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Group of museums and research centers administered by the United States government

  • 1,976PODCASTS
  • 4,029EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 16, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about smithsonian

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Latest podcast episodes about smithsonian

Trend Following with Michael Covel
Ep. 1076: Michael Meyer Interview with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio

Trend Following with Michael Covel

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 44:53


My guest today is Michael Meyer. He took a wide route to the story of Benjamin Franklin's remarkable afterlife, starting when Meyer was sent to China as one of its first Peace Corps volunteers. Beginning with The Last Days of Old Beijing, he authored three critically-acclaimed reported books set there, as well as numerous stories that appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Financial Times, Time, Smithsonian, and on This American Life. A Guggenheim Fellow and Whiting Award winner, Meyer has also received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the New York Public Library's Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers, MacDowell, and the Rockefeller Foundation's Bellagio Center in Italy. The topic is his book Benjamin Franklin's Last Bet: The Favorite Founder's Divisive Death, Enduring Afterlife, and Blueprint for American Prosperity. In this episode of Trend Following Radio we discuss: The incredible story of Benjamin Franklin's parting gift to the working-class people of Boston and Philadelphia—a deathbed wager that captures the Founder's American Dream and his lessons for our current, conflicted age. Jump in! --- I'm MICHAEL COVEL, the host of TREND FOLLOWING RADIO, and I'm proud to have delivered 10+ million podcast listens since 2012. Investments, economics, psychology, politics, decision-making, human behavior, entrepreneurship and trend following are all passionately explored and debated on my show. To start? I'd like to give you a great piece of advice you can use in your life and trading journey… cut your losses! You will find much more about that philosophy here: https://www.trendfollowing.com/trend/ You can watch a free video here: https://www.trendfollowing.com/video/ Can't get enough of this episode? You can choose from my thousand plus episodes here: https://www.trendfollowing.com/podcast My social media platforms: Twitter: @covel Facebook: @trendfollowing LinkedIn: @covel Instagram: @mikecovel Hope you enjoy my never-ending podcast conversation!

Pelecanus Radio
Pelecanus NEWS May 15 2022

Pelecanus Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 7:33


Check out these awesome headlines from the last few weeks! All podcasts can be found at Pelecanus.org, iTunes, Soundcloud, Spotify, Stitcher, Amazon Podcasts, and Google Podcasts. Long form podcasts including our series with The Smithsonian's Earth Optimism "The Possibilists" and Pelecanus Deep Dives can also be found on YouTube! Wildlife Endangered Hawaiian monk seal population highest in decades. https://www.latimes.com/world-nation/story/2022-05-06/endangered-hawaiian-monk-seal-population-rises Innovations Scientists Discover Method to Break Down Plastic in Days, Not Centuries https://www.vice.com/en/article/akvm5b/scientists-discover-method-to-break-down-plastic-in-one-week-not-centuries Drawdown Europe's largest floating solar farm is ready to come online in Portugal https://electrek.co/2022/05/09/europes-largest-floating-solar-farm-is-ready-to-come-online-in-portugal/ India to set up 30,000 MW offshore wind power, 50,000 MW of solar capacity https://www.msn.com/en-in/money/topstories/india-to-set-up-30-000-mw-offshore-wind-power-50-000-mw-of-solar-capacity/ar-AAWSrIX

The Photo Detective
Ancestor Trouble with Maud Newton

The Photo Detective

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 29:31


This week Maureen Taylor, The Photo Detective, is joined by author Maud Newton – who recently published Ancestor Trouble: A Reckoning and Reconciliation. She and Maureen dive into what it means to have a skeleton in the closet, or an ancestor who didn't live up to the same standards we do. It's the embarrassing and shameful actions of our ancestors – and what to do about it – that drive this conversation. Or, as we discuss in the episode, “Everybody's family is different and everybody's family has something, even if they don't admit it.”Related Episodes:Episode 22: A Murder Mystery with the Literary DetectiveEpisode 78: A Grandmother's Gift with Gonzalo LuengoLinks:Maud NewtonSign up for my newsletter.Watch my YouTube Channel.Like the Photo Detective Facebook Page so you get notified of my Facebook Live videos.Need help organizing your photos? Check out the Essential Photo Organizing Video Course.Need help identifying family photos? Check out the Identifying Family Photographs Online Course.Have a photo you need help identifying? Sign up for photo consultation.About My Guest:Maud Newton has written for The New York Times Magazine, Harper's, The New York Times Book Review, and Oxford American. She grew up in Miami and graduated from the University of Florida with degrees in English and law.About Maureen Taylor:Maureen is a frequent keynote speaker on photo identification, photograph preservation, and family history at historical and genealogical societies, museums, conferences, libraries, and other organizations across the U.S., London, and Canada.  She's the author of several books and hundreds of articles and her television appearances include The View and The Today Show (where she researched and presented a complete family tree for host Meredith Vieira).  She's been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Better Homes and Gardens, The Boston Globe, Martha Stewart Living, Germany's top newspaper Der Spiegel, American Spirit, and The New York Times. Maureen was recently a spokesperson and photograph expert for MyHeritage.com, an internationally known family history website, and also writes guidebooks, scholarly articles, and online columns for such media as Smithsonian.com. Learn more at Maureentaylor.comDid you enjoy this episode? Please leave a review on Apple Podcasts.Support the show

Dr. D’s Social Network
412. Dr. Kristen Eccleston - The Mental Health of Children and How Parents Play a Big Role

