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Score derived from tests purported to measure individual differences in human intelligence

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Latest podcast episodes about iq

Killer Psyche
George Trepal: The Mensa Murderer

Killer Psyche

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 42:55


Former FBI agent and criminal profiler Candice DeLong examines George Trepal, The Mensa Murderer. George attempted to kill 6 people - his next door neighbors - but only one of the victims died. George, a former chemist, used a highly toxic and rare poison, and believed with his genious IQ that he could outsmart the police. Candice dives into what the use of this particularly brutal poison tells us about this brilliant chemist, and why his faith in his own intelligence might have led to his eventual capture and arrest.Overland Sheepskin Co.- Get the highest quality sheep skin slippers on the market overland.com/psyche!Modern Fertility- Listeners get $20 OFF your fertility test moderfertility.com/psyche!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

SAFe Business Agility Podcast
The Value of Emotional Intelligence

SAFe Business Agility Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 20:54


When people think of intelligence, most associate it with IQ. But emotional intelligence is actually a better indication of how a person will succeed in their career. In this episode, Jennifer Fawcett, SAFe Fellow and semi-retired Agile coach, consultant, and speaker, joins us to discuss emotional intelligence, how it can help individuals and organizations succeed, and the role it plays in SAFe.

Coffee, Kids, and Crazy
Danny & Sheri Silk Answer Listener Questions (Part 2)

Coffee, Kids, and Crazy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 37:46


Danny and Sheri Silk are back on the podcast today! Brittney and Seth invite Danny and Sheri to answer listener questions- and it's gold.Get ready as they tackle topics like surviving zoom calls; parenting adults, the importance of connection, and more! Just listening to today's episode will raise your parenting IQ.Welcome to the Coffee, Kids, and Crazy Podcast, a show about creating a heart-to-heart connection with your kids. Your podcast hosts, Brittney Serpell and Seth Dahl are here to answer your biggest parenting questions so that you can become a powerful parent.

The John Batchelor Show
Marilyn Brookwood. #UNBOUND: Eugenics and orphans. The complete, forty-minute interview. October 13, 2021. @MarilynBrookwo1 @wwnorton

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 39:30


Photo:  Eugenics supporters hold signs criticizing various "genetically inferior" groups. Wall Street, New York, c. 1915. @Batchelorshow The Orphans of Davenport: Eugenics, the Great Depression, and the War over Children's Intelligence, by Marilyn Brookwood.   https://www.amazon.com/Orphans-Davenport-Depression-Childrens-Intelligence/dp/1631494686 The fascinating―and eerily timely―tale of the forgotten, Depression-era psychologists who launched the modern science of childhood development. “Doomed from birth” was how the psychologist Harold Skeels described two toddler girls at the Iowa Soldiers' Orphans' Home in Davenport, Iowa, in 1934. Their IQ scores, added together, totaled just 81. Following prevailing eugenic beliefs of the times, Skeels and his colleague Marie Skodak assumed that the girls had inherited their parents' low intelligence and were therefore unfit for adoption. The girls were sent to an institution for the “feebleminded” to be cared for by “moron” women. To Skeels and Skodak's astonishment, under the women's care, the children's IQ scores became normal.  Now considered one of the most important scientific findings of the twentieth century, the discovery that environment shapes children's intelligence was also one of the most fiercely contested―and its origin story has never been told. In The Orphans of Davenport, the psychologist and esteemed historian Marilyn Brookwood chronicles how a band of young psychologists in 1930s Iowa shattered the nature-versus-nurture debate and overthrew long-accepted racist and classist views of childhood development. Transporting readers to a rural Iowa devastated by dust storms and economic collapse, Brookwood reveals just how profoundly unlikely it was for this breakthrough to come from the Iowa Child Welfare Research Station. Funded by the University of Iowa and the Rockefeller Foundation, and modeled on America's experimental agricultural stations, the Iowa Station was virtually unknown, a backwater compared to the renowned psychology faculties of Stanford, Harvard, and Princeton. Despite the challenges they faced, the Iowa psychologists replicated increased intelligence in thirteen more “retarded” children. When Skeels published their incredible work, America's leading psychologists―eugenicists all―attacked and condemned his conclusions. The loudest critic was Lewis M. Terman, who advocated for forced sterilization of low-intelligence women and whose own widely accepted IQ test was threatened by the Iowa research. Terman and his opponents insisted that intelligence was hereditary, and their prestige ensured that the research would be ignored for decades. Remarkably, it was not until the 1960s that a new generation of psychologists accepted environment's role in intelligence and helped launch the modern field of developmental neuroscience. Drawing on prodigious archival research, Brookwood reclaims the Iowa researchers as intrepid heroes, and movingly recounts the stories of the orphans themselves, many of whom later credited the psychologists with giving them the opportunity to forge successful lives. A radiant story of the power and promise of science to better the lives of us all, The Orphans of Davenport unearths an essential history at a moment when race science is dangerously resurgent. 16-page black-and-white insert

Locked On Rockets - Daily Podcast On The Houston Rockets
Eric Gordon Game-Winner Keeps Rockets Win Streak Alive Against Orlando Magic

Locked On Rockets - Daily Podcast On The Houston Rockets

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 37:07


Host Jackson Gatlin (@JTGatlin) talks the Rockets 118-116 win behind a big-time game-winner from Eric Gordon to keep the win streak alive. Gordon's strong night and clutch buckets down the stretch, Christian Wood asserting himself in the second half, Kevin Porter Jr. starting out the night strong (8 points, 6 assists) before leaving the game due to the same hamstring issue he's been struggling with, Alperen Sengun with an impressive performance off the bench, sparking a run in the fourth quarter, including a perfect display of his basketball IQ and more. #Rockets #NBA #EricGordon Subscribe to the Locked On Rockets YouTube Channel: Locked On Rockets Follow/Subscribe/Listen Anywhere: linktr.ee/LockedOnRockets Download & Follow JTGatlin on Spotify Greenroom If your business wants to advertise on Locked On Rockets, DM Jackson on Twitter or email JacksonTGatlin@gmail.com Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! | Offers: lockedonpodcasts.com/offers Built Bar -- Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to built.com and use promo code “LOCKED15” and you'll get 15% off your next order.   BetOnline AG -- There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus.   PrizePicks -- Don't hesitate, check out PrizePicks.com and use promo code: “NBA” or go to your app store and download the app today. PrizePicks is daily fantasy made easy!   TrueBill -- Don't fall for subscription scams. Start cancelling today at Truebill.com/LOCKEDONNBA.   Shopify -- Go to SHOPIFY.com/lockedonnba for a FREE fourteen-day trial and get full access to Shopify's entire suite of features. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

On Wisdom
43: Invisible to Ourselves: A Life of a Psychological Scientist (with Richard Nisbett)

On Wisdom

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 71:16


A disturbing thought - might it be impossible for us to directly observe the workings of our minds? Richard Nisbett joins Igor and Charles to discuss a life lived on the cutting edge of behavioral sciences in the second part of the 20th Century. He shares tales from his groundbreaking research into our faulty mindware, discussing various biases, cultural differences in cognitive processes, our inability to directly observe our mental processes, and why job interviews are not only unhelpful but potentially harmful to our ability to hire the best person for the job. Igor is keen to learn about the human beings behind some of the 20th Century's academic idols in social psychology like Daniel Kahneman, Amos Tversky and Lee Ross, Richard explains why important work and interesting work are not necessarily the same thing, and Charles struggles to make sense of when we do and don't intervene to help strangers in peril. Welcome to Episode 43. Special Guest: Richard Nisbett.

Talk Murder To Me
284 | Goodbye Joe

Talk Murder To Me

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 40:01


Evidence Photos @ https://talkmurder.com/joe-arridy/Case book @ https://amzn.to/3dfOsVvJoe Arridy was a "feeble-minded" prison inmate falsely accused of the brutal murder and rape of a 15-year-old girl. Arridy, along with another 'fella' was put to death by the State of Colorado in 1939. Newspapers referred to Joe Arridy as "the happiest man on death row", because of his extremely low IQ and child-like attitude.

Talk Murder To Me
283 | Death Row Joe // Joe Arridy "Happiest Man on Death Row"

Talk Murder To Me

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 57:22


Evidence Photos @ https://talkmurder.com/joe-arridy/Case book @ https://amzn.to/3dfOsVvJoe Arridy was a "feeble-minded" prison inmate falsely accused of the brutal murder and rape of a 15-year-old girl. Arridy, along with another 'fella' was put to death by the State of Colorado in 1939. Newspapers referred to Joe Arridy as "the happiest man on death row", because of his extremely low IQ and child-like attitude.

Polk and Kush: A Not-So-Serious New Orleans Sports Podcast
Dec 2nd 2021 - It's Beginning to look a lot like Taysom Time

Polk and Kush: A Not-So-Serious New Orleans Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 57:24


The Pelicans are starting to look like the team we hoped with impressive wins over quality opponents thanks to high IQ play and hustle from Herb Jones and Josh Hart. The Saints get demolished by Buffalo on Turkey Day in the dome, and limp into another Thursday night showing against a Covid-addled Cowboys. Brian Kelly is gonna have to adjust to Baton Rouge! Fex Ex is throwing your packages away! Much more! SPONSORS: Jansen Petagna at French Quarter Realty | Follow him at J_Petagna on Instagram Ale on Oak | Located at 8124 Oak Street in Uptown with a spacious patio and over 30 beers on tap. Theme song by Mike Wiebe of Drakulas and Riverboat Gamblers.

Anesthesia Deconstructed: Science. Politics. Realities.
The Butterfly IQ+ Ultrasound With Butterfly Network CMO Dr. John Martin

Anesthesia Deconstructed: Science. Politics. Realities.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 25:49


On this episode we talk to the John Martin, MD the Chief Medical Operator at Butterfly Network, Inc. about the utility, future and applications of the powerful Butterfly IQ+ portable ultrasound probe. We discuss the butterfly iQ+ built in educational videos teaching point of care ultrasound (POCUS) and how it is all three probes in one right on your hip. Will this be the replacement of the stethoscope and be on everyone's hip? Listen and find out! Learn more at https://www.butterflynetwork.com/iq

Heal Yourself. Change Your Life
IQ-33: Are You Stuck In “Intra-transformation”?

Heal Yourself. Change Your Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 15:20


Many times people can unknowingly be stuck inside their transformation – where they are not seeing the big picture of how to create real, lasting change in their lives. This can result in hurt, frustration, struggle and not being able to genuinely transform chronic health issues. For that reason, today's IQ episode is very insightful! Brandy breaks the information down in a very simple and logical way so that your mind can “see” transformation with more clarity. This clarity can help you to open your mind and expand your consciousness to a greater awareness to help you get real tangible results in your life.   Additional links and resources:  * Website: https://brandygillmore.com * Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/brandy.gillmore/ * IG: https://www.instagram.com/brandygillmore/ * Twitter: https://twitter.com/BrandyGillmore * If you would like to learn how to heal your body: https://brandygillmore.com/healing * TEDx Talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5dEbqRYqY_0   Please remember that genuine change and follow through are key for getting lasting results. And do not avoid seeing your doctor. Instead of avoiding your doctor, your goal should be to continue to see your doctor as recommended and blow their mind with what you are capable of with your mind. 

The Vision Driven Basketball Training Podcast
How To Watch Film In-Season To Maximize Your On-Court Performance

The Vision Driven Basketball Training Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 24:30


Click the link below to get my FREE Elite Perimeter Scorer Workout:https://www.visiondrivenbball.com/eliteperimeterscorer Watching film is crucial to playing your best. Both watching yourself as well as the teams you will play is what will give you a significant advantage. In this episode, I go through what exactly you should be looking for when you watch film, how to apply it to your own game, and how to use it to boost your basketball IQ and play at a high level!If you have any questions or topics that you want me to talk about on the podcast, DM me on Instagram! Emotional Intelligence Test: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/tests/personality/emotional-intelligence-testInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/visiondrivenbasketball/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCe1Ka1W1V_TfRSwE_luacEg?view_as=subscriberThanks for listening!

The Uncontested OKC Thunder Podcast
Post Game #19: Wizards cast a spell on the Thunder 101-99

The Uncontested OKC Thunder Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 37:27


Jacob and Kamiar go live post-game to dissect OKCs 99-101 loss to the Wizards, including SGA's return to the lineup, Tre Mann's performance, how the Thunder should distribute minutes, Giddey's high basketball IQ, and much more! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Generative Energy Podcast
#74: Vaccine Shedding | Progesterone and Thyroid | Immunology, Ideology, and Power with Ray Peat and Georgi Dinkov

Generative Energy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 85:16


00:00 - Catch-up with Ray, allergens in food, celery juice, bacon 04:09 - How did the coronavirus phenomenon manifest? Fort Detrick, military games, germ warfare lab leaks, China, event 201, operation lockstep, Eric Schmidt, artificial intelligence 16:58 - 'Not going there as fast as the ruling class had hoped' 20:56 - How does vaccination fit in? Digital currency 25:27 - What type of emails is Ray getting from the vaccine-injured? Spike protein shedding, avoiding crowds, quarantining vaccinated people 28:09 - What if your significant other is vaccinated? 28:29 - Does Ray think there's a placebo group in this experiment? 30:08 - Does it take 30-50 years to see the side effects of any new drug or vaccine? 31:10 - How will they cover up children dying from the vaccine? How to use VAERS 33:40 - What will replace the coronavirus narrative? 38:58 - Everything Is a Rich Man's Trick (2014) Execution of the Romanov family 42:18 - The physiological role of antibodies 46:51 - Quinine, bitter taste 52:38 - How to get Ray's newsletter and books, Progest-E from Kenogen 53:39 - Why would a person have a bad response to Progest-E? Thyroid function, beta-glucuronidase, and stress 57:26 - Question: who is the healthiest person Ray has ever known? What made them that way? 58:45 - Question: does a person's name influence their personality and behavior? 01:00:14 - Question: is having a sense of humor related to a person's metabolism? 01:02:10 - Question: what accounts for handedness? 01:05:06 - Question: what does Ray do to maintain a sense of novelty in his life? 01:11:23 - Question: neuroticism, anxiety, depression, and high IQ? 01:16:13 - Question: if a person's health improves, do they become more sensitive to the environment? 01:19:36 - Question: Ray's thoughts on surviving the great reset in Mexico 01:23:10 - Question: what is Ray working on? 01:23:52 - Question: is there value in self-discipline?

Work Life Play with Aaron McHugh
The Integrity of Yes and NO

Work Life Play with Aaron McHugh

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 6:13


Friends, this is Aaron, and I've been thinking. I've been thinking about the slippery slope, the slippery slope of...as humans, as leaders, we find ourselves in a place progressively over time far from where we intended to be or accidentally just waking up one day and finding that we're in a place that no longer looks familiar or is no longer desirable. I've found myself on that slope many time. I just had a conversation with a friend this morning, and he was stating, after a year of really intentional work and changes in family, moved into a new home, found himself in a place of work rhythms, lifestyle rhythms that were unfamiliar and undesirable. Really not a place, like, "Why am I doing this? How did I get here?" And it's really helpful to know and have the awareness to start with. "Huh. This isn't working." Paying attention...what I talk about often is the dashboard lights of your life, and they start going off. For me, sometimes it happens in sleep where I notice, boy, I'm sure up a lot at 1 to 2:30 in the morning with lists of unfinished things in my head. Or, boy, I really notice that I'm way less patient than I wanna be, or I really notice that I'm finding the Zoom world of constantly switching of 30-minute or 60-minute blocks and the mental fatigue that that requires. I was just reading a book from Cal Newport on Deep Work, and he talked about how the mental...basically IQ points go down through the day from the progressive switching between topic and between task. That we actually become dumber effectively is what it means. So what do we do? What do we do when we find ourselves in a place where it isn't where we started, it's not where we intended to be, or, simply, where we want to be or what we want to be experiencing is something different than what we currently are. And I believe it usually, like, begins with two vocabulary words. One is starting to say yes to different things and say no to others. And those two words, yes and no, pulling those out, looking at those, one in our left hand, one in our right, and deciding, "Okay, now what are the mends and adjustments and trades I can make?" For myself, I notice this constant gravitational pull to say yes to more client work, to say yes to the next opportunity, to say yes to that next small thing. My wife was in a training program, and they called 'em, "The big things that you put in a bowl are oranges. The small things you put in a bowl are Skittles." And it's much easier to have a bowl that you start with oranges in than it is to start with a bowl, fill it full of Skittles, and then try and shove the oranges in. And oranges being figurative for the things, the big, juicier, meatier, chunkier pieces of your commitments, your yeses and then moving into, then, adding the small bits around those big blocks. So for me, personally, I find it really fatiguing when I end up with a bowl full of Skittles of just tons of little bitty penny ante small things I'm doing. And for me, as I learn to lead myself, learn to lead others, the impact I seek to create has to do with fewer yeses to Skittles, more no to those small little things, and stronger...my friend called them "straight spine" and "open heart" yeses, where the oranges are easier to place in, so that I don't find myself on down the road fatigued and surprised of the results of the impact of my experience of my work and my life and, in the end, finding myself on the slippery slope in some place I don't intend to be or choose not to be. So start with a yes. Figure out where those yeses need to be invested fully, and then where are some of the noes. I just, before recording this episode, said no to two separate invitations,so that I can keep the integrity of the yeses that I'd formally already committed to. You can do this, friends. Keep going. This is good for you. Aaron

Locked On Knicks - Daily Podcast On The New York Knicks
The Knicks Reign Supreme In The Battle Of Coastal Elites: Keep Immanuel Quickley And Obi Toppin Together Forever!

Locked On Knicks - Daily Podcast On The New York Knicks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 29:39


Gavin goes solo to break down the highs and lows of a big Knicks win over the Lakers, including the team's incendiary start, some hot shooting from Immanuel Quickley and Evan Fournier, moments of brilliance from Julius Randle and the case for keeping IQ and Obi together forever.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

ROGUE NEWS Radio
Kyle Exposes Lin Wood, The Left Fights Harder & Empire Of Morons

ROGUE NEWS Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 58:09


V and CJ breakdown the latest news. They talk about how Lin Wood is a Piece Of Sh!t, How we need to be more organized and politically active than the left. America is a has been power led by low IQ morons

No Sharding - The Solana Podcast
Daffy Durairaj - Co-Founder, Mango Markets Ep #53

No Sharding - The Solana Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 42:46


