Podcasts about state university

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Group of public universities supported by an individual state in the United States

  • 1,255PODCASTS
  • 2,177EPISODES
  • 51mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Dec 3, 2021LATEST
state university

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about state university

Show all podcasts related to state university

Latest podcast episodes about state university

Other Voices
Kayleigh Reynolds-Flynn — FFA American degree, a BKW first

Other Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 22:27


Kayleigh Reynolds-Flynn has been riding horses since she was born.Her mother grew up riding horses, too.“My favorite picture I have is of me when I was probably about three or four months old with my mom sitting on our old horse, Bandy,” Reynolds-Flynn says in this week's podcast.Her mother would take her on trail rides as a baby and she would fall asleep in her mother's arms on the back of a horse.Now an adult, Reynolds-Flynn's passion for horses has not faded. She lives in Alaska with her financé, Travis Perkovich; her horse, Tango; and their husky puppy, Gimli.She has bred a mare named Girlfriend and is expecting a foal in June. The gestation period, she explained, is 340 days or roughly 11 months.This fall, Reynolds-Flynn became Berne-Knox-Westerlo's first graduate to earn an American FFA Degree, the top honor earned by fewer than 2 percent of the more than 730,000 Future Farmers of America members.Her family ran a business in Knox, providing carriage rides for weddings and special occasions like holiday sojourns around Stuyvesant Plaza in Guilderland. She described a “white Cinderella carriage” pulled by Belgian horsesBehind the fairytale was a lot of work, feeding the horses every day and gradually desensitizing them to the hurly-burly of modern traffic.A young horse would be paired with an old horse who was “basically bombproof,” said Reynolds-Flynn as they traveled a two-mile circular route along two busy roads to get back home.Reynolds-Flynn took classes in agriculture at BKW from Micaela Kehrer and joined the FFA.At 16, she won the People in Agriculture competition at the New York State FFA convention after making a presentation on State Police canine handlers — her dream job at the time.After graduating from BKW in 2019, she went to the State University of New York College of Agriculture and Technology at Cobleskill. Reynolds-Flynn started in the canine program and said she had a lot of fun working with dogs.But she came to the realization that her true passion was working with horses and she majored in equine husbandry.She moved to Alaska to be with her fiancé. They live in Soldotna, population 4,000, on the Kenai Peninsula at the edge of a two-million-acre wildlife preserve.“It's almost like the Hilltowns,” said Reynolds-Flynn of the small-town atmosphere.She works in a shop that melts down lead, putting it into molds to make weights for fishermen's nets.Reynolds-Flynn tried salmon fishing herself this past summer, donning waders and standing hip-deep in the Kenai River. “It's almost like fly fishing,” she said.Her major focus outside of work is on her horse, Tango. Because she competes in barrel racing — she started at the Altamont Fair — she is training Tango on endurance and bending into turns.She likes challenges and has stepped into traditionally male roles, like being a volunteer firefighter in Knox.Her biggest thrill was receiving her American FFA Degree on Oct. 30 at the national convention in Indianapolis. Up to 60,000 members from across the country assemble for the annual convention.Earning her degree involved more than just an academic record or FFA membership for three years. She also had to demonstrate outstanding leadership, complete at least 50 hours of community service, earn $10,000 and invest $7,500, and work in excess of 2,250 hours in agriculture.Reynolds-Flynn has this advice for others who might want to follow in her footsteps: When it seems like it's getting tough, just keep on pushing through it and there's always light at the end of the tunnel. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mike & Maurice's Mind Escape
UAP and NDE's with Dr. Bob Davis Episode #227

Mike & Maurice's Mind Escape

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 76:39


“UAP and NDE's with Dr. Bob Davis” Episode 227 We sat down with Dr. Bob Davis who is an internationally recognized research scientist and author. He taught at the State University of New York for over thirty years. His recent research publications focuses on the Science of the Subjective and human consciousness. His three books are “Unseen Forces”, “Life After Death”, and “The UFO Phenomenon”. We will be discussing UAP/UFOs, Consciousness, and Near Death Experiences. *Check out our new Merch store. We have some amazing designs for T-shirts, Hoodies, Mugs, Stickers, and more https://www.teepublic.com/stores/mind-escape?ref_id=24655 *If you are interested in winning a Mind Escape Logo T-shirt at the end of the month just go to our apple podcast link below and leave us a nice review and take a screenshot of it. Send the screenshot to MindEscapePodcast@gmail.com and we will randomly pick a winner at the end of the month. If you have already left us a 5 star rating or review we love you and appreciate the support. We only have size large and medium left. Apple Podcasts - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/mind-escape-podcast/ *If you are watching on Youtube please check us out on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and all audio/podcast platforms. We appreciate reviews and comments. If you are listening on an audio/podcast platform please check out our Youtube channel where we do our episodes https://www.youtube.com/MindEscapePodcast You can find all of our links on our website https://www.mindescapepodcast.com/ *Sign up for Indra's Web which is the social media platform we created dedicated to metaphysics and the topics we discuss on this podcast. The platform is live so head on over there and set up a profile. https://indrasweb.org/ *If you enjoy our podcast and content and want to help us grow, check out our Patreon account and enjoy the exclusive episodes and interviews. You can also listen to us on the go through our website listed below. Join our Discord channel if you want to chat. We are also on all podcast platforms. Our Links: Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/MindEscapePodcast Website - https://www.MindEscapePodcast.com Discord - https://discord.gg/62bHFpd Youtube - https://www.youtube.com/MindEscapePodcast Twitter - https://twitter.com/MikeEscape Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/mindescapepodcast/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/groups/MindEscapePodcast/ Apple Podcasts - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/mind-escape-podcast/ Spotify Podcasts - https://open.spotify.com/show/0OXM81pXkn2OYT45NsoRQb?si=THFEq0SoRVqvsZzjR5xZMA *Here is the link to Bob's website and books: https://bobdavisspeaks.com/

The Conversation Weekly
Planet pharma: what the industry got out of COVID

The Conversation Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 41:46


After nearly two years of COVID, how is the pharmaceutical industry faring? In this episode, we explore where drug companies were before the arrival of COVID and how they performed financially during the pandemic. And we hear about the ongoing tensions between profits and equitable access to vaccines.Featuring, Ray Moynihan, assistant professor at the Institute for Evidence-Based Healthcare at Bond University in Australia; Jérôme Caby, professor of corporate finance at Sorbonne Business School in Paris, France; Ana Santos Rutschman, assistant professor of law at Saint Louis University in the US; and Nicole Hassoun, professor of philosophy at Binghamton University, State University of New York in the US.And Ozayr Patel, digital editor at The Conversation in Johannesburg, South Africa, recommends some reading on the emergence of the Omicron variant of COVID-19. The Conversation Weekly is produced by Mend Mariwany and Gemma Ware, with sound design by Eloise Stevens. Our theme music is by Neeta Sarl. You can sign up to The Conversation's free daily email here. Full credits for this episode available here.Further reading:COVID vaccines offer the pharma industry a once-in-a-generation opportunity to reset its reputation. But it's after decades of big profits and scandals, by Ray Moynihan, Bond UniversityWhy Moderna won't share rights to the COVID-19 vaccine with the government that paid for its development, by Ana Santos Rutschman, Saint Louis UniversityThe US drug industry used to oppose patents – what changed? by Joseph M. Gabriel, Florida State UniversityThe hunt for coronavirus variants: how the new one was found and what we know so far, by a panel of experts in South AfricaOmicron is the new COVID kid on the block: five steps to avoid, ten to take immediately, by Shabir A. Madhi, University of the Witwatersrand See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

New Books in African American Studies
Crystal Webster, "Beyond the Boundaries of Childhood: African American Children in the Antebellum North" (UNC Press, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 109:48


For all that is known about the depth and breadth of African American history, we still understand surprisingly little about the lives of African American children, particularly those affected by northern emancipation. But hidden in institutional records, school primers and penmanship books, biographical sketches, and unpublished documents is a rich archive that reveals the social and affective worlds of northern Black children. Drawing evidence from the urban centers of Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, Crystal Webster's innovative research yields a powerful new history of African American childhood before the Civil War. In Beyond the Boundaries of Childhood: African American Children in the Antebellum North (UNC Press, 2021), Webster argues that young African Americans were frequently left outside the nineteenth century's emerging constructions of both race and childhood. They were marginalized in the development of schooling, ignored in debates over child labor, and presumed to lack the inherent innocence ascribed to white children. But Webster shows that Black children nevertheless carved out physical and social space for play, for learning, and for their own aspirations. Reading her sources against the grain, Webster reveals a complex reality for antebellum Black children. Lacking societal status, they nevertheless found meaningful agency as historical actors, making the most of the limited freedoms and possibilities they enjoyed. Adam McNeil is a Ph.D. Candidate in History at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

New Books in African American Studies
Peter Cole, "Ben Fletcher: The Life and Times of a Black Wobbly" (PM Press, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 96:00


In the early twentieth century, when many US unions disgracefully excluded black and Asian workers, the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) warmly welcomed people of color, in keeping with their emphasis on class solidarity and their bold motto: "An Injury to One Is an Injury to All!" A brilliant union organizer and a humorous orator, Benjamin Fletcher (1890-1949) was a tremendously important and well-loved African American member of the IWW during its heyday. For years, acclaimed historian Peter Cole has carefully researched the life of Ben Fletcher. Ben Fletcher: The Life and Times of a Black Wobbly (PM Press, 2021) includes a detailed biographical sketch of his life and history, reminiscences by fellow workers who knew him, a chronicle of the IWW's impressive decade-long run on the Philadelphia waterfront in which Fletcher played a pivotal role, and nearly all of his known writings and speeches, thus giving Fletcher's timeless voice another opportunity to inspire a new generation of workers, organizers, and agitators. This revised and expanded second edition includes new materials and much more. Adam McNeil is a Ph.D. Candidate in History at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

Reimagining Black Relations
#53 PAY - Part 1 Speakers

Reimagining Black Relations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 26:53


Four of the speakers from the Inaugural Pan-African Youth (PAY) Summit.Dr. Jasmine L. Blanks-Jones, a dynamic theatre nonprofit leader, award-wining educator, who holds a dual PhD in Education and Africana Studies from the University of Pennsylvania, speaking on Pan-Africanism.Paulinarh Bolatito Ogunleye is 21 years old. The first female President of the Faculty of Arts Student Union at the University of Lagos, Nigeria, and the longest seating president of the same body. She will speak on the Perspectives of Youth in Africa.Prof. Seth N. Asumah, the State University of New York Distinguished Teaching Professor, Chair, and Professor of Africana Studies, and Professor of Political Science, speaking on Effective Mobilization for Political Success.Hon. Allyson Maynard-Gibson QC, former Attorney-General and Minister of Legal Affairs of The Commonwealth of Bahamas, an advocate for people centered justice, diversity, and the rights of women and children and an expert in governance, restructuring and rebranding of organizations, speaking on Ethics and Leadership. 

