Podcasts about Church Fathers

Group of ancient and influential Christian theologians and writers

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Latest podcast episodes about Church Fathers

Issues, Etc.
0194. Responding to Roman Catholic Proof Texts: The Church Fathers – Dr. Steven Parks, 1/19/23

Issues, Etc.

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 30:23


St Peters Orthodox Church
Christ's Baptism: The Heavens Open for Us

St Peters Orthodox Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 12:58


There is wonder to be embraced in the Baptism of our Lord Jesus Christ. His Baptism was certainly not for Him. His Baptism was entirely for us. Today we look at the early Church Fathers to see what Christ accomplished for us in His Baptism. And everything we see God accomplish as Christ enters those waters, He accomplishes for everyone of us who have entered therein.

The Patrick Madrid Show
The Patrick Madrid Show: January 18, 2023 - Hour 2

The Patrick Madrid Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 51:09


Special Guest Host Ken Hensley #FastforLife Ken continues his talk about the Early Church Fathers Andrew - Is there a source, a definitive reference, I can use to learn more about our early Church Fathers? Ken recommends “The Fathers Know Best: Your Essential Guide to the Teachings of the Early Church” by Jimmy Akin and “The Apostasy That Wasn't - The Extraordinary Story of the Unbreakable Early Church” by Rod Bennett Andre - Why have protestants been allowed to continue in the world today when other heretical groups were stomped out by Catholics in the past? Jim - I am a convert to the Catholic Church. What other books about the history of the faith can you recommend? Ken recommends “Early Christian Doctrines” by J.N.D. Kelly and “The Faith of the Early Fathers” by William Jurgens

For College Catholics
94 Remembering Benedict XVI

For College Catholics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 15:20


In this episode I present a brief analysis of the late Pope Benedict's legacy, looking at his wisdom, his humility, his love for the Church and the Liturgy, and his childhood example. - For further reading: Encyclical “Spe Salvi” [link];“The Spirit of the Liturgy” book [link]; “The Ratzinger Report” book [link]. “Jesus of Nazareth” [link]; “Jesus, the Apostles and the Early Church” [link]; “Church Fathers” [link]; “St. Paul” [link] - Fr. Patrick Wainwright is a priest of Miles Christi, a Catholic Religious Order. - Visit the Miles Christi Religious Order website: https://www.mileschristi.org - This Podcast's Website: https://www.forcollegecatholics.org - To learn about the Spiritual Exercises (silent weekend retreat) preached by the Priests of Miles Christi, visit: https://www.mileschristi.org/spiritual-exercises/ - Recorded at our Family Center in South Lyon, Michigan. - Planning, recording, editing and publishing by Fr. Patrick Wainwright, MC. - Gear: Shure MV7 USB dynamic microphone. - Intro music from pond5.com

Catholic Saints
St. Clement of Rome

Catholic Saints

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 18:45


Sit down with Dr. Ben Akers and Dr. Carl Vennerstrom as they discuss Pope St. Clement of Rome, who was an early Church Father and the third successor to St. Peter. He wrote an original letter to the dissentient church of Corinth that we can still read and access today! His feast day is November 23. St. Clement, pray for us! 

Restoration Seattle
The Jewish Paul Problem

Restoration Seattle

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 43:15


Judaism and Christianity have distanced from each other for 1900 years. The Rabbis and The Church Fathers have twisted and confused Paul's words to separate him from Jewish life and practice. Watch as Matt clears up some of the confusion in a message called the Jewish Paul Problem.Link here: https://subspla.sh/xzpcd8c- More on the Restoration app! -Apple Store: https://rb.gy/kgbnwqGoogle Play: https://rb.gy/wz74bm#thehappyrabbi #seattle #jewish #messianic #restorationseattle #JewishinSeattle

Respect Life Radio
James Papandrea: Reading the Bible through the Church Fathers

Respect Life Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 27:00


"We live in a world that is so focused on the self and individualism and each person making him- or herself their highest authority, that when you apply that sort of worldview and that sort of way of thinking to reading Scripture, then it very quickly becomes...all about me. And that's entirely the wrong way to read Scripture...Especially as our culture has been influenced by the Protestant Reformation and Protestant Christianity, I think that we have lost our way in terms of how we are supposed to read Scripture," said James L. Papandrea, Ph.D., a professor of Church History and Historical Theology at Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary in Evanston, Ill. Papandrea is the author of books, including "Reading Scripture Like the Early Church: Seven Insights from the Church Fathers to Help You Understand the Bible" (Sophia Institute Press).  Learn more at his website and hear a previous Respect Life Radio interview with him: "Pondering the truths of the early Church? It's Catholic."

Interior Integration for Catholics
103 Your Anger, Your Body and You

Interior Integration for Catholics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 90:44


