Podcasts about The Nature Conservancy

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Latest podcast episodes about The Nature Conservancy

Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living
Real or Artificial Christmas Trees: Which Option Is Better for the Environment?

Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 40:25


The holidays are quickly approaching, and you know what that means: it's time to decorate the Christmas tree! Before making a purchase, let's dive into one of the most popular holiday debates: Which is better for the environment—real or artificial? This week, we answer that question with Andy Finton, a Massachusetts-based Forest Ecologist for The Nature Conservancy. For more information, visit https://brightly.eco/blog/christmas-tree-sustainability.

Clauses & Controversies
Ep 91 ft. Sydney Maki

Clauses & Controversies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 43:13


A Truly Gnarly Year Times are pretty bad for emerging markets, what with a surging dollar, interest rate increases, etc. But somehow, despite having a president with, ahem, eccentric economic views, Turkey's recent $1.5 billion bond issuance was reportedly way oversubscribed. So things are a bit weird. We've long admired and learned from the work of this week's guest, Sydney Maki of Bloomberg. Sydney joins us to talk about the state of the sovereign debt world in general and, in particular, about a couple of deals (and debt crises) that have perplexed us. What are the prospects for a restructuring of Suriname's debt, and how does the discovery of offshore oil complicated things? And what should we make of the recent blue bond transaction involving Barbados and the Nature Conservancy? We are skeptical of debt buybacks in general, especially when the country buys back only a fraction of debt at seemingly high prices. But maybe we are being too cynical about the blue bond deal? Sydney helps us make sense of what's going on. Producer: Leanna Doty

Tom Rowland Podcast
David Moss -  Fisheries Project Manager for The Nature Conservancy - Episode #693

Tom Rowland Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 71:33


David Moss is the fisheries Project Manager for The Nature Conservancy in Florida who has recently been working on implementing descending devices to improve the survival rate of Grouper and Snapper. The new Deck to Depth program will drive collaboration with recreational anglers, captains, and others across Florida to promote proper release practices and better data collection.  This podcast is presented by Black Rifle Coffee  Use code BLASTOFF25 for 25% off Salt Strong Insiders Club: https://bit.ly/RowlandMembership LMNT Electrolytes Special Offer: http://DrinkLMNT.com/TomRowland If you have questions or suggestions for the show you can text Tom at 1 305-930-7346 This episode has been brought to you by Waypoint TV. Waypoint is the ultimate outdoor network featuring streaming of full-length fishing and hunting television shows, short films and instructional content, a social media network, Podcast Network. Waypoint is available on Roku, Samsung Smart TV, Amazon Fire TV, Apple TV, Chromecast, Android TV, IoS devices, Android Devices and at www.waypointtv.com all for FREE! Join the Waypoint Army by following them on Instagram at the following accounts @waypointtv @waypointfish @waypointsalt @waypointboating @waypointhunt @waypointoutdoorcollective Find over 150 full episodes of Saltwater Experience on Waypoint You can follow Tom Rowland on Instagram @tom_rowland and find all episodes and show notes at Tomrowlandpodcast.com Learn more about Tom's Television shows by visiting their websites:  Saltwater Experience Into the Blue Sweetwater Contact Tom through email: Podcast@saltwaterexperience.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Trail EAffect
Copper Harbor Trails Club 2022 Updates / Partnership with SRAM #97

Trail EAffect

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 44:09


Trail EAffect Episode 97 Copper Harbor Trails Club 2022 Updates / SRAM Partnership Intros for Nathan Miller and Adam Yeoman Giving Tuesday Campaign – Adam SRAM $500,000 Partnership for Five Years – Nathan Triple Your Donation to Copper Harbor Trails Through Giving Tuesday when you donate to Copper Harbor Trails Club through the Portage Health Foundation, which is then matched by SRAM 31,000 Acres of land acquired through The Nature Conservancy of Michigan for the purpose of continued recreation and conservation for all The actual scope of the 31,000 acres of land 2022 Review and successes Opening of formerly closed trails: Overflow, Flying Squirrel and Danimal Keweenaw Mountain Lodge Purchase of land for trail access The Highland Trail East Bluff Bike Park Copper Harbor Trails Fest New courses for 2023? Copper Harbor Trails Fest Enduro Staging / Timing Closing Comments Huge Thank You to Volunteers! Links: Portage Health Foundation Giving Tuesday Link: https://www.phfgive.org/giving-tuesday Copper Harbor Trails Club / SRAM Partnership Link: https://copperharbortrails.org/sram-support The Nature Conservancy Michigan 31,000 Acres of Land Acquisition: https://www.nature.org/en-us/newsroom/michigan-keweenaw-31000-acres-protected/   This Podcast has been edited and produced by Evolution Trail Services Trail EAffect Show Links: Evolution Trail Services: www.evotrails.com Contact Josh at evolutiontrails@gmail.com Support Trail EAffect through donations at: https://www.patreon.com/traileaffect You can also reach out and donate via PayPal or other means if you feel so inclined to do so.  

RBC Disruptors
COP27: Turning Talk into Action?

RBC Disruptors

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 28:40


Amidst a backdrop of Russia's invasion of Ukraine, rapidly rising inflation, ever-lingering COVID, and near constant political convulsions, this year's COP27 took on an unprecedented weight. In this episode, let John Stackhouse walk you through the recently wrapped COP27 in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. With his special guest co-host Naomi Powell, Managing Editor of RBC Economics and Thought Leadership, get John's front row seat perspective on the United Nations Climate Change Conference, also known as the Conference of the Parties (COP27)Hear from some of the world's top leaders and thinkers, including talking to climate scientists Katharine Hayhoe and Johan Rockström; Elizabeth Nsimadala, the President of the Eastern Africa Farmers Federation, as well as Heather Chalmers, the president and CEO of GE Canada.From loss and damages to climate financing, John talks about the successes and failures of COP27, and where Canada stands out. Is the goal of halting global warming at 1.5*C still attainable? Listen in and find out. John Stackhouse shares his takeaways from COP27, click here to read the piece called, “Reality Bites”. For more information about COP27, the United Nations Climate Change Conference, in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt click here. If you'd like to know more about some of the people John spoke with, read up on Katharine Hayhoe at the Nature Conservancy; Rick Smith, the president of the Canadian Climate Institute, or the call to action by Elizabeth Nsimala, the President of the Eastern Africa Farmers Federation. Disruptors recently took an in-depth look at how Canada can reduce emissions and waste in the agricultural sector, it's a special, three-part series called, The Growing Challenge, listen here.

Flatlander Podcast
Episode 40: Migratory and Shorebirds at Cheyenne Bottoms

Flatlander Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 62:51


Hey Flatlanders! Join us today as we learn about the many species of birds that call Cheyenne Bottoms home. Tanna and Lyndzee are joined on location at the Kansas Wetlands Education Center by Dr. Robert Penner, The Nature Conservancy, and Jason Wagner, Kansas Wildlife and Parks, to talk about shorebirds and migratory birds.HostsTanna Fanshier, Lyndzee RhineSourcesKDWP Waterfowl ReportPocket Guide - Shorebirds and Migratory BirdseBirdCheyenne Bottoms Kansas Wetlands Education CenterKansas Birding Facebook GroupSandhill Crane Identification TestSandhill Crane RegulationsDuck Stamp

Rewilding Earth
Episode 98: The Story Of Fire and Ecological Restoration with Deborah Landau

Rewilding Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 36:41


About Deborah Landau is the Director of Ecological Management at the Maryland/DC Chapter of The Nature Conservancy, where she has worked since 2001. Her work focuses on restoration at more than 30 Conservancy preserves across Maryland and DC. She works with staff and partners to restore natural communities across the state, ensuring they are healthy […] Read full article: Episode 98: The Story Of Fire and Ecological Restoration with Deborah Landau

ClimateGenn hosted by Nick Breeze
At COP27 with Professor Katharine Hayhoe Asking, Are These The Shifting Sands of Climate Policy?

ClimateGenn hosted by Nick Breeze

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 15:51


Recorded in week 2 of COP27 in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt. See more climate change podcasts at https://genn.cc and support my work at https://patreon.com/genncc Professor Hayhoe is a Canadian climate scientist and communicator at the Nature Conservancy and Texas Tech University on the United States. I this episode we discuss the shifting momentum away from 1.5ºC as a boundary for climate heating, as well as the new arrival of Loss & Damage into the negotiations. Are the public becoming too cynical and are we all, on the outside, powerless to have any impact? Katharine gives her take on all these issues.

County Conversations
Voters Approve $4.2 Billion Environmental Bond Act

County Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 18:05


Last week voters passed the Clean Air, Clean Water and Green Jobs Bond Act. The bond act will fund flood reduction, wastewater and stormwater upgrades, park preservation, and green infrastructure and renewable energy projects to fight climate change. In light of this historic investment, we've revisited a conversation held earlier this year with NYSAC's Multimedia Specialist Kate Pierce-Nimz and Jessica Ottney Mahar, Director of Policy & Strategy at The Nature Conservancy to dive into details about the Clean Air, Clean Water, and Green Jobs Bond Act. Our thanks go to NYSAC's sponsor, the New York Power Authority.

What Fuels You
S15E9: Kristen Bauer

What Fuels You

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 48:47


Kristen Bauer is the CEO of Laird Norton Wealth Management (LNWM) and has more than two decades of experience in private wealth management, financial services, and business management. Before joining LNWM, Kristen was a senior leader at Tiedemann Advisors serving as Managing Director for the Pacific Northwest. She also served as CFO, Chief Business Development Officer, Chief Client Service Officer, and then President of Threshold Group. Kristen graduated from the University of Washington Foster School of Business with a Bachelor of Arts with an emphasis in Business and Accounting. She is a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) and a Personal Financial Specialist (PFS). Kristen grew up in Bend, Oregon, which inspired her love of the outdoors and her ongoing involvement with environmental causes. She currently serves as Board Chair of The Nature Conservancy, Washington Chapter, and is Board President of the Wilderness Awareness School. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Zest
Awww… Shucks! “OysterMom” Deborah Keller on the Importance of Sustainable Aquaculture

The Zest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 25:35


For Deborah Keller of Tallahassee, the world is her oyster. After a 29-year career with The Nature Conservancy, Deborah turned her attention to sustainable shellfish. Nicknamed the OysterMom, she has been farming and selling fresh oysters for nearly a decade.In this interview, the conservationist describes the impact of climate change and hurricanes on oystering. She also explains the far-reaching economic impact of Florida's oyster industry, recounts the bureaucratic red tape she encountered along the way and describes the serenity and stress she experiences on oyster harvesting day.And of course, we had to ask Deborah about her favorite way to eat oysters.Related episodes:Conscious Cuisine: How to Choose Sustainable SeafoodDive into Florida's Spiny Lobster SeasonConscious Cuisine: Chef Justin Timineri of Fresh From Florida Offers Ideas for Eating What's in SeasonChef Tenney Flynn's Love Affair with The Deep End of Flavor

Hacks & Wonks
Ballot in Review: November 4, 2022 - with Mike McGinn, Shannon Cheng, and Bryce Cannatelli