Daffy Durairaj is the co-founder of Mango Markets and is currently working full time as a developer in service of the Mango DAO.00:28 - Origin Story04:44 - Seeing the order book10:20 - The idea behind creating Mango Markets15:38 - Going from creating smart contracts to creating Mango17:32 - How big is the DAO?20:01 - The Launch29:15 - VCs and the launch32:43 - Decentralization and getting stuff done34:55 - Will DAOs ever compete with big tech companies?40:43 - What's next for Mango Markets? Transcript:Anatoly (00:09):Hey folks, this is Anatoly and you're listening to the Solana Podcast, and today I have with me Daffy Durairaj, who is the co-founder of Mango Markets, so awesome to have you.Daffy (00:20):It's great to be here.Anatoly (00:22):So origin story, how'd you get into crypto? What made you build Mango Markets?Daffy (00:30):How did I get into crypto? So, I started off really not wanting to get into crypto. I was really interested in algorithm training. I did that in college and did some competitions that I did well in, and I wanted to trade equities, but it turns out if you have not enough money, if you have a few thousand dollars it's just not allowed. You're not allowed to algorithmically trade. There's a patent day trader rule, and I was infuriated and I was just looking around and I found Poloniex where you can do anything you want. The thing that actually hooked me first to Poloniex was the lending market because immediately as soon as I saw an open lending market, I was like, "Oh wow, I have to buy some bitcoin, and I have to lend it out." And, Poloniex was all bitcoin, and then it gradually got into just the meat of it, which was algorithmic trading and everything about crypto seemed exciting, but I actually didn't want to hold bitcoin. Poloniex was all bitcoin, but again, I think the government sort of pushed me in the right direction.I was like, "Okay, I don't want to hold bitcoin, I'll hedge off my risk on BitMEX, but again, not open to US persons, and so I was kind of reluctantly holding bitcoin and thinking, all right, I have a few thousand dollars if things go bad in this whole bitcoin thing. I'll come out okay. I'll get a job or whatever, but just never got a job, just kept holding bitcoin and continue to trade crypto, and I did that for about five years. Then, I wanted to actually start trading on chain because I thought this was probably for a lot of the reasons that you built Solana, the censorship resistance, and the global liquidity of it, and the openness of it, the fact that you're not excluding people that have a few thousand dollars. I wanted to build on chain and I was just not very bullish on a lot of things, so I kept going back to trading, and then I saw Serum DEX, and I was just hooked. I placed a trade and it felt totally natural and normal. It wasn't like $40 and takes 20 seconds and you don't know if it... And, then MetaMask was jammed and you're like, "Oh, but how do I cancel this?" So, that was a long-winded way of saying I was a trader and then I saw Serum DEX and then I had to start building the tools that would make Serum DEX even more fun.Anatoly (02:59):That's awesome. I got into it by trading. Basically, I set up like an Interactive Brokers IRA account, and that let me kind of bypass the rules.Daffy (03:11):Really?Anatoly (03:13):With a very small amount of money. I think they probably closed these loopholes already. I wrote a bunch of stuff on top of their Java STK and started trading there.Daffy (03:22):I remember I actually got started that way too. I did a bunch of stuff for their Java, and we can tell you we're both programmers. We wanted to build this money machine. It's so fascinating, and it's a machine that-Anatoly (03:40):It prints money.Daffy (03:40):It does things and it prints money. What more could you want? So, I got started with Interactive Brokers, but I guess the whole IRA thing... Because I was a college student, and so even talking to an accountant would take a huge dent out of my net worth.Anatoly (04:01):Totally, it's all really not designed for... The whole financial system in trading in the US is designed to funnel retail towards an app like E-Trade or Robinhood, which takes a cut, and then sells that trade to somebody else, who will take a cut, and then 10 other people until it gets an exchange, and that's how everybody's protecting their neck. They're all taking a little slice, and I think what's cool about crypto is that even centralized exchange like FTX is 1,000 times better and less extractive of the users than anything in traditional finance, simply because they can guarantee settlement. Such a very simple thing.Daffy (04:49):You feel it right from the beginning. You go to Poloniex in 2016, and it's like, oh, you have an email, you have deposited bitcoin, and now you're just lending to people. So, just talk about not being extractive. To see the order book through Interactive Brokers or Ameritrade or whatever costs you a lot of money and it costs them a lot of money to provide it, and I don't think I'd ever seen an order book. This was my passion, this is what I love to do, and I've never actually seen it.There's that story of the blind men who are touching this elephant, and so I had kind of figured out maybe what the order book looks like, but then on Poloniex, you go there and you just see the order book and you see all the lights flashing and you're like, "Oh, this is it. This is where the trades are happening." And, that's free, and of course, a big part of Mango Markets as well is you can see the order book. That's it, that is it, there's nothing more, and it's all on chain and all this stuff. So, in terms of not being extractive, it's a really big piece of what motivates people to come in.Anatoly (06:02):I don't know if you ever tried to get data, real data. I wanted timing information when a bid comes in or when an ask comes in versus when it's filled. How do I get access to it? Because when you get data from any of these places, basically it's like a little better than Yahoo Finance, which is like every five minutes they give you a low and a high.Daffy (06:27):I don't know, did you ever succeed at doing that in Interactive Brokers?Anatoly (06:32):No, I recorded some of it, but it just never had that fidelity and it always felt like a gamble. I'll build some models and sometimes stuff would work locally against my simulations, but then whenever I would actually try to run it, I'd see that fills take a little longer than they should and all this stuff really feels like you're not interacting directly with the trading system, that somebody when they see your order they're like, "Well, maybe I'll put my order ahead of yours or do whatever or slow you down a bit." It just sucks.Daffy (07:16):It feels very opaque, it's like a black box, and of course, this is all for people like me who are kind of looking on the outside looking in. So, if I had gotten a job at Citadel or somewhere, then I could probably see what's actually happening, but the fact that the vast majority of people are going to look at it and not really know it's actually happening, not everyone wants to see an order book. That's an important fact, but there are a large number of people who need it to be a little bit transparent to be involved.Anatoly (07:49):What I hate about it is that there's a lot of people that make a lot of money from you not seeing, that they're in the business of information assymetry and fuck them.Daffy (07:58):So, it's not a family friendly podcast, so it's good. I was going to ask that. So, there's a funny story on RuneScape. I don't know if you've ever played RuneScape.Anatoly (08:17):I played Ultima Online, which is I think similar vibes in the early days.Daffy (08:22):Yeah, so on RuneScape, just like on the point of no one being able to see anything, on RuneScape, also they had an order book because that's the most natural thing to do, and I actually had to figure it out from first principles. I would place a trade and I would see that sometimes it would get executed and sometimes it would not get executed, then I realized, okay, if I place a trade for these water runes or something or oak logs or something, and I put the price really high it gets executed at some price that's not the price that I said, and then I was able to form this concept of that's the asking price. I didn't even have the terminology for this, and then I did the same for set the price to zero for a trade and now I found the bid, and now I can make a lot of money actually underbidding the best asker and overbidding the best bid.Anatoly (09:18):So, you're market making.Daffy (09:20):Yeah, so it's funny, I was reminded because you said there's a lot of people who make a lot of money in you not knowing, and I was just minting money. It took me years to accumulate like 1 million gold pieces in RuneScape and then I was able to just 30X it in a month.Anatoly (09:46):Too bad RuneScape is not a crypto currency. Whoever is running RuneScape, you're missing a huge opportunity right now to just go full crypto.Daffy (10:00):There was some talk about some NFT or something on Twitter. Somebody was trying to encourage Jagex, the company, to get involved in crypto, and of course, I tried to signal boost it, but eventually everyone falls in line.Anatoly (10:17):How did you end up with the idea for Mango Markets?Daffy (10:21):So, I have to give credit to dYdX. It was like 2019 and I hadn't really considered that this was possible. I was heads down writing, trading algorithms and trading crypto just kind of holding all of my wealth in bitcoin and I was borderline bitcoin maxi on that, and just seeing dYdX do it in those early days... Now of course, they're way more successful now. Those early days seemed that you could do leverage trading on chain, and they kind of showed it as a proof of concept, which I just kind of started pacing back and forth like, oh my God, this is changing our worldview completely.Ethereum was slow and whatever, so years went by. Actually, maybe just like a year, and then I saw Serum DEX where I felt finally, okay, all the pieces are in play and also I wanted to market make on Serum DEX, but I really need leverage. I don't really need leverage, it just makes market making dramatically more efficient and safer. Leverage is just this tool that people who are involved in the financial plumbing really need, and it wasn't there. I was like, "Okay, this is the time and I have to learn how to code smart contracts," which sounds like a very scary and daunting task, but it was not that bad.Anatoly (11:54):The scary part was that you guys were building on a platform that was really rough around the edges at the time.Daffy (12:02):Well, no one told me that shit was really rough around the edges at the time. That was actually maybe important. You come in and there was nothing to do, this was August of 2020, things were not locked down necessarily here in the United States, but people kind of scattered. No one was hanging out in the major cities, they had kind of went to go live with their families, as did I. I fled San Francisco and went to the rural part of North Carolina. So, there was nothing going on and you just have all the time in the world and bitcoin is doing well, so that's funding you in a way.Bitcoin is this big, or crypto in general, it's all the people who bought it or own some crypto, as long as it's going up, it's kind of funding whatever zany side projects you have in mind. So, this is just a side project. Wouldn't it be cool if I could access this part of the world or this technology? And so, that's why chewing glass... You probably coined that term, I don't know, that's why chewing glass wasn't so hard because that pressure to... You have all the time in the world basically.Anatoly (13:30):Basically, COVID and lockdowns were so boring that chewing glass to learn how to code smart contracts with Solana was like a reprieve from the boredom.Daffy (13:45):And, I've heard you kind of say, okay, a bear market is when everyone is coding. To give the opposite perspective, I feel like a bull market, unlike much more chill, oh yeah, nothing really matters. Crypto is going up, it doesn't matter what I do. The rent is going to be paid for, everything is going to be fine, might as well engage in high variance new ideas, new projects. In a bear market, I'm very I got to grind, I got to squeeze out a couple of more bips out of this trading algorithm because I got to pay rent. So, that's the bullish case on bull markets.Anatoly (14:30):That you can try something crazy. That is the point where people enter this space is in a bull market. It's that they kind of start coming in droves because they're like, "Everything is crazy and I can also be part of the party." But, it's hard as a founder to stay focused because you are in that high variance, high risk taking kind of mindset.Daffy (14:58):There's a trade off of during a bull market there's a lot of things looking for your attention, and a bear market is very calm, or it can be. If you built up a lot of liabilities during the bull market, now you have to stay afloat during the bear market. Maybe it's calm in the external world, but internally it's not calm. You're like, "I got to do X, Y, and Z today every day." There's that natural pressure.Anatoly (15:32):So, you decided to learn coding on smart contracts on Solana. How did you end up going from there into Mango?Daffy (15:39):Initially, it was called Leverum. Not it, there was just an idea and there was a command line tool where you could... The YouTube video might still be out there, and Max was out there somewhere on the internet and he saw it and he thought it was a great idea. And so, he reached out to me and we did some other things like speculative about a prediction market, and then we were like, "Okay, no one is going to build margin trading." A lot of people are saying it, but it doesn't look like if we just wait it's just going to happen in the next couple of weeks or something. It's probably we just have to build it.Not we just have to, but we totally should. This is clearly a very important piece of the Solana ecosystem. So, we started building it. Mango was just we were thinking alliteration is good. Everybody loves mangoes, it's a fruit that I have never heard of anybody who doesn't like mangoes. It's probably the high sugar content and Mango Margin was the idea, but then we got the domain Mango.Markets. It's kind of evolved now. When you're starting off with something, you have kind of a narrow scope. You're like, "I just want to be able to borrow money." And now, there's this Mango DAO and people are talking about NFTs and drones. I'm talking about drones. I don't know if anybody else is, but it's just gone way higher and now I'm like, "I'm a humble servant of the Mango DAO." And, that's totally a normal thing to say.Anatoly (17:27):How big is the DAO?Daffy (17:28):How big is the DAO? That's a good question.Anatoly (17:30):In humansDaffy (17:31):That's like a philosophical question. In human terms, wow, again, even still a philosophical question. So, I think if you go to MNGO token, if you go to the Solana explorer and just type in mango or MNG or something, you can probably... I don't know if they have a list of unique token addresses, so in some sense that's the DAO, but in terms of the number of people who actively post on the forums and make proposals, that's much smaller. I'm guessing there's thousands of people who have votes, but the number of people who make proposals and add meaningful commentary on the forums is maybe 20 people, and it's expanding pretty quickly.I always see new people coming in. There's also not just people, there's the wealth of the DAO and the cultural reach of the DAO, the spiritual significance of the DAO, all of those seem like size if you ask how big is the DAO. You interviewed Balaji Srinivasan, and there's this idea that he had on Twitter that was like a DAO should buy land in Wyoming and send a drone to circle it and this is kind of like a moon landing sort of kind of thing or some kind of significant breakthrough where the DAO is controlling physical objects in the real world. So, this is very exciting to me, but it has nothing to do with margin trading, it's just something exciting that maybe in a bear market, I don't know, I'll push to get this done.Anatoly (19:23):Do you want the control to happen on chain?Daffy (19:25):Yeah, I think that's necessary. Maybe not the total control, but some kind of signal that distance... So, you can kind of think of Congress authorizes a certain thing and then the executive branch does it. If we could make that link be as automated as possible, I think there's something useful there, at the very least something exciting and interesting, kind of like the moon landing where maybe there wasn't anything useful, but it was inspiring for sure.Anatoly (20:02):So, the DAO, if you guys decided you want to do something with leverage and lending, and how you guys launched was really unique. I don't even know if people did this in Ethereum. To me, this is the first time anyone's kind of done this style of launch. Can you talk about the design and how you guys thought of it and what let you make those choices?Daffy (20:25):So, people early to Solana may be familiar with the Mango market caps and how that went, which somewhat argues the first NFT on Solana, and that was done pretty much sort of like how NFTs are typically done where there's a mad rush to grab the caps as soon as possible and the price is swinging wildly and there's a lot of people. Now, I think we put that together as an April Fool's kind of thing, very quickly, and so it was great for what it did, but the experience from that was, okay, there's going to be a lot of angry people. If you do it in this way where the DAO is raising funds, and this is the inception of the DAO, the DAO is raising funds for insurance fund, you probably don't want it to just be distributed to the people who were the fastest to click.And, that was the idea. We probably don't want that. It doesn't seem useful, it seems like a lot of angry people, and a lot of frustrated people. So okay, so you take out the time component, you take out the luck component, and then you're left with you kind of have this sort of auction that lasts 24 hours, but then what if X somebody comes at the last moment and dumps in a huge amount of money and raises the price for everyone? Everyone gets the same price. So, our design was we'll have a withdrawal period or a grace period at the end, the remaining 24 hours where if you kind of don't like the price, you can bail out. It had some flaws and I think we knew about those flaws from the beginning. We were like, "Okay, we just pushed to this game of chicken to a later point where someone can put in a lot of money to scare other people away and then they pull out at the last second. And that did happen, but it's not clear if that was net positive or net negative.Anatoly (22:28):And kind of in summary, there's this 24 hour period where people deposit funds in for a fixed supply of tokens.Daffy (22:36):Correct.Anatoly (22:37):And, then the period is over, and now everybody knows what the total amount in the pot is for the token and there's kind of this price that's created and then if you don't like the price, you can withdraw the entire bid or as much as you want. You can only reduce your bid.Daffy (22:54):Correct.Anatoly (22:54):But, you don't need to withdraw the entire bid, you can just reduce it.Daffy (22:57):Correct, yep.Anatoly (22:58):So, then that pushes the average price down at the same time, so for every dollar you take out, you kind of get a better price per token.Daffy (23:07):And, you see the price ticking up during the first 24 hours as more and more people are putting money in and then the price ticking down over the next 24 hours.Anatoly (23:19):I'm a huge fan of this setup because it creates a lot of... There was news, you guys made the news because it was almost half of all of USDC that was minted on Solana ended up in that smart contract. It was like 45% of it.Daffy (23:43):I remember actually because we saw the USDC on Solana was 700 million the days before and then it had climbed up to like 1.1 billion or I don't know what the number was at the end, and there was 500 million in the contract at the end of the first 24 hours. That was not the intention.Anatoly (24:05):It's like it was minted.Daffy (24:05):And honestly, I think you could appreciate it better from the outside than from my point of view for sure, and of course, I also could appreciate it better from the time distance, but that was not expected. We kind of knew that there would be a lot of money placed in the beginning and then money would go down. That was in all the documentation that we wrote, and that was expected and we had all these dev calls where everyone was always talking about it, and I was like, "Okay, come on. Literally, there isn't that much USDC in Solana." So, it can't be that bad, but of course, I underrated the possibility that someone could just mint a whole bunch of new USDC and bring it in from somewhere else. It made the news and a couple of other projects did the same thing, and I wonder if maybe it's a one time kind of thing. The game only works once. You can't expect to scare people every time or use the tactic every time.Anatoly (25:10):Maybe, I think a lot to be said, but there was no other way to go. Mango took it all, so there was no private round, they were never listed anywhere. This was really the only way to get it, and the anticipation of a project that was awesome, and from every other perspective is... What I always tell founders is that you should always raise the least amount for the highest price. The VCs kind of have more power than you usually because they have more information, they look at many deals, people come to them, they have the money, but it's sometimes the founders have this asymmetry where they're the only ones without equity. They're the only ones without tokens and that moment is if you can get everybody at the same time to compete for that thing, then you've kind of created the symmetry there and you maximize the capital raise for the DAO, for the project, for the community, and therefore that actually is a good thing. You have more resources to build a vision.Daffy (26:16):Although, I'll clarify, I think the DAO is still handing out a lot of tokens, so there's still a lot of ways to acquire Mango tokens, and that was kind of the inception for the insurance fund. The DAO has been paying people out of the insurance fund, and so it's been useful, but there's still more tokens to be had. There is a slight private rounds and I totally understand why people do them, but like I said earlier, if you are in crypto for a while, and this the cool thing about bull markets, I don't actually need money, I just need to pay rent and bitcoin has gone up 50%, so I'm solid.And, no one was paid anything. There was just Mango tokens that were given to people and they were told the DAO values your contribution or this is the inception of the DAO, and everyone worked to build this thing. People worked without even the Mango tokens and sort of the tokens were given after the fact. I think it's a valuable way to build crypto projects actually.Anatoly (27:30):I want more teams to try to totally from genesis this DAO first approach, but it's really tough because you guys had such a principled view on how things should be done and there's a lot of people out there that are offering money for that one thing. How did you guys have the discipline to just go stick with this?Daffy (27:54):We had a lot of discussions about all these things. We talked to VCs and we still do and we like all VCs actually. So, I think Satoshi, I'm not trying to draw a comparison to us to Satoshi or anything, but there is this beauty in that story and I think there's a lot, maybe even the majority of bitcoin's value at least to me... To me, I just love the narrative. I love the story of Satoshi, the pseudonymous founder who is one of the richest people on the planet right now. Obviously, they're in a no VCs. This person wanted to not make a big fuss. It was kind of like this clockmaker prophetic person who just came and then left, built this thing and then left, and that's such an amazing story.There are these long, long payoffs. Maybe they take a while, but they definitely do pay off that if you're not hurting for rent, again, I was in a position, all the other Mango devs were in this position as well where it was a bull market, we're not getting eviction notices or something, we could kind of float the boat for a while. Just consider the longterm payoffs, consider the five year payoffs. Stories are amazing.Anatoly (29:17):The weirdest thing is that every good VC will tell you that you should maximize for the highest return. Don't worry about the middle exit, or don't compromise. Actually, imagine you're taking over the world, what are the steps to get there? And, the risk don't matter. Actually maximize for the high and this is the irony here is that I think this kind of fair launch, most distribution will probably result in overall longterm, better, and higher returns, but the risks that I always find is that humans are hard to organize and at the same time, cryptography is this new tool for organization.It is what allows us to massively scale agreement and complex problems, really, really complicated problems. We can just click a button and vote and agree on that one and you know. You know that the decision was made, but I'm curious, do you see tension between the decentralization, kind of the disorganization of the DAO and getting shit done? I've got to build stuff.Daffy (30:34):No, 100% actually, on a daily basis actually. There was a podcast with the guy on Twitter that goes by Austerity Sucks and this was back in April. We talked about this and he brought up a similar point and he was, "Yeah, this DAO thing, it's all a fine and dandy idea, but do you think this will work?" And I, to be honest with you, am skeptical, however it is always felt to me sort of a high variance idea, kind of like if you were in the 16th century Netherlands or the 17th century Netherlands and you were like, "Okay, we've got to get spices from India. How do we do it?"And, you come up with a joint stock corporation and then the join stock corporation is everywhere and I don't think anyone has really figured out how to do DAOs well or what's the right mix, how do we communicate, how do we coordinate, all those things. I don't think anyone's quite figured it out yet. No one had figured it out like six months ago. I still don't think we have figured it out, but if it works, the payoff is enormous. There is global coordination, there isn't a jurisdiction. I imagine the DAO is controlling drones one day. It could be wild. So, even taking into account all of my skepticism, I was still like, "Okay, we should do the DAO idea." Anyway, not just me, Max is totally on board with this and Tyler and all the other people who kind of built Mango Markets. But on a day to day basis, as of October 2021, now I'm thinking, okay, maybe what we need to do is have small teams that build things and then pitch it in front of the DAO and get compensation. So, the DAO is kind of the government and it subcontracts out to people. Maybe not like direct democracy rules everything and we'll try that out and if that doesn't work, we'll try something else out, but try new stuff out quickly.Anatoly (32:45):That's awesome. This is actually a really good strategy to incentivize product development. Building an MVP, which means you're the PM, and the implementer, the dev, and you go do all the work and here's your management. It's all done, just give me money.Daffy (33:09):And, there's some maintenance tasks, so it's not purely new products, so I'm thinking Mango V4, but also in the meantime, there are all these nodes that need to be paid for.Anatoly (33:24):I think you guys will need to split. We called it KTLO, keeping the lights on work. You for six months, you're on KTLO duty, and you get paid a salary effectively, and you just got to keep the lights on, but then some other folks are like, "Go build something that you can propose to the DAO and the DAO will fund it."Daffy (33:49):I think that's basically what we have coalesced on is that, well, some people should be doing KTLO and other people should be doing new things, building the new product, and it takes kind of the risk out. The DAO doesn't have to pay for whatever stuff that I produce for Mango V4, but we both have some kind of incentive to be honest about it. If it's clearly a huge improvement or even a very substantial improvement, DAO should pay me something because if the DAO doesn't, then you can expect future builders to not go for it. And, we have these discussions on the forums.People make good arguments like this. I think the average IQ in the Mango Markets forums is very high. I think probably higher than most legislative bodies. I'm just going to go out on a limb and just say that. Not ours of course, ours is obviously very high IQ, smart people in our government, but you know.Anatoly (34:55):Do you believe five years there's going to be a 30,000 person DAO. Imagine a tech company, 30,000 engineers, or 30,000 people, they got product managers, teams, layers of bullshit. Is there going to be a DAO that's competing with a big tech company?Daffy (35:16):It's legitimately really hard to figure out how this might look. The reason why I hesitate so much with the question of a 30,000 person DAO is I'm not sure it'll look exactly like a corporation that we can say, okay, these are these 30,000 people. You might never be able to figure out who is part of the DAO and maybe that's one of the benefits of the DAO. If I asked you, how many people are part of Solana, not Solana Labs, but Solana the community? It's a little bit difficult to even answer, lots of people, various levels of involvement, and financial. Some people have a lot of financial stake until you don't, but some people have a lot of financial stake and no involvement at all. It's wild all over the place. Does Bitcoin look like a country or a corporation? I can even point my finger on what it is.Anatoly (36:20):So, even LINE had a battle that had 8,000 people all coordinating over something and I think they have corporations within that game that are maybe probably span up to 1,000 I'd imagine. So, that's people organizing using tech for a common goal without a job, without a structure that you normally have at a company. Linux was built by people organizing online. I think as soon as you have something to lose and in Linux and even LINE you start building up a virtual token, your reputation is a contributor to this thing and becomes a thing that we don't normally think of as valuable in a monetary way, but it's valuable to that person, but I definitely care about my ability to continue contributing to an open source project. So, where tokens I think can get there is if there is something of value being created by the community, some common goal that everyone is working on and that token is in the middle of it and is uniting and organizing it. I think that could scale as large as a corporation.Daffy (37:45):No, I agree with you. I just think it'll always be a little bit hard to figure out how many or who is involved, just by the nature of it. I just think it'll be always a little bit hard to figure out, but will 30,000 people be building on Mango or some DAO? You already know the numbers better, but we might even be approaching that with Solana. So, I'm not part of Solana Labs or affiliated with Solana in any way, but building on Solana, and also I have a financial incentive too, but also I have a reputation incentive and it feel like I'm part of the Solana corps or whatever it is, but I don't know what it is. It doesn't even exist. It's not even a DAO. There isn't even a DAO there.Anatoly (38:39):Oddly enough, I feel the same way about Eth and bitcoin even is that we're competing with them.Daffy (38:50):But, it all feels like we're actually kind of a part of the same team and-Anatoly (38:54):This is the weird part that I think is going to be really interesting how it plays out because I don't think it's obvious to anybody what is crypto. Is it the token? Is it the coin? Is it the network? Is it the cryptography itself?Daffy (39:10):It's not the cryptography itself, so we can strike that one out.Anatoly (39:14):Are you so sure? I think it's honestly the power that a person has to be able to make these very concrete statements that are unbreakable no matter how... That's the math. The math behind it is what allows them to do them.Daffy (39:36):I don't totally know the cryptography itself. I know basic 101 number theory stuff, but I remember going through my first programming class and coming up feeling just very powerful. I'd write stuff down and then it happens. Kind of like a king, actually, more powerful than a king in a lot of ways because I was writing these training algorithms and it was happening around the world in ways that probably a medieval king couldn't imagine and crypto brings that to finance where things of actual value can be moved.Mango Markets exists and you can go there and place a trade right now, but it was just somebody who wrote it. I was involved based on you can see the GitHub contributions, but it was just people who wrote it and that's probably... We can maybe chalk that up to the cryptography.Anatoly (40:43):So, what's next for you guys?Daffy (40:46):There's drones on the horizon. Yes, sometime in the future, but we have to do a lot of the nitty-gritty, roll up your sleeves kind of work. On Solana so far, there isn't... Maybe a lot of projects are struggling with this, indexing all the data and providing it for people in a usable way because there's just so many transactions. It turns out if transaction fees are really low, people just make a lot of transactions and they don't think about it.And so, gathering it up and displaying it in a useful format to people, that's a very immediate term and then slightly medium term is sort of becoming the place where everyone does leverage trading and does borrow and lending, all the crypto natives. And then of course in the longterm, I would say it's somebody like my mom should be able to store her money in Mango Markets and not think twice about it. It's not a good idea right now I wouldn't say, but that's the goal. That involves a lot more social things than just technological things. That's get it to a level where she can do it safely and feel comfortable and manage her keys, or even if she's not managing her keys, have a solution for how the keys might be managed, that she's not falling for scams, and that's I would say my longterm goal.Anatoly (42:09):That's awesome, man. On that note, man, really awesome to have you on the podcast. Great conversation. I'm always excited about what you guys are doing and how the community is building this ecosystem of its own, so really amazing. It's serendipity that you guys started going on Solana, just really lucky to have folks like you in the ecosystem.Daffy (42:35):Thanks a lot. It means a lot. This was really fun.

