Podcasts about Johns Hopkins

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Entrepreneur, philanthropist, and abolitionist

  • 1,602PODCASTS
  • 2,916EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jul 2, 2022LATEST
Johns Hopkins

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Best podcasts about Johns Hopkins

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Latest podcast episodes about Johns Hopkins

Primal Potential
Update on My Surgery

Primal Potential

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 31:56


What a week it's been! We unexpectedly ended up at Johns Hopkins this week to have surgery on the twins in utero. I didn't record a Saturday episode before we left and I didn't bring a microphone in our frantic rush to pack and get to Baltimore, but I jumped on my phone to give you an update. Back to our normal programming on Monday. Love you guys! 

Square Pizza
#82 - Brittany Young, Founder + CEO, B-360

Square Pizza

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 49:39


Welcome back to another episode of the #squarepizzapod. This week, Greg is in conversation with Brittany Young, Founder + CEO of B-360. One fun fact you will learn about Brittany and B-360 is the Mayor of Baltimore designated March 25th as "B-360" day to honor the five-year anniversary of their organization. The celebration includes a press conference and a proclamation from the Mayor. In this episode:B-360 history and overview Awards: Kelly Clarkson, Steve Harvey, Ne-Yo, Ted TalkFellowship experience at Camelback & Echoing GreenDiverse funding modelRide for Change campaignSuccess and challengesBio:Brittany is a retired engineer, educator, professor, and Baltimore native; she has programmed nuclear plants, developed medical devices, and planned satellite explorations, but finds the most satisfaction in her roles in education, problem-solving & service to her community. After the incarceration of her minor brother as an adult, she became empowered to create solutions to funnel talent which resulted in B-360. B-360 , is an organization that utilizes dirt bike culture to end the cycle of poverty, disrupt the prison pipeline, and build bridges in communities. Through STEM education, community engagement, workforce pipe-lining, and events the organization is changing the perception of engineers and dirt bike riders.She was the first Black woman Baltimore native to have a TED Talk, the First Black person ever to receive the prestigious Bessie Stringfield Award, and is currently creating the first ever campus for dirt bikes and education in the country. If you visit Union Station Market in DC, she is currently on a mural 3 blocks from the White House focusing on successful Black women entrepreneurs. Outside of being a history maker she has some of the following accolades and accomplishments: Yale School of Management Lecturer, Baltimore 40 under 40, Echoing Green Fellow, Baltimore's Woman to Watch, and transition team member to Mayor Brandon Scott. Her work has been featured in Johns Hopkins, CBS, Forbes, Teen Vogue, Afro-Punk, Broccoli City Fest, Toyota, Nike NBC Sports, and more!   Brittany is a champion for Black joy, Black women, and true systemic change and providing digits and skills access to people just like her. Brittany's life goals are to show people how smart they truly are and to unlock innate genius. When she is not advocating for change through B-360, you can also find her advocating for caregivers and supporting her brother who lives with down syndrome. Support the show

Plein Air Easton Podcast
What Moves Your Spirit with Dan Weiss

Plein Air Easton Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 49:01


Dan Weiss, president of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, served as the judge of the 2021 Plein Air Easton art competition.  As we worked with Dan during the festival, we found him to be a passionate, kind, and easy-going man that was able to say incredibly intelligent things in a way that felt connecting when other wise people may sound exclusionary.  He joined us virtually from quarantine to share the story of how he became such a uniquely qualified candidate for his role at the Met and express his love for Plein Air painting. A scholar of art history and a seasoned leader of complex institutions, Dan Weiss was previously President and Professor of Art History of Haverford College and, from 2005 to 2013 of Lafayette College. He holds an MBA from Yale and a PhD from Johns Hopkins University in western medieval and Byzantine art, where he joined the art history faculty and in six years rose to full professor and then chair of the department. Three years later, he became the James B. Knapp Dean of Johns Hopkins's Krieger School of Arts and Sciences. He holds a BA in Art History and Psychology from The George Washington University.  The author of six books and numerous articles, Weiss has published and lectured widely on a variety of topics, including the art of the Middle Ages and the Crusades, higher education, museums, and American culture. His most recent books include In That Time: Michael O'Donnell and the Tragic Era of Vietnam (2019), and Remaking College: Innovation and the Liberal Arts (2013). Earlier in his career, Weiss spent four years as a management consultant at Booz, Allen & Hamilton in New York. The recipient of fellowships from Harvard University, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanities, Weiss received the Business and Society Award from the Yale School of Management, the Van Courtlandt Elliott Award from the Medieval Academy of America for scholarship in medieval studies, the Distinguished Alumni Award from George Washington University, and he was inducted into the Society of Scholars at Johns Hopkins in 2018. Follow The MET: Official Site Facebook Instagram Twitter YouTube Follow Plein Air Easton: Official Site Facebook Instagram YouTube To inquire about being a guest or sponsoring the Plein Air Easton Podcast, send us an email at info@pleinaireaston.com. This episode is sponsored by JFM Enterprises, providing distinctive ready-made and custom frames & mouldings to the trade since 1974. Music in this episode was generously provided by Blue Dot Sessions & Scott Gratton.

Reflections with Jad Ghosn
المستشار المالي مايك عازار : عن الهراء الاقتصادي والمالي المسوَّق في لبنان - الحلقة 59

Reflections with Jad Ghosn

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 97:26


To support the channel: https://www.patreon.com/jadghosn مايك عازار متخصص بالاقتصاد في جامعة UCLA وتابع دراساته العليا في المالية والتمويل الدولي في جامعة Johns Hopkins. ومنذ ١٣ عاما يعمل عازار لدى احدى الشركات الدولية المعنية في التمويل الدولي لمشاريع البنى التحتية. تنقسم هذه الحلقة الى جزئين، في هذا الجزء الاول يتطرق الحديث الى بداية عازار مع عالم المال وعودته الى لبنان، قبل الحديث عن الخلاف داخل جمعية المصارف، وخطة الحكومة المتنازع عليها، تصريحات حاكم مصرف لبنان رياض سلامة ومستقبل الازمة المالية في لبنان من سعر صرف الليرة الى توزيع الخسائر. الجزء الثاني سيعرض غدا وفيه حديث عن المؤشرات الاقتصادية والمالية السلبية عالميا ومسبباتها، وكلام عن "العملات الرقمية" واقعها ومستقبلها.

The Twin Cities Wellness Collective™ Podcast
#160: Chris Maltbie- How Tough Mudder Cultivates a Supportive Community

The Twin Cities Wellness Collective™ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 32:55


Chris Maltbie is the Director of Global Product at Tough Mudder, where he oversees the development of customer experiences and event products. He previously co-founded Pine Coast Culture Company, a New Jersey-based kombucha brewery. Chris formerly studied Neurobiology and Physiology at the University of Maryland, before working with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in a developmental biology laboratory at Johns Hopkins. Outside of the office, Chris is an avid ultramarathoner and traveler with aspirations of running/eating his way around the world. Links From the Episode:Tough Mudder in Hugo, MN: https://toughmudder.com/events/twin-cities/Join the Twin Cities Wellness Collective™: https://www.tcwellnesscollective.com/

Our MBC Life
S04 E16 - Psilocybin-assisted Therapy: Patient Experiences

Our MBC Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 85:32


Welcome to the second episode in our series on the potential of psilocybin-assisted therapy to help us live as well as possible with metastatic breast cancer.In this episode, we talk to two women with breast cancer who had legal access to psilocybin-assisted therapy. Journalist and writer Erica Rex participated in a clinical trial at Johns Hopkins after being diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. Mari Singfield, a young Canadian woman living with MBC, gained access through an exemption to Section 56(1) of the Canadian Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, a process facilitated by the organization, TheraPsil. Both women shared with us the process that they went through to gain legal access to psilocybin-assisted therapy, what the treatment was actually like for them,  and what, if anything, changed in their lives afterward.This series has been led by series producer and co-host, Paula Jayne,  with assistance from co-host Lynda Weatherby, and senior producer and host, Lisa Laudico.Thanks for listening!More info is available in our episode notes for this series on our website:www.ourmbclife.orgGot something to share? Feedback?Email: ourmbclife@sharecancersuupport.orgSend us a voice recording via email or through speakpipe on our website.  Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter @ourmbclife

Blood Bank Guy Essentials Podcast
097CE: Acute Normovolemic Hemodilution (ANH) with Steve Frank

Blood Bank Guy Essentials Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 49:17


Continuing education episode! For decades, medical personnel have been aware of the technique of “Acute Normovolemic Hemodilution (ANH),” the collection of blood immediately before surgery followed by infusion near the end. Dr. Steve Frank and his colleagues in the Bloodless Medicine Program at Johns Hopkins believe ANH is an underutilized strategy. He joins the BBGuy Essentials Podcast to share the details of ANH, and show how other facilities can implement ANH as a part of their overall Patient Blood Management Program.

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts
Covid vaccination is becoming a more complex choice as many different vaccines become available, Elizabeth Tracey reports

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 1:03


Covid vaccines have been authorized by the FDA for young children, and Novavax is poised for review and authorization by the agency. Do we really need these new measures in our quest to control Covid-19? Stuart Ray, an infectious disease expert at Johns Hopkins, says yes. Ray: Having all these vaccines is exciting because we […]

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts
Monoclonal antibodies are being developed in new ways to treat Covid-19, Elizabeth Tracey reports

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 1:04


Covid-19 has revolutionized many things, including how antibodies to fight the infection are developed. Stuart Ray, an infectious disease expert at Johns Hopkins, explains. Ray: There's some really exciting technologies here. An antibody has two major features, it's shaped like a Y. The tips of the Y bind the virus and then the tail of […]

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts
What is the role of monoclonal antibodies in treating Covid infection today, with so many Omicron variants circulating? Elizabeth Tracey reports

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 1:05


With new Covid variants turning up frequently, do monoclonal antibodies, which are very specific, still have a role in treatment? Infectious disease expert Stuart Ray at Johns Hopkins says new ones are continuously being developed. Ray: Monoclonal antibody treatments are really innovative in the way we're used them and we've had so many of them, […]

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts
What are the limitations of Covid-19 tests? Elizabeth Tracey reports

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 1:05


Can you trust Covid-19 tests you take at home, whether they are positive or negative? Infectious disease expert Stuart Ray at Johns Hopkins says it's important to remember that all tests have limitations. Ray: The humbling thing about our diagnostics is that we only see the surface, so it's more like an iceberg. So when […]

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts
What explains why some people on the Covid drug Paxlovid seem to see their infection return? Elizabeth Tracey reports

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 1:05


Paxlovid is an oral medication given to people at high risk for complications from Covid-19 infection, but now that it's in more widespread use some are reporting a return of symptoms after they've finished their course of the medication. Stuart Ray, an infectious disease expert at Johns Hopkins, comments. Ray: Many of us were not […]

Inside the Admissions Office: Advice from Former Admissions Officers
What a Johns Hopkins Admissions Officer Wants from Applicants | Johns Hopkins University

Inside the Admissions Office: Advice from Former Admissions Officers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 50:13


On today's episode, we chat with Zak Harris, a Former Admissions Officer at Johns Hopkins University, George Washington University, Bowdoin College, and Regis College. Zak and I discuss admissions at Johns Hopkins, breaking down each component of the application. Zak reveals admissions strategies for students who hope to attend Hopkins. Check out our blog for more free resources: College Admissions 101: How to Start the Application Process Approaching the Johns Hopkins Supplemental Essay 2021-2022 Click here to sign up for a free consultation with an admissions expert. Register for one of our webinars. Questions or comments? Email contact@ingeniusprep.com Visit us at ingeniusprep.com to learn more. See you every other Monday!