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 86:24


With Election Day looming and ballots due in a few days, this week's show is a Ballot-In-Review! Crystal is joined by perennial favorite Mike McGinn along with the rest of the Hacks & Wonks team - Bryce Cannatelli and Shannon Cheng - to discuss the recent political climate, break down the context of down-ballot races and why your vote matters. Listen in as the crew opens their ballots and thinks their way through the important choices in front of them. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Follow us on Twitter at @HacksWonks. Find the host, Crystal Fincher, on Twitter at @finchfrii and find today's ballot party attendees: Mike McGinn at @mayormcginn, Bryce Cannatelli at @inascenttweets, and Shannon Cheng at @drbestturtle. More info is available at officialhacksandwonks.com.   Time Stamps Washington State Advisory Votes - 05:57 King County Charter Amendment 1 and Proposition 1 -  08:25 Federal Races - 16:54 Washington Congressional Races - 18:00 Secretary of State - 32:00 Washington State Legislature Races - 33:13 LD26 - 33:27 LD47 - 35:30 LD42 - 36:57 LD30 - 38:09 LD44 - 38:22 LD46 - 38:55 LD36 - 39:45 LD37 - 39:56 LD34 - 41:05 King County Prosecuting Attorney - 41:32 City of Seattle Municipal Court - 52:40  City of Seattle Proposition Nos. 1A and 1B - 1:01:48   Reminders Don't forget to vote! Visit votewa.gov for voting resources.   Institute for a Democratic Future 2023 applications are live! The initial deadline is November 2nd, and the final deadline is November 13th.   Learn more about how to get involved in Seattle's budget season at this link and about King County's budget timeline here.   Student debt relief sign-ups are live! Visit this link to enroll.   Resources  Washington State Advisory Votes:  “Tim Eyman's legacy of advisory votes on taxes hits WA ballots again” by David Kroman from The Seattle Times King County Charter Amendment 1 and Proposition 1: “King County considers moving most elections to even years” by Joseph O'Sullivan from Crosscut   King County Proposition No. 1 - Conservation Futures Levy Washington Congressional Races: “Congressional candidate Joe Kent wants to rewrite history of Jan. 6 attack” by Jim Brunner from The Seattle Times   Straight Talk bonus round: Marie Gluesenkamp Perez and Joe Kent from KGW News   “Rep. Schrier, challenger Matt Larkin clash in debate over who's extreme” by Jim Brunner from The Seattle Times Secretary of State: Hacks & Wonks Interview - Julie Anderson, Candidate for Washington Secretary of State   Hacks & Wonks Interview - Steve Hobbs, Candidate for Washington Secretary of State   Hacks & Wonks - Secretary of State audiograms - Addressing Democratic criticism of Julie Anderson   Hacks & Wonks - Secretary of State audiograms - Thoughts on Ranked Choice Voting   Hacks & Wonks - Secretary of State audiograms - Experience to manage the broad portfolio of the SoS office Washington State Legislature Races: LD26 - “New ad highlights Washington candidate's past behavior against staffers” by Shauna Sowersby from The News Tribune   Sign up to volunteer for Emily Randall's campaign here on her website.   LD47 - Hacks & Wonks Interview - Claudia Kauffman, Candidate for 47th LD State Senator   “Boyce, Kauffman vie for WA senate in swing district with Kent, Auburn” by Daniel Beekman from The Seattle Times   LD42 - “Sefzik-Shewmake forum highlights abortion, health care” by Ralph Schwartz from Cascadia Daily News   LD44 - Hacks & Wonks Interview - April Berg, Candidate for 44th LD State Representative   LD46 - Hacks & Wonks Interview - Darya Farivar, Candidate for 46th LD State Representative   LD36 - Hacks & Wonks Interview - Jeff Manson, Candidate for 36th LD State Representative   Hacks & Wonks Interview - Julia Reed, Candidate for 36th LD State Representative   LD37 - Hacks & Wonks Interview - Emijah Smith, Candidate for 37th LD State Representative   Hacks & Wonks Interview - Chipalo Street, Candidate for 37th LD State Representative   South Seattle Emerald 37th LD Candidate Forum   LD34 - Hacks & Wonks Interview - Emily Alvarado, Candidate for 34th LD State Representative   Hacks & Wonks Interview - Leah Griffin, Candidate for 34th LD State Representative   Hacks & Wonks Elections 2022 Resource Page King County Prosecuting Attorney: "PubliCola Questions: King County Prosecuting Attorney Candidate Leesa Manion" by Erica C. Barnett from PubliCola   "PubiCola Questions: King County Prosecuting Attorney Candidate Jim Ferrell" by Erica C. Barnett from PubliCola   "Leesa Manion, Jim Ferrell tied in the 2022 contest for King County Prosecuting Attorney" by Andrew Villeneuve from The Cascadia Advocate   "Leesa Manion Holds Razor-Thin Lead in King County Prosecutor Race, NPI Poll Finds" by Douglas Trumm from The Urbanist Washington Supreme Court: Hacks & Wonks Interview - Washington Supreme Court Justice Mary Yu   Hacks & Wonks Interview - Washington Supreme Court Justice G. Helen Whitener City of Seattle Municipal Court: Hacks & Wonks City of Seattle Municipal Court Judge Candidate Forum   "Defense Attorneys Say Harsh Sentencing Decision Reveals Judge's Bias" by Will Casey from The Stranger City of Seattle Proposition Nos. 1A and 1B: City of Seattle - Proposition Nos. 1A and 1B   Ranked Choice Voting vs. Approval Voting from FairVote   The Stranger - City of Seattle Propositions Nos. 1A and 1B   Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I am Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant - a busy one - and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington state through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full text transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Today, we are continuing our Friday almost-live shows where we review the news of the week with a co-host - and we're adding a little twist. So first, we want to welcome back to the program, friend of the show and today's co-host: activist, community leader, former mayor of Seattle, and Executive Director of America Walks, the popular Mike McGinn. Welcome back. [00:01:03] Mike McGinn: Not quite popular enough - Crystal - you have to acknowledge that, but I think we need to go to the other guests on the show today. [00:01:12] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, so we're coming with you with a full Hacks & Wonks crew today. We have the incredible Bryce Cannatelli, who coordinates everything with the show and holds it down. Pleased to have her with us today. Hey, Bryce. [00:01:29] Bryce Cannatelli: Hey, Crystal. [00:01:30] Crystal Fincher: And we have Dr. Shannon Cheng, who is here to enlighten us also with her wisdom and insight, along with Bryce. Hey, Shannon. [00:01:39] Shannon Cheng: Hey, Crystal - super excited to be here. [00:01:42] Crystal Fincher: You could probably hear the sarcasm in that - but this is going to be fun. We are having a Hacks & Wonks little ballot party - we thought it may be helpful - because we talk about several things on the ballot, we talk about several races. But a lot of times we open up the ballot and there are things on there that we haven't seen, haven't heard of, and are trying to figure out. So we thought we would all just open up the ballots, go through them together - some of us in this call are later-voting people because we like receiving all of the voter communication until the last minute, so we haven't turned them in - but we encourage everyone to turn in their ballots as soon as possible. As we go through this ballot, we will add timestamps and let you know when we discuss the different areas of the ballot. So if you have a particular question about a particular area, you can just go to that portion in the show and figure out that, because we actually have taken some time to discuss what is in this ballot and on this ballot. So good luck. Make sure you get your ballot in. If you can't find it, if something happens to it, if you have questions, votewa.gov, V-O-T-E-W-A.gov is a resource. Or hey, just @ the show @HacksWonks to reply to us and we will try and chase down any answers to questions that you have. So vote, make sure everyone you know votes. This is really important and a lot is at stake locally and nationally. And what we do locally is going to dictate what happens nationally. And with that, I will give a few reminders today. And yeah, number one is vote. Don't forget to vote. The election - Election Day is Tuesday, November 8th. You can go to votewa.gov, that's V-O-T-E-W-A.gov to get all of the information about voting. If something has gone haywire, if you can't find your ballot, if you're not sure what you need to do, if you need information about accessible voting, or if you need to figure out about how to register to vote - which you still can do in person if you haven't registered to vote or changed your address or anything like that - go to votewa.gov and you can get all that figured out. Also, the Institute for a Democratic Future is accepting applications for this coming year's new class. The deadline is November 13th and so make sure to get those in there. I've talked about this before on the show, the Institute for a Democratic Future is great for people who lean left and who want to learn about making a difference in their community, who want to learn about politics and policy, or potentially even having a career - it's responsible for my career in politics. So if you want to learn more about that, feel free to hit me up or visit the website, which we'll link in the show notes. Also, it is budget season around the state - and including in Seattle - and so we're going to include resources for the Seattle budget process as well as King County in our show notes, so stay tuned with that and make sure that you get involved in making your priorities and needs known to your elected officials who are allocating money for the next year or two there. Student debt relief - signing up is happening now. Don't forget to do that. Don't wait to do that. We'll put a link to that in the show notes. And Daylight Savings Time ends this Sunday at 2 a.m. We're falling an hour back. We're moving into darkness in dismay and it's a very sad time for some of us here at Hacks & Wonks who like the extra sunshine in the evening. So here we go into the dark months of winter. [00:05:31] Mike McGinn: But Hacks & Wonks will be on every week to bring some sunshine into your life. [00:05:37] Crystal Fincher: We will try. We will try. [00:05:40] Mike McGinn: Stay tuned in on a regular basis. Yeah. [00:05:43] Crystal Fincher: So let's open up our ballots, crew. Let's see what we have here and start to talk through - for those of you who still have to vote - some things that may be useful, helpful. So the first things we see on this ballot that we've opened up are Advisory Votes. Man, these Advisory Votes on every freaking ballot. We have two Advisory Votes here. How did we get into this Advisory Vote situation, Mike? What is this going on? [00:06:15] Mike McGinn: This was part of the Tim Eyman Full Employment Act where he was trying to find yet another ballot measure to put in front of the people. So what this one does - it is passed by the people - and basically they have the opportunity to have a second opinion on every tax that's passed by the Legislature. So that's why you always have all these Advisory Votes at the top. But everybody approves to-date, the public approves the votes that are passed by the Legislature. It's why we elect people, send them to the Legislature. It's really just turned into extra space on the ballot, which costs money and makes the ballot a little longer. And so we could all save a little space on the ballot if the Legislature changed this. In the meantime, don't upset that budget that your Legislature worked to craft - just vote to approve. [00:07:08] Crystal Fincher: I completely agree with that. I cannot wait until we get to the time where we get the opportunity to repeal this. It makes our ballot longer. It confuses people. This is just anytime there is basically revenue passed, it has to appear as an Advisory Vote, which does not have any force of law. It doesn't actually do anything. It is basically a poll about something that has already happened. So yes, vote to approve. But also I would really like a movement to vote to eliminate these Advisory Votes. One thing it does is it makes the ballot longer, which is not pleasant for a lot of people. What do you think, Bryce? [00:07:49] Bryce Cannatelli: Yeah, I wanted to hop in just to say that the choices are Repealed and Maintained. And so the suggestions to vote to approve them are to Maintain them as the maintain option. But yeah, no, I definitely agree. We've talked about it in past shows. We talk about it off the air. Getting people to vote down-ballot is always a challenge. And these Advisory Votes just get in the way of that. I think we'll have more to talk about when we get to the Proposition Nos. 1A and 1B question on the back of the ballot about what length might do to people answering those questions. [00:08:25] Crystal Fincher: All right. So we are here in King County. We all have King County ballots. The next thing I see on my ballot - I think you probably see the next thing on yours - as we travel down from the Advisory Votes, is actually King County, a County Charter Amendment. Charter Amendment No. 1 - even-numbered election years for certain county offices. Question: Shall the King County Charter be amended to move elections for the county offices of Executive, Assessor, Director of Elections, and Councilmembers from odd-numbered years to even-numbered years? Why is it important to move from odd-numbered to even-numbered years according to the advocates for this charter amendment, Mike? [00:09:10] Mike McGinn: The single most important thing you can do to improve voter turnout. When you look at election results in the state of Washington, Oregon, anywhere else around the country, so many more people turn out in an even year because you also have congressional elections or presidential elections. It's just a more momentous ballot than the odd year elections. And so if you think people should vote more, if you think democracy is a good thing, moving it to an even year is great. The county has the option to do that. Cities can't just do it on their own - they need a change in state law. Representative Mia Gregerson has been pushing for that and others have pushed for it. In addition to getting more people to vote, it also really improves the demographics of the ballot. We're getting more young people, more people of color, more immigrant refugees - who are here and can legally vote. We're just getting so many more people voting that we're getting a more representative ballot. So I've been a big proponent of this. You just get a different electorate. You get a better, more representative electorate. And if what you care about, and I do, is more affordable housing - if you get an older, more conservative electorate, they're going to oppose new housing and they're going to oppose new taxes for affordable housing. They're going to be more likely to say, keep the car lane and don't make it easier to walk or bike or use transit. So we need to get an electorate and get elections in even years where we have an electorate that more reflects where we need to go. And hearing from more people, if you believe in democracy, it's great. So big kudos to King County Council for - and Girmay Zahilay, in particular - for championing this. And hopefully we can move all the elections to even years. By the way, we'll save some money too. We'll have fewer elections that the elections offices have to step up for. [00:11:15] Crystal Fincher: I'd love to see it. What do you think about it, Dr. Cheng? [00:11:18] Shannon Cheng: I'm really excited. We talk a lot about - on this show - about how local elections really matter and that local government is really where you feel the actual changes and impacts in people's day-to-day lives. And so having some of more of our local elections in a year where more people are going to be paying attention to it, I think it will be super helpful. I know I talked to somebody recently who felt like they were in Washington state and so their vote didn't matter. And, we're going to get to these other races. And I was trying to tell them, no, we have things on our ballot that really do matter, like the King County Prosecutor and judges and all that. And I think just combining it in a way where people are going to be paying more attention to these things that really matter in their lives will be super helpful. [00:12:03] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. Well said - I agree. Next up on the ballot for King County is Proposition No. 1, the Conservation Futures Levy. So the King County Council passed Ordinance 19-458 concerning funding to protect open space lands in King County. The proposition would provide funding to pay, finance, or refinance acquisition and preservation of urban green spaces, natural areas, wildlife, and some salmon habitat, trails, river corridors, farmlands, and forests. And would reauthorize restoration of the county's Conservation Futures property tax to levy a rate that will be assessed for collection in 2023 and use the dollar amount from 2023 for the purpose of computing subsequent levy collections. So should this be approved or rejected? There are some really compelling statements about this, but this is really important for protecting open space lands in King County. There have been lots of conversations just about the preservation of land, the preservation of open and undeveloped land, and how important that is. These are conversations related to sprawl, related to just air quality, related to just people having the opportunity to recreate near where they live and not selling or developing all available land and the consequences that potentially come from that. So it is important, I think, widely acknowledged as important from people all across the aisle. It's important to maintain all of this. I see a statement submitted by Sally Jewell, who I believe is a former CEO of REI and served in a presidential administration, and De'Sean Quinn, who is a Tukwila City Council member, as well as Dow Constantine. And really, we have to take this action to protect climate change, to protect these last best places throughout King County. So far, this program has safeguarded over 100,000 acres of land, including Cougar Mountain, the Duwamish Waterway Park, and Sammamish River Trail. And they can accelerate that with this proposition. Statement in opposition to it really basically says that, hey, parks are having challenges being maintained, and we've already done enough. I don't know that there's a lot of people here in King County feeling that we've done enough to address climate change or that we've done enough to protect local land. Protecting farms and fresh water, and open space seems like a priority to so many people in this area - and what makes this area so desirable to the people living here and those who visit and eventually come here. What do you think about this, Mike? [00:15:08] Mike McGinn: It's a parks levy. I'm for parks levies, generally. I actually got to run one once, and it was just great. And there's so much more in it than you might think. And if we talk about community - that to me is ultimately what this is about. There's clearly the environmental protection, but that's the quality of life and the community gathering places as well. So yeah, and it's a renewal. It's an expansion and a renewal of an existing levy. And I think every time you get to go to a great county facility, you just have to remember that the money came from somewhere, and this is where it comes from. They really have to pass these levies to make it work, given the way finances work for county and municipal governments. [00:15:54] Crystal Fincher: Yeah. And so this will cost the average homeowner about $2 more per month. There is relief available to qualified low-income seniors and other households. And the funding recommendations are made by an independent advisory committee and subject to external audit. So it's not just, hey, willy-nilly stuff happening here. There is accountability and oversight - looks like it is endorsed by the Nature Conservancy, Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust for Public Land, the Wilderness Society, Seattle Parks Foundation, REI, Dow Constantine and council members - just a lot of support there. I find those arguments to be particularly convincing. But this is an important one that's flown under the radar for a number of people, I think. I've gotten a lot of questions from people saying, whoa, what should I do with these county amendments and this proposition? And so just wanted to make sure that we went through that. Next on my ballot are the federal races, which have gotten a ton of coverage. I think if you listen to the show, odds are you probably know if you're going to be voting for Senator Patty Murray or her challenger, Tiffany Smiley, but that is at the top of the ballot right now. Do any of you have anything to chime in with about this race? [00:17:22] Mike McGinn: It's really fascinating to watch how this race is starting to become part of a national narrative about whether or not there's a red wave - going to hit the federal elections. And then there's some counterarguments. And we could pundit all afternoon on this one. And I'm sure a lot of you, if you're politically oriented, have really been watching the national news about what will happen in Congress. Will the Senate remain Democratic or will it turn Republican? Is the House going to flip? Most