclosure Movement and the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions

Audio Mises Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022


While historians paint the enclosure movement in negative terms, it actually played an important role in developing agricultural entrepreneurship. Original Article: "The Enclosure Movement and the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon.

Mises Media
The Enclosure Movement and the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022


While historians paint the enclosure movement in negative terms, it actually played an important role in developing agricultural entrepreneurship. Original Article: "The Enclosure Movement and the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions" This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon.

Jannah Firdaus Mediapro Podcast
ASMR Spiritual Healing Sound of Subak Traditional Agricultural Irrigation Water System From Bali Island Podcast Edition

Jannah Firdaus Mediapro Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 13:57


Subak is the water management (irrigation) system for the paddy fields on Bali island, Indonesia. It was developed in the 9th century. For the Balinese, irrigation is not simply providing water for the plant's roots, but water is used to construct a complex, pulsed artificial ecosystem. The system consists of five terraced rice fields and water temples covering nearly 20,000 hectares (49,000 acres). The temples are the main focus of this cooperative water management, known as subak. Subak is a traditional ecologically sustainable irrigation system that binds Balinese agrarian society together within the village's Bale Banjar community center and Balinese temples. The water management is under the authority of the priests in water temples, who practice Tri Hita Karana Philosophy, a self-described relationship between The Humans, The Earth and The Creator. Tri Hita Karana draws together the realm of spirit, the human world and nature. The overall subak system exemplifies this philosophical principle. Water temple rituals promote a harmonious relationship between people and their environment through the active engagement of people with ritual concepts that emphasize dependence on the life-sustaining forces of the natural world. Rice is seen as gift from The Creator of Universe, and the subak system is part of temple culture. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jannahfirdausmediapro/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jannahfirdausmediapro/support

The Mbali Nwoko Podcast
EP 37 I Liza Bohlmann: Agricultural Writers South Africa

The Mbali Nwoko Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 36:15


In conversation with Liza Bohlmann - Chairperson and North Regional  Representative for Agri Writers SA. Agricultural Writers SA is a voluntary, non-profit association promoting the image and standards of agricultural journalism in South Africa.Visit: https://www.agriculturalwriterssa.co.za/Please rate and review this episode, and subscribe to the podcast.

Finding Genius Podcast
Diving Deep Into Horticulture: Optimizing Controlled Agricultural Environments To Improve Plant Production

Finding Genius Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 44:07


Joining us today to discuss his horticultural work is Daniel Wells. Daniel is an Associate Professor in Auburn University's Department of Horticulture where he teaches and focuses his research on “improving controlled environment agriculture in the southeast.”   Daniel grew up on an agricultural research station, where he was exposed to this field at a young age. Since then, he has been delving into the world of hydroponics, aquaponics, and plant nutrition with a hunger to learn more…  Offer: Increased stress is linked with teeth grinding and clenching, which causes poor sleep, jaw pain and headaches. But did you know that 1 in every 4 adults grind or clench their teeth while sleeping? A Remi Custom Night Guard can protect your teeth from grinding and clenching while saving you hundreds of dollars compared to the dental office. Use code GUARD20 for 20% off your order. Visit ShopRemi.com now. In this episode, Daniel discusses: The research projects he has been working on. The unique environmental challenges that the southeast United States has when it comes to horticulture. The difference between hydroponics and soil-grown farming techniques. What contributes to the nutritional value of plant produce. The intricacies that exist within the field of horticulture certainly inform our food production methods as we know them. So how can we ensure that we are able to continue growing crops efficiently and sustainably? Tune in now to find out! Want to find out more about Daniel and his research efforts? Visit agriculture.auburn.edu now! Episode also available on Apple Podcast: http://apple.co/30PvU9C

The Regenerative Agroforestry Podcast
#45 Rethinking the agricultural status-quo by mimicking natural ecosystems with Mark Shepard

The Regenerative Agroforestry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 93:46


Mark Shepard is the founder of the Restoration Agriculture farming method and New Forest Farm, where Mark grows food in perennial polycultures, without using external fertilisers, with very limited management activities, whilst integrating animals. In this episode, Mark shares with us the results he has achieved by actively engaging with tree crop breeding on his farm - one of the foundations of his system. Mark is also the author of two books: ‘Restoration Agriculture: Real World Permaculture for Farmers' and ‘Water for Any Farm'. He is also the founder of Restoration Agriculture Development, an enterprises that catalyses Restoration Agriculture projects worldwide. We hope you enjoy the interview! TABLE OF CONTENTS02:15 How did you get to agroforestry? 10:44 What is restoration agriculture? 19:33 Low inputs and precocity of yield 31:29 Description of New Forest Farm40:10 How do you harvest? 45:42 Managing the system49:20 Biodiversity on the farm57:22 Process of plant selection01:02:40 Starting a nursery 01:07:28 Why haven't more people replicated your system? 01:12:00 Which cultivars to include in mass selection? 01:21:19 What is the key knowledge required to get started? • RESOURCEShttp://www.restorationag.com/https://restoringagriculture.com/https://www.forestag.com/https://newforestfarm.us/https://www.instagram.com/restoration.ag/?hl=enhttps://www.facebook.com/restorationagriculture/• GET IN TOUCH www.regenerativeagroforestry.org• SUPPORT US www.gumroad.com/regenagroforestry• FOLLOW US on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Instagram• FUNDING FOR EUROPEAN PROJECTS https://explore.ecosia.org/regenerative-agriculture Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Italian Wine Podcast
Ep. 1090 Scienza In The Mensa; Leonardo's Vineyard | #everybodyneedsabitofscienza