Hustle and Pro - Lifestyle Frisco's Sports Podcast
Local FISD QB & P2P Coach: Ethan Lollar

Hustle and Pro - Lifestyle Frisco's Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 20:01


Episode 155: Our guest Ethan Lollar recently graduated from Frisco ISD’s Memorial High School. A multi-sport athlete, he played most of his high school seasons at Quarterback and will continue that path as he goes to Johns Hopkins in Baltimore later this summer.

Lax Goalie Rat Podcast
LGR 159: Johns Hopkins Legend Brian Carcaterra on Developing Confidence in the Cage

Lax Goalie Rat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 75:28


On today's Lax Goalie Rat Podcast episode, Coach Damon sits down to chat with Johns Hopkins Alum All-American and New York Lizards goalie Brian Carcaterra.Deep RoughA golf podcast for all the weekend battlers out thereListen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Getting Off Course PodcastThe golf world is filled with colorful characters. This podcast highlights their stories.Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify The Fantasy Football DudesIf you're looking for Fantasy Football insights, The Dudes got you covered. Each week...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify

The Way the World Works: A Tuttle Twins Podcast for Families
313. Why Did We Even Lockdown for Covid?

The Way the World Works: A Tuttle Twins Podcast for Families

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 16:08


For two years we were told we needed to lockdown to lessen the impacts of Covid. Now, a new study from a very important university shows that the lockdowns did almost nothing to keep us safe.

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
Cancer Topics - Career Paths in Oncology (Part 1)