Dr. D’s Social Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 42:54


Dr. Kristen Eccleston's key differentiator is her first-hand knowledge and demonstrated competence grounded in real-life professional experience. She has a Doctorate of Education in Mind, Brain, & Teaching from Johns Hopkins University, a Master of Science in Special Education from Johns Hopkins University, and a Certificate in Educational Leadership and Administration from Hood College. Dr. Eccleston was the creator and former Director of the Enhanced- Social-Emotional Special Education Services (E-SESES) Program for Montgomery County Public Schools and was a Montgomery County Special Education teacher for over 15 years. She is currently an Adjunct Professor at Towson University in their Secondary and Special Education Graduate Programs. Dr. Eccleston has worked on extensive research examining adolescent mental health impairments in the education environment and is well versed in the needs of the neurodiverse brain. She currently serves as part of the Smithsonian's Zero Barriers in STEM Education Advisory Committee and is a National Board Certified Teacher: Exceptional Needs Specialist. www.ecclestoneducationconsulting.com, Instagram: The.NeuroDiverse.Teacher --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/drdarianparker/message

The Not Old - Better Show
#625 Fred Rogers Presence - Steven Emmanuel

The Not Old - Better Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 29:42


Fred Rogers Presence - Steven Emmanuel The Not Old Better Show, Smithsonian Associates Interview Series Welcome to The Not Old Better Show, Smithsonian Associates Interview series on radio and podcast.  I'm Paul Vogelzang and today's show will be a fan favorite for a couple reasons:  Steven Emmanuel, our guest today, is known for his depth, consciousness, caring and for excellent Smithsonian Associates presentations.  He's always been a fan favorite, too and today's subject by Steven is none other than Fred Rogers, of PBS and public television fame.   For 33 years, Fred Rogers opened each episode of Mister Rogers' Neighborhood with a cheerful smile and a heartfelt invitation, delivered in the show's iconic theme song “Won't You Be My Neighbor?” Steven Emmanuel says being a neighbor in the moral and spiritual sense of the word entails a kind of presence that goes beyond mere physical proximity: It is a way of being that expresses care, compassion, and unconditional acceptance. Steven M. Emmanuel, is the dean of the Susan S. Goode School of Arts and Humanities at Virginia Wesleyan University and will tell us today that It was Rogers' extraordinary capacity to make himself fully present to his audience that made him such an endearing figure to the millions of children (and grown-ups) who watched his show. We will also talk to Steven Emmanuel about Fred Rogers' motivation to enter the arena of broadcast television which was out of a deep concern about its potentially harmful effects on children and society. To do that he developed a pedagogy that allowed him to connect with his young viewers in a way that transcended the limitations of the medium, preserving the ethical quality of interpersonal communication. Fred Rogers envisioned the possibility of public television creating a network of interpersonal relationships aimed at building self-esteem and greater self-understanding in viewers. Steven Emmanuel will examine how  Fred Rogers was able to create a powerful sense of his personal presence using the impersonal medium of television. Emmanuel takes us on a close look at Rogers' ideas about the role of television in the moral and psychological development of children and its potential for building healthy communities based on the values of care and mutual respect. Turning his attention to today, he reexamines the value of Rogers' contributions at a time when education is increasingly shifting to remote platforms and the pervasiveness of technology and media seems to be driving people away from each other, creating deep social and political divisions that tear at the fabric of communities. There is still much that we can learn from Rogers, holds Emmanuel, about how to preserve our humanity in the digital age. Please join me in welcoming to The Not Old Better Show Smithsonian Associates Interview Series on radio and podcast, Smithsonian Associate, Steven Emmanuel. My thanks to Steven Emmanuel.  Steven Emmanuel will be appearing at Smithsonian Associates and you'll find out more in our show notes today.  My thanks always to the Smithsonian team for all they do to support the show.  My thanks to you, my wonderful audience here on The Not Old Better Show on radio and podcast.  Be well, be safe, treat one another with kindness and Let's Talk About Better, the Not Old Better Show on radio and podcast. Check out our website; notold-better.com for past shows and other FREE resources.  Thanks, everybody and I'll see you next week.   For more information about Smithsonian Associates, program details and resources, please click HERE: https://smithsonianassociates.org/ticketing/tickets/mister-rogers  

New Books Network
Facing Failure and the Museum Dedicated to It

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 59:17


Welcome to The Academic Life! In this episode you'll hear about: Why failure is part of the hidden curriculum Why you can't be creative or innovative without failing [sometimes a lot] How to learn from it, instead of sweeping it under the rug A failure our guest and our host each faced A discussion of the Museum of Failure Our guest is: Dr. Samuel West, a licensed psychologist (cognitive behavioral therapy) with a PhD in Organizational Psychology. His research focuses on creating climates for innovation by encouraging experimentation and exploration. In 2017 he founded the Museum of Failure showcasing over a 100 innovation failures from around the world. The aim of the museum is to stimulate productive discussions about the important role of failure for innovation and to increase organizational acceptance of failure. Our host is: Dr. Christina Gessler, the co-creator and co-producer of the Academic Life. She previously worked in Museum Education at a small museum in New York; and as a PhD student worked for a professor who was a Smithsonian curator. Listeners to this episode might also be interested in: The Museum of Failure The Museum of Broken Relationships The remote control referred to in this podcast The marshmallow candy referred to in this podcast TedTalk on Failing “Mindfully” Podcast on fear and failure Podcast on the role of failure in student success Failosophy: A Handbook for When Things Go Wrong, by Elizabeth Day Dr. Manu Kapur's work on Productive Failure You are smart and capable, but you aren't an island and neither are we. We reach across our mentor network to bring you experts about everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we'd bring on an expert about something? DM us on Twitter: The Academic Life @AcademicLifeNBN. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The Not Old - Better Show
#624 The Cartiers - Francesca Cartier Brickell