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 13:48


Welcome to Episode 1090, a special #everybodyneedsabitofscienza! This is one of several episodes we like to sporadically add to the lineup. “Scienza in the Mensa” Today Stevie will be chatting to the Professore about Leonardo Da Vinci's vines over some delicious pizza choices and some wines to wash it down! If you want to learn more about the Professore: The one who checks all the facts and regulates when we mistakenly type "Verdicchio" in place of "Vermentino.” Attilio Scienza is a full professor at the University of Milan in the Department of Agricultural and Food Sciences where he teaches courses on genetic improvements to the vine; he also teaches Viticulture in the Master's program of the University of Turin in Asti. He has been the lead for many national research projects in the field of physiology, agricultural techniques, and vine genetics. As the author of over 350 publications on vine and viticulture in national and international journals, you can bet he knows his stuff! To find out more about Attilio Scienza visit: vinitalyinternational.com/wordpress/via-faqs/ winenews.it/en/an-italian-profe…l-be-one-of_307764/ If you want to learn more about Stevie Kim, the Scienza wrangler: Stevie hosts Clubhouse sessions each week (visit Italian Wine Club & Wine Business on Clubhouse), these recorded sessions are then released on the podcast to immortalize them! She often also joins Professor Scienza in his shows to lend a hand keeping our Professor in check! You can also find her taking a hit for the team when she goes “On the Road”, all over the Italian countryside, visiting wineries and interviewing producers, enjoying their best food and wine – all in the name of bringing us great Pods! To find out more about Stevie Kim visit: Facebook: @steviekim222 Instagram: @steviekim222 Website: vinitalyinternational.com/wordpress/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, Cin Cin!

The John Batchelor Show
#France: The rich, agricultural Aquitaine and the price of electricity. Simon Constable, WSJ.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 11:40


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow #France: The rich, agricultural Aquitaine and the price of electricity. Simon Constable, WSJ. https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/energy/how-electricity-gets-priced-in-europe-and-how-that-may-change/2022/09/07/ecec5788-2ebf-11ed-bcc6-0874b26ae296_story.html

Climbing with Coach Kiah
61. Navigating the Pivot with Natalie & Tara

Climbing with Coach Kiah

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 48:25


In this episode, I'm welcoming two guests onto the show at once! Natalie Kovarik and Tara Vander Dussen are on the show today to chat about navigating the pivot in life and business.   Natalie and Tara launched Elevate Ag (the online course, podcast, and summit) to serve Agricultural producers and rural entrepreneurs by teaching them how to successfully share and monetize their Ag stories online. Along with running Elevate, they each have their own online platforms that they use to individually share their farm and ranch stories to advocate for the Ag industry.   In this episode, we'll chat about: Challenges and opportunities that come with advocating for Agriculture  How change is hard but when you lean into your gut and trust your intuition, it can be hard and right all at the same time The importance of checking in with ourselves to make sure we're still in alignment and on the right path Tips on being content even as enneagram 3s/achievers and separating our worth from our work    Resources & Links:  Check out the Elevate Ag website Connect with Natalie, Tara, and Elevate Ag on Instagram Join the Women's Retreat waitlist! Shop Spark*l Bands (Use Code Kiah10 for 10% off) SparklBands - Luxury Hand Crafted Bands for your Apple Watch – Spark*l [affiliate link] Start a Squarespace site today! [affiliate link] Sign up for my email newsletter! FREE Habit Tracker Check out the Backroad Cowgirls site! Shop the Coach Kiah Store. Use code climb10 for 10% off your first purchase! Let's hang out on social media and keep the conversation going! Connect with me on Instagram and Facebook. The Climbing with Coach Kiah podcast is produced by Jill Carr Podcasting Some of the links mentioned are affiliate links, which help to support this podcast at no additional cost to you.   Find the complete show notes here: https://www.coachkiah.com/blog/navigating-the-pivot-with-natalie-and-tara

Baa's and Bleat's - The AASRP Podcast
Using Drugs in Dairy Goats

Baa's and Bleat's - The AASRP Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 60:20 Very Popular


*We want to hear from you! Send an email to DairyGoatExtension@iastate.edu and let us know where you are listening from, how you are involved with the dairy community, and if you have any questions that you'd like our experts to answer in a future episode!*Today we are talking with Dr. Virginia Fajt -- a boarded veterinary clinical pharmacologist from Texas A&M University -- about the in's and out's of how to use pharmaceuticals appropriately in dairy goats.Topics discussed include: Appropriate drug selection for a small ruminant; withdrawal times, how they are determined and where to find them; what is FARAD and what do they do; accidental inappropriate drug or chemical exposure protocols; how meat and milk processing facilities prevent accidental drug residues from reaching consumers; safeguards for preventing treated animals/milk from leaving the farm.Helpful Links:AASRP Guidance for Antimicrobial Stewardshiphttp://www.aasrp.org/resources/AASRPantimicrobial3F.pdfDatabases for searching for approved drugs:https://animaldrugsatfda.fda.gov/adafda/views/#/searchhttps://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/ Federal regulations about extralabel drug use:https://www.ecfr.gov/current/title-21/chapter-I/subchapter-E/part-530?toc=1 FDA resource for veterinarians about extralabel drug use:https://www.fda.gov/animal-veterinary/resources-you/ins-and-outs-extra-label-drug-use-animals-resource-veterinarians Food Animal Residue Avoidance Databank for estimated withdrawal intervals for extralabel drug use:http://www.farad.org/ Details about how withdrawal times are established for approved drugs:https://www.fda.gov/regulatory-information/search-fda-guidance-documents/cvm-gfi-3-general-principles-evaluating-human-food-safety-new-animal-drugs-used-food-producing Compliance policy guide about using feed additives extra-label in minor species:https://www.fda.gov/regulatory-information/search-fda-guidance-documents/cpg-sec-615115-extralabel-use-medicated-feeds-minor-speciesThis podcast is sponsored by the American Association of Small Ruminant Practitioners as well as USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Agricultural and Food Research Initiative Competitive Program, Antimicrobial Resistance grant # 2020-04197.Questions or comments about today's episode can be directed to DairyGoatExtension@iastate.edu

The Huddle: Conversations with the Diabetes Care Team
Supporting the Unique Healthcare Needs of Agricultural Workers with Maria Bustamante & Megan Martinez