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 26:24


In part one, of this two-part ASCO Education podcast episode, host Dr. Jeremy Cetnar (Oregon Health & Science University) interviews two very accomplished physicians and researchers, Dr. Lauren Abrey and Dr. Jason Faris. We'll hear about their motivations for pursuing medicine and how they arrived at the different positions they've held in academia and industry.  If you liked this episode, please subscribe. Learn more at https://education.asco.org, or email us at education@asco.org.   TRANSCRIPT   Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: Hello, and welcome to the ASCO Education podcast episode on career paths and oncology. My name is Jeremy Cetnar. I'm a Medical Oncologist and Associate Professor of Medicine at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland. I'm delighted to introduce today's two guests, whose careers in oncology have crisscrossed academia and industry. Dr. Lauren Abrey and Dr. Jason Faris, I'm excited to chat with you about the inspiration and motivations that drive you, people you've leaned on, how you've made your career decisions, challenges you've faced, and more.  So let's start by asking each of you, could you share a little bit about your early life and background, what attracted you to medicine, and who are some of your early mentors and role models? Let's start with you, Dr. Faris.  Dr. Jason Faris: Yeah, I'd be happy to. Thank you. So, I grew up in a small town in South Jersey in Greater Philadelphia. My mom was a registered nurse in pediatrics in the maternal infant unit for many years at Cooper Hospital. I was always interested in science and medicine and my mom's dedication to her patients. Her altruism and compassion served as a real inspiration for me, for my eventual decision to go to medical school. But I took a long time to get there. I had a bit of a circuitous route to arrive to my career in medicine though it started off conventionally enough. I was initially geared towards a premedical track in college, majoring in biology, but an exciting summer research project, working on the biochemical mechanisms underlying osmoregulation in a marine crustacean with mentoring from my first true mentor, Dr. Don Lovett, led me to apply to and attend graduate school in molecular biology at Princeton.  This was followed by a position at Merck as a molecular biologist in the genetic and cellular toxicology group. I went to veterinary school at the University of Pennsylvania where I met my future wife. And then finally, back to the original plan of attending medical school, but I have to say with a much better sense of why I wanted to attend medical school in the first place, now in my late 20s, which was a bit unconventional at the time. I really did my fair share of exploration of Allied Health careers. That's for sure. I attended Johns Hopkins for medical school, where I quickly discovered a passion for internal medicine. And that was far and away my favorite clerkship and sub-internship. That's the background to how I got to medical school.  Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: Dr. Abrey?  Dr. Lauren Abrey: Interesting. I love your story. We share... I grew up in a small town, not so far away, but I was in upstate New York. And I think there were two influences that kind of got me to my ultimate passion for brain tumors. And this sounds a little quirky to start with. But I had a pretty serious head injury as a tween. So I guess I was about 12. I had a skull fracture, epidural hematoma. And while I would never have said I woke up at that moment and thought I have to be a doctor, I think I became fascinated about things to do with the brain.  In parallel, something that I think tinged a lot of my childhood was a number of family members who had cancer. So both of my grandmothers had breast cancer, while I was well aware of the fact that they were sick and battling this. And two of my aunts also had cancer. And I would say it's an interesting split in my family. So about half of them are survivors and about half ultimately died of their disease.  So both of these things really motivated me or focused me on the need to do something important, but also to do something that really motivated me to get out of bed in the morning. I think I was much more to the point. I went straight to college, straight to medical school. I remember calling my parents and telling them I was applying to medical school and having them say, “Wait. You? Really?” So it wasn't necessarily the family expectation that I would do this, but I was very driven and motivated to make some of these choices and then discover my particular interests as I progressed through medical school. So I went to Georgetown for medical school and then have trained at a number of places in the US. I think that's a little bit how I took my first step on this career journey, let's say.  Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: So take us through what the decisions were like in your head at the end of fellowship in terms of first jobs. Dr. Faris?  Dr. Jason Faris: In terms of my choice to pursue a career in medical oncology, this goes back to medical school during an internal medicine clerkship. I had an assistant chief of service, ACS, at the time, Phil Nivatpumin. He'd go on to become a medical oncologist. He really inspired me with his optimism and bedside manner, including with multiple oncology patients on that clerkship. His enthusiasm for science and medicine, his teaching skills, and an absolutely legendary fund of knowledge. For Phil, he was just an incredible ambassador for both internal medicine and for oncology.  After medical school, I went to internship and residency at Mass General Hospital. And in one of my first rotations, I was on the oncology service, which was not so creatively called Team Three. I think they can up the ante there, but oncology services on Team Three. I was caring for many extremely ill patients battling disease progression from their metastatic cancers, or sadly, in many cases complications of their treatments. During that rotation, I was intrigued by clinical trials offering novel treatment options based on cutting edge science, but also struck by the number of patients who just didn't have any clinical trial options. I became aware of the limitations of the conventional treatments that were offered.  I was really inspired by the patience and dedication of the nurses and doctors caring for them. And I vividly recall a roughly 50-year-old woman I helped care for with AML, watching as the 7+3 chemotherapy caused lots of side effects for her and being amazed by her strength and grace, her resilience as she faced her illness, her potential mortality, and the intense chemotherapy she was undergoing. And I knew during those moments with that leukemia patient while caring for other patients on that oncology service that this was the field I would pursue. Oncology was really the perfect blend of humanism, problem solving, longitudinal follow-up and rapidly accelerating scientific progress leading to new avenues for clinical trial treatments.  Like Lauren, I was motivated and inspired by cancer diagnoses in my own family. My maternal grandmother died of pancreatic cancer during my junior year of college. My dad was diagnosed with colon cancer during my first year of fellowship. So those are all really strong motivators, I would say. And after completing my fellowship at the combined Dana-Farber MGH program, my first position out of fellowship was in the gastrointestinal cancer group at MGH. I actually had been training in genitourinary oncology after my main clinically focused year of fellowship, but I did a chief resident year in the middle of fellowship, and that was the tradition at MGH. And as I was about to return to fellowship for my senior year of fellowship, the head of the GI Group and head of the Cancer Center at the time, Dave Ryan, offered to serve as a clinical research mentor for me in GI cancers. As a senior fellow, I wrote an investigator-initiated trial of cabozantinib for patients with neuroendocrine tumors under his mentorship that went on to demonstrate encouraging results, led to a Phase III study in that cancer population, and I ultimately accepted a position at the MGH Cancer Center in the GI cancer group about 11 years ago. And that was the start of my post-training career.  Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: And how about you, Dr. Abrey?  Dr. Lauren Abrey: So for people who don't know, I'm actually a neurologist. I finished my training in neurology and then pursued a fellowship in neuro oncology. I would say it was really patients and observations of things that were happening with patients during my residency. I did my residency at the University of Southern California at Los Angeles. I was at the LA County Hospital, which for people who don't know, is one of the largest hospitals in the country. I had the chance to see several patients who had paraneoplastic syndromes, and got the support from different faculty members to write those cases up, and really resulting in my first independent publications. That was what kind of got me bitten by the bug to understand this link between neurology and oncology.  I very intentionally went to Memorial Sloan Kettering to have the opportunity to work with Jerry Posner. And I think I no sooner got there than I got totally bitten by the brain tumor bug, which seems a little counterintuitive. But the paraneoplastic work was kind of deep laboratory work. And I realized that I really enjoyed seeing the patients having the partnership with neurosurgeons and digging into what is still a pretty intense unmet medical need.  So it was an interesting pivot because I really thought I was going to Sloane to focus on paraneoplasia. I still think I learned so much with that interest that I think we can reflect on when we consider how immunology has finally entered into the treatment landscape today for different tumor types and understanding is there a background in paraneoplastic disorders that could help us. But I have to say it was really the brain tumor work that got me focused and the chance to work with people like Lisa DeAngelis, Phil Gutin, and others that was kind of fundamental to my choices. I stayed there for two years of fellowship and then continued as faculty for about another 15 years at Sloan Kettering. So that's really the start of my academic career and the pivot to industry came much later.  Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: So both of you have impressive career CVs, have been trained at very prestigious institutions. So at some point in time, take me through, what was that transition like between, 'Hmm, what I'm doing is enjoyable, but maybe there's something else out there that I want to explore.' And what I mean by that is mostly industry at this point. So that's an important question that I think a lot of junior faculty face, a lot of mid-career faculty, maybe even later-stage faculty. But I think that's a tension point for a lot of people because I think there's a lot of fear. I think there's a lot of anxiety about moving outside of the academic realm. So, tell us a little bit about what was the pull in terms of going to industry and what were some of the thought processes that were going on. Dr. Faris?    Dr. Jason Faris: I've experienced two transitions, actually, between academia and industry. I like to do things in pairs, I guess. But the first was, after multiple years at the MGH as a resident fellow and as a clinical investigator at the MGH Cancer Center. As a new attending and clinical investigator, I was attempting to balance my work priorities, providing patients with GI cancers, which is a rewarding but complex and I'd say emotionally intense experience, given the phenomenally aggressive and devastating cancers these patients grapple with such as pancreatic cancer, alongside the other responsibilities of my clinical investigator position.  Those other responsibilities included writing grants and papers and protocols, evaluating patients who were interested in open clinical trials, and serving as the principal investigator for multiple studies. I was serving on committees, mentoring and teaching. Patient care was always my top priority as it should and really must be. And I feel incredibly lucky to have had truly amazing colleagues at MGH across several disciplines, from medical oncology, nurse practitioners, practice nurses, radiation oncologists, and surgeons. It was and continues to be a dynamic place full of extremely talented and dedicated clinicians. I think we really all benefited from the coordinated teamwork in both patient care and research in a really tight-knit GI Group.  But nonetheless, for me as someone who delighted in spending large amounts of time with my patients in the clinic rooms, and I think my colleagues would agree frequently agonizing over decisions impacting their care, achieving sufficient balance to really focus on writing and overseeing clinical trials was becoming increasingly challenging for me. And it was in that context, after spending roughly a decade and the combination of residency fellowship training and as an attending in the GI cancer group all at MGH that I made a truly difficult decision to move from my beloved outpatient clinical and clinical investigator role to industry to focus more exclusively on clinical research.  And after interviewing for several industry-based roles, I accepted a position in the early-phase group at the Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research or NIBR as we kind of pronounced those words in Cambridge. I absolutely loved my time at NIBR. It's an incredible place with a strong history of and commitment to innovation as well as passionate, talented colleagues, many of whom I've worked with in the past. When I first started at Novartis, I was amazed at the array of experts on the teams I was helping to lead as a clinical program leader. Our teams are the definition of multidisciplinary. They're composed of what we call line function experts in multiple disciplines. This includes preclinical safety experts who design and analyze data from studies that precede the filing of an IND, research scientists, chemists, preclinical, and clinical pharmacologists, statisticians, program managers, drug and regulatory affair colleagues, who focus on the interactions with health authorities, including the FDA, operational colleagues called clinical trial leaders, and many others.  In my role as a senior clinical program leader, I also have the opportunity to collaborate frequently with research colleagues on preclinical programs, designing and writing first in human trials, followed by conducting the actual studies and in close collaboration with our academic colleagues, analyzing the clinical and translational results.  Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: Dr. Abrey, how about you? Was there a moment or what were the moments that led to you deciding to make this transition?  Dr. Lauren Abrey: I guess I have the other sort of story. I got pushed, I would say, in the sense that like many of us, I'm married, and my husband was the one who took a job with Novartis and said, “This would be an adventure. Let's go live in Switzerland.” So similar to Jason, he took a position at NIBR, and I think for many of the same reasons, he really wanted to delve deeply into early mechanism of action and allow himself to dedicate really a chunk of his career to developing key drugs. But moving to Switzerland changes your options suddenly. I think I had spent most of my career at Sloan Kettering doing clinical trials. That was really my comfort zone, my sweet spot. And when we moved over here, I explored briefly, could I set up an academic career here?  And very kindly, I was invited by a number of Swiss colleagues to look for opportunities to do that. But I realized what I loved was talking to patients, and that that was going to be difficult with the language barrier. And I equally loved running clinical trials. So I had a great opportunity to join Roche shortly after their merge or full acquisition of Genentech. This allowed me to continue the work I had been doing on Avastin for brain tumors.  But I think the other thing that allowed me to do, that was something I was really looking for was to broaden my scope and to no longer be niched as just a brain tumor expert. And if you're in academia and you're a neurologist, obviously, you're going to be fairly constrained in that space. But moving into a role in industry really allows you to look much more broadly and work across multiple tumor types. And I spent the next seven years at Roche running not just the Avastin teams that were developing drugs for a number of indications, but really overseeing the clinical development group based in the European sites. And they had about 14 different drugs in different stages of development as well as partnerships with their early research group that was European based.  So it was a fascinating time for me, and I feel kind of like I got thrown into the pond. I knew a lot about clinical trials. I had no idea about so many other aspects of what I needed to consider. And I think Jason started to allude to some of this with the different line function expertise and things I think we take for granted or maybe we simply have blind spots around them when we are sitting in our academic organizations. So it's been a really delightful plunge into the pool. I've continued to swim mostly. Occasionally, a little bit of drowning, but a lot of fun.  Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: What would you say are the major differences between an academic career and industry?  Dr. Lauren Abrey: I think, as you said, the things that are similar is that the purpose or the mission for both is in many ways the same. We would like to develop better treatments for patients with cancer. And so there's a huge focus on clinical trials. There needs to be a huge focus on patients, and that can get diluted in industry. I think the things that you don't appreciate sometimes when you're sitting on the academic side is just really the overarching business structure and the complexity of some of the very large organizations. So you suddenly are in this huge space with people focused on regulatory approvals focused on pricing, focused on manufacturing, focused on the clinical trial execution, and why you are doing it in different spots.  And so I think some of the different factors that you have to consider are things that again, we either take for granted or are super focused when you're in one organization. And I think the tradeoffs and how decisions are made, particularly in large pharma, can be frustrating. I think we are all used to applying for grants or getting the funding we need to do whatever our project or trial is. And then you just start very laser focused on getting to the end. If you're in a large organization and they have a portfolio where they're developing 14, 15, 20 different things, you might suddenly find that the project you think is most important gets de-prioritized against something that the company thinks is more critical to move forward. And that could be because there's better data, but it could also be because there's increasing competition in the space or there's a different pull for a large company. I haven't seen the early development side as much. I've seen the development. I've now seen Medical Affairs for how some of those decisions are made, but I'd be curious to hear what Jason has seen in some of his experiences as well.  Dr. Jason Faris: Comparing and contrasting a little bit between the two, because I've run early phase studies on the academic side, I'll talk more about that in a little bit in terms of another academic position that I held. So I've run early-phase studies there. I've run early-phase studies in industry as well. And they share a lot of similarities, certainly following compelling science, the excitement about new therapies that are going to be offered to patients. But I think the execution is a bit different, and I would say, when you're running clinical trials in the academic setting, you're meeting every patient that you're going to put on study or at least one of your colleagues is, if you have sub-eyes on the study, that's a major, major difference, right? You're directly taking care of a patient going on to an experimental therapy, consenting that patient, following them over time, getting the firsthand experience and data from that patient interaction, but not necessarily, unless you're running an investigator-initiated study, not necessarily having access to the data across the whole study.  You're hearing about the data across the whole study at certain time points on investigator calls, PI meetings, dose escalation meetings, those kinds of things. But you're not necessarily having access to the real-time emergence of data across the whole study from other people's patients. So you're a bit dependent on the sponsor to provide those glimpses of the data, synthesize that and present overview. So those are some operational differences, I would say, because you're not taking direct care of the patients and having your time split among different commitments in that way I have felt a greater ability to focus on the clinical research that I'm doing in my industry-based role, which I like, of course, but I also miss taking care of patients. I love taking care of patients.   So I think it's always a double-edged sword with that if we can use a sword analogy here. But I think they both offer really exciting options to pursue new therapies for patients, which for me, was one of the fundamental reasons that I pursued medical oncology in the first place. It was really this idea that the field is rapidly advancing. I wanted to be a part of that. I saw firsthand what cancer could do to my family or family members, and I took care of patients in the hospital as an intern resident and fellow where I think there's just a tremendous unmet medical need. And so having an opportunity to contribute to the development of new therapies was always a real inspiration for me.  Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: With that being said, what led you to go back into academia?  Dr. Jason Faris: This is an ongoing saga, I guess. So after several years of professional growth at Novartis, gaining experience with designing and conducting clinical trials on the industry side, I was actually at ASCO and I learned of an open role for the director of the early phase trials program at Dartmouth's Cancer Center. After extensive consideration, which I think you can see as my trademark at this point, I made another difficult decision to interview for the position, which was focused on helping to grow the early phase trials program at an NCI comprehensive designated cancer center that's unique in a way because it's in a rural area. And it had a new director of the Cancer Center, Steve Leach, who's a renowned laboratory scientist with a focus on pancreatic cancer and a surgeon by training.  I ultimately decided to accept the early phase director position, moving my family away from Greater Boston, where we had lived for about 15 years, to the upper valley of New Hampshire. And while at Dartmouth, I was part of exciting projects, including writing and overseeing an NCI grant called Catch Up, which was geared towards improving access to early phase clinical trials for rural patients. I opened numerous sponsor-initiated immunotherapy and targeted therapy, early phase trials. Just to say a little bit about Dartmouth's Cancer Center - I think they also benefit from tremendous collaboration, this time across Dartmouth College, the Geisel School of Medicine, the School of Public Health. I think they provide really excellent care to their cancer patients. And I was extremely proud to be part of that culture in the GI Group, which was much smaller than the one at MGH, but also an incredibly dedicated group of multidisciplinary colleagues who work tirelessly to care for their patients.  But nonetheless, less than six months into that new position, the COVID pandemic started, and that introduced some significant and new challenges on the clinical trials side in terms of staffing, infrastructure, those kinds of things. In that context, I made a decision to return to NIBR, refocus on clinical research, and hope to harness my background in running clinical trials in both settings, both academic and industry, as well as the resources and pipeline of Novartis to really maximize my impact on drug development. So for me, it was a question of where can I have the maximum impact at this crazy time, difficult time. I saw that my best option was to return to industry to work on studies to try to develop new therapies. Broadly speaking, my role as a senior clinical program leader in the translational and clinical oncology group at NIBR is to design, write, conduct, and analyze innovative clinical trials of early phase therapeutics.  Dr. Jeremy Cetnar: Wow, that's fascinating, very, very interesting. A lot of stress. You should definitely be buying lots of presents for your family for moving them all over the place.  This concludes part one of our interview with Drs. Abrey and Faris. Thank you so much for sharing your inspiring career stories. And thank you to all our listeners for tuning into this episode of the ASCO Education Cancer Topics podcast.  Thank you for listening to the ASCO Education podcast. To stay up to date with the latest episodes, please click subscribe. Let us know what you think by leaving a review. For more information, visit the Comprehensive Education Center at education.asco.org.    The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions.  Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. 