Summary  In this episode, Dr. Peter reviews the limitations of current Catholic resources on anger, and then reviews secular resources, including interpersonal neurobiology and the structural theory of dissociation.  We examine the role of the body in anger responses, and discuss more wholistic ways of working constructive with parts that experience anger, rather than trying to dismiss anger, suppress it or distract from it.   Lead-in William Blake, A Poison Tree: I was angry with my friends; I told my wrath, my wrath did end. I was angry with my foe: I told it not, my wrath did grow.  We've all experienced anger and we've all experienced angry people  We know it's a problem.  And global data suggest that it's getting worse.   Gallup world poll from 2021: 140 countries  Did you experience the following feelings during a lot of the day yesterday? How about anger?  17% of US respondents agreed 26% of women worldwide up from 20% from 10 years ago  20% of men -- flat from 10 years ago.   Harm can come from anger Mark Twain “Anger is an acid that can do more harm to the vessel in which it is stored than to anything on which it is poured.”  CCC 2302  By recalling the commandment, "You shall not kill," our Lord asked for peace of heart and denounced murderous anger and hatred as immoral. Anger is a desire for revenge. "To desire vengeance in order to do evil to someone who should be punished is illicit," but it is praiseworthy to impose restitution "to correct vices and maintain justice." If anger reaches the point of a deliberate desire to kill or seriously wound a neighbor, it is gravely against charity; it is a mortal sin. The Lord says, "Everyone who is angry with his brother shall be liable to judgment."   "Everyone who is angry with his brother shall be liable to judgment."  And who hasn't been angry -- including Jesus himself?.  We have got to unpack this There is so much misunderstanding about anger in the Catholic world, so much of the way that Catholics have approached anger has been limited, misinformed, and misguided When I think about why the Catholic Church in the US, in Canada, in Europe and Australia, in the entire Western World, there are many factors.   Brandon Vogt  New Stats on Why Young People Leave the Church  based on his book Return:  How to Draw Your Child Back to the Church One critical factor is that cradle Catholics, especially young Catholics do not believe that the Church can help them with their problems.  Diocese of Springfield Exit Surveys (2014)  68% – Spiritual needs not met67% – Lost interest over time Only 7% of Millennials raised Catholic still actively practice their faith today (weekly Mass, pray a few times each week, say their faith is “extremely” or “very” important) 6.5 people leave the Catholic Church for every one that joins 66% of “nones” agree that “religion causes more problems than it solves” That's why so many fall away from the Faith.  The Church doesn't seem relevant to them because she doesn't seem like she has the answers to the real issues they face. 10% of American adults are former Catholics Nearly half of those who fall away from the Church become "nones"  And another quarter become Evangelical Christians.   79% of former Catholics leave the Church before age 23.   50% of Millennials raised Catholic no longer identify as Catholic today  And it's about topics like anger -- we are not doing a good job meeting the needs that Catholics have today, human formation needs.   Intro I am Dr. Peter Malinoski, a.k.a. Dr. Peter, clinical psychologist, trauma therapist, podcaster, blogger, cofounder and president of Souls and Hearts -- but most of all I am a beloved little son of God, a passionate Catholic who wants to help you to taste and see the height and depth and breadth and warmth and the light of the love of God, especially God the Father and  Mary our Mother, our spiritual parents, our primary parents.  To really absorb your identity as a little child of God and Mary.   I want you to enter much more deeply into an intimate, personal, loving relationship with the three Persons of the Trinity and with our Lady. That is what this Interior Integration for Catholics podcast is all about, that is what Souls and Hearts is all about – all about shoring up the natural foundation for the spiritual life of intimacy with God, all about overcoming the natural human formation deficits and obstacles to contemplative union with God our Father and our Lady, our Mother  We are on an adventure of love together. And one thing, one major, big, huge thing that gets in the way of being loved by God and Mary and loving in return is anger.  Anger.   This is Episode 103 of Interior Integration for Catholics.  Interior Integration for Catholics is part of Souls and Hearts, our online outreach, check us out at soulsandhearts.com.   Anger: one of the seven deadly sins, one the lethal vices that can kill your soul.  Anger.   So much confusion about anger.  The Burden of Anger:  June 10, 2021 Catholic-daily-reflections.com The first level of sin is simply to be “angry” interiorly. The sin of anger is an interior attitude of disgust toward another. Jesus says that the consequence of having anger toward another is that you will be “liable to judgment.” Humility.  I could be wrong.    The offerings from Five Catholic writers on anger are a case in point.   The most popular book Fr. T.G. Morrow, Overcoming Sinful Anger  303 Amazon Review, mostly positive, #16  on the list of bestsellers in Catholic Theology, put out by Sophia Press in 2015 And it's not very good.  I can't recommend it.   First off, Fr. Morrow admits that he doesn't understand why people get angry We've all encountered people who explode when they feel angry. It baffles me how often the sort of anger rears its ugly head in marriages – even in allegedly Christian marriages. (p. 9).   I am often surprised to discover Christians who pray ardently, receive the sacraments regularly, we've and attend Mass daily, and yet have an anger problem. (p. 10) Presumes a homogeneous, single personality.   Easy to explain with part.   Why do people explode in anger? There are many reasons, but I think the top three are power and control, a refusal to take responsibility, and habit. (p. 13). Very simplistic view of psychology, and no consideration of neurology, traumatology,  Confusion about the causal chain in anger.  Where anger fits in a sequence of events  Little genuine interest in anger.  Anger is something to essentially get rid of.   Not much consideration of the unconscious and unconscious anger.  Acknowledges that suppressing anger is problematic, but there still is an assumption that if I'm not feeling anger, it's not there.  Disconnect.   "Irrational anger"   Very focused on the will and will training -- naïve assumptions about sympathetic arousal. Nike Spirituality -- Just do it.   Romans 7:15:  I do not understand my own actions. For I do not do what I want, but I do the very thing I hate.   Spiritual Bypassing  Definitions John Welwood: American clinical psychologist, psychotherapist, teacher, and author, known for integrating psychological and spiritual concepts  Using “spiritual ideas, words and practices to sidestep or avoid personal, emotional ‘unfinished business,' to shore up a shaky sense of self, or to belittle basic needs, feelings, psychological wounds and developmental tasks.”  Blogger Rose Hahn:  Spiritual Bypassing: What It Is & How To Avoid It  Bypassing occurs when spiritual ideals get elevated to the realm of absolute truth in such a way that our real, lived experience is somehow denied. Rather than doing the work of healing deep wounds, we may use these ideals to deny, devalue, or avoid meeting our more human needs – such as emotional bonding, love, and esteem. In other words, rather than risk opening ourselves to real human connection, and possibly get hurt, we adopt a more enlightened, spiritual way of relating to the world that doesn't rely on human relationship.  Not a lot from a specifically Catholic perspective, but this is from Katharina, who styles herself "The Bohemian Catholic" We are supposed to uplift each other, and treat each other with love and respect - like icons of Christ, as God's creation… BUT if you find yourself trying to tell someone that their faith should keep them "happy" all the time, then you aren't helping them.  Using spiritual words, spiritual means, spiritual concepts -- all to whitewash or put a Band-Aid on significant psychological or emotional problems in the natural realm  Bypassing the natural realm and going to the spiritual realm.   Essentially saying -- You should not feel this way.  Which is what Fr. Morrow is saying.  He promises to "I will offer some ideas, which I consider quite novel, on how to avoid angry explosions." (p.4) Tips So, as a first step in overcoming passive-aggressive anger keep reminding yourself that you want to be a Christian, and therefore you can't take revenge anymore. (p. 9).  First, take the time to calm down and figure out why you're angry…. One of the tactics often recommended is to count to ten before deciding what to do. (p. 20).  Better still, say a short prayer before acting. The next step is to ask yourself if your angry feeling is been caused by something significant. Most angry fights in marriage are caused by trifling things. (p. 20).  Or perhaps use humor to make your point.(p. 20).  Offering your angry feeling as a sacrifice is not suppressing it but doing something with it. It is making a bad situation into a beneficial one. That is what it means to embrace the cross. (p. 23-24).  If we can forgive others, we can pull the rug out from beneath our anger most of the time. Unforgiveness is the main culprit behind anger. (p. 25).  … Refocus your thoughts away from the things that made you angry to some very positive thoughts. For example, thank God for the beautiful weather for the ability to read or buy things you need. (p. 30).  I often encourage people with an anger problem to daily for humility. It works. (p. 36).  Chapter 7: Thanking God, praising God  Consider your future. One key way to change her behaviors to work on in your mind just what your life will be like if you don't change your angry behavior. (pp. 72-73)  If you struggle with an anger problem write on an index card all the negatives of continuing your anger and read that list several times a day. (p. 74).   Fr. Joseph Esper, Saintly Solutions to Life's Common Problems  99 reviews on amazon.  #138 in Roman Catholicism.  2001 Book -- First Chapter is on anger.   St. Thomas of Villanova: "Dismiss all anger and look into yourself a little." (p. 7) "St. Francis de Sales advises that, to avoid the sin of anger, you must quickly ask God to give peace to your heart when you're angered and then turn your thoughts to something else. Don't discuss the matter at hand or make decisions or correct other person while you're angry. When a person angers you, St. Francis advises, consider the person's good qualities rather than the words or actions you find objectionable." (p. 7) When we have to speak to someone with whom we are angry, we should first pray for the Lord's guidance and help. It's often more effective to speak in terms of asking favors, rather than making demands or giving orders…" (p. 5-6) ...rehearse possible responses and evaluate which ones which might help you. (p. 7) Tommy Tighe St. Dymphna's Playbook: A Catholic Guide to Finding Mental and Emotional Well-Being 2021 book,  #57 in Christian Pastoral Counseling, 66 reviews, mostly positive.   Doesn't discuss anger.  Discusses irritability as a symptom of depression and resentment as a problem in relationships "However, the more I have experienced depression in my own life and in my work as a clinician, the more I have seen the symptoms of irritability and anger is predominant features of depression." (p. 13).  That's one way, not the only way.   So often depression results from  Recommendations "…go for a walk, take some time to meditate, watch or read something that lightens our mood. (p. 13)  "Keeping a diary of our emotions and reactions to those emotions is a great place to start… Look back on a situation, slow it down, and examine what exactly happened….We might ask ourselves: What is it that has led to my irritability? Is it because I'm depressed and trying to stuff that feeling down rather than address it? What am I thinking in that situation? (p. 15).  "We draw this all out on paper, examine what was really behind our emotional response, and then explore ways of thinking that will restructure our reactions and response. And we write these down! Simply thinking about these things isn't going to help. The whole point is to get them out of our head and onto paper so that we can work them out. Consider it an emotional "show your work" kind of exercise." (p. 15).  Then, after a really brief introspective process, we can catch that the real reason for our irritability is our depressed mood, and we can interject coping skills for depression to stave off our irritability. (p. 16).  Changing the focus of our thinking is key when we try to battle against depression and irritability that inevitably rears its ugly head. You've probably heard people suggest keeping a gratitude list to help you feel more positive, much along the same lines as St. Paul's advice. It works. (p. 18).   Steps in the process Visualize yourself from the perspective of compassionate observer.  Notice from the outside whole feelings xare upsetting you and how they are reflected in your appearance.  Try to let the warm feeling of compassion and desire to help arise within you.  Say to yourself: "It is understandable that you feel that way. You are experiencing a natural response to depressing thoughts. But I'm going to help you."  Visualize putting your hand on your shoulder or hugging yourself to soothe and comfort yourself. Give yourself a friendly smile.  Think about if there are other things you want to tell yourself that would energize and encourage you to cheer up.  Taking time to say those things. When you feel it is appropriate, begin saying goodbye to yourself and remind yourself that you come back anytime you want. (p. 16-17). For resentment: Active listening  Tommy Tighe: to fend off resentment, we have to communicate with things are important to us and why. We can't expect our partner to read her mind. We have to tell them the things we value, what things we have grown to expect in relationships because of our past experiences and we have to tell them why. (p 113)   Rhonda Chevrin Taming the Lion Within: 5 Steps from Anger to Peace 2017  16 ratings  is a Catholic author, international speaker and Professor of Philosophy. She is the author of over 60 books concerning the matters of Catholic thought, practice and spirituality,  Take a secure thought -- use your imagination to think of ways out of annoying or enraging situations   Avoid exceptionality.  Accept the averageMove your musclesHumor is your best friendF.I.S.T.  Feelings, Impulses, Sensations, Thoughts:  What it signifies is that we can control our immediate impulses and sensations when hurt or frustrated, but if we control our thoughts we can control her impulses.Put your mental health firstPeace over power:  Many times you can't win, and it doesn't matter if you lose.  It's not worth the effort to put up a fight.  They are not doing it to you; they're just doing it! – Much is not done on purposeNot a 911  Not everything is an emergency,.Be Group minded Anger at GodForgiveness  Fr. Spitzer Angry with God? Here's Fr. Spitzer's Advice on How to Overcome Anger God understands your anger.  Don't dwell on it.  Don't go there.   Choose instead to: Three step process in the YouTube clip Angry with God:   Stop comparing to the way you once were.   Stop comparing yourself to others.   Stop having expectations for your suffering.   Offer it up.  Stop the questioning.   Saints' behaviors  Meg Hunter-Kilmer - published on 09/28/17Aleteia September 28, 2017, What We Probably Don't Know about St. Jerome Is Just What We Need to Know St. Jerome was known to carry around a stone that he would hit himself with every time he lost his temper.     If these are helpful to you, great.  I don't want to put up roadblocks.  Might be helpful to many people.   As a Catholic psychologist, I am not comfortable recommending any of these Catholic sources Very simplistic view of psychology, and no consideration of neurology, traumatology,  Confusion about the causal chain in anger.  Where anger fits in a sequence of events  Little genuine interest in anger.  Anger is something to essentially get rid of.   Very focused on the will and will training -- naïve assumptions about sympathetic arousal.  And they don't get that anger has a protective function -- to protect us against shame.  Not one of those sources connects anger to shame.  And that's the primary connection we need to understand if we want to resolve anger, not just try to shoo it away.   What are we talking about when we discuss anger -- let's get into definitions of Anger Focused on vengeance secondary to a desire -- more than an emotion.   Written discussions of anger in the western canon go back as far as fourth-century BC in Greece when the philosopher Aristotle (384-322 B.C.) argued that anger is a rational and natural reaction to being offended and thus is closely associated with reason. In the Rhetoric (1991, p. 1380) he defined anger as “a belief that we, or our friends, have been unfairly slighted, which causes in us both painful feelings and a desire or impulse for revenge.” 1907 Catholic Encyclopedia:  Anger:  The desire of vengeance. Its ethical rating depends upon the quality of the vengeance and the quantity of the passion. When these are in conformity with the prescriptions of balanced reason, anger is not a sin. It is rather a praiseworthy thing and justifiable with a proper zeal. It becomes sinful when it is sought to wreak vengeance upon one who has not deserved it, or to a greater extent than it has been deserved, or in conflict with the dispositions of law, or from an improper motive. The sin is then in a general sense mortal as being opposed to justice and charity. It may, however, be venial because the punishment aimed at is but a trifling one or because of lack of full deliberation.  Likewise, anger is sinful when there is an undue vehemence in the passion itself, whether inwardly or outwardly. Ordinarily it is then accounted a venial sin unless the excess be so great as to go counter seriously to the love of God or of one's neighbor.   CCC 2302  By recalling the commandment, "You shall not kill," our Lord asked for peace of heart and denounced murderous anger and hatred as immoral. Anger is a desire for revenge. "To desire vengeance in order to do evil to someone who should be punished is illicit," but it is praiseworthy to impose restitution "to correct vices and maintain justice." If anger reaches the point of a deliberate desire to kill or seriously wound a neighbor, it is gravely against charity; it is a mortal sin. The Lord says, "Everyone who is angry with his brother shall be liable to judgment."  Contradiction that aggression (or vengeance) and anger have to go together  Lot of research to tease about anger and aggression: Ephesians 4:26:  Be angry but do not sin; do not let the sun go down on your anger   APA Dictionary of Psychology: an emotion characterized by tension and hostility arising from frustration, real or imagined injury by another, or perceived injustice. It can manifest itself in behaviors designed to remove the object of the anger (e.g., determined action) or behaviors designed merely to express the emotion (e.g., swearing). Anger is distinct from, but a significant activator of, aggression, which is behavior intended to harm someone or something. Despite their mutually influential relationship, anger is neither necessary nor sufficient for aggression to occur.  Psychologist Paul Ekman. (1999). Basic emotions. In T. Dalgleish & M. J. Power (Eds.), Handbook of cognition and emotion (pp. 45–60). John Wiley & Sons Ltd  Due to its distinct and widely recognizable pattern of face expression, anger has always been included in the repertoire of basic emotions.   Benefits of Anger  Farzaneh Pahlavan Multiple Facets of Anger: Getting Mad or Restoring Justice?  Chapter 3:  The Neurobiology of RAGE and Anger & Psychiatric Implications with a Focus on Depression Daniel J. Guerra1, Valentina Colonnello and Jaak Panksepp As a basic emotion, anger emerges early in life and has a unique adaptive function in motivating, organizing, and regulating behavior. No other emotion can match the consistency and vigor of anger in mobilizing high-level energy and sustaining goal-directed activity. Anger serves a variety of regulatory functions in physiological and psychological processes related to self-defense as well as to interpersonal and societal behaviors. Through socialization processes, it plays an important role in the development of personality and individual differences in responding to environmental challenges, which can be more or less adaptive.  (p. v).   Aristotle:  Aristotle: Nichomachean Ethics: It is easy to fly into a passion – anybody can do that – but to be angry with the right person into the right extent and at the right time and with the right object in the right way – that is not easy, and it is not everyone who can do it  In themselves passions are neither good nor evil. They are morally qualified only to the extent that they effectively engage reason and will….It belongs to the perfection of the moral or human good that the passions be governed by reason. CCC 1767  CCMMP: Catholic-Christian Meta-Model of the Person  DMU Paul Vitz, William Nordling, Paul Craig Titus.    p. (294)  to remain in the virtuous middle ground requires being disposed to a righteous anger that will stand up to injustice, and use a good measure of anger in ways that are corrective of the evil, preventive of further injustice, and indicative of a balance to mean between extremes. Emotions are good when, as reactions antecedent to reasoning, they make us conscious of reality and prepare us for a more complete reaction and moral action. Emotion and choice then serve moral flourishing (e.g., when we have an appropriate spontaneous reaction of anger at injustice). Second, emotions are good as felt reactions that also follow the intellectual evaluation of the situation. Emotions can be expressive of rational decisions. Emotions can thus participate in our life of reason and will (Gondreau, 2013). For example, when we choose to rectify and injustice, a balanced expression of anger can help us to act decisively will being restrained enough that we do not overreact. Through a righteous or just expression of anger, we entered rectify injustice, will finding a just and rational mean between excessively weak or exceedingly strong emotional displays. (p. 650). Emotions are viewed as informing people about their cares and concerns. To prepare the body for action, directing our thoughts to ways that will appropriately address the issues at hand. They can signal and manipulate other people in ways that suit the person's emotional needs (Parrott, 2001). Being disconnected from emotional experience, therefore, means being cut off from adaptive information (Pos et al., 2003). (pp. 650-651). Digression into justification of secular sources Question may arise, "OK, Dr. Peter, as you already noted, anger has been recognized for a long time, going all the way back to Aristotle and way before that in Sacred Scripture.  You emphasize that you are a Catholic psychologist, so why are you even looking at these secular sources like the American Psychological Association? There is a lot about anger in Scripture, in the Church Fathers and the saints about anger in the spiritual life.   Discalced Carmelite Abbott Marc Foley in his excellent book The Context of Holiness: Psychological and Spiritual Reflections on the Life of St. Therese of Lisieux "One…misconception is that the spiritual life is an encapsulated sphere, cloistered from the realities of daily living….we have only one life composed of various dimensions.  