The LA Report
Omicron COVID variant; Holiday supply chains; Bear escapes wildlife refuge; USC's new head coach; State university applications due – The A.M. Edition

The LA Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 5:32


Here's your morning news: All eyes on Omicron COVID variant; Small businesses feel supply chain squeeze; Black bear escapes wildlife refuge in South Lake Tahoe; USC hiring new head football coach; State college applications due; This program is made possible in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people.   Support the show: https://support.laist.com/laistnav

Richard Skipper Celebrates
Richard Skipper Celebrates Rob Russell (11/24/2021)

Richard Skipper Celebrates

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 66:00


For Video Edition, Please Click and Subscribe Here: https://youtu.be/svHf6iV9xsM Dear Richard, I can't thank you enough for having me on your show! It was such a wonderful chat…you remind me of a young Mike Douglas! He used to be a frequent guest at my nightclub! Thanks again for a great experience! Best, Rob Russell   Rob Russell was born and raised in Babylon, New York. He studied musical theater and business administration at the State University of New York at Fredonia with the outstanding Rockefeller Arts Center. After struggling as an actor (modeling, bartending, singing etc.), Rob eventually landed in the hospitality and hotel business where he co-founded and managed the renowned Royal Room Cabaret at The Colony Hotel in Palm Beach for nearly 20 years. Rob recently recorded an album and is presently writing a book about his life in Palm Beach working closely with numerous celebrities. He now performs regularly at the Pelican Cafe in North Palm Beach and can be heard on Legends Radio.  

The New Dimensions Café
Enhancing The Health Of Our Brains - Brant Cortright, Ph.D. - C0345

The New Dimensions Café

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 15:08


Brant Cortright is a clinical psychologist and Professor of Psychology at California Institute of Integral Studies. His consulting practice specializes in cutting-edge brain health and neuroscience-informed depth therapy. He's the author of Psychotherapy and Spirit: Theory and Practice in Transpersonal Psychotherapy (Suny Series, Philosophy of Psychology) (State University of New York Press 1997), Integral Psychology: Yoga, Growth, and Opening the Heart (Suny Series in Transpersonal and Humanistic Psychology) (State University of New York Press 2007) and The Neurogenesis Diet & Lifestyle: Upgrade Your Brain, Upgrade Your Life (Psychic Media 2015)Interview Date: 8/11/2015  Tags: Brant Cortright, Brain, neurogenesis, diet, oxidized cholesterol, oxidized fats, cooking oils, Alzheimers, memory loss, relationships, spiritual practice, meditation, exercise, changing habits, neurotoxic, Health & Healing, Relationships/Partnerships/Sexuality

New Dimensions
A Healthy, More Resilient Brain - Brant Cortright, Ph.D. - ND3554

New Dimensions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 57:20


Brant Cortright brings brain research into a new dimension by putting it into a holistic health context. Cortright's lessons about brain health incorporate body, heart, mind, and spirit. He clarifies some common misconceptions, and shares how we can help our brains thrive and grow, including what we might be doing to unknowingly cause harm. Brant Cortright, Ph.D. is a clinical psychologist and Professor of Psychology at California Institute of Integral Studies. His consulting practice specializes in brain health and neuroscience-informed depth therapy. He is the author of Psychotherapy and Spirit: Theory and Practice in Transpersonal Psychotherapy (Suny Series, Philosophy of Psychology) (State University of New York Press 1997), Integral Psychology: Yoga, Growth, and Opening the Heart (Suny Series in Transpersonal and Humanistic Psychology) (State University of New York Press 2007) and The Neurogenesis Diet & Lifestyle: Upgrade Your Brain, Upgrade Your Life (Psychic Media 2015).Interview Date: 8/11/2015   Tags: Brant Cortright, neuroscience, neurogenesis, brain science, brain health, Alzheimer's, antidepressants, Prozac, depression, serotonin, isolation, emotional regulation, emotional navigation, spiritual practice, meditation, devotional love practice, lifelong learning, cognitive reserve, relationships, aerobic activity, running, Science, Self Help, Heath & Healing, psychology

Dugongs And Seadragons
SCCS-NY Workshop “Dugongs and Sea Dragons: Using Game Play and Storytelling to Engage Diverse Conservation Voices” Unabridged Workshop.

Dugongs And Seadragons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 99:39


Hi Folx, welcome to this very special unabridged version of the past of Dugongs and Seadragons miniseries: A workshop titled “Dugongs and Sea Dragons: Using Game Play and Storytelling to Engage Diverse Conservation Voices” organized by Josh Drew of the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry, and Chris Parsons of the University of Exeter. The episode has the full introduction, one-shot adventure, and post adventure Q&A period. Please support Dugongs & Seadragons on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/DugongsAndSeadragons

The Tightrope with Dan Smolen
Get Philosophical for Work Success

The Tightrope with Dan Smolen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 28:54


Future of Work Sherpa Dan Smolen interviews Cristina DiGiacomo who wants people to get philosophical for work success. An author, podcaster, and practical philosopher, Cristina draws on ancient insight to help people solve contemporary problems. And as the founder of MorAlchemy, she guides people with practical philosophy to lead happier, more purposed lives doing meaningful work. Skeptics may not recognize the value to get philosophical for work success. But, for every stressor, difficult workplace relationship, and vexing business problem Cristina says: “There's a philosophy for that.” Full interview starts at 2:52 In this episode, Cristina describes: Her work through MorAlchemy and the idea of practical philosophy. Starts at 4:14 How she gets “high flyers” to settle their minds to embrace practical philosophy. Starts at 7:54 Overcoming skepticism. Starts at 12:24 Her reaction to Adam Grant's article on languishing, and ways that practical philosophy helps to overcome languishing. Starts at 15:12 Participating in the collective goal of humanity. Starts at 21:31 Full interview starts at 2:52 Cristina believes people should get philosophical for work success. She says: “Things like the handshake were born out of philosophical ideas. The norms that we take for granted in our society, of how we should interact with each other, all come from philosophy.” About our guest: Cristina DiGiacomo earned a Bachelors of Science in Communications from the State University of New York at Albany and a Masters of Science in Organizational Change Management from New School University. She lives and works in New York City. EPISODE DATE: November 19, 2021 Social media: – LinkedIn – Website – WiseUp! Book Author's Page – WiseUp! Podcast Please Subscribe to The Dan Smolen Podcast on: – Apple Podcast – Android – Google Podcasts – Pandora – Spotify – Stitcher – TuneIn …or wherever you get your podcasts. You may also click HERE to receive our podcast episodes by email. Image credits: Digitized thinker, Jackie Niam for iStock Photo; Cristina DiGiacomo screenshot, The Dan Smolen Experience; Podcast button, J. Brandt Studio for The Dan Smolen Experience.

The Thomistic Institute
Who Am I to Judge? Politics and the Problem of Moral Relativism | Prof. Michael Gorman

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 59:06


This talk was given at the University of Dallas on October 6th, 2021. For information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the speaker: Michael Gorman is a graduate of St. Michael's College in the University of Toronto (B.A., Christianity and Culture, 1987), The Catholic University of America (Ph.L., Philosophy, 1989), the State University of New York at Buffalo (Ph.D., Philosophy, 1993), and Boston College (Ph.D., Theology, 1997). After serving as assistant professor of Catholic Studies at Saint Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, Nova Scotia from 1997 to 1999, he joined the faculty of the School of Philosophy at The Catholic University of America, where he has taught ever since. A fellow of The Catholic University's Institute for Human Ecology, he has also been an Alexander von Humboldt fellow (Leipzig 2004), a Fulbright fellow (Cologne 2008), and a scholar in the Templeton Foundation's Working Group "Virtue, Happiness, and the Meaning of Life" (2015-2017). He works primarily on metaphysics, especially the metaphysics of essence, substance, and normativity, and on applications of metaphysics in areas such as theory of mind, Christology, action theory, and ethics. He is the author of Aquinas on the Metaphysics of the Hypostatic Union (Cambridge, 2017) and over thirty scholarly articles. He is particularly interested in how analytic philosophy and medieval philosophy can be brought together in a way that is historically accurate and philosophically fruitful.

The Thomistic Institute
Suffering and Flourishing | Prof. Eleonore Stump

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 54:42


This talk was delivered on October 11, 2021 at The University of Oklahoma. For information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the Speaker: Stump received a BA in classical languages from Grinnell College (1969), where she was valedictorian and received the Archibald Prize for scholarship; she has an MA in biblical studies (New Testament) from Harvard University (1971), and an MA and PhD in medieval studies (medieval philosophy) from Cornell University (1975). Before coming to Saint Louis University, she taught at Oberlin College, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, and University of Notre Dame. Currently, she also holds secondary or honorary appointments at Wuhan University, the University of St Andrews, and Australian Catholic University. She has published extensively in medieval philosophy, philosophy of religion, and contemporary metaphysics. Her books include her major study Aquinas (Routledge, 2003), her extensive treatment of the problem of evil, Wandering in Darkness: Narrative and the Problem of Suffering (Oxford, 2010), and her recent treatment of the Christian doctrine of the atonement, Atonement (Oxford, 2018). Among the named lectureships she has given are the Gifford Lectures (Aberdeen, 2003), the Wilde lectures (Oxford, 2006), the Stewart lectures (Princeton, 2009), and the Stanton Lectures (Cambridge, 2018). In 2013, the American Catholic Philosophical Association awarded her the Aquinas medal. She has held grants from the Danforth Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Association of University Women, the National Humanities Center, and the Pew Charitable Trust. In addition, she has received several teaching awards, including, in 2004, the Robert Foster Cherry Award for Great Teaching from Baylor University. For 2013–15, together with John Greco, she held a $3.3 million grant from the John Templeton Foundation for a project on intellectual humility. In 2017 she was awarded an honorary doctorate from Tilburg University, the Netherlands. She is past president of the Society of Christian Philosophers, the American Catholic Philosophical Association, the American Philosophical Association, Central Division, and the Philosophers in Jesuit Education. She is also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

CAA Conversations
Jose DeJesus // Steve Rossi // Interdisciplinary Foundational Studio Art Pedagogy

CAA Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 41:45


In this podcast Steve Rossi and Jose DeJesus discuss aspects of interdisciplinary foundational studio art pedagogy in Parson's first year Space/Materiality course, benefits of limitations in lesson planning, being present for students, aspects of embodied learning, and design efficiency found in nature. Steve Rossi received his BFA from Pratt Institute in 2000 and his MFA from the State University of New York at New Paltz in 2006. His work has been exhibited at Dorsky Curatorial Projects, Eco Art Space, NURTUREart, the Open Engagement Conference at the Queens Museum, Bronx Art Space, the Wassaic Project, the John Michael Kohler Art Center, and the Jules Collins Smith Museum of Fine Arts among others. As a part-time faculty member, he has taught in the First Year Program at Parsons School of Design, the Sculpture Program and Art Education Program at the State University of New York at New Paltz, and in the Art Department at Westchester Community College. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Sculpture Program at St. Joseph's University, in Philadelphia, PA. Formerly a personal assistant to Jeff Koons, Jose DeJesus Zamora is a sculptor whose practice and teaching methods are rooted in his studies of architecture, geometry, and a deep love for the studio methods and knowledge of the Italian Renaissance. Jose has presented in conferences and Symposia in London, Athens, Ecuador, Paris, Florence and Hong Kong. Jose presently teaches three dimensional courses in Space-Materiality and also Design Drawing at Parsons School of Design in New York City. He has been teaching at Parsons for more than twenty years. He brings the knowledge of his research into his teaching.

Money Circle
Navigating Student Loans Post-Pandemic

Money Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 32:56


Related Links:NerdwalletFind Anna's work on NerdwalletFollow Anna on TwitterIncome-Driven Repayment PlansBorrower Defense Loan DischargePublic Service Loan ForgivenessClosed School DischargeTotal and Permanent Disability Dischargehttps://studentaid.gov/ --Anna Helhoski is a student loan expert at NerdWallet. Her work has appeared in The Associated Press, The New York Times, The Washington Post and USA Today. She previously covered local news in the New York metro area for the Daily Voice and New York state politics for The Legislative Gazette. She holds a bachelor's degree in journalism from Purchase College, State University of New York.--To learn more about Maggie and her coaching and speaking services, visit www.maggiegermano.com.The theme music is called Escaping Light by Aaron Sprinkle. The podcast artwork design is by Maggie's dear husband, Dan Rader.