The Not Old - Better Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 30:55


The Cartiers - Francesca Cartier Brickell The Not Old Better Show, Smithsonian Associates Interview Series Welcome to The Not Old Better Show, Smithsonian Associates interview series on radio and podcast.  We have a wonderful show and interview today with Francesca Cartier Brickell.  Francesca Cartier Brickell is a member of the Cartier dynasty and is the author of the new book, The Cartiers – the untold story of the family behind the jewelry empire.   Francesca Cartier Brickell will be appearing at Smithsonian Associates and you'll find out more in our show notes today.  We are talking with Francesca Cartier Brickell today and we'll learn about the wondrous and eventful past of the Cartier family. The Cartier story unfolds against the backdrop of the world events and happenings that take place at the same time.  In our Smithsonian Associates interview series interview with Francesca Cartier Brickell, you'll get a glimpse into the Cartier business, the personal family innovation,  the fabulously wealthy often “Royal” clients, as well as the wildly fascinating story of the Cartiers, which all begins with Francesca Cartier Brickell discovering an old, hidden trunk. That of course is our guest today, Francesca Cartier Brickell reading from her new book, The Cartiers – the untold story of the family behind the jewelry empire  Please join me in welcoming to The Not Old Better Show, Smithsonian Associates interview series, Smithsonian Associate, Francesca Cartier Brickell.   My thanks to Francesca Cartier Brickell.  Francesca Cartier Brickell will be appearing at Smithsonian Associates and you'll find out more in our show notes today.  My thanks always to the Smithsonian team for all they do to support the show.  My thanks to you, my wonderful audience here on The Not Old Better Show on radio and podcast.  Be well, be safe, treat one another with kindness and Let's Talk About Better, the Not Old Better Show on radio and podcast.  Thanks, everybody and I'll see you next week.   For more information on this event and other Smithsonian Associates events,s, please click HERE: https://smithsonianassociates.org/ticketing/tickets/royal-rivals-cartiers-and-faberge

Stuff You Missed in History Class
Six Impossible Episodes: Prison Breaks

Stuff You Missed in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 39:27


Dramatic prison escapes often have some common themes -- they often include a lot of tunneling. Here are six highly ingenious and low-violence prison breaks from history.  Research: "Warriors, witches and damn rebel bitches: The Scotswomen who stood their ground." Herald [Glasgow, Scotland], 15 Sept. 2019. Gale In Context: Global Issues, link.gale.com/apps/doc/A599477490/GPS?u=mlin_n_melpub&sid=bookmark-GPS&xid=32ea1a50. Accessed 18 Apr. 2022. Abashiri Prison Museum. https://www.kangoku.jp/multilingual_english/ Alcatraz History. “The Great Escape from Alcatraz.” https://www.alcatrazhistory.com/alcesc1.htm Britannica, The Editors of Encyclopaedia. "Pennsylvania system". Encyclopedia Britannica, 20 Jul. 1998, https://www.britannica.com/topic/Pennsylvania-system. Accessed 20 April 2022. Callow, John. “Maxwell, William, fifth earl of Nithsdale.” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. 10/27/2010. https://doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/18413      Carlos, Marius Jr. “Yoshie Shiratori: The Incredible Story of a Man No Prison Could Hold.” Breaking Asia. 2/3/2020. https://www.breakingasia.com/gov/yoshie-shiratori-the-incredible-story-of-a-man-no-prison-could-hold/ Cho, Hahna. “Escape from Libby Prison.” Backstory Radio. 9/28/2018.  https://www.backstoryradio.org/blog/escape-from-libby-prison/ Detwiler, Jacqueline. "How Popular Mechanics inspired the most Famous escape in history." Popular Mechanics, vol. 195, no. 1, Jan.-Feb. 2018, pp. 74+. Gale In Context: Science, link.gale.com/apps/doc/A522758178/GPS?u=mlin_n_melpub&sid=bookmark-GPS&xid=e0949ca7. Accessed 18 Apr. 2022. Eastern State Penitentiary https://www.easternstate.org/ Eastern State Penitentiary. “"That's Where the Tunnel Is".” Via YouTube. 10/12/2010. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4dgaKHfbGlo Eicke, Leigh. "Maxwell [née Herbert], Winifred, countess of Nithsdale (1672–1749), Jacobite courtier." Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.  23. Oxford University Press. Date of access 20 Apr. 2022, FBI. “Alcatraz Escape.” https://www.fbi.gov/history/famous-cases/alcatraz-escape Kurohi, Rei. “French gangster escapes prison a second time: 5 other serial jailbreakers from around the world.” The Straits Times International Edition. 7/2/2018. https://www.straitstimes.com/world/french-gangster-escapes-prison-a-second-time-5-other-serial-jailbreakers-from-around-the-world Lewis, Robert. "Alcatraz escape of June 1962". Encyclopedia Britannica, 4 Jun. 2021, https://www.britannica.com/event/Alcatraz-escape-of-June-1962. Accessed 20 April 2022. Murray, Jean. “The Law Must Take Its Course – Limerick Women Sentenced to Transportation.” Limerick Civic Trust, September 2005 – August 2006. https://www.limerick.ie/sites/default/files/atoms/files/limerick_women_sentenced_to_transportation_by_jean_murray.pdf  Schreiber, Mark. “News outlets quick to fall in love with prison break coverage.” Japan Times. 5/5/2018. Slater, Sharon. “9 Limerick Women Escape Prison in 1930.” Limerick's Life. 10/17/2013. https://limerickslife.com/limerick-women-prison/ Stamp, Jimmy. “The Daring Escape From the Eastern State Penitentiary.” Smithsonian. 11/13/2013. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/the-daring-escape-from-the-eastern-state-penitentiary-180947688/ Stater, Victor. "Herbert, William, styled first marquess of Powis and Jacobite first duke of Powis (c. 1626–1696), Jacobite courtier." Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.  24. Oxford University Press. Zombek, Angela. "Libby Prison" Encyclopedia Virginia. Virginia Humanities, (07 Dec. 2020). Web. 20 Apr. 2022 https://encyclopediavirginia.org/entries/libby-prison/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Charles Mizrahi Show
Father of the Nuclear Navy — Marc Wortman