The Huddle: Conversations with the Diabetes Care Team

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 28:54


Maria Bustamante and Megan Martinez are involved in the diabetes care and prevention programs at the National Center for Farmworker Health (NCFH) and join us today to share some of the work they're doing to improve health outcomes for the vital workforce of agricultural workers. While the topic may sound niche at first, you are likely to recognize the challenges faced by agricultural workers in your own patent populations, especially if you are working within immigrant communities, in rural, agricultural settings, or with men with physically demanding jobs. You'll hear how Megan and Maria's teams developed resources to meet people with prediabetes or diabetes where they are—and we'll tell you how you can access these tools for your own practice! ResourcesDiabetes & U.S. Agricultural Workers Data: http://www.ncfh.org/diabetes-fact-sheet.htmlAg worker access campaign: http://www.ncfh.org/ag-worker-access.htmlNCFH Diabetes Resource Hub: http://www.ncfh.org/diabetesresourcehub.htmlJeopardy game: http://www.ncfh.org/uploads/3/8/6/8/38685499/jeopardy_guide-final_eng.pdfNCFH Diabetes Webinar Archive: http://www.ncfh.org/archived-webinars.html#diabetes_webinarsNCFH Health Information and Referral Hotline: http://www.ncfh.org/callforhealth.htmlTelehealth readiness worksheet: http://www.ncfh.org/uploads/3/8/6/8/38685499/final_patient_telehealth_readiness_tool_.pdfResource for being active for men who are already physically active: https://www.diabeteseducator.org/docs/default-source/living-with-diabetes/tip-sheets/aade7/adces-men-health-being-active-v1.pdfResource for reducing risks: https://www.diabeteseducator.org/docs/default-source/living-with-diabetes/tip-sheets/aade7/adces-reducing-risk-english-final.pdf?sfvrsn=84c39758_2ADCES resources in Spanish: www.DiabetesEducator.org/Spanish

IRMI Podcast
A Look at the High Complexity of Agricultural Food Processing Claims

IRMI Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 23:51


In this 23-minute podcast episode, Trent Gillette, McLarens US agriculture director, shares interesting stories about what can go wrong in a food processing plant. Properly handling these claims entails exact understanding of the risks and exposures of not just the processing plant but also the supply chain effects on farmers and ranchers with time-sensitive processing needs as well as all the downstream effects. Learn how knowledge specialization impacts a successful claim resolution and what you can do to minimize the risks in this sector. Be sure to check out the other agribusiness resources that IRMI has to offer! 

The Animal Behavior Podcast
S2E9 Andy Sih on Animal Personality, Behavioral Skill, and 'Big Picture' Thinking

The Animal Behavior Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 38:43


In this episode, Amy speaks with guest Andy Sih, a Distinguished ​​Professor in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy within the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at UC Davis.They open by discussing the concept of animal personalities (a.k.a 'behavioral syndromes' or 'consistent individual differences in behavior'). Then, they chat about fear generalization in animals, and they discuss how and why human-induced rapid environmental change threatens some species more than others. After the break, they discuss international collaboration, integrative approaches to behavioral questions, and the value of 'big picture' thinking.This week's Two-Minute Takeaway comes from Jason Dinh  (@jasonpdinh), a PhD Candidate at Duke University. He uses physiology and physics to understand how sexually selected signals are used and perceived, exploring proximate mechanisms through an evolutionary lens. Learn more about Jason's work here.Papers relevant to today's show:1. Behavioral syndromes: an ecological and evolutionary overview 2004 Trends in Ecology & Evolution2. On the importance of individual differences in behavioural skill 2019 Animal Behaviour3. Integrating social networks, animal personalities, movement ecology and parasites: a framework with examples from a lizard 2018 Animal BehaviourCredits:The Animal Behavior Podcast is created by a team of animal behavior researchers and audio professionals. Come meet us here! We receive production support from the Cornell Broadcast studio directed by Bert Odom-Reed, and financial support from the Animal Behavior Society.

GES Center Lectures, NC State University
#1 – AgBioFEWS Fellows - Loss and Resiliency: Agricultural Complexity in Eastern NC

GES Center Lectures, NC State University

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 59:38


Loss and Resiliency: Exploring Agricultural Complexity in Eastern North Carolina AgBioFEWS Cohort 3 Website | Twitter #AgBioFEWS Focusing on environmental pressures and changing social dynamics within agriculture, the 2022 AgBioFEWS Fellows reflect on their immersive summer field experience with farming communities in eastern North Carolina. Abstract North Carolina's geographical and biological diversity present crop-growers with both exciting opportunities and immense challenges. Following an immersive field experience in NC's Central and Northern Coastal Plains, AgBioFEWS Cohort 3 will provide a first-hand account of these complexities, giving close attention to recurring themes of loss and resilience. The discussion begins with farmers' perspectives on environmental pressures, including climate change, salt intrusion, insect resistance, and the adoption of emerging biotechnologies. Secondly, it will consider the changing social dynamics within farming communities, including issues surrounding land acquisition, market constraints, trusted expertise, farmer-to-farmer relationships, and labor concerns. Taken together, these reflections demonstrate how, in the face of constant change to both the environment and their communities, NC farmers demonstrate resilience and adaptability worthy of deeper consideration. Speakers AgBioFEWS Fellows are Ph.D. candidates across multidisciplinary fields of study collaboratively examining the science, policy, and public engagement aspects and impacts of Agricultural Biotechnology on Food, Energy, and Water. In addition to their primary graduate program, Fellows complete coursework toward a graduate minor in Genetic Engineering and Society and collaborate on an interdisciplinary cohort project. Cohort 3 includes: Modesta Abugu, Rebekah Brown, Asa Budnick, Eric Butoto, Greg Ferraro, Adelyn Flowers, Jill Furgurson, Katrina Geist, Chris Gillespie, Nick Loschin, Amanda Mainello, Nolan Speicher, and Ruthie Stokes. GES Colloquium is jointly taught by Drs. Jen Baltzegar and Dawn Rodriguez-Ward, who you may contact with any class-specific questions. Colloquium will be held in-person in Poe 202, as well as live-streamed via Zoom. Please subscribe to the GES newsletter and Twitter for updates . Genetic Engineering and Society Center GES Colloquium - Tuesdays 12-1PM (via Zoom) NC State University | http://go.ncsu.edu/ges-colloquium GES Mediasite - See videos, full abstracts, speaker bios, and slides https://go.ncsu.edu/ges-mediasite Twitter - https://twitter.com/GESCenterNCSU GES Center - Integrating scientific knowledge & diverse public values in shaping the futures of biotechnology. Find out more at https://ges-center-lectures-ncsu.pinecast.co