pundits say it will flip to Republican control, but there are still some folks out there holding hope that it might not. So I think the real message just is - if you cared about the national scene, you have an opportunity to play locally too. There's a Senate election in the state of Washington as well. [00:18:15] Crystal Fincher: All right. And next up on people's ballots - is going to vary based on where we live. It's going to be the congressional races. So I actually live in the Ninth Congressional District. We have a very competitive Eighth Congressional District race between Kim Schrier and Matt Larkin. Kim Schrier, the Democrat, Matt Larkin, the Republican. We have other races. Who's on your ballots? What congressional districts are you in? [00:18:43] Mike McGinn: I've got Seven, which is Pramila Jayapal and Cliff Moon. [00:18:46] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, I think all three of you are in Seven there. Those races are a bit less competitive. I think two of the most competitive races here are going to be Kim Schrier versus Matt Larkin. And then down in southwest Washington, actually - in the Third Congressional District - between Marie Gluesenkamp Perez and extremist Republican, MAGA Republican Joe Kent, who is just... It's hard to do justice to him by describing him because I've tried to do it and then I've been like, okay, I can't do this. Here, watch this clip of him and Marie Gluesenkamp Perez in this sit-down with a reporter, just answering questions. And it is wild. He does not think January 6th happened in the way we all saw it happened with our eyes. He thinks that it was a CIA false flag operation. He doesn't think that police officers were killed as a result of that. He's deep into conspiracy theories, deep into the election denial of the 2020 election. Just deep into so many things - eager to cut social security, eager to cut so many things, eager to defund Ukraine between Ukraine and Russia, eager to do all sorts of things at the border. This is someone who eagerly and has multiple times appeared on Tucker Carlson. This is not Jaime Herrera Beutler. This is not the type of Republican that people are used to seeing in this district, or even as people think about Republicans in this country now - even the more extreme version that people are getting familiar with. This is the tip of the spear of the most extreme. He models himself after Marjorie Taylor Greene, says he looks up to her and wants to do that, does not want to work across the aisle, doesn't see a point to it. Rarely does media outside of the conservative bubble, does not want to debate Marie Gluesenkamp Perez. This is a race where a lot is at stake. Jim Brunner just wrote an article about it this morning in The Seattle Times. Actually, he shared it - I'm not sure if he wrote it. But this is an important one for people to get engaged in. We've talked about the importance of - even if you don't live in a district, hey, why don't you adopt a district, make some phone calls, do some phone banking, get down there and canvass - do what you can. Don't let this slip away without doing everything possible. The Third Congressional District is traditionally a Republican district, but it's traditionally a Republican district that has elected Republicans like Jaime Herrera Beutler, who were nowhere near as extreme as Joe Kent. This is a closer race than we've seen there in quite some time. If enough people get involved and if enough people get engaged, who knows what could happen? Democrats seem energized down there. This is one where - don't let it go by without everyone pitching in and doing what they can to engage in that race. Any thoughts that you have on that one? [00:22:10] Mike McGinn: This race, yeah, it does highlight just where the Republican Party has been going. I think you see some of this in the Murray-Smiley race as well. I've been really impressed by the campaigning of the Democrat in the race and the way in which she's approaching the race. This is a district that is - it's a swing district, but it's a lean-R swing district, if that makes sense. It has the Portland suburbs, but it also has more rural areas as well. Yeah, maybe this - if this were on the East Coast, people would be looking at this as a bellwether of which way the trend is going in national politics. Who knows? Maybe we'll be able to tell a little bit from the East Coast about how this race might work out by the time they start announcing results from this coast. But really, I think the D in this race - she's run a really solid race, speaking directly to people's economic concerns as a small business owner as well. And there's this thing where reporters want to talk about partisanship or polarized politics or divisiveness. And yeah, I would say the electorate is polarized - there are a hell of a lot of folks nationwide who are going to pull the lever for candidates because they want to see Republicans have charge of the chamber, regardless of the shortcomings of the local candidate. It's a really fascinating phenomenon that's going on. But I'm going to make an argument that it's - the Democrats look a lot like candidates I've seen in the past running. And the Republicans don't, in my mind, in terms of the extremism that we start to see on whether or not the election was stolen. The number of election deniers that are out there for the last election - there's just no credible evidence that there was any voter fraud. It went in front of numerous, numerous courts. It went in front of judges appointed by Republicans and Democrats. There's just no evidence for this. And I don't know that the media knows how to handle this - that when you have one side that just denies reality and the other side is still operating mostly within the frame of U.S. politics, as I've seen it in the years I've been involved in U.S. politics, but they both-sides it so much. And I think this raises a great illustration of that. The Democrat is really a right down the middle-of-the-road type of politician, and the Republican here is espousing things that just aren't so, and it's one hell of a tight race down there, according to all the polls. And portraying this as Americans are divided or the politicians are polarizing doesn't capture what's going on. [00:25:19] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, I think that is a good point. What do you think, Bryce? [00:25:23] Bryce Cannatelli: Yeah, I just wanted to weave back in something that Shannon mentioned earlier, which is that there are still people who live here and who vote here, who think that they live in Washington - they live in Western Washington - they're pretty safe from things. And I think this race is an important reminder that there are people running with these extreme views. There are these people running here in the state with really far-right priorities and goals. And this is a federal race, so it's gotten a lot of media attention, but it just highlights how important it is to pay attention to local races as well - races that for the State House and for State Senate and other positions - and just pay attention to what people are running on and making sure when we see people coming with extreme and dangerous views, that that's called out, that we let people know. Election Day is still in a few days. There's still opportunities to inform voters in this district about the candidates. There are still opportunities for voters who are really worried about rhetoric like this and candidates like this to get out there and talk to voters and inform them about this race. [00:26:32] Crystal Fincher: This conversation reminds me of one other thing, and actually was having a conversation about this as we were punditing on Kiro the other day. And there are some Republicans who are going - well, they're calling everybody extreme. Yeah, they're calling Joe Kent extreme, but they're also calling Tiffany Smiley extreme. And they're not the same extreme, but they're painting them with the same brush - you're hearing that for everybody, all the Republicans. If you say it about everybody, it's meaningless. And the challenge is, and the thing that the Republican Party has set up, is that they do have these extremists who are out further than a lot of the other Republicans that are elected, at least outwardly, right? And saying things that have been openly covered as white nationalism, Christian nationalism, that have been anti-Semitic, that have been racist, that have been homophobic, anti-trans, anti-gay - just very openly blatant right? And that is absolutely extreme. And no, not every Republican is outwardly openly saying that. They leave that to the Joe Kents and the Marjorie Taylor Greenes. But what is striking to me is how they have not been reined in by the people who have previously been considered as moderate and have previously been considered as the adults in the room. Those adults in the room are doing nothing to contain that extremist element in the party, and in fact, have given them more power, more visibility. The Republican Party, all of their caucuses have pumped money into these campaigns. Their allied PACs and supporters have pumped money into these campaigns and have been apologists for them. So if you will not rebuke when you hear those things said, if you will not stand up and say, you know what, I'm standing for these principles, and that person is not doing that, and we're both carrying the same label - I don't want to carry the same label as a person who is saying that - that is not what I stand for. We're not standing shoulder to shoulder. We're hearing none of that. We're hearing silence. And there are some people who want to interpret that silence as, well, clearly they don't agree. And when I talk to them, they sound perfectly reasonable, and they've been moderate in the past. We're hearing some of the most troubling things that we have in a while. Just the open anti-Semitism, the open racism, the open homophobia and transphobia that we're seeing is alarming. They're passing laws against it. This is not theoretical language. And we're seeing political violence as a direct result. That, of course, was predicted, right? When we hear speech like that, it incites violence. We have talked about it inciting violence, and it incited violence in multiple places, in multiple ways. And we've seen that just in the past couple of weeks - from January 6th to Nancy Pelosi to the Michigan governor - we're seeing this all over the place, right? And so silence is enabling violence. Silence is not moderation. It's enabling this extremism and violence. So yes, when you hear them all being painted with the same broad brush, it's because they're doing nothing to stop this rapid descent into this cesspool that we're on the precipice of, and that some states have already fallen to, right? It's important to vocally stand up against this, against hate, whenever we see it. And that's not a partisan statement. And if a party is trying to say that when you say that you need to call out violence, that you need to call out political violence, that you need to stand up and talk against anti-Semitism and call it what it is, and somehow they're putting a partisan label on that, be very wary of a party that says that speaking against those things is speaking against their party. They're telling you what the party is about if those things they're labeling as a partisan attack. I think that's very important to be said. This is so far beyond a Democratic and Republican issue, and we have to be aware that these Republicans are caucusing together, right? They're voting together for a national agenda, and we've heard this national agenda articulated. We've heard the things that they're queuing up. We've seen the types of policies that they're passing in places like Florida and Texas. We have the preview of what's coming there, and it is ugly, right? And ugly to people who used to consider themselves Republican. So to me, this is beyond the conversation of just Democrat and Republican. This is a conversation that we have to have before we even get to issues, because if we're leading with that hateful rhetoric and we're leading with that extremism, it really doesn't matter what someone is saying about issues, because the things that they are saying about people in their community is already excluding people and already doing that. I think that's extremely important to say, that we can't say that enough, and that trying to dismiss this extremism, and dismiss criticisms of it, and dismiss the refusal to call it out for what it is - is extremism itself. All right. So next on our ballot, we have the state races, starting with Secretary of State, which is a lively race. Now, we have talked a bunch about the Secretary of State race, and have also been posting a lot about it on the Hacks & Wonks Twitter account this week. So for that, between Democrat Steve Hobbs and Non-partisan Julie Anderson, we're going to refer you to those other shows. We'll put links in the show notes. We'll put links to the little audiograms and snippets that we have of the candidates' takes on different things. Steve Hobbs was a longtime Democratic senator known as a moderate for quite some time - and Julie Anderson actually just released a new ad that talks about that and him as a moderate. And then Julie Anderson has been the Pierce County auditor in Pierce County for 12 years, I believe now, and has built relationships around that area. So that's an interesting race to follow. We'll put those links in there, but that's the next one on the ballot. And then we get into the legislative races, which are going to be different depending on which legislative district that you're in. I just wanted to mention a few of the battleground districts here in the state. So one of them is in the 26th Legislative District Senate race - very important - between Emily Randall, Senator Emily Randall, and current Representative Jesse Young, who's running for that Senate seat. Emily's a Democrat with a strong record and has been representing that community and been in the community for quite some time. Jesse Young is one of the more extreme Republicans in our legislature, has - in the mold of the Matt Sheas, who made a lot of news for his activity in domestic terrorism. And if you think that sounds like a euphemism or like a stretch of the truth, I mean literal domestic terrorism like running a camp training people for war and putting tracking devices on law enforcement vehicles, and making threats to political opponents - extremism - and advancing bills to outlaw abortion in Washington state under threat of putting doctors in prison - that kind of extremism. And Jesse Young, as we talked about last week with Pierce County Council Chair Derek Young, has actually been suspended from working with legislative staff because of his past behavior and harassment or abuse. He is no longer permitted to have legislative staff, which is certainly hobbling in one's ability to get their job done. They lean very heavily on those staff. And so not being allowed to have one and having to do or not get done all of the administrative work, preparation work, ability to meet with constituents, ability to review and prepare legislation and represent the community is absolutely hobbled by that. But that is actually a really close race. Another one where it makes sense if you can adopt a race, that 26th Legislative District is a really important one where people can get involved with and make their voices heard. Also, the 47th Legislative District is a hotbed of activity - a competitive Senate race there - open seat left by the exiting Senator Mona Das and is being competed for by former State Senator, Democrat Claudia Kauffman and Republican Bill Boyce. This has been a purple district, a swing district, has elected both Democrats and Republicans. This district has a history of extremely close races. And so we have a race here where we're seeing some of the dynamics that we see in Democrat versus Republican races. Choice is a huge issue here. Bill Boyce - being bankrolled by far-right Republicans - has been giving really mushy responses about what he thinks about a woman's right to choose. And so that is certainly on the ballot, as well as just the history of corporate giveaways, tax - as was quoted in the paper - tax breaks and sweetheart deals given to rich developers and donors. And so certainly looking at the donor rolls there, you get a different story of who those legislators would be based on the activity there. So another very important partisan race. 42nd Legislative District, a very competitive race between Sharon Shewmake and Simon Sefzik - another Democrat versus Republican race - very important here for the Senate and just a variety of things. And again, we're seeing just greater space between the two parties. Here in the state, we, I think, have seen Republicans who have considered themselves moderate and who have been less eager to engage in some of the social wedge issue rhetoric that sometimes we see on a national basis. There have been Republicans who wore it as a badge of honor previously to say, no, that's not me. I'm focused on these other issues, but stand up. And whether it's being pro-choice, whether it is standing up for marriage equality. There have been some before here who have done that, some who haven't, but some who have. We are not seeing that now. Things are following the direction of some of the national races. And so we have that there. 30th Legislative District with Claire Wilson and Linda Kochmar, as well as the race between Jamila Taylor and Casey Jones are close - and so engaging in those is important. And then the 44th Legislative District with John Lovick, the Democrat who was previously a representative, currently a representative, now running to be a Senator, against Republican Jeb Brewer. Republican Mark Hamsworth for the House seat versus Brandy Donaghy, who was appointed to that seat and is running to fill the term, this new term. And then April Berg versus her Republican opponent. So pay attention to those races. Please make sure that you're engaging in these battlegrounds. And then we also have just Seattle races and - that we've covered. So in the 46th Legislative District, we have a classic Seattle moderate versus progressive race. Even though those, when you get into it, the labels might be a little bit simplistic, but certainly someone who seems more resistant to taxation, more resistant to change in Lelach Rave versus Darya Faravar, who wants to take more of an active approach in addressing issues like homelessness, housing affordability, and public safety - and move more in the direction of things that we've seen with the history of working versus those that have not. So that's a choice that we have there. We also have previously interviewed Darya, and so we'll link that in the show notes for your information. The 36th Legislative District features a race between Democrats Julia Reed and Jeff Manson. We've also interviewed both in that race. And we'll link that in the show notes. The 37th Legislative District is one where we did a primary candidate forum, have interviewed both of those candidates there - Democrat Chipalo Street and Democrat Emijah Smith. And we also did a debate in partnership with the South Seattle Emerald and others - hosted by the South Seattle Emerald - an in-person debate, actually. And we will link those there. I think that there are some interesting issues in that race, notable differences. We will also share kind of the lightning round stuff. But also, hey let's make sure that we're recognizing the full humanity of people and that we are not treating people who are in the LGBTQ community any differently than others. And that is an issue of difference in that race. So I encourage you all to do your homework about that and make sure that any candidate that you're voting for fully stands up for the rights of all people in our community. And that you communicate with the candidates about that and make sure all of your candidates know how important that is to you. And then we have the 34th Legislative District with Democrats Leah Griffin and Emily Alvarado. We've interviewed both of them. We'll link both of those shows in the show notes. So there are contested races throughout Seattle. Encourage you to vote in those races and make your choice. If you need help, refer to our show notes or to officialhacksandwonks.com. We have an Election 2022 page there and we'll put all of the resources on there. Next, we go to the County Prosecuting Attorney's race here in King County, that is between Jim Ferrell, who is the mayor of Federal Way, and Leesa Manion, who's the current Chief of Staff in the Prosecuting Attorney's Office. Jim Ferrell has been endorsed by folks like the King County Republican Party, some mayors, King County Council member Pete von Reichbauer, like the Covington and Algona mayor. Leesa Manion has been endorsed by the King County Democratic party, former governor Gary Locke, local labor unions. So there's a little bit of a difference in the profile of their supporters that kind of indicates the approach that they're looking to take. One, being more in line with some of the data that we're seeing in the most effective approaches to addressing crime and accountability - that has yielded some results in what we've seen, especially with youth crime and youth intervention, which seems to be particularly effective with Leesa Manion and her managing this office and hundreds of staff and attorney, which is certainly in line with what the County Prosecuting Attorney needs to do. Jim Ferrell, coming from the mayor of