Tell Me About Your Father
Brad Listi on the bravery and brevity of fatherhood

Tell Me About Your Father

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 70:42


On this special Father's Day-themed episode of Tell Me About Your Father, Erin talks to her old friend and real-life dad of two, Brad Listi, the author and host of the much-loved literary podcast Otherppl with Brad Listi, where he has epic conversations with legendary writers. In his new autobiographical novel, Be Brief and Tell Them Everything, Brad has written a love letter of a book to his children, in which he writes candidly about fatherhood and all of its moods - elation, fear, hope, excitement, ambivalence, guilt, and grief; all the terror and all the love. Brad shares how Buddhism and a spiritual practice which includes a midlife psilocybin mushroom trip with a playlist curated by Johns Hopkins, influence his approach to parenthood. It's a moving conversation that reflects the specific challenges of raising a child with disabilities, negotiating middle age, and defining what it means to be a good man, a good parent, and a good writer (we think the answer for all is telling the truth). Be Brief and Tell Them Everything is the book title, Otherppl is the podcast, and Brad Listi is the man. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tell-me-about-your-father/support

First Draft: A Dialogue on Writing
First Draft - Lawrence Jackson

First Draft: A Dialogue on Writing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 63:00


Lawrence Jackson is a biographer and critic whose work has appeared in Harper's Magazine, n+1, and Best American Essays. He teaches English and history at Johns Hopkins and founded the Billie Holiday Project for Liberation Arts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

WashingTECH Tech Policy Podcast with Joe Miller
Friday News Brief - 06.17.22

WashingTECH Tech Policy Podcast with Joe Miller

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 2:46


Biden calls for better kids privacy laws in State of the Union During his state of the Union address Tuesday, President Joe Biden called for better regulation of social media companies. First Lady Jill Biden invited Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen to the State of the Union – Haugen was the first to shed light on Facebook's (now, Meta's) internal efforts to target children as young as 6 on Instagram, and the fact that the company ignored its own research showing Instagram damaged teenage girls' self-esteem. Facebook is getting sensitive medical information The Markup reported yesterday that Facebook may have been receiving your medical information from a tracking tool – Pixel. Many hospitals use Pixel on their websites to track site visits. So let's say hypothetically that you search for a health condition on the hospital's website – well, for about a third of those sites, the tracking tool sends the information to Facebook. Johns Hopkins, UCLA ReaMgan, New York Presbyterian, Northwestern Memorial, and Duke University Hospital are among the hospitals that track site visitors with Pixel. Democrats led by Sen. Warren introduce bill that bans sale of location data In the wake of the leaked Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, which paves the way for red states to criminalize abortion procedures, Sen. Elizabeth Warren led a group of Democratic lawmakers to introduce a new bill – The Health and Location Data Protection Act – that would completely ban the sale of your location data. The bill also envisions empowering the Federal Trade Commission to intervene when necessary.   Advocates warn of hate speech problems in Klobuchar's antitrust bill Advocates including Free Press are pushing back against Amy Klobuchar's antitrust bill – the American Innovation and Choice Online Act – because they're concerned the bill would let companies that may have profited from hate speech and disinformation – like Infowars – to sue platforms like Google from banning them in search rankings. Advocates worry a provision that prohibits Google from favoring their own search results over smaller competitors  – could pave the way for disinformation profiteers to make anticompetitive accusations when platforms ban their sites. Elon Musk suggests  harmful content on Twitter should stay up if it's just entertainment Elon Musk announced to Twitter employees in a livestream that free speech issues should outweigh content moderation. Last month, said that he'd reinstate Donald Trump's account, although he said that prior to the commencement of the January 6th committee proceedings. Twitter's stock has steadily dropped from $54.20 per share, which was the price when Elon Musk made his $44 billion bid to purchase the company. At the closing bell today, Twitter was trading at $37.78. That's it for this week. You can find links to all of these stories in the show notes. Stay safe, stay informed, have a great weekend. See you Monday.

The CyberWire
Malibot info stealer is no coin miner. "Hermit" spyware. Fabricated evidence in Indian computers. FBI takes down botnet. Assange extradition update. Putting the Service into service learning.

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 31:15


Malibot is an info stealer masquerading as a coin miner. "Hermit" spyware is being used by nation-state security services. Fabricated evidence is planted in Indian computers. The US takes down a criminal botnet. The British Home Secretary signs the Assange extradition order. We wind up our series of RSA Conference interviews with David London from the Chertoff group and Hugh Njemanze from Anomali. And putting the Service into service learning. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/11/117 Selected reading. 'MaliBot' Android Malware Steals Financial, Personal Information (SecurityWeek) F5 Labs Investigates MaliBot (F5 Labs) Sophisticated Android Spyware 'Hermit' Used by Governments (SecurityWeek) Lookout Uncovers Android Spyware Deployed in Kazakhstan (Lookout) Police Linked to Hacking Campaign to Frame Indian Activists (Wired) U.S., partners dismantle Russian hacking 'botnet,' Justice Dept says (Reuters) Russian Botnet Disrupted in International Cyber Operation (US Attorney's Office, Southern District of California) Julian Assange: Priti Patel signs US extradition order (The Telegraph) AIVD disrupts activities of Russian intelligence officer targeting the International Criminal Court (AIVD) Alleged Russian spy studied at Johns Hopkins, won ICC internship (Washington Post)

The Frankie Boyer Show
Dr. Gregory Jantz (A Place of Hope), Ellie Cullen (Your Future Health), Chef David Rose (Omaha Steaks)

The Frankie Boyer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 39:36


Dr. Gregory Jantz (A Place of Hope)BOOK: The Anxiety Resethttps://www.aplaceofhope.com/Dr. Gregory Jantz PhD, is a psychologist who specializes in anxiety, depression and addiction care. He is the bestselling author of numerous books, including the latest The Anxiety Reset: A Life-Changing Approach to Overcoming Fear, Stress, Worry, Panic Attacks, OCD and More. Dr. Jantz has been a National Media expert for ABC, CBS, CNN, FOX, Associated Press, Woman's Day, Family Circle, among many others. https://www.drgregoryjantz.com/Ellie Cullen (Your Future Health)https://www.yourfuturehealth.com/Ellie Cullen has been a licensed Registered Nurse for more than forty years. She trained at Johns Hopkins, and has over forty years of extensive clinical nursing, nutrition, and lifestyle consulting experience. She has personally overcome arthritis and low blood sugar using her YFH system. Ellie has lectured for doctors and health organizations for the last thirty-four years and has clients all over the world. https://www.yourfuturehealth.com/Chef David Rose (Omaha Steaks)https://www.omahasteaks.com/shop/ChefRoseChef David Rose is a Food Network/TV personality and author of the soon to be released cookbook "EGGin': David Rose Cooks on the Big Green Egg.” Recently, he was named as Executive Chef for Omaha Steaks, the 100+ year old, family-run company which first pioneered delivery of great steaks to people's homes in the 1950s, and has since expanded to a wide array of food and wine favorites for millions of fans. http://www.chefdavidrose.com/

Naturally Inspired Podcast
Dr Peter Breggin - The Real Peter Breggin

Naturally Inspired Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 77:48


Today on the Naturally Inspired Podcast Dr Peter Breggin is joining us. Peter R. Breggin MD is a lifelong reformer known as “The Conscience of Psychiatry” for his criticism of biological psychiatry and his promotion of more effective, empathic, and ethical forms of psychological, educational, and social approaches to people with emotional suffering and disability. He graduated from Harvard College with Honors and his psychiatric training included a Teaching Fellowship at Harvard Medical School. Following his training, he became a Full Time Consultant in the U.S. Public Health Service at NIH, assigned to the National Institute of Mental Health. Since then, he has taught at several universities, including Johns Hopkins, George Mason, and the University of Maryland, as well as at the Washington School of Psychiatry.           Dr. Breggin is the author of more than 20 medical and scientific texts, as well as popular books, including the bestseller and highly-documented Talking Back to Prozac. Coauthored in 1994 with his wife Ginger, Talking Back to Prozac has sold close to one million copies and continues to sell. Dr. Breggin's more than 70 peer-reviewed scientific reports and articles have been published in many journals, including JAMA (the Journal of the American Medical Association), the American Journal of Psychiatry, the AMA Archives of General Psychiatry, and most recently several European journals, including Medical Hypotheses and Children and Society. He is known worldwide as the leading critic of authoritarian biological psychiatry and an advocate of psychosocial approaches to healing the mind and spirit.  Learn more about Dr Peter Breggin at https://breggin.com/     Please welcome Dr Peter Breggin to the Naturally Inspired Podcast.    

The Joe Piscopo Show
8 AM Hour The Joe Piscopo Show 6-15-22

The Joe Piscopo Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 53:09


Dr. Marty Makary, Johns Hopkins physician and public health researcher, Editor-in-Chief of Medpage Today, and New York Times bestselling author of “The Price We Pay” Topic: New Novavax vaccine for COVID-19 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Losing Control
Episode 10: Mental Health and the Yips

Losing Control

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 40:03


From Simone Biles' brush with the twisties to Rick Ankiel's experience of the yips, the constellation of phenomena known as the yips–and the stories of the athletes who experience it–are some of the strangest in the world of sports. Far more common, but perhaps equally opaque, are mood disorders like depression and anxiety, and on this episode of Losing Control, host Justin Su'a talks with Karen Swartz, a clinical psychiatrist who specializes in mood disorders and community education. Mood disorders destabilize confidence, shift the relationship with the things we care about the most, and impact how we see ourselves–just like the yips–and in the second half of the episode, retired Major Leaguer Rick Ankiel reflects on the yips, mental health, and how his experiences in baseball have shaped his relationship to sports, and to life. Rick Ankiel, a retired professional pitcher, outfielder, and author of “The Phenomenon: Pressure, the Yips, and the Pitch that Changed My Life” Karen Swartz, the director of clinical and educational programs at the Johns Hopkins Mood Disorders Center and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts
There are many ways to reduce bleeding during surgery, Elizabeth Tracey reports

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 1:03


Operating rooms are often very cold places, but keeping the patient warm actually helps reduce blood loss during surgery, and so does reducing blood pressure. That's according to Steven Frank, a blood transfusion expert at Johns Hopkins. Frank: If we can do a controlled hypotension to bring the blood pressure down to say, 20% below […]