Italian Wine Podcast
Ep. 1079 Scienza In The Mensa, The Gen Z Question | #everybodyneedsabitofscienza

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 10:00


Welcome to Episode 1079, a special #everybodyneedsabitofscienza! This is one of several episodes we like to sporadically add to the lineup. “Scienza in the Mensa” Today Stevie will be chatting to the Professore and our Videographer Mattia Rizzi about wine and Generation Z over some delicious pizza choices and some wines to wash it down! If you want to learn more about the Professore: The one who checks all the facts and regulates when we mistakenly type "Verdicchio" in place of "Vermentino.” Attilio Scienza is a full professor at the University of Milan in the Department of Agricultural and Food Sciences where he teaches courses on genetic improvements to the vine; he also teaches Viticulture in the Master's program of the University of Turin in Asti. He has been the lead for many national research projects in the field of physiology, agricultural techniques, and vine genetics. As the author of over 350 publications on vine and viticulture in national and international journals, you can bet he knows his stuff! To find out more about Attilio Scienza visit: vinitalyinternational.com/wordpress/via-faqs/ winenews.it/en/an-italian-profe…l-be-one-of_307764/ If you want to learn more about Stevie Kim, the Scienza wrangler: Stevie hosts Clubhouse sessions each week (visit Italian Wine Club & Wine Business on Clubhouse), these recorded sessions are then released on the podcast to immortalize them! She often also joins Professor Scienza in his shows to lend a hand keeping our Professor in check! You can also find her taking a hit for the team when she goes “On the Road”, all over the Italian countryside, visiting wineries and interviewing producers, enjoying their best food and wine – all in the name of bringing us great Pods! To find out more about Stevie Kim visit: Facebook: @steviekim222 Instagram: @steviekim222 Website: vinitalyinternational.com/wordpress/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, Cin Cin!

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 09.08.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 61:49 Very Popular