Federal Way, has talked about more of a punitive approach to this and is talking about cracking down on some of the things that we have been seeing as successful. It's interesting in how this race is shaping up and what the candidates are talking about and what they aren't talking about with them. Certainly Leesa has been leaning into her experience, the type of coalition that she's building, whether it's people who are in support of more common sense gun reform and making sure guns don't proliferate on the streets, to those who are looking to maintain accountability but make sure that we're doing the things that give folks the best chance of reducing recidivism, or people returning, or revictimizing people who are committing further crimes. Jim Ferrell seems very focused on trying to apply longer sentences, lengthier sentences, talking about a more, again, punitive approach, prosecuting more, longer sentences - that type of stuff. So with that, what do you think? What is your take on this race, Shannon? [00:44:01] Shannon Cheng: So this race is between Leesa Manion, who's the current Chief of Staff for the outgoing King County Prosecutor, Dan Satterberg - she's been in that position for quite a time. And her opponent is Jim Ferrell, who is the current mayor of Federal Way. So when I look at this race, I see - with Leesa Manion who - it's a continuation of what King County has been doing, which I would characterize as incremental reform of the criminal legal system to be more fair and equitable. I think this can be embodied in initiatives they aspire to, such as declaring racism as a public health crisis or the goal of Zero Youth Detention. So I think with Manion, you will get a continuation of the slow work that the county is doing to try to make our criminal legal system more equitable and fair. Whereas with Ferrell, I see this as a candidate who's trying to throw us back to punitive tactics that have been proven to be ineffective. He wants to be more tough-on-crime and is riding this wave of Republicans pointing to crime as being the reason not to support the Democratic candidate. I think that Ferrell has specifically spoken about being against and wanting to roll back some of the diversion programs that King County has started to try to use, especially for youth. And I also - even if you don't - if you agree on this punitive approach, I think it's also worth considering that right now the legal system is kind of at capacity. So what Ferrell is suggesting is going to put even more strain on it. The courts are already - have backlogs coming from the pandemic and the jails are full and not functioning well and not providing people humane conditions to be in there. So I just fear that that will lead to a lot more suffering for many people across our county. And I think this is a really important race to look at and think about. [00:46:12] Crystal Fincher: So Mike, what's your take on this? [00:46:14] Mike McGinn: It's interesting to see the contrast here. It's a local version of this national debate that we have now seen - that the proper response to crime is to crack down harder. And we're seeing this here as well. I worked with Dan Satterberg and he was a really interesting elected official. And honestly, to me, I may not have agreed with him on every decision - I know I didn't agree with him on every decision he made. But he was a civil servant first and foremost. He was trying to figure out what was the right path forward. He was engaged in the discussion. He led on things like Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion, people returning to the community from jail - getting their records cleared and restoration of rights. So he was really, and it's interesting, he was elected as a Republican, moved the race to a nonpartisan race and then was elected as a Democrat. So he clearly was somebody who was willing to go where the evidence led and not go based on ideology. So that's the experience we've had from that office, which is, I think, what you want in a prosecutor's office. It's a pretty important position. The effect it has on people's lives is immense. I think that really says something that we see someone looking to continue that tradition. And then we see someone coming in with - if only we punished people more. How's that been working? Really? We have some information on that, which is it doesn't really work. It takes a combination of the judicial system and community systems to really try to deal with root causes of crime, to deal with recidivism, to deal with the issues here. And I think that this is a little bit of a bellwether here. Are we going to try to be a progressive place, a progressive county that adopts and looks at new approaches? Or are we going to go to a more regressive approach to this? Because, yeah, that's worked so well in solving crime over the decades. [00:48:34] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, I think so. What's your take, Bryce? [00:48:37] Bryce Cannatelli: Yeah, I don't know how much more I have to add to this other than just the importance of this race and the importance of making sure we have somebody who's really thinking about the - not just people's emotional concerns about crime, but the actions and the strategies and the programs that have been proven to address the things that actually lower crime. We've talked on a number of different episodes throughout this year about programs that have successfully reduced recidivism. And those are programs that often get criticized by people who claim to be tough on crime. And I just think that's something to interrogate our candidates about for this position, because the county prosecutor has a lot of influence in terms of how the county addresses crime in a way that's going to impact real people in big ways. [00:49:29] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, I agree. I will chime in and say that we just got a new public poll here that was just reported on, I think yesterday, showing that this race is basically statistically tied. So turnout is going to be really important. Lots of people talk about - they look at the federal races - they wonder if their vote matters. They're going, okay millions of people are voting. Why does mine make a difference? Really what makes a difference are these down-ballot races, are these local races. If you care about the issues of homelessness, justice, equity, affordability, what our community looks like, who it serves - our criminal legal system is an essential part of that equation. And we're talking about, in so many of these conversations, how we intervene and address victims. And most people who have perpetrated crimes have been victims of them. And how we intervene when people are victims, especially early, and especially when they're young, dictates how their future goes and whether they end up on the path to criminalization and poverty or a better path. So the way we intervene in that makes a difference. The way we treat and handle these cases that come through and how we address accountability depends on whether our streets are made safer, whether our tax dollars are used in a way that makes it less likely that people are going to commit crime and less likely that people are victimized or more, right? And we're seeing the impacts of the status quo of a more punitive approach. And either we choose to keep doing the same thing, and polls keep showing that no one is satisfied with the condition of things today. And so we do need to consider that when we are making these choices. And I hope you take a long, hard look at that. And most of all, get engaged and vote, make sure other people vote. And talk about these races, talk about the county attorney races, talk about the judicial races that we're going to talk about in just a moment, right? These are very important. Turnout is not where we would love it to be. It's lagging behind some previous years here locally, especially among younger people. And I know that is concerning to some. So the more that people can do to make sure that everyone can - and the most impactful thing you can do is just text those close to you, call those close to you, talk to them. Hey, coworker - hey, did you get that ballot in? What are you doing for this race? Remember, this is important. Hey, cousin, hey, brother, sister, mom - it's those connections close to you and those personal contacts that actually make it more likely for those people to vote. External organizations can try and do all the voter mobilization that they can and that work is valuable and good and should happen. But hearing from someone who you care about and who cares about you saying, hey, make sure you do this, you have any questions, you need help - is one of the best things you can do to make sure that people actually turn out to vote. So with that, we can talk about a couple of these judicial races, which are next on the ballot. Now we see the state Supreme Court races and we see Justice Mary Yu, who - you probably hear affection and admiration in my voice because I have affection and admiration for Justice Mary Yu. We also have a great interview with her from a few months back that we will post in the episode notes. Justice Barbara Madsen, also wonderful. Justice Helen Whitener, who is just - look, I'm going to just go ahead and get personal. Justice Helen Whitener is everything. I just need everyone to know that Justice Whitener is everything from - just everything. Her experience - vast, broad experience - in so many elements and areas of the law. The thoughtfulness, the lived experience, the outreach into the community - just a beautiful human being and an effective and intelligent justice. I am a fan of Justice Helen Whitener and we've done a couple interviews with Justice Whitener. And fortunately this time she isn't being challenged by anyone mediocre like she was last time, so this is an uncontested race. And when I say mediocre - I mean just got his license to practice law in order to run against someone with a resume as vast and deep as Justice Whitener's. And so now we'll talk about the contested municipal judge races in the City of Seattle between Damon Shadid, who is the incumbent in that one seat - has been endorsed by a number of Democratic organizations, received Exceptionally Well Qualified by a number of organizations, and is standing on his record. And a new challenger from the City Attorney's Office, Nyjat Rose-Akins, who is endorsed by the King County Republican Party and Jenny Durkan, and is wanting to make changes to some things and talking about the record of Community Court and changes that she wants to make there. In the other race, we have judge Adam Eisenberg, who has been rated Exceptionally Well Qualified by a number of the local and ethnic bar associations, but also has received a high number of negative feedback and surveys from the King County Bar Association and concerns about management and whether women are treated fairly under his management. And then Pooja Vaddadi, who is a newcomer and a new challenger, who has been - received a number of Democratic endorsements, but also has not received any ratings from local judicial bar associations because she has chosen not to stand in front of them for ratings. Bryce, how would you characterize those races? [00:55:42] Bryce Cannatelli: Like Crystal said, we got to hear from all of these candidates in a forum. I'll start with the Damon Shadid and Nyjat Rose-Akins portion of it - they're running for Position 7. Damon Shadid has been a judge in this position for quite a while. And the main point of difference between the two is Nyjat Rose-Akins often talked about during the forum criticisms of Community Court and her interest in making a lot of changes to the Community Court system, whereas Judge Shadid has defended what that court has been able to do and hopes to see it continue in its current direction. As far as Pooja Vaddadi and Judge Eisenberg, that's another kind of longtime incumbent in the position - I can't remember how long he's been in that role - and a newcomer. And Pooja Vaddadi brought up concerns about the way that Judge Eisenberg has handled himself in the courtroom. You can hear her talk about that in our forum specifically at the end - is something that her campaign has been highlighting as of late, but also just the need that she claims there is in the municipal court for some changes. [00:56:52] Crystal Fincher: What's your take on those races, Shannon? [00:56:55] Shannon Cheng: So I think - so for the Judge Eisenberg and Pooja Vaddadi race - Pooja Vaddadi is a practicing public defender. And I think her experience in being in the court with somebody such as Judge Eisenberg presiding - it was a maybe not great experience for her. And so she saw a lot of injustice there and felt called to try to step up and bear witness and call out what was happening and how she has a different vision for how that court could be run. I personally appreciate that because I think judicial races are just very low information. It's really hard - as Crystal just went through, there was a long list of uncontested judges on the ballot - and I often look at those names and I have no idea who those people are. And so it has been interesting in this race to get a window into how courts work. And I know for me, it's been very educational. And I continue to aspire to learn more about how courts are run and what matters. And yeah, so for the Damon Shadid and Nyjat Rose-Akins - as Bryce said, I think it comes down to the vision of how Community Court will be run in the future in Seattle. Whether you want somebody from the City Attorney's Office driving the vision of how to handle low-level offenses in the city versus the path that we had been on to to try to support people in need and not further entangle them in a system that kind of - a system that can snowball on people's lives. [00:58:41] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, I think that's right on. And I think in these races, we are seeing a little bit of a difference. There has been a lot called out by Pooja Vaddadi's campaign. But in fairness, I think you referred to Pooja talking about how she was partly moved to run for this position based on some of the injustices she saw. But one of the issues in this race that has been brought up is that Judge Eisenberg was the recipient of the highest number of - basically highest amount of negative feedback. King County Bar Association does an anonymous poll of its member attorneys for judges and the highest percentage of attorneys returned negative responses for Judge Eisenberg - higher than all of the other judges and gave that feedback. Judge Eisenberg didn't seem to feel that that had any validity. And he talked about how he had been rated Exceptionally Well Qualified, which is the highest rating given by a number of different bar associations. And it being pretty standard that judges go before different bar associations and get interviewed and they evaluate their fitness for judicial office and provide a rating from Exceptionally Well Qualified, I think Very Well Qualified, just on there. And so he had a number of highest ratings. And Pooja Vaddadi decided not to sit in front of those. And she said it was because she felt that it was biased or tilted or they would automatically give high ratings to incumbents, but not give high ratings to people who weren't incumbents. So she didn't feel the need to sit before them, which is a bit different. A lot of first-time candidates do go before those bodies and are evaluated and come out with decent ratings. I'm trying to think if I recall first-time candidates getting Exceptionally Well Qualified - I think I recall a couple, but also some who haven't. So I don't know, there very well may be a role that incumbency plays in that, but that was an element in that race that came through. As well as prior coverage about whether Judge Eisenberg potentially gave someone a harsher sentence for exercising their right to a jury trial instead of accepting a plea deal. And that being a wrong thing - that is a right that people have to exercise. And whether someone pleads guilty to a charge on a deal or is found guilty on that charge, penalizing someone simply for choosing to go to trial is not something that should happen and is certainly frowned upon. And so there was some coverage in question about that. We can also link that in the show notes. So those are certainly interesting races. And I think Shannon summed up really well just what's at stake moving forward in the Damon Shadid and Nyjat Rose-Akins race. So now let's get into the meat of a Seattle big-time initiative - Propositions 1A and 1B, which are on the City of Seattle ballot. They are not on my ballot, but we've got ballots waving with Shannon and Bryce and Mike over here talking about this question. [01:02:10] Mike McGinn: Do you want me to take a shot at it? [01:02:11] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, go ahead. Take a shot at it, Mike McGinn. [01:02:16] Mike McGinn: Okay. We all know how ballots work - you get a choice between - in the primary, you normally get a whole lot of candidates to vote for and you pick one. And what this is proposing is that in the City of Seattle, whether you want a different way to vote that will give you more choices. So the first question is, and let me tell you what the two choices are. One is called approval voting. So you'd look at your ballot and you'd have multiple people on the ballot and anyone that you approved of, you'd vote for. So you could vote for one, two, three, four, to approve as many as you want. And the idea there is that you don't want to have to restrict your vote to one candidate. And I have to say there have been times when I've had multiple friends on the ballot - I just want to be able to say I voted for all of them. But there are other good reasons to want to maybe approve multiple candidates. The other style is something called ranked choice voting. So in that case, you'd rank the candidates - one, two, three, four, five. And they'd add up the votes, and whoever the lowest vote getter was would get dropped off. And so let's say - I'm standing here with Bryce and Shannon and Crystal - let's say I had ranked them Crystal first, and then Bryce, and then Shannon. If Crystal was the lowest vote getter, she'd be off the list. And my vote would now go to Bryce - my second vote would be counted. And you do this by a process of eliminating the lowest-ranked candidate until you get to a winner. And we'll probably get more into why - what are the differences between the two systems and why they're better. And there's a whole world of election nerddom, which is substantial - what is the best way to represent what the voters really want, but you're going to get to choose here. So the real question is, do you want to keep the existing system - and that's the first question on the ballot - or do you want a new system? And if you vote Yes, I want a new system, you'll also be asked - well, actually, no matter how you vote on whether you want a new system - you're then asked, which one do you like more, approval voting or ranked choice voting? So yeah, it is pretty dense and complicated. You probably want to sit down and look at this. But if I could break it down for you - if you think you want more ways to have your vote count and have more discretion in how to award it to people, you'll want to vote Yes on the initial question. And then you'll get to weigh in and decide which one of those two - approval or ranked choice voting - you like more. And that'll tee it up for people to offer their opinions on what they like more on the rest of the podcast. How was that? Did I do okay, guys, in getting the description out? [01:05:13] Crystal Fincher: You did! You did, in fact, do okay of getting the description out. And I think also just the - functionally on the ballot - what you said was really important and I just want to reiterate. So this - we're talking about - okay, there are two choices there, approval voting and ranked choice voting. But when you get your ballot, you're going to see that it is constructed in a way that's not just that simple choice. There really is an initial question and then a secondary question. The initial question - why don't you just read what's on the ballot? [01:05:47] Bryce Cannatelli: Yeah, I could do that. I can also hold it up to you, so you can see the wall of text that happens beforehand. Shannon is shaking her head on the video feed, because - Seattle voters will know it if they've opened their ballots - there's a lot of text that goes before you can actually answer the question. So please read your ballot from top to bottom to make sure that you vote for everything. But the way that it's formatted is we get an explanation of both of the individual propositions. So it says Proposition 1A, submitted by initiative petition number 134, and Proposition 1B, alternative proposed by the city council and mayor, concern allowing voters to select multiple candidates in city primary elections. Proposition 1A would allow voters in primary elections for mayor, city attorney and city council to select on the ballot as many candidates as they approve of for each office. The two candidates receiving the most votes for each office would advance to the general election consistent with state law. The city would consult with King County to include instructions on the primary ballot, such as vote for as many as you approve of for each office. As an alternative, the city council and mayor have proposed Proposition 1B, which would allow primary election voters for mayor, city attorney and