The Charles Mizrahi Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 53:54


His development of nuclear submarines changed the course of the Cold War … Yet Admiral Hyman Rickover — the “Father of the Nuclear Navy” — is largely unknown. Historian Marc Wortman joins host Charles Mizrahi to discuss how this unconventional engineer revolutionized U.S. naval power and the role this nuclear technology still plays today. Topics Discussed: An Introduction to Marc Wortman (00:00:00) Father of the Nuclear Navy (00:02:16) Submarine Warfare Before Nuclear Energy (00:6:36) Rickover's Revolutionary Idea (00:15:23) Sputnik and the Cold War (00:27:31) Rickover's Influence (00:32:25) Nuclear Warfare (00:43:39) Guest Bio: Marc Wortman is a historian, award-winning journalist and author. His work is featured in Vanity Fair, Smithsonian and Time. And he's appeared on CNN, NPR and the History Channel. Wortman is also the recipient of several writing prizes. His books have been named in The Daily Beast's “Best Long Reads” and in The Wall Street Journal's “Books of the Month.” His latest book (below) profiles the “Father of the Nuclear Navy.” Resources Mentioned: · https://www.amazon.com/Admiral-Hyman-Rickover-Engineer-Jewish/dp/0300243103 (Admiral Hyman Rickover: Engineer of Power) Transcript: https://charlesmizrahi.com/podcast/podcast-season-7/2022/05/10/father-nuclear-navy-marc-wortman/ (https://charlesmizrahi.com/podcast/)  Don't Forget To... • Subscribe to my podcast! • Download this episode to save for later • Liked this episode? Leave a kind review! Subscribe to Charles' Alpha Investor newsletter today: https://pro.banyanhill.com/m/1962483 (https://pro.banyanhill.com/m/1962483)

Biophilic Solutions
Form Follows Feeling: Serenity, Human Emotion, and Design with Suchi Reddy

Biophilic Solutions

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 40:55


How do we connect human emotion to the built environment? Is it possible to design spaces that produce serenity and wellbeing? Can we harness technology as a force for good rather than division? We're diving into all of this and more with renowned architect, artist, and self-professed “serene-ist” Suchi Reddy, founder of Reddymade. Throughout her career, Suchi has strived to put human emotion at the center of everything she creates, from a biophilic, LEED Platinum Google flagship store to an interactive art installation in the Smithsonian that challenges viewers to imagine our collective future. Suchi credits her childhood in India, where biophilia was embedded into everyday life, with shaping her extraordinary perspective.Suchi Reddy founded Reddymade in 2002 and in the years since, the firm has built a reputation for experimentation with materials, color, and technology -  as well as their approach to the overlapping fields of architecture, design, and immersive works of art. Reddymade is the recipient of numerous awards including the NYCxDesign award, AIA Brooklyn + Queens Award, AIA New York Excelsior Award, and Interior Design's best of the year awards. Show NotesReddymadeForm Follows Feeling Google at Milan 2019 Design Week: A Place for Being (YouTube)Suchi Reddy, Architect of Serenity (W Magazine)Designing a Digital Future by Suchi Reddy (New York Times Opinion)21 Questions with Architect Suchi Reddy (Curbed)Suchi Reddy and the Neuroaesthetics of Architecture (Design Well)Suchi Reddy talks about space, community, and tech in art with me + you (Stir World)Key Words: design, architecture, art, installation, technology, technology and culture, technology and society, nature, nature based learning, biophilia, biophilic design, Suchi Reddy, innovation, technology and innovation, neuroaesthetics, equity and inclusionCover Art Image © Ashok Sinha.