Our emotional life, intellectual life, social life, work life, sex life, spiritual life are simple ways of speaking of the different facets of our one life.  (p. 1).  We have one life.  One life.  We don't have a spiritual life that is separate from our emotional life.  We have one life.  If we are angry, that affects our whole life.   The Church herself encourages us to look to all branches of knowledge and glean what is best from them in order to live our one life better.  From the CCC, paragraph 159  "Though faith is above reason, there can never be any real discrepancy between faith and reason. Since the same God who reveals mysteries and infuses faith has bestowed the light of reason on the human mind, God cannot deny himself, nor can truth ever contradict truth." "Consequently, methodical research in all branches of knowledge, provided it is carried out in a truly scientific manner and does not override moral laws, can never conflict with the faith, because the things of the world and the things of faith derive from the same God. The humble and persevering investigator of the secrets of nature is being led, as it were, by the hand of God in spite of himself, for it is God, the conserver of all things, who made them what they are." And from the Vatican II document, the Pastoral Constitution of the Church in the Modern World, paragraph 62 reads:  In pastoral care, sufficient use must be made not only of theological principles, but also of the findings of the secular sciences, especially of psychology and sociology, so that the faithful may be brought to a more adequate and mature life of faith. Remember that we are embodied beings -- we are composites of a soul and a body. The 17th Century Philosopher Rene Descartes' popularized what is called mind-body dualism.  Mind-body dualism is the idea that the body and the mind operate in separate spheres, and neither can be assimilated into the other.  And that is false.  Demonstrably false in a lot of ways, be we so often assume it to be true.  We have one life.   In the last several years we are realizing just how much of our mental life and our psychological well-being is linked in various ways to our neurobiology -- the ways that our nervous systems function.  And the relationship between our embodied brain and our minds is reciprocal -- each affects the other in complex ways that we are just beginning to understand.  In other words, brain chemistry affects our emotional states.  And our emotional states and our behaviors affect brain chemistry.  It's not just our minds and it's not just our bodies and it's not just our souls -- it's all of those, all of what makes me who I am, body, mind, soul, spirit, all of it.   And since Scripture, the Early Church Fathers, the Catechism and so on are silent on neurobiology, neurochemistry, neurophysiology and so many other areas that impact our minds and our well-being, as a Catholic psychologist I am going to look elsewhere, I'm going to look into secular sources.  I just don't think it's reasonable to expect the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops or the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith in the Vatican to be experts in these areas -- it's not their calling, it's not their expertise.  St. John of the Cross in his  Prologue of Ascent of Mt. Carmel: "I will not rely on experience or science…[but] I will not neglect whatever possible use I can make of them.  Fr. Marc Foley, OCD : The Context of Holiness:  As St. Thomas wrote of St. Augustine's use of Platonic philosophy in the Summa: "whenever Augustine, who was imbued with the doctrines of the Platonists, found in their teaching anything consistent with the faith, he adopted it and those things which he found contrary to the faith he amended." (ST I, q. 84,a. 5) p.4 And St. Thomas himself drew on so much of Aristotle's thought in his writings, bringing it into his body of work.   Abbot Marc Foley.  In short, we should never swallow the school of thought whole; we should sift the wheat from the chaff, separate truth from falsehood. p.4 We want the best from all sources.   Emphasis on biological processes:   From Heidi Crockett Anger Management with Interpersonal Neurobiology  Discussed Interpersonal Neurobiology at length in  Episode 92 of this podcast Understanding and Healing your Mind through IPNB In interpersonal neurobiology, anger as an emotion is viewed from the perspective of cognitive neuroscience. And cognitive neuroscience states that cognition and emotion are dynamically combined with physical arousal. When anger is induced as an emotion in humans, it can unconsciously affect physiological and neural resources. Affective states of anger are subsequently expressed in the brain as well as the body, and these neural and physiological changes can influence the cognitive processes. Many studies and resources have been expended on studying the emotions of happiness, sadness, and fear, which align with psychopathological states of hypomania, depression, and anxiety. Kathy Steele, Suzette Boon, Onno van der Hart:  Treating Trauma-Related Dissociation: A Practical, Integrative Approach:  Anger is an affect to derived from activation of the sympathetic nervous system, geared to energize the body for maximum effort to fend off perceived danger. Psychologically, it protects from awareness of vulnerability and lack of control, and therefore from shame. And fight mode, we are all primed to perceive cues of danger rather than cues of safety and relational connection. In such a heightened state of arousal, it is easy to misunderstand the intentions of others. (p.332). Polyvagal theory and anger  A critical period for experience-dependent development of the feelings of safety during early infancy: A polyvagal perspective on anger and psychometric tools to assess perceived safety  Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience July 2022 article   Andrea Poli, Angelo Gemignani, Carlo Chiorri and Mario Miccoli Brief primer here on some neurology.  Don't worry.  I will keep it simple.   Neurons are specialized cells that receive and send signals to other cells through fragile and thin cellular extensions called axons. Myelination:   a membrane or a sheath around the axons on neurons.   Myelinated axons often have a larger diameter Myelinated axons are insulated Myelination allows for much faster transmission of electric impulses Presence of safety during the critical period (first year of life).   Decreased unmyelinated/myelinated cardioinhibitory fibers ratio in adulthood Ventral Vagal complex is able to have a greater impact on reducing the Sympathetic Nervous System arousal -- decreasing anger  VVC is able to have a greater impact on reducing Dorsal Vagal Complex fear and shutdown responses -- the freeze response.   Greater capacity for self-regulation.   Absence of safety during the critical period  Increased unmyelinated/myelinated cardioinhibitory fibers ratio in adulthood Ventral Vagal complex has a lesser impact on reducing the Sympathetic Nervous System arousal -- less able to decrease sympathetic arousal, including anger  VVC has a lesser impact on reducing Dorsal Vagal Complex fear and shutdown responses -- less able to reduce the freeze response.   Less capacity for self-regulation.   Dampened VVC activity reduces the capacity of adaptive inhibition of SNS and DVC (Dorsal Vagal Complex), and emotional self-regulation. Hence, environmental detection of unsafety cues may preferentially trigger SNS-mediated anger in order to avoid DVC-mediated immobilization with fear. Young children exposed to five or more significant adverse experiences in the first three years of childhood face a 76% likelihood of having one or more delays in their language, emotional or brain development. (6) As the number of traumatic events experienced during childhood increases, the risk for the following health problems in adulthood increases: depression; alcoholism; drug abuse; suicide attempts; heart and liver diseases; pregnancy problems; high stress; uncontrollable anger; and family, financial, and job problems. (6) 7 ways childhood adversity changes a child's brain Donna Jackson Nakazawa Acestoohigh.com website September 8, 2016 Epigenetic Shifts  gene methylation, in which small chemical markers, or methyl groups, adhere to the genes involved in regulating our stress response, and prevent these genes from doing their jobs.  Size and Shape of the Brain stress releases a hormone that actually shrinks the size of the hippocampus, an area of our brain responsible for processing emotion and memory and managing stress.  Chronic neuroinflammation can lead to changes that reset the tone of the brain for life   Brain connectivity:  Dr. Ryan Herringa, neuropsychiatrist and assistant professor of child and adolescent psychiatry at the University of Wisconsin, found that children and teens who'd experienced chronic childhood adversity showed weaker neural connections between the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus. Girls also displayed weaker connections between the prefrontal cortex and the amygdala. The prefrontal-cortex-amygdala relationship plays an essential role in determining how emotionally reactive we're likely to be to the things that happen to us in our day-to-day life, and how likely we are to perceive these events as stressful or dangerous. Including anger.   Wiring of the brain and nervous system matter -- they matter a lot Brain activation in anger  Distinct Brain Areas involved in Anger versus Punishment during Social Interactions  Olga M. Klimecki, David Sander & Patrik Vuilleumier Scientific Reports 2018. 25 men fMRI study anger induced in an in inequality game designed to be unfair.   In the present study, we found that the intensity of experienced anger when seeing the face of the unfair other was parametrically related to activations in amygdala, STS (superior temporal sulcus), and fusiform gyrus (related to facial recognition). The STS has been shown to produce strong responses when subjects perceive stimuli in research areas that facial recognition   Farzaneh Pahlavan Multiple Facets of Anger: Getting Mad or Restoring Justice?  Chapter 3:  The Neurobiology of RAGE and Anger & Psychiatric Implications with a Focus on Depression Daniel J. Guerra1, Valentina Colonnello and Jaak Panksepp Rage emerges when specific environmental stimuli arouse the neural circuitry of the RAGE system. Even if the anger-thoughts and the related expression are modulated and regulated by higher cortico-cognitive areas, the human basic circuitry of anger is still subcortical. Since the early description of rage in decorticated cats (Dusser De Barenne, 1920) and dogs (Rothmann, 1923) and their responses to inoffensive stimuli, it was clear that the rage expression is i) dependent on subcortical areas, i.e. the ancient regions play a crucial role more than the higher neocortical regions; ii) independent of an intact cortex. p. 11  Among the higher limbic regions of this network, the medial nucleus, the basal complex, and central and lateral nuclei of the amygdala play a key role in the modulation of RAGE.  p. 1   All this happens far away from the frontal cortex in the limbic system of your brain.   Kathy Steele, Suzette Boon, Onno van der Hart:  Treating Trauma-Related Dissociation: A Practical, Integrative Approach   Why of Chronic anger.   Anger is the primary emotion of the "fight" defense.  When (parts of) the patient become stuck in this defense, anger becomes chronic.  Thus, the first intervention is safety.  332 As long as a fight reaction remains unresolved, anger will remain chronic. (p.332).  Almost no one seems to understands that anger is a defense against fear and shame.  It's a way of trying to protect oneself.   There are several reasons that anger and hostility become chronic in dissociative patients. First, patients typically have been severely invalidated, ignored, heard, betrayed, and sometimes even tortured over extended periods of time, while helpless to stop it. In itself, this is enough to generate enormous rage in anyone as part of the naturally occurring fight defense. Second, as children, patients often had little to no help in learning how to regulate and appropriately express normal anger, much less how to cope with it. Often it was unacceptable for many patients to express any kind of anger as children, while the adults around them were uncontained and highly destructive with their anger. Others had no limit set on their angry behaviors. (p. 330). Angry dissociative parts are feared and avoided internally by most other parts, particularly those that function in daily life. After all, angry behaviors toward self and others may interfere with functioning in a variety of personal and social ways. An ongoing vicious cycle of rage and shame ensues internally: the more patients avoid their angry and destructive dissociative parts, the angry these parts become, and the more they shame other parts and are shamed by them. (p. 331). … Angry parts have a deep shame and are highly defended against the strong belief that they are very bad. Their defense is reinforced by the shame of patients that such parts of themselves even exist. These parts of the patient are terrified of attachment to the therapist and you the relationship is dangerous, mainly because they are afraid that the therapist will never accept them. (p. 331-332). Whether the anger is part of a fight response or not, it is often a secondary emotion that protects the patient from feelings of sadness, extreme powerlessness, shame, guilt, and loss. (p. 333).  (add grief) Parts of the patient that developed  controlling-punitive strategies will be angry with others to get what they need,  while those that have controlling-caregiving strategies will punish themselves for being angry or having needs. (p. 333).  This is often the case in hostile parts such as those of self-injure or encourage other parts to self-harm, prostitute themselves, abuse drugs or alcohol, or engage in other self-destructive behaviors. They are often stuck in destructive and harmful behaviors that are an "attack self" defense against shame. (p.333). Finally, the rage of the perpetrator is often an embodied experience from which patients cannot yet escape without sufficient realization and further integration. Some dissociative parts imitate perpetrators internally, repeating the family dynamics from the past with other parts in a rather literal way. (p.333). "Getting the anger out" is not really useful, as the problem is that the patient needs to learn how to effectively express anger verbally rather than physically, and in socially appropriate and contained ways, so the patient can be heard by others. It is less the fact that patients express anger, but how they do so and whether that expression allows him to remain grounded in the present, to retain important relationships, and to avoid being self-destructive. (p. 334). Expression of anger is not necessarily therapeutic in itself. It is how (parts of) the patient experience and express it that is important; whether it is within a window of tolerancex in a socially appropriate and safe. Therapist must learn when expression of anger is therapeutic and when containment of anger is more helpful. (p. 334). Working with anger an angry parts (p.335). Take the time to educate the patient as a whole about the functions of anger and angry parts. Although they may seem like "troublemakers," they can be understood as attempting to solve problems with ineffective or insufficient tools.  Encourage all parts of the patient understand, accept, and listen to angry parts, instead of avoiding them.  Make efforts to understand what provokes angry parts. There are many potential triggers.   Not direct quotes Do all parts feel the same way as the angry part?  If not, can those parts listen to and accept angry parts perspective?  Would the angry part be willing to listen to the other internal perspectives?  Invite other parts to watch and listen if possible.  Can set limits with the angry part  the angry part and all parts need to learn that healthy relationships do not include punishment, humiliation, or force  Use titration, helping the person experienced as a small amount of anger will remain grounded in the present   Parts and imitate a perpetrator often literally experience themselves in our experienced by other parts as the actual perpetrator. Thus they understandably induce fear and shame within a patient as a whole, and sometimes fearing the therapist. (p. 345). The functions of perpetrator-imitating parts are (1) protect the patient against threats of the perpetrator, which continue to be experienced as real in the present; (2) defend the patient against unbearable realizations of being helpless and powerless as a child, (3) re-enact traumatic memories from the perspective of the perpetrator, as mentalize by the child; (4) serve as a defense against shame through attacking the patient and avoiding inner experiences of shame; (5) provide an outlet for the patient's disowned sadistic and punitive tendencies; and (6) hold unbearable traumatic memories. (p. 346). Suzette Boon, Kathy Steele, Onno van der Hart 2011 book  Coping with Trauma-Related Dissociation: Skills Training for Patients and Therapists Destructive expressions of anger include persistent revenge fantasies or actions, hurting self or others, "taking it out" on innocent people (or animals), or destruction of property. (p. 265).  Dissociative parts of a person that are stuck in anger may experience this feeling as vehement and overwhelming, often without words. They may have irresistible urges to act aggressively and have great difficulty thinking and reflecting on their feelings before acting. Angry parts have not learned how to experience or express anger and helpful ways. There are two types of anger dissociative parts. The first are parts that are stuck in a defensive fight mode, ready to protect you. Their anger at original injustices may be legitimate and naturally accompanies a tendency to strike out and fight, which is an essential survival strategy. However, such parts have become stuck in anger, unable to experience much else. They rigidly perceived threat and ill-will everywhere and they react with anger and aggression as their only option of response. Although these parts of you may not yet realize it, anger is often a protection against vulnerable feelings of shame, fear, hurt, despair, powerlessness, and loss. The second type of angry part may seem very much like the original perpetrator. They imitate those who hurt them in the past, and they can be experienced internally as the actual perpetrator. This experience can be particularly frightening, disorienting, and shameful. But be assured this is a very common way of dealing with being traumatized. In fact, although these parts may have some similarities to those who hurt you, they also significant differences: they are parts of you as a whole person, who is trying to cope with unresolved traumatic experiences. (p. 267)   Tips for coping with anger (p, 269 to 271) recognize how to make distinctions among the many gradations of anger, from mild irritation to rage, so that you can intervene more rapidly.  Understand your tells around anger, which may include a tight or tense feeling in your body, clenched jaw's or fists, feeling flushed or shaky, breathing heavily, heart racing, a feeling of heat, a surge of energy.  Empathize with her angry parts, recognizing they have very limited coping skills, and very limited vision. They've been shunned by other parts, left alone with their hurt, fear, shame, in isolation. This does not mean you have to accept their impulses toward inappropriate behavior  Once you start feeling some compassion toward these parts you can begin to communicate with them, listening with an intention, with curiosity to understand what lies underneath the anger  Angry parts have a strength, that they could transferred to use and more positive ways  Become more curious about why anger is happening.  Try creative and healthy nonverbal ways of expressing your anger, such as writing, drawing, painting, making a collage  Physical exercise may help as an outlet for the physical energy generated by the physiology of anger  Work on understanding your anger, by reflecting on it, rather than just experiencing it, being immersed in it. You might imagine observing yourself from a distance, and getting curious about why you feel the way you do.  Give yourself a time-out, that is, walk away from the situation if you're getting too angry. Counseling to 10, or even 200 before you say or do something you might regret later.  Calm breathing may help  Listen to each part of you, about what might help that part with anger. You can have in her conversations with parts of yourself about anger and how to express it. Small and safe ways to express anger can be negotiated that are agreeable to all parts of you  Watch safe people in your life and seal they handle their own anger. Do they accept being angry? Are they are respectful and appropriate with her anger? Are there particular strategies that they use that you could practice for yourself?  Healthy anger can get positive strength and energy. It can help you be appropriately assertive, set clear boundaries, and confront wrongs in the world. Anger can pave the way to other emotions, leading to the resolution relational conflicts.  We learn the most common triggers of your anger. Once you learn these triggers, you can be more aware when they occur and more able to prevent an automatic reaction of anger. Establish intercommunication among parts of yourself to recognize triggers and negotiate possible helpful strategies to cope with them rather than just reacting.  You can try allowing yourself to experience just a small amount of anger from another part of yourself: a drop, a teaspoon, 1% or 2%. In exchange you can share with angry parts feelings of calm and safety.  Inner safe spaces can be very helpful for childlike parts that feel terrified   My parts Feisty Part-- defends against shame -- Melancholio.   Good Boy  Challenger  Creative-distracting me.   Closing Mark your calendars.  Next Live Experience of the IIC podcast will be on Friday, January 13, 2023 from 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM Eastern time on Zoom (repeat) -- All about Anger -- dealing with your anger.  Going beyond what books can do.  Experiential exercise.  Links to register have gone out in our emailed Wednesday Reflections.  Can get the link on the IIC landing page as well, SoulsandHearts.com/iic  December 28, 2022  Reflection at soulsandhearts.com/blog  From Rejecting to Embracing Aging Reach out to me Crisis@soulsandhearts.com  Conversation hours:  cell is 317.567.9594 conversation hours 4:30 PM to 5:30 PM Eastern Time Every Tuesday and Thursday.   Resilient Catholic Community -- you do not have to be alone.   Why a deep intimate personal relationship with God our Father, Mary our Mother -- spiritual parents   By claiming our identity as beloved daughters and sons of God the Father and Mary our Mother. Identity is freely given.   How By dealing with the natural level issues we have, the human formation issues we have that have spiritual consequences.  Grace perfects nature  So many spiritual problems have their roots in the natural realm, in human formation.   If this kind of exercise is helpful to you, we have nearly 100 of them in the Resilient Catholics Community.   120 Catholics like you already on board, already on the pilgrimage -- just had 47 apply for the December 2022 cohort, excited to get to know our new applicants.   Closed December 31 -- wait list should be up soon for the June 2023 Cohort.   Get to know your own parts Get to love your own parts If interested, contact me.   Crisis@soulsandhearts.com 317.567.9594 conversation hours 4:30 PM to 5:30 PM Eastern Time Every Tuesday and Thursday.    