Hot Buttons
The latest food group is the micro plastics we're wearing — and digesting

Hot Buttons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 50:32


This week, we're talking about microplastics and what they're doing to the environment and our bodies. We've heard plenty about the giant plastic trash island out in the Pacific and beaches across the globe littered with plastic bottles and bags. But we're talking about plastic microfibers, the ones that make up the majority of apparel produced today. These nearly invisible fibers have been found at nearly every depth of the ocean, and they're showing up in the food chain and our bodies. They are commonly found in apples and carrots, lettuce and broccoli, and they've recently been found in 24 of 36 samples of human breast milk. Dr. Alexis Jackson from the Nature Conservancy joins the pod to help us understand the enormity of the challenge ahead. Have a question for Christina, Rachel and Shilla? Give us a call at (508) 622-5361.‬ We might feature your voicemail in an upcoming episode. Resources:   The Guardian on the first study to quantify the microfibers problem The New York Times on California's new plastics law Sourcing Journal on studies of microplastics and apparel The Nature Conservancy's Dr. Alexis Jackson Hot Buttons is a production of Post Script Media. The show is hosted by Christina Binkley, Rachel Kibbe, and Shilla Kim-Parker. Follow the show on Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dairy Stream
National-scale project examines dairy's greenhouse gas footprint

Dairy Stream

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 43:51


Across eight states, dairy farms are participating in the Dairy Soil and Water Regeneration Project to determine dairy farms' greenhouse gas footprint. Dairy Stream host Mike Austin talked with Mara Cloutier, a Ph.D in soil science and biogeochemistry with the Soil Health Institute, and Lee Kinnard, dairy farmer of Kinnard Farms in Casco, Wis. They discussed carbon associated with cover crops, reduced tillage, different manure-based products and how soil health practices are practical on all-sized dairies. Thank you to The Nature Conservancy in Wisconsin for sponsoring this episode.  Learn more about the Dairy Strong conference Jan. 18-19 here, discount registration ends Nov. 1. This podcast is co-produced by the Dairy Business Association and Edge Dairy Farmer Cooperative, sister organizations that fight for effective dairy policy in Wisconsin and Washington, D.C. 

Hudson Mohawk Magazine
Nature Conservancy Urges A Yes Vote On Environmental Bond Act

Hudson Mohawk Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 9:53


This November, voters will be asked whether they approve of the $4.2 billion Clean Water, Clean Air and Green Jobs Environmental Bond Act. $1.5 billion would go for climate change mitigation; $1.1 billion for flooding; $650 million in open space; and $650 million in water quality. Jessica Ottney Mahar talks about the bond act with Mark Dunlea for Hudson Mohawk Magazine.

Talk+Water Podcast
#48 - Andrew Sansom - Using Water Markets to Benefit the Texas Environment

Talk+Water Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 53:38


Texas+Water Editor-in-Chief Dr. Todd Votteler talks with Dr. Andrew Sansom, Founder of The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment at Texas State University, about using water markets as a tool to protect environmental flows in Texas. Dr. Andrew Sansom is one of Texas' leading conservationists. He is the Founder of The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment at Texas State University. He is a former Executive Director of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and Executive Director of the Texas Nature Conservancy. For his commitment to the management and protection of natural resources, he is a recipient of the Chevron Conservation Award, The Chuck Yeager Award from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, The Pugsley Medal from the National Park Foundation, the Seton Award from the International Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Nature Conservancy. Dr. Sansom is a Distinguished Alumnus of Austin College and Texas Tech University.

Bringin' it Backwards
Interview with Forester

Bringin' it Backwards

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 32:19


We had the pleasure of interviewing Forester over Zoom video!Following up their spring 2022 album, Watercolor, the Los Angeles-based indie electronic duo, Forester (aka David Parris and Xander Carlson) return with the new single “All I Need” on Kygo's Palm Tree Records. “All I Need” takes a sharp turn from previous Forester releases, bringing a dose of filtered house and an irresistible chorus sample to the duo's signature organic electronic production. It's a summertime hit and then some. The accompanying music video shows the duo performing on an idyllic beach, and as the daylight turns into a picturesque sunset, the video follows a couple through a trippy and passionate dance party in the sand as the song's lyrics “You Are All I Need” echo behind them. Inspired by nature and the natural beauty in the world, longtime friends, Parris and Carlson launched the Forester project in 2019 and experienced immediate success with their debut single “Spark” which collected more than 5.8 million streams on Spotify. True to its name, the song was an auspicious beginning that caught the ear of an A&R at Kygo's Palm Tree Records, where Forester signed in 2020. The guys further developed the Forester sound, at 8,000 feet, at Carlson's family cabin in Mammoth Lakes, California, on the eastern slope of the vast Sierra Nevada mountain range. Musically, Forester fell into a dreamy, achingly emotional, and thoroughly sophisticated, middle ground between the indie folk of Bon Iver – a hero to both Parris and Carlson – and melody-focused electronic giants like Avicii. The music made in the mountains became their 2020 sophomore LP, A Range Of Light. Three albums down, Forester has now amassed over 75 million streams. A pillar of the project is the preservation of nature that's inspired them, with the guys donating a portion of the revenue from their first album to The Nature Conservancy, who used it to plant roughly 1,000 trees. Their ultimate goal is for their streaming to be at net zero carbon emissions. We want to hear from you! Please email Tera@BringinitBackwards.com. www.BringinitBackwards.com#podcast #interview #bringinbackpod #Forester #AllINeed #Watercolors #NewMusic #zoom Listen & Subscribe to BiB https://www.bringinitbackwards.com/follow/ Follow our podcast on Instagram and Twitter! https://www.facebook.com/groups/bringinbackpod

Ask About Fly Fishing - Internet Radio
Silver Creek – The Legend and Its Future

Ask About Fly Fishing - Internet Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 89:12


Matthew Miller is the director of science communications for The Nature Conservancy and has fished Silver Creek countless times. Silver Creek is well known for testing the skills of many an accomplished fly fisher so Matt's tips for fishing it will be invaluable. Join us and learn about fishing this legendary fishery and what changes are taking place that may affect the future of this spring creek.

A New Angle
Ami Vitale's Camera is her Passport

A New Angle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 28:43


This week's guest is Ami Vitale, an award-winning National Geographic Photographer and Nikon Ambassador. Ami has visited over 100 countries, documenting the horrors of war and the good work being done to protect endangered species. In this conversation, Ami attributes her curiosity as a child to getting her out in the world as a photographer. She tells Justin about her early experience in journalism where she had to navigate a male dominated industry that couldn't see her in the field. Overcoming that, she learned the importance of spending time in the communities she photographed, not just parachuting in and out. Ami talks about her work with the Nature Conservancy and her new nonprofit, Vital Impacts. Transcript here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1fI70sWqwdpUXHI0KqT1SIIzDu_pGBGc3XuGqBJH-Ezc/edit Learn more about Vital Impacts here: https://vitalimpacts.org/

通勤學英語
每日英語跟讀 Ep.K455: About Hong Kong - 香港取消檢疫措施與垃圾取DNA

通勤學英語

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 3:26


歡迎留言告訴我們你對這一集的想法: https://open.firstory.me/user/cl81kivnk00dn01wffhwxdg2s/comments 每日英語跟讀 Ep.K455: About Hong Kong - Hong Kong scraps quarantine measures after economy takes a beating Hong Kong will ditch its stringent hotel quarantine for incoming travellers(譯註:英式拼法) that has eroded the city's status as a financial hub, hammered its economy and sparked an exodus of residents. 香港將取消針對入境旅客的嚴格的飯店檢疫措施,該措施已損及這座城市作為金融樞紐的地位、重創其經濟,以及引爆居民大舉出走。 The policy, which at one point required visitors and residents to quarantine in a hotel for as long as three weeks, had been in place for two and a half years, effectively cutting the city off from the rest of the world as well as from mainland China. 這項一度要求訪客與居民在飯店內檢疫長達3週的政策已實施2年半,有效斬斷香港與世界其他地方以及與中國大陸的聯繫。 John Lee, the city's chief executive, said that the quarantine requirement would be eliminated from Monday, but travellers would be subject to testing and monitoring for three days after landing. 香港特區行政長官李家超表示,將自下週一起取消該檢疫要求,但旅客抵港後仍得接受篩檢與3天的醫學監測。 Next Article Hong Kong litterbugs shamed in billboard portraits made using DNA from trash 從垃圾中找出DNA製成肖像公布令香港亂丟垃圾者蒙羞 A campaign that used DNA analysis to give a face to anonymous Hong Kong litterbugs, then posted representations of the faces on billboards across the city, has been a big hit on social media. 一項行動藉由分析去氧核醣核酸,為香港匿名的亂丟垃圾者建立一張面貌,然後將這些面貌圖像張貼在全市公告欄,已成為社群網站熱門話題。 The Face of Litter campaign was launched on Global Earth Day for the Hong Kong Cleanup Initiative, organised by online magazine Ecozine and the Nature Conservancy. It was aimed at raising awareness of the extent of littering in the city by pinpointing those responsible and encouraging people to change their behaviour. 這項「亂丟垃圾的面貌」行動是為網路雜誌「生態誌」和自然保育協會所主辦「清潔香港運動」,在世界地球日啟動,旨在透過點出該負起責任之人,提高民眾注意香港亂丟垃圾程度,鼓勵民眾改變行為。 Last year, NGO Hong Kong Cleanup rallied 418 teams for a six-week challenge that saw 3,894 tonnes of litter from streets, coastlines and country trails, according to co-founder and CEO Lisa Christensen. 根據非政府組織「清潔香港」共同創辦人暨執行長麗莎克里斯汀森說法,去年該組織號召418團隊進行六週挑戰,從街頭、岸邊和鄉村小徑撿了3894噸垃圾。 Marketing communications agency Ogilvy & Mather Hong Kong came up with the idea for the billboard campaign and enlisted US-based Parabon Nanolabs. 行銷傳播公司「香港奧美」提出這項公佈欄行動的點子,並且找來設於美國的生物科技公司「帕拉本奈米實驗室」協助。 Christensen says the purpose of the campaign was not to point fingers at specific individuals. 克里斯汀森說,這項行動的目的不是要指責特定個人。 Reed Collins, the Ogilvy chief creative officer who led the campaign, says he is not aware of any other city launching such a campaign to tackle the scourge of littering. 領導這項行動的奧美創意長柯林斯說,就他所知,沒有其他城市展開這樣的行動來處理亂丟垃圾之患。Source article: https://features.ltn.com.tw/english/article/paper/1542943 ; https://news.ltn.com.tw/news/world/paper/887382 Powered by Firstory Hosting