The Speaker Lab
How to Develop a Meaningful Workshop w/ Carrie Kerskie [Student Highlight]

The Speaker Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 49:26


Sharing in the excitement of our student's success is such a privilege for our team at the Speaker Lab. Our Director of Student Success, Maryalice Goldsmith, is taking the mic for our Student Highlight series so you can hear more about our students' experiences and what they want you to know about growing your speaking business. Carrie Kerskie has been speaking for over 15 years to consumer groups about identity theft and helping victims of fraud. Through a variety of opportunities, she uncovered a passion for helping people develop their cyber intelligence. With the need to shift her perspective and learn how to land speaking gigs, Carrie found The Speaker Lab and everything changed! She shares about finding her niche, learning to build a pipeline, create meaningful content, and how to tap into the pain points of your audience. Join Maryalice and Carrie for an energetic and encouraging conversation on what it looks like to work through our TSL Elite program! THE FINER DETAILS OF THIS SHOW: What is a cyber IQ? Living in a cyber security culture. Creating perspective with a keynote. How to develop a meaningful workshop. Why we need to change our habits? Coaching during the Elite TSL program. Why finding your niche matters. Working with event planners. And much more!

The Vision Driven Basketball Training Podcast
Emotional Intelligence: The KEY To Your Success As A Basketball Player

The Vision Driven Basketball Training Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 36:15


Click the link below to get my FREE Elite Perimeter Scorer Workout:https://www.visiondrivenbball.com/eliteperimeterscorer Studies have shown that emotional intelligence is the number one predictor for success in every industry around the world. It matters more than IQ, communication, decision making, and any other metric you can measure. Yet it's rarely something that's talked about in the game of basketball, which is why it's lacking in a ton of players at every level. As you get more emotionally intelligent, you will continue to get more and more successful individually, as a leader, and your team will be better because of you. This is a game changer!If you have any questions or topics that you want me to talk about on the podcast, DM me on Instagram! Emotional Intelligence Test: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/tests/personality/emotional-intelligence-testInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/visiondrivenbasketball/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCe1Ka1W1V_TfRSwE_luacEg?view_as=subscriberThanks for listening!

Cheap Suits Podcast
Episode 210 | ”Hot Boy Summers”

Cheap Suits Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 109:49


This week, the gang continues riding down the road of cancellation as we talk IQ and his Wu-Tang crew, the unfortunate passing of Young Dolph, Kyle Rittenhouse, new presidential expectations, a night in Austin and much more. Music: Slim Biggie Tha Mack- “On It”

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1816: Marilyn Brookwood. #UNBOUND: Eugenics and orphans. The complete, forty-minute interview. October 13, 2021. @MarilynBrookwo1 @wwnorton

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 39:30


Photo:   Logo from the Second International Eugenics Conference, 1921, depicting eugenics as a tree which unites a variety of different fields @Batchelorshow The Orphans of Davenport: Eugenics, the Great Depression, and the War over Children's Intelligence, by Marilyn Brookwood.   https://www.amazon.com/Orphans-Davenport-Depression-Childrens-Intelligence/dp/1631494686 The fascinating―and eerily timely―tale of the forgotten, Depression-era psychologists who launched the modern science of childhood development. “Doomed from birth” was how the psychologist Harold Skeels described two toddler girls at the Iowa Soldiers' Orphans' Home in Davenport, Iowa, in 1934. Their IQ scores, added together, totaled just 81. Following prevailing eugenic beliefs of the times, Skeels and his colleague Marie Skodak assumed that the girls had inherited their parents' low intelligence and were therefore unfit for adoption. The girls were sent to an institution for the “feebleminded” to be cared for by “moron” women. To Skeels and Skodak's astonishment, under the women's care, the children's IQ scores became normal.  Now considered one of the most important scientific findings of the twentieth century, the discovery that environment shapes children's intelligence was also one of the most fiercely contested―and its origin story has never been told. In The Orphans of Davenport, the psychologist and esteemed historian Marilyn Brookwood chronicles how a band of young psychologists in 1930s Iowa shattered the nature-versus-nurture debate and overthrew long-accepted racist and classist views of childhood development. Transporting readers to a rural Iowa devastated by dust storms and economic collapse, Brookwood reveals just how profoundly unlikely it was for this breakthrough to come from the Iowa Child Welfare Research Station. Funded by the University of Iowa and the Rockefeller Foundation, and modeled on America's experimental agricultural stations, the Iowa Station was virtually unknown, a backwater compared to the renowned psychology faculties of Stanford, Harvard, and Princeton. Despite the challenges they faced, the Iowa psychologists replicated increased intelligence in thirteen more “retarded” children. When Skeels published their incredible work, America's leading psychologists―eugenicists all―attacked and condemned his conclusions. The loudest critic was Lewis M. Terman, who advocated for forced sterilization of low-intelligence women and whose own widely accepted IQ test was threatened by the Iowa research. Terman and his opponents insisted that intelligence was hereditary, and their prestige ensured that the research would be ignored for decades. Remarkably, it was not until the 1960s that a new generation of psychologists accepted environment's role in intelligence and helped launch the modern field of developmental neuroscience. Drawing on prodigious archival research, Brookwood reclaims the Iowa researchers as intrepid heroes, and movingly recounts the stories of the orphans themselves, many of whom later credited the psychologists with giving them the opportunity to forge successful lives. A radiant story of the power and promise of science to better the lives of us all, The Orphans of Davenport unearths an essential history at a moment when race science is dangerously resurgent. 16-page black-and-white insert

The tastytrade network
Trading Futures With LIZ & JNY - November 18, 2021 - A Small Futures Pair Idea

The tastytrade network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 31:09


Frank, our favorite redhead, joins Liz and Jenny on Red Shirt Thursday as they discuss a Small Exchange futures pair with a premium ticker.  Featured symbols: /STIX, /SM75 and IQ

The tastytrade network
Trading Futures With LIZ & JNY - November 18, 2021 - A Small Futures Pair Idea

The tastytrade network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 30:18


Frank, our favorite redhead, joins Liz and Jenny on Red Shirt Thursday as they discuss a Small Exchange futures pair with a premium ticker.  Featured symbols: /STIX, /SM75 and IQ

Midnight Train Podcast
Unsolved: The Springfield Three

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 127:45


Tonight we are taking the train back to true-crimeville. Unsolved as per the usual, the case, or cases if you will, also has a crazy connection to one of our own here in the midnight train family. First we are going to talk about the Springfield 3. The Springfield 3 is an unsolved missing persons case that began on June 7, 1992, when friends Suzanne "Suzie" Streeter and Stacy McCall, and Streeter's mother, Sherrill Levitt, went missing from Levitt's home in Springfield, Missouri. Then we are going to roll into a talk about a giant hunk of shit named Larry Dewayne Hall. And in our discussion of Mr. Hall we shall get to the personal connection to us at the train! So without further ado… Let's get into today's episode!   29 years ago Suzie Streeter, 19, her mother Sherill Levitt, 47, and her friend Stacy McCall, 18 disappeared without a trace from their central Springfield home. Authorities have gathered many theories to explain what could have happened. Some people have even gone as far as blaming alien abduction and the rapture. Can't we go a single unsolved true crime episode without an alien abduction theory?    Anyways, the day before the three went missing, the two girls were celebrating. They had graduated from highschool that day and were planning on going to a friend's house for a party later that day. The two initially intended to head to their friend Janelle Kirby's house, but it was too crowded, and instead, they went back to the home Streeter shared with her mother, Sherrill Levitt. The next day the girls were supposed to meet up with Kirby and her boyfriend to go to a water park. They did not show up at Kirby's house so Kirby and her boyfriend went to the girl's house to see what was going on. They assumed the girls had just overslept.  When they got to the house the girls were not there and there was no sign of the mother either. When they arrived at the home, Kirby found the front door unlocked and entered the house to find it empty despite the women's cars still being outside. The family dog, however, was present and was described as agitated. Kirby also noticed that the porch light was smashed and there was glass everywhere. She decided to go ahead and clean up and unfortunately, not realizing it, may have destroyed some evidence while cleaning the mess. Kirby and her boyfriend started to look around the house and the phone rang. Kirby answered the phone call and said that the call was full of "sexual innuendo". She hung up and then another call came through and it was basically the same as the first. A few hours later, McCall's mother arrived at the property after she failed to reach her daughter on the phone. She noted Suzie's clothes, purse and cigarettes were still in the house and decided to call the police. While doing so, she noticed there was a message on the answering machine. Listening to it, she later described it as "strange" but inadvertently deleted it. Police believe the message may have contained evidence and it was unconnected to the sexual calls made when Kirby was present, which are largely dismissed as a prank.    It was now 16 hours since the two girls had been confirmed to have been seen. The mother had been last heard from at 11:15 the night before when she had called a friend of hers. When Kirby first accessed the property at 9 a.m., more and more friends and relatives came looking for their loved ones, with up to 20 people walking through the house. The crime scene became utterly compromised, and, needing a warrant, police were unable to enter until June 8. By June 9, they had called the FBI.    "The only thing unusual about this house was that three women were missing from it," retired Springfield Police Capt. Tony Glenn told News-Leader in 2006. "You had this feeling as you looked around that something was missing, that something had to be missing. But there wasn't. Just them."   Regardless, there was very little evidence at the property, with no signs of a struggle or blood present. All three women owned a car, and all three vehicles were still present; Levitt's blue Corsica was in the carport, Streeter's red Ford Escort and McCall's Toyota Corolla were in the circle drive. The keys were all in the house. Their purses were at the bottom of the stairs, and an inviting graduation cake was waiting in the fridge.   Meanwhile, Levitt's bed had been slept in, and her book was even turned over on the nightstand, ready to be resumed. The two young women had also certainly gotten prepared for bed, washing their make-up off and leaving their jewelry by the basin. McCall left her shorts and placed them by Streeter's waterbed, and given that no other clothing appeared to be missing, she is likely to have vanished in just a t-shirt and underpants. The only sign of any disturbance at all was the shattered porch light. The possibility exists that the light was deliberately broken to draw Levitt, Streeter and McCall out of the house just after the two young women arrived home, or another deception was used to the same effect, yet that can only be speculation.   Thousands of posters went up throughout Springfield. Police logged 5,200 tips in the case and gave polygraphs to numerous people. They searched woods and fields throughout the Ozark area and made inquiries in 21 states. All to little avail.   One potential piece of evidence was a letter left at a News-Leader rack at Smitty's. The letter had a drawing of the Bolivar Road Apartments with the phrase "use Ruse of Gas Man checking for Leak" written on. What it may have meant is unknown.   An image of a transient man in the area was distributed, as was a photo of a retouched dodge van seen by the home on June 7. The van is seemingly crucial to the case as an eyewitness claims to have seen Streeter driving a green Dodge later in the day on June 7 and, apparently under duress, a male voice telling her not to do anything stupid. Another witness reported seeing the van with a blonde female driver at a local grocery store and was suspicious enough to write down the license plate on a newspaper. Unfortunately, he threw the newspaper away before contacting authorities.   The hunt for the three women was relentless, with police logging 1,632 hours of overtime on the case over ten days, theorizing the transient might have been involved or the answer lay in the background of Sherrill Levitt.   A new lead appeared on June 24 when a waitress came forward to say the three missing women had been at George's Steakhouse between 1 a.m., and 3 a.m., with earlier evidence on the timing of the younger women's movements suggesting this is likely to have been near the end of that window. The witness said Streeter appeared to be drunk, and her mother tried to calm her. The sighting has never been confirmed.   Going nowhere, the investigation was featured on the Dec. 31 edition of "America's Most Wanted" and produced 29 calls. One stood out above the others when a caller claimed he had information about the three disappearances. However, attempts to link the caller with investigators failed, as he became spooked and hung up. Police appealed for him to get in touch again, but he never did, and his identity remains a mystery.   Another program, "48 Hours," shadowed police for weeks as they investigated the case, showing pictures from the search and officers sifting through the many leads. Nothing led to a workable angle, and the case went cold. Five years later, Springfield police announced it could no longer justify the money spent on the matter, officially shutting the case down.   Ok so that's fucking odd… Three women just disappeared. No signs of a struggle… No robbery… No blood.. everything left in place. Maybe it was aliens!   No you may be asking yourself...but guys… There's gotta be a suspect or something, well we found a couple.   Here's what we found:   Gerald Carnahan: A businessman, he was convicted in the 1985 killing of Jackie Johns 25 years after it happened. He has ties to Springfield and a long history of legal troubles including: Jan. 13, 1994, second-degree burglary of a business, two-year prison sentence;   -- Jan. 13, 1994, stealing from that business, four-year prison sentence;   -- Jan. 13, 1994, arson at that business, three-year prison sentence;   -- Jan. 10, 1994, attempted kidnapping of a girl in Springfield in 1993;   -- June 1, 1994, assault of a law enforcement officer, 11 months in county jail;   -- June 1, 1994, unlawful use of a weapon, one-year prison sentence; and   -- other prison sentences for attempted kidnapping and tampering with evidence. So, he's an all around, grade A butthole   Then there's Dustin Recla, Michael Clay and Joseph Riedel: Recla is the ex-boyfriend of Streeter who told police he wanted her dead because she gave officers a statement about the men, who were charged with the felony institutional vandalism of a cemetery in February 1992. Which seems a bit excessive to want to kill someone over. Riedel is accused of breaking into a mausoleum at Springfield's Maple Park Cemetery on Feb. 21 1992 and stealing a skull and some bones. Police have said Dustin Recla sold 26 grams of gold teeth fillings from the skull at a Springfield pawn shop for $30. So, these jerks were working together, breaking into graves and stealing their gold fillings. In the early 90s.    Steven Garrison:   Garrison told police a friend had confessed to killing the three women during a drunken party. He told police information unknown to the public that led investigators to serve three search warrants at two sites in western Webster County; that info was that they would find the women's bodies and clues about their abduction and deaths. He also said a moss green van believed used to take the women would be found about 12 miles away, south of Fordland.   The property searched was the same site where in 1990 LE searched for two of three missing Springfieldians. Property owner Francis Lee Robb Sr. pleaded guilty to two counts of second-degree murder in a case authorities said at the time they believed involve a drug deal gone awry.   Garrison was believed enough that a gag order concerning the three search warrants was issued by a judge.“…certain aspects of the information we received fit with other (private) aspects of the case,” Springfield Police Capt. Todd Whitson said. Whitson said the gag order was rare, but he could not say why it was issued,“other than to say there is such an order, and it governs the operation and everything related to the operation out here.” Added Webster County Sheriff C.E. Wells:“We can't tell you anything about it until the order's lifted.”   Garrison is serving 40 years in prison for raping, sodomizing and terrorizing a female Springfield college student in the summer of 1993.   After tracking him and several associates almost exclusively for more than a year, police have since backed off Garrison. But not all the way off. They last approached him last summer. Six months ago, investigators looked to Colorado for information on Garrison, who is in a Missouri prison.   "They've never let up on me," Garrison says.   But even with all these buttholes on the list, there is one main suspect that the police and many others like in this case, Robert Craig Cox. It's always about Cox on this fucking show…   In 1995, Cox was arrested for holding a gun on a 12-year-old girl in Decatur, Texas. He is presently serving a life sentence for that robbery and a consecutive 15-year federal sentence.    Robert Craig Cox was convicted of killing a 19-year-old Florida woman who was somehow intercepted while driving home from work at Disney World one night in 1978. Cox - who lived in Springfield the summer of 1992 - walked away from death row in 1989 after the Florida Supreme Court said the jury didn't have enough evidence to convict him.   Through the years, Cox has toyed with Springfield police - saying he knows the women are dead and that they're buried near the city. Having discovered that Cox lied about his alibi on the morning of June 7, 1992, officials are skeptical about his claims. Cox declined to be interviewed by the News-Leader, but in recent letters to the newspaper, he acknowledges police consider him a suspect and that years ago he worked as a utility locator in south-central Springfield. Get that? Remember the “gas ruse” note??   Robert Craig Cox was convicted in 1988, of first degree murder, in the 1978 beating death of Sharon Zellers, 19, an employee of Walt Disney World.  The case was weak, and Cox was not charged until eight years after the murder. Cox and his family were staying at a motel in Orlando where the victim's body was found. He had a cut on his tongue, and hair and blood samples found near the victim were compatible with his. Cox testified he bit through his tongue during a fight.   The Florida Supreme Court reversed Cox's conviction, ruling that, at best, the evidence created “only a suspicion” of guilt. The court ordered his acquittal and release from death row in1990    He was immediately taken into custody to complete a prison sentence in California for an unrelated 1985 kidnapping. Then he returned to his boyhood home of Springfield, Mo., where he came under suspicion — but was never charged — in the 1992 disappearance of the three females. Texas police also questioned him about an abduction in Plano. In 1995, Cox was arrested for holding a gun on a 12-year-old girl during a robbery in Decatur, Texas. He is serving a life sentence for that robbery and is not eligible for parole until 2025.  A couple years After being sent to prison in 1995, Cox claimed he knew what happened to the three women. Cox claimed all three had been murdered and buried, taunting that their bodies would never be found. Cox was living in Springfield at the time of the murders and didn't claim to be the killer, saying he was in church that morning as corroborated by his girlfriend.   However, that would not discount his involvement earlier in the morning, and in any case, the girlfriend later recanted her statement and said Cox asked her to lie for him. Cox said he was at his parents' home when asked where he was earlier, which was again corroborated.   Police remain uncertain as to Cox's involvement with the crimes, observing that he only ever tells them enough for them to believe he knows something but never enough to incriminate himself. Some believe Cox is merely seeking infamy through a false confession. For his part, Cox said he will reveal the truth once his mother dies, but the bodies are buried somewhere around Springfield. wow what a stand up fella. Someone kill that old lady! I'm kidding… Can we at least fake her death??   Also one more interesting tidbit. In 2007, investigators revealed they'd received a tip that the bodies were buried in the foundations of the Cox Hospital parking lot. (yay more Cox) That same year, crime reporter Kathee Baird had a corner of the parking lot scanned with ground-penetrating radar and found three anomalies. However, it remains doubtful that the site is the burial location as construction didn't begin there until September 1993, over a year after the disappearances. Equally, the tip came not from anyone connected with a burial but somebody professing psychic abilities. So there's that…   While the claims of Cox possibly have merit, there is no evidence to say for sure. Despite 50,000 tips from the public, the case remains unsolved, and with nearly 30 years having now passed, the case of the Springfield Three may never actually be resolved.   Ok so by now you may have forgotten that there is a personal connection to this case. You're kind of getting a twofer today.    Let's talk about another fine upstanding citizen, scratch that, a huge giant hunk of shit, Larry DeWayne Hall. Larry DeWayne Hall was born on December 11th 1962 in Wabash, Indiana, US. He was born 2nd of 2 children and raised by both parents. He was raised as a youngest child and had one older (by a few seconds) twin brother, Gary Hall. His father, Robert Hall, was an abusive alcoholic. His mother, a homemaker. His father abused alcohol and/or drugs. He had a speech defect. During his education he had academic, social or discipline problems, including being teased or picked on. Larry DeWayne Hall was physically and psychologically abused at some point of his life. Sound like the makings of a serial killer, what say ye passengers!   Police believe that Hall, 54, may have killed 30 to 40 women. He's confessed to rapes, murders and abductions of women all over the Midwest to reporters, book authors and police investigators. He was convicted in federal court of abducting and raping a 15-year-old Illinois girl.   But he's never been convicted of murder.   Hall is serving a life sentence in federal prison in North Carolina for the 1993 kidnapping of school girl Jessica Roach, whose ravaged body was found in a cornfield. She had been out riding her bicycle. In Hall's confession, which was read to the jury, he admitted that he raped Jessica and strangled her with a belt, the ends of which he held from behind a tree where the child was forced to sit so he wouldn't have to see her face. He was not tried for murder because the teenager's remains were mangled by a farmer's combine to the extent that a cause of death could not be determined. HOLY HELL!! That's a new and extremely disturbing one on this show, folks.  Without a cause of death, the case was transferred to federal court and Hall was charged with bringing a minor across state lines for purposes of sex.   However, in 1996, the federal Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago ruled that Hall should be given a new trial because the trial judge erred by not allowing the testimony of a psychologist that Hall's mental condition led him to falsely confess, to please police. He was convicted again at a second trial and sentenced to life without parole.   Hall also confessed to police to killing 20-year-old Laurie Depies after abducting her in Menasha in northern Wisconsin. But he was never charged in connection with her 1992 disappearance, even though he said he killed her and scraps of paper were found in his van on which he had written “Lori” and “Fox River Mall,” where Depies worked. Authorities said they could not corroborate his confession, a legal requirement to bring murder charges.   The strange, 30-year odyssey of Larry Hall, a twin who once lived in an Indiana cemetery and wandered the Midwest in a van, involved occasionally attending Civil War re-enactments dressed as a Union soldier, and toying with police despite a low IQ of 85, according to a police report. Hall sent a letter to author Christopher H. Martin, who is from Hall's hometown of Wabash, Indiana. Martin wrote a book about Hall's alleged murderous sprees titled, “Urges: A Chronicle of Serial Killer Larry Hall.”   On page 39 of the book, Paulette Webster, 19, is listed as a victim. She was walking to a local bowling alley to meet a friend when she disappeared. Hall's letter to Martin was taunting, noting that, “If I did it, I would have put her in a river or in a field.”   Eulalia “Lolly” Chavez was found in a field near Summerfield.   Paulette's mother, Mary Webster, 68, said she and her husband William first learned about Hall when Martin visited them, around 2010. Martin had the letter from Hall, but Mary Webster declined to look at it.   Hall also confessed to a television reporter that he killed and sexually mutilated Chavez, who was known for years as the Summerfield Jane Doe until her exhumation in 2008 led to her identification. He later recanted.   St. Clair County Sheriff Rick Watson recently revived an investigation involving Hall and the murder of Chavez, which happened 31 years ago.   So where are we going with this? Well well tell you.    Larry was also a suspect in the Springfield 3 disappearances after his twin brother, who people claim looked exactly like Larry, said his brother claimed to have murdered the three women. They were in the area for a civil war reenactment at the time of the disappearances. Twin brothers that traveled around the country doing Civil War Reenactments, known serial killers. Larry claims his brother Gary was stalking one of the teens that night. There are many that believe both men were involved as it would have been hard for one man to subdue and kidnap and murder three women at once. The disappearances fit Larry's mo. And he's a giant piece of shit that's definitely capable. So that brings us full circle to the disappearance of Tricia Reitler. The following details of her disappearance we're taken from the Charley project. Org website:    Reitler was a freshman psychology major at Indiana Wesleyan University in Marion, Indiana in 1993. She was a good student with a high grade point average. She was last seen at approximately 8:00 p.m. on March 29, 1993.   Reitler was writing a term paper that evening, and decided to take a break. She walked to Marsh Supermarket, which was approximately half a mile from the university's campus. She purchased a soda and a magazine and left the store, intent on returning to her dormitory in Bowman Hall.   She never made it there and has never been seen or heard from again. Reitler's bloodstained jeans, shirt and shoes were discovered in a field near Seybold Pool and Center Elementary School, which is located between Marsh's Supermarket and the campus.   Investigators said six or seven unidentified people were playing basketball in the Center School playground adjacent to the pool at the time Reitler disappeared, but none of the possible witnesses have come forward with information regarding her case. Authorities believe that Reitler was taken against her will while walking back to campus. Foul play is suspected in her disappearance.   Donald W. Grenier was considered a possible suspect in Reitler's case at one time. Grenier was arrested in 1999 and charged with the abduction and molestation of a young girl from the Marion area. His home was searched for evidence connecting him to Reitler's case and the 1987 Indiana disappearance of Wendy Felton, which seemed to share common traits.   Nothing was discovered in the search and Grenier has since been cleared of involvement in both Reitler and Felton's cases. Grenier has always maintained his innocence in both cases.   Tony R. Searcy, a habitual criminal offender, has also long been considered a possible suspect in Reitler's case. He has denied all involvement and authorities have never arrested Searcy in connection with Reitler's disappearance.   Another possible suspect emerged when authorities discovered materials related to Reitler's case in a van owned by Larry DeWayne Hall several months after her 1993 disappearance. Hall resided with his parents in the 300 block of Grant Street in Wabash, Indiana at the time.   Investigators found maps, ether, photos and newspaper articles concerning Reitler inside Hall's vehicle. A photograph of him is posted with this case summary. He was arrested in December 1994 and charged with abducting Jessica Roach, a teenager whose remains were discovered in an Indiana cornfield in 1993.   Hall signed a statement confessing to Reitler's kidnapping and murder, but he later recanted and was never charged in connection with her disappearance due to a lack of evidence. Investigators searched an area of Grant County, Indiana near the Mississinewa Reservoir for Reitler's body. Hall led them to the scene, saying he'd buried her body there, but no evidence was located.   Hall is presently incarcerated in a psychiatric prison in North Carolina, serving a life sentence for Roach's kidnapping. He is still considered a suspect in Reitler's presumed abduction. He confessed to the murder of Laurie Depies, who disappeared from Wisconsin in 1988, and implied he was involved in the 1988 disappearance of Paulette Webster from Illinois. Police believe he may have killed thirty to forty women, but he hasn't been charged in any cases besides Roach's.   Reitler's case remains open and unsolved. She has never been located. Her family lived in Olmsted Township, Ohio, southwest of Cleveland, at the time she disappeared. She is the oldest of four children in a conservative Christian family. Her parents believe she is deceased.    Now you may say to yourself… Olmsted falls? That sounds awfully familiar.. Well friends that's because that's where the train station is located and where both I and Logan live. And now the crazy connection to the case and today's episode? Tricia was Grace, my wife's, babysitter! (Jon take over and give more back story) Movies:   Horror movies involving planes… Cus why not   https://www.ranker.com/list/best-horror-movies-about-airplanes/ranker-film