SharkPreneur
728: TV Broadcast Quality Live Streaming with Howard Zales, Viridity Entertainment Services

SharkPreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 15:58


TV Broadcast Quality Live Streaming Howard Zales, Viridity Entertainment Services   – The Sharkpreneur podcast with Seth Greene Episode 728 Howard Zales Emmy Award winning Camera Operator who turned his passion for television broadcasting into several entrepreneurial endeavors, Howard Zales created HJZ Productions, Inc in 2000 to address the need for professional level sports crewing/staffing in the New York market.   Under his leadership, HJZ Productions grew to a multi-million nationwide provider of top talent in the broadcasting field. In 2019, Howie and his team founded Viridity Entertainment Services, Inc. (VES) which initially focused on staffing in non-union markets. With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in early 2020, they quickly pivoted to offering best in class, broadcast quality livestreams of professional sports shows and interviews, corporate interviews and meetings, and religious services.   In addition, Howie took his love of the television production business and created The TV Sports Course, a hands-on training boot camp for the next generation of television crew professionals. Howie is a graduate of the State University of New York at Plattsburgh's Mass Communication program. Howie is a big believer in that overall wellness, including healthy eating and exercising, are key to both personal and professional success. He lives in New York with his family.   Listen to this illuminating Sharkpreneur episode with Howard Zales about TV broadcasting quality live streaming. Here are some of the beneficial topics covered on this week's show: - How Viridity controls everything remotely and produces all of the feeds at once. - How Viridity produces high quality events while their customers stay at home. - How Viridity takes you through a step by step process so you can easily create content. - How Viridity's equipment is scalable to whatever the costumers' needs are. - How not knowing your equipment is one of the biggest mistakes businesses make when making a live stream video.   Connect with Howard: Guest Contact Info Instagram @howiezales Facebook facebook.com/veslivestreams LinkedIn linkedin.com/in/howardzales Links Mentioned: viridityentertainment.com   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Keto 911 Podcast
Keto911 Podcast Influencers: The Rita Brewer PA-C, DFAAPA Interview

Keto 911 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 49:36


To continue to bring you the best of what's in the ketoverse, I am honored to have such an amazing clinician tp come share her expertise in wellnes and health when it comes to keto and carnivore. I present to you: Rita Brewer PA-C, DFAAPA You can also follow her on Facebook, Instagram and Tiktok Rita Brewer PA-C, DFAAPA Private Health Coach Board Certified Physician Assistant Board Certified Lifestyle Medicine Practitioner Functional Medicine Practitioner Rita Brewer pursued her passion for Medicine by receiving a Bachelor's Degree in Biology from the State University of NY@ Geneseo, followed by the Weill Cornell Surgical Physician Assistant Program in Manhattan, NY. Over the past thirty years she has worked in hospitals, private practices and outpatient clinics specializing in Internal Medicine, Surgery, Weight loss and Integrative Medicine. She is a Distinguished Fellow of the American Academy of Physician Assistants, Certified Diplomate of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine and is the Founder & Leader of the Healthy Lifestyles Ministry at Raleigh North Christian Center in Raleigh, North Carolina. After seeing thousands of patients suffering with preventable chronic diseases her mission became educating, equipping and empowering men and women around the world with the tools they need to reclaim their optimum health. Rita has a private virtual health coaching practice where she specializes in weight loss, blood sugar balancing and chronic disease reversal. She creates customized  programs for each individual client using Lifestyle and Functional Medicine principles to transform their health. Learn more at www.RitaBrewer.com. Website: www.RitaBrewer.com Email:  rita@ritabrewer.com LinkedIn:   https://www.linkedin.com/in/rita-brewer-consulting/ Instagram: @ritabrewerconsulting www.facebook.com/ritabrewerconsulting TikTok: Rita Brewer Consulting   --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/daniel-sells/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/daniel-sells/support

The Cruelest Month
Pick Apart: Common Area

The Cruelest Month

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 55:29


Join actors Grace Vandewaa and Gina Trebiani as they discuss tropes and themes in the Cruelest Month episode: Common Area with writer Matthew Klein and director Kelly Johnston! The following interview deals with the tragic shooting that occurred on April 16th, 2007 at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, Virginia, United States. Please know that what you are about to hear may be triggering. Listener discretion is advised.

Success Is My Religion #SIMR
S7 E8: North Carolina A&T State University 3rd Edition ft Dr. RJ

Success Is My Religion #SIMR

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 34:18


Connect with Dr. RJ on her website www.askdrrj.com on Facebook @askdrrj and Instagram @askdrrj OUT NOW!! The HBCU Experience Movement, LLC presents the BEST SELLING BOOK The HBCU Experience: The North Carolina A&T State University 3rd Edition. Featuring Chancellor Harold L. Martin, Sr. Ph.D. our amazing Chancellor of North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University. Prominent Aggies throughout the world share their stories of how North Carolina A&T State University molded them into the people they are today. Official Release Date! Wednesday October 27, 2021!!! follow @thehbcuexperiencemovement Instagram/Facebook page for updates and announcements. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/successismyreligion/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/successismyreligion/support

H.E.R. Story
The HBCU Experience: The North Carolina A&T State University 3rd Edition Feat. Cheylaina Fultz

H.E.R. Story

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 23:11


IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE HBCU EXPERIENCE MOVEMENT, LLC.The HBCU Experience: The North Carolina A&T State University 3rd Edition Cheylaina Fultz may have been raised as a small-town girl, but she has always had big city dreams with an entrepreneurial spirit and a passion for acting and media. Cheylaina is also a proud 2008 graduate of North Carolina A&T State University. Since 2012, she has planned weddings and events nationally and internationally--which led her to create The Cheylaina Fultz Talk Show. Please take a listen as I chat with Cheylaina about her HBCU experience, entrepreneurial journey, and more! #HERSTORY is meant to be heard--let's listen NOW.

The Fearless and Successful Podcast by Dijana Llugolli
Howie Zales: From Emmy Award Winner to Unexpected Entrepreneur

The Fearless and Successful Podcast by Dijana Llugolli

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 29:21


Howie Zales is an Emmy Award-winning Camera Operator who turned his passion for television broadcasting into several entrepreneurial endeavours. Howie created HJZ Productions, Inc in 2000 to address the need for professional-level sports crewing/staffing in the New York market. Under his leadership, HJZ Productions grew to a multi-million nationwide provider of top talent in the broadcasting field. In 2019, Howie and his team founded Viridity Entertainment Services, Inc. (VES) which initially focused on staffing in non-union markets. With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in early 2020, they quickly pivoted to offering best in class, broadcast-quality live streams of professional sports shows and interviews, corporate interviews and meetings, and religious services. In addition, Howie took his love of the television production business and created The TV Sports Course, a hands-on training boot camp for the next generation of television crew professionals. Howie is a graduate of the State University of New York at Plattsburgh's Mass Communication program. This was an amazing conversation about Entrepreneurial Mindset, Growth Mindset, Routines and Habits and Trends for Virtual Events for 2022. Connect with Howie: https://www.linkedin.com/in/howardzales/ https://www.facebook.com/hjzproductions/ www.instagram.com/hjzprodinc Check his website and podcast: https://www.viridityentertainment.com/ https://www.howiezales.com/ D's call to action: - Share your biggest takeaway over at Instagram tagging Howie: www.instagram.com/hjzprodinc and myself www.instagram.com/dijanallugolli - Rate the podcast on Android or Apple: https://reviewthispodcast.com/insider - Check our website for ways to collaborate with D: www.dijanallugolli.com LOVE + GRATITUDE D --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/fearlessandsuccessful/message

New Books in American Studies
Alaina E. Roberts, "I've Been Here All the While: Black Freedom on Native Land" (U Pennsylvania Press, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 59:00


Perhaps no other symbol has more resonance in African American history than that of 40 acres and a mule--the lost promise of Black reparations for slavery after the Civil War. In I've Been Here All the While: Black Freedom on Native Land (U Pennsylvania Press, 2021), we meet the Black people who actually received this mythic 40 acres, the American settlers who coveted this land, and the Native Americans whose holdings it originated from. In nineteenth-century Indian Territory (modern-day Oklahoma), a story unfolds that ties African American and Native American history tightly together, revealing a western theatre of Civil War and Reconstruction, in which Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek, and Seminole Indians, their Black slaves, and African Americans and whites from the eastern United States fought military and rhetorical battles to lay claim to land that had been taken from others. Through chapters that chart cycles of dispossession, land seizure, and settlement in Indian Territory, Alaina E. Roberts draws on archival research and family history to upend the traditional story of Reconstruction. She connects debates about Black freedom and Native American citizenship to westward expansion onto Native land. As Black, white, and Native people constructed ideas of race, belonging, and national identity, this part of the West became, for a short time, the last place where Black people could escape Jim Crow, finding land and exercising political rights, until Oklahoma statehood in 1907. Adam McNeil is a Ph.D. Candidate in History at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in the American West
Alaina E. Roberts, "I've Been Here All the While: Black Freedom on Native Land" (U Pennsylvania Press, 2021)

New Books in the American West

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 59:00


Perhaps no other symbol has more resonance in African American history than that of 40 acres and a mule--the lost promise of Black reparations for slavery after the Civil War. In I've Been Here All the While: Black Freedom on Native Land (U Pennsylvania Press, 2021), we meet the Black people who actually received this mythic 40 acres, the American settlers who coveted this land, and the Native Americans whose holdings it originated from. In nineteenth-century Indian Territory (modern-day Oklahoma), a story unfolds that ties African American and Native American history tightly together, revealing a western theatre of Civil War and Reconstruction, in which Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek, and Seminole Indians, their Black slaves, and African Americans and whites from the eastern United States fought military and rhetorical battles to lay claim to land that had been taken from others. Through chapters that chart cycles of dispossession, land seizure, and settlement in Indian Territory, Alaina E. Roberts draws on archival research and family history to upend the traditional story of Reconstruction. She connects debates about Black freedom and Native American citizenship to westward expansion onto Native land. As Black, white, and Native people constructed ideas of race, belonging, and national identity, this part of the West became, for a short time, the last place where Black people could escape Jim Crow, finding land and exercising political rights, until Oklahoma statehood in 1907. Adam McNeil is a Ph.D. Candidate in History at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-west

New Books in Native American Studies
Alaina E. Roberts, "I've Been Here All the While: Black Freedom on Native Land" (U Pennsylvania Press, 2021)

New Books in Native American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 59:00


Perhaps no other symbol has more resonance in African American history than that of 40 acres and a mule--the lost promise of Black reparations for slavery after the Civil War. In I've Been Here All the While: Black Freedom on Native Land (U Pennsylvania Press, 2021), we meet the Black people who actually received this mythic 40 acres, the American settlers who coveted this land, and the Native Americans whose holdings it originated from. In nineteenth-century Indian Territory (modern-day Oklahoma), a story unfolds that ties African American and Native American history tightly together, revealing a western theatre of Civil War and Reconstruction, in which Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek, and Seminole Indians, their Black slaves, and African Americans and whites from the eastern United States fought military and rhetorical battles to lay claim to land that had been taken from others. Through chapters that chart cycles of dispossession, land seizure, and settlement in Indian Territory, Alaina E. Roberts draws on archival research and family history to upend the traditional story of Reconstruction. She connects debates about Black freedom and Native American citizenship to westward expansion onto Native land. As Black, white, and Native people constructed ideas of race, belonging, and national identity, this part of the West became, for a short time, the last place where Black people could escape Jim Crow, finding land and exercising political rights, until Oklahoma statehood in 1907. Adam McNeil is a Ph.D. Candidate in History at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/native-american-studies