Video: Scientist Carl Sagan testifying to the U.S. Senate in 1985 on the greenhouse effect: (2:00) WEF: The Most Evil Business in the World – Samuel Leeds (10:49) Israel caught hiding BOMBSHELL Pfizer   Frequent nut consumption associated with less inflammation Brigham and Women's Hospital, September 1, 2022 In a study of more than 5,000 people, investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital have found that greater intake of nuts was associated with lower levels of biomarkers of inflammation, a finding that may help explain the healthbenefits of nuts. The results of the study appear in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. “Population studies have consistently supported a protective role of nuts against cardiometabolic disorders such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, and we know that inflammation is a key process in the development of these diseases,” said corresponding author Ying Bao, MD, ScD, an epidemiologist in BWH's Channing Division of Network Medicine. “Our new work suggests that nuts may exert their beneficial effects in part by reducing systemic inflammation.” Previously Bao and her colleagues observed an association between increased nut consumption and reduced risk of major chronic diseases and even death, but few prospective cohort studies had examined the link between nut intake and inflammation. In the current study, the research team performed a cross-sectional analysis of data from the Nurses' Health Study, which includes more than 120,000 female registered nurses, and from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, which includes more than 50,000 male health professionals. The team assessed diet using questionnaires and looked at the levels of certain telltale proteins known as biomarkers in blood samples collected from the study participants. They measured three well-established biomarkers of inflammation: C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL6) and tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2). After adjusting for age, medical history, lifestyle and other variables, they found that participants who had consumed five or more servings of nuts per week had lower levels of CRP and IL6 than those who never or almost never ate nuts. In addition, people who substituted three servings per week of nuts in place of red meat, processed meat, eggs or refined grains had significantly lower levels of CRP and IL6. Peanuts and tree nuts contain a number of healthful components including magnesium, fiber, L-arginine, antioxidants and unsaturated fatty acids such as α-linolenic acid. Researchers have not yet determined which of these components, or if the combination of all of them, may offer protection against inflammation, but Bao and her colleagues are interested in exploring this further through clinical trials that would regulate and monitor diet. “Much remains unknown about how our diet influences inflammation and, in turn, our risk of disease,” said Bao. “But our study supports an overall healthful role for nuts in the diet and suggests reducing inflammation as a potential mechanism that may help explain the benefits of nuts on cardiometabolic diseases.” Blueberry extract could help fight gum disease and reduce antibiotic use Laval University (Quebec), September 2, 2022 Gum disease is a common condition among adults that occurs when bacteria form biofilms or plaques on teeth, and consequently the gums become inflamed. Some severe cases, called periodontitis, call for antibiotics. But now scientists have discovered that wild blueberry extract could help prevent dental plaque formation. Their report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry could lead to a new therapy for periodontitis and a reduced need for antibiotics. Many people have had some degree of gum inflammation, or gingivitis, caused by dental plaque. The gums get red and swollen, and they bleed easily. If left unchecked, the condition can progress to periodontitis. The plaque hardens into tartar, and the infection can spread below the gum line and destroy the tissue supporting the teeth. To treat this condition, dentists scrape off the tartar and sometimes have to resort to conventional antibiotics. But recently, researchers have started looking at natural antibacterial compounds to treat gum disease. Daniel Grenier and colleagues wanted to see if blueberry polyphenols, which work against foodborne pathogens, could also help fight Fusobacterium nucleatum, one of the main species of bacteria associated with periodontitis. In the lab, the researchers tested extracts from the wild lowbush blueberry, Vaccinium angustifolium Ait., against F. nucleatum. The polyphenol-rich extracts successfully inhibited the growth of F. nucleatum, as well as its ability to form biofilms. It also blocked a molecular pathway involved in inflammation, a key part of gum disease. The researchers say they're developing an oral device that could slowly release the extract after deep cleaning to help treat periodontitis. Meat consumption contributing to global obesity University of Adelaide, August 11, 2022 Should we be warning consumers about over-consumption of meat as well as sugar? That's the question being raised by a team of researchers from the University of Adelaide, who say meat in the modern diet offers surplus energy, and is contributing to the prevalence of global obesity. “Our findings are likely to be controversial because they suggest that meat contributes to obesity prevalence worldwide at the same extent as sugar,” says Professor Maciej Henneberg. “In the analysis of obesity prevalence across 170 countries, we have found that sugar availability in a nation explains 50% of obesity variation while meat availability another 50%. After correcting for differences in nations' wealth (Gross Domestic Product), calorie consumption, levels of urbanization and of physical inactivity, which are all major contributors to obesity, sugar availability remained an important factor, contributing independently 13%, while meat contributed another 13% to obesity. “While we believe it's important that the public should be alert to the over-consumption of sugar and some fats in their diets, based on our findings we believe meat protein in the human diet is also making a significant contribution to obesity,” Professor Henneberg says. “There is a dogma that fats and carbohydrates, especially fats, are the major factors contributing to obesity,” Mr You says. “Whether we like it or not, fats and carbohydrates in modern diets are supplying enough energy to meet our daily needs. Because meat protein is digested later than fats and carbohydrates, this makes the energy we receive from protein a surplus, which is then converted and stored as fat in the human body.” “Nevertheless, it is important that we show the contribution meat protein is making to obesity so that we can better understand what is happening. In the modern world in which we live, in order to curb obesity it may make sense for dietary guidelines to advise eating less meat, as well as eating less sugar,” he says. Study suggests possible link between artificial sweeteners and heart disease French National Institute for Health and Medical Research, September 7, 2022 A large study of French adults published by The BMJ today suggests a potential direct association between higher artificial sweetener consumption and increased cardiovascular disease risk, including heart attack and stroke. The findings indicate that these food additives, consumed daily by millions of people and present in thousands of foods and drinks, should not be considered a healthy and safe alternative to sugar, in line with the current position of several health agencies. Artificial sweeteners are widely used as no- or low-calorie alternatives to sugar. They represent a $7.2 billion (£5900m; €7000m) global market and are found in thousands of products worldwide, particularly ultra-processed foods such as artificially sweetened drinks, some snacks, and low calorie ready meals. Several studies have linked consumption of artificial sweeteners or artificially sweetened beverages (ASB) to weight gain, high blood pressure, and inflammation. To investigate this further, a team of researchers at the French National Institute for Health and Medical Research (Inserm) and colleagues drew on data for 103,388 participants (average age 42 years; 80% female) of the web-based NutriNet-Santé study, launched in France in 2009 to investigate relations between nutrition and health. Dietary intakes and consumption of artificial sweeteners were assessed by repeated 24-hour dietary records and a range of potentially influential health, lifestyle, and sociodemographic factors were taken into account. A total of 37% of participants consumed artificial sweeteners, with an average intake of 42.46 mg/day, which corresponds to approximately one individual packet of table top sweetener or 100 mL of diet soda. The researchers found that total artificial sweetener intake was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (absolute rate 346 per 100,000 person years in higher consumers and 314 per 100,000 person years in non-consumers). Artificial sweeteners were more particularly associated with cerebrovascular disease risk (absolute rates 195 and 150 per 100,000 person-years in higher and non-consumers, respectively). Aspartame intake was associated with increased risk of cerebrovascular events (186 and 151 per 100,000 person-years in higher and non-consumers, respectively), while acesulfame potassium and sucralose were associated with increased coronary heart disease risk (acesulfame potassium: 167 and 164 per 100,000 person-years; sucralose: 271 and 161 per 100,000 person-years in higher and non-consumers, respectively). Your soap and toothpaste could be messing with your microbiome University of Chicago, September 2, 2022 Antimicrobial chemicals found in common household products could be wreaking havoc with people's guts, according to a research paper out this week in the journal Science. Triclosan is an antibacterial compound used in soaps, detergent and toothpaste, as well as toys and plastics. It was originally only used in hospitals, but it found its way into homes as Americans became more germ-phobic. (However, recent studies have found it no more effective at killing bacteria than plain soap. ) Now, there are growing concerns about the possible negative effects of the chemical on human health and the environment. According to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), animal studies have shown that the chemical can act as a hormone disruptor. A 2008 study found traces of triclosan in the urine of 75% of the participants – some as young as six. The chemical has also been found in more than half of freshwater streams in the US. Disturbing the human microbiome has been “linked to a wide array of diseases and metabolic disorders, including obesity, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and behavioral and metabolic disorders,” wrote the paper's authors, Alyson L Yee and Jack A Gilbert. Yee and Gilbert also suggested that exposure to triclosan could be even more detrimental to the health of developing fetuses and newborns than to adults. A 2014 New York University study found that gut disruptions in early infancy could have lasting negative effects on immune and brain development. Triclosan could also be contributing to antibiotic resistance, which scientists believe is caused by the overuse of antimicrobials in humans and animals. There are partial bans of the chemical in the European Union and in Minnesota, and the FDA says it will continue reviewing the chemical for its safety. Exposure to phthalates could be linked to pregnancy loss Peking University, September 2, 2022 A new study of more than 300 women suggests that exposure to certain phthalates — substances commonly used in food packaging, personal-care and other everyday products — could be associated with miscarriage, mostly between 5 and 13 weeks of pregnancy. The research, appearing in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology, is the first epidemiological study on non-work-related exposure to phthalates to provide evidence for the possible link among a general population. Out of concern over the potential health effects of phthalates, the U.S. has banned six of these substances from use in certain products made for young children. But many are still included as ingredients in paints, medical tubes, vinyl flooring, soaps, shampoos and other items. Research on phthalates has shown that long-term exposure to low levels of some of these compounds harms lab animals' health and can increase their risk for pregnancy loss. Additionally, at least one study found that female factory workers exposed to high levels of phthalates through their work were at a higher risk for miscarriage. But there is little epidemiological evidence of phthalates' effects on pregnancy among women with non-occupational exposure. Jianying Hu, Huan Shen and colleagues wanted to find out if there might be a link. The researchers tested urine samples from 132 women who had miscarriages and 172 healthy pregnant women in China. They found pregnancy loss was associated with higher levels of urinary phthalate metabolites from diethyl phthalate (DEP), di-isobutyl phthalate (DiBP) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP). Although this doesn't prove that phthalates cause pregnancy loss, the study suggests an association exists that the researchers say should be studied further.