Left Reckoning
45 - Who Ended Apartheid & No Free Speech for Mine Workers ft William Shoki & Jacob from the Valley Labor Report

Left Reckoning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 91:35


support the show at patreon.com/leftreckoning and get our weekend bonus episodesWilliam Shoki (@Shokispeare) of Africa is a Country joins us first to discuss the death of FW de Klerk and who really deserves the credit for ending apartheid. Then, Jacob from The Valley Labor Reporters (@JacobM_AL) joins us for an update on the Warrior Met strike in Alabama.Also, Ben Shapiro prompts us to recommend the work of Stephen Jay Gould on IQ.

Teaching Kindness: Bullies Be Gone Podcast
S4 E12: Help your kids to help themselves with Jheri South

Teaching Kindness: Bullies Be Gone Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 22:25


There has always been a big push for having a good IQ. But something we need to talk more about is what I like to call EQ AKA emotional intelligence. Those soft skills like problem solving and being able to be emotionally aware are really important, and our kids struggle with em. So today, I speak with expert parenting coach Jheri South. @jherisouth Jherisouth.com Make sure to go follow me @builliesbe.gone and email me at bullies.speaker@gmail.com for speaking inquiries --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Jiffy Pop Culture
Ep 68. Rocky

Jiffy Pop Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 86:28


The real Rocky Horror has nothing to do with Frank N. Further or the Time Warp. The real Rocky Horror scored a 57 on his IQ test- and he cheated. The real Rocky Horror has a girlfriend who desperately needs Breck for Oily hair, and dresses like she's gunning for the title of “Miss Special Ed 1975.” This is Rocky.

MaYapinion
95 - Relaunches in Your Life with Hilary DeCesare

MaYapinion

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 45:03


This week, we have Hilary DeCesare, owner and founder of The ReLaunch Co. In her own words, she says, "we help women through transitions into major transformations in their business, relationships and personal lives. We have a special model around The 3H Effect that takes a person through the heart, the head, into the higher self to manifest midlife magic." 01:43 Hilary talks about her two coming books next year, how she decided to author, and what subjects is she going to deal with in these two coming books? Why should we love ourselves to succeed? 05:24 Why IQ and brain aren't enough to succeed? And why should we take EQ in consideration as well? What does the 3HQ formula mean? The secrets of How to go from your brain to your heart to manifest your ultimate goals. 10:28 How are SQ and beliefs important Besides EQ and IQ? How limiting beliefs can stop us from achieving big goals? How to create habits and beliefs? How does creating a solid foundation of habits and beliefs keep success progressive and help go through relaunches faster? How to learn from relaunches at an early age to stop them from repeating? 16:22 Why 21days aren't enough to build habits and beliefs? Why do most people quit after 21days? How long scientifically it takes to build a new habit and new belief? Hilary talks about her process of 6 steps to master beliefs, 23:09 How tragic and trauma can trigger major changes in our lives and how to start building yourself up again? 29:16 What Hillary is going to name her two coming books next year and when are the launch dates? And what are they talking about? 32:01 Why do we need mentors and how to find the correct one? How to become the CEO of your own life and how important is that? 35:51 Who is eligible for the 6 months business Hillary's course? and how can help to speed up your business to the next level? 40:30 Hilary talks about her podcast, what does the podcast covers, And the story behind starting it, 43:14 Hilary's advice to become a CEO of your life and get through relaunches and avoid limiting beliefs. Hilary has a unique understanding and up-close perspective of the center of any successful business, organization, or life - it's people and what they desire to the C.O.R.E. After a 10 year career at Oracle Corporation garnering more than 100 worldwide managerial sales awards including Top Account Manager Worldwide, DeCesare decided to shift her focus to helping C suite executives and women looking to relaunch in either life, business, or in relationships in order to reach their goals and align with their future possibilities. As a mother to 3, step-mother to 2 children, and wife to her amazing husband, life in the Bay Area is filled with an abundance of joy for DeCesare. A self-confessed adrenaline junky she has jumped from planes, dived in some of the rarest locations, and is up for anything that resembles a challenge or growth opportunity. When she is not coaching or spending time with family, she also devotes time to fitness and nutrition and enjoys traveling to exotic or unique locations that bring a new perspective to both her and her client's lives. A little more about Hilary, from Hilary "My career has crossed over from Corporate to Coaching to Entrepreneurship. I have had the highest of highs and the lowest of lows including a board member doing a Ponzi Scheme with our company." Connect with Hilary here: https://therelaunchco.com/ https://www.instagram.com/therelaunchco/ XXX Maya https://mayapinionpodcast.com/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mayapinion/message

Locked On Reds - Daily Podcast On The Cincinnati Reds
Jonathan India Wins NL Rookie if the Year and Headlines an Impressive Young Core for the Cincinnati Reds

Locked On Reds - Daily Podcast On The Cincinnati Reds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 26:04


Jonathan India won the NL Rookie of the Year in the most obvious vote, ever (except for the one guy who voted for Trevor Rogers). India is at the head of a group of five-to-six players who are the core of the Cincinnati Reds future. The challenge will be how the Reds support this core. Jonathan India's baseball IQ proved to be ultra-impressive and the key to his 2021 successes, as well as his future hype. How he translates that to future success will determine a lot for the Cincinnati Reds and their competitive aspirations. India leads a group of Tyler Stephenson, Hunter Greene, Nick Lodolo, and possibly Jesse Winker and Tyler Mahle as the core of the Cincinnati Reds. How management and the ones signing the checks will support them will be the biggest question-mark, moving forward. They must be all-in, one way or another. *FOLLOW* the podcast on your favorite app and on Twitter and Instagram @lockedonreds Also follow @jefffcarr on Twitter and @carrjefff on Instagram Call or text (513) 549-0159 Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Ecommerce Brain Trust
Amazon FBA Aggregators: Should Retail Brands Be Concerned? - Episode 214

Ecommerce Brain Trust

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 32:04


In today's podcast, we talk with Russ Dieringer about Amazon FBA aggregators. We discuss their business model, hiring practices, as well as advantages and disadvantages compared to incumbent brands in the digital space as well as brick and mortar stores. We share our opinions about the future of aggregators and accelerators, as well as some predictions about their future. Make sure you tune in to find out more! Russ Dieringer is the founder of Stratably, a company dedicated to elevating the digital IQ of leading consumer brands. Each week, Russ creates impactful, practical, and easy to digest research that speaks to all layers of an organization, helping them see further around the corner of what's coming in retail.

Wellness Force Radio
422 Ian Clark | 1,000 Days To Live: Using Nature's Wisdom to Turn on Your Wellness Epigenetics

Wellness Force Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 82:55


When you take something for your body that makes you feel really good that's not a stimulant but something that's totally natural or superfood and nutrient-based and it turns on a bunch of switches, you're getting activated. When you feel good, you want to feel better and you may ask yourself if that's even possible and the answer is always, 'yes.' - Ian Clark   Are You Stressed Out Lately? Take a deep breath with the M21™ wellness guide: a simple yet powerful 21 minute morning system that melts stress and gives you more energy through 6 science-backed practices and breathwork. Click HERE to download for free. Is Your Energy Low? Get more superfoods to improve your energy, digestion, gut health plus also reduce inflammation and blood sugar. Click HERE to try Paleovalley's Apple Cider Vinegar Complex + Save 15% with the code 'JOSH' *Review The WF Podcast & WIN $150 in wellness prizes! *Join The Facebook Group   Wellness Force Radio Episode 422 Founder and CEO of Activation Products, Ian Clark, shares the life-changing experience that led him to pursue a path of natural healing remedies, why reconnecting with his spiritual and emotional self was key to healing his physical body, why suffering will bring you real joy and how he uncovered the root cause of all his serious health issues. What if someone told you that you only have 1,000 days left to live? Would you treat your life differently?  Those are the questions Ian was faced with that led him to become the CEO of his body and take radical ownership of his wellbeing. Try Activation Products Today CLICK HERE TO SAVE 20% ON YOUR ACTIVATION ORDER WITH THE CODE “WELLNESSFORCE“ At Activation Products, they are committed to helping your body heal itself naturally and effectively... allowing you to live longer, look younger, and have a higher quality of life. And they're excited for you to be part of the family! They work hard to make premium products and supplements using the purest, most potent natural ingredients found on Earth. Their CEO and Founder, Ian Clark uses their products every single day. There is nothing in their product line that he wouldn't personally use. In fact... here's how he looked 16 years ago and today: He was overweight. Depressed. Sick. But when he started to use some of the powerful superfoods you'll find in our product line...He made a transformation like no other. Some would even say he aged backwards. If it wasn't for Mother Nature's powerful healing substances, he would not be the healthy, vibrant 62 year old that he is today. And that, my friend, is the reason why Ian started this company. So that health-conscious folks like yourself can get access to premium superfoods that not only help you reduce and manage your symptoms...but actually target the root cause of your health problems from a holistic standpoint. If you click the link below, it'll take you to their website where you can browse all of their products AND save 20% - Their gift to you for being a Wellness Force listener! CLICK HERE TO SAVE 20% ON YOUR ACTIVATION ORDER WITH THE CODE “WELLNESSFORCE“ Listen To Episode 422 As Ian Clark Uncovers: [1:30] Ian's Gentle Journey Towards Greater Health Ian Clark Activation Products Ian's healing journey and his choice to turn to nature when he was told he had 1,000 days left to live. What inspired him to start Activation Products and their mission to help people on their path of healing and wellness. The power of investing in ourselves and our health to create a greater impact in the world. Ian's previous programming of what living a fulfilled life should look like including trusting 100% in western medicine. The terrible cancer prognosis that both of his uncles received before they passed away two days apart and the impact that had on Ian's mental health. Multiple health issues Ian faced at 46 years old and the simple questions he began to ask to get to the root cause of them all. Why he was told multiple times that his health issues were genetic predispositions that he couldn't change yet he continued to fight against that idea. The positive impact of making small, gentle changes and gradually meeting more people who could help Ian naturally heal. [17:00] Become the CEO of Your Body The fact that deception is a very tricky thing and so he began to unpack how the medical community had deceived him about his health. His journey of deprogramming the thoughts that had impacted everything single thing he was doing in his life. The ego death he faced as he came to terms that everything he knew was killing him. Why you cannot get rid of the old programming; you have to build a new understanding and protocol to purge and replace it. The gradual physical purge he went through to be rid of toxic heavy metals and fungus in his system and repair what was broken. His revelation that he is not his body, his body is the host that his soul lives in. How he "fired" his body and finally began to act as the CEO of it. The intense battle he went through with his body as he fought against the temptation to eat bad foods in order to heal himself. 353 Dr. Ben Lynch Chemicals that he was breathing in including lead while working in the oil industry plus the mercury fillings that were in his teeth since he was a teenager which impacted his health. Exploring the most efficient ways to detox and gain greater health without going broke. [27:00] Our Oceans' Healing Wisdom Why detoxing the heavy metals in his body made the biggest positive impact on his ability to heal. How tapping into source intelligence outside of yourself is key to the healing journey. The moment he realized it doesn't matter what we physically own because money is just an energy fuel and purpose is what really matters in life. Why money isn't ours, it's given to us to flow out as a value proposition to the world and to bring more value to people. How he stumbled upon the marine phytoplankton during his healing journey which is used today in their Oceans Alive product. Oceans Alive The fact that there are over 40,000 strains of marine phytoplankton in the ocean but only 2 are fit for human biology. Josh's experience when he took Oceans Alive and why it gave him a mild electric feeling. The properties of Oceans Alive including all of the periodical elements in it with no stimulants basically giving you a 1/3 strength ocean water. How his team makes sure that the seawater that the marine phytoplankton is grown in is pure. What people tend to get wrong about the ocean's minerals and phytoplankton. How the ocean naturally cleanses itself and the benefits of negative ions we receive from it when we go in the water. Seaspiracy | Official Trailer [45:30] Which Supplements Should You Take? How all 7 of his children have played a role with the growth and development of Activation Products. The incredible health transformation Ian went through losing 90 pounds with his healthy lifestyle changes from 2004 to 2009. Powerful biomarkers to look at including how flexible your cardiovascular system is and the importance of keeping them supple. Important supplements to consider taking including iodine and magnesium. Why magnesium and Vitamin K-2 MK-7 specifically go hand in hand together for positive results. Ease Magnesium Perfect K2D3 Bo Eason The dramatic shift you will see in your health when you use Vitamin K-2 MK-7 even with 120 micrograms a day. How taking a higher dosage of Vitamin K-2 MK-7 had a positive impact on Ian's personal health transformation. The difference between applying magnesium on the skin rather than taking it sublingually. How they've developed their Ease Magnesium spray for direct benefits and why it won't make you sleepy. The best time to use the Ease magnesium spray and how many sprays you should do each time you use it. [1:00:00] Why Suffering Will Bring Real Joy What Ian has embodied on an emotional level to allow these health changes to start, continue, and sustain. Unpacking why the right kind of suffering will bring real joy. How positive emotions can spread when we see other people experiencing joy especially the power of healing. What you can do to continue to have a positive mindset in the face of unexpected challenges. How we can see obstacles as just a new adventure and how to work through the pain that comes up in those moments. Why we should let the pain soak in and let it work through us so that it can teach us new lessons. The fact that the word, "natural immunity" has been blocked and censored all over on Facebook, Instagram, and Google. Why the ability to obtain natural immunity is all around us if we're willing to seek it. Ian's vision for Activation in the future as we see authentic, loving leaders being noticed more and more. What genuine love looks like and how we can live by it every day. Why we cannot produce love, we can only nurture and care for what is already there. What it means to him to truly honor Mother Nature and use its gifts to help people get back to homeostasis. Power Quotes From The Show Our Soul's Life Energy "There is this life energy that is here in our spiritual world that is keeping our body alive and we are souls. We don't have a soul, we are souls. One of the biggest revelations I had on my healing journey is that my body isn't me - My body is the host I live in and I mistook it for me very much. I would think, "Oh I have cancer," and "I have heart disease," but that's not possible. A soul cannot get cancer and a soul cannot get heart disease." - Ian Clark Be In Charge of Your Health "The body can get sick and they can call it names but the body is either going to misbehave itself and keep being addicted to the wrong foods and throw temper tantrums when you try to correct your body or it's going to come under subjection to you. You have to put your body under subjection to you; you have to take over. So, I literally told my body one day, "You are fired. You are absolutely fired." My body had been the CEO of my life but I, my soul, was going to change all that and take back being in charge." - Ian Clark Healing On Your Terms "You have to figure out for yourself what the most efficient time, money, and energy-wise way to heal is because you don't want to go broke getting healthy. Do not chase your tail all day long to be a health nut. You simply want to have top-level health based on the cards your epigenetics were dealt. Feed your body with Mother Nature's intelligence and you will unplug all of the pathways causing your body harm. You will see the difference in your brain function, your body, and your emotional IQ." - Ian Clark Links From Today's Show  Ian Clark Save 20% on your Activation Products at wellnessforce.com/activation 353 Dr. Ben Lynch Oceans Alive Seaspiracy | Official Trailer Ease Magnesium Perfect K2D3 Bo Eason 15 Signs And Symptoms You're Probably Magnesium Deficient Amyloid plaques Leave Wellness Force a review on iTunes Cured Nutrition – Get 15% off of your order when you visit wellnessforce.com/cured + use the code ‘WELLNESSFORCE' Organifi – Special 20% off to our listeners with the code ‘WELLNESSFORCE' Paleovalley – Save 15% on your ACV Complex with the code ‘JOSH' Drink LMNT – Zero Sugar Hydration: Get your free LMNT Sample Pack, you only cover the cost of shipping Botanic Tonics – Save 20% when you use the code ‘WELLNESS20' Seeking Health - Save 10% with the code 'JOSH' breathwork.io M21 Wellness Guide Wellness Force Community Activation Products YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter LinkedIn About Ian Clark When Ian Clark was just 46 years old, a number of life-threatening health issues slammed Ian all at once and he was then forced to start searching for solutions across the world. Refusing to accept the heavy dire circumstances where he found himself, he decided to pursue a natural path to fixing his health. Ian traveled the globe, uncovering potent remedies and whole foods with powerful natural health benefits. After over five years of intense research and learning what it takes to support the body's natural ability to heal itself, Ian set out to share that information with others. With his sons and the support of a team of innovators, Activation Products was born with Ian as a Trustee and quickly grew into a company that helps tens of thousands of people achieve their health goals every day.  