New Books Network
Alaina E. Roberts, "I've Been Here All the While: Black Freedom on Native Land" (U Pennsylvania Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 59:00


Perhaps no other symbol has more resonance in African American history than that of 40 acres and a mule--the lost promise of Black reparations for slavery after the Civil War. In I've Been Here All the While: Black Freedom on Native Land (U Pennsylvania Press, 2021), we meet the Black people who actually received this mythic 40 acres, the American settlers who coveted this land, and the Native Americans whose holdings it originated from. In nineteenth-century Indian Territory (modern-day Oklahoma), a story unfolds that ties African American and Native American history tightly together, revealing a western theatre of Civil War and Reconstruction, in which Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek, and Seminole Indians, their Black slaves, and African Americans and whites from the eastern United States fought military and rhetorical battles to lay claim to land that had been taken from others. Through chapters that chart cycles of dispossession, land seizure, and settlement in Indian Territory, Alaina E. Roberts draws on archival research and family history to upend the traditional story of Reconstruction. She connects debates about Black freedom and Native American citizenship to westward expansion onto Native land. As Black, white, and Native people constructed ideas of race, belonging, and national identity, this part of the West became, for a short time, the last place where Black people could escape Jim Crow, finding land and exercising political rights, until Oklahoma statehood in 1907. Adam McNeil is a Ph.D. Candidate in History at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Alaina E. Roberts, "I've Been Here All the While: Black Freedom on Native Land" (U Pennsylvania Press, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 59:00


Perhaps no other symbol has more resonance in African American history than that of 40 acres and a mule--the lost promise of Black reparations for slavery after the Civil War. In I've Been Here All the While: Black Freedom on Native Land (U Pennsylvania Press, 2021), we meet the Black people who actually received this mythic 40 acres, the American settlers who coveted this land, and the Native Americans whose holdings it originated from. In nineteenth-century Indian Territory (modern-day Oklahoma), a story unfolds that ties African American and Native American history tightly together, revealing a western theatre of Civil War and Reconstruction, in which Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek, and Seminole Indians, their Black slaves, and African Americans and whites from the eastern United States fought military and rhetorical battles to lay claim to land that had been taken from others. Through chapters that chart cycles of dispossession, land seizure, and settlement in Indian Territory, Alaina E. Roberts draws on archival research and family history to upend the traditional story of Reconstruction. She connects debates about Black freedom and Native American citizenship to westward expansion onto Native land. As Black, white, and Native people constructed ideas of race, belonging, and national identity, this part of the West became, for a short time, the last place where Black people could escape Jim Crow, finding land and exercising political rights, until Oklahoma statehood in 1907. Adam McNeil is a Ph.D. Candidate in History at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in African American Studies
Alaina E. Roberts, "I've Been Here All the While: Black Freedom on Native Land" (U Pennsylvania Press, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 59:00


Perhaps no other symbol has more resonance in African American history than that of 40 acres and a mule--the lost promise of Black reparations for slavery after the Civil War. In I've Been Here All the While: Black Freedom on Native Land (U Pennsylvania Press, 2021), we meet the Black people who actually received this mythic 40 acres, the American settlers who coveted this land, and the Native Americans whose holdings it originated from. In nineteenth-century Indian Territory (modern-day Oklahoma), a story unfolds that ties African American and Native American history tightly together, revealing a western theatre of Civil War and Reconstruction, in which Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek, and Seminole Indians, their Black slaves, and African Americans and whites from the eastern United States fought military and rhetorical battles to lay claim to land that had been taken from others. Through chapters that chart cycles of dispossession, land seizure, and settlement in Indian Territory, Alaina E. Roberts draws on archival research and family history to upend the traditional story of Reconstruction. She connects debates about Black freedom and Native American citizenship to westward expansion onto Native land. As Black, white, and Native people constructed ideas of race, belonging, and national identity, this part of the West became, for a short time, the last place where Black people could escape Jim Crow, finding land and exercising political rights, until Oklahoma statehood in 1907. Adam McNeil is a Ph.D. Candidate in History at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

UFO Garage
106: The Consciousness Connection - Robert Davis Ph.D.

UFO Garage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 148:21


Robert Davis is an internationally recognized scientist in his field, and after receiving his doctorate degree in 1981, he conducted research, taught, and was an administrator for the State University of New York for over thirty years. He has spoken about his scientific research on the effects of toxic stimuli on the brain and sensory systems in venues that vary from national and international scientific conferences, and has published over sixty articles in scholarly journals. Bob has spoken on over one hundred national and international radio shows and podcasts about his research on the extraordinary states and potential of human consciousness. He has also written three books entitled: 1) The UFO Phenomenon: Should I Believe? 2) Life after Death: An Analysis of the Evidence, and 3) Unseen Forces: The Integration of Science, Reality and You, and published articles based on these books in the Journal of Consciousness Studies, the Journal of Scientific Exploration, and Edge Science. Bob has lectured on these topics at national and international conferences, and has been interviewed on numerous podcasts, radio shows, and documentaries. Bob is also currently in co-production with Emmy Award winning filmmaker, Dave Beaty of Dreamtime Entertainment developing a documentary called: The Consciousness Connection at: consciousnesfilm.info Bob's website is: bobdavisspeaks.comThe Consciousness Connection: https://consciousnessfilm.info/--------UFO Garage links--------------------------------WEBSITE: https://ufogaragepodcast.com/MERCH: https://ufogaragepodcast.com/merch/TWITTER: https://twitter.com/ufogarage/INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/ufogarage/LIVE CHAT--------------------------------We love chatting with our listeners live during the show! Keep in mind that your chats will be published along with the playback of each live video so have a good time and be nice!#consciousness #ufogaragepodcastThis video may include copyrighted material, we try to follow fair use guidelines as best we can. If you have any issues or questions please email us at hey@ufogaragepodcast.com.Copyright UFO Garage

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.05.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 59:44