Pod Save the People
Disagree with Love (with Will Jawando)

Pod Save the People

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 94:38


DeRay, Kaya, De'Ara and Myles cover the underreported news of the week— including the ongoing Tulsa race massacre reparations lawsuit, the Smithsonian plans to return  looted items, the racial disparity in bar exam results, and the rise and fall of Kevin Ssamuels. DeRay interviews Montgomery County Council member and author Will Jawando about his new book My Seven Black Fathers: A Young Activist's Memoir of Race, Family, and the Mentors Who Made Him Whole. News:Kaya https://thegrio.com/2022/05/04/smithsonian-smith-looted-unethically-procured-items-return/?fbclid=IwAR2dTrkggSvSuqsCDK0X1EUa4y7cLCOz8c_8VH0D0iSwZ-aGYtSqvayquMgDe'Ara https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/judge-lets-tulsa-race-massacre-reparations-lawsuit-proceed-rcna27041DeRay https://news.bloomberglaw.com/us-law-week/racial-disparities-in-bar-exam-results-causes-and-remediesMyles https://www.rollingstone.com/culture/culture-news/kevin-samuels-dead-obituary-1349201/ Transcription coming soon.

The Nifty Show: Digital Collectibles and NFTs Podcast

We are launching the official Farrah Fawcett red bathing suit poster as an NFT collection next month.  This is an iconic piece of American pop culture. The original is hanging in the Smithsonian. Full show notes: Nifty.Show/158 SUBSCRIBE, RATE, & REVIEW: Podcasts: http://nifty.show/itunes Spotify: http://nifty.show/spotify Stitcher: http://nifty.show/stitcher Google Play: http://nifty.show/play iHeart: https://nifty.show/iheart YouTube: http://badco.in/youtube FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: @BadCrypto - @joelcomm - @finallyaligned Facebook: /TheNiftyShow /BadCryptoPod /JoelComm LinkedIn: /in/joelcomm Instagram: @BadCryptoPodcast DISCLAIMER: Do your own due diligence and research. Neither Joel Comm nor Zach Comm are FINANCIAL ADVISORS. We are sharing our journey with you as we learn more about this crazy little thing called cryptocurrency. We make NO RECOMMENDATIONS. Don't take anything we say as gospel. Do not come to our homes with pitchforks because you lost money by listening to us. We only share with you what we are learning and what we are investing it. We will never "pump or dump" any cryptocurrencies. Take what we say with a grain of salt. You must research this stuff on your own! Just know that we will always strive for RADICAL TRANSPARENCY with any show associations.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WILDERNESS AND WILDLIFE
Andrew Jakes - Smithsonian Conservation Biological Institute

WILDERNESS AND WILDLIFE

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 29:13


How do you like it so far?
Museum Curation with Jacqueline Stewart and Tyree Boyd-Pates

How do you like it so far?

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 58:45


This week we are joined by archivist Jacqueline Stewart and historian Tyree Boyd-Pates to discuss the power of museum curation. The role of the museum curator is critical to the way that museums are experienced. We begin by discussing museums as “safe spaces for dangerous ideas” – in other words, how museums can be harbingers of racist and colonialist rhetoric when spaces are improperly curated. Museums can not only present history through materials, but also have the power to represent the present materials. We then discuss how museums can be spaces of change through seeing not only more presentation of anti-colonial materials, but also seeing those materials represented through an anti-colonial gaze. The guests stress the importance of having more African American curators in order to not only tell the history of a people, but of the community as well.Jacqueline Stewart is film scholar, archivist, curator and a Professor in the Department of Cinema and Media Studies and the College, Director of Arts + Public Life at the University of Chicago. She is also the Chief artistic and programming officer at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles. She also serves as an appointee to the National Film Preservation Board and hosts Silent Sunday Nights on Turner Classic Movies.Stewart is also the author of Migrating to the Movies Cinema and Black Urban Modernity and William Greaves Filmaking as Mission, and is an editor of L.A. Rebellion Creating a New Black Cinema.Tyree Boyd-Pates is a historian, speaker,  and museum curator at the Autry Museum of the American West as the Associate Curator of Western History. He previously held the position of History Curator and Public Program Manager at the California African American Museum. He began his career as a Professor of Africana Studies at California State University Dominguez Hills. He has curated shows for notable institutions such as the Smithsonian, the LA Philharmonic, The Getty, and more. A full transcript of this episode will be available soon!Here are some of the references from this episode, for those who want to dig a little deeper:“Where Are the Jews?”Black Films at TCMBlack Cinema at the Academy Museum“Oscars So White”Iris BarryLewis JacobOscar MicheauxAnna May Wong ; Academy Series Academy Museum PodcastMaking  film history more inclusiveRacism in AnimationGene AutryCommunity CurationShare your thoughts via Twitter with Henry, Colin and the How Do You Like It So Far? account! You can also email us at howdoyoulikeitsofarpodcast@gmail.com.Music:“In Time” by Dylan Emmett and “Spaceship” by Lesion X.––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––In Time (Instrumental) by Dylan Emmet  https://soundcloud.com/dylanemmetSpaceship by Lesion X https://soundcloud.com/lesionxbeatsCreative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported — CC BY 3.0Free Download / Stream: https://bit.ly/in-time-instrumentalFree Download / Stream: https://bit.ly/lesion-x-spaceshipMusic promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/AzYoVrMLa1Q––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Sunny Side Up Nutrition
Redefining Healthy Cooking with Julia Turshen