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Common Places
It's Always Personal: Church Fathers, Nestorianism, and the Christian Life

Common Places

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 73:26


A lecture with Q&A given by visiting Davenant Hall Teaching Fellow, Dr. Matt Hoskins. In the fifth century, the Church decisively rejected Nestorianism―the teaching that Jesus Christ is comprised of two persons hitched together, one human and one divine. This rejection was shared by Church Fathers writing across the Mediterranean in different languages, such as John Cassian in Latin, Shenoute of Atripe in Coptic, and Mark the Monk in Greek. Far from being a dry doctrinal dispute, the rejection of Nestorianism was vital for the preservation of the Gospel. In this lecture, Dr. Matthew Hoskin demonstrates how, despite their diverse tongues and contexts, Latin, Coptic, and Greek authors were united in their rejection of Nestorianism through a shared concern for its negative impact on spiritual life. All knew that only a true union of God and man in the person of Christ can bring good news and spiritual fruit to the personal lives of Christians. Dr Matthew Hoskin (PhD, University of Edinburgh) teaches ancient and medieval Christian history for Davenant Hall. His research focusses on manuscripts, monks, popes, canon law, and councils, which all feature in his book The Manuscripts of Leo the Great's Letters (2022), and he blogs about the historic faith at Classically Christian. He lives on Superior's northern shore in Thunder Bay, Ontario, with his wife and sons.

Second Cup with Keith
32: We Are Gods

Second Cup with Keith

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 49:18


What if I told you that Jesus, Paul, and early Church Fathers ranging from Irenaeus all the way to St. Augustine and St. Thomas Aquinas all taught the Deification of Humanity? They did. So, what does that mean for us today? *Connect with Keith on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Visit the blog at keithgiles.com

Father Matthew Wiering Podcast
Christmas 2022: Wrapped in Swaddling Clothes, Lying in a Manger

Father Matthew Wiering Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 16:40


St. Luke repeats two details for us: That the newborn Jesus was wrapped in swaddling clothes and lying in a manger (this latter detail Luke repeats thrice. The Church Fathers, attentive to this seemingly intentional repetition, saw in these two details at the beginning of Christ's life a prophesy of how his life would be culminate -- in his handing over his body through his dying and becoming food for his believers. This prophetic imagery is fulfilled today at our Christmas (literally, "Christ's Mass) Liturgy.

Morning Air
Martha Fernandez-Sardina, Love Comes Alive on Christmas/ William Albrecht, Incarnation

Morning Air

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 47:10


12/20/22 7am CT Hour John and Sarah chat about the best Christmas songs and National Go Caroling Day. Martha shares the story of St. Francis and the first manger scene and how we can come and see and go share the love of Christ on Christmas with others. William shares where we can find mentions of the Incarnation of Christ throughout scripture and what the early Church Fathers spoke about regarding this topic.

1517 Blogcast
Church Fathers on Christmas: St. Bernard of Clairvoux

1517 Blogcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 8:35


Take courage, you who were lost: Jesus comes to seek and save that which is lost. Ye sick, return to health: Christ comes to heal the contrite of heart with the balm of his mercy. Rejoice, all you who desire great things: the Son of God comes down to you that he may make you the co-heirs of his kingdom.

Busted Halo Show w/Fr. Dave Dwyer
Understanding Scripture With the Church Fathers and Dr. Jim Papandrea

Busted Halo Show w/Fr. Dave Dwyer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 18:35


People often have difficulty interpreting the Bible, and Fr. Dave welcomes back Dr. Jim Papandrea to give insights from his new book, “Reading Scripture Like the Early Church: Seven Insights From the Church Fathers to Help You Understand the Bible.”

1517 Blogcast
Church Fathers on Christmas: Athanasius

1517 Blogcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 11:35


In whatever direction the bias of men might be, from thence he might recall them, and teach them of his own true Father, as he himself says: I came to save and to find that which was lost.