Sins Of Omission: The AZT Scandal By Celia Farber Spin Nov. 1989 On a cold January day in 1987, inside one of the brightly-lit meeting rooms of the monstrous FDA building, a panel of 11 top Aids doctors pondered a very difficult decision. They had been asked by the FDA to consider giving lightning-quick approval to a highly toxic drug about which there was very little information. Clinically called Zidovudine, but nicknamed AZT after its components, the drug was said to have shown a dramatic effect on the survival of Aids patients. The study that had brought the panel together had set the medical community abuzz. It was the first flicker of hope - people were dying much faster on the placebo than on the drug.  But there were tremendous concerns about the new drug. It had actually been developed a quarter of a century earlier as a cancer chemotherapy, but was shelved and forgotten because it was so toxic, very expensive to produce, and totally ineffective against cancer. Powerful, but unspecific, the drug was not selective in its cell destruction.  Drug companies around the world were sifting through hundreds of compounds in the race to find a cure, or at least a treatment, for Aids. Burroughs Wellcome, a subsidiary of Wellcome, a British drug company, emerged as the winner. By chance, they sent the failed cancer drug, then known as Compound S, to the National Cancer Institute along with many others to see if it could slay the Aids dragon, HIV. In the test tube at least, it did.  At the meeting, there was a lot of uncertainty and discomfort with AZT. The doctors who had been consulted knew that the study was flawed and that the long-range effects were completely unknown. But the public was almost literally baying at the door. Understandably, there was immense pressure on the FDA to approve AZT even more quickly than they had approved thalidomide in the mid-60s, which ended up causing drastic birth defects.  Everybody was worried about this one. To approve it, said Ellen Cooper, an FDA director, would represent a "significant and potentially dangerous departure from our normal toxicology requirements."  Just before approving the drug, one doctor on the panel, Calvin Kunin, summed up their dilemma. "On the one hand," he said, "to deny a drug which decreases mortality in a population such as this would be inappropriate. On the other hand, to use this drug widely, for areas where efficacy has not been demonstrated, with a potentially toxic agent, might be disastrous."  "We do not know what will happen a year from now," said panel chairman Dr. Itzhak Brook. "The data is just too premature, and the statistics are not really well done. The drug could actually be detrimental." A little later, he said he was also "struck by the facts that AZT does not stop deaths. Even those who were switched to AZT still kept dying."  "I agree with you," answered another panel member, "There are so many unknowns. Once a drug is approved there is no telling how it could be abused. There's no going back."  Burroughs Wellcome reassured the panel that they would provide detailed two-year follow-up data, and that they would not let the drug get out of its intended parameters: as a stopgap measure for very sick patients.  Dr. Brook was not won over by the promise. "If we approve it today, there will not be much data. There will be a promise of data," he predicted, "but then the production of data will be hampered." Brook's vote was the only one cast against approval.  'There was not enough data, not enough follow-up," Brook recalls. "Many of the questions we asked the company were answered by, 'We have not analyzed the data yet,' or 'We do not know.' I felt that there was some promising data, but I was very worried about the price being paid for it. The side effects were so very severe. It was chemotherapy. Patients were going to need blood transfusions. That's very serious.  "The committee was tending to agree with me," says Brook, "that we should wait a little bit, be more cautious. But once the FDA realized we were intending to reject it, they applied political pressure. At about 4 p.m., the head of the FDA's Center for Drugs and Biologics asked permission to speak, which is extremely unusual. Usually they leave us alone. But he said to us, 'Look, if you approve the drug, we can assure you that we will work together with Burroughs Wellcome and make sure the drug is given to the right people.' It was like saying 'please do it.'"  Brad Stone, FDA press officer, was at that meeting. He says he doesn't recall that particular speech, but that there is nothing 'unusual" about FDA officials making such speeches at advisory meetings. "The people in that meeting approved the drug because the data the company had produced proved it was prolonging life. Sure it was toxic, but they concluded that the benefits clearly outweighed the risks."  The meeting ended. AZT, which several members of the panel still felt uncomfortable with and feared could be a time bomb, was approved.  Flash forward: August 17, 1989. Newspapers across America banner-headlined that AZT had been "proven to be effective in HIV antibody-positive, asymptomatic and early ARC patients," even through one of the panel's main concerns was that the drug should only be used in a last-case scenario for critically-ill AIDS patients, due to the drug's extreme toxicity. Dr. Anthony Fauci, head of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), was now pushing to expand prescription.  The FDA's traditional concern had been thrown to the wind. Already the drug had spread to 60 countries and an estimated 20.000 people. Not only had no new evidence allayed the initial concerns of the panel, but the follow-up data, as Dr. Brook predicted, had fallen by the waysite. The beneficial effects of the drug had been proven to be temporary. The toxicity, however stayed the same.  The majority of those in the AIDS afflicted and medical communities held the drug up as the first breakthrough on AIDS. For better or worse, AZT had been approved faster than any drug in FDA history, and activists considered it a victory. The price paid for the victory, however, was that almost all government drug trials, from then on, focused on AZT - while over 100 other promising drugs were left uninvestigated.  Burroughs Wellcome stock went through the roof when the announcement was made. At a price of $8,000 per patient per year (not including blood work and transfusions), AZT is the most expensive drug ever marketed. Burroughs Wellcome's gross profits for next year are estimated at $230 million. Stock market analysts predict that Burroughs Wellcome may be selling as much as $2 billion worth of AZT, under the brand name Retrovir, each year by the mid-1990s - matching Burroughs Wellcome's total sales for all its products last year.  AZT is the only antiretroviral drug that has received FDA approval for treatment of AIDS since the epidemic began 10 years ago, and the decision to approve it was based on a single study that has long been declared invalid.  The study was intended to be a "double-blind placebo-controlled study," the only kind of study that can effectively prove whether or not a drug works. In such a study, neither patient nor doctor is supposed to know if the patient is getting the drug or a placebo. In the case of AZT, the study became unblinded on all sides, after just a few weeks.  Both sides of the contributed to the unblinding. It became obvious to doctors who was getting what because AZT causes such severe side effects that AIDS per se does not. Furthermore, a routine blood count known as CMV, which clearly shows who is on the drug and who is not, wasn't whited out in the reports. Both of these facts were accepted and confirmed by both the FDA and Burroughs Wellcome, who conducted the study.  Many of the patients who were in the trial admitted that they had analyzed their capsules to find out whether they were getting the drug. If they weren't, some bought the drug on the underground market. Also, the pills were supposed to be indistinguishable by taste, but they were not. Although this was corrected early on, the damage was already done. There were also reports that patients were pooling pills out solidarity to each other. The study was so severely flawed that its conclusions must be considered, by the most basic scientific standards, unproven.  The most serious problem with the original study, however, is that it was never completed. Seventeen weeks in the study, when more patients had died in the placebo group, the study was stopped short, and all subjects were put on AZT, no scientific study can ever be conducted to prove unequivocally whether AZT does prolong life.  Dr. Brook, who voted against approval, warned at the time that AZT, being the only drug available for doctors to prescribe to AIDS patients, would probably have a runaway effect. Approving it prematurely, he said, would be like "letting the genie out of the bottle."  Brook pointed out that since the drug is a form of chemotherapy, it should only be prescribed by doctors who have experience with chemotherapeutic drugs. Because of the most severe toxic effects of AZT - cell depletion of the bone marrow - patients would need frequent blood transfusions. As it happened, AZT was rampantly prescribed as soon as it was released, way beyond its purported parameters. The worst-case scenario had come true: Doctors interviewed by the New York Times later in 1987 revealed that they were already giving AZT to healthy people who had tested positive for antibodies to HIV.  The FDA's function is to weigh a drug's efficacy against its potential hazards. The equation is simple and obvious: A drug must unquestionably repair more than it damages, otherwise the drug itself may cause more harm than the disease it is supposed to fight. Exactly what many doctors and scientists fear is happening with AZT.  AZT was singled out among hundreds of compounds when Dr. Sam Broder, the head of the National Cancer Institutes (NCI), found that it "inhibited HIV viral replication in vitro." AIDS is considered a condition of immune suppression caused by the HIV virus replicating and eating its way into T-4 cells, which are essential to the immune system. HIV is a retrovirus which contains an enzyme called reverse transcriptase that converts viral RNA to DNA. AZT was thought to work by interrupting this DNA synthesis, thus stopping further replication of the virus.  While it was always known that the drug was exceedingly toxic, the first study concluded that 'the risk/benefits ratio was in favour of the patient."  In the study that won FDA approval for AZT, the one fact that swayed the panel of judges was that the AZT group outlived the placebo group by what appeared to be a landslide. The ace card of the study, the one that cancelled out the issue of the drug's enormous toxicity, was that 19 persons had died in the placebo group and only one in the AZT group. The AZT recipients were also showing a lower incidence of opportunistic infections.  While the data staggered the panel that approved the drug, other scientists insisted that it meant nothing - because it was so shabbily gathered, and because of the unblinding. Shortly after the study was stopped, the death rate accelerated in the AZT group. "There was no great difference after a while," says Dr. Brook, "between the treated and the untreated group."  "That study was so sloppily done that it really didn't mean much," says Dr. Joseph Sonnabend, a leading New York City AIDS doctor.  Dr. Harvey Bialy, scientific editor of the journal Biotechnology, is stunned by the low quality of science surrounding AIDS research. When asked if he had seen any evidence of the claims made for AZT, that it "prolongs life" in AIDS patients, Bialy said, "No. I have not seen a published study that is rigorously done, analyzed and objectively reported."  Bialy, who is also a molecular biologist, is horrified by the widespread use of AZT, not just because it is toxic, but because, he insists, the claims its widespread use are based upon are false. "I can't see how this drug could be doing anything other than making people very sick," he says.  The scientific facts about AZT and AIDS are indeed astonishing. Most ironically, the drug has been found to accelerate the very process it was said to prevent: the loss of T-4 cells.  "Undeniably, AZT kills T-4 cells [white blood cells vital to the immune system]" says Bialy. "No one can argue with that. AZT is a chain-terminating nucleotide, which means that it stops DNA replication. It seeks out any cell that is engaged in DNA replication and kills it. The place where most of this replication is taking place is the bone marrow. That's why the most common and severe side effect of the drug is bone marrow toxicity. That is why they [patients] need blood transfusions."  AZT has been aggressively and repeatedly marketed as a drug that prolongs survival in AIDS patients because it stops the HIV virus from replicating and spreading to healthy cells. But, says Bialy: "There is no good evidence that HIV actively replicates in a person with AIDS, and if there's isn't much HIV replication in a person with AIDS, and if there isn't much HIV replication to stop, it's mostly killing healthy cells."  University of California at Berkeley scientist Dr. Peter Duesberg drew the same conclusion in a paper published in the Proceedings, the journal of the National Academy of Sciences. Duesberg, whose paper addressed his contention that HIV is not a sufficient cause for AIDS, wrote: "Even if HIV were to cause AIDS, it would hardly be legitimate target for AZT therapy, because in 70 to 100 percent of antibody positive persons, proviral DNA is not detectable... and its biosynthesis has never been observed."  As a chemotherapeutic drug, explained Duesberg, explained Duesberg, AZT "kills dividing blood cells and other cells," and is thus "directly immunosuppressive."  "The cell is almost a million-fold bigger target than the virus, so the cell will be much, much more sensitive," says Duesberg. "Only very few cells, about one in 10,000 are actively making the virus containing DNA, so you must kill incredibly large numbers of cells to inhibit the virus. This kind of treatment could only theoretically help if you have a massive infection, which is not the case with AIDS. Meanwhile, they're giving this drug that ends up killing millions of lymphocytes [white blood cells]. It's beyond me how that could possibly be beneficial."  "It doesn't really kill them," Burroughs Wellcome scientists Sandra Lehrman argues. "You don't necessarily have to destroy the cell, you can just change the function of it. Furthermore, while the early data said that the only very few cells were infected, new data says that there may be more cells infected. We have more sensitive detection techniques now."  "Changes their function? From what - functioning to not functioning? Another example of mediocre science," says Bialy. "The 'sensitive detection technique' to which Dr. Lehrman refers, PCR, is a notoriously unreliable one upon which to base quantitative conclusions."  When specific questions about the alleged mechanisms of AZT are asked, the answers are long, contradictory, and riddled with unknowns. Every scientific point raised about the drug is eventually answered with the blanket response, "The drug is not perfect, but it's all we have right now." About the depletion of T-4 cells and other white cells, Lehrman says, "We don't know why T-4 cells go up at first, and then go down. That is one of the drug mechanisms that we are trying to understand."  When promoters of AZT are pressed on key scientific points, whether at the NIH, FDA, Burroughs Wellcome or an AIDS organization, they often become angry. The idea that the drug is "doing something," even though this is invariably followed with irritable admissions that there are "mechanisms about the drug and disease we don't understand," is desperately clung to. It is as if, in the eye of the AIDS storm, the official, government-agency sanctioned position is immunized against critique. Skepticism and challenge, so essential to scientific endeavour, is not welcome in the AZT debate, where it is arguably needed more than anywhere else.  The toxic effects of AZT, particularly bone marrow suppression and anemia, are so severe that up to 50 percent of all AIDS and ARC patients cannot tolerate it and have to be taken off it. In the approval letter that Burroughs Wellcome sent to the FDA, all of 50 additional side effects of AZT, aside from the most common ones, were listed. These included: loss of mental acuity, muscle spasms, rectal bleeding and tremors.  Anemia one of AZT's common side effects, is the depletion of red blood cells, and according to Duesberg, "Red blood cells are the one thing you cannot do without. Without red cells, you cannot pick up oxygen."  