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts
How can you reduce your need for blood transfusion during surgery? Elizabeth Tracey reports

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 1:05


If you're scheduled for surgery, you can take steps to reduce your possible need for a blood transfusion in this time of critically short supplies of blood. Steven Frank, a blood transfusion expert at Johns Hopkins, says that might start with stopping some nutritional supplements you're taking. Frank: Certain nutritional supplements can actually increase bleeding […]

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts
Besides the OR, people can lose a lot of blood in the intensive care unit, Elizabeth Tracey reports

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 1:04


When you think of blood loss accidents and operating rooms may come to mind right away, but another place where people can experience significant blood loss is while they're hospitalized. Blood may be taken often to manage someone's care, and Steven Frank, a blood transfusion expert at Johns Hopkins, says ICUs are at the top […]

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts
How are blood shortages being dealt with in the operating room? Elizabeth Tracey reports

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 1:04


Blood is in more limited supply right now than it was before the pandemic, with the Red Cross citing blood donation event cancelations as key. Steven Frank, a blood transfusion expert at Johns Hopkins, says there are several strategies to help reduce the need for blood during operations. Frank: There's a medication called transexemic acid […]

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts
With limited blood supplies there are options if you need to have surgery, Elizabeth Tracey reports

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 1:05


The pandemic has caused many shortages, among them blood. That's because many blood drives have been canceled and traditional donors, such as college students, sidelined for the same reason. Steven Frank, a blood transfusion expert at Johns Hopkins, says there are several strategies to cope if you're scheduled for surgery. Frank:  If we simply give you […]

Tactical Leadership
Overcoming The Stigma Associated With Psychedelic Treatments With Josh Bartch

Tactical Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 36:23


“Every story is different, every experience is different and how people talk about is completely different as well. But one thing that is always consistent is this is just as profound kind of enlightenment, if you will, as to they understand their disease and why they're experiencing what they have and the root of the problem, just on a really different level.” – Joshua Bartch In today's episode, we welcome Joshua Bartch, he is the Director, Chief Executive Officer, and Chairman of Mydecine Innovations Group (MIG). Joshua's entrepreneurial career took off in 2009 when he co-founded AudioTranscriptionist.com and founded a boutique investment firm that operated through the U.S. and Canadian markets. In 2014, Bartch co-founded Cannabase.io, the U.S.'s most significant legal and sophisticated cannabis wholesale platform. He took successful exits from AudioTransciptionist.com, Doctor's Orders, and Cannabase.io. In this conversation, Joshua's goal is to bring more effective treatments to those who need them most. He found that current treatments are not effective and that this is a major focus of their work. [00:01 - 07:26] Who is Josh Bartch? Zack introduces his guest Josh Bartch Josh talks about his company, Mydecine, a biotechnology company which is focused on mental disorders and addiction He talks about assembling a team with extensive background on drug development in order to drive a successful company Mydecine is developing a drug to help smokers quit, based on the molecule psilocybin, which the active component of medicinal mushrooms The drug is being developed in partnership with https://www.jhu.edu/ (Johns Hopkins) [07:27 - 13:06] On A Mission To Educate Veterans About The Potentials Benefits of Psychedelics Josh acknowledges the contributions of https://www.mydecine.com/news-media/press-releases/detail/84/mydecines-chief-medical-officer-dr-rakesh-jetly-to (Dr. Rakesh) After numerous months of research, they found that most of the population was biologically verified completely absent from smoking They aim to combat stress with a focus on working with veterans' organizations His team is focused on developing treatments for PTSD in veterans, which is a population that is particularly resistant to treatment Their studies show how psychedelics may be able to play a role in treating these conditions Josh discusses how the team has been successful in getting veterans organization on board with their mission and educating them about the potential benefits of treatments using psychedelics [13:07 - 17:51] Overcoming The Stigma Associated With Psychedelic Treatments Josh understands that people have been through different things, whether it's PTSD or trauma-related or have become addicted to different aspects of things How Josh is reaching out to Alpha-types  As soldiers, they are taught to be tough and they would need a therapist to penetrate through the brain Mydecine's goal is to get the general medical community to think that prescribing clinicians will prescribe psychedelics, and it has put out a media platform to do this It offers guided meditations and other ancillary services to its users Josh discusses the challenges and stigma associated with psychedelic treatment and how Johns Hopkins is working to overcome these obstacles   [17:52 - 30:22] The Importance of Changing Public Perception of Psychedelics Josh emphasizes the importance of changing public perception of psychedelics in order to facilitate wider acceptance and use He knows a lot of people suffers from addiction and addiction is a huge problem in society Josh discusses the business side of psychedelics that it is different pharmaceuticals but the treatment is the same Josh's company is daring big pharma to catch up in order treat people to make medicine bills inexpensive [30:23 - 30:44] Closing Segment Josh shares that his organization's goal is to help people with PTSD and other mental health issues, and they...

The Learning Objective
The Art & Science of Experience

The Learning Objective

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 35:42


In this episode, presented by Mannington Commercial, ThinkLab interviews two experts in the emerging field of neuroaesthetics: Susan Magsamen, the director of Johns Hopkins' International Arts + Mind Lab, and Suchi Reddy, architect and founder of Reddymade. They explain how neuroaesthetics can provide clues about how our bodies respond to design on a biological level. ThinkLab also speaks with David Rockwell, founder of Rockwell Group, who discusses his multidisciplinary approach to design, creating memorable experiences blending both theater and architecture. Accredited for: IDCEC, AIA | 0.5 CEU/0.5 LU After listening, you will be able to: 1.    Identify what neuroaesthetics is and how it can be used in architecture and interiors. 2.    Examine projects where neuroaesthetics and biometric data were used to inform participants' unique experiences. 3.    Evaluate how you can use data and technology in projects to measure experience and influence outcomes. 4.    Point out the six ways that architecture can draw from theater in creating experience. Tune in as Magsamen and Reddy describe their unique exhibit, “A Space for Being,” hosted at Milan's Salone del Mobile design fair. Their team designed three separate spaces, each evoking a different emotional experience by using contrasting visuals, sounds, and smells. Visitors wore a custom wristband that recorded their biometric data to see where they felt most at ease — with surprising results. Magsamen and Reddy discuss how these sorts of insights can influence design thinking and how to use new technology to innovate. Then, Rockwell shares his own perspective on what matters most when creating an engaging experience, whether in designing interiors or theater set design. His focus is on how stories are told and places are formed, and for great design in both fields, he recommends asking how you want the audience to feel. He also looks to the future and discusses his expectations for new forms of public spaces that will appear after the pandemic. Quiz: Want CEU credit for listening? Click here to take the quiz, and earn your certificate of completion. How it works:   Step 1: Listen to the episode. Step 2: Sign in at this link to take a short, 5-question quiz. * Scoring an 80% or above on the quiz will earn you 0.5 CEU/0.5 LU. Step 3: Upon passing the quiz, receive your certificate of completion via email from CEU sponsor Mannington Commercial. Step 4: Self-report to IDCEC and AIA. Connect with our expert guests on LinkedIn: Susan Magsamen Suchi Reddy David Rockwell Special thanks to our CEU episode sponsor, Mannington Commercial, for partnering with us to provide valuable insights on compelling topics for the design industry.

CEO Podcasts: CEO Chat Podcast + I AM CEO Podcast Powered by Blue 16 Media & CBNation.co
IAM1394 - Real Estate Investor Teaches Others How to Buy their First Property

CEO Podcasts: CEO Chat Podcast + I AM CEO Podcast Powered by Blue 16 Media & CBNation.co

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 16:58


Pam Hill, founder and CEO of My Smart Cousin, is a real estate investor who owns 25 properties and 31 units, all purchased for the price of a car, and in some cases, a bicycle, at $2,500 to $35,000. Pam began her real estate investment career ten years ago during the Great Recession, as a side hustle while working as an executive at an electric utility company. Since then Pam has become the ‘Smart Cousin' to everyone in her family with personal finance and real estate advice, as well as a real estate investment coach, teaching others how to buy their first or 101st property for the price of a car. Pam received her Bachelors degree from Dartmouth College and her Masters degree from Harvard University. Pam coaches her clients in English, Spanish, and Mandarin, Chinese when required, as a graduate of Johns Hopkins' Chinese studies program in Nanjing, China. Website: mysmartcousin.com Instagram: MySmartCousin Twitter: smartcousin

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts
If you've put off cancer screening during the pandemic, what might be of concern? Elizabeth Tracey reports

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 1:04


As Covid has ground on, many people avoided routine medical care, including cancer screenings. Needa Zaidi, an oncologist at Johns Hopkins, says that's understandable, but if you notice anything unusual going on, it may be time to seek care. Zaidi: The first thing as doctors that we worry about is unintentional weight loss. That means […]

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts
Even as more people are developing cancer worldwide, survival is also going up, Elizabeth Tracey reports

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 1:04


Heart disease remains the number one cause of death worldwide, but cancer is coming up quickly. Needa Zaidi, an oncologist at Johns Hopkins, says the data point to much better outcomes even though more people are developing cancer. Zaidi: The chances of surviving breast cancer were about 75% in 1975 and today, they're about 90%. […]

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts
Do antibiotics increase someone's risk for colon cancer? Elizabeth Tracey reports

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 1:04


Almost everyone has taken an antibiotic for an infection during their lifetime. Now two new studies examine the role of antibiotics in disrupting gut microbes, and an increased risk for colon cancer. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, examines the data. Nelson: One question is what do the antibiotics do […]

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts
What is the role of aspirin in preventing colorectal cancer? Elizabeth Tracey reports

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 1:02


Aspirin's benefits and harms in heart disease and colorectal cancer prevention have once again been examined by a federal workgroup, and Kimmel Cancer Center director William Nelson at Johns Hopkins says for younger people, who have been experiencing an uptick in colorectal cancer rates, using low dose aspirin is a maybe. Nelson: If you're likely […]

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts
What can a new study of gene defects in cancer tell us? Elizabeth Tracey reports

Health Newsfeed – Johns Hopkins Medicine Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 1:02


Inherited genes for cancer may also predispose to a number of other health conditions, a new study shows. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, says additional mutations acquired as a cancer develops also have a big influence. Nelson: Usually in those cancers what's happened is the inherited defect and then […]

Public Health On Call
477 - Unpacking Unexplained Hepatitis in Children

Public Health On Call

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 11:12


The CDC is investigating reported clusters of children with acute severe hepatitis that have no known cause. Johns Hopkins pediatric hepatologist Dr. Kathryn Smith talks with Stephanie Desmon about hepatitis in children and what we know and don't know about this particular phenomenon. Ultimately, she says, it's a question of whether this really is something new or if we're just now noticing patterns that already existed. 