Armed Lutheran Radio
Episode 341 - Taking the Church Fathers Out of Context

Armed Lutheran Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 58:58


Our newest book "Duty to Defend: Volume 2" addresses Bible verses that are used without context in the gun-rights debate. In response to the book's announcement, Facebook user Jason decided to respond by taking quotes from the early church fathers out of context. Lloyd and the Padre discuss the early church fathers, the context of their writings, and the quotes that Jason provided us from Justin Martyr, St. Irenaeus, and St. Athanasius. Armed Lutheran Radio is a listener-supported podcast. If you value the information and entertainment we provide, consider supporting the show by joining our membership site, The Reformation Gun Club! http://gunclub.armedlutheran.us Segments [00:00] - Blooper [00:43] - Opening and welcome [02:33] - Thanks to our Members [03:51] - Introduction [06:00] - Who Were the Early Church Fathers? [11:45] - Challenges Sourcing Quotes [13:12] - Justin Martyr [32:15] - St. Irenaeus [38:40] - Ante-Nicene vs. Post-Nicene Fathers [45:54] - St. Athanasius [49:13] - Conclusions [55:11] - Wrapping Up [58:21] - Show Close Duty to Defend: Volume 2 is now available! Pick up your copy today in paperback, Kindle, or ePub formats! www.ArmedLutheran.us/books Thank You to this Week's Members! Richard from Pagosa Springs, CO Edwin from Round Lake Beach, IL Morris from Dallas, TX Rob from Green Bay, WI Annita from Old fort, TN Derek from Huntsville, AL Rich from Lawton, MI Anthony from Cottonwood Heights, UT Justin from Berryville, AR Prayer of the Week Lord, we implore You, give ear to our prayers and lighten the darkness of our hearts by Your gracious visitation; for You now live and reign with the Father and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever. Amen. Use these Links to Support Armed Lutheran Radio Armed Lutheran Radio is a listener-supported podcast. If you value the information and entertainment we provide, consider supporting the show by joining our membership site, or shopping at your favorite online stores using the links below. Join the Reformation Gun Club! - http://gunclub.armedlutheran.us Check out the other Great Armed Lutheran Books - http://www.ArmedLutheran.us/Books Shop at Amazon* - http://www.armedlutheran.us/amazon Shop at GunMagWarehouse* - http://www.armedlutheran.us/mags Get Regular Refills Coffee Subscriptions at Dunkin' Donuts* - www.ArmedLutheran.us/Coffee Armed Citizens Legal Defense Network - https://www.armedcitizensnetwork.org Get in Touch Visit our Feedback Page - http://www.armedlutheran.us/feedback Please tell your friends about us, leave an iTunes review, and like us on Facebook Join our Facebook group - http://www.armedlutheran.us/facebook Subscribe to us and follow us on Youtube - http://www.armedlutheran.us/youtube Check Out More at our Website- http://www.armedlutheran.us Disclaimer The links above which are indicated with an asterisk (*) are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, I will earn a commission. This commission comes at no additional cost to you. Please understand that I have experience with all of these items, and I recommend them because they are helpful and useful, not because of the small commissions I make if you decide to buy something. Please do not spend any money on these products unless you feel you need them or that they will help you. Keep Shooting, Keep Praying, We'll Talk to you Next time!

Catholic Daily Reflections
Third Sunday of Advent (Year A) - Change and Newness in Christ

Catholic Daily Reflections

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 4:46


When John the Baptist heard in prison of the works of the Christ, he sent his disciples to Jesus with this question, “Are you the one who is to come, or should we look for another?” Matthew 11:2–3Why did Saint John the Baptist send his disciples to Jesus to ask this question? Recall that John had previously stated about Jesus, “Behold, the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world” (John 1:29). So if John knew that Jesus was the “Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world,” then why would he send his disciples to ask Jesus if He is the one who is to come?The Church Fathers explore many reasons, but most arrive at the conclusion that John did this not because he didn't know Who Jesus was, but for the sake of his disciples, so that they would come to follow our Lord once John was killed by Herod. So this was a way of trying to point his disciples to Jesus and to encourage them to embrace this new change in their life of faith.Jesus understood the reason John sent his disciples to Him. As a result, Jesus gave these disciples what they needed so as to come to believe themselves. He points them to the works that He has done as the Christ so that they would be able to interpret these works on their own and, thus, come to the newness of faith. Jesus points out that the blind regain their sight, the lame walk, lepers are cleansed, the deaf hear, the dead are raised, and the poor have the good news proclaimed to them. Who could argue with such miraculous signs from Heaven? But Jesus goes even further and states something very subtle. He says, “And blessed is the one who takes no offense at me.” This line appears to be one way that Jesus gently reproached these disciples for what appears to be their own personal struggle with this change of spiritual leaders. Jesus identified a certain “offense” that they were dealing with. They were “offended” by the fact that Jesus was indeed increasing while John was decreasing.In many ways, this is a common experience any time there is a change in our spiritual lives. When something is new, we often struggle with various aspects of the change and newness. But the Christian life is all about change, transformation and newness of life. And this is good. We must seek to change, be transformed, build better and new relationships, learn new ways of loving and reaching out, and become very comfortable with any and every new experience that our Lord places in our lives.Reflect, today, upon any way that you have struggled with changes in your spiritual life. Oftentimes, those things we struggle with are actually glorious opportunities to live our Christian faith and charity on a new level. Seek out the changes God is calling you to embrace in your life and know that even if they are difficult, they are the surest pathway to a life of greater holiness for you.Dear Lord, I know You call me to embrace the newness of life and the changes that I must endure so as to follow You more faithfully. Help me to be open to all that You call me to so that I will continually become a new creation in Your grace. Jesus, I trust in You.Source of content: catholic-daily-reflections.comCopyright © 2022 My Catholic Life! Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission via RSS feed.

Walk Boldly With Jesus
What Is The Solemnity of The Immaculate Conception

Walk Boldly With Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 11:20


What is the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception?Today, I decided to do something a little different.  I usually begin by sharing a scripture verse with you.  However, today is a very special day, at least in the Catholic Church.  There is a lot of confusion about this day and so I wanted to explain what we are actually celebrating today and why we are celebrating it.  Today, in the Catholic Church, we celebrate the Immaculate Conception.  When I was growing up I never understood how Mary could have immaculately conceived Jesus on the 8th of December and then delivered him on December 25th.  It didn't make sense to me and yet I didn't really question it.  It was not until I was an adult, I am not sure how many years ago, that I learned what we were truly celebrating.  I found this great article that explains what we are celebrating and why.  It is called, “8 Things You Need to Know About the Immaculate Conception,” by Jimmy Akin.  I will put a link for the article in the show notes.  (Click Here) for the article. This is where I found the information for this episode.The Immaculate Conceptions is not referring to Jesus' conception, it is referring to Mary's conception.  Mary has a human mother and father, her conception was not the same as Jesus'.  However, it was special in another way.  Here is how the Catholic Church explains it:CCC490 To become the mother of the Saviour, Mary “was enriched by God with gifts appropriate to such a role.” The angel Gabriel at the moment of the annunciation salutes her as “full of grace”.  In fact, in order for Mary to be able to give the free assent of her faith to the announcement of her vocation, it was necessary that she be wholly borne by God's grace.CCC491 Through the centuries the Church has become ever more aware that Mary, “full of grace” through God, was redeemed from the moment of her conception. That is what the dogma of the Immaculate Conception confesses, as Pope Pius IX proclaimed in 1854:The most Blessed Virgin Mary was, from the first moment of her conception, by a singular grace and privilege of almighty God and by virtue of the merits of Jesus Christ, Saviour of the human race, preserved immune from all stain of original sin. This means that Mary was not only free from original sin, but she was also free from person sin as well.  The Catechism of the Catholic Church explains:CCC493 The Fathers of the Eastern tradition call the Mother of God “the All-Holy” (Panagia), and celebrate her as “free from any stain of sin, as though fashioned by the Holy Spirit and formed as a new creature”.  By the grace of God Mary remained free of every personal sin her whole life long. “Let it be done to me according to your word. . .”The next question Akin asks is, “If Mary was free from sin, does that mean she didn't need Jesus to die on a cross for her?"He answers, “No. What we've already quoted states that Mary was immaculately conceived as part of her being “full of grace” and thus "redeemed from the moment of her conception" by "a singular grace and privilege of almighty God and by virtue of the merits of Jesus Christ, Saviour of the human race."The Catechism goes on to state:CCC492 The “splendour of an entirely unique holiness” by which Mary is “enriched from the first instant of her conception” comes wholly from Christ: she is “redeemed, in a more exalted fashion, by reason of the merits of her Son”.  The Father blessed Mary more than any other created person “in Christ with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places” and chose her “in Christ before the foundation of the world, to be holy and blameless before him in love”.CCC508 From among the descendants of Eve, God chose the Virgin Mary to be the mother of his Son. “Full of grace”, Mary is “the most excellent fruit of redemption” (SC 103): from the first instant of her conception, she was totally preserved from the stain of original sin and she remained pure from all personal sin throughout her life.The next question Akin asked is, “How does this make Mary a parallel of Eve?”  His is answer is:  Adam and Eve were both created immaculate--without original sin or its stain. They fell from grace, and through them mankind was bound to sin.  Christ and Mary were also conceived immaculate. They remained faithful, and through them mankind was redeemed from sin. Christ is thus the New Adam, and Mary the New Eve.The Catechism notes:CCC494 . . . As St. Irenaeus says, “Being obedient she became the cause of salvation for herself and for the whole human race.” Hence not a few of the early Fathers gladly assert. . .: “The knot of Eve's disobedience was untied by Mary's obedience: what the virgin Eve bound through her disbelief, Mary loosened by her faith.”  Comparing her with Eve, they call Mary “the Mother of the living” and frequently claim: “Death through Eve, life through Mary.”Another question Akin asked was, “Was it necessary for God to make Mary immaculate at her conception so that she could be Jesus' mother?”Akin writes, “No. The Church only speaks of the Immaculate Conception as something that was "fitting," something that made Mary a "fit habitation" (i.e., suitable dwelling) for the Son of God, not something that was necessary. Thus in preparing to define the dogma, Pope Pius IX stated:And hence they [the Church Fathers] affirmed that the Blessed Virgin was, through grace, entirely free from every stain of sin, and from all corruption of body, soul and mind; that she was always united with God and joined to him by an eternal covenant; that she was never in darkness but always in light; and that, therefore, she was entirely a fit habitation for Christ, not because of the state of her body, but because of her original grace. . . .For it was certainly not fitting that this vessel of election should be wounded by the common injuries, since she, differing so much from the others, had only nature in common with them, not sin. In fact, it was quite fitting that, as the Only-Begotten has a Father in heaven, whom the Seraphim extol as thrice holy, so he should have a Mother on earth who would never be without the splendor of holiness [Ineffabilis Deus]."Many of you listening may have already known all about this special day.  However, I felt it was important to explain as I remember when I first found out what we were celebrating I was confused.  I didn't really understand at first and I would have loved to have had this article back then.  I know there are some people who don't understand that we aren't celebrating Jesus' immaculate conception and so I wanted to clear up any misunderstandings about this day.  For those of you who are Catholic, just in case you don't know, the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conceptions is a holy day of obligation.  I hope you all enjoyed this little explanation and I hope you check out the article for more information.  Dear Heavenly Father, we are so grateful you gave us Mary so she could say yes to having your one and only son.  We are so grateful you came up with a plan to save us.  We are grateful for all you have done for us over the years.  We don't deserve anything and yet you give us so much.  We thank you Lord.  We love you and we celebrate and honor your beautiful daughter Mary today.  We honor you and your plan for her life.  You are so amazing how you plan everything out in advance.  You are the King of Kings and the Lord of Lords.  You are truly remarkable and we ask all of this in accordance with your will and in Jesus' holy name, Amen!Thank you so much for joining me on this journey to walk boldly with Jesus.  I look forward to spending time with you tomorrow.  Remember, Jesus loves you and so do I! Have a blessed day!