FORward Radio program archives
Bench Talk | Coming Eclipses; Homophobia & IQ; Diabetes & COVID-19 (Iuliana Popescu) | Nov. 15, 2021

FORward Radio program archives

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 29:00


The excitement is in the air....a lunar eclipse is on the way! Professor Scott Miller fills us in. Then, Dr. Leslie Moise discusses a recent paper showing a correlation between homophobia and low IQ. EarthDate.org fills us on how trees adapt to cold winter weather. And finally, our guest of honor, Dr. Iuliana Popescu (of the UK Diabetes Research Center) discusses the biological links between Diabetes and COVID-19. Here are the full-length EarthDate stories on trees: https://www.earthdate.org/node/134 and https://www.earthdate.org/node/139. Bench Talk is a weekly program that airs on WFMP Louisville ‘Forward Radio' 106.5 FM (forwardradio.org) every Monday at 7:30 pm, Tuesday at 11:30 am, and Wednesday at 7:30 am. Visit our Facebook page for links to the articles discussed in this episode: https://www.facebook.com/pg/BenchTalkRadio/posts/?ref=page_internal

Education Bookcast
122. Hive Mind by Garrett Jones

Education Bookcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 48:35


In my episode on Stuart Ritchie's Intelligence: All that Matters I spoke about IQ and intelligence, after a long silence on this issue. In Hive Mind, we get a look at how IQ affects the fate of entire nations, rather than just the individuals living in them. Jones' argument rests on data showing that IQ correlates positively with patience, win-win thinking, productivity in teams, supporting "good" policies (i.e. those endorsed by experts), and saving more money. There is also data to indicate that richer countries tend to have higher average IQ, and some indications that causality goes from IQ to national wealth. The Flynn effect - a constant increase by the equivalent of 3 IQ points per year around the world throughout the 20th century - shows that IQ can be increased, but a more important question is whether that increase can be encouraged somehow. Jones also covers this ground, although it seems that we don't really know good answers to this. Nevertheless, that doesn't stop authors like David Didau in Making Kids Cleverer proposing that the purpose of school is to increase IQ so that children can benefit from the associated health, wealth, and other benefits. Overall, by combining economics and intelligence research, Hive Mind brings new perspectives to each of these domains. Enjoy the episode. ### RELATED EPISODES 111. Intelligence: All that Matters by Stuart Ritchie

Retirement Rescue Radio
Episode 138: From Janitor to Millionaire Philanthropist-The Psychology of Money

Retirement Rescue Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 23:49


Nate dissects a few excerpts from the book “The Psychology of Money” by Morgan Housel. Key takeaways: IQ, AQ, EQ Ronald Reed Financial success Relationships with Money

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2717 - Casual Friday w/ Heather Digby Parton & David Roth

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 161:19


It's Casual Friday! Sam and Emma host Heather Digby Parton, contributing writer at Salon and proprietor of the Hullaballoo blog. Digby, Sam, and Emma jump right into recent news surrounding the January 6th committee, as the infrastructure and reconciliation fights fade into the background. They begin with former Chief of Staff Mark Meadows ignoring his subpoena for criminal contempt of congress, before getting into the recent Trump audio leak regarding “common sense” regard for Pence by the insurrectionists, and the hope that Democrats will finally capitalize on something in the public eye with these hearings, as well as the likelihood that they won't, especially with Pelosi's desire to maintain a “strong” Republican party. Next, they jump to the corporatist Dems pushing the “inflation is the new deficit” idea, all while they continue to reject any helpful provisions in reconciliation, and cover whether Biden and Co. will actually put any leverage on Manchin or if they're still shilling for a right-wing that will never respect them. Lastly, they touch on the continued supply line issues, and get into the Rittenhouse judge's absurdly explicit political performance.   In the second half: Sam and Emma are joined by David Roth, co-owner of Defector and host of The Distraction podcast, to discuss his recent piece "I Will Create A Winning Basketball Program At The University Of Austin", and cover the education institution for a new age, sponsored by every libertarian contrarian that spends too much time on the internet, and how and why Bari Weiss has decided on creating a “university” as her next money-making initiative in her fight against the woke trinity of trans people, Black people, and Palestinians. And in the Fun Half: Emma and Sam dive into Kyle Rittenhouse's judge taking time in the trial to test out his right-wing tight five with some supply line jokes, before looking deep into Jimmy Dore's mystery producer who either: A). Jimmy lets run wild in editing, or B). Jimmy encourages to manipulate information. Matt Lech has Stephen Jay Gould walk us through the history of Ben Shapiro's bell curve nonsense, and the weird fact that IQ is somehow never important in homogenous societies. They also cover Youngkin's 17-year old son trying to vote… twice, plus, your IMs!   Purchase tickets for the live show in Boston on January 16th HERE! Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here. Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) You can now watch the livestream on Twitch Check out today's sponsors: sunsetlakecbd is a majority employee owned farm in Vermont, producing 100% pesticide free CBD products. Great company, great product and fans of the show! Use code Leftisbest and get 20% off at http://www.sunsetlakecbd.com. And now Sunset Lake CBD has donated $2500 to the Nurses strike fund, and we encourage MR listeners to help if they can. Here's a link to where folks can donate: https://forms.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Tushy: Hello Tushy cleans your butt with a precise stream of fresh water for just $79. It attaches to your existing toilet – requires NO electricity or additional plumbing – and cuts toilet paper use by 80% – so the Hello Tushy bidet pays for itself in a few months. Go to hellotushy.com/majority to get 10% off today! ZocDoc: With Zocdoc, you can search for local doctors who take your insurance, read verified patient reviews and book an appointment, in-person or video chat. Never wait on hold with a receptionist again. Whether you need a primary care physician, dentist, dermatologist, psychiatrist, eye doctor, or other specialist, Zocdoc has you covered. Go to Zocdoc.com/MAJORITY and download the ZocDoc app to sign-up for FREE and book a top-rated doctor. Prisoner Wine: Wine is like fine art. It can be good, bad, and every once in a while, it can be truly transcendent. Introducing The Prisoner Wine Company. Twenty years ago, The Prisoner Wine Company combined some of California's best and most unusual grape varieties to make a bold and complex blend – The Prisoner Red Blend. From the shape and weight of the bottle to the label featuring Francisco Goya's artwork, every detail is striking and memorable. Go to theprisonerwine.com/MAJREP for 20% off plus shipping included on your first purchase - get it in time for the Holidays. This is the best deal they have available! Get 20% off plus shipping included at theprisonerwine.com/MAJREP. Support the St. Vincent Nurses today as they continue to strike for a fair contract! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! Check out The Nomiki Show live at 3 pm ET on YouTube at patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada, at patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop Donate to Lance aka Gimpy G on Twitch's GoFundMe here!

Relentless Health Value
EP345: Can Pharma Imagine How Our Health System Will Look in the Future? With Paul Simms

Relentless Health Value

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 31:36


At the beginning of 2021, my guest in this healthcare podcast, Paul Simms, had come up with a set of predictions for 2021. Some came true; some didn't. But I was fascinated by a bunch of things, one of them being Paul's sort of implicit and explicit assessment of the context of these predictions. Right now, Pharma is in a weird moment: It's a confluence of technology, consumer expectations, changes in care delivery accelerated by the pandemic, policy at the state and federal level, and the financial realities of where we're at today. So, if you meet patients or providers or payers where they were last year or the year before that, you're gonna potentially be pretty far off the mark. There's also the financial realities which Pharma kind of exacerbated for themselves when some, many, spent the past however many years making their numbers by raising prices on existing drugs and developing drugs for mostly rare diseases but then, at the same time, not innovating antibiotics or for other diseases that impact so many lives. I mean, no comments on these strategies, but is it safe to then assume that an environment that allows for this sort of thing will continue indefinitely? Not only from an “Is this really the most patient-centric thing we can do?” standpoint, especially when you consider how many patients are being left behind as a result of both the narrow focus and also the price points—upwards of 40% of Americans have said they've abandoned meds due to cost, after all—but potentially also from a business continuity standpoint. Right now could be a decent time to start getting creative and experiment with new models and new ways to reach and engage. My guest in this episode, Paul Simms, is the former chairman of eyeforpharma, which ran the largest events in the pharmaceutical space for a number of years. His new company, Impatient Health, helps a very conservative industry find ways to deliver and provide patient value. During our conversation, Paul made a bunch of thought-provoking points; but one of them I keyed onto was a counterpoint to the ye old pharmaceutical conventional wisdom that high drug prices are needed for innovation. He said that actually all the money sloshing around could inhibit R&D innovation. Here's the thinking: If you can make a ton of money not being super innovative, then why be innovative? If you can make a ton of money not really improving OS (overall survival) in a meaningful way and not really helping a whole lot of patients, then why bother doing anything else, especially if the “anything else” might require risk or new business models that are going to take time and determination? During our chat, the work of Clay Christensen comes up more than once. Just to remind you, Clay Christensen is the one who coined the term disrupters. He wrote The Innovator's Dilemma back in the 1990s. Keep in mind that the main point of that whole book is that if you're a big incumbent, it's pretty easy to cruise along thinking everything is great until you get kneecapped by a competitor who takes advantage of a new business model or consumer preference or technology or law—all of which are coming out of the woodwork right now. Paul Simms has put it this way: When the habitat changes, evolution happens and entities that are able to adapt will thrive. I've also heard it put this way: It's not IQ or even EQ that matters most when change is afoot. It's AQ—the ability to adapt. You can learn more by connecting with Paul on LinkedIn. Paul Simms is known as the “pharma provocateur” for his efforts to realize the unfulfilled potential of the life sciences industry. His journey started in 2003 with eyeforpharma, an organization which he quickly grew into the pharmaceutical industry's most influential and largest event organizer, acquired by Reuters in 2019. He has since set up a think tank and consultancy called Impatient Health. Paul counts the industry's CEOs and innovators amongst his friends and is a regular speaker, host, author, and commentator.   05:04 “We're at that catalyst point where we could go one way or the other.” 05:39 How can the analogy of Web 1.0 vs Web 2.0 be applied to the future of healthcare business models? 07:06 “People need to improve their awareness at the very least as to a new generation of companies coming forward.” 08:31 “What now is the new business model that can exist in that world?” 09:07 Is there a stage pre-agility that will allow pharma companies to pivot to future markets? 12:08 What are the new ways to think about things in the future of healthcare business? 14:09 “The mind boggles at what is possible but is not yet being achieved.” 16:11 Why could prices falling actually spark more innovation? 16:49 EP300 with Bruce Rector, MD.21:36 “It's these companies that have this data-driven consumer relationship that I think are very interesting.” 25:16 “I just think that it's a mindset change first.” 25:38 “I'm not here to be right or wrong. I'm just here to enable the conversation.” 25:56 “What I find is that companies make significant efforts and that they don't quite gain the same traction as quickly as they might like to.” 26:20 “It seems to be this great impatience that companies can turn around these non-medicine initiatives more quickly.” 29:42 “It seems to me that the pharmaceutical industry's reaction to the pandemic has been, ‘We need to double down.'” You can learn more by connecting with Paul on LinkedIn. @xpablo of @HealthImpatient discusses the future of #pharma in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #pharmahealth “We're at that catalyst point where we could go one way or the other.” @xpablo of @HealthImpatient discusses the future of #pharma in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #pharmahealth “People need to improve their awareness at the very least as to a new generation of companies coming forward.” @xpablo of @HealthImpatient discusses the future of #pharma in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #pharmahealth “What now is the new business model that can exist in that world?” @xpablo of @HealthImpatient discusses the future of #pharma in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #pharmahealth Is there a stage pre-agility that will allow pharma companies to pivot to future markets? @xpablo of @HealthImpatient discusses the future of #pharma in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #pharmahealth What are the new ways to think about things in the future of healthcare business? @xpablo of @HealthImpatient discusses the future of #pharma in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #pharmahealth “The mind boggles at what is possible but is not yet being achieved.” @xpablo of @HealthImpatient discusses the future of #pharma in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #pharmahealth Why could prices falling actually spark more innovation? @xpablo of @HealthImpatient discusses the future of #pharma in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #pharmahealth “It's these companies that have this data-driven consumer relationship that I think are very interesting.” @xpablo of @HealthImpatient discusses the future of #pharma in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #pharmahealth “I just think that it's a mindset change first.” @xpablo of @HealthImpatient discusses the future of #pharma in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #pharmahealth “I'm not here to be right or wrong. I'm just here to enable the conversation.” @xpablo of @HealthImpatient discusses the future of #pharma in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #pharmahealth “What I find is that companies make significant efforts and that they don't quite gain the same traction as quickly as they might like to.” @xpablo of @HealthImpatient discusses the future of #pharma in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #pharmahealth “It seems to be this great impatience that companies can turn around these non-medicine initiatives more quickly.” @xpablo of @HealthImpatient discusses the future of #pharma in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #pharmahealth “It seems to me that the pharmaceutical industry's reaction to the pandemic has been, ‘We need to double down.'” @xpablo of @HealthImpatient discusses the future of #pharma in our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #pharmahealth Recent past interviews: Click a guest's name for their latest RHV episode! Dr Steven Quimby, Dr David Carmouche (EP343), Christin Deacon, Gary Campbell, Kristin Begley, David Contorno (AEE17), David Contorno (EP339), Nikki King, Olivia Webb, Brandon Weber, Stacey Richter (INBW30), Brian Klepper (AEE16), Brian Klepper (EP335), Sunita Desai, Care Plans vs Real World (EP333), Dr Tony DiGioia, Al Lewis, John Marchica, Joe Connolly, Marshall Allen, Andrew Eye, Naomi Fried, Dr Rishi Wadhera, Dr Mai Pham, Nicole Bradberry and Kelly Conroy, Lee Lewis, Dr Arshad Rahim, Dr Monica Lypson

CTRL the Narrative
MELO MANIA IN LOS ANGELES | E88

CTRL the Narrative

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 69:50


We talked to Joe, Kenny and Vick about the great start Melo is having early in the season, his role when Lebron and others come off the injured list, Russell Westbrook's terrible season and the importance of high IQ ball handlers for Melo.CTRL the NarrativeJoin the next episode by becoming a CTRL the Narrative member: https://www.patreon.com/ctrlthenarrativeListen on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/5CTDtXjF4OQyl9IvznG5g6?si=UUpjHdzbSsaZNwgUyqkGBAListen on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/ctrl-the-narrative/id1485220053Shop CTRL the Narrative: http://shop.ctrlthenarrative.comAbout CTRL the Narrative:CTRL the Narrative is a weekly podcast hosted and created by Steven Tsakanikas, a die-hard Carmelo Anthony fan since 2004, after seeing his favorite player's career be heavily influenced by uninformed people. They create the narrative, we CTRL it.Timestamps00:00 - Intro02:05 - Why is Carmelo Anthony so good in this Team USA role in LA?08:46 - Will Melo's role be diminished when guys come back from injury?25:15 - How do the Lakers fix the Westbrook issue? Will time fix it?48:22 - How important is a high IQ ball handler like Rondo or Lebron for Melo?59:18 - CTRL a Narrative#STAYME7O #CarmeloAnthony #Melo

The Brian Lehrer Show
Mayor-Elect Eric Adams

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 22:02


Eric Adams, NYC Mayor-Elect and current Brooklyn Borough President talks about his plans for office and the launch of the transition process, plus hears from one caller from each of the five boroughs.   "I'm excited about the future, I'm excited about the future of New York," @ericadamsfornyc tells @BrianLehrer in his first interview as Mayor-elect — Brigid Bergin (@brigidbergin) November 10, 2021 .@BrianLehrer asks @ericadamsfornyc about comment he will look at emotional intelligence, not just IQ, when putting together a team. Adams says it's imperative to hire ppl who understand troubles ppl who need government services face, ppl who have empathy-not just fancy degrees. — Sally Goldenberg (@SallyGold) November 10, 2021 "Love it," @ericadamsfornyc says on @BrianLehrer of idea of capping the Cross Bronx Expressway & creating more green, community space. Also cites idea of capping the BQE. @SenSchumer & @RitchieTorres just held an event, with others, on the CBE. — Ben Max (@TweetBenMax) November 10, 2021 "Let's fix the bias in the court system," Adams says but stresses it should not be done at the risk to public safety — Brigid Bergin (@brigidbergin) November 10, 2021 "I'm going to spend a lot of time on Staten Island. I'm not going to be a Manhattan-centric mayor," @ericadamsfornyc tells @BrianLehrer — Sally Goldenberg (@SallyGold) November 10, 2021 .@BrianLehrer asks @ericadamsfornyc about @lizkimtweets' article which he says, he agrees with. "We need to stop a dysfunctional city." https://t.co/4GaEP0gltT — Brigid Bergin (@brigidbergin) November 10, 2021

Lions on Leashes
Ep. 32 - Lana Saleh, Emotional Intelligence & Communications Coach for Legal Professionals

Lions on Leashes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 62:28


Lana is a lawyer, speaker, coach, and facilitator. She has over 15 years of experience teaching individuals and groups about equity, communication, and emotional intelligence. Her experience in law, psychology, equity, and the arts gives her a unique approach to the services she provides. She's worked with individuals, universities, law firms, and professional organizations alike tackling difficult concepts in a simple and generous way. Her goal is to inspire a kinder, more empowering justice system through connection, collaboration, and compassion. Lana shared amazing knowledge and insight into the world of emotional intelligence, not just for legal professionals, but for everyone. We discussed self-evaluating when you're triggered, compassion for ourselves and others, and searching for ways to do things differently. What We Also Talked About: - Wanting to change the world and effect change - Searching for a way to do things differently - Emotional Intelligence in the legal field and leadership positions - Bedside manner old school v new school doctors - Social cues - Filtering what you hear because of your beliefs - IQ vs. EQ - Self-evaluating when you're triggered - When it's easy to blame other people - Are you addicted to complaining? - Your identity outside of your household Resources: www.lanasaleh.com LinkedIn: Lana Saleh --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The mindbodygreen Podcast
349: How to tackle inflammation | Madiha Saeed, M.D.