Lacrosse All Stars Network
Quintessential Lacrosse Podcast: Maryland Lacrosse Makes History ft. Head Coach John Tillman

Lacrosse All Stars Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 33:43


The Terps are the first team in NCAA lacrosse history to go 18-0 in a season. Owen Prybylski scored the Terps' 10th pole goal of the season. They got 33 goals from non-offensive personnel. They attacked opponents in all phases. They owned restarts, faceoffs, and the substitution phase. If an opponent offered them a crack or window of opportunity, they exploited it. The Terps set an NCAA record for most assists in a season (205) with nine on Monday. There were many reasons to fear the turtle. Where does the 2022 Maryland team fit in history? After the dog pile, let the debate begin. I'll let it marinate and dissect the data and personnel later this summer after the rings are ordered. Without question, their season merits comparison with 1976 Cornell, 1984 Johns Hopkins, 1991 North Carolina, 1990 Syracuse, 1997 Princeton, and 2006 Virginia. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lax-all-stars/message

Fit Rx
Why We Age and How to Stop It!

Fit Rx

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 54:37


I am joined by Dr. Sandra Kaufmann, M.D.  to discuss her book The Kaufmann Protocol, Why We Age and How to Stop It.  Dr. Kaufmann began her academic career in the field of cellular biology, earning a Master's Degree from the University of Connecticut in Tropical Ecology and Plant Physiology. Turning to medicine, she received her medical Degree at the University of Maryland, and completed a residency and fellowship at Johns Hopkins in the field of pediatric anesthesiology. For the last five years she has been the Chief of Pediatric Anesthesia at the Joe DiMaggio Children's Hospital, a nationally recognized center of excellence. Most recently, she was recognized as “Best in Medicine” by the American Health Council.Her avid interest in the science of anti-aging began many years ago as an intense hobby. Utilizing her knowledge in cell biology, human pharmacology and physiology, this hobby has now become a main focus. The project represents years of non-clinical research leading to the first, ever, comprehensive theory of aging.You can find more info atwww.kaufmannprotocal.com

Behind The Knife: The Surgery Podcast
Journal Review in Trauma Surgery: Imaging for Blunt Cerebrovascular Injury (BCVI)

Behind The Knife: The Surgery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 26:52


Determining when to order imaging for blunt cerebrovascular injury is a diagnostic quandary that has long engendered controversy. Today we discuss a paper that introduced universal CT angiogram of the neck to screen for BCVI in all blunt trauma patients and then compared the result to what would have happened if some of the current screening guidelines were utilized. Join us as we discuss their fascinating results and what it means for blunt trauma patients going forward. Hosts:  Elliott R. Haut, MD, Ph.D., a senior, nationally recognized name in trauma and acute care surgery at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Haut is a past president of The Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma (EAST).  Marcie Feinman, MD, MEHP, the current program director of General Surgery Residency at Sinai Hospital of Baltimore and editorial board member of SCORE. She received her Master's in Education in the Health Professions from Johns Hopkins.  David Sigmon, MD, MMEd, a PGY-6 resident at the University of Illinois at Chicago who plans on going into trauma surgery. He did two years of research in surgical education at the University of Pennsylvania where he also received his Master's in Medical Education.  LITERATURE Black JA, Abraham PJ, Abraham MN, et al. Universal screening for blunt cerebrovascular injury. J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2021;90(2):224-231. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33502144/ Kim DY, Biffl W, Bokhari F, et al. Evaluation and management of blunt cerebrovascular injury: A practice management guideline from the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma. J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2020;88(6):875-887. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32176167/ Biffl WL, Moore EE, Offner PJ, Brega KE, Franciose RJ, Elliott JP, Burch JM. Optimizing screening for blunt cerebrovascular injuries. (1999) American journal of surgery. 178 (6): 517-22. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/10670864/ Geddes AE, Burlew CC, Wagenaar AE, Biffl WL, Johnson JL, Pieracci FM, Campion EM, Moore EE. Expanded screening criteria for blunt cerebrovascular injury: a bigger impact than anticipated. (2016) American journal of surgery. 212 (6): 1167-1174. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27751528/ Ciapetti M, Circelli A, Zagli G et-al. Diagnosis of carotid arterial injury in major trauma using a modification of Memphis criteria. Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2010;18 (1): 61. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21092211/ Please visit behindtheknife.org to access other high-yield surgical education podcasts, videos and more.  

Chicago's Afternoon News with Steve Bertrand
Johns Hopkins students invent edible tape to hold your burrito together

Chicago's Afternoon News with Steve Bertrand

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022


Rachel Nie, a senior at Johns Hopkins University joins Lisa Dent on Chicago’s Afternoon News to explain how she and four engineering students invented Tastee Tape, an edible tape that hold wraps and burritos together. Follow Your Favorite Chicago’s Afternoon News Personalities on Twitter:Follow @LisaDentSpeaksFollow @SteveBertrand Follow @kpowell720 Follow @maryvandeveldeFollow @LaurenLapka

She Pivots
‘I was always a woman': Paula Neira

She Pivots

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 43:44


When Paula Neira graduated with distinction from the U.S Naval Academy in 1985 and went on to serve in the Navy, she was faced with the difficult choice. As a transgender woman, Paula had to make the difficult choice to leave the Navy so she could live authentically. A difficult moment turned into an inspiring pivot when she decided to serve her country in another way - through nursing. She spent five years as a trauma ER nurse, but after feeling frustrated that she didn't have a voice, she pivoted again. She decided to go to law school then used her law degree to fight for something deeply personal to her: the repeal of Don't Ask Don't Tell (the archaic policy that barred openly gay, lesbian, or bisexual persons from military service). Emily talks with Paula about how she leveraged her pivots and became a leading expert on transgender military service and health care. She now works at Johns Hopkins and has an impressive list of letters after her name (Paula M. Neira, J.D., M.S.N). Be sure to subscribe, leave us a rating and share with your friends if you liked this episode! She Pivots was created in partnership with Marie Claire to highlight women, their stories, and how their pivot became their success. To learn more about Paula, follow us on Instagram @ShePivotsThePodcast or visit marieclaire.com/shepivots.This episode is sponsored by Michter's Distillery. Michter's Distillery has a passion for making the finest bourbon, rye and American whiskey possible.For more information follow us on social media @michterswhiskey or go to michters.com or visit your favorite bartender.LINKS: Instagram: www.instagram.com/shepivotsthepodcastTwitter: twitter.com/shepivotsthepodWebsite: www.shepivotsthepodcast.com/

The MSing Link
65. True Relapse/Flare vs. Pseudoexacerbation: A Neurologists' Take

The MSing Link

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 36:03


Distinguishing the difference between a true flare or relapse vs. a pseudo flare or relapse can be challenging at the best of times. Today, I sit down with Dr. Michael Kornberg to discuss what he, as a neurologist, looks out for in determining the difference between the two. We also discuss holistic approaches to treatment, medications, and the future of MS treatments. This episode is chock full of great insight! Dr. Kornberg is Assistant Professor of Neurology and an Associate Director of the Neurology Residency Program at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is a member of the Johns Hopkins Immunology and Cellular and Molecular Medicine graduate programs. Dr. Kornberg received MD and PhD degrees from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and he stayed at Johns Hopkins to complete residency training in neurology followed by a clinical and research fellowship in neuroimmunology. He specializes in the care of individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases of the nervous system. In addition to his clinical work, he runs a research program focused on better understanding the pathogenesis of MS and identifying novel therapeutic strategies to prevent neurodegeneration and promote remyelination in MS patients. Specifically, his lab studies the role of diet and metabolism in inflammation, as well the role of innate immune cells in determining the success or failure of repair processes in the brain. Find Dr. Kornberg: Twitter - @mdkornberg Research Website - https://kornberglab.com Google - Johns Hopkins Multiple Sclerosis Center Additional Resources: https://www.doctorgretchenhawley.com/insider Reach out to Me: Gretchen@DoctorGretchenHawley.com Website: www.MSingLink.com Social: ★ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/mswellness ★ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/doctor.gretchen ★ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/doctorgretchenhawley?sub_confirmation=1 → Game Changers Course: https://www.doctorgretchenhawley.com/GameChangersCourse → Total Core Program: https://www.doctorgretchenhawley.com/TotalCoreProgram → The MSing Link: https://www.doctorgretchenhawley.com/TheMSingLink