Catholic Daily Reflections
Friday of the Second Week of Advent - Dancing and Mourning

Catholic Daily Reflections

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 4:50


Jesus said to the crowds: “To what shall I compare this generation? It is like children who sit in marketplaces and call to one another, ‘We played the flute for you, but you did not dance, we sang a dirge but you did not mourn.'”   Matthew 11:16–17What does Jesus mean when He says “We played the flute for you…” and “we sang a dirge…?” The Church Fathers clearly identify this “flute” and “dirge” as the word of God that has been preached by the prophets of old. So many came before Jesus to prepare the way, but so many failed to listen. John the Baptist was the final and greatest prophet, and he called people to repentance, but few listened. Thus, Jesus points out this sad truth.In our day and age, we have so much more than the prophets of the Old Testament. We have the incredible witness of the saints, the infallible teaching of the Church, the gift of the Sacraments and the life and teaching of the Son of God Himself as recorded in the New Testament. Yet, sadly, so many refuse to listen. So many fail to “dance” and “mourn” in response to the Gospel.We must “dance” in the sense that the gift of Christ Jesus, by His life, death and resurrection should be the cause of our wholehearted rejoicing and eternal adoration. Those who truly know and love the Son of God are filled with joy! Furthermore, we must “mourn” on account of the countless sins in our own lives and in the lives of those all around us. Sin is real and prevalent, and a holy sorrow is the only appropriate response. Salvation is real. Hell is real. And both of these truths demand a total response from us.In your own life, how fully have you allowed the Gospel to affect you? How attentive are you to the voice of God as it has been spoken through the lives of the saints and through our Church? Are you tuned in to the voice of God as He speaks to you in the depths of your conscience in prayer? Are you listening? Responding? Following? And giving your whole life in the service of Christ and His mission?Reflect, today, upon the clear, unmistakable, transforming and life-giving words and presence of the Savior of the world. Reflect upon how attentive you have been in life to all that He has clearly spoken and to His very presence. If you do not find yourself “dancing” for God's glory and “mourning” over the evident sins of your life and within our world, then recommit yourself to a radical following of Christ. In the end, the Truth that God has spoken throughout the ages and His holy and divine presence are all that matter.My glorious Lord Jesus, I acknowledge Your divine presence in my life and in the world all around me. Help me to be more attentive to the countless ways that You speak to me and come to me each and every day. As I discover You and Your holy word, fill me with joy. As I see my sin and the sins of the world, give me true sorrow so that I will work tirelessly to combat my own sin and bring Your love and mercy to those who are most in need. Jesus, I trust in You.Source of content: catholic-daily-reflections.comCopyright © 2022 My Catholic Life! Inc. All rights reserved. Used with permission via RSS feed.

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen
Have Pastors Replaced the Church? (12-7-22)

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 60:34


Topics: Pastors, Pastoral Care, Pastoral Duties, John Calvin, the Reformation, Church Fathers, Church History, Cure for the Souls, Care for the Souls, One Bishop Rule, One Pastor Rule, 1 Corinthians 11-14, Edification, Consolation, EncouragementSupport the showSign up for Matt's free daily devotional! https://mattmcmillen.com/newsletter

Holistic Christian Life - Worshiping God - Mind, Body, Soul
171 - Barbara Pappas - Best of Countdown - Our Special Calling by God

Holistic Christian Life - Worshiping God - Mind, Body, Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 36:38


Cynthia presents the first episode in her “Best of” countdown today with BARBARA PAPPAS! Barbara joins Cynthia today to talk about our calling. There are two...secular and spiritual. How do we meld the two, and why is this important? Today, you will get and idea of how constructing our life around our spiritual purpose is the key to contentment. Barbara Pappas has a Bachelor of Arts from DePaul University, Chicago, Illinois, with a concentration in early Church Fathers.  She also holds a Master of Arts in Applied Orthodox Theology from the University of Balamand, in association with the St. John of Damascus Institute of Theology & the Antiochian House of Studies in North America.   She is the author of three books:   Are You Saved?: the Orthodox Christian Process of Salvation,  Now in its sixth edition & 10 languages, with two more in process.  First & Second Corinthians:  a study of Paul's Letters.   A verse-by-verse commentary based on writings of St. John Chrysostom & other Fathers of the Church. Includes “Food For Thought” questions & comments.  God's Bubbly, Gurgly, Overwhelming, Overflowing Love.  A look at salvation through Christ for children of all ages. Includes a section on “Questions from Kids,” with help for those who answer them.   Is it time to make some changes in your life? Do you want to stop the madness and get on track with your health? Maybe coaching is right for you. I've helped many people gain their health back over the years, and would love to talk with you. Just reach out with the link below to get on my schedule. From time to time I have openings for new clients and accept them on a first come first serve basis. Book a Discovery Call

Morning Air
William Albrecht, Incarnation/ Annabelle Moseley, Saints of December

Morning Air

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 43:42


12/5/22 6am CT Hour John, Glen and Sarah chat about new Supreme Court case, the Georgia runoff election tomorrow and a real life case of "It's A Wonderful Life" William shares where we can find mentions of the Incarnation of Christ throughout scripture and what the early Church Fathers spoke about regarding this topic. Annabelle lists the Saints in December and what we need to know about them and how we can strive for greatness just like them.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Tuesday, November 29, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsTuesday of the First Week of Advent Lectionary: 176All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint ClementClement of Rome was the third successor of Saint Peter, reigning as pope during the last decade of the first century. He's known as one of the Church's five “Apostolic Fathers,” those who provided a direct link between the Apostles and later generations of Church Fathers. Clement's First Epistle to the Corinthians was preserved and widely read in the early Church. This letter from the bishop of Rome to the Church in Corinth concerns a split that alienated a large number of the laity from the clergy. Deploring the unauthorized and unjustifiable division in the Corinthian community, Clement urged charity to heal the rift. Reflection Today many in the Church experience polarization regarding worship, how we speak of God, and other issues. We'd do well to take to heart the exhortation from Clement's Epistle: “Charity unites us to God. It knows no schism, does not rebel, does all things in concord. In charity all the elect of God have been made perfect.” Rome's Basilica of St. Clement, one of the city's earliest parish churches, is probably built on the site of Clement's home. History tells us that Pope Clement was martyred either in the year 99 or in 101. His liturgical feast is celebrated on November 23. Saint Clement is the Patron Saint of: Marble Workers Mariners Tanners Check out these seven books on saints! Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

1517 Blogcast
Church Fathers on Christmas: John Chrysostom

1517 Blogcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 9:26


For with God we look not for the order of nature, but rest our faith in the power of him who works.

Brews, Beards, & Shipwrecks
Pastor Mike Landsman on Helping the Hurting through Chaplaincy, Church Relations, and Pastoral Care

Brews, Beards, & Shipwrecks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 108:48


Once again, Nomadik Vagabond here!!! What up beautiful people of the global sphere!!! We hope y'all had a great time giving thanks!! We got the pleasure of chopping it up with Mike Landsman, a pastor, hospital chaplain, and husband & father. He gives a glimpse into his daily routine as a hospital chaplain and shares with us the joys and challenges he faces dealing with people who are often terminally ill. After jumping right into the heavy stuff we discuss his upbringing as a pastor's kid, his time in the Word Faith Movement (https://www.equip.org/perspectives/word-faith-whats-wrong-with-the-word-faith-movement/)and how he was introduced to the early church fathers and the impact their teaching has had on his life.  He is also co-host of The Areopagus podcast on Ancient Faith Radio with Fr. Andrew Stephen Damick. He shares his experience being a non-Orthodox Christian on an Orthodox Christian platform. This leads us into how Orthodox Christianity and the early Church Fathers have impacted him, how he has implemented some practices from early Christianity to enrich the worship life of his own church, and what it's been like to touch "multiple Christianities." Lastly Pastor Mike shares what his pastoral role is like being "the new guy" at an established church with over 200 years of history—and the challenges and joys that come with it. Thank you all for tuning in! Remember to share and subscribe we want as many people to hear these shows! And of course you can follow us on IG @brewsbeards @nomadikvagabond @royalruckusofficial and if your nice you might be able to follow Pastor Mike on IG @landspersona and if you wasn't to hear any of his sermons or contact him go to zionstoneucc.com And as a treat we play the new Royal Ruckus song "Recording In Progress" produced by DJ Sean P!! Check out the new music video here: https://youtu.be/2dwsH2_nloo Also hit up http://buymeacoffe.com/royalruckus to support the album!! Peace and all the Love! - Nomadik Vagabond

Morning Air
Fr. Burke Masters, Series on the Sacraments: Anointing of the Sick/ Dr. Jim Schroeder, Overcoming Resistance to Daily Exercise

Morning Air

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 47:32


11/28/22 7am CT Hour John, Glen and Sarah chat about protests in China, Cyber Monday and the Thanksgiving weekend. Fr. Burke shares what the Church Fathers taught about the Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick. Dr. Schroeder explains why we have such a resistance to exercise and how we can overcome this and stay healthy. Callers chime in with why they think exercise is important.

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen
Did the Reformers Actually Reform the Church? (Part 1) (11-25-22)

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 68:06


Topics: Reformation, Catholic, Priests, Church Fathers, Church History, Eucharist, Cyprian of Carthage, Eat My Flesh, Drink My Blood, Communion, Mana From Heaven, Forgive Sins, John 6, John 14, John 20, Royal Priesthood, The RockSupport the showSign up for Matt's free daily devotional! https://mattmcmillen.com/newsletter

Wake Up!
Wake Up! Tuesday, November 22, 2022

Wake Up!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 45:32


We're live with Steve Ray, Catholic Convert and pilgrimage leader joins us to talk about the presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Fr. Tim Grimes, Parochial Vicar at Sacred Heart in Baton Rouge talks about his vocation story and Dr. Jim Papandrea talks about his book Reading Scripture Like the Early Church: ​​Seven Insights from the Church Fathers to Help You Understand the Bible.

Morning Air
Martha Fernandez-Sardina, Thank God For Love & Begin Again/ William Albrecht, Incarnation in Scripture & Tradition

Morning Air

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 48:38


11/22/22 7am CT Hour John. Glen and Sarah chat about JFK Assignation anniversary, World Cup, Thanksgiving and Charlie Brown. Martha lists all the ways that God is good and there for us and how we can fight the holiday blues. William shares where we can find mentions of the Incarnation of Christ throughout scripture and what the early Church Fathers spoke about regarding this topic.

Theology Taco! Podcast
Confidence, Grace, & Romans 5

Theology Taco! Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 138:20


In this episode, Tim T reflects on his theological influences, coming to terms with where he's at now and how God has used John Chrysostom to help him. Then Tim J discusses how Romans 5 has shaped his views on grace and what that might mean for sin. Email: theologytaco@gmail.com Book Recommendation: Learning Theology with the Church Fathers by Christopher A. Hall For the YouTube version, click here.

Death To Tyrants Podcast
Ep. 235: Western Materialism, Modernity, and the Age of Information, with Adam Patrick

Death To Tyrants Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 81:14


My guest on this episode of Counterflow is Adam Patrick. Adam was the host of the now defunct "Y'er Talkin Over Me" podcast and is now launching "The Age of Information" podcast. His goal is to move the discussions past just "government bad, freedom good" and start to look at the larger battle taking place. In this chat, we discuss the way we view religion and spirituality in the Western world vs. how it was viewed in the East for thousands of years. The Western mindset often informs our thinking, but is it the way the Church Fathers looked at things? What is the difference? Was the Covid Cult of the last few years rooted in spirituality? We discuss all of this and more in this episode. For more about Adam's new show, go here: Sponsors: FoxNSons Coffee ( ): Enter code BUCK25 at checkout for 25% off your order! Paloma Verde CBD ( ): Enter code BUCK at checkout for 20% off your order! Visit my website: Donate to the show here: Audio Production by Podsworth Media: Leave us a review and rating on iTunes! Thanks!