AJ Daily
9-8-22 CAB Insider: corn basis factors; AFBF supports advancement of Doug McKalip for chief agricultural negotiator; NCBA urges Senate committee to pass Livestock Regulatory Protection Act; drought recovery forage options

AJ Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 4:49 Transcription Available


9-8-22 AJ DailyCAB Insider: Corn Basis FactorsAdapted from an article by Paul Dykstra, Certified Angus Beef LLC AFBF Supports Advancement of Doug McKalip for Chief Agricultural Negotiator Adapted from a release by the American Farm Bureau Federation NCBA Urges Senate Committee to Pass Livestock Regulatory Protection Act Adapted from a release by the National Cattlemen's Beef Association Drought Recovery Forage Options Adapted from a release by the University of Missouri Extension Compiled by Paige Nelson, field editor, Angus Journal.  For more Angus news, visit angusjournal.net. 

Marketplace Morning Report
Vladimir Putin wants to limit agricultural exports from Ukraine

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 7:03


From the BBC World Service: Russia and the West have already faced off on energy supplies, now Putin alleges grain exports from Ukraine are not going to the world’s poorest countries. Plus, how India’s silicon valley has been pounded by the heaviest rains in decades with power cuts and worries of further disruptions.

Marketplace All-in-One
Vladimir Putin wants to limit agricultural exports from Ukraine

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 7:03


From the BBC World Service: Russia and the West have already faced off on energy supplies, now Putin alleges grain exports from Ukraine are not going to the world’s poorest countries. Plus, how India’s silicon valley has been pounded by the heaviest rains in decades with power cuts and worries of further disruptions.

Destination Marketing Podcast
213: An Immersive Agricultural Experience in Modesto, California with Todd Aaronson

Destination Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 36:10


This week on the Destination Marketing Podcast, Adam talks with Todd Aaronson, CEO at Visit Modesto. They discuss how agricultural tourism has been crucial in the rapid growth of Modesto as a destination, and how the annual Almond Blossom Cruise has brought in over 100,000 visitors in the off-season. They also talk about what Antonio Banderas and Catherine Zeta-Jones have to do with the area and how cannabis tourism has been a surprising addition to the destination experience. "By creating experiences around what the natural environment provides, we have been able to drive incredible tourism into the region." -Todd Aaronson Visit Modesto Destination Marketing Podcast Relic Agency The Destination Marketing Podcast is a part of the Destination Marketing Podcast Network. It is hosted by Adam Stoker and produced by Relic. If you are interested in any of Relic's services,  please email adam@relicagency.com or visit https://www.relicagency.com/ To learn more about the Destination Marketing Podcast network and to listen to our other shows, please visit https://thedmpn.com/. If you are interested in joining the network, please email adam@relicagency.com.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 09.01.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 56:58 Very Popular