Kaleidoscope
Climate Urban Cities Heat

Kaleidoscope

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 10:43


On this week's "Kaleidoscope with Allison Keyes", we discuss the problem of climate change and its effect on low-income, urban communities. Decades of segregation forced many Blacks and Hispanics into places where there are few trees and bad air quality, and temperatures that are at least 13 degrees higher than nearby wealthy neighborhoods. Allison speaks with Anna Bettis, Arizona Healthy Cities Program Director for the Nature Conservancy. The non-profit is the world's largest conservation organization, and has been partnering with others to help mitigate the problem.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Weekend Roundup
January 6th, Inflation, Climate Urban Cities Heat

Weekend Roundup

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 39:59


On the "CBS News Weekend Roundup", host Allison Keyes gets the latest on the January 6th Committee Hearing and its subpoena of former President Trump from CBS's Scott MacFarlane. We'll hear about the state of inflation and the latest on Social Security. In the Kaleidoscope, Allison speaks with Anna Bettis at the non-profit The Nature Conservancy, about ways to mitigate the costs of climate change in low-income, underserved communities of color.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

KUNR Public Radio: Local News Feed
TNC offers a ‘Goldilocks' option for saving Western land as wind and solar boom

KUNR Public Radio: Local News Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 1:11


The build-out of clean energy infrastructure in the West on its current trajectory would occupy about 39 million acres of land – roughly three-fourths the size of Utah – by 2050. A new study by The Nature Conservancy, however, suggests that the right mix of technologies can cut the amount of land needed in half.

Earth Wise
Saving Giant Sequoias | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 2:00


Last year, the KNP Complex Fire burning in Sequoia National Park drew global attention as the General Sherman, the world's largest tree, was wrapped in tinfoil-like material in order to repel the flames from the fire.  Hundreds of firefighters labored for weeks trying to save giant redwood trees.  Despite these efforts, the U.S. Forest Service […]

Financing Nature
COP27 Special, Episode 2: Andrew Deutz and Yasmine Sagita

Financing Nature

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 33:58


In our second episode of Financing Nature's special series with UNEP, Andrew Deutz, Director of Global Policy, Institutions and Conservation Finance at The Nature Conservancy shares the need to mobilise government and development bank aid into nature restoration projects, and the role of guarantees and insurance, and Yasmine Sagita, Chief of People, Sustainability and Corporate Affairs at rubber company, PT Royal Lestari Utama (RLU) discusses the Tropical Landscape Finance Facility (TLFF) which was funded by the world's first sustainability bond.

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch
20VC: Kevin Weil on The Biggest Lessons from Leading Product at Instagram and Twitter | How Working With Kevin Systrom Impacted His Approach To Product | 3 Things Instagram Did To Make Stories So Successful and Why Investing Makes Operators Better at Thei

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 44:38


Kevin Weil is President of Product and Business @ Planet and Operator in Residence @ Scribble Ventures. In the past, Kevin has been Head of Product at Twitter, Instagram, and Novi (the digital currency effort within Facebook). During his seven years at Twitter, he helped the company scale from 40 to 4000 people and from $0 to $2B in revenue. He then moved to Instagram in 2016 to lead the product and data teams and led through an inflection point as Instagram grew from 400M to over 1B users, including launching Instagram Stories. Kevin then co-founded Diem (formerly known as Libra) and Novi and built both for three years before moving to Planet in 2021. If that was not enough, Kevin is also on the board of Strava, the Nature Conservancy, and the Black Product Managers Network. In Today's Episode with Kevin Weil We Discuss: 1.) Lessons From Leading Product for Instagram and Twitter: What does Kevin believe makes Instagram so inherently good at product? How did leading product for Instagram change the way Kevin thinks and operates? What are 1-2 of Kevin's biggest lessons from working with Kevin Systrom, Instagram's Founder? What are the biggest takeaways for Kevin from leading product at Twitter? 2.) Launching Products, Customer Discovery and Product Sessions: What were Kevin's biggest learnings from launching Instagram stories? How did Kevin's conviction impact the product building and success of Instagram stories? How does Kevin advise founders on the best way to approach customer discovery? What are the best questions to ask to reveal the truth? How does Kevin approach product testing today? Why does Kevin not like softly softly testing new products? 3.) Kevin Weil: Leadership 101 What are some of the biggest leadership mistakes that Kevin made in his time at Twitter? How does Kevin approach decision-making frameworks? How does one balance the speed vs the quality of the decision? What makes a great product strategy? Where do so many go wrong in their product strategy? How do the best leaders communicate with their team? How does this change over time? What is Kevin's preferred medium and style of communication with his teams? 4.) Kevin Weil: The Athlete, Father and Husband: Kevin is an ultra-marathon runner, what does his training routine look like? What 1-2 changes has Kevin made that have had the biggest impact on performance? How does Kevin manage, investing, advising, training and being a father and husband?  

Town Hall Seattle Civics Series
297. Margaret McKeown and Sally Jewell - The SCOTUS Steward: The Environmental Legacy of William O. Douglas

Town Hall Seattle Civics Series

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 72:45


Long before “going green” became a hashtag, people like William O. Douglas were on the front lines of the environmental justice movement. Despite being known for some notable accomplishments — for example, the fact that he was the longest serving U.S. Supreme Court justice, having sat from 1939-1975 — Douglas largely remained an unsung environmental advocate. Author and U.S. Court of Appeals Judge M. Margaret McKeown's new book, Citizen Justice: The Environmental Legacy of William O. Douglas explores Douglas's impact not only during his near forty-year SCOTUS tenure, but the ripple effects that helped shape environmental policy and practice today. Douglas, nominated to the U.S. Supreme Court by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, embraced both a personal and political connection to nature, which fueled his drive to save trees and protect the land. Despite these achievements, he was not without controversy: impeachments, oppositions, and a series of failed marriages marred his public image. Though a complex figure, his commitment to bettering the earth is indisputable. Joining with McKeown at Town Hall is former U.S. Secretary of the Interior and former CEO of recreational giant REI, Sally Jewell. The two will discuss the ways that Citizen Justice elucidates the tensions that arose from Douglas's efforts, as well as the contemporary lessons that we can draw from them as we examine one man's life — and legacy — on the road to achieving environmental justice. Judge M. Margaret McKeown was appointed to the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in 1998. She holds a J.D. and an honorary doctorate from Georgetown University Law Center.Before her appointment, Judge McKeown was the first female partner at Perkins Coie in Seattle and Washington, D.C., and served as a White House Fellow. Judge McKeown has lectured throughout the world on international law, human rights law, intellectual property, litigation, ethics, judicial administration, and constitutional law and has participated in numerous rule of law initiatives with judges and lawyers. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and received the ABA Margaret Brent Women Lawyers of Achievement award, the ABA John Marshall Award, and the Girl Scouts Cool Woman Award, among others. Sally Jewell served as U.S. Secretary of the Interior from 2013-17, overseeing the nation's national parks, wildlife refuges, and public lands, working closely with Indigenous peoples during a period when President Obama protected more lands and waters than any other U.S. president. Previously, she was President and CEO of outdoor retailer REI. Jewell currently serves on the board of The Nature Conservancy and other corporate and non-profit boards, and has held fellowships at the University of Washington and Harvard. A lifelong outdoor enthusiast, she has explored our public lands from coast to coast, with a deep appreciation of the people who have stewarded them since time immemorial. Citizen Justice: The Environmental Legacy of William O. Douglas—Public Advocate and Conservation Champion (Hardcover) Elliott Bay Books

Investing For Ocean Impact
1. Why private finance for ocean conservation?

Investing For Ocean Impact

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 23:39


Welcome to season 2! In the first episode, we're going back to basics. Why should the private sector be involved in ocean finance in the first place? Private finance actors and their contributions are being increasingly recognised - but not everyone is on board with their new place in ocean conservation and restoration. Are we making a deal with the devil? Is this a waste of taxpayers' money? Or is it crucial for the future of our ocean? Featuring Ivo Mulder, Head of the UN Environment Programme's Climate Finance Unit; and Melissa Garvey, Global Director of Ocean Protection at The Nature Conservancy. Investing For Ocean Impact is a Fresh Air Production on behalf of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. It is presented by Dorothée Herr and produced by Phil Sansom, with production assistance from Kamau Joseph.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Purpose and Profit with Kathy Varol
39. Lois Quam on How Reproductive Health Connects Us All

Purpose and Profit with Kathy Varol

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 55:06


Named three times to FORTUNE's list of the most influential women leaders in business, Lois Quam joined Pathfinder in 2017 as CEO. Pathfinder's vision is a world where everyone has access to contraception, where there are zero new HIV infections, where no woman dies from preventable pregnancy-related complications, and where everyone leads a healthy sexual and reproductive life. Prior to leading Pathfinder, Lois served as CEO of The Nature Conservancy and was selected by President Obama to head his signature Global Health Initiative at the Department of State which provided more than $8 billion annually to help solve major health challenges facing millions of individuals across 80 countries. Reporting directly to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Lois advanced a comprehensive strategy to increase US global health diplomacy, created a $200 million public-private partnership, and introduced integrated systems approaches for global health problems. Prior to that, Lois was the founding CEO of Ovations, a division of the FORTUNE 50 global corporation UnitedHealth Group.   In this episode we discuss: The importance of supporting change from inside a community The incredible potential of women to impact our collective future The power of authentic stories to build empathy and action   Key Takeaways: The statistics I shared are overwhelming. Like 12 millions girls under the age of 18 being married every single year, or that pregnancy complications are the leading cause of death for 15-19 year olds in the world's poorest nations, killing 300K women annually. These statistics are so massive it's hard to compute, which can cause our brains to click off. I really appreciate the way Lois is able to ground these statistics in very personal stories. She's able to show the humanity behind the numbers, the personal impact behind the power of reproductive rights, and ultimately the personal justice and equity work that Pathfinder does in a relatable way for every woman (and man) globally. This isn't someone else's problem to deal with, it's our collective responsibility. Reproductive health connects all of us. There is only one human doorway onto Earth, which is through a uterus. Reproductive health is a timeless and universal part of the human experience. Whether you're male, female, or non-binary. Whether like Lois you have children, you want to have them in your future, or like me, you've chosen not to have them at all. Reproductive health is essential for each one of those desires. One of the blessings of the times we live in, is having autonomy over when and if to have children. Unfortunately, 45% of women globally aren't able to make their own reproductive health decisions. It's time for that to change. After all, there is no bigger impact on your life than creating a child (for both the parents and the child). The ability to enter that decision with intention is imperative for the health of families, communities, and society. One theme throughout the conversation was the power of community. The power of leaders in a community to change norms and taboos. The power of peer-to-peer groups to support each other while navigating shared experiences and processing past experiences. And the power of mentors to share what they've learned, so the same hardships aren't unnecessarily repeated and the path is easier for the next generation. No matter who you are, or where you live, your experience matters. Share it generously with others. Share your perspective, and the lessons you've learned along the way. Lean in with curiosity as others share a piece of themselves with you.     References: Connect with Lois on LinkedIn Pathfinder International US Supreme Court Opinion, Dobbs vs. Jackson Women's Health Organization Gates Foundation President Obama's statement on the Global Health Initiative Children's Defense Fund   Connect & Share: If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts/iTunes? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really makes a difference in helping to convince hard-to-get guests. I also love reading them!   If this episode resonated with you, I ask you to send it to a friend. Help bring even more visibility to these leaders that are using business as a force for good!   Subscribe to the Purpose and Profit newsletter to make sure you don't miss future episodes.   This podcast is for you, the listener. I'd love to hear what resonated with you, or if you have a suggestion on who would be a great guest for this show. Please send me a note at info@KathyVarol.com.