Sunny Side Up Nutrition

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 38:56


Anna Lutz and Elizabeth Davenport chat with Julia Turshen about the process of researching and writing a cookbook, and how it felt to include an essay on breaking up with diet culture in her latest cookbook, Simply Julia. She also talks about how disconnection is inherent in diet culture; in families, or among friends, having weight loss as a common goal can feel temporarily good, but ultimately creates a deficit of joy around food. We discuss: How isolating it can be to grow up in a family that is immersed in diet culture, but also how connecting with people and having conversations about the impacts of diet culture is incredibly healing. How cookbooks are so often welcomed into peoples homes, but the contents are often not questioned. Examples of diet culture's trickery and disconnection when it appears in cooking and cookbooks. The over abundance of images of thin, white, cis-gendered women in food-related social media posts is detrimental and is largely what has lead us to equate that type of body with “healthy”. How forms of oppression tend to be best countered as a community. Julia's go-to meals. Links:  About Julia Turshen Simply Julia Keep Calm and Cook On Live cooking classes every Sunday afternoon Equity At The Table (EATT) God's Love We Deliver's Culinary Council Kitchen Cabinet Advisory Board for the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History Sunny Side Up Nutrition Podcast  Lutz, Alexander & Associates Nutrition Therapy Pinney Davenport Nutrition Julia Turshen is a New York Times bestselling cookbook author. Her latest cookbook, Simply Julia, a National Bestseller, is available wherever books are sold. Julia is also the author of Now & Again (named the Best Cookbook of 2018 by Amazon and an NPR ‘Great Read'), Feed the Resistance (named the Best Cookbook of 2017 by Eater), and Small Victories (named one of the Best Cookbooks of 2016 by the New York Times and NPR). She also hosts and produces the IACP-nominated podcast called ‘Keep Calm & Cook On.' Julia lives in the Hudson Valley with her wife and their pets. She teaches cooking classes most Sunday afternoons.

The Photo Detective
Cabinet Card Photos Transformed Into Art with Tom Butler

The Photo Detective

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 23:07


This week, Maureen Taylor, The Photo Detective, is joined by Tom Butler, an artist whose work may be controversial to some listeners. Tom uses unidentified cabinet cards to create art, often altering the original image to enhance them, which begs the question if he is destroying the image, or creating something even better than before.Related Episodes:Bonus Episode: Stitching on Pictures with Stitchography by EmmaEpisode 153: Ellis Island Immigrant Photo IdentifiedLinks:Sign up for my newsletter.Watch my YouTube Channel.Like the Photo Detective Facebook Page so you get notified of my Facebook Live videos.Need help organizing your photos? Check out the Essential Photo Organizing Video Course.Need help identifying family photos? Check out the Identifying Family Photographs Online Course.Have a photo you need help identifying? Sign up for photo consultation.About My Guest:For the last twelve years artist, Tom Butler has been appropriating anonymous Victorian cabinet cards with incorporated personal symbols such as hair, masks, flowers, and geometric abstractions, painted on the surface with gouache. In the process, he attempts to reveal the imagined personalities of the sitters while in the knowledge that he is cloaking them with parts of himself. He also makes self-portraits and uses cabinet cards and found photographs to create collages, sculptures, and rubbings to express both a love of the medium and a critique of photography as a whole.Butler was born in London, England and now lives in Portland ME, USA. He studied at Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton, Chelsea College of Art, UAL, and the Slade School of Fine Art, UCL. He exhibits internationally and his work can be found in collections such as The British Museum and Soho House.About Maureen Taylor:Maureen is a frequent keynote speaker on photo identification, photograph preservation, and family history at historical and genealogical societies, museums, conferences, libraries, and other organizations across the U.S., London, and Canada.  She's the author of several books and hundreds of articles and her television appearances include The View and The Today Show (where she researched and presented a complete family tree for host Meredith Vieira).  She's been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Better Homes and Gardens, The Boston Globe, Martha Stewart Living, Germany's top newspaper Der Spiegel, American Spirit, and The New York Times. Maureen was recently a spokesperson and photograph expert for MyHeritage.com, an internationally known family history website, and also writes guidebooks, scholarly articles, and online columns for such media as Smithsonian.com. Learn more at Maureentaylor.comDid you enjoy this episode? Please leave a review on Apple Podcasts.Support the show

The Dispatch Podcast
Supreme Court, Abortion, and the Political Fallout

The Dispatch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 54:14


What are we to make the Justice Samual Alito's leaked draft opinion in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health? Our hosts are here to discuss as the politics of abortion take shape. Sarah, Jonah, and David then pivot to what they learned from Tuesday's primary elections. And finally, what does all of this mean for Trump's chances in 2024? Show Notes:-David and Sarah's podcast breaking down the Suprme Court leak-French Press: “The Supreme Court Abortion Leak—Your Questions, Answered”-G-File: “Why Joe Biden Hates Saying the A-Word”-The Sweep: “What Does J.D. Vance's Victory Tell Us About the Midterms?”-Sarah in the Washington Post: “We in the ‘shallow state' thought we could help. Instead, we obscured the reality of a Trump presidency.”-Smithsonian's National Zoo: “Tragic Loss of Animal Life at Smithsonian's National Zoo”-DCist: “There's An Angry Turkey Attacking People On The Anacostia Riverwalk”