The mindbodygreen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 42:08


Madiha Saeed, M.D.: “The things that we put in bodies have a dramatic effect on our behaviors.”  Saeed, a board-certified integrative family physician, joins mbg co-CEO, Jason Wachob to discuss how unchecked inflammation can affect your mental health, plus: - The best foods to support immunity & protect your brain - How to enhance the flavor of your veggies - How gratitude can help reduce inflammation - How your behaviors can actually change other people's brains - How to get more plant-based sources of iron Referenced in the episode: - mbg Podcast episode #292, with Saeed. - Saeed's latest book, The Holistic Rx For Kids. - A study on inflammatory markers and behavioral problems in children. - A study on how junk food affects adolescents' brains. - A study on how fruits and vegetables can support children's mental health. - A study on 400 infants showing how gut bacteria can affect cognition. - A study showing childhood obesity linked to psychosocial & cognitive consequences. - A study showing vitamin D levels during pregnancy associated with higher IQ scores. - Recent research on mirror neurons. Enjoy this episode of the mindbodygreen podcast, sponsored by Emergen-C, the dietary supplement and wellness brand for year-round immune support.* Give it a listen and claim your coupon today!   *This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Mind Pump: Raw Fitness Truth
1681: The Optimal Body Fat Percentage for Building Muscle, Staying Disciplined With Workout & Diet, the Best Intra-Workout Foods & Drinks & More

Mind Pump: Raw Fitness Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 91:39


In this episode, Sal, Adam & Justin discuss whether there is an optimal body fat percentage for building muscle, advice for someone who tends to hop between training programs and diet plans, the benefits of intra workout food & drinks, and how to get over the fear of failing when wanting to become an entrepreneur. Is the pump sometimes overrated? (5:20) Finally, a positive way to give your kids a ‘complex'. (13:03) The Caldera partnership has been fully received by the ‘pump heads'. (19:34) Why we should have exceptions to the rule in the criminal justice system. (22:34) Understanding the excitement surrounding the Metaverse. (26:27) Breaking down the Double-slit experiment and its relation to the simulation. (30:54) Revisiting the Zillow conversation and future of the housing market. (39:39) Yet another reason to increase your financial IQ and resiliency. (50:03) #Quah question #1 – Is there an optimal body fat percentage for building muscle? (58:43) #Quah question #2 – What advice do you have for someone who tends to hop between training programs and diet plans? (1:06:41) #Quah question #3 – What's your take on intra workouts and drinks? What are the benefits of incorporating them, and what are some good options? (1:13:36) #Quah question #4 - How to get over the fear of failing when wanting to become an entrepreneur? (1:18:12) Related Links/Products Mentioned November Promotion: MAPS Anywhere and the Fit Mom Bundle – Both 50% off! **Promo code “NOVEMBER50” at checkout** Mind Pump #1675: Eight Ways To Get The BEST Muscle Pump Visit Paleo Valley for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! **Promo code “Mindpump15” at checkout for 15% discount** Visit Caldera Lab for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! **Code “mindpump” at checkout for the discount** Man killed his daughter's boyfriend for selling her into sex trafficking ring, police say Microsoft Teams enters the metaverse race with 3D avatars and immersive meetings Double-slit experiment - Wikipedia Nick Bostrom: The Threat Of Artificial Intelligence - Elon Musks Biggest Fear Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies – Book by Nick Bostrom Opendoor shares soar on optimism of gains in iBuying after Zillow exit 77% of people who inherit family wealth lose it in less than 3-years Visit Oli Pop for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! **Promo code “mindpump” at checkout for 15% off your first order** Mind Pump #1512: The Value Of Following A Workout Program Mind Pump #1522: How To Stay Consistent With Your Diet & Workout Visit Drink LMNT for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! Your Next Five Moves: Master the Art of Business Strategy – Book by Patrick Bet-David Mind Pump Podcast – YouTube Mind Pump Free Resources People Mentioned Patrick Bet-David (@patrickbetdavid)  Instagram Robert Kiyosaki (@therealkiyosaki)  Twitter

Wheelbarrow Profits Podcast: Multifamily Real Estate Investment
Five Keys to Helping Your Kids Connect Well with Others W/ Author Dewey Wilson

Wheelbarrow Profits Podcast: Multifamily Real Estate Investment

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 52:54


On this episode, Julia and Gino Barbaro interview Dewey Wilson, the co-author of "The Relationally Intelligent Child: Five Keys to Helping Your Kids Connect Well with Others". The Relationally-Intelligent Child teaches parents the crucial insights of a must grasp concept: relational intelligence. This tool for growth and connection will not only change a child's life, but also a parent's own relationships. You'll discover five key elements that can engage and equip your child with skills for being relationally intelligent with family, friends, and others. Key Insights: 00:00 Introduction to the Multifamily Zone podcast 01:03 Introduction to the Guest: Dewey Wilson 01:34 The essence of human relationships 03:35 Shaping up your family life 04:10 What is 'Relational Intelligence'? 09:45 IQ is overrated 10:55 If you are in stress, it impacts your children too 13:10 Parents always their children and it is important to express that 17:00 The five elements of Relational Intelligence 26:03 Parenting is always a work-in-progress 30:43 Communication between parents and kids 33:00 Difference between listening and hearing 36:25 What is meant by wise decision-making 40:18 Future-focused service, from entrepreneurial standpoint 42:05 Lack of empathy 43:54 Finding out "What are you created for" 48:06 Sum-up Listen to the podcast to learn more. Get the book "The Relationally Intelligent Child: Five Keys to Helping Your Kids Connect Well with Others" on Amazon: https://amz.run/52MU Get Julia Barbaro's recently released book "The Cannolis Exploded! Now What?: A Story About Three Different Paths You Can Take In Life": https://amz.run/52ML About Jake and Gino Jake & Gino are multifamily investors, operators, and mentors who have created a vertically integrated real estate company that controls over $100,000,000 in assets under management. They have created the Jake & Gino community to teach others their three-step framework: Buy Right, Finance Right and Manage Right®, and to become multifamily entrepreneurs. Subscribe to this channel: https://ytube.io/3McA Sign up for free training: https://jakeandgino.mykajabi.com/freetraining Apply for Mentorship: https://jakeandgino.com/apply/ #parentingtips #financialeducationforkids #financialintelligenceforkids #parentingbooks Jake & Gino Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jakeandgino/ Jake & Gino Twitter: https://twitter.com/JakeandGino Jake & Gino Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/jake-and-gino-llc/ Jake & Gino Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jakeandgino/

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes
Diabetes Tech Round Table: What are we waiting for?