Catholic
Son Rise Morning Show - Monday 11.14.22

Catholic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 114:00


Good morning! On today's show, Matt Swaim and Anna Mitchell welcome Fr. Patrick Briscoe, O.P. to talk about our disposition when hearing homilies. Other guests include Fr. John Gavin with more on how the Catechism uses the Church Fathers, and Kevin Schmiesing with This Week in Catholic History. Plus news, weather, sports and a whole lot more...

Morning Air
Fr. Burke Masters, Series on the Sacraments: Confession/ Howard Dvorkin, Smart Holiday Shopping

Morning Air

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 48:56


11/14/22 7am CT Hour John, Glen and Sarah give the results of the "Join the Family" Pledge Drive and thank all the listeners for their support. Fr. Burke delves into what the Church Fathers taught when it came to the sacrament of Reconciliation and why there is comfort and assurance in confessing to a priest. Howard relays how store's sale tricks can lead us into a tailspin when it comes to over shopping during the holidays and gives advice to stay ahead of going into debt.

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen
5 Errors of the Early Church Fathers (11-13-22)

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 59:33


Topics: Church History, Church Fathers, Bishops, Pastors, Elders, Presbyters, Priests, Forgive Men Their Sins, Church Offices, Clemente of Rome, Cyprian of Carthage, Covenant Mixture Theologians, Communion, Eucharist, John 20, Matthew 23, 1 Timothy 3:1, Hebrews 7:23 Support the showSign up for Matt's free daily devotional! https://mattmcmillen.com/newsletter

Diocese of Lansing
Week 45 | Disciples Together on the Way w/ Bishop Boyea | November 13 to 19 | Corporal Works of Mercy | Develop a family almsgiving plan

Diocese of Lansing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 2:57


Dear Friend,As we continue to meditate on the Corporal Works of Mercy, it is interesting to note that a good portion of the Church's teaching about them is contained in the Catechism's section on the Commandments and, particularly, on the Seventh Commandment: “You shall not steal.” Let us see how almsgiving fits into this category.Almsgiving — not to mention the other Corporal Works of Mercy — is considered an act of justice as opposed to an act of mere charity. Almsgiving is closely tied to our duty to love our neighbor.  The Catechism teaches that “Love for the poor is even one of the motives for the duty of working so as to be able to give to those in need” (CCC #2444).  The text continues with a quotation from the Church Father, Saint John Chrysostom, who wrote: “Not to enable the poor to share in our goods is to steal from them and deprive them of life. The goods we possess are not ours but theirs.” (CCC #2446)It should be clarified that almsgiving — a requirement for being a disciple of Christ — is different from tithing. Tithing is offering God the first fruits of our labor — of our earnings — giving a regular percentage of our earnings to God and the Church. It is fulfilling our duty to God and His Church.Almsgiving, on the other hand, is fulfilling our duty toward our neighbor and our community.  That being said, almsgiving is charitable giving above and beyond our regular tithe. In the Bible, almsgiving is also tied to making amends for sins.  In Sirach 3:30 it says: “As water quenches a flaming fire, so almsgiving atones for sins.” Similarly, in the book of Daniel 4:27, King Nebuchadnezzar is told to “Redeem your sins by almsgiving and your iniquity by generosity to the poor.”Jesus, during one of his meals at a Pharisee's house, as part of his challenges to his fellow diners, added: “But as to what is within, give alms, and behold, everything will be clean for you” (Luke 11:41).With all of this in mind, we come to our weekly challenge: Develop a plan for almsgiving and discuss it with your family/spouse. It could be placing a jar at the entrance of your home into which everyone in your family contributes spare change and then periodically donates the money to a local crisis pregnancy center or other charitable organization. You could donate the funds from your bottle returns to charity. You could also simply go over your budget with your spouse and decide on an amount to contribute to charity beyond your regular tithe.  Until next week, may God bless you, in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.+ Earl BoyeaBishop of Lansing

The Revisionist History Podcast
Sundays with the Saints: St. Augustine of Hippo

The Revisionist History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 12:05


In today's Sundays with the Saints episode we look at a saint and Church Father that virtually everyone has heard of: St. Augustine of Hippo, author of "The Confessions." --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/revisionisthistory/support

Thinking Faith with Eric Gurash and Dr. Brett Salkeld

November is traditionally a month dedicated to remembering and praying for our dearly departed loved ones and friends. It can also be a time when we experience a deepening or resurgence of grief over losses, whether they have been recent or some time ago. Deacon Eric takes time this week to examine ways we might approach the experience of grief from a faith perspective. "The Church Fathers, many of them, really picked up on this idea of St. Paul's and really discouraged lamenting and grieving publically in Christians as a sign of a lack of faith in the Resurrection...BUT I did find one notable and quite profound exception that really hits on healthy ways to grieve..." This podcast is made possible through generous donations to our Archbishop's Appeal. Donations can be made at https://archregina.sk.ca/giving.

The Revisionist History Podcast
Sundays with the Saints: St. Ambrose of Milan

The Revisionist History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 7:31


In today's Sundays with the Saints episode, we look at the life of another early Church Father. Let's meet St. Ambrose of Milan. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/revisionisthistory/support

History of the Germans
Episode 80: A different kind of Emperor

History of the Germans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 35:05 Transcription Available


A medieval ruler that has a Muslim fighting force at his back and call and who negotiates Jerusalem out of the hands of the Sultan of Egypt is not what you expected when you began listening to the History of the Germans Podcast. I am afraid you aint seen nuttin yet! This week we come to what was long believed to be his masterpiece, the Constitutions of Melfi. Even if It isn't the creation of a modern state in the 13th century as Kantorowicz had believed there is still something fundamentally different here. The Middle Ages is a world where progress comes from people moving forward whilst looking back. They ask questions about the world and seek the answers in the past, in the Bible, the Church Fathers, Aristotle, Averroes etc. Only where the ancients are silent will great minds like Albertus Magnus look at the real world, undertake experiments and collect observation to derive their answers. Frederick is different. He does turn around and look at the natural world first and at dusty books second. Let's see what that means when it comes to organising his kingdom. As always, this episode has a dedicated website with the transcript and maps, pictures and additional comments to read along. It is to be found here: https://historyofthegermans.com/episode-80-a-different-kind-of-emperor-2/ (Episode 80 - A different kind of Emperor • History of the Germans Podcast) The music for the show is Flute Sonata in E-flat major, H.545 by Carl Phillip Emmanuel Bach (or some claim it as BWV 1031 Johann Sebastian Bach) performed and arranged by https://www.windrep.org/Michel_Rondeau (Michel Rondeau) under https://imslp.org/wiki/Flute_Sonata_in_E-flat_major%2C_H.545_%28Bach%2C_Carl_Philipp_Emanuel%29 (Common Creative Licence 3.0). As always: Homepage with maps, photos, transcripts and blog: http://www.historyofthegermans.com/ (www.historyofthegermans.com) Facebook: @HOTGPod  Twitter: @germanshistory Instagram: history_of_the_germans Reddit: u/historyofthegermans Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/Historyofthegermans (https://www.patreon.com/Historyofthegermans)

Catholic Answers Live
#10861 Open Forum - Jimmy Akin

Catholic Answers Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022


Questions Covered: 06:12 – Since God is above time, are we currently in heaven or hell outside time with him? 13:40 – Could you elaborate on St. Augustine's comments and perspective on the account of Genesis? 21:03 – Can you give an explanation why a protestant who fully embraces doctrinal matters still cannot receive communion? 28:55 “Catholics leave out the real second commandment from the Old Testament” 37:20 – My protestant/anti-Catholic wife is requiring contraception in our marriage. If I don’t go along with it, there's a possibility that she'll seek divorce. What should I do? 45:53 – Were there 3 days that were dropped from the Gregorian calendar? Was it a correction or a miscalculation? 51:09 Before St. Paul died, he said wolves would arrive. How do we know that these wolves are not the Church Fathers? …

Morning Air
Fr. Burke Masters, Series on the Sacraments-Eucharist/Bruce Lachenauer, Best Practices for Hiring Manager Part II

Morning Air

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 48:37


10/24/22 7am CT Hour John, Glen and Sarah chat about "Dirty Bomb" in Ukraine and the results of the latest MLB Playoff games. Fr. Burke shares his thoughts on baseball playoffs and reveals character of former Cub, Kyle Schwarber. He reveals what the early Church Fathers mentioned and preached about the Eucharist. Bruce relays the important things that a hiring manager should do to be prepared for potential employees when hiring.

Literary Bible Themes  (with Dr. Chip Bennett)
John & Revelation Project - Part 4 - What The Church Fathers Believed About Revelation

Literary Bible Themes (with Dr. Chip Bennett)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 30:37


What did the church father's believe about the book of Revelation? Dr. Chip Bennett and Dr. Warren Gage continue their series by discussing in detail the book of Revelation and the connection it has to the other scriptures and particularly its connection to the Gospel of John.

Pints With Aquinas
The Society-Shaking Power of Christian Friendship w/ Mike Aquilina

Pints With Aquinas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 87:07


Mike Aquilina is an author and expert on the Church Fathers. Mike's Books: https://bit.ly/3g0PFVn Mike's Website: https://fathersofthechurch.com The Octavius: https://www.newadvent.org/fathers/0410.htm OUR COMMUNITY Rumble: https://rumble.com/c/pintswithaquinas Locals: https://mattfradd.locals.com/support Special thanks to all our supporters for your continued support! You don't have to give anything, yet you do. THANK YOU! SPONSORS Parler: http://parler.com MY Parler: https://parler.com/mattfradd Hallow: https://hallow.com/matt MERCH PWA Swag: https://shop.pintswithaquinas.com SOCIAL Rumble: https://rumble.com/c/pintswithaquinas Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/mattfradd Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/mattfradd Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mattfradd Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/312eXMI31liKUHSx6U5p1H Parler: https://parler.com/mattfradd Website: https://www.pintswithaquinas.com

The Arena
Abraham Our Father

The Arena

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 25:33


The Arena Podcast is the flagship of Patristic Nectar Publications and contains the Sunday Sermons and other theological reflections by Father Josiah Trenham delivered from the ambon of St. Andrew Church in Riverside, California and begun in 2010. Currently there are more than 550 sermons and lectures covering ten years worth of preaching through the liturgical calendar. | Links | Sirach: Fashioning a Life of Wisdom | 5 Lectures https://patristicnectar.org/bookstore_220620_112 Patristic Nectar Publications is pleased to present a new five-lecture series by Father Josiah Trenham entitled Sirach: Fashioning a Life of Wisdom. The Wisdom of Sirach or Ecclesiasticus, as the book is known in the Western or Latin tradition, is a choice composition from the Wisdom literature of the Old Testament.  Written in the 2nd century BC in Hebrew and translated into Greek by the author's grandson in Alexandria, Egypt, this majestic portion of Holy Scripture combines the rich aphorisms of traditional Hebrew sapiential literature with the concerns and background of 2nd-century Hellenic culture. Jesus, the Son of Sirach, was highly prized by the Church Fathers from the earliest days of the Church. In these five lectures, Father Josiah hones in on the themes of learning and seeking wisdom, humility, work, wealth, almsgiving, friendship, social life, wives, women, medicine and physicians, youth and aging, and wise speech and the power of words. In these topical lectures, practical substance is given to the practice of the fear of God in a wide array of human activity so that the servant of God pleases the Lord and lives thoroughly and thoughtfully before Him. Lecture #1 - Learning and Humility. Lecture #2 - Work and Wealth in Sirach Lecture #3 - Almsgiving, Friendship, and Social Relations Lecture #4 - Wives, Women, and the Stages of Life Lecture #5 - Wise Words Visit our merch store and support Patristic Nectar! https://patristic-nectar.mybigcommerce.com Please subscribe and rate the podcast! If you are interested in other available titles, or if you would like more information on Patristic Nectar Publications, please visit our website at PatristicNectar.org | Social Media | Patristic Nectar Films Youtube Channel Patristic Nectar Instagram Patristic Nectar Facebook Page | Support Our Ministry | 1) Spread the Word - tell your family and friends about Patristic Nectar. Share Patristic Nectar website links to content you have enjoyed. A personal invitation is the number one way the Church grows. Tell a friend to "Come and see!" 2) Make a Donation -Patristic Nectar is a small non-profit ministry with a big vision for expanding access to Patristic Orthodox teaching throughout the world. Since our establishment in 2010, we have made steady progress but there is so much more we could do. With funding, we can work to make our ministry vision a reality. Make a Donation Here 3) Pray For Us - remember us in your prayers, asking that the Lord strengthen, help, and direct us according to His divine will.