The Not Old - Better Show
#623 Breaking the Age Code - Dr. Becca Levy

The Not Old - Better Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 31:10


Breaking the Age Code - Dr. Becca Levy The Not Old Better Show, Science of Aging Interview Series Welcome to The Not Old Better Show on radio and podcast.  I'm Paul Vogelzang and today's show will give you some aging insights to live longer and more joyfully.   Sometimes life isn't so joyful, and we've all had moments of frustration when we can't remember someone's name or where we put the car keys. If this happens to you and you're 25, you shrug it off as a temporary lapse of memory. If you're over 60, like so many in our Not Old Better Show audience, you likely label it as a ‘senior moment” and start to question your cognitive abilities. According to our guest today, Yale Professor Becca Levy, PhD and author of the new book, Breaking the Age Code: How Your Age Beliefs Determine How Long and Well You Live, labeling this a ‘senior moment' is an example of an ageist belief. Dr. Levy tells us today these “moments of forgetfulness can happen at any age. Sometimes memory simply short circuits and it happens to everyone.” People's beliefs about aging have a profound impact on their health, influencing everything from their memory and sensory perceptions to how well they walk, how fully they recover from disabling illness, and how long they live, including where they live, and interestingly enough, living in Japan, of all places has some real aging and longevity benefits. That of course is our guest today, Dr. Becca Levy reading from her new book, ‘Breaking The Age Code.' Available HERE on Apple Books. We are talking aging today with Becca Levy and know right out of the gate that age, according to our audience and Dr. Levy is not seen as a negative experience, characterized by terms such as decrepit, incompetent, dependent, and senile.  Join us today to learn about when our views are positive we are more likely to be active and resilient and to have a stronger will to live joyfully. Please join me in welcoming to The Not Old Better Show on radio and podcast, Dr. Becca Levy. My thanks today to Dr. Becca Levy for her generous reading, her expertise, and research, and her new book, ‘Breaking the Age Code,' available HERE on Apple Books.  We'll have links in the show notes to Dr. Levy and her new book…please check it out at NotOld-Better.com.  My thanks to you our wonderful audience of The Not Old Better Show.  Please be well, be safe, let's have those positive age beliefs as Dr. Levy suggests, and let's talk about better…the Not Old Better Show on radio and podcast.  I'm already looking forward to our next show…have a great week and thanks, everybody.

MTR Podcasts
Paige Hernandez

MTR Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 50:26


About the guestPaige Hernandez is a multidisciplinary artist who is critically acclaimed as a performer, director, choreographer and playwright.  As an AEA equity actress, Paige has performed on many stages throughout the country. She has collaborated with the Lincoln Center and has been commissioned by several companies including the National New Play Network, the Smithsonian, The Kennedy Center, La Jolla Playhouse and the Glimmerglass Festival. She is the recipient of an Individual Artist Award from the Maryland State Arts Council as well as four Helen Hayes nominations for choreography, directing and performance.  Paige has also been named a “classroom hero” by The Huffington Post, a “Citizen Artist Fellow” with the Kennedy Center, “40 under 40” by the Washington Post and one of “Six Theatre Workers You Should Know” by American Theatre Magazine. She is elated to be the Associate Artistic Director of Everyman Theatre in her hometown of Baltimore, MD. With her company B-FLY ENTERTAINMENT, Paige continues to develop and tour original work internationally.ses. The Truth In This ArtThe Truth In This Art is a podcast interview series supporting vibrancy and development of Baltimore & beyond's arts and culture.Mentioned in this episode:B-FLY ENTERTAINMENTTo find more amazing stories from the artist and entrepreneurial scenes in & around Baltimore, check out my episode directory.★ Support this podcast ★

Brew Skies Happy Hour
Episode 4: Dr. Theresa McCulla from the Smithsonian

Brew Skies Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 59:55


Dr. Theresa McCulla has what might be the best job in the world. As the curator of the American Brewing History Initiative, she collects objects, documents, and oral histories from the talented women and men who make the American brewing industry the most creative in the world. In this episode she helps Bret and Mike make sense of what they have learned about the history of craft brewing thus far and leaves them with a lot of ideas for future episodes.

The Not Old - Better Show
#622 Senior Products, Innovation & Entrepreneurship - John Zapolski

The Not Old - Better Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 34:59


Senior Products, Innovation & Entrepreneurship                             - John Zapolski The Not Old Better Show, Business Buildout Interview Series Welcome to The Not Old Better Show, Business Buildout interview series on radio and podcast.  I'm Paul Vogelzang and today's show is brought to you by MD Hearing Aid.   As we in The Not Old Better Show audience know well, age can be an advantage.  And, today, entrepreneurship isn't just for the young.  Experts say that more adults over age 60 are starting their own businesses than ever before.  And, as a matter of fact, older adults are finding that starting a business can be the perfect way to turn a lifetime of experience into something meaningful, take control of their time, counter workplace ageism, and, in some cases, make a lot more money. There are challenges, though.  Lots of them, but that's not surprising.  If it was easy, we'd all be doing it.   One who has done it is our guest today, John Zapolski.  He's here today to talk about the myths of senior-related products, how to research senior opportunities, and how to motivate yourselves to do what you love, alongside people you respect, in later life.   John Zapolski is the founder and CEO of Alive Ventures. As a serial social entrepreneur, John has long worked at the intersection of new ventures, philanthropy, design, and culture. He previously co-founded and led several new social purpose ventures, including Fonderie 47 and STEAM Carnival. John Zapolski founded and created Alive Ventures to bring focus, creative energy, and new investment to the aspects of life worth looking forward to as we age. We're talking about how to design new products for the older age community, market opportunities in the older age demographic, and assumptions and misconceptions about building a startup targeted at older adults…what you think about this may be wrong…stay tuned…Please join me in welcoming to The Not Old Better Show Business Buildout interview series on radio and podcast, John Zapolski.   My thanks to MD Hearing Aid for sponsoring today's show.  Please support our sponsors and learn more at our website, NotOld-Better.com.  My thanks to John Zapolski for his generous time, expertise and inspiration.  My thanks to you, my wonderful Not Old Better Show audience on radio and podcast. Please be well, be safe, be kind to one another and let's talk about better…The Not Old Better Show on radio and podcast.  See you next week…thanks, everybody.