The ERP Advisor
The ERP Minute Episode 57 - September 27, 2022

The ERP Advisor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 3:14 Transcription Available


This week at Dreamforce, Salesforce's user conference, Salesforce introduced Genie, a hyper-scale real-time data platform that powers the entire Salesforce Customer 360. Genie unifies all of a company's customer data across channels and interactions into a single, real-time customer profile, so every experience across the Customer 360 is more automated, intelligent, and real-time. Microsoft made a few announcements this week, beginning with its board of directors declaring a quarterly dividend of $0.68 per share, reflecting a 10% increase over the previous quarter's dividend. Microsoft then released a Work Trend Index Pulse report, “Hybrid Work is Just Work. Are We Doing in Wrong?” coinciding with the announcement of new capabilities in Microsoft Viva, its employee experience platform, designed to help empower and energize employees in a time of economic uncertainty. Microsoft Viva expanded its offerings to include confidential feedback capabilities, the centralization of communications, the utilization of AI to assist users, richer integration with Microsoft Teams, and more. The final announcement from Microsoft this week was the planned launch of Global Renewables Watch (GRW) in partnership with Planet Labs PBC and The Nature Conservancy. GRW will be a first-of-its-kind living atlas intended to map and measure all utility-scale solar and wind installations on Earth using AI and satellite imagery, allowing users to evaluate clean energy transition progress and track trends over time. A recent Gartner survey found that security and risk management, application and integration strategies, and infrastructure and operations are the top three technology priorities for midsize enterprises (MSEs) in 2022. As we prepare for Cybersecurity Awareness month and see an ever-increasing number of cybersecurity risks in the ERP space, EAG will be discussing the frightening topic of Ransomware, with special guest James McQuiggan of KnowBe4.https://www.erpadvisorsgroup.com866-499-8550LinkedIn:https://www.linkedin.com/company/erp-advisors-groupTwitter:https://twitter.com/erpadvisorsgrpFacebook:https://www.facebook.com/erpadvisorsInstagram:https://www.instagram.com/erpadvisorsgroupPinterest:https://www.pinterest.com/erpadvisorsgroupMedium:https://medium.com/@erpadvisorsgroup

Glowing Older
Episode 11:7 Michael Hebb on Launching Generations Over Dinner

Glowing Older

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 33:46


Generations Over Dinner is designed to alleviate ageism and loneliness by encouraging different generations to go deep at the dinner table. Learn how the founders joined a think tank of leaders in the aging space to create a turn-key program that any individual or senior living community can implement. About Michael Michael Hebb is the Founder of Over Dinner (Death Over Dinner, Drugs Over Dinner, Generations Over Dinner) and the author of Let's Table About Death (Over Dinner). He currently serves as a Board Advisor at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts, is the primary editor of the COVID Paper; and in the recent past served as a Partner at RoundGlass and Senior Advisor to Summit Series, Theo Chocolate, CreativeLive, Architecture For Humanity, and Mosaic Voices Foundation. In 1997 Hebb co-founded City Repair and Communitecture with architect Mark Lakeman, winning the AIA People's Choice Award for the Intersection Repair Project. In 1999 Michael and Naomi Pomeroy co-founded Family Supper in Portland, a supper club that is credited with starting the pop-up restaurant movement. In the years following they opened the restaurants clarklewis and Gotham Bldg Tavern, garnering international acclaim. After leaving Portland, Hebb built Convivium, a creative agency that specialized in the ability to shift culture through the use of thoughtful food and discourse-based gatherings. Convivium's client list includes: The Obama Foundation, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, TEDMED, The World Economic Forum, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Clinton Global Initiative, X Prize Foundation, The Nature Conservancy. Key Takeaways Generations Over Dinner is the framework you need to have the experience. The turnkey program includes nine dinner scripts with three primary topics: love and relationships, purpose, and the future. Senior living communities can have their own Generations Over Dinner secure platform where they can plan dinners and invite residents and their kids, grandkids, and friends from outside the community. Loneliness is not alleviated by having more conversations or by being around more people. It is only alleviated by having high quality conversations and real connection.

The Gun Dog Notebook Podcast
TSLN EP. 148: “Across the Prairies: Author Interview & Book Review with Robert Franks”

The Gun Dog Notebook Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 88:09


THE SPORTING LIFE NOTEBOOK PODCAST SHOW NOTES Robert Franks A Book Review THE CHARLES JORDAN GROUP- The Charles Jordan Group is a boutique, award-winning consulting firm growing top-line revenue for national and global companies across diverse industries.  The group does this by crafting growth strategies and strengthening them with strategic marketing and truly unique messaging, all while empowering and inspiring sales teams.   Starting with a situational analysis, no-cost to you, after presenting their findings, you may view your current situation differently. Today, our Situation Analysis is a vital reason why they've been delivering results for nearly 20 years. So learn more by visiting them at https://www.charlesjordangroup.com/  MINORITY OUTDOOR ALLIANCE - MOAFest 2022 was an absolute blast!  As an initiative in partnership with Pheasants Forever, we were able to kick off our Learn to Hunt Experience in Alabama at Orvis Pursell Farms and we had a great number of attendees who came to the festival looking to learn more about hunting and fishing.  Thank you to everyone who came to celebrate and cultivate inclusivty for a healthier outside!  I want to say thank you to my wife Ashley who spearheaded the event and really put together a knockout event with the help of so many others who believe in the vision and future of MOA. EADY SMITH WEALTH MANAGEMENT Beretta USA https://www.beretta.com/en/ultraleggero/ https://www.beretta.com/en-us/beretta-486-parallelo/ BUSA Promo code: TSLN15 EUKANUBA SPORTING DOG (change when contract renews) New Puppy PRO formula- p.6 of Euk Field Guide BENCHMADE KNIFE COMPANY 15535 TAGGEDOUT™ Here's a hunt-inspired Bugout-like knife for the lightweight hunters who travel long distances. When going far with a kit on your back, every ounce of weight carried matters. This lightweight and slim hunting folder can handle any task while in the wilderness—from prepping food at camp to skinning or field dressing animals to cutting paracord. Light in weight, high in visibility, slim in pocket feel, and a razor-sharp cut from the CPM-154 steel with SelectEdge® application make the new 15535 Taggedout a go-to for go-far adventures. Im also featured in the new TaggedOut Promo from Benchmade so check them out on instagram @benchmadeknifecompany and at their website https://www.benchmade.com/15535-taggedout.html   GEORGIA POWER The Nature Now Film Festival, sponsored by Georgia Power and put together by Paige Swift (interview coming soon), was absolutely fantastic and I was most impressed by the protagonists and cast of the film, Black Ice, and I was so blessed to be able to hang out with a few of them while in Columbus, GA.  We received incredible love and support for the Dogmen film, and I was also able to speak with the Columbus State University arts students that morning for a short artist talk about my assemblage work that was also shown during the festival.   Thank you GA Power for supporting the arts and supporting habitat and conservation, as well as the company themselves being an unlikely case in the outdoors.  So many people see GA Power as just a light bill, but looking deeper, the company has been actively involved in the environment and creating recreational outdoor spaces for each and every resident of Georgia.  Check out their work at https://www.georgiapower.com/community/environment.html You can see my artworks at https://www.durrellsmithart.com/work TSLN BACK AT IT NEWSLETTER- GO SUBSCRIBE TODAY FOR ISSUE 0.3 coming soon   Backcountry Hunters & Anglers: EXPLORE HUNTING ATLANTA Have you been interested in learning about hunting, but don't know where to start? Or maybe you just want to get more involved with conservation?  Backcountry Hunters & Anglers and Minority Outdoor Alliance have a campfire going in Atlanta and there's a spot open just for you. We're hosting a free, all-inclusive 2-day workshop for those that want to learn more about hunting, wild food, and the conservation community. Day one will be an evening event - we'll provide refreshments and help you to learn more about conservation and conservation groups. We'll have appetizers and door prizes to boot! Day two will be at a full day breaking down those initial barriers to understanding and getting started in hunting followed by an understanding of where to go next if you want to learn more or stay involved.  Let us help you get you safely outdoors and to find community, get involved with conservation, and harvest your own wild food. While we're at it, come join us and let's throw another log on.    What You'll Learn: Day 1 - Building Community - November 4th, 6 PM - 8 PM  A social gathering to bring together workshop participants, conservation leaders, decision-makers, and BHA and MOA members and staff. Day 2 - November 5th, 10 AM - 4 PM Motivations for Hunting, How Hunting Ties Into Conservation & The Ethics of Hunting Understanding What You Need to go Hunting Including Basic Skills and Gear How to Understand Rules and Regulations with Hunting  How To Process & Store Your Own Wild Game  And More! BHA is a grassroots, non-profit conservation organization with chapters across North America. We focus our efforts on keeping public lands public, bolstering access to public lands, ensuring we have quality fish and wildlife habitat, and upholding fair chase hunting and angling ethics.  Minority Outdoor Alliance works to cultivate inclusivity for a healthier outside.  If you have questions about the event, please reach out to Trey Curtiss from BHA or Durrell Smith from MOA! BHA is proud to partner with Minority Outdoor Alliance & Patagonia November 04, 2022 at 6:00pm - November 05, 2022 OWAA DIVERSITY COMMITTEE- As a member of the OWAA Diversity Committee, I'm encouraging yall to join OWAA if you are an aspiring or practicing writer or creative.   OWAA is a nonprofit, international organization that represents a diverse group of professional communicators dedicated to sharing the outdoor experience. Our members include the nation's best:   writers, authors, publishers and editors broadcasters film and video producers photographers fine artists lecturers/speakers bloggers and new media communicators communications and PR professionals Join at owaa.org    CURRENT CONSERVATION NEWS Ten Champions of Conservation https://gardenandgun.com/feature/championsofconservation/ In a precarious time for our Southern ecosystems, these ten under-the-radar scientists, advocates, and groundbreakers are saving endangered butterflies, defending the Everglades, fighting for shorebirds, creating art that speaks from the heart, and more The methodology: To help select our Champions of Conservation, we called in experts with a broad range of perspectives, from sustainability in packaging to ecosystem and species restoration. “There is no place in the world that compares to the ecologically diverse habitat of the South,” says the Nature Conservancy's Dale Threatt-Taylor. “I felt hopeful just reading about the work of the outstanding conservationists working to protect it.” From left: Durrell Smith is a Georgia-based hunter, bird-dog trainer, podcast host, and artist who cofounded the Minority Outdoor Alliance in 2020. The organization's mission is to cultivate inclusiveness in the outdoors. Last year, Smith received the Orvis Breaking Barriers Award for his work bringing new participants into the upland bird hunting, bird dog, and wing-shooting communities. Carol Denhof serves as president of the Longleaf Alliance, working across the Southeast to restore the region's formerly dominant longleaf pine forests, which once blanketed up to ninety million acres from Texas to Virginia. She took the helm of the organization in 2019 and fosters partnerships, provides landowner assistance, and offers science-based outreach to promote longleaf habitat. Wes Carter is the third-generation president of Atlantic Packaging, the largest privately owned industrial packaging company in North America. As a lifelong outdoorsman, he feels both a connection to the land and a responsibility to create sustainable supply chains. Through his A New Earth Project and other initiatives, he is committed to reducing plastic and partnering with outdoor enthusiasts, brands, and packaging suppliers to implement industry-level change. Dale Threatt-Taylor brings twenty-five years of experience in conservation leadership to her role as the executive director of the Nature Conservancy in South Carolina. She oversees projects and partnerships ranging from forest restoration to the revival of living shorelines to species protection plans. Simon Perkins took over as the third-generation president of Orvis in 2020, having started at the company eight years earlier after a stint as a hunting and fly-fishing guide in Montana. Under his leadership, the outdoor retailer continues to support conservation projects with such organizations as the Everglades Foundation, the Teddy Roosevelt Conservation Partnership, and Trout Unlimited, and supports diversity in fly fishing through its Breaking Barriers Awards and by becoming the first company to sign the Angling for All pledge along with Brown Folks Fishing.   Dakota283 Kennels We are back on deck with D283 Use my promo code GDN10 for 10% off at Checkout CABLE Gangz  CABLE GANGZ, premium tie-out systems for all sporting dogs.  From the benchmark ALL-AGE series for 2-10 dogs, to swivel stakes for 1 dog, we have everything you need to safely and efficiently tie your dogs out.  Light weight, expandable, and tough.  Custom work is always available through the custom work request form  on our website.  If you can dream it, we'd love to build it for you.  Our systems are used by ALL-AGE competing pros, gundog owners, weekend training groups, traveling hunters, and kennel owners.  Whether feeding while traveling, airing dogs safely on long drives, getting them out of the box at your hunting camp, or working multiple dogs, these gangs are a must.  Bird hunters, hound hunters, retriever trainers, agility dogs, and treeing dogs all across the country rely on CABLE GANGZ.  Check us out at cablegangz.com , break dogs not tie-outs. 

Impact Outdoors Podcast
David Moss with The Nature Conservancy

Impact Outdoors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 35:39


This week's show features David Moss, Fisheries Project Manager for The Nature Conservancy in Florida. Listen in as we discuss some of the issues facing snapper and grouper species when fishing offshore and ways that you can help ensure a successful release of the fish that you return to the water. The Nature Conservancy's "Deck to Depth" Program is leading the way in educating anglers about the beneficial use of descending devices and the success rate of using these devices to safely return fish that are suffering from barotrauma back to the depths from which they were caught. Be sure to check out the link below to learn more about David's work: www.nature.org/floridafisheries https://youtu.be/G-9yqFsBA7Q If you have questions, comments or guest suggestions please email me at Derek@impactoutdoorspodcast.com Music provided by Epidemic Sound: https://www.epidemicsound.com/track/5A7gnNYE53/ https://www.epidemicsound.com/track/7CuugqCVvk/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

News & Features | NET Radio
A grassbank in Missouri shows how cattle can conserve prairie

News & Features | NET Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 0:42


Dunn Ranch Prairie has the first grassbank in the Midwest, a partnership where The Nature Conservancy allows local ranchers to graze their cattle on its grasslands while the ranchers' pasture is allowed to rest.

Small Steps, Giant Leaps
Small Steps, Giant Leaps: Episode 93: Circuit Theory Application to Animal Movement

Small Steps, Giant Leaps

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022


The Nature Conservancy's Kim Hall discusses the use of NASA Earth observation data to map animal movement and patterns.

NASACast Audio
Small Steps, Giant Leaps: Episode 93: Circuit Theory Application to Animal Movement

NASACast Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022


The Nature Conservancy's Kim Hall discusses the use of NASA Earth observation data to map animal movement and patterns.