Vax Whistleblower – Mary Hollen Anna Maria Mihalcea – D-Dimer elevation in the Unvaccinated. A Marker of Shedding? Why You Should Have Faith  Plandemic – Indoctrination    Green tea compound shows promise for treating rheumatoid arthritis Washington State University August 25, 2022 A compound found in green tea could be an effective treatment for rheumatoid arthritis, according to the results of a new study. Green tea being poured into a cup] EGCG – a compound found in green tea – could help treat rheumatoid arthritis, new research suggests. In the journal Arthritis and Rheumatology, researchers from Washington State University (WSU) in Spokane reveal how the compound – called epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) – reduced ankle swelling in a mouse model of the disease. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a disease that affects the joints of the body, most commonly the joints of the hands, feet, wrists, elbows knees and ankles. In RA, the immune system mistakingly attacks the synovial tissues surrounding the joints, causing inflammation, swelling and pain. This can cause damage to the cartilage and bone. Current treatments for RA include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), corticosteroids and JAK inhibitors. But study leader Salah-uddin Ahmed, of the WSU College of Pharmacy, notes that some of these treatments are expensive, reduce immune system activity and can be unsuitable for long-term use. In their study, Ahmed and colleagues suggest that the compound EGCG may be a promising alternative to current treatments for RA. EGCG targets key signaling protein to reduce RA inflammation EGCG is a chemical compound that belongs to a class of flavanols known as catechins. After giving EGCG to mouse models of RA for 10 days, the team noticed that treatment with the compound led to a significant reduction in ankle swelling. The researchers found that EGCG reduces the activity of TAK1 – a key signaling protein through which pro-inflammatory cytokines transmit their signals to trigger the inflammation and tissue damage found in RA. What is more, the team says that EGCG reduced inflammation in RA without interfering with other cellular functions – unlike some current medications for the disease. According to Ahmed, their study suggests the green tea compound may be highly effective against RA. Antioxidant-rich pomegranate juice may aid blood sugar management for diabetics: Human data Jordan University of Science and Technology, August 20, 2022 Daily consumption of pomegranate juice may help control blood sugar levels in type-2 diabetics, as well as improving the function of beta cells in the pancreas, say data from a human trial. Scientists from the Jordan University of Science and Technology report that pomegranate juice at a dose of 1.5 mL per kg of body weight (or 105 mL for a 70 kg human) was associated with reductions in fasting glucose levels in type-2 diabetics. “Studying the effects of pomegranate consumption (in a juice form) on the reduction of blood glucose levels in type-2 diabetes patients could lead to a dietary approach to control this disease,” they added. “Since there are many herbs and fruits that are easily available and of value in controlling this disease, this study may contribute to a better understanding and improved management of type 2 diabetes by the individual.” To investigate this, they recruited 85 people with type-2 diabetes and assigned them to receive 1.5 mL of the juice per kg of body weight. Blood sugar and insulin levels, and beta cell function were assessed three hours after ingestion. (Beta-cells are found in the pancreas and their primary function is to store and release insulin.) Results showed that pomegranate juice was associated with significantly lower fasting glucose levels (8.5 mmol/L) compared with the control participants (9.44 mmol/L). However, this result was an average for the whole cohort and about 20% of the participants did not experience this benefit. Going with the flow: Study shows canals and rivers help boost your mood King's College London, August 31, 2022 Researchers report that the combination of blue and green space with wildlife, has a greater impact on well-being than spending time in an environment that is characterized by only green space. The researchers used Urban Mind, a smartphone-based app, to collect thousands of real time audits about participants' location and mental well-being. Results from this first of its kind study showed positive associations between visits to canals and rivers and mental well-being, as well as a positive experience for feelings of safety and social inclusion relative to all other types of environments (such as indoors, or outside in an urban environment, or near green spaces). Andrea Mechelli, Professor of Early Intervention in Mental Health, King's College London, said, “Canals and rivers contain not only water but also an abundance of trees and plants, which means their capacity to improve mental well-being is likely to be due to the multiple benefits associated with both green and blue spaces. Canals and rivers also provide homes to a range of wildlife, and we know from other research that there is a positive association between encountering wildlife and mental well-being. Taken collectively, these findings provide an evidence base for what we thought about water and well-being and support the proposal that visits to canals and rivers could become part of social prescribing schemes, playing a role in supporting mental health.” The study found that visiting canals and rivers was associated with a greater improvement in mental well-being, and this relationship was still present when accounting for individual variation due to age, gender, education, ethnicity, and a diagnosis of a mental health condition. People also reported continued improvements in their mental well-being for up to 24 hours after the visit had taken place.”The powerful mix of blue, green and wildlife-rich space shows that although built for industry, repurposed canals are actually amongst our most important places of health and well-being in our towns and cities. Men, people over 65 sleep better when they have access to nature University of Illinois College of Agricultural, August 24, 2022 Men and persons age 65 and older who have access to natural surroundings, whether it's the green space of a nearby park or a sandy beach and an ocean view, report sleeping better, according to a new University of Illinois study published in Preventive Medicine. In the study, Grigsby-Toussaint worked with both U of I researchers and scientists from the New York University School of Medicine. The team used data from the CDC's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, which surveyed 255,171 representative U.S. adults, to learn whether there was an association between self-reported days of insufficient sleep and access to green space. The team also used a USDA index that scores the country's geographical areas for their natural amenities, using hours of sunlight, which is important in regulating a person's circadian rhythm, and temperature. In response to the survey question about sleep quality in the last month, the researchers found that the most common answer was that respondents had slept poorly for less than one week. “Interestingly, though, across the entire sample, individuals reporting 21 to 29 days of insufficient sleep consistently had lower odds of access to green space and natural amenities compared to those reporting less than one week,” she said. For men, the relationship between sleep and exposure to green space was much stronger than for women. And males and females 65 and over found nature to be a potent sleep aid, she added. Grigsby-Toussaint noted that living near green landscapes is associated with higher levels of physical activity and that exercise in turn predicts beneficial sleep patterns. But men appeared to benefit much more from their natural surroundings. The researcher speculated that women may take less advantage of nearby natural settings out of concern for their safety, but she added that more research is needed. New study links ultra-processed foods and colorectal cancer in men Tufts University and Harvard University, August 31 ,2022 For many Americans, the convenience of pre-cooked and instant meals may make it easy to overlook the less-than-ideal nutritional information, but a team led by researchers at Tufts University and Harvard University hope that will change after recently discovering a link between the high consumption of ultra-processed foods and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. In a study published in the BMJ, researchers found that men who consumed high rates of ultra-processed foods were at 29% higher risk for developing colorectal cancer—the third most diagnosed cancer in the United States—than men who consumed much smaller amounts. They did not find the same association in women. “We started out thinking that colorectal cancer could be the cancer most impacted by diet compared to other cancer types,” said Lu Wang, the study's lead author and a postdoctoral fellow at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts. “Processed meats, most of which fall into the category of ultra-processed foods, are a strong risk factor for colorectal cancer. Ultra-processed foods are also high in added sugars and low in fiber, which contribute to weight gain and obesity, and obesity is an established risk factor for colorectal cancer.” The study analyzed responses from over 200,000 participants—159,907 women and 46,341 men—across three large prospective studies which assessed dietary intakeand were conducted over more than 25 years. The analyses revealed differences in the ways that men and women consume ultra-processed foods and the prospective associated cancer risk. Out of the 206,000 participants followed for more than 25 years, the research team documented 1,294 cases of colorectal cancer among men, and 1,922 cases among women. The team