The Dishcast with Andrew Sullivan
Francis Fukuyama On How Liberalism Split Apart

The Dishcast with Andrew Sullivan

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 64:06


Fukuyama is simply the most sophisticated and nuanced political scientist in the field today. He’s currently at Stanford, but he’s also taught at Johns Hopkins and George Mason. The author of almost a dozen books, his most famous is The End of History and the Last Man, published shortly after the collapse of the Soviet Union. His new book is Liberalism and Its Discontents.You can listen to the episode right away in the audio player above, or click the dropdown menu to add the Dishcast to your podcast feed. For two clips of my convo with Fukuyama — explaining why we need to pay attention to “the men without chests,” and remembering when the political right championed open borders — head over to our YouTube page.Did you ever catch the episode last year with Glenn Greenwald criticizing Bolsonaro, woke journalism, and animal torture? We now have a full transcript available, if you’d rather read the conversation.Back to Fukuyama, the following meme captures much of the sentiment addressed in the episode:A fan of the Dishcast has been anticipating the episode:You announced a few weeks ago that you’d be interviewing Francis Fukuyama, so I decided to re-read The End of History. While I’m sure you’ve no need of assistance of any kind, I wanted to remind you of why some folks are struck by its prescience. Towards the end, he highlights the potential danger for liberal societies that have solved so many problems — there is no end to the amount of “problems” that a society can then invent:To find common purpose in the quiet days of peace is hard…. [When] there is no tyranny or oppression against which to struggle, experience suggests that if men cannot struggle on behalf of a just cause, because that struggle was victorious in an earlier generation, then they will struggle against the just cause. They will struggle for the sake of struggle. They will struggle, in other words, out of a certain kind of boredom. They cannot imagine living in a world without struggle. If the world they live in is a world characterized by peace and prosperity, then they will struggle against that peace and prosperity … and against democracy.He then refers to some French college-student protests in 1968 against Charles de Gaulle:… [they] had no rational reason to rebel. They were, for the most part, pampered offspring of one of the freest and most prosperous societies on earth. But it was precisely the absence of struggle and sacrifice in their middle-class lives that led them to take to the streets and confront the police … they had no particularly coherent vision of a better society.Like the old Cervantes metaphor — then and now, we see people inventing enemies and problems while they obliviously find themselves “tilting at windmills.”There is no greater example of this, to my mind, than the current LGBTQIA++ movement. Fukuyama and I discuss these people, also known as “the men without chests”:Related to that conversation is a reader email over my recent item, “The Rumblings of Rome”:I enjoyed your take on the faltering mos maiorum of our American republic, and I think you’re onto something important. These values and practices are what keep the system together in times of crisis, and their abandonment is a canary in the democratic coal mine. I know you’ve used the Weimar analogy before, and it is apt: Hitler may have issued the coup de grace to German democracy, but its demise was hastened by powerful elites who in the years beforehand eroded republican norms and removed safeguards to authoritarianism. Certainly the Roman example is also apt, as you convincingly argue here.But what troubles me is a point you make in the linked article in New York Magazine: “But a political system designed for a relatively small city had to make some serious adjustments as its territory and prosperity and population exploded.”  The system was ill-equipped for how Rome evolved over centuries from a city-state to a sprawling empire, and the lack of meaningful reform amplified popular frustrations and opened the door for opportunists like the Gracchus brothers to demagogue, generals like Marius and Sulla to assert political authority, and Senators — desperate to preserve the system — to embrace political violence and thus inadvertently hasten its demise. The system did not evolve enough to meet the challenges posed by expansion, and so people began to reject the system, sometimes for cynical and self-serving reasons, sometimes due to righteous anger born from real suffering, and sometimes in a misguided attempt to save the system from itself.Our America, of course, is vastly different from the Founders’ in any number of areas, and I have often wondered how well our system, even with the amendment process, can respond to the challenges of the 21st century. Especially given our partisan intransigence, our social media echo chambers, and our Super-PAC funded campaigns — things no one imagined in the 18th century — do we really have any chance of meaningful reform on healthcare, welfare, immigration, election integrity, etc.?  To put this another way, democracies work best, I think, when they combine change and continuity — keeping a foot in virtuous traditions while also adapting to new circumstances. If we can’t do the latter, what chance is there to also do the former? I mean, are we fucked?Thanks for your historical thinking on this issue — I try to tell my students that a working knowledge of history is essential to making sense of the modern world. The Sinister Symmetry Of CRT And GRT, CtdReaders continue the debate from this week’s main page over my comparisons of CRT to GRT. This next reader shares a brilliant video on the parallels between right-wing racists and woke racists:Your excellent piece reminded me of this very funny sketch:I recently read James Lindsay’s new book, Race Marxism. His analysis isn’t always watertight, and people have picked holes in the past, but his explanation on page 239 is that this conflict results from the Hegelian dialectical process at the heart of CRT (thesis/antithesis/synthesis):In a very real sense, all of this “alchemy” is meant to reinvigorate the master-slave dialectic in a contemporary cultural and legal context. Indeed, this feature of Critical Race Theory is why so many people rightly perceive that it is, for all its “anti racism” built on an undeniable engine of white supremacy that regards whites as superior, blacks as inferior, and this state being in immediate need of being abolished through critique and multiculturalism. In fact Critical Race Theory defines itself as the antithesis (and method for seeking synthesis) to the systemic “white supremacy” it believes fundamentally organises society …CRT’s version of anti-racism therefore isn’t about a liberal process of using democratic institutions to reduce racism gradually through passing laws and changing public opinion through education. It’s a deliberately confrontational process by which you challenge an idea (racism/white supremacy) with its opposite (antiracism/anti whiteness). We end up in constant racial conflict, as the Hegelians forever continue to restart the dialectic process after every failure they suffer.  This next reader, though, senses a false equivalence:You quoted a reader voicing one of the right’s standard new grievances, about alleged differences in media treatment between the Buffalo shooter and the recent NYC subway shooter. Instead of just nodding along, you should pause for a second and examine this critically, because it’s not an apples-to-apples comparison. The Buffalo shooter wrote a manifesto in which he apparently explained that he intended to target black people and why. And then he did so. The NYC subway shooter, in contrast, made some rambling videos expressing a mishmash of racist views, and then, in addition, he shot up a subway. Have you ever been on the subway? Did it strike you as a bastion of whiteness or white privilege? Is it where you would go to try to kill white people (or shoot them in the legs, as he apparently did, for whatever mentally disturbed reason)? Is there any evidence that he selected white people out of the crowd? His attack was just some kind of weirdly disordered thinking, or perhaps intended in a foggy sense as an attack on New York City, whose (black) mayor he had also criticized.I think that’s a fair distinction, especially the choice of target. Another reader claims a false equivalence of a very different sort:I found your latest column unpersuasive. While I like the aesthetic symmetry of “CRT and GRT” as a title, I am not at all convinced there exists an actual intellectual symmetry of the two things as distinct ideas. Yes, both depend on and promote a race-essentialist worldview, and both undermine our nation’s ideals and identity. But that is where their symmetry ends. On a political level, CRT not only claims far more power throughout all our elite institutions, but it also holds responsibility for far more violence and destruction. Which major institution has propagated anything close to GRT? One could make a case for Fox News through Tucker Carlson. I would disagree — as would your podcast guest Briahna Joy Gray, who is on the left. But even so, that is one institution that claims any kind of power in our society, compared to all the others captured by CRT. In terms of violence and destruction, see no further than the summer 2020 riots and the various other attacks motivated by anti-whiteness. Of course, none of this is to dismiss the vile atrocities committed by white supremacists. But I don’t understand why you find the need to draw a false equivalence between the two when one of these evils is clearly a fringe element of our society, with no real threat of spreading further beyond its current limits, while the other already has near-complete elite capture.Also, a minor but important point: you wrote that “Hispanics are originally from Europe.” This is false. The reason Hispanics/Latinos are considered an ethnicity and not a race in the U.S. context is that we are a complete mix of many races. There are Asian Peruvians, Black Cubans, Indigenous Mexicans, White Argentines, and a complete mix of all of the above and more, including mestizos, mulattos, et al. Of course, Hispanics/Latinos (which are not the same circles, by the way; most of Latin America is considered both, but Brazilians are Latinos and not Hispanics, and Spaniards are Hispanics but not Latinos) are united by a common Iberian history, which has resulted in common institutions, heritage, culture, religion, and pair of languages (Spanish and Portuguese). But given the deep, centuries-old mix of indigenous peoples and African slaves and Asian immigrants beyond just Europeans throughout Latin America, it’s just false to claim that “Hispanics are originally from Europe.”Along those lines, another adds:In 2019, Mexican-Americans comprised 61.5% of all Latino Americans, so by and large, when we discuss Hispanics, we are generally discussing Mexican immigrants. Weren’t there a lot of indigenous people in Mexico and Central America at the time of the Conquest? Didn’t most of them have children, so that those children are reflected in current demographic analyses of Mexico?The 1921 census shows Mestizos and indigenous groups as the majority — usually the vast majority — in literally every Mexican state. Numbers of self-reported “white” Mexicans have increased substantially since then (though no explanation is posited for the decline in Mestizo or indigenous populations), but self-identified “whites” still are a minority at 47% of the Mexican population, with 51.5% as either indigenous or “most likely Mestizos.” Frankly, it is likely not the white groups that are congregating at the border. Your explanation seems to assume that Mexico was unpopulated at the time of the Conquest, which is a gross misrepresentation. Thanks for these complications of too breezy a statement. Another reader gets philosophical:I enjoyed your piece this week on CRT/GRT. Also, on Friday I read David Brooks’ piece on conservatism/progressivism, and it made me think of John Keats’ bitter — and ultimately incorrect — epitaph for himself: “Here lies one whose name is writ in water.” That would fit most of those who have ever walked the earth, including most “public intellectuals,” to use your phrase. Humans come and go, and we know damned well that we are likely soon to be forgotten, unless we become a curiosity for ancestry researchers.It strikes me that this is a defense for conservative “philosophy.” We don’t live a life entirely within ourselves. We pay attention to what has gone before. Progressives see a long history of oppression, identify with it, and project it into the future. Conservatives are mindful of the past, in family, ethnicity and faith; even if some of it is wrapped in a flag of “patriotism.” Tradition is important to both sides, for better or for worse. We can’t escape it, so why not find ways to discuss it civilly? Which brings me back to Keats. His eying expression of humility was mistaken. Present-day feelings of certitude, on left or right, are badly in need of humility — and that, I believe, is a conservative thought.Me too.David French On Religious Liberty, CRT, Grace, CtdFrom a “gay, Christian, moderate conservative”:I thoroughly enjoyed your episode with David French, especially since I got to hear the two of you discuss Church of Christ theology at the beginning. I grew up in the Church of Christ denomination and went to a sister school (Abilene Christian University) of the one French attended (Lipscomb). The faith journey you both described is one very familiar to me. My boyfriend also grew up in the Church of Christ tradition and we still feel a certain affinity to it, although it’s obviously not a tradition that affirms same-sex relationships.I loved that the two of you were able to have such a gracious conversation about faith and politics. I enjoy reminders that one’s stance on gay marriage is hardly the litmus test for both conservatism and Christianity that it once was. There’s so much more common ground to explore, and Christianity and conservatism are big enough for differing views — even in the midst of this bizarre cultural climate we’re in.Here’s a snippet of my convo with David: Another listener makes a recommendation:In follow-up to your conversation with David French, could you possibly interview Tim Alberta? His new article in The Atlantic, “How Politics Poisoned the Evangelical Church,” is worth your attention.Indeed. Thanks for the tip. Lastly, a sermon for Sunday:I am an Episcopal priest in Atlanta (though hopefully one not quite as woke as Douglas Murray accuses us of being). If it’s not too bold, I wanted to send you the manuscript of my sermon from last Sunday. The sermon is from a small passage for Easter 6, Revelation 22.3-4: “Nothing accursed will be found there any more. But the throne of God and of the Lamb will be in it, and his servants will worship him; they will see his face, and his name will be on their foreheads.”I started working on it, and then on Friday I heard the first part of your interview with David French. I think that interview found its way into my sermon, and I know that your ongoing conversations have affected my preaching in a positive way.The manuscript is pasted below, but I’ll close by saying again how grateful I am for your podcast, and I hope that you might consider occasionally having theologians onto your show.  I’ve loved hearing you talk about faith with Cornell West and David French, and I think it might be fascinating to have a systematic theological think through issues like CRT and gender.The sermon in full:“They’re out to get you.”  That’s what the world will tell you, over and over.  “They” — whoever they are — “really are out to get you.”Now, sometimes it’s true.  The world can be a dangerous place, after all.  But usually the message isn’t that they are after you, Jennifer, or you, Meredith, or Kevon, or Rafael, or whatever your name might be.And they’re not after you because of your character or your choices.  The message is that they are after you because of your team, because of your skin color, or where you were born, or your gender.  They’re after you because of what you represent.And again, sometimes it’s true.  Last weekend the threats were real on both sides of our country.Last weekend a young man consumed by evil drove 200 miles to Buffalo to open fire on innocent people.  But not just any innocent people.  He targeted a black neighborhood because he wanted to send a message of hate, a message of terror.  He wanted black people all across the country to believe that they had a target on their backs. And with our history of violence and terror, our black sisters and brothers heard his message.On the other side of the country another man used a gun to send the same message of hate to a different group of people.  In California the Irvine Taiwanese Presbyterian Church was enjoying a church picnic when a Chinese-born American citizen walked up and started shooting.The sheriff said the man was motivated by his hatred of Taiwan, and he sent his message of hate and terror to those innocent people.+++The messages don’t always come with bullets, and they aren’t always about race, and they also aren’t limited to one side of our national divide.When you listen with a careful ear to the issues that divide us, what gives them their power is the underlying threat that something of YOUR identity, something of YOUR autonomy, is about to be taken away.“They” are going to take something away from you because of who you are.+++I remember 20 years ago after the Twin Towers fell, the rhetoric on both sides of our political culture was that “they” hated our freedom, hated capitalism, hated democracy.  That “they” were coming for us.Two years later, our church was almost split apart by the debate over same-sex relationships.  For the progressive, the message was that “they” were coming for your right to love who you choose.  For the conservative the message was that “they” were coming to destroy the social values you had been taught were right and good.We hear those threats still today.  The uproar over cancel culture and over excesses in cultural trends doesn’t feel to some conservatives like an interesting social trend; it feels like a threat.  It feels like “they” are telling conservatives,  “We’re coming for you.”On the other side, progressives and especially progressive women heard an old threat earlier this month: “They’re coming to take away control of your bodies.”  When that Supreme Court draft was leaked, the message went forth - “They’re coming for you, they’re coming to take control of your bodies away from you.”In fact, they’re not just coming for your right to an abortion, they’re also coming to take away Obergefell and then Loving and then Brown v. Board of Education.+++So…I’ve been taking some big swings up here this morning, on things that are frankly outside of my area of expertise, and I haven’t said a word yet about God or Jesus or had any kind of gospel message.That’s about to change, but the reason I’m trying to bring up all the touchy stuff is because the call to follow isn’t just for other people and it isn’t just for when somebody cuts you off in traffic. Now let me repeat my disclaimer.  I’m not saying the threats are all imagined, or that they’re all equal.  Sometimes the threat is real.  BUT, in the face of those threats, in the face of the world’s desire to put you on notice that you NEED to be afraid, the question for us this morning is, “Should my being a follower of Jesus affect how I respond?”+++When I was first ordained Bishop Alexander told me to always keep my vows in the correct order. He meant that FIRST I was a baptized child of God, THEN I was Emily’s husband, and THEN I was a priest, and if I remembered the hierarchy of those vows my life would be properly ordered.I haven’t always gotten it right but when I’ve gotten a little unbalanced his advice has helped me get back where I need to be.And Bishop Neil’s advice helped me to see something even deeper:  we all move through the world with multiple identities and we have to keep them in their proper order.In my case I can think of myself as a man, even as a white man, as a Georgian, an American a Christian, a father, a husband, priest, neighbor, brother, and of course a really, really good singer/dancer.Almost all of those identities are important but for me to be who I aspire to be there needs to be a hierarchy to them.  I need to make sure all those identities are properly ordered.+++There’s a distinction in Christianity between being a Creature of God and a Child of God.All of us are Creatures of God.  All of us, every person who ever lived, are creatures of God.  Our first and most important identity is that we are created by a God who loves every single one of us and that, as Fr. Rhett said last Sunday, there’s not a thing you can do about it.And for those of us baptized into the body of Christ, those of us who believe in Jesus as the crucified and risen Lord we have a second and eternal identity - beloved Child of God.+++A properly ordered life embraces those two identities - beloved Creature of God and beloved Child of God - as more important than all the others we have.  And then downstream of those two come all the rest:  gender, sex, family, values, race, creed, and on and on.So am I white?  Am I black?  Am I Taiwanese or Woman or Man or Husband or parent or Democrat or Republican or even American? Yes, I am all of those things and more, but my first identity, the very core of who I am, is always beloved Creature of God, and my eternal hope is not in escaping the threats or defeating my enemies but in holding on to my identity as a Child of God, as a member of the Body of Christ.+++The world will try to disorder your identities.  The world will whisper and then shout fear & danger & division, will try to make your threatened identity the center of who you are.When evil drives to Buffalo, fear will tell you that your first identity is the color of your skin, and that it always will be.When evil drives to a church picnic, fear tells you that your primary identity, your fundamental self is as a pawn in a great ethnic & political strife.When cultural values change, when marriage is redefined, or social programs try to right historic wrongs, or when human laws try to legislate that which cannot be legislated but must be legislated, when they try to balance the rights of the mother and the rights of the unborn, fear will tell you that your core identity is not beloved Creature of God or beloved Child of God, but is your demographic or political or racial or gender identity, and that your response has to come from that threatened self.But Jesus tells us something different.  Jesus tells us to love our enemies.Jesus tells us we are all beloved creatures of God, the just and unjust alike, AND that those baptized into his death and resurrection have an ETERNAL identity greater than anything else about us, an ETERNAL hope that will live  beyond any other understanding of self.+++Our response to Jesus’ message is to understand who we really are and order our identities so that we do not respond to threats as the world does.Our call is to respond as beloved, as BELOVED children of God who share a common humanity and a common creator, and as people whose hope is not in temporary victories but in eternal life.+++It’s not easy.Hate invites you to respond with hate.  Fear invites you to respond with fear.Change makes you want to dig in your heels and hunker down and defend YOUR turf, YOUR way of life, with all that you’ve got.No wonder Jesus said we must give up our lives to follow him.+++In the Revelation to John, Jesus showed John a vision of the heavenly city.  In that city the Children of God had the name of Jesus written on each of their foreheads.Using our language of baptism, they were sealed by the Holy Spirit and marked as Christ’s own forever.WE are those Children of God.  Our true identity is not in any of our human distinctions but in the name of Jesus written across our faces.Our task is to understand that truth and to live it, to treat one another with that common heritage as Creatures of God even when we feel threatened by one another, and to teach our children that no matter what the world whispers to them about who they are, their truest, deepest, most fundamental self will always be … Beloved of God. Get full access to The Weekly Dish at andrewsullivan.substack.com/subscribe