Trail EAffect
Mitchell Allen Trail Project Manager for the Arkansas Parks and Recreation Foundation #88

Trail EAffect

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 72:44


Trail EAffect Episode 88 Mitchell Allen Trail Project Manager for the Arkansas Parks and Recreation Foundation The Mitchell Allen Back Story The relationship between conservation and recreation Developing properties in Arkansas that allow for more recreation to help connect people with the land, and help to engage new users onto the properties The difficult part of collecting user data on properties What the Arkansas Parks and Recreation Foundation is Mitchell's role as Trail Project Manager What Monument Trails Are Elevation found at State Parks in Arkansas Trail Maintenance Rock Armoring Trails and Jumps Wood Features on Trails What inspires Mitchell while traveling to other communities to bring back to Arkansas Building really good beginner trails, the importance of beginner Trails, and some of the difficulty that comes with building beginner trails as well. A famous failure or learning experience Keeping the community needs in mind Learning how much Mitchell didn't know from others Thinking about all trail users Directional Trails Making more sense to Mitchell Value in separating groups and value in keeping groups together and where Going deeper on Directional Trails The Internet Earbuds in the woods What Mitchell thinks makes a great trail community Closing comments by Mitchell Experience all of Arkansas Womble Trail Links discussed in the show: The Arkansas Parks and Recreation Foundation: https://www.arparksfoundation.org/ The Nature Conservancy in Arkansas: https://www.nature.org/en-us/about-us/where-we-work/united-states/arkansas/contact-us/ Monument Trails: https://www.arkansasstateparks.com/trails/monument-trails Monument Trails on YouTube: https://youtu.be/8PGh1o9RHRc   This Podcast has been edited and produced by Evolution Trail Services   Trail EAffect Show Links: Evolution Trail Services: www.evotrails.com Contact Josh at evolutiontrails@gmail.com Support Trail EAffect through donations at: https://www.patreon.com/traileaffect You can also reach out and donate via PayPal or other means if you feel so inclined to do so.  

Tech, Innovation & Society - The Creative Process
Kent Redford - Co-author of "Strange Natures: Conservation in the Era of Synthetic Biology”

Tech, Innovation & Society - The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 56:24


Kent H. Redford is a conservation practitioner and Principal at Archipelago Consulting established in 2012 and based in Portland, Maine, USA. Archipelago Consulting was designed to help individuals and organizations improve their practice of conservation. Prior to Archipelago Consulting Kent spent 10 years on the faculty of University of Florida and 19 years in conservation NGOs with five years as Director of The Nature Conservancy's Parks in Peril program and 14 years as Vice President for Conservation Science and Strategy at the Wildlife Conservation Society. For six years he was Chair of IUCN's Task Force on Synthetic Biology and Biodiversity Conservation. In June 2021 Yale University Press published Kent's book with W.M. Adams: Strange Natures. Conservation in the Era of Synthetic Biology."The field of synthetic biology, which is known by some as extreme genetic engineering – that's a name mostly used by people who don't like it - amounts to a set of tools that humans have developed to be able to very precisely and accurately change the genetic code, the DNA of living organisms in order to get those organisms to do things that humans want. So the applications in medicine are predominantly devoted to trying to make us healthier people, and they range from some really exciting work on tumor biology to work on the microbiome, which is all of the thousands and tens of thousands of species that live on our lips, our mouths, our guts, our skin. And in agriculture, it's primarily directed at crop genetics, trying to improve the productivity of crops, the nutritional value of crops, the ability of crops to respond to climate change, and a whole variety of other things. Some people may have heard of one of these tools called CRISPR used to very precisely alter the sequences of DNA.This book that Bill and I wrote is about the impending intersection between synthetic biology and the field of nature conservation, not an examination of the technologies per se, but an examination of the way that we are going to end up needing to think about the intersection between our ability to change DNA, and what it means to be natural, and what it means to conserve things and whether or not we want to conserve things that we have altered."https://yalebooks.yale.edu/book/9780300230970/strange-natures/ https://archipelagoconsulting.comwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

Tech, Innovation & Society - The Creative Process
Highlights - Kent Redford - Co-author, ”Strange Natures: Conservation in the Era of Synthetic Biology”

Tech, Innovation & Society - The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 13:20


"The field of synthetic biology, which is known by some as extreme genetic engineering – that's a name mostly used by people who don't like it - amounts to a set of tools that humans have developed to be able to very precisely and accurately change the genetic code, the DNA of living organisms in order to get those organisms to do things that humans want. So the applications in medicine are predominantly devoted to trying to make us healthier people, and they range from some really exciting work on tumor biology to work on the microbiome, which is all of the thousands and tens of thousands of species that live on our lips, our mouths, our guts, our skin. And in agriculture, it's primarily directed at crop genetics, trying to improve the productivity of crops, the nutritional value of crops, the ability of crops to respond to climate change, and a whole variety of other things. Some people may have heard of one of these tools called CRISPR used to very precisely alter the sequences of DNA.This book that Bill and I wrote is about the impending intersection between synthetic biology and the field of nature conservation, not an examination of the technologies per se, but an examination of the way that we are going to end up needing to think about the intersection between our ability to change DNA, and what it means to be natural, and what it means to conserve things and whether or not we want to conserve things that we have altered."Kent H. Redford is a conservation practitioner and Principal at Archipelago Consulting established in 2012 and based in Portland, Maine, USA. Archipelago Consulting was designed to help individuals and organizations improve their practice of conservation. Prior to Archipelago Consulting Kent spent 10 years on the faculty of University of Florida and 19 years in conservation NGOs with five years as Director of The Nature Conservancy's Parks in Peril program and 14 years as Vice President for Conservation Science and Strategy at the Wildlife Conservation Society. For six years he was Chair of IUCN's Task Force on Synthetic Biology and Biodiversity Conservation. In June 2021 Yale University Press published Kent's book with W.M. Adams: Strange Natures. Conservation in the Era of Synthetic Biology.https://yalebooks.yale.edu/book/9780300230970/strange-natures/ https://archipelagoconsulting.comwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

Dairy Stream
Sustainability focus includes methane reduction, no-till and cover crops

Dairy Stream

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 29:26


Deer Run Dairy in Kewaunee County takes a holistic approach to sustainability focusing on no-till, cover crops, methane reduction and more. Dairy Stream host Mike Austin talks with Duane Ducat, owner of Deer Run Dairy, and Lauren Brey, managing director of Farmers for Sustainable Food about Deer Run Dairy being recognized as one of four Outstanding Dairy Farms with a U.S. Dairy Sustainability Award. The farm was specifically highlighted for its involvement and progress in a three-year sustainability project and eye-opening experiences on the dairy. Thank you to The Nature Conservancy in Wisconsin for sponsoring this episode.  This podcast is co-produced by the Dairy Business Association and Edge Dairy Farmer Cooperative, sister organizations that fight for effective dairy policy in Wisconsin and Washington, D.C. 

North American Ag Spotlight
The Spotlight is on American Heroes: Helping Transition Veterans from Active Service to Agriculture

North American Ag Spotlight

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 37:03


Today's Ag Spotlight is on real American Heroes who help transition veterans from active service to agriculture. Tod Bunting is a retired Air Force major General – with over 30 years of service. He has devoted his post military life to veteran care. Also with us is Virgil Williams who is also a veteran and runs operations at Save Farm. SAVE Farms is a training farm for veterans of all eras and their families. A pathway to farming and healing. Americans celebrate Veterans Day on November 11 to honor our veterans' patriotism, love of country, and willingness to serve and sacrifice for the common good. While this day is a wonderful tribute, there are organizations who honor veterans every single day of the year. The SAVE Farm in Manhattan, KS., is one of them. The concept for the SAVE Farm  began nearly a decade ago, when retired Colonel Gary Lagrange and his daughter saw results from training beekeeping and providing therapy to soldiers at nearby Ft Riley. A non profit was formed by a diverse group of veterans, farm and ranch experts and educators.  With the help of organizations like The Nature Conservancy, and the Conservation Fund, the SAVE Farm is now a reality. It provides therapy as needed and hands-on teaching to veterans and transitioning service members through experienced professionals. They learn how to successfully and sustainably manage cropland, livestock animals, orchards, horticulture, and beekeeping. In 2020, SAVE celebrated a significant milestone - the purchase of 308-acres of farmland for future hands-on training. In 2021, the critical and life-changing work of the SAVE Farm received further support from John Deere through a donation of $200,000 to continue its collaboration with The Nature Conservancy and assist in the completion of training facilities. Learn more about the SAVE Farm at https://www.thesavefarm.org/The American Royal is a non-profit organization based in Kansas City since 1899. They provide opportunities for youth & adults from around the country to compete in Livestock Show, ProRodeo & Horse Shows. Also known for the World Series of Barbecue®, which is their largest fundraiser. Events including the barbecue allow them to give over $1 million annually for youth scholarships & support agriculture education programs. https://agr.fyi/amerThe Women in Agribusiness (WIA) Summit annually convenes over 800 of the country's female agribusiness decision-makers. The 2022 WIA Summit, September 26-28 in Dallas, TX includes presentations from Cargill's Corporate Senior Vice President, Animal Health & Nutrition, Ruth Kimmelshue; Marco Orioli, VP of Global Grain & Processing for EMEA, CHS; and Brooke Appleton of the NCGA. Learn more at https://agr.fyi/wia_register. FIRA USA 18-20 OCT. 2022 (FRESNO-CA): The only 3-day event dedicated to the California and North America market for autonomous agriculture and agricultural robotics solutions.Learn More at https://agr.fyi/fira

The Creative Process Podcast
Highlights - Kent Redford - Co-author, ”Strange Natures: Conservation in the Era of Synthetic Biology”

The Creative Process Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 13:20


"The field of synthetic biology, which is known by some as extreme genetic engineering – that's a name mostly used by people who don't like it - amounts to a set of tools that humans have developed to be able to very precisely and accurately change the genetic code, the DNA of living organisms in order to get those organisms to do things that humans want. So the applications in medicine are predominantly devoted to trying to make us healthier people, and they range from some really exciting work on tumor biology to work on the microbiome, which is all of the thousands and tens of thousands of species that live on our lips, our mouths, our guts, our skin. And in agriculture, it's primarily directed at crop genetics, trying to improve the productivity of crops, the nutritional value of crops, the ability of crops to respond to climate change, and a whole variety of other things. Some people may have heard of one of these tools called CRISPR used to very precisely alter the sequences of DNA.This book that Bill and I wrote is about the impending intersection between synthetic biology and the field of nature conservation, not an examination of the technologies per se, but an examination of the way that we are going to end up needing to think about the intersection between our ability to change DNA, and what it means to be natural, and what it means to conserve things and whether or not we want to conserve things that we have altered."Kent H. Redford is a conservation practitioner and Principal at Archipelago Consulting established in 2012 and based in Portland, Maine, USA. Archipelago Consulting was designed to help individuals and organizations improve their practice of conservation. Prior to Archipelago Consulting Kent spent 10 years on the faculty of University of Florida and 19 years in conservation NGOs with five years as Director of The Nature Conservancy's Parks in Peril program and 14 years as Vice President for Conservation Science and Strategy at the Wildlife Conservation Society. For six years he was Chair of IUCN's Task Force on Synthetic Biology and Biodiversity Conservation. In June 2021 Yale University Press published Kent's book with W.M. Adams: Strange Natures. Conservation in the Era of Synthetic Biology.https://yalebooks.yale.edu/book/9780300230970/strange-natures/ https://archipelagoconsulting.comwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

Social Justice & Activism · The Creative Process
Highlights - Kent Redford - Co-author, ”Strange Natures: Conservation in the Era of Synthetic Biology”

Social Justice & Activism · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 13:20


"So there are lots of different indigenous peoples who have their own world views and experiences. One of the most impressive people I know is Aroha Mead. She's a Maori, and she's a lawyer, and she has been active in this conservation organization IUCN for decades. New Zealand as a nation and the Maori as a people have engaged in very careful and systematic discussions amongst themselves about what they think about synthetic biology, and its potential use on the islands of New Zealand and in some of the areas that are sacred to them. People can read. They have written and published on some of this work. And again, the first thing to say is there is no such thing as a Maori position. There are some people who felt very strongly that this was a terrible idea, and there were other people who felt it was an essential thing to do because New Zealand has a tremendous problem with invasive species."Kent H. Redford is a conservation practitioner and Principal at Archipelago Consulting established in 2012 and based in Portland, Maine, USA. Archipelago Consulting was designed to help individuals and organizations improve their practice of conservation. Prior to Archipelago Consulting Kent spent 10 years on the faculty of University of Florida and 19 years in conservation NGOs with five years as Director of The Nature Conservancy's Parks in Peril program and 14 years as Vice President for Conservation Science and Strategy at the Wildlife Conservation Society. For six years he was Chair of IUCN's Task Force on Synthetic Biology and Biodiversity Conservation. In June 2021 Yale University Press published Kent's book with W.M. Adams: Strange Natures. Conservation in the Era of Synthetic Biology.https://yalebooks.yale.edu/book/9780300230970/strange-natures/ https://archipelagoconsulting.comwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

Social Justice & Activism · The Creative Process
Kent Redford - Co-author of "Strange Natures: Conservation in the Era of Synthetic Biology”

Social Justice & Activism · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 56:24


Kent H. Redford is a conservation practitioner and Principal at Archipelago Consulting established in 2012 and based in Portland, Maine, USA. Archipelago Consulting was designed to help individuals and organizations improve their practice of conservation. Prior to Archipelago Consulting Kent spent 10 years on the faculty of University of Florida and 19 years in conservation NGOs with five years as Director of The Nature Conservancy's Parks in Peril program and 14 years as Vice President for Conservation Science and Strategy at the Wildlife Conservation Society. For six years he was Chair of IUCN's Task Force on Synthetic Biology and Biodiversity Conservation