found the strongest association between colorectal cancer and ultra-processed foods among men come from the meat, poultry, or fish-based, ready-to-eat products. “These products include some processed meats like sausages, bacon, ham, and fish cakes. This is consistent with our hypothesis,” Wang said. The team also found higher consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, like soda, fruit-based beverages, and sugary milk-based beverages, is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer in men. However, not all ultra-processed foods are equally harmful with regard to colorectal cancer risk. “We found an inverse association between ultra-processed dairy foods like yogurt and colorectal cancer risk among women,” said co-senior author Fang Fang Zhang, a cancer epidemiologist and interim chair of the Division of Nutrition Epidemiology and Data Science at the Friedman School. Overall, there was not a link between ultra-processed food consumption and colorectal cancer risk among women. It's possible that the composition of the ultra-processed foods consumed by women could be different than that from men. “Foods like yogurt can potentially counteract the harmful impacts of other types of ultra-processed foods in women,” Zhang said. 8 Benefits of Pine Bark Extract for Your Brain GreenMedInfo, August 31, 2022 Our brains can be harmed by many factors such as disease, stress from the environment, physical injuries or natural aging but pine bark extract may be one key to a healthier brain Pine bark extract (PE), trade name Pycnogenol (pronounced “pig-nah-gen-all”), has many beneficial properties such as being anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and neuroprotective. It can help with memory, cognition, inattention, hyperactivity, mood, thinking and various symptoms of brain injuries, aging and neurological diseases. Fights Inflammation and Protects the Brain In a systematic review and meta-analysis of Pycnogenol supplementation on C-reactive protein (CRP) — a marker of oxidative stress — researchers examined five trials including 324 participants. Pycnogenol supplementation had a significant effect in reducing CRP and demonstrated a strong anti-inflammatory effect.[i] In a study of gerbils, pine bark extract was administered at 100 milligrams (mg) per kilogram (kg) once a day for seven days before the brain was submitted to a brain ischemic injury. The PE treatment markedly inhibited the death of neurons in the brain, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines — interleukin 1β and tumor necrosis factor α — and showed a strong activation effect on anti-inflammatory cytokines of interleukin 4 (IL-4) and interleukin 13 (IL-13). Pine bark protected the brain and decreased inflammation.[ii] Improves Attention, Memory, Executive Functions and Mood in Healthy People In a study over eight weeks, Pycnogenol supplementation improved sustained attention, memory, executive functions and mood ratings in 53 healthy students compared to an equivalent control group.[iii] In a trial of 60 healthy professionals from 35 to 55 years old, half of the participants supplemented with Pycnogenol of 50 mg three times a day for 12 weeks in combination with a controlled health plan — regular sleep, balanced meals and daily exercise — and the other half followed only the health plan as the control group. PE significantly improved mood by 16%, mental performance by 9%, attention by 13% and memory by 4%, and reduced oxidative stress by 30%, outperforming all results of the control group.[iv] Prevents Brain Aging and Cognitive Decline Brain aging is a complex process involving changes in the brain's structure, neuron activity and biochemical profile that has been linked to age-associated variations in cognitive function. Increased oxidative stress may also be an important factor related to reduced cognition in older people. In a systematic review of over 100 research trials and animal studies, the antioxidant Pycnogenol significantly improved cognitive function after chronic administration.[v] Improves Cognition and Stress in the Mildly Impaired or Highly Oxidative Stressed Eighty-seven healthy subjects with mild cognitive impairment scores were included in a trial with one group given standard management (SM) and the other half given Pycnogenol supplements for two months. The median increase in mild impairment scores was 18% with Pycnogenol compared to 2.48% in the SM group, largely due to its effects on oxidative stress levels.[vi] In a study of 88 healthy patients ages 55 to 70 who had high oxidative stress, half were supplemented with 100 mg per day of Pycnogenol for 12 months and the other half were the control group followed as a reference point for a year. Those in the pine bark group had significantly improved cognitive function scores, attention and mental performance and lowered oxidative stress levels compared to those in the reference group.[vii] Increases Cognitive Function and Helps Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease Researchers studied 43 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients who had been diagnosed at least one year before the trial. The condition was considered “mild,” with minimal progression. The standard management (SM) for PD — carbidopa/levodopa — was used in a similar-sized reference group of PD subjects for comparison purposes. The trial subjects were supplemented with Pycnogenol of 150 mg per day along with SM for a period of four weeks. Cognitive function was significantly higher with the Pycnogenol group. Target symptoms including tremors, rigidity, bradykinesia — slow or impaired movements in limbs — and speech were improved in the PE group compared to the control group. Oxidative stress was also significantly lower in the pine bark group at four weeks.[viii] Enhances Memory and Prevents Harmful Plaque and Tau Buildup in Alzheimer's Disease In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the release of amyloid-beta (Aβ) is a marker. Aβ aggregates into oligomers, then plaques, which induce inflammatory responses, synapse loss and misfolding of tau, a second hallmark of AD. Accumulation of tau misfolding leads to tangles in the brain and neuron cell death impacting brain synapses in a pattern of progression closely related to cognitive decline, which can happen years before memory loss symptoms even appear.[ix] Pycnogenol significantly decreased the number of plaques in both pre-onset and post-onset treatment paradigms and improved spatial memory in the pre-onset treatment only in an AD-induced mouse model.[x] In an in vitro study of AD-induced animals, pine bark — Oligopin — prevented and halted the progression of AD preclinically by inhibiting oligomer formation of not only Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42, but also tau in vitro.[xi] Reduces Inflammation and Improves Outcomes for Traumatic Brain Injuries In a scientific trial of 67 traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU), the intervention group received 150 mg of the PE supplement Oligopin with enteral nutrition — tube feeding through stomach or intestine — for 10 days while the control group received a placebo.[xii] Pine bark supplementation significantly decreased inflammatory biomarkers of IL-6, IL-1β and CRP compared to the control group after 10 days. In addition, pine bark reduced clinical scores for acute physiology and chronic health evaluation as well as sequential organ failure. The Nutric score — a way to measure if a patient is under-nourished and at critical risk of dying[xiii] — was reduced compared to the control group as well. Overall, the survival rate was 15% higher in the pine bark group compared to the placebo group. PE supplementation for TBI patients in ICUs reduced inflammation, improved their clinical status and malnutrition score and, thereby, reduced their mortality rate. Improves Attention, Focus, Thinking, Behavior and Antioxidant Levels in ADHD Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impulsivity, distractibility and hyperactivity. One of the factors associated with ADHD is oxidative stress. Pycnogenol consists of bioflavonoids, catechins, procyanidins and phenolic acids.[xiv] Pycnogenol acts as a powerful antioxidant stimulating certain enzymes, like superoxide dismutase (SOD) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), which can defend against oxidative stress. In the pathophysiology of ADHD, damage to adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine metabolism occurs in the brain. These changes can modify attention, thinking and acting.[xv] In a trial of 43 children ages 6 to 14 with ADHD, patients were administered Pycnogenol — 1 mg per kg of body weight every day — or a placebo of look-alike pills daily for a month. The PE group had a significant decrease in GSSG and a highly significant increase in GSH levels as well as improvement of GSH/GSSG ratio in comparison to the placebo group. The total antioxidant status (TAS) decreased in children with ADHD who took pine bark, showing a normalization of TAS in ADHD children.[xvii] In a crossover study of 20 children with ADHD, participants experienced two experimental units — four weeks of pine bark supplementation with 25 or 50 mg PE and four weeks with placebo supplementation — separated by two weeks of a washout period. PE supplementation caused a significant reduction in inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity measures.

The Jenna Ellis Show
THE GREAT AGRICULTURAL RESET: WEAPONIZING FOOD AND HEALTH

The Jenna Ellis Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 38:08


Author of “The Eggs Benedict Option” joins Jenna for a fascinating discussion how the globalists are weaponizing health and agriculture and how you can be prepared to fight back.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

NASACast Audio
Media Teleconference on Agricultural Resources, Aug. 25, 2022

NASACast Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022


The media teleconference occurred Aug. 25, 2022.