Fred, a person with AIDS, was put on AZT and suffered such severe anemia from the drug he had to be taken off it. In an interview in the AIDS handbook Surviving and Thriving With AIDS, he described what anemia feels like to the editor Michael Callen: "I live in a studio and my bathroom is a mere five-step walk from my be. I would just lie there for two hours; I couldn't get up to take those five steps. When I was taken to the hospital, I had to have someone come over to dress me. It's that kind of severe fatigue... The quality of my life was pitiful... I've never felt so bad... I stopped the AZT and the mental confusion, the headaches, the pains in the neck, the nausea, all disappeared within a 24-hour period."  "I feel very good at this point," Fred went on. "I feel like the quality of my life was a disaster two weeks ago. And it really was causing a great amount of fear in me, to the point where I was taking sleeping pills to calm down. I was so worried. I would totally lose track of what I was saying in the middle of a sentence. I would lose my directions on the street."  "Many AIDS patients are anemic even before they receive the drug." Says Burroughs Wellcome's Dr. Lehrman, "because HIV itself can infect the bone marrow and cause anemia."  This argument betrays a bizarre reasoning. If AIDS patients are already burdened with the problems such as immune suppression, bone marrow toxicity and anemia, is compounding these problems an improvement?  "Yes AZT is a form of chemotherapy." Says the man who invented the compound a quarter-century ago, Jerome Horowitz. "It is cytotoxic, and as such, it causes bone marrow toxicity and anemia. There are problems with the drug. It's not perfect. But I don't think anybody would agree that AZT is of no use. People can holler from now until doomsday that it is toxic, but you have to go with the results."  The results, finally and ironically, are what damns AZT. Several studies on the clinical effects of AZT - including the one that Burroughs Wellcome's approval was based on - have drawn the same conclusion: that AZT is effective for a few months, but that its effect drops of sharply after that. Even the original AZT study showed that T-4 cells went up for a while and then plummeted. HIV levels went down, and then came back up. This fact was well-known when the advisory panel voted for approval. As panel member Dr. Stanley Lemon said in the meeting, "I am left with the nagging thought after seeing several of these slides, that after 16 to 24 weeks - 12 to 16 weeks, I guess - the effect seems to be declining."  A follow-up meeting, two years after the original Burroughs Wellcome study, was scheduled to discuss the long range effects of AZT, and the survival statistics. As one doctor present at that meeting in May 1988 recall, "They hadn't followed up the study. Anything that looked beneficial was gone within half a year. All they had were some survival statistics averaging 44 weeks. The p24 didn't pan out and there was no persistent improvement in the T-4 cells."  HIV levels in the blood are measured by an antigen called p24. Burroughs Wellcome made the claim that AZT lowered this level, that is, lowered the amount of HIV in the blood. At the first FDA meeting, Burroughs Wellcome emphasized how the drug had "lowered" the p24 levels; at the follow-up meeting, they didn't mention it.  As that meeting was winding down, Dr. Michael Lange, head of the AIDS program at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital in New York, spoke up about this. "The claim of AZT is made on the fact that it is supposed to have an antiviral effect," he said to Burroughs Wellcome, "and on this we have seen no data at all... Since there is a report in the Lancet [a leading British medical journal] that after 20 weeks or so, in many patients p24 came back, do you have any data on that?"  They didn't.  "What counts is the bottom line," one of the scientists representing Burroughs Wellcome summed up, "the survival, the neurologic function, the absence of progression and the quality of life, all of which are better. Whether you call it better because of some antiviral effect, or some other antibacterial effect, they are still better."  Dr. Lange suggested that the drug may be effective the same way a simple anti-inflammatory, such as aspirin, is effective. An inexpensive, nontoxic drug called Indomecithin, he pointed out, might serve the same function, without the devastating side effects.  One leading AIDS researcher, who was part of the FDA approval process, says today: "Does AZT do anything? Yes, it does. But the evidence that it does something against HIV is really not there."  "There have always been drugs that we use without knowing exactly how they work," says Nobel Prize winner Walter Gilbert. "The really important thing to look at is the clinical effect. Is the drug helping or isn't it?"  "I'm living proof that AZT works," says one person with ARC on AZT. "I've been on it for two years now, and I'm certainly healthier than I was two years ago. It's not a cure-all, it's not a perfect drug, but it is effective. It's slowing down the progression of the disease."  "Sometimes I feel like swallowing Drano," says another. "I mean, sometimes I have problems swallowing. I just don't like the idea of taking something that foreign to my body. But every six hours, I've got to swallow it. Until something better comes along, this is what is available to me."  "I am absolutely convinced that people enjoy a better quality of life and survive longer who do not take AZT," says Gene Fedorko, President of Health Education AIDS Liaison (HEAL). "I think it's horrible the way people are bullied by their doctors to take the drug. We get people coming to us shaking and crying because their doctors said they'll die if they don't take AZT. That is an absolute lie." Fedorko has drawn his conclusion from years of listening to the stories of people struggling to survive AIDS at HEAL's weekly support group.  "I wouldn't take AZT if you paid me," says Michael Callen, cofounder of New York City's PWA coalition, Community Research Initiative, and editor of several AIDS journals. Callen has survived AIDS for over seven years without the help of AZT. "I've gotten the shit kicked out me for saying this, but I think using AZT is like aiming a thermonuclear warhead at a mosquito. The overwhelming majority of long-term survivors I've known have chosen not to take AZT."  The last surviving patient from the original AZT trial, according to Burroughs Wellcome, died recently. When he died, he had been on AZT for three and one-half years. He was the longest surviving AZT recipient. The longest surviving AIDS patient overall, not on AZT, has lived for eight and one-half years.  An informal study of long-term survivors of AIDS followed 24 long-term survivors, all of whom had survived AIDS more than six years. Only one of them had recently begun taking AZT.  In the early days, AZT was said to extend lives. In actual fact, there is simply no solid evidence that AZT prolongs life.  "I think AZT does prolong life in most people," says Dr. Bruce Montgomery of the State University of New York City at Stony Brook, who is completing a study on AZT. "There are not very many long-tern survivors, and we really don't know why they survive. It could be luck. But most people are not so lucky."  "AZT does seem to help many patients," says Dr. Bernard Bahari, a New York City AIDS physician and researcher, "but it's very hard to determine whether it actually prolongs life."  "Many of the patients I see choose not to take AZT," says Dr. Don Abrams of San Francisco General Hospital. "I've been impressed that survival and lifespan are increasing for all people with AIDS. I think it has a lot to do with aerosolized Pentamidine [a drug that treats pneumocystis carinii pneumonia]. There's also the so-called plague effect, the fact that people get stronger and stronger when a disease hits a population. The patients I see today are not as fragile as the early patients were."  "Whether you live or die with AIDS is a function of how well your doctor treats you, not of AZT," says Dr. Joseph Sonnabend, one of New York's City's first and most reputable AIDS doctor, whose patients include many long-term survivors, although he has never prescribed AZT. Sonnabend was one of the first to make the simple observation that AIDS patients should be treated for their diseases, not just for their HIV infection.  Several studies have concluded that AZT has no effect on the two most common opportunistic AIDS infections, Pneumocystic Carinii Pneumonia (PCP) and Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS). The overwhelming majority of AIDS patients die of PCP, for which there has been an effective treatment for decades. This year, the FDA finally approved aerosolized Pentamidine for AIDS. A recent Memorial Sloan Kettering study concluded the following: By 15 months, 80% of people on AZT not receiving Pentamidine had a recurring episode. "All those deaths in the AZT study were treatable," Sonnabend says. "They weren't deaths from AIDS, they were deaths from treatable conditions. They didn't even do autopsies for that study. What kind of faith can one have in these people?"  "If there's any resistance to AZT in the general public at all, it's within the gay community of New York," says the doctor close to the FDA approval, who asked to remain anonymous. "The rest of the country has been brainwashed into thinking this drug really does that much. The data has all been manipulated by people who have a lot vested in AZT."  "If AIDS were not the popular disease that it is - the money-making and career-making machine - these people could not get away with that kind of shoddy science," says Bialy. "In all of my years in science I have never seen anything this atrocious." When asked if he thought it was at all possible that people have been killed as a result of AZT poisoning rather then AIDS he answered: "It's more than possible."  August 17, 1989: The government has announced that 1.4 million healthy, HIV antibody-positive Americans could "benefit" from taking AZT, even though they show no symptoms of disease. New studies have "proven" that AZT is effective in stopping the progression of AIDS in asymptomatic and early ARC cases. Dr. Fauci, the head of NIH, proudly announced that a trial that has been going on for "two years" had "clearly shown" that early intervention will keep AIDS at bay. Anyone who has antibodies to HIV and less than 500 T-4 cells should start taking AZT at once, he said. That is approximately 650,000 people. 1.4 million Americans are assumed HIV antibody-positive, and eventually all of them may need to take AZT so they don't get sick, Fauci contended.  The leading newspapers didn't seem to think it unusual that there was no existing copy of the study, but rather a breezy two-pages press release from the NIH. When SPIN called the NIH asking for a copy of the study, we were told that it was "still being written." We asked a few questions about the numbers. According to the press release, 3,200 early AARC and asymptomatic patients were devided into two groups, one AZT and one placebo, and followed for two years. The two groups were distinguished by T-4 cell counts; one group had less than 500, the other more than 500. These two were then divided into three groups each: high-dose AZT, low-dose AZT, and placebo. In the group with more than 500 T-4 cells, AZT had no effect. In the other group, it was concluded that low-dose AZT was the most effective, followed by high-dose. All in all, 36 out of 900 developed AIDS in the two AZT groups combined, and 38 out of 450 in the placebo group. "HIV-positive patients are twice as likely to get AIDS if they don't take AZT," the press declared.  However, the figures are vastly misleading. When we asked how many patients were actually enrolled for a full two years, the NIH said they did not know, but that the average time of participation was one year, not two.  "It's terribly dishonest the way they portrayed those numbers," says Dr. Sonnabend. "If there were 60 people in the trial those numbers would mean something, but if you calculate what the percentage is out of 3,200, the difference becomes minute between the two groups. It's nothing. It's hit or miss, and they make it look like it's terribly significant."  The study boasted that AZT is much more effective and less toxic at one-third the dosage than has been used for three years. That's the good news. The bad news is that thousands have already been walloped with 1,500 milligrams of AZT and possibly even died of toxic poisoning - and now we're hearing that one third of the dose would have done?  With all that remains so uncertain about the effects of AZT, it seems criminal to advocate expanding its usage to healthy people, particularly since only a minuscule percentage of the HIV-infected population have actually developed ARC or AIDS.  Burroughs Wellcome has already launched testing of AZT in asymptomatic hospital workers, pregnant women, and in children, who are getting liquid AZT. The liquid is left over from an aborted trial, and given to the children because they can mix it with water - children don't like to swallow pills. It has also been proposed that AZT be given to people who do not yet even test positive for HIV antibodies, but are "at risk."  "I'm convinced that if you gave AZT to a perfectly healthy athlete," says Fedorko, "he would be dead in five years."  In December 1988, the Lancet published a study that Burroughs Wellcome and the NIH do not include in their press kits. It was more expansive than the original AZT study and followed patients longer. It was not conducted in the United States, but in France, at the Claude Bernard Hospital in Paris, and concluded the same thing about AZT that Burroughs Wellcome's study did, except Burroughs Wellcome called their results "overwhelmingly positive," and the French doctors called theirs "disappointing." The French study found, once again, that AZT was too toxic for most to tolerate, had no lasting effect on HIV blood levels, and left the patients with fewer T-4 cells than they started with. Although they noticed a clinical improvement at first, they concluded that "by six months, these values had returned to their pretreatment levels and several opportunistic infections, malignancies and deaths occurred."  "Thus the benefits of AZT are limited to a few months for ARC and AIDS patients," the Fench team concluded. After a few months, the study found, AZT was completely ineffective.  The news that AZT will soon be prescribed to asymptomatic people has left many leading AIDS doctors dumbfounded and furious. Every doctor and scientist I asked felt that it was highly unprofessional and reckless to announce a study with no data to look at, making recommendations with such drastic public health implications. "This simply does not happen," says Bialy. "The government is reporting scientific facts before they've been reviewed? It's unheard of."  "It's beyond belief," says Dr. Sonnabend in a voice tinged with desperation. "I don't know what to do. I have to go in and face an office full of patients asking for AZT. I'm terrified. I don't know what to do as a responsible physician. The first study was ridiculous. Margaret Fishl, who has done both of these studies, obviously doesn't know the first thing about clinical trials. I don't trust her. Or the others. They're simply not good enough. We're being held hostage by second-rate scientists. We let them get away with the first disaster; now they're doing it again."  "It's a momentous decision to say to people, 'if you're HIV-positive and your T4-cells are below 500 start taking AZT,'" says the doctor who wished to remain anonymous. "I know dozens of people that I've seen personally every few months for several years now who have been in that state for more than five years, and have not progressed to any disease."  "I'm ashamed of my colleagues," Sonnabend laments. "I'm embarrassed. This is such shoddy science it's hard to believe nobody is protesting. Damned cowards. The name of the game is protect your grants, don't open your mouth. It's all about money... it's grounds for just following the party line and not being critical, when there are obviously financial and political forces that are driving this."  When Duesberg heard the latest announcement, he was particularly stunned over the reaction of Gay Men's Health Crisis President Richard Dunne, who said that GMHC now urged "everybody to get tested," and of course those who test positive to go on AZT. "These people are running into the gas chambers," says Duesberg. "Himmler would have been so happy if only the Jews were this cooperative." 