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 53:32


At this point in 2021, we thought there would be several new pieces of diabetes technology on the market. COVID delayed several FDA submissions and approvals so where do we stand? Stacey sits down with Kamil Armacki, AKA Nerdabetic, and Chris Wilson to talk tech. Both Kamil and Chris keep a close eye on everything from filings to clinical trials to investor calls and neither is affiliated with any diabetes company. There is also video of this if you prefer to watch over on the YouTube channel. Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom! Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group! Sign up for our newsletter here ----- Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners! ----- Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go! Episode transcription below Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android Stacey Simms  0:00 Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario Health. Manage your blood glucose levels increase your possibilities by Gvoke Hypopen the first premixed auto injector for very low blood sugar, and by Dexcom, take control of your diabetes and live life to the fullest with Dexcom. This is Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. This week, I wanted to try something a little different as we enter the end of 2021. And look ahead to next year, I thought it would be a good time to sort of take stock of diabetes Technology. Welcome to another week of Diabetes Connections. I'm your host, Stacey Simms. And we aim to educate and inspire about diabetes with a focus on people who use insulin. And while this community likes to say we are not waiting, frankly, there was a lot of stuff that we are waiting for right now, I asked a couple of friends who really have their finger on the pulse of this stuff to come on and share their thoughts. The only problem we really like to talk. So this is a longer episode than I expected. And frankly, it's not just that we'd like to talk there's just a lot of technology that we are waiting for. So to that end, I'm just going to jump right in, we'll do the quick add that we always do at the top and then we'll get to the panel. There is also video if you prefer to watch our conversation that's over on the YouTube channel. I'll link it up in the show notes but we are not showing any product. So it's really just about whether you prefer audio or video. Alright, Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario health. And the bottom line is you need a plan of action with diabetes. We've been lucky that Benny's endocrinologist has helped us with that and that he understands the plan has to change as Benny my son gets older, he wants that kind of support. So take your diabetes management to the next level with Dario health. Their published studies demonstrate high impact results for active users like improved in range percentage within three hypoglycemic events. Try Dario's diabetes success plan and make a difference in your diabetes management. Go to my dario.com forward slash diabetes dash connections for more proven results and for information about the plan. And as always, this podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider. All right, welcome. We're trying something new on Diabetes Connections. And that is the first of its kind kind of tech panel. And I am joined in this conversation by Chris Wilson and Kamil Armacki . And these are two guys that I'm gonna let them introduce themselves a little bit, but that I follow for technology news, as well as for some analysis. So thank you both for jumping on with me. You're not industry people. But let me ask you to kind of describe yourselves first, Chris, you are somebody that I always turn to for the insight and information about technology. But this is not what you do for a living?   Chris Wilson  3:00 No, not really. I sort of jumped into the online diabetes online community when I reached a point where I had access to insurance and could actually look at diabetes technology because it became affordable. And at that point sort of started jumping into a lot of the groups and online discussions tried to figure out what I was interested in for myself at the time. And then over time, I wound up being asked to join the admin team of a couple of the bigger Facebook groups getting involved on Twitter and other platforms. And so now i is part of that role. I sort of find and analyze listen to the investor calls that the companies do, you know, sort of keep an ear to the ground here what people's sales reps and endos are whispering about to to their patient populations and glean some information from that. I've also been a frequent participant in research, especially in clinical trials. I was in the clinical trial for the G6 that prove that acetaminophen didn't interfere with it. I was in the clinical trial for the Xeris Gvoke. I was in the clinical trial for the Ilet, which is still apparently ongoing. I've got a fair amount of experience for playing with stuff that isn't necessarily out yet. And sort of seeing things from a different perspective than just the end product that people see when they finally get a prescribe from their doctors.   Stacey Simms  4:23 That's great and comedic view or better known as Nerdabetic. On social media, many people probably recognize your Omnipod. Those are Omnipod pods lit up right behind you.   Kamil Armacki  4:34 That is absolutely right. That is 550 inch LED Omnipods. Most of them this is very DIY. Most of them actually placed with LED lights and painted and we saved them on a temporary wall kind of thing and we glued them off. So we had this is one of the proudest things I've ever done as Nerdabetic I also can't really take credit my dad that 95% I only paid a couple of walls, and I feel like I'm taking all the credit. So massive shout out to him.   Stacey Simms  5:07 I love it. I love it. And as Nerdabetic, you are known for interviewing CEOs getting all sorts of tech information out there. And we'll probably mentioned this at least once later on, you do a lot of both, you do some 3D printing, right to see what the items might look like. Yeah, so   Kamil Armacki 5:23 I've been running my YouTube channel for I think four years at this point, just when I started university, and I just graduated this summer. So it kind of it was over four years ago. So you just been trying out different things within within that channel. One of them was 3D printing. I'm absolutely fascinated by that technology. I don't own a 3D printer. But I think it is a very interesting way of giving an idea, a bit of a tangible feel to it. So for doing that, and all of those things they mentioned. And most recently, I had the honor of speaking to some pretty pretty important people in the industry to see what's been happening over there as well.   Stacey Simms  6:01 Cool. All right. And Kamil is in the UK, obviously, you sound like you're based in the UK, but you are there now, which means some of this discussion will include information from the US FDA, or at least we're gonna speculate about that same thing, European CE mark, but some differentiation of products there. But I just thought it'd be fun to talk to you guys. So all right, we've got it out there. And I'm a diabetes mom, I read stuff, I listen to stuff, I don't think quite as much as Chris, or Kamil, but that's my knowledge base. So just to be clear, nobody who works for the FDA, nobody who works for diabetes company, we are just observing and birth speculating, which I think would be some pretty fun and interesting conversation we'll see. So let's start by talking about what is in front of the FDA right now, because this year, and last year had seen some big delays due to COVID. So we're waiting. I mean, it's been a long time. Let's start with Omnipod 5. And that is, of course, still as we are speaking, I mean, who knows what will happen today or tomorrow, but it is still in front of the FDA. But what's interesting is when they submitted and Phil, I know you talked to their CEO recently I talked to her I believe right before they submitted, it was going to be very different from the other commercial hybrid close loops in that the range was going to be lower. In other words, your blood sugar range, initially, I believe, was supposed to be able to get below 100 As a set point, but now it's 110. And they do have all sorts of really interesting other features. What did Shacey Petrovic, the CEO of Omnipod share with you recently, when you talk to her anything changed, or anything that stood out to you?   Kamil Armacki 7:36 Yeah, so I've spoken to her a couple of weeks ago at this point. And the product that they've submitted to the FDA, for my understanding, has a target glucose, which goes as low as 110, and can be customized up to 150 milligrams per deciliter. In terms of the actual product, I think I'm very excited about Omnipod 5, because it will be the first product, the first pump, which actually talks directly to the Dexcom G6 continuous glucose monitor. So there'll be no need to carry a physical controller, which obviously, I think makes sense for a product like Omnipod because you know, you wear it on your body. And so it will connect directly in terms of actual updates to submission as of a couple of weeks ago, she said they still expect an A by the end of the year, with a limited release in the US. And during that interview, which was slightly kind of European focused. We talked about many things including Omnipod on the runway during Italy's Fashion Week in Milan. But she also mentioned that they are hoping to bring that technology to their to Europe to the UK, once they get their FDA approval.   Stacey Simms  8:48 When you said the first one or the only one do you mean in the UK? Because we've got Dexcom talking to Tandem, at least here in the States.   Kamil Armacki 8:55 First one where you don't need so where the pod talks wearable talks throughout behind okay. Yeah, I thought directly to the G 610.   Stacey Simms  9:05 Is control IQ approved in the   Kamil Armacki 9:06 UK stupid question. Yes, we have. So at the moment, we have control IQ and seven ATG which we will I'm sure mentioned Oh, yeah. Okay. I didn't come EPS actually. So we have three other countries across Europe. They have other systems like dialup as well, France, Germany, but we don't have that one here. Yeah. Hashtag Brexit.   Stacey Simms  9:28 I was gonna say show off, but then right. It's not in the UK. Lots of and there's other systems coming to that we may get to, Chris, anything that you have heard over the last year in terms of Omnipod? Five. I mean, I just feel like we're kind of waiting.   Chris Wilson  9:40 I mean, just from my view on the outside. I think that insolence estimates of hopefully getting it before the end of the year, probably right. I know that it did qualify as a breakthrough device. So it's supposed to have a faster review at the FDA, but we're still dealing with the COVID backlog with all kinds of stuff. For me, there's things that we probably expected six months ago, there's still pending. And I know there's always rumors circulating that this got approved, but it hasn't been released yet. And so half the time I'm going and checking the FDA database for what approvals were announced in the last week.   Kamil Armacki 10:16 Only Chris does this kind of stuff.   Stacey Simms  10:20 I did have an interesting question from a listener who was talking about Okay, so as we're taping, Dexcom g7 has not yet been submitted to the US FDA, it has been submitted in Europe. And her her thought was like, Oh, my gosh, if Omnipod has been sitting there all this time, and Dexcom hasn't even submitted, how much longer is it going to take? And my point to her was, it's not as though Omnipod and these other submissions are just sitting in a file cabinet. Right? I mean, they are actively being looked at. You're both nodding. Can you tell me a little bit about what we know I mean, these submissions again, they don't just land on a desk and then one day someone opens them and rubber stamps them. Back to our conversation in just a moment, but first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Gvoke Hypopen and you know, low blood sugar feels horrible. You can get shaky and sweaty or even feel like you're going to pass out there are a lot of symptoms and they can be different for everyone. I am so glad we have a different option to treat very low blood sugar. Gvoke Hypopen is the first auto injector to treat very low blood sugar. Gvoke Hypopen is pre mixed and ready to go with no visible needle before Gvoke people needed to go through a lot of steps to get glucagon treatments ready to be used. And this made emergency situations even more challenging and stressful. This is so much better. And I'm grateful we have it on hand, find out more go to diabetes connections.com and click on the Gvoke logo. Gvoke shouldn't be used in patients with pheochromocytoma or insulinoma visit Gvoke glucagon.com/risk. Now back to Chris answering my question about FDA submissions.   Kamil Armacki 12:00 Yeah, so for the pandemic, the main reason as to as to why we have a backlog is that regulators that used to regulate that were in charge of regulating medical devices like continuous glucose monitors, hybrid closed loop systems. And this is across actually Europe and US it's very similar, simply because of the pandemic, they were actually responsible for overseeing all of the medical queries related to the pandemic from, you know, vaccines emergency authorizations. So that's what we call when a product is used in a slightly different way to kind of simplify it. And so using a CGM and hospital was a good example of that we seen an emergency authorization of that, so they've kind of, you know, dos thinks took priority. So too, you know, that's where we have a backlog, but now they from my understanding, kind of back on on track, and, you know, four hands on that backlog, working their way through it.   Chris Wilson  12:57 There's just only so many people to do the work. And I mean, even when stuffs in development, there's always a lot of back and forth between the company that's developing it and the FDA, what are you going to require us to do, and so then they alter the product design sometimes to make it fit what the FDA wants, and that can even go into is as deep as the training modules. And the other information that gets given to patients when the product is prescribed, they're looking at all of that they're looking at human factors testing are people you know, able to follow the directions and use it the way that it's intended to be used, are they going to do something stupid and mess it up? They're looking at all of that. And then they're going through all of that data on all the different aspects of the devices and needing to decide, okay, is this safe enough to actually be effective? And there are different standards in Europe versus in the US? The FDA has much higher safety thresholds, whereas the European standard is basically does it do what it says it's going to do?   Kamil Armacki 13:58 And just to close up Omnipod 5, I think FDA has added it Chrissie would agree this is just my personal opinion. I think FDA has been pretty scared of going to full control. And the biggest today there isn't an insulin pump, which offers, you know, remote bolus capabilities. And that's part of Omnipod 5, you know, that's what they've submitted to them. So, you know, my speculation would be that if actually they didn't submit full control within that first submission, maybe we already you know, maybe it would be here already. You know, it is an area that FDA has been very cautious about. So I guess that's a significant factor contributing to to the to the backlog as well to the delight.   Stacey Simms  14:40 Well, and that brings us to our next item that's in front of the FDA. Thank you for setting that up. So Tandem has also submitted in the last year and is waiting for bolus by phone. You know, that's not the official name of it. But I agree with you. I think the FDA is really taking a very, very careful look at that bit of technology. And Tandem, you know, I believe, to your point, Chris, there has been some back and forth. You know, they don't issue press releases. Every time they asked for that, but it is happening, I think, to me, you know, as a mom of a kid who takes his phone everywhere, you know, this is something that I cannot wait for. I mean, bullets by phone just seems like such a basic capability in 2021. But of course, it's a medical device, and it's your phone. Chris, are you hearing anything? Or do you have any opinion on that?   Chris Wilson  15:29 I mean, at least as far as Tandem goes, I think there's less of a risk because you still actually have the physical pump that can be used to do something if for some reason, there's a problem with the phone. If you're relying exclusively on the phone, you've got to worry about what happens if it gets lost. What happens if they're dead batteries? What happens if you unlock it and hand it to your kid to play a game and the kid goes into your bolus app and accidentally gives you 15 or 20 units of bolus while they're chatting around? I mean, all of those things need to need to be taken into consideration and mitigated as much as possible.   Stacey Simms  16:01 I wonder Kamil, it's interesting to think about Omnipod because they've when I've talked to them, I've always asked like, why can't you put some buttons on the pod. And their point was, and I think this leads to Chris's point from the phone, their point has always been well, it's for safety with the pediatric patients, they don't want the kids touching the pod pressing buttons, this makes perfect sense. I was a parent of two small children, they're gonna touch everything. But it's kind of the flip side now on the phone, right. So it's an interesting look to see what you trade off in a way.   Kamil Armacki 16:31 So actually, to that point, in the UK, we do have an insulin pump from rush called accucheck. Solo. And on the high level, it's kind of like a nominal pot, where the pot like device that you put on your body and actually has two buttons on it. So you can actually bolus from the patch itself. And the way they've actually engineered it is that you need to press both buttons at the same time, ensure that you don't kind of you know, lean on the you know, you could very easily lean on a button and just press it, you know, other companies have gone down that route as an Omnipod. To use that I do use a monopod. So I use Dexcom and Omnipod in a DIY setting. And yeah, I love the simplicity of it. So yeah, massive, massive fan.   Stacey Simms  17:14 I think it's just all trade offs. Right. I mean, there's no perfect system, I don't think but people want to perfect. Exactly. Right. Exactly. Chris, what do you use? If you don't mind me asking?   Chris Wilson  17:25 I am on a Tandem with control IQ, although I don't use it exactly as designed. I've been working with better bullet strategies and playing with the modes that have put that it gets put in be an exercise or sleep that change some of the the targets that it's trying to hit to get it to behave a little bit more like I think it should.   Stacey Simms  17:47 So you're using Ctrl Q and Kamil, you're using   Kamil Armacki 17:50 loop? Yeah, that's right. Yeah. on any iPhone. Yeah.   Stacey Simms  17:53 All right. I don't want to move on from Tandem quite yet. But I want to talk about loop in a moment. So we've got bolus by phone in front of the FDA, which we also think could come approval could come by the end of the year, but Tandem moved their submission for TSport. Right. They were going to submit that in 2021. Chris, they are moving that to 2022. Right.   Chris Wilson  18:12 That was the last that I heard. Yes. To me.   Stacey Simms  18:16 I see you nodding.   Kamil Armacki 18:17 Yeah, I agree that that's what my understanding of the T sport is, I think they had some communication with FDA with the phone control, which obviously plays into T sports as well. Like the point Chris was making, you know, there's no display I don't think on the although, you know, it's a patch, you know, it's kind of moving into that kind of tubeless to pipe bridge mode kind of pump. So yeah, I'm pretty sure they've decided it's pushed back further.   Stacey Simms  18:48 And I should have set that up better if you're not familiar with a tee sport is a very tiny version of the T slim it is been to me it looks kind of like a beefed up cartridge and it sticks somehow to your body. There is still a tube and there is still an inset, but it kind of I don't know if it dangles off, or it sticks some I don't know. So they haven't they haven't released that I've asked a bunch of people when Lily a while ago was coming up with its own pump and it was supposed to be inset and sticky. I'm still trying to figure out how it supposed to stick to your body with an inset and they haven't really explained that. So maybe at some point, but clearly you made a 3D version of this yourself right? Didn't you like mock up a Teesport at one point and freak everybody out? Because we thought you had one?   Kamil Armacki 19:27 I did. So just on that entire idea in general, there's actually a pump in it's been kind of out here in Europe and has been taken off the market and I think it's coming back at some point called collider which uses a similar idea of where three colors bright colors. Yeah, so So that's kind of it's an interesting concept because you have an infusion set and like a sticky dye upon your body. And I think it that's what Tandem has gone off as well. But yeah, I did. It's very interesting how people often will look at especially on YouTube because it's a very visual form, they will look at a picture without watching the video. And yeah, a lot of people thought I had some insider info on the T spot, which was a very interesting experiment and a lot of comments about that go like, where did you get this? And I'm like, I didn't Freeview print hello, it's 2020.   Kamil Armacki 20:19 Be careful, be careful, hey,   Chris Wilson  20:21 I need to take some of the blame, actually, I think for potential delays on the other Teesport, I was involved in some of the Human Factors testing. And based on some of the questions that I got asked afterwards, I think I may have done some things that they weren't expecting it some stupid things or something that was not dissipated. So that may actually be the source of some of the   Stacey Simms  20:45 Alright, well, if you can't answer I understand what the heck could you have done? What   Chris Wilson  20:52 I think it was, it was just in case of directions weren't necessarily clear. Or I was expecting, you know, think about this, rather than actually do it. I obviously can't go into specifics. But needless to say, I clearly wasn't doing everything that they expected as part of the tasks in the testing. So who knows that may be part of the the reason that things got delayed, but hey, if it prevents somebody else from doing the stupid things that I did, and having a problem later on, then that's actually a good thing. And actually,   Kamil Armacki 21:24 I'm so glad that you did, Chris, because so many companies have tried this idea of you know, having a patch and in a short tube. So novo, they went out of business Kaleido also really struggling, we don't really know if they're gonna come back. And Tandem is now trying, they're kind of stab at it. No one has really made this idea work. So   Stacey Simms  21:43 yeah, it's a good point. But one thing I do like, again, I don't have diabetes, I don't wear the devices. But the idea I like is that with an inset, you do have a choice of how it connects angled or what the cannula length is, or steel, you know, with Omnipod, or you don't have as many options in terms of how it connects. Now, many people will say to counter that, well, you have many more options of where you can put it, you know, so it really just depends on how you wear it where you're comfortable with. But I think that's why they keep trying cumulus because there's that different kind of inset that people can use. So who knows? But I think that's a really good point.   Chris Wilson  22:18 Well, it's a great example of how your diabetes may vary. Yeah, no one solution is going to work for everyone. So that's why it's important that we have these options.   Stacey Simms  22:27 Alright, so let's talk about loop. One of the other submissions. This is such a laundry list in front of the FDA is tide pool loop. And that was submitted earlier in 2021. It's been very quiet, but it is it's hanging out there. Anybody here anything? Anybody know anything? Any comments?   Chris Wilson  22:45 I really haven't heard anything. I mean, it's so pure speculation. Obviously, this coming from the open source community is going to be subject to a lot probably more scrutiny than if it's coming from an established player. And I was not entirely clear on exactly what the trials for approval looked like. It sounded like some of the DIY data from DIY loot may have actually been used as part of the submission. So I would imagine that that's probably at least one of the things that may be taking a little bit extra time because I'm feeling the FDA is probably going to look a little bit more closely at that than they would if it was coming directly from Insulet. Or someone else.   Stacey Simms  23:28 That's a good point and was used I believe, that's what they told me earlier this year was a lot of that open source a lot of that DIY community data was put in so you wonder what then the FDA came back and asked for no, no, what we really need is or no, that is enough. I mean, we'll find out later, but it's very interesting stuff.   Kamil Armacki 23:46 And in some ways, it is a perfect storm, because it is using, you know, using that DIY technology, which is just absolutely amazing. I mean, the whole title team has been so tremendous in this project. So it's you know, taking that DIY, but then also the phone control point that we mentioned earlier, where it's an Omnipod. So actually, you know if your battery dies, I'm sure everybody's asking those questions. You know, if your iPhone dies, how is the child going to bolus? I'm sure that those are the questions that you know regulated system has to they need to have that usually answers for that. So I'm sure they face in similar scrutiny on the phone point just like Omnipod 5 does with eventually   Stacey Simms  24:26 this just occurred to me and again, I don't use the system so that's probably way to think about it, but these DIY systems that already use the phone can you use your watch to control them to Kamil, I wonder if that's something that's done? Yes.   Kamil Armacki 24:39 It's it's just like with Dexcom you still need your phone. So phones like the the house the home of the of the whole system, you can remotely you know, bolus and enter carbohydrates and Al's meals etc. Using your Apple Watch. Bought a phone is still required to actually do all of the calculations the brain behind all of it on Omnipod, five doc, this all happened on the pod both title loop that's all happening on the phone just like with a DIY system. Oh, yeah, that's a really good point. So you really need that to to make this system work. And there are all of those you know, your phone die in, you know, someone's stealing your phone cases that you know, I'm sure FDA is wants answers for   Stacey Simms  25:22 it to be clear, because a lot a lot of information there. I think this is a good point Omnipod 5, as you said, controlled by the pod. So you lose your phone, it keeps on trucking, it's going to deliver basil, the loop will continue a tide pool loop and loop DIY, whatever it's called right now is all controlled by the phone. So if your phone dies, the system won't continue.   Kamil Armacki 25:40 Well, so by design, it will always deliver background insulin in the way that it's intended. I mean, my phone dies, sometimes you know, it's live, right? I'm a 23 year old. Me because it is difficult to keep it charged in the pub. So you know it does happen. So and those are kind of a real world cases that you know, I'm sure FDA is also asking about. So with the DIY system, and I would assume with Title loop as well. But that is just my speculation. When your phone dies with the DIY system, it automatically goes to the default background rates for you kind of bolus because you need your phone to do that. And I would assume it would be relatively similar of tide pool loop, because I don't think there would be making a separate backup device like Omnipod just doing with Omnipod 5. Okay,   Stacey Simms  26:31 thanks. Alright, last item that is in front of the FDA, I think is the Medtronic 780, which is already available in Europe.   Right back to our conversation, but first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dexcom. And if you're a veteran, the Dexcom G6 continuous glucose monitoring system is now available at Veterans Affairs pharmacies in the United States. qualified veterans with type one and type two diabetes may be covered and pick it up your Dexcom supplies at the VA pharmacy may save you a lot of time to connect with your doctor for more information. Dexcom even has a discussion guide you can bring with you I know it can be hard to know what questions to ask, get that guide, find out more about eligibility at dexcom.com/veterans. Now back to Kamil answering my question about whether the Medtronic 780 is available in Europe?   Kamil Armacki 27:34 That's right. Okay. So 780 G has been here for it's been approved last summer. So kind of just as COVID was kind of a couple of months in, and it's been rolled out across various countries in Europe. I think we got it in the UK earlier this year. Well, I think the 770 G's, the newest version that you guys have in the US. So the 700 pumps, they all have Bluetooth built in. So you can have your pump alarms, all of that on your phone, no control. But you can view everything by the 780s, kind of the newest pump in that line, which has a new brain new algorithm. In my view, it is completely different. Because actually, it's not really made by Medtronic. It's made by an Israeli company called Dream met.   Stacey Simms  28:23 So that's free. That's right. The algorithm is from Dream Med, I've interviewed them, I forgot to actually   Kamil Armacki 28:28 said that in one of my videos, and Medtronic wasn't really happy with me. So   Stacey Simms  28:32 I feel like we have it's ours. Now. It's been,   Kamil Armacki 28:35 they officially said something like it's built by a dream met with Medtronic engineers. So you know, it is a partnership. And that's apparently true. You know, I have no reason to deny that. So I'm sure they work together on it. But you know, the the foundation of seven ATG is actually completely different. It's not like they took 670 and added a couple of capabilities. You know, it's a great we design I mean, on the outside, it looks the same, but actually the the actual brain inside is completely different. And I guess one of the one of the key things that we mentioned is actually the ability to have your glucose set as low as 100. You know, people have diabetes across Europe, they've they've been really kind of enjoying that. And it has automatic corrections as well. So a lot of people listening to this might not be as techie as we are. So just in simple terms, it kind of matches control IQ, I would kind of say in terms of the feature set, maybe slightly better, because you can reduce your target to 100, which I know a lot of people have been asking about. I don't know if you agree, Chris, without saying it's kind of at the same level as control like you   Chris Wilson  29:37 from a tech perspective. Yeah, they both the the key difference or the key feature there is the automated correction boluses, which is what differentiates what they call an advanced hybrid closed loop from just a standard hybrid closed loop, which is what the 670 and 770 were, it's nice to see more high tech options coming to the market from more players. says it gives people more options.   Stacey Simms  30:01 That's interesting, though about any kind of criticism for mentioning dream, Ed, because I mean, control IQ was developed by type zero technology, right? Wasn't it like a University of Virginia thing that then Tandem bought? Yeah, well,   Chris Wilson  30:14 it got bought by Dexcom Dexcom, bought type zero and then license the tech to Tandem. So   Stacey Simms  30:22 interesting times. And we should also mention that all the Medtronic systems use their sensors. This is not yet a mix and match world, I believe the Medtronic sensors, and I keep hearing that they're much better, but still need to be calibrated. So even the latest version No, your shake your head, Kamil tell Oh, that's right. We're waiting for that approval in the US.   Kamil Armacki 30:42 Well, so. So guardian for has been approved in three guardians. And so that's the no calibration version. And it's I know, like one person who's using it. So it's not I think they slowly roll in and out. They haven't really started shipping it yet. But it's basically what we all know, as guardian free just with with no calibrations. As far as I'm understanding the accuracy is not improved. It's kind of the same, if not slightly worse, from a margin perspective with Guardian four, compared to Guardian three. And yeah, I think it's in the FDA backlog as well. I'm gonna go ahead and   Stacey Simms  31:21 just double check that on my end only because it'll be good to know the actual mark from their studies and things like that. So we'll pop that into the show notes. But I think you're exactly right, because I was just doing the time. It'll be interesting to see what the time shift is, in terms of episodes being released, because we were just doing our game show. Wait, wait, don't poke me for friends for life. And I actually I can't believe I forgot I asked this question about Guardian four. Because the codename for it or at least the in house name for it was Zeus. So we had been talking about Zeus for Medtronic for a long time, no calibrations I know this is the I get in the weeds of the trivia and then I forget what I know. So thanks for correcting me. Alright, and then Alright, let's talk about Dexcom. Because Dexcom g7, as we're taping g7 has not been submitted to the US FDA, but it has been submitted for European approval. Kamil, you had Dexcom CEO on your show, wearing and showing off the device. I was so jealous when I saw that I'm gonna yell at Kevin Sayer. Next time I talked to him. But yeah, tell us what that was like and what you thought of it when you saw it.   Kamil Armacki 32:27 You know, I've been the massive Dexcom advocate, I pay for my own decks because I'm not an ambassador, I just genuinely it's been a life changing product for me. And yeah, it's been it's been an honor speaking to him. So you've spoken to him a couple of weeks after they announced that they submitted for the for the European European approval. I mean, it looks tiny, as I'm sure you've seen, if you've seen the video, I'm incredibly excited to see kind of how that one develops, and from literally a couple of days. So they kind of in the investors call, like Chris was saying, I also sometimes tune into those, and they confirmed that the expecting to get that approved in Europe by the end of the year.   Stacey Simms  33:07 It's interesting. And Chris, maybe you could speak to this, for people who might not be that familiar, the Dexcom technology, while it is very different from the G6, the speed at which it might get approval, Europe is one thing, right us is another this is not like an insulin pump, we don't expect it at least to take quite as long as insulin pumps are different systems because it's not putting insulin into your body, right? It's just measuring,   Chris Wilson  33:28 but it is being used to calculate doses of a high risk medication, which is insulin, there's definitely still some concern as far as how accurate it is. And if it's off it, how off? Is it? Is it going to cause a problem? But I'm really excited with the clinical data that they presented. I think it was at EASD Earlier this year, showing that the g7 the marred the that measure of accuracy that they use is actually now under 8%. With the g7 which I mean we're getting into how much more accurate can we reasonably get just because there's so much variation in human body that I mean, you can take six fingerprints from six different fingers and get six different answers from his standard meter. The fact that we're really dialing in the accuracy is as tight as we can and actually ever since is almost in the same boat with their new Wow, what any product they had. I think two versions I recall, but that's coming as well. And the the 180 day version as long as we're talking CGM. Yeah, there is no absolute answer for anything. This is actually I was in a study last Thursday, where they were seeing how long I could go without insulin. But as part of it, they're they're monitoring it with a y si, which is this reference grade laboratory meter that they actually do a blood draw and they centrifuge it down. And then they measured the glucose level in the plasma without any of the blood cells in it. And that device in the lab was actually not putting out the correct numbers, there was some sort of hiccup, they had to restart it to get it to come up. But my Dexcom was matching, and then they compared it to multiple Ultra accurate fingerstick meters and set to figure out what was going on. But, you know, nothing's perfect. This was, you know, elaborate reference glucometer. That's the most accurate one that you can get. And they don't even make them anymore.   Stacey Simms  35:23 I will never forget, when Betty was little like poking the same finger, you said six different fingers, who put the same finger three times in a row because it was confusing or something. And it was always three different numbers. It's crazy.   Chris Wilson  35:33 I just think it's important that people keep in mind that you know, nothing is ever going to be perfect. whatever device you're wearing, however, you're measuring your stuff, there's always going to be variation, it's never going to be exactly the same number every time on every device   Stacey Simms  35:46 you mentioned ever since that's the CGM that goes under your skin. And then the transmitter goes on top. And Kamil, you are you've got a little bit are you using the libre as well like to test it out? Or did you? What did you show us earlier,   Kamil Armacki 36:00 I am trying the free celebrate free, which is like the newest version. It's not available in the UK, I should make it very clear. But someone bought it for me in Germany. And they imported it over to the UK is actually it's actually been a very interesting over here. Because obviously it's it's not available in the UK. So I had to enter freestyling briefly, there was no physical receipt, but you need to get an app. So only use your phone, you can only use your phone, there's no physical reader, there's no physical device, which I don't know how that's going to work with, you know, children going to school and you know, having to carry phones, but anyway, but it's not available in the British App Store. So I had to create a German Apple ID. And everything on my phone is German. So I gem Apple Music, German podcasts, everything is in German, it's still English. But other than that I have been enjoying my German lifestyle over the last I've had it for four days now. So it's been it's been fun.   Stacey Simms  37:03 What are the different features like what's I'm not as familiar with the Libre system. So what is new with the three,   Kamil Armacki 37:08 it's much smaller, it's much smaller compared to the first two. And on a high level, it works exactly like you would expect a CGM to work like Dexcom web, no scan and it just always shows the value and the glucose your trends alarms ever found on your phone. So they kind of made it work in exactly the same way as at the center of Dexcom. But most importantly for me, they keep them the same price. And I think that's very important for a lot of people have diabetes here in Europe because I mean, Libra has been a giant success in the UK for example, just because actually, because of its price point it is accessible to the National Health Service. So it is you know reimbursed to you know, vast majority pretty much every single person of type one who wants it to get can get it. And libre two is the same price point is libre one and now libre free. In Germany, when they did launch, it's also the same price. So they keeping it the same, which is which is very reassuring   Stacey Simms  38:08 process, we'll see what happens in the US. But that is very reassuring for our friends in Europe. I went device I meant to ask about and didn't but I don't think it's been submitted. And that is beta bionics and the iLet. And Chris, you kind of alluded to this much earlier in our talk, because you were I believe in one of those trials,   Chris Wilson  38:25 I was at least told that I was patient number one at the trial site that I was at.   Stacey Simms  38:33 But we don't think we don't know for sure they have not submitted down or have they?   Chris Wilson  38:38 Well, I keep hearing parents and other patients still people diabetes, still saying, you know, I just finished my time in the primary phase of the trial for the eyelids, or now my kid is going into the extension phase, things like that. So if the trial is ongoing, clearly, I don't think they've they've submitted yet. It's definitely more hands off. I won't lie my time and range did go down a little bit when I was on it.   Stacey Simms  39:03 But your your time and range we should specify is extremely high.   Chris Wilson  39:06 Right? My 90 day average right now is 94% a week going into the current trial, the arm of the trial that I just finished was actually 97.   Stacey Simms  39:20 So it's all relative, but otherwise. Yeah. But it's a good point in that, you know, the eyelid is much more hands off, as you mentioned,   Chris Wilson  39:32 right? It's you know, no correction boluses there's not even mechanism to do it. All you can really do is tell it when you're eating and give it a rough guesstimate as to the meal size. So I would imagine especially for people who want to be more hands off with their diabetes and have good control because of the control wasn't bad by any stretch of the imagination, that it'll be a very good option for a lot of people once it does get approved. And this is the Insulet only version. We've still got The version with insulin and glucagon having both a gas and a brake will definitely make it easier to drive the car going forward in the next version. So we're looking forward to, to them starting the trials on that as well.   Stacey Simms  40:13 Yeah, it is all relative. I mean, I just think about my son, you know, he misses a couple of meal boluses a week for sure. And I think he would happily trade off control, you know, to just have that kind of stuff be taken care of. It's so interesting to see how I mean, I'm, I'm, I know, we're gonna get somebody questions as Chris gets so much time and range, what is he doing with control IQ? So that'll be another episode tips and tricks from Chris to or maybe the maybe the tips and tricks, Kamil is just spent a lot of your time in diabetes trials? Yeah. I mean, I kidding. I know. That's not it. But   Kamil Armacki 40:48 well, you're my time and ranges, but it's knowing me about? Very, very happy with it. I like to say that my time and happiness, though is 98. If not 100%?   Kamil Armacki 41:00 Go? And that's what matters. Yeah, right.   Stacey Simms  41:04 Absolutely.   Chris Wilson  41:05 I mean, that we joke about doable, do a lot of trials. And it helps. But there is definitely some truth to that. I mean, I get to talk to and interact with some of the top endocrinologist in the world, right? Sometimes, you know, on a weekly basis. So I'm going into the clinic to have an injection of something that they're testing out or to check in and let them download the data from the device that I'm testing in half the time we're chatting while they're doing other stuff. And you know, discussing the theories that underlie a lot of this stuff. And it definitely deepens your understanding, if you want to really understand diabetes, more and more like an endocrinologist does that say, it's a great way to gain some experience?   Stacey Simms  41:49 Let's talk a little bit. We've talked about what's happening and what we're waiting for. So let's talk a little bit about what we're excited for. And not just the products that we mentioned. But if there's anything else that's on your mind, I'm curious what you guys who live with diabetes, you use these devices, you follow this tech? Chris, what are you looking forward to? And I mean, it could be something that we talked about, or something that's like maybe 10 years from now,   Chris Wilson  42:10 I think probably the thing that that's most interesting, I mean, to a certain extent, the tech we even if it's not there yet, we know where it's going. Yeah, where it's sort of the end point is the point is you were a sensor, you were a pump, and it does everything for you, and you don't need to worry about it. But beyond that, I think one of the things that I'm most excited about is seeing the medications that were originally designed for type twos being used in more type ones. Yeah, since most type ones do have some insulin resistance, it's actually you know, a known thing that happens, it's partly just due to the fact that normally, insulin gets made on in the middle and spreads out to the edges, and we're infusing it from the edges and having it go into the middle of the circulation. But things like I know, Stacy, you've mentioned in the past the SDLT, two drugs that help us her pee out the excess sugar from your blood, those have shown really great improvements in kidney health, cardiovascular outcomes, and making those safer for type ones, since it can cause an issue with going into DKA even though your blood sugar's stay relatively normal. That was actually the the test that I was last Thursday was checking a new drug that as an add on to help reduce the chance of that happening if you're a type one on one of these medications, but there's lots of different classes of medications that are coming out things that not only enhance the function of insulin, but potentially block some of the functions of glucagon to help improve things since they've documented that. A lot of type ones the the sort of regulation and counter regulation in insulin, the insulin glucagon axis, I guess, it does happen with a fair amount of frequency in people with type one. So that may be something moving forward. And actually, it's not even necessarily just diabetes. They're testing this medication that they were trying to lay on me as an enhancement for cancer immunotherapy. Wow. In North Carolina, I somebody was asking me about something. And so I went on the clinical trials website, it was digging into what said he's looking at this drug and found a study that they were looking at it to see if it'll enhance the ability of some immunotherapies for breast cancer. So I mean, a lot of this stuff may even have ripple effects outside of diabetes.   Stacey Simms  44:33 That's really amazing. All right. That's a great point. I love that. All right. You know, you don't have to go outside of technology. I mean, that is still technology gets medication, but can we what are you looking forward to? Are you looking at down the line? I'm   Kamil Armacki 44:46 going to keep this one very, very simple. I'm just looking forward to seeing more access to all of this. I feel like in terms of getting incredible technology. I feel like we could summarize all of this all of today's talking Massive tech, right? We have incredible continuous glucose monitors even better on the market. And even better versions of them are common over the next year or so with g7, libre free etc. Same with pumps, that technology so sadly, isn't really accessible to so many people. And this applies to so many regions, so many countries in the UK, we now have an a trial of 1000 people with diabetes trial in closed loop technology to hopefully have our national proof that it does work is self restraint and actually seeing all of this because, you know, it's like every single country wants their own proof even though you know, there are so many trials from all over the world proven that yes, actually, it does help people. But you know, it is a very bureaucratic process. So I'm just looking forward to actually see in 1000s, if not millions of people have access to CGM. And then if they choose to hypertrophic therapy.   Stacey Simms  45:55 That's wonderful. All right. Before I let you go, this last question, it's not really a great follow up to our discussion about access. But this is one that it just honestly, it drives me bananas, and I want to get your opinion on and that is this every other day, I feel like someone is asking me when the Apple Watch is going to monitor blood glucose with non invasively. Right, that I know, right? You're gonna get the watch, it's gonna read your blood glucose and then move on. And I get these questions all the time by people outside the diabetes community, frankly, who read about it or hear about it. What's your take? I mean, I know what's coming. I hope it's coming. I don't want to I feel like I'm the hope killer. I go on these threads. And I'm like, unless you see a clinical trial, right. It's not going to happen. But I feel like it is coming it will be useful to some people sometime, right?   Chris Wilson  46:44 I think, absolutely. I think there's a couple of companies that are pretty far along. In the process of actually doing non invasive glucose monitoring. I think you had an episode recently, where you mentioned one where they look at the eye, yeah, within the eye, which is cool. I've heard of a couple of different texts that are technologies that are being introduced, using either heat at low levels infrared, to potentially sense it, or radio signals, believe there's a company in Israel that's working on that as well. Yeah, they're probably not good enough to necessarily dose insulin from yet, but they're getting there and the tech keeps getting smaller and more portable and stuff, I think there's a company in Germany that's got the tabletop scale right now, where you can just basically put a finger into on the sensor and it will give you an estimate of your blood sugar in there hoping to scale that down to being a portable device that will be non invasive, and then eventually a wearable device that will be non invasive. So it's, it's definitely coming, but the stuff takes time, there's so figuring out serve a lot of the ways that the various sensing technologies interact with the body and figuring out exactly how best to estimate your blood sugar from the readings that they get back. So it's coming. I've seen presentations with actually impressive accuracy, especially considering that it's non invasive, but I don't see it any time at least probably not in the next couple of years, but especially integrated into a consumer device like an Apple Watch.   Kamil Armacki 48:13 I completely agree with Chris I think especially as someone living with diabetes we tend to look at this from a you know, kind of a medical point of view but if this ever were to happen, it's really a health companion and I think that entire trend have actually seen a lot of what I would consider mainstream technology companies you know, Apple Samsung, you know, those kinds of players becoming more involved in health is a good thing because I think you know, we've heard of so many stories of you know, people using you know, Apple watches and you know being alerted that actually your heart rate is too low or too high and actually you know, if you deploy that kind of capability on you know, a population scale you know, with with millions of people using Apple Watches, it really drives you know, big changes and cold drives colossal impact on you know, general population you know, how we live our lives for if ever does happen I mean, we hear about this all the time and literally this year I think it was six or seven days after Apple Watch Series seven came out there was already a rumor saying the Apple Watch Series eight Yes. Well habit and I saw on Twitter and I just went I just did this emoji six days, six days the longest amount of time we can have without any rumors about Apple Watch.   Stacey Simms  49:39 It just shows you how much money is in it   Kamil Armacki 49:43 It's click bait, interesting topic because you know it is the next frontier that you know everyone is trying to tackle. Yeah, so I understand the excitement bore and sometimes I'm probably causing it because I have talked about as well. In my in my printer diabetic days, I I was excited about it. I've been excited about as Nerdabetic, and we can't not be excited.   Stacey Simms  50:05 Well, even this episode, someone could clip out what Chris said it's coming.   Kamil Armacki 50:09 Yeah. But we do need to be realistic about it that even when it comes in, you know, 1015 years, it probably won't really have any tangible impact on any buyer lives.   Chris Wilson  50:21 Maintaining being realistic, that's a very good point. Because it reminds me of the vertex announcement a couple of weeks ago, with the the first patient of their trial, got infusion of stem cell derived Ilet cells, and is, you know, 90% reduction in insulin use. And everybody went nuts over that. And I wound up posting a big, long thread on Twitter explaining that really like this isn't the hard part yet. It's great that they're this far, it's awesome that people are pursuing different avenues, I hope they succeed. But this isn't going to be something that people are going to have in the next couple of years to just go in and get your eyelid infusion. And then you don't need to worry about measuring your blood glucose or worrying your pump or taking injections anymore.   Stacey Simms  51:10 I heard a great point on that, which was if they've sent a press release, it's quite different than if they've submitted a for publication in a clinical journal. It was a little bit, I'll say a little meaner than that. I think the quote was something like, you know, if it's a press release, they're looking for money, if it's a journal they're looking for, you know, approval. There's some truth to that, though. And I think that that's a good thing for us to keep in mind as we stay very hopeful is a very hopeful crowd. And as we stay realistic, as well, I think we've run the gamut. There's always so much more to talk about. So I hope you'll come back on when these things maybe we hear more, they start to get approved, or we just talk about different things. But this was great. Thank you both so much for jumping on.   Chris Wilson  51:50 It's always fun to talk to you, Stacey.   Stacey Simms  51:51 Oh, thank you, thank you. It's always great to get caught up on this stuff and kind of speculate and talk about it. So thanks so much. I appreciate you guys both being here. And we will put lots of links in the show notes and everywhere else we can find them so that people can find you on social and follow your musings and your thoughts, but I really appreciate it. We'll talk to you soon.   You're listening to Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. Lots of information there. I'm going to link up a couple of articles some things we referenced at diabetes connections.com. At the homepage for this episode, there is a transcription as well as always, what do you think? I mean, I know it was long, and there were a lot of things to get through. But I'd like to do that on a more regular basis, maybe with some different people in the community. Love to hear feedback from you what questions you have, what topics you'd like us to tackle. But man, those guys, really they know the ins and outs of all of this, they really keep their finger on the pulse. So we'll follow up. We'll do more on that. This was taped, as I said the very first week of November 2021. So in a couple of days between now and when the episode comes out, maybe something else was approved. If it happened, we will follow up on it here. All right, thank you, as always to my editor John Bukenas from audio editing solutions. We've got in the News Live every Wednesday now 4:30pm Eastern Time, on YouTube and on Facebook Live on both channels, and then we turn it around into an audio podcast episode that airs Fridays. So I hope to see you back here for that until then be kind to yourself. Diabetes Connections is a production of Stacey Simms media. All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged

MaYapinion
94 - Creating Magic at Work with Amy Lynn Durham

MaYapinion

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 30:38


This week we have Amy Lynn Durham, the founder of Create Magic at Work, on the podcast. Create Magic At Work's intention is to offer Spiritual Intelligence (SQ) and Emotional Intelligence (EQ) tools to energize and transform the workplace. As an expert in building positive company cultures, Amy designed Create Magic At Work to bring a variety of services and strategies to aid in cultivating teamwork and harmony in order to improve profits and employee morale. Amy Lynn Durham is the CEO of “Create Magic At Work” and a U.C. Berkeley Certified Executive Coach. She is certified to coach in the 21 skills associated with Spiritual Intelligence (SQ) using the SQ21 Assessment and an Emotional Intelligence Practitioner (EQ). Amy has spent years in the corporate world successfully managing hundreds of employees for private and publicly traded companies. In her spare time, you can also find her spending time with her Cavapoo puppy, Mr. Bingley. Amy is an author of an amazing book too, "Create Magic at Work" This magical book contains field-tested activities that leaders and coaches can utilize to ignite authentic connection with their clients, teams, or employees. The time is now to apply these practices so we can all thrive as human beings. “I intentionally made this book feel magical and whimsical to bring a childlike play and feel back into the workplace. Please enjoy the beautiful illustrations from the magical mermaid artist Marybel Martin and the beautiful book design from Chad Beckerman.” – Amy Lynn Durham. 01:34 Amy gives an overview and the major definitions of Spiritual Intelligence (SQ). 03:54 Explains step by step how to learn about Spiritual Intelligence 21 Skills, and how her assessment works, also about how to discover your hidden strengths. 08:46 How Spiritual Intelligence helped Amy after leaving her corporate executive job to bring back her creativity, also talks about her book “Create Magic at Work” and how she discovered the 21 Skills. 11:34 The main reasons that made Amy leaves her job and how she did plan to leave her employees, how she spent her last year at work and what activities she did, the story behind the quote “leap and a net will appear”, How data and numbers are not enough and why rational intelligence (IQ)and Spiritual Intelligence (SQ) are indispensable to succeed in the future. 15:33 Amy answers the question What is the difference between men and women leaders, and why men should work on their emotional and spiritual skills. And how does collaborating and connecting masculine and feminine increase productivity. 18:36 Amy defines Servant leadership, what most people think about it and why it's important besides emotional and spiritual intelligence. 23:03 Amy talks about her book, "Create Magic at Work," how it helps to build IQ and SQ, how she wrote it, and how she authored the "Journal Prompt Card Deck" during the pandemic, and how that helped her during lockdown. 25:10 Amy Picks a Card (Reward) "I Take Time to Reward myself for the Work that I accomplish." and answers two questions: 1. What am I proud of that I have accomplished? 2. Write four sentences congratulating yourself on a job well job. 27:43 Amy gives bits of advice for leaders. https://createmagicatwork.net/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/amylynndurham/ https://www.facebook.com/112951637095427 https://twitter.com/createmagicwork --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mayapinion/message

The Hezi
Sleepy Sunday upsets! Who blows it up first? And the Steph Poole dynamic

The Hezi

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 19:03


Kd & Cade 2:15 Luka FTW 4:30 Bulls show their warts 6:40 Who blows it up first? 7:30 Rubio goes off 9:45 Cole world 11:22 Warriors have the best record in the L 15:50 Top 5 low IQ players

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit
This is Why Your Oral Health is Deeply Connected to Your Overall Health (Minisode #53)

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 32:20


This is Why Your Oral Health is Deeply Connected to Your Overall Health | This episode is brought to you by BiOptimzers and InsideTracker.If we want to continue learning how to optimize health, we have to stay open to new information that might contradict previous research, even if it questions the status quo. Fluoride and dental health are great examples of this process. Fluoride gained support due to an observation one man-made many years ago, which has progressed into many cities fluoridating their water and most dentists singing its praises. But over the years the research on fluoride has greatly evolved, to the point that we can now see large differences in how it works topically versus internally, and identify risks that come with consumption. In today's mini-episode, Dhru speaks with Dr. Mark Burhenne and Dr. Steven Lin about the emerging research that supports connections between fluoride and IQ changes, neurotoxicity, arthritis, osteosarcomas, and changes in metabolism, among other concerns. They also talk about the root cause of cavities—it's not a deficiency in fluoride, but the sugary and starchy foods making up the Standard American Diet, an altered oral microbiome, and mouth breathing.Dr. Mark Burhenne is a functional dentist and the author of the #1 Amazon bestseller The 8-Hour Sleep Paradox. He has appeared in Dr. Hyman's Sleep Masterclass, the oral microbiome docuseries Gateway to Health, NPR, and more. Dr. Steven Lin is a world-leading authority in the field of functional dentistry and the author of, The Dental Diet: The Surprising Link between Your Teeth, Real Food, and Life-Changing Natural Health.Find Dhru's full-length conversation with Dr. Mark Burhenne here: https://lnk.to/dhru-207/ Find Dhru's full-length conversation with Dr. Steven Lin here: https://lnk.to/dhru-172/ For more on Dhru Purohit, follow him on Instagram @dhrupurohit, and on YouTube @dhrupurohit. Text Dhru at (302) 200-5643.This episode is brought to you by BiOptimzers and InsideTracker.BiOptimizers Magnesium Breakthrough contains 7 different forms of magnesium, which all have different functions in the body. For the entire month of November, BiOptimizers is having a Black Friday Cyber Monday blowout sale on their best-selling Magnesium Breakthrough. You'll get up to 10% off every order and access to over $200 in free gifts. Just head over to magbreathrough.com/dhru, with code DHRU10. InsideTracker looks at everything from metabolic and inflammatory markers to nutrients and hormones. Traditional lab tests can be hard to read on your own, but InsideTracker makes their results easy to understand and provides tips on how to use food first for optimal nutrition. Right now, they're offering my podcast community 25% off. Just go to insidetracker.com/DHRU. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Long Shot with Duncan Robinson and Davis Reid
Episode 40: Taylor Heinicke | “A good setback is just a possibility for a comeback”

The Long Shot with Duncan Robinson and Davis Reid

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 61:51


This week the podcast moves from the hardwood to the gridiron as the guys sit down with one of the best recent underdog stories in the NFL. Taylor Heinicke was out of professional football a year ago and finishing his master's degree at Old Dominion when he got a call from The Washington Football Team to be their “emergency COVID practice player.” After some injuries and roster changes, Taylor found himself starting in the NFC Wildcard game just a few months later. Now he is the starting quarterback in Washington and just inked a new contract that will keep him there for the next two seasons. The guys discuss his story, finding a rhythm as a consistent starter, the pressure & responsibility that comes with being a quarterback, and how you find comfort and confidence in that role. They also talk about his career at Old Dominion, how a smaller school benefitted him as an athlete, and why so many undrafted guys seem to find success in the NFL.  Then the conversation shifts into the psyche of playing football, the amount of film that Taylor watches, how you “unlock” your mind during games, and dealing with adversity with so much time in-between games. To wrap up the convo, the guys talk NFL dress code, meditation, float tanks, and favorite music. Before all of that, Duncan and Davis talk about the red-hot Miami Heat, Duncan reflects on getting some shade thrown at him from his teammates, Davis tests Duncan's IQ, they discuss what it's like for NBA players at the airport, and more! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The John Batchelor Show
1813: Marilyn Brookwood. #UNBOUND: Eugenics and orphans. The complete, forty-minute interview. October 13, 2021. @MarilynBrookwo1 @wwnorton

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 41:00


Photo:   U.S. eugenics poster advocating the removal of genetic "defectives" such as the insane, "feeble-minded" and criminals, and supporting the selective breeding of "high-grade" individuals, c. 1926 CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow The Orphans of Davenport: Eugenics, the Great Depression, and the War over Children's Intelligence, by Marilyn Brookwood.   https://www.amazon.com/Orphans-Davenport-Depression-Childrens-Intelligence/dp/1631494686 The fascinating―and eerily timely―tale of the forgotten, Depression-era psychologists who launched the modern science of childhood development. “Doomed from birth” was how the psychologist Harold Skeels described two toddler girls at the Iowa Soldiers' Orphans' Home in Davenport, Iowa, in 1934. Their IQ scores, added together, totaled just 81. Following prevailing eugenic beliefs of the times, Skeels and his colleague Marie Skodak assumed that the girls had inherited their parents' low intelligence and were therefore unfit for adoption. The girls were sent to an institution for the “feebleminded” to be cared for by “moron” women. To Skeels and Skodak's astonishment, under the women's care, the children's IQ scores became normal.  Now considered one of the most important scientific findings of the twentieth century, the discovery that environment shapes children's intelligence was also one of the most fiercely contested―and its origin story has never been told. In The Orphans of Davenport, the psychologist and esteemed historian Marilyn Brookwood chronicles how a band of young psychologists in 1930s Iowa shattered the nature-versus-nurture debate and overthrew long-accepted racist and classist views of childhood development. Transporting readers to a rural Iowa devastated by dust storms and economic collapse, Brookwood reveals just how profoundly unlikely it was for this breakthrough to come from the Iowa Child Welfare Research Station. Funded by the University of Iowa and the Rockefeller Foundation, and modeled on America's experimental agricultural stations, the Iowa Station was virtually unknown, a backwater compared to the renowned psychology faculties of Stanford, Harvard, and Princeton. Despite the challenges they faced, the Iowa psychologists replicated increased intelligence in thirteen more “retarded” children. When Skeels published their incredible work, America's leading psychologists―eugenicists all―attacked and condemned his conclusions. The loudest critic was Lewis M. Terman, who advocated for forced sterilization of low-intelligence women and whose own widely accepted IQ test was threatened by the Iowa research. Terman and his opponents insisted that intelligence was hereditary, and their prestige ensured that the research would be ignored for decades. Remarkably, it was not until the 1960s that a new generation of psychologists accepted environment's role in intelligence and helped launch the modern field of developmental neuroscience. Drawing on prodigious archival research, Brookwood reclaims the Iowa researchers as intrepid heroes, and movingly recounts the stories of the orphans themselves, many of whom later credited the psychologists with giving them the opportunity to forge successful lives. A radiant story of the power and promise of science to better the lives of us all, The Orphans of Davenport unearths an essential history at a moment when race science is dangerously resurgent. 16-page black-and-white insert

The John Batchelor Show
1809: Marilyn Brookwood. #UNBOUND: Eugenics and orphans. The complete, forty-minute interview. October 13, 2021. @MarilynBrookwo1 @wwnorton

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 41:00


Photo:  Anthropometry* demonstrated in an exhibit from a 1921 eugenics conference. * Scientific study of the measurements and proportions of the human body.   CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow The Orphans of Davenport: Eugenics, the Great Depression, and the War over Children's Intelligence, by Marilyn Brookwood.   https://www.amazon.com/Orphans-Davenport-Depression-Childrens-Intelligence/dp/1631494686 The fascinating―and eerily timely―tale of the forgotten, Depression-era psychologists who launched the modern science of childhood development. “Doomed from birth” was how the psychologist Harold Skeels described two toddler girls at the Iowa Soldiers' Orphans' Home in Davenport, Iowa, in 1934. Their IQ scores, added together, totaled just 81. Following prevailing eugenic beliefs of the times, Skeels and his colleague Marie Skodak assumed that the girls had inherited their parents' low intelligence and were therefore unfit for adoption. The girls were sent to an institution for the “feebleminded” to be cared for by “moron” women. To Skeels and Skodak's astonishment, under the women's care, the children's IQ scores became normal.  Now considered one of the most important scientific findings of the twentieth century, the discovery that environment shapes children's intelligence was also one of the most fiercely contested―and its origin story has never been told. In The Orphans of Davenport, the psychologist and esteemed historian Marilyn Brookwood chronicles how a band of young psychologists in 1930s Iowa shattered the nature-versus-nurture debate and overthrew long-accepted racist and classist views of childhood development. Transporting readers to a rural Iowa devastated by dust storms and economic collapse, Brookwood reveals just how profoundly unlikely it was for this breakthrough to come from the Iowa Child Welfare Research Station. Funded by the University of Iowa and the Rockefeller Foundation, and modeled on America's experimental agricultural stations, the Iowa Station was virtually unknown, a backwater compared to the renowned psychology faculties of Stanford, Harvard, and Princeton. Despite the challenges they faced, the Iowa psychologists replicated increased intelligence in thirteen more “retarded” children. When Skeels published their incredible work, America's leading psychologists―eugenicists all―attacked and condemned his conclusions. The loudest critic was Lewis M. Terman, who advocated for forced sterilization of low-intelligence women and whose own widely accepted IQ test was threatened by the Iowa research. Terman and his opponents insisted that intelligence was hereditary, and their prestige ensured that the research would be ignored for decades. Remarkably, it was not until the 1960s that a new generation of psychologists accepted environment's role in intelligence and helped launch the modern field of developmental neuroscience. Drawing on prodigious archival research, Brookwood reclaims the Iowa researchers as intrepid heroes, and movingly recounts the stories of the orphans themselves, many of whom later credited the psychologists with giving them the opportunity to forge successful lives. A radiant story of the power and promise of science to better the lives of us all, The Orphans of Davenport unearths an essential history at a moment when race science is dangerously resurgent. 16-page black-and-white insert