The Pulse
Chasing Sleep

The Pulse

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 50:17


Sleep — we all need it, but most people aren't getting enough of it. Ideally, we spend about a third of our lives asleep. When we're well rested, we feel like we can take on the world. But when we're not, we find ourselves exhausted, cranky, moody, forgetful … and our overall health takes a hit. Clearly, sleep is important. The question is — why? What happens when we sleep? What makes it such an important part of our survival? And what's stopping us from getting our best rest? On this episode, we look at the anatomy of sleep — why it matters, how we get our best sleep, and what happens when we don't. We hear stories about what happened to one physician when long COVID brought her sleeplessness to a crisis level, why one physical therapist says we're all sleeping wrong, and a look inside our sleeping brains. Also heard on this week’s episode: We talk with Mark Wu, a professor of neurology at Johns Hopkins and sleep physician, who explains the latest science on what happens in our brains when we sleep, and what happens when we don’t. We also put together a mixtape with some of our favorite songs about sleep and dreams. You can find it below or listen on Spotify.

Hochman and Crowder
05-26-2022 - Fixing the Burrito

Hochman and Crowder

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 1:32


Say goodbye to the days of your burrito falling apart because of a bad roll... engineering students from Johns Hopkins university, or as we like to call them: heroes, have the solution. 

Incident Report
Curing COVID Myopia (w/Dr. Marty Makary)

Incident Report

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 94:53


What has our short-sighted COVID approach cost us? Dr. Makary returns to discuss all the other stuff we're damaging or neglecting. Video: https://zdoggmd.com/covid-myopia All our shows with Marty: https://zdoggmd.com/tag/marty-makary/ Marty's "Redesigning Healthcare" Johns Hopkins research movement: https://healthredesign.org Your support keeps us independent and mild-to-moderately awesome: https://zdoggmd.com/supporters or make a 1-time donation at https://paypal.me/zdoggmd Show, podcast, music, support, shop, social media, and email: https://lnk.bio/zdoggmd

The Jordan Harbinger Show
664: Reiki Healing | Skeptical Sunday

The Jordan Harbinger Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 33:38


Is Reiki -- the not-so-ancient Japanese energy healing technique by which your psychic empath aunt swears -- a legitimate way to treat ailments like cancer, diabetic neuropathy, anxiety, lactose intolerance, and cooties? Or is it nothing more than a placebo that, at best, might offer you a relaxing way to spend an hour of your day -- and a day of your savings? Here on Skeptical Sunday, it's all hands on deck to discover the truth about the controversial practice of Reiki healing. Welcome to Skeptical Sunday, a special edition of The Jordan Harbinger Show where Jordan and fact-checker, comedian, and podcast host David C. Smalley break down a topic that you may have never thought about, open things up, and debunk common misconceptions. Full show notes and resources can be found here: jordanharbinger.com/664 On This Week's Skeptical Sunday, We Discuss: How "ancient" is the hallowed practice of Reiki healing? With over 800 hospitals in the world offering Reiki -- including Johns Hopkins and the Mayo Clinic -- there must be some tangible benefit to this energy healing technique, right? What scientific evidence do we have to support the efficacy of Reiki healing? How [much] does someone [have to pay to] become a Reiki practitioner? What can (and what can't) Reiki do for you? Connect with Jordan on Twitter, on Instagram, and on YouTube. If you have something you'd like us to tackle here on Skeptical Sunday, drop Jordan a line at jordan@jordanharbinger.com and let him know! Connect with David at his website, on Twitter, on Instagram, on TikTok, and on YouTube, and make sure to check out The David C. Smalley Podcast here or wherever you enjoy listening to fine podcasts! If you like to get out of your house and catch live comedy, keep an eye on David's tour dates here and text David directly at (424) 306-0798 for tickets when he comes to your town! Sign up for Six-Minute Networking -- our free networking and relationship development mini course -- at jordanharbinger.com/course! Like this show? Please leave us a review here...