The Cruelest Month
April 16th 2007: Common Area

The Cruelest Month

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 21:58


The following audio drama deals with the tragic events that occurred on April 16th, 2007 at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, Virginia, United States. Please know that what you are about to hear may be triggering. Listener discretion is advised. We're all capable of the unthinkable. But, how do we get from, "I would never do that" to "I can't believe I did that?" Common Area follows the path of Kelly, an excellent student, who becomes obsessed with a weapon she discovers in her dorm room. Who does it belong to? How did it get there? And who will it be used on? As the her suspicions ensnare her, will Kelly go be able to stop herself from going over the line or will she meet a dead end? Find out by listening to Common Area now!

The Thomistic Institute
Philosophy, Religion, and Rationality | Prof. Michael Gorman

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 53:38


This talk was delivered on September 21, 2021 at Cornell University. For information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the speaker: Michael Gorman is a graduate of St. Michael's College in the University of Toronto (B.A., Christianity and Culture, 1987), The Catholic University of America (Ph.L., Philosophy, 1989), the State University of New York at Buffalo (Ph.D., Philosophy, 1993), and Boston College (Ph.D., Theology, 1997). After serving as assistant professor of Catholic Studies at Saint Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, Nova Scotia from 1997 to 1999, he joined the faculty of the School of Philosophy at The Catholic University of America, where he has taught ever since. A fellow of The Catholic University's Institute for Human Ecology, he has also been an Alexander von Humboldt fellow (Leipzig 2004), a Fulbright fellow (Cologne 2008), and a scholar in the Templeton Foundation's Working Group "Virtue, Happiness, and the Meaning of Life" (2015-2017). He works primarily on metaphysics, especially the metaphysics of essence, substance, and normativity, and on applications of metaphysics in areas such as theory of mind, Christology, action theory, and ethics. He is the author of Aquinas on the Metaphysics of the Hypostatic Union (Cambridge, 2017) and over thirty scholarly articles. He is particularly interested in how analytic philosophy and medieval philosophy can be brought together in a way that is historically accurate and philosophically fruitful.

The Measure of Everyday Life
Protecting Our Schools

The Measure of Everyday Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 29:40


School Resource Officers work in schools across the U.S. now, but their placement has led to some controversy. To what extent does having SROs in place reduce violence and crime in schools? To what extent might such placement lead to undesirable consequences? On this episode, we talk with Lucy Sorensen of the University at Albany of the State University of New York. 

The Long View
Bob Seawright: 'There Is No Such Thing as a Passive Investor'

The Long View

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 50:18


Our guest this week is Bob Seawright. Bob is chief investment and information officer at Madison Avenue Securities, a Registered Investment Advisorand broker/dealer based in San Diego, California. Bob has received a number of accolades through the years but is perhaps best known for his popular newsletter, "The Better Letter," where he writes about a wide range of topics, including human behavior, decision-making, and investing. Before coming to the finance industry, Bob was a practicing lawyer. He later joined Merrill Lynch, where he worked as a financial advisor until joining Madison in 2010. Bob earned his bachelor's degree from the State University of New York at Fredonia, his J.D. from Duke University, and is a CFA charterholder. BackgroundBioThe Better LetterHow I Invest My Money: Finance Experts Reveal How They Save, Spend, and Invest, by Joshua Brown and Brian PortnoyUbiquity: Why Catastrophes Happen, by Mark BuchananTerrance Odean: “The Average Investor Is His Own Worst Enemy,” Forbes.com, June 10, 2010.Confirmation Bias and Addition by Subtraction“The Better Letter: Believing Is Seeing,” by Bob Seawright, betterletter.substack.com, May 21, 2021.The Geometry of Wealth: How to Shape a Life of Money and Meaning, by Brian Portnoy“A Hierarchy of Advisor Value,” by Bob Seawright, RPSeawright.wordpress.com, Feb. 12, 2016. “The Better Letter: Addition by Subtraction,” by Bob Seawright, betterletter.substack.com, July 30, 2021.Error Avoidance“Investors' 10 Most Common Behavioral Biases,” by Bob Seawright, RPSeawright.wordpress.com, July 16, 2012.“Not Stupid Wins,” by Bob Seawright, RPSeawright.wordpress.com, Dec. 20, 2019.“The Better Letter: Crash Protection,” by Bob Seawright, betterletter.substack.com, Sept. 24, 2021.“Forecasting Follies 2020,” by Bob Seawright, RPSeawright.wordpress.com, Jan. 2, 2020.Skill Versus Randomness“The Better Letter: Randomness Rules,” by Bob Seawright, betterletter.substack.com, July 16, 2021.“The Better Letter: Process, Probability, and Power,” by Bob Seawright, betterletter.substack.com, Aug. 14, 2020.

Reflect Forward
When Playing It Safe Becomes Riskier Than Change w/ Amy Parsons

Reflect Forward

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 50:18


Guest: Amy Parsons is the CEO and co-founder of Mozzafiato, an e-commerce DTC business that imports Italian luxury brands in beauty and men's grooming and sells at retail in the US. Amy launched Mozzafiato during the middle of the pandemic in 2020, leaving a 20-year career as an attorney and university executive to focus exclusively on starting up the company. Today, one year into running Mozzafiato, the company represents 20 different heritage brands, selling approximately 1,000 products on its site and has been featured in Vogue, Travel & Leisure, the Robb Report, among others, and is working to quickly scale to be an industry leader in the beauty and grooming industry. Amy is also a member of YPO (Young President's Organization). Episode in a Tweet: Starting a new career is never easy. How this CEO left the safety a job as a university exec to launch a fiercely authentic luxury Italian beauty brand. Quick Background: Amy Parsons has never been a risk-taker. She built her career on doing what was expected. Go to law school. Work for a great law firm. Become in-house corporate conical for a well-respected company. Take an executive position with a State University. And then the pandemic hit and made her rethink everything. She had a stable job as the Executive Chancellor at Colorado State University (CSU), but it left her questioning, “Am I really making the impact I would like? Am I living my passion?” It became clear that it was risker to stay than it was to leave, and she made the leap to co-found the Italian luxury beauty and men's grooming brand, Mozzafiato. And what a leap it was! During our interview, Amy shares how she overcame her fear, taking a risk on herself. She details how important a team is in a start-up and how she handles the stress of running a startup. We talk about how what you tolerate becomes what's expected and how to manage your energy to show up as the best version of yourself. It's a magical interview and I know you will love Amy as much as I do! How to find Amy: https://www.linkedin.com/in/amybuildingmozzafiato/ https://www.instagram.com/amybuildingmozzafiato/ https://mozzafiato.com/ https://www.instagram.com/iammozzafiato/

Talking Indonesia
Academic Freedom - Dr Robertus Robet

Talking Indonesia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 27:45


Dr Robertus Robet – Academic Freedom Recently, a number of high-profile cases have highlighted growing threats to academic freedom in Indonesia, amid a broader environment of shrinking civic space. Last month, the imprisonment of Dr Saiful Mahdi from Syaih Kuala University in Aceh, under the draconian Law on Information and Electronic Transactions (known as ITE Law), brought condemnation from academics and civil rights groups across Indonesia and abroad. In the face of widespread agreement that authorities had overreached, President Joko "Jokowi" Widodo eventually granted Saiful amnesty. But this was just one example of the pressure academics and students have faced under the Jokowi administration. And while the government has acknowledged the need for reform of the ITE Law, serious structural, legal and cultural restrictions remain in the higher education sector, and beyond. What is driving these limits on academic freedom? What has been the impact of the ITE Law on academic freedom? What topics are off limits, and are curbs on academic freedom part of Indonesia's broader democratic decline? In this week's Talking Indonesia podcast, Dr Jemma Purdey discusses these issues and more with Dr Robertus Robet, head of sociology at the State University of Jakarta (UNJ), and a frequent contributor to Indonesia at Melbourne. The Talking Indonesia podcast is co-hosted by Dr Dave McRae from the University of Melbourne's Asia Institute, Dr Jemma Purdey from Monash University, Dr Annisa Beta from the University of Melbourne, and Dr Charlotte Setijadi from the Singapore Management University. Look out for a new Talking Indonesia podcast every fortnight. Catch up on previous episodes here, subscribe via iTunes or listen via your favourite podcasting app. Relevant links: https://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/attempts-to-revise-draconian-ite-law-stumble/ https://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/luhut-reporting-activists-for-defamation-is-another-blow-to-freedom-of-expression/ https://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/academic-freedom-another-victim-of-the-ite-law/ Image: ANTARA FOTO/ANIS EFIZUDIN

New Books Network
Robert J. Spitzer, "The Politics of Gun Control" (Routledge, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 54:45


Dr. Robert J. Spitzer's classic text, The Politics of Gun Control: 8th Edition (Routledge, 2020), has been revised based on new data on gun ownership and use. Dr. Spitzer insightfully interrogates the impact of gun politics on the 2018 elections, new research on the history of American gun laws, and controversies over the geography of guns -- where and when they can be carried and whether they can be concealed. The podcast conversation digs into new findings on elections, public opinion, single-issue voting, the parallel histories of gun rights/regulations, and the changing profiles and strategies of gun safety groups. Dr. Spitzer provides insights on the upcoming midterm elections, forecasts what is at stake in the upcoming Supreme Court case, NYS Gun & Pistol v. Bruen, and provides a reminder that federalism can never be far from any case analysis in American politics. Dr. Robert J. Spitzer is a Distinguished Service Professor of Political Science at the State University of New York at Cortland. Trained by Theodore Lowi, Dr, Spitzer has published books on the presidency, the right to life mov, and the constitution -- with several works focused on the right to bear arms, gun control, and gun rights. The Supreme Court will hear its first Second Amendment case since 2010 and Robert's article “Gun Law History in the United States and Second Amendment Rights” is cited by the Solicitor General of the US in his amicus brief. Daniella Campos assisted with this podcast. Susan Liebell is Dirk Warren '50 Professor of Political Science at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in American Studies
Robert J. Spitzer, "The Politics of Gun Control" (Routledge, 2020)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 54:45


Dr. Robert J. Spitzer's classic text, The Politics of Gun Control: 8th Edition (Routledge, 2020), has been revised based on new data on gun ownership and use. Dr. Spitzer insightfully interrogates the impact of gun politics on the 2018 elections, new research on the history of American gun laws, and controversies over the geography of guns -- where and when they can be carried and whether they can be concealed. The podcast conversation digs into new findings on elections, public opinion, single-issue voting, the parallel histories of gun rights/regulations, and the changing profiles and strategies of gun safety groups. Dr. Spitzer provides insights on the upcoming midterm elections, forecasts what is at stake in the upcoming Supreme Court case, NYS Gun & Pistol v. Bruen, and provides a reminder that federalism can never be far from any case analysis in American politics. Dr. Robert J. Spitzer is a Distinguished Service Professor of Political Science at the State University of New York at Cortland. Trained by Theodore Lowi, Dr, Spitzer has published books on the presidency, the right to life mov, and the constitution -- with several works focused on the right to bear arms, gun control, and gun rights. The Supreme Court will hear its first Second Amendment case since 2010 and Robert's article “Gun Law History in the United States and Second Amendment Rights” is cited by the Solicitor General of the US in his amicus brief. Daniella Campos assisted with this podcast. Susan Liebell is Dirk Warren '50 Professor of Political Science at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in Law
Robert J. Spitzer, "The Politics of Gun Control" (Routledge, 2020)

New Books in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 54:45


Dr. Robert J. Spitzer's classic text, The Politics of Gun Control: 8th Edition (Routledge, 2020), has been revised based on new data on gun ownership and use. Dr. Spitzer insightfully interrogates the impact of gun politics on the 2018 elections, new research on the history of American gun laws, and controversies over the geography of guns -- where and when they can be carried and whether they can be concealed. The podcast conversation digs into new findings on elections, public opinion, single-issue voting, the parallel histories of gun rights/regulations, and the changing profiles and strategies of gun safety groups. Dr. Spitzer provides insights on the upcoming midterm elections, forecasts what is at stake in the upcoming Supreme Court case, NYS Gun & Pistol v. Bruen, and provides a reminder that federalism can never be far from any case analysis in American politics. Dr. Robert J. Spitzer is a Distinguished Service Professor of Political Science at the State University of New York at Cortland. Trained by Theodore Lowi, Dr, Spitzer has published books on the presidency, the right to life mov, and the constitution -- with several works focused on the right to bear arms, gun control, and gun rights. The Supreme Court will hear its first Second Amendment case since 2010 and Robert's article “Gun Law History in the United States and Second Amendment Rights” is cited by the Solicitor General of the US in his amicus brief. Daniella Campos assisted with this podcast. Susan Liebell is Dirk Warren '50 Professor of Political Science at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