Arena
Abraham Our Father

Arena

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 25:33


The Arena Podcast is the flagship of Patristic Nectar Publications and contains the Sunday Sermons and other theological reflections by Father Josiah Trenham delivered from the ambon of St. Andrew Church in Riverside, California and begun in 2010. Currently there are more than 550 sermons and lectures covering ten years worth of preaching through the liturgical calendar. | Links | Sirach: Fashioning a Life of Wisdom | 5 Lectures https://patristicnectar.org/bookstore_220620_112 Patristic Nectar Publications is pleased to present a new five-lecture series by Father Josiah Trenham entitled Sirach: Fashioning a Life of Wisdom. The Wisdom of Sirach or Ecclesiasticus, as the book is known in the Western or Latin tradition, is a choice composition from the Wisdom literature of the Old Testament.  Written in the 2nd century BC in Hebrew and translated into Greek by the author's grandson in Alexandria, Egypt, this majestic portion of Holy Scripture combines the rich aphorisms of traditional Hebrew sapiential literature with the concerns and background of 2nd-century Hellenic culture. Jesus, the Son of Sirach, was highly prized by the Church Fathers from the earliest days of the Church. In these five lectures, Father Josiah hones in on the themes of learning and seeking wisdom, humility, work, wealth, almsgiving, friendship, social life, wives, women, medicine and physicians, youth and aging, and wise speech and the power of words. In these topical lectures, practical substance is given to the practice of the fear of God in a wide array of human activity so that the servant of God pleases the Lord and lives thoroughly and thoughtfully before Him. Lecture #1 - Learning and Humility. Lecture #2 - Work and Wealth in Sirach Lecture #3 - Almsgiving, Friendship, and Social Relations Lecture #4 - Wives, Women, and the Stages of Life Lecture #5 - Wise Words Visit our merch store and support Patristic Nectar! https://patristic-nectar.mybigcommerce.com Please subscribe and rate the podcast! If you are interested in other available titles, or if you would like more information on Patristic Nectar Publications, please visit our website at PatristicNectar.org | Social Media | Patristic Nectar Films Youtube Channel Patristic Nectar Instagram Patristic Nectar Facebook Page | Support Our Ministry | 1) Spread the Word - tell your family and friends about Patristic Nectar. Share Patristic Nectar website links to content you have enjoyed. A personal invitation is the number one way the Church grows. Tell a friend to "Come and see!" 2) Make a Donation -Patristic Nectar is a small non-profit ministry with a big vision for expanding access to Patristic Orthodox teaching throughout the world. Since our establishment in 2010, we have made steady progress but there is so much more we could do. With funding, we can work to make our ministry vision a reality. Make a Donation Here 3) Pray For Us - remember us in your prayers, asking that the Lord strengthen, help, and direct us according to His divine will.

Arena
Providential Nothings | The Great Catch of Fish, St. Luke 5

Arena

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022


The Arena Podcast is the flagship of Patristic Nectar Publications and contains the Sunday Sermons and other theological reflections by Father Josiah Trenham delivered from the ambon of St. Andrew Church in Riverside, California and begun in 2010. Currently there are more than 550 sermons and lectures covering ten years worth of preaching through the liturgical calendar. | Links | Sirach: Fashioning a Life of Wisdom | 5 Lectures https://patristicnectar.org/bookstore_220620_112 Patristic Nectar Publications is pleased to present a new five-lecture series by Father Josiah Trenham entitled Sirach: Fashioning a Life of Wisdom. The Wisdom of Sirach or Ecclesiasticus, as the book is known in the Western or Latin tradition, is a choice composition from the Wisdom literature of the Old Testament.  Written in the 2nd century BC in Hebrew and translated into Greek by the author's grandson in Alexandria, Egypt, this majestic portion of Holy Scripture combines the rich aphorisms of traditional Hebrew sapiential literature with the concerns and background of 2nd-century Hellenic culture. Jesus, the Son of Sirach, was highly prized by the Church Fathers from the earliest days of the Church. In these five lectures, Father Josiah hones in on the themes of learning and seeking wisdom, humility, work, wealth, almsgiving, friendship, social life, wives, women, medicine and physicians, youth and aging, and wise speech and the power of words. In these topical lectures, practical substance is given to the practice of the fear of God in a wide array of human activity so that the servant of God pleases the Lord and lives thoroughly and thoughtfully before Him. Lecture #1 - Learning and Humility. Lecture #2 - Work and Wealth in Sirach Lecture #3 - Almsgiving, Friendship, and Social Relations Lecture #4 - Wives, Women, and the Stages of Life Lecture #5 - Wise Words Visit our merch store and support Patristic Nectar! https://patristic-nectar.mybigcommerce.com Please subscribe and rate the podcast! If you are interested in other available titles, or if you would like more information on Patristic Nectar Publications, please visit our website at PatristicNectar.org | Social Media | Patristic Nectar Films Youtube Channel Patristic Nectar Instagram Patristic Nectar Facebook Page | Support Our Ministry | 1) Spread the Word - tell your family and friends about Patristic Nectar. Share Patristic Nectar website links to content you have enjoyed. A personal invitation is the number one way the Church grows. Tell a friend to "Come and see!" 2) Make a Donation -Patristic Nectar is a small non-profit ministry with a big vision for expanding access to Patristic Orthodox teaching throughout the world. Since our establishment in 2010, we have made steady progress but there is so much more we could do. With funding, we can work to make our ministry vision a reality. Make a Donation Here 3) Pray For Us - remember us in your prayers, asking that the Lord strengthen, help, and direct us according to His divine will.

The Arena
Providential Nothings | The Great Catch of Fish, St. Luke 5

The Arena

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022


The Arena Podcast is the flagship of Patristic Nectar Publications and contains the Sunday Sermons and other theological reflections by Father Josiah Trenham delivered from the ambon of St. Andrew Church in Riverside, California and begun in 2010. Currently there are more than 550 sermons and lectures covering ten years worth of preaching through the liturgical calendar. | Links | Sirach: Fashioning a Life of Wisdom | 5 Lectures https://patristicnectar.org/bookstore_220620_112 Patristic Nectar Publications is pleased to present a new five-lecture series by Father Josiah Trenham entitled Sirach: Fashioning a Life of Wisdom. The Wisdom of Sirach or Ecclesiasticus, as the book is known in the Western or Latin tradition, is a choice composition from the Wisdom literature of the Old Testament.  Written in the 2nd century BC in Hebrew and translated into Greek by the author's grandson in Alexandria, Egypt, this majestic portion of Holy Scripture combines the rich aphorisms of traditional Hebrew sapiential literature with the concerns and background of 2nd-century Hellenic culture. Jesus, the Son of Sirach, was highly prized by the Church Fathers from the earliest days of the Church. In these five lectures, Father Josiah hones in on the themes of learning and seeking wisdom, humility, work, wealth, almsgiving, friendship, social life, wives, women, medicine and physicians, youth and aging, and wise speech and the power of words. In these topical lectures, practical substance is given to the practice of the fear of God in a wide array of human activity so that the servant of God pleases the Lord and lives thoroughly and thoughtfully before Him. Lecture #1 - Learning and Humility. Lecture #2 - Work and Wealth in Sirach Lecture #3 - Almsgiving, Friendship, and Social Relations Lecture #4 - Wives, Women, and the Stages of Life Lecture #5 - Wise Words Visit our merch store and support Patristic Nectar! https://patristic-nectar.mybigcommerce.com Please subscribe and rate the podcast! If you are interested in other available titles, or if you would like more information on Patristic Nectar Publications, please visit our website at PatristicNectar.org | Social Media | Patristic Nectar Films Youtube Channel Patristic Nectar Instagram Patristic Nectar Facebook Page | Support Our Ministry | 1) Spread the Word - tell your family and friends about Patristic Nectar. Share Patristic Nectar website links to content you have enjoyed. A personal invitation is the number one way the Church grows. Tell a friend to "Come and see!" 2) Make a Donation -Patristic Nectar is a small non-profit ministry with a big vision for expanding access to Patristic Orthodox teaching throughout the world. Since our establishment in 2010, we have made steady progress but there is so much more we could do. With funding, we can work to make our ministry vision a reality. Make a Donation Here 3) Pray For Us - remember us in your prayers, asking that the Lord strengthen, help, and direct us according to His divine will.

Bible Study Evangelista Show
02_Creation of the Body, Physical Healing and Faith Series

Bible Study Evangelista Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 48:00


The Church Fathers teach that the body is not the "container" for the soul, but the soul is the "container" of the body, and is everywhere throughout the body. This view is reflected in Jesus' statements, "The eye [the soul, according to the Fathers] is the light of the body. So, if your eye is sound [integrated, one], your whole body will be full of light; but if your eye is not sound, your whole body will be full of darkness. If then the light in you is darkness, how great is the darkness!" When the soul, which is everywhere in the body, is suffering and sick, the body is suffering and sick. But in Christ, man is the subject and co-creator of the salvation and redemption of both his body and soul (Theology of the Body, JPII), so that the whole human person, soul and body, becomes "full of light." Thank you to my newest Friends of the Show, Rhonda S; Priya P-H; and Jody C, for loving and lifting me! Friends of the Show get all Premium Content and monthly meet-ups with Sonja: We're studying the Book of Romans! September's Monthly Bible Study Meet-up for Friends of the Show is tonight, September 19 at 7:00 PM CDT.  LOVE the Word® is a Bible study method based on Mary's own practice: lectio without the Latin. Get the book based on Sonja's method in the right margin, How to Pray Like Mary.   L | Listen (Receive the Word via audio or video.)  O | Observe (Connect the passage to your life and recent events.) Several things in this episode blew my mind when studying for it. Did anything jump out at you? What is the Holy Spirit inviting you to? V | Verbalize (Pray about your thoughts and emotions.) Tell Him everything in your heart right now.  Remembering that He loves you and that you are in His presence, talk to God about the particulars of your O – Observe step. You may want to write your reflections in your LOVE the Word® journal. Or, get a free journal page and guide in the right-hand margin. E | Entrust (May it be done to me according to your word!) Precious Blood of Jesus, flow through me. Mary, Mother of Divine Love, take the Precious Blood of Jesus to the throne of God, the Father, and offer it in sweet humble adoration, then send it back flowing by the Holy Spirit as a healing of body, mind, heart, and soul. Grant me complete and total healing as I cooperate with you, Lord Jesus, in the healing of my soul and body as you direct. Amen. + Get Healed Already! Connect Join me in the Sacred Healing community, where I'm offering healing prayer livestreams, Bible studies, LOVE the Word® takeaways, a healing masterclass and other courses, a dynamic phone app, and a flourishing community to help you experience deeper healing.  What We Discussed | Show Notes Overview: Minutes 00:12:00 – The body reveals the Trinitarian God and is healed by love; we are both the subject and co-creators of suffering and salvation Minutes 12:01-24:00 – The human soul is created with the body at conception; the soul as everywhere in the body as the body's "container" Minutes 24:01-36:00 – The disorder of soul and body at the fall, and loss of control of the body; restoration and elevation in Christ and proper hierarchy of the human person Minutes 36:01-48:00 – Suffering, its meaning and purpose as personal and apostolic purification in JPII's Salvifici Doloris  Transcript Click here for a transcript of the show.