Higher Journeys Radio with Alexis Brooks
Dr. Robert Davis – Synchronicity, the Illusion of Time and the Unseen Realm

Higher Journeys Radio with Alexis Brooks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 56:52


Synchronicity experiences, sudden spiritual awakenings and even our strange interaction with time has been in constant upTICK recently. Though some say their interaction with the invisible, mystical realms has been part of their lives for years, others are now admitting it's off the charts lately. Could this strange confluence of phenomena be due to the crisis we've all been navigating since 2020? Could the challenges be opening up the floodgates to who we really are and showing us what we are becoming? Consciousness researcher and neuroscientist Dr. Robert Davis says, without a doubt, the lockdown has put an energetic squeeze play on our individual and collective consciousness, bringing us to a place of profound realization that we are definitely NOT interacting with the normal that we used to know but rather, an unseen force that's revealing itself to us more and more each and everyday. In this episode we will cover, the dynamic of synchronicity in everyday life (happening to everyday people), the link between precognition, telepathy and synchronicity events, and how all of these may be more pronounced if you've had a peak experience INCLUDING contact with non human intelligence (ET contact.) We will also look at the idea that you (YES YOU!) may be able to alter past events (Dr. Davis explains how this has been done experimentally). We're talking: #synchronicity #spiritualawakening #etcontact Dr. Robert Davis is an internationally recognized scientist in his field, and served as a professor at the State University of New York for over 30 years. Bob graduated with a B.A. and M.A. from the City University of New York and with a Ph.D. in Sensory Neuroscience from the Ohio State University. He has published over 60 articles in scholarly journals, lectured at national and international conferences, and was awarded several major grants by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health to fund research in the neurosciences. After retiring from his role as a professor and researcher, he wrote three books entitled: The UFO Phenomenon: Should I Believe?; Life after Death: An Analysis of the Evidence, and Unseen Forces: The Integration of Science, Reality and You. He has published articles and lectured on these topics at national and international conferences. Visit his website at http://bobdavisspeaks.com ✅ DON'T MISS our AFTER SHOW with Dr. Robert Davis as we go deeper into the spiritual/transformative/peak experience (he will also share his): http://www.patreon.com/higherjourneys ✅ Watch our (ET contact) EXPERIENCERS SPEAK series playlist: https://bit.ly/3BLecnn

The Cosmic We with Barbara Holmes and Donny Bryant
Growing a Global Heart with Belvie Rooks

The Cosmic We with Barbara Holmes and Donny Bryant

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 43:18


On this episode, Belvie Rooks joins Dr. Barbara Holmes and Dr. Donny Bryant in conversation for this episode of The Cosmic We. Belvie Rooks' work weaves the worlds of spirituality, feminism, cosmology and social justice with a passion for dialogue. She is the co-founder of Growing a Global Heart, a project to plant a million trees along the Trans-Atlantic Slave Route in West Africa and the Underground Railroad in the U.S. to honor the millions of lives lost during the slave trade. She has a Bachelor of Science degree in Anthropology and an MA in Inter-disciplinary Studies in Education and has taught and lectured at a number of colleges and universities including, the State University of New York at Old Westbury, University of the District of Columbia and University of California, Santa Cruz. Connect with us: To send a question to Dr. Barbara and Donny, or to share your thoughts, comments, or feedback with us about this show: Send us an email. Belvie Rooks: Growing A Global Heart The transcript for this episode will be available soon. This podcast is made possible, thanks to the generosity of our donors. If you would love to support the ongoing work of the Center for Action and Contemplation and the continued work of our podcasts, you can donate at cac.org/podcastsupport Thank you!

H.E.R. Story
The HBCU Experience: The North Carolina A&T State University 3rd Edition- Feat. Brittney Dennis

H.E.R. Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 27:00


This episode is in partnership with The HBCU Experience Movement, LLC, The HBCU Experience: The North Carolina A&T State University 3rd Edition. Take a listen as I chat with Brittney Dennis, who is one of a dozen Aggies in her family to graduate and find love at North Carolina A&T. She graduated in the Fall of 2011 with a Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education. She later obtained her Master's in School Administration in the Spring of 2020. Brittney and I not only chat about her experience on the yard, but we also highlight career growth, lessons learned, and inspiration for those with similar interests. #HERstory is meant to be shared! Let's take a listen now.

Indianz.Com
Patty Ferguson-Bohnee / Indian Legal Clinic atArizona State University

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 5:36


The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs holds an oversight hearing titled “Voting Matters in Native Communities” on October 27, 2021. The committee hears from tribal leaders and Native voting rights advocates about ongoing challenges to exercising the right to vote in Indian Country. They also learn more about the less-formally documented Native Hawaiian voter experience. Witness List The Honorable Janet Davis Chairwoman Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe Nixon, Nevada https://www.indianz.com/News/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/27/fawnsharp102721.pdf The Honorable Fawn Sharp President National Congress of American Indians Washington, DC https://www.indianz.com/News/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/27/juliekitka102721.pdf The Honorable Julie Sitka President Alaska Federation of Natives Anchorage, Alaska https://www.indianz.com/News/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/27/juliekitka102721.pdf Professor Patty Ferguson-Bohnee Director Indian Legal Clinic, Arizona State University Phoenix, Arizona https://www.indianz.com/News/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/27/pattyfergusonbohnee102721.pdf Ms. Jacqueline De Leon Staff Attorney Native American Rights Fund Boulder, Colorado https://www.indianz.com/News/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/27/jacquelinedeleon102721.pdf Mr. Nā'ālehu Anthony Community Advocate & Principal Palikū Films Honolulu, Hawiii https://www.indianz.com/News/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/27/naalehuanthony102721.pdf Senate Committee on Indian Affairs Notice: https://www.indian.senate.gov/hearing/business-meeting-consider-hr1688-oversight-hearing-voting-matters-native-communities

New Books in African American Studies
Imani Perry on a Life in African American Studies

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 64:03


On today's podcast, I am chopping it up with my dear friend and play cousin Dr. Imani Perry, the Hughes-Rogers Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University. Dr. Perry is on the program today to discuss her intellectual and political foundations, her mother, AKA, the person that trained yours truely at Simmons University, none other than, Dr. Theresa Perry, her affection for Black Studies, and much much more, enjoy the conversation, family! Adam McNeil is a Ph.D. Candidate in History at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

New Books Network
Imani Perry on a Life in African American Studies

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 64:03


On today's podcast, I am chopping it up with my dear friend and play cousin Dr. Imani Perry, the Hughes-Rogers Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University. Dr. Perry is on the program today to discuss her intellectual and political foundations, her mother, AKA, the person that trained yours truely at Simmons University, none other than, Dr. Theresa Perry, her affection for Black Studies, and much much more, enjoy the conversation, family! Adam McNeil is a Ph.D. Candidate in History at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

By Any Means Necessary
Political Prisoners and the History of Black Resistance to Capitalism and Imperialism

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 112:32


In this episode of By Any Means Necessary, hosts Sean Blackmon and Jacquie Luqman discuss the right wing elements in the Democratic Party whittling down the budget reconciliation bill, Joe Biden's hiding behind Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema in the broader selling out of the working class be the Democratic Party, and its connections to issues like Striketober and impending evictions.In the second segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Dr. Mohammed Nurhussein, retired professor of Medicine at the State University of New York - Brooklyn and the Chairman of the United African Congress to discuss the recent coup in Sudan and the protests against it, the history proceeding and context surrounding civilian power and the current political situation, and how imperialist forces like AFRICOM and Saudi Arabia play into the military coup's survival.In the third segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Patricia Gorky, technology and security analyst to discuss revelations that Facebook failed to prevent human trafficking on its platforms, Facebook's impact on the mental health of children and its fueling of addcition to its platforms, and its maximization fo profit over wellbeing.Later in the show, Sean and Jacquie discuss the freedom of Russell “Maroon” Shoatz and the contradictions of the existence of political prisoners in a country that claims to be free, how this fits into the history and current reality of Black resistance against capitalism and imperialism, the jailing of Black children in Tennessee by Judge Donna Scott Davenport on made-up charges, and a report detailing that White House and Congressional staff took part in meetings with organizers of the rally that resulted in the Capitol insurrection .

By Any Means Necessary
Sudan Resists Military Coup

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 18:07


In this segment of By Any Means Necessary, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Dr. Mohammed Nurhussein, retired professor of Medicine at the State University of New York - Brooklyn and the Chairman of the United African Congress to discuss the recent coup in Sudan and the protests against it, the history proceeding and context surrounding civilian power and the current political situation, and how imperialist forces like AFRICOM and Saudi Arabia play into the military coup's survival.

Succeed In A&P
A Student's Insight to Learning A&P

Succeed In A&P

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 13:47


Hear from Ryan DeNault, a student at The State University of New York College at Cortland, as he shares his perspective on learning A&P—both in the classroom and fully digital in the wake of the pandemic. Although he is a Fitness Development major, he enjoys teaching and helping his fellow students in human anatomy. Perhaps he will become an A&P instructor one day!  

The Thomistic Institute
Thomistic Science and the Knowledge Of Principles | Prof. Michael Gorman

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 53:56


This talk was delivered on June 24, 2021. For information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the speaker: Michael Gorman is a graduate of St. Michael's College in the University of Toronto (B.A., Christianity and Culture, 1987), The Catholic University of America (Ph.L., Philosophy, 1989), the State University of New York at Buffalo (Ph.D., Philosophy, 1993), and Boston College (Ph.D., Theology, 1997). After serving as assistant professor of Catholic Studies at Saint Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, Nova Scotia from 1997 to 1999, he joined the faculty of the School of Philosophy at The Catholic University of America, where he has taught ever since. A fellow of The Catholic University's Institute for Human Ecology, he has also been an Alexander von Humboldt fellow (Leipzig 2004), a Fulbright fellow (Cologne 2008), and a scholar in the Templeton Foundation's Working Group "Virtue, Happiness, and the Meaning of Life" (2015-2017). He works primarily on metaphysics, especially the metaphysics of essence, substance, and normativity, and on applications of metaphysics in areas such as theory of mind, Christology, action theory, and ethics. He is the author of Aquinas on the Metaphysics of the Hypostatic Union (Cambridge, 2017) and over thirty scholarly articles. He is particularly interested in how analytic philosophy and medieval philosophy can be brought together in a way that is historically accurate and philosophically fruitful.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.14.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 60:49


What are health personnel observing in outpatient and ER settings with vaccine adverse reactions   Deborah Conrad is a board certified physician assistant and hospitalist who was formerly employed at the Rochester Regional Health Center in upstate New York.  During her career when has worked in emergency medicine, urgent care, Internal medicine and pediatrics. In her position in emergency room admissions and examination she has on the ground experience with covid-related patients, including those who have had adverse reactions to the Covid vaccines. Due to her position regarding the medical interventions being undertaken during the pandemic, vaccination, and a reluctance of medical personnel to report adverse vaccine events, she was relieved of her work at the health center.  Deb holds a degree from the State University of New York at Buffalo in clinical laboratory medicine, and received her PA physician assistant degree at Lock Haven University.