Sidedoor
Bonus: Moonshine

Sidedoor

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 28:46


We're hard at work producing the next season of Sidedoor, but just in case you can't get enough Smithsonian podcasts, we're sharing a special guest episode of AirSpace, from the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum. This story is about a truly intoxicating period of American history – Prohibition! In this episode of AirSpace, you'll learn how banning alcohol in the U.S. gave the fledgling air travel industry the shot it needed to get off the ground. You can subscribe to AirSpace wherever you get your podcasts.

The John Batchelor Show
What is Project Maven? Francis Rose, @FrancisRoseDC @FedScoop, host, Government Matters (Washington, D.C.); NationalDefenseWeek.com and francisrose.com; The Daily Scoop, The Fed Scoop podcast

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 9:35


Photo:  A stand-alone exhibit entitled, “Innovations in Defense: Artificial Intelligence and the Challenge of Cybersecurity,” features Pittsburgh-based team ForAllSecure's Mayhem Cyber Reasoning System. The system took first place at the August 2016 Cyber Grand Challenge finals, beating out six other computers. The Mayhem CRS  was put on display at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. The exhibit was produced by the Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation. DoD photo What is Project Maven? Francis Rose, @FrancisRoseDC   @FedScoop,  host, Government Matters (Washington, D.C.); NationalDefenseWeek.com and francisrose.com; The Daily Scoop, The Fed Scoop  podcast https://www.fedscoop.com/radio/project-maven-is-moving-improving-how-citizens-interact-with-government-what-the-army-gains-from-cloud%EF%BF%BC/

The Not Old - Better Show
#621 Smashing Statues - Dr. Erin Thompson

The Not Old - Better Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 29:49


Smashing Statues - Dr. Erin Thompson The Not Old Better Show, Smithsonian Associates Interview Series Welcome to The Not Old Better Show, Smithsonian Associates interview series on radio and podcast.  I'm Paul Vogelzang and we have a wonderful episode today with Smithsonian Associate, Dr. Erin Thompson.   Dr. Erin Thompson, is a professor of art crime at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, and is a leading expert in the legal, political, and social issues involved in such battles.  As America's only professor of art crime, Dr. Thompson studies the black market for looted antiquities, art forgery, museum theft, and the  ethics of digital reproductions of US cultural heritage. Dr. Thompson's new book Smashing Statues: The Rise and Fall of America's Public Monuments and her upcoming presentation at Smithsonian Associates are  the subject of our conversation today.  More details are found on our website and at Smithsonian Associates with links in our show notes. A timely and fractious national debate over public monuments has erupted in America. Some people risk imprisonment to tear down long-ignored hunks of marble; others form armed patrols to defend them. Why do we care so much about statues? And who gets to decide which ones should stay up and which should come down?  American holds thousands of historical monuments… That of course is our guest today, author Erin L. Thompson as she traces the turbulent history of American monuments and its ironies—starting with the enslaved Black man who helped make the statue of Freedom that still sits atop the U.S. Capitol—and explores the surprising motivations behind such contemporary flashpoints as the toppling of a statue of Columbus at the Minnesota State Capitol in 2020.   Please join me in welcoming to The Not Old Better Show Smithsonian Associate's interview series on radio and podcast, author, professor of art crime and Smithsonian Associate Dr. Erin Thompson. For more information, please click HERE:  https://smithsonianassociates.org/ticketing/tickets/smashing-statues  

Stuff You Missed in History Class
The Okapi and the Western World

Stuff You Missed in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 35:27


The okapi became known to European explorers in the late 19th century, and then several explorers tried and failed to even see a live okapi. Sir Harry Hamilton Johnston often gets credit for its discovery, but there's much more to the story than that.  Research: “Obituary: Dr. Wilhelm Junker.” Journal of the American Geographical Society of New York, vol. 24, 1892, pp. 148–50, http://www.jstor.org/stable/196694. Accessed 8 Apr. 2022. “Newly Discovered Beast of the Congo Forests.” Saturday Evening Kansas Commoner. June 27, 1901. https://www.newspapers.com/image/383188816/?terms=%22equus%20johnstoni%22&match=1 Britannica, The Editors of Encyclopaedia. "Wilhelm Junker". Encyclopedia Britannica, 2 Apr. 2022, https://www.britannica.com/biography/Wilhelm-Junker L., R. Dr. P. L. Sclater, F.R.S. . Nature 91, 455 (1913). https://doi.org/10.1038/091455a0 H., M. Sir Harry Johnston, S.G.M.G., K.C.B. Nature 120, 339–340 (1927). https://doi.org/10.1038/120339a0 Kinder, John M. “Year Zero: Restocking the Post-war Zoo.” National WWII Museum New Orleans. Sept. 21, 2021. https://www.nationalww2museum.org/war/articles/restocking-post-world-war-ii-zoos Silverstein, Raymond O. “A note on the term “Bantu” as first used by W. H. I. Bleek.” African Studies. Volume 27. 1968. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00020186808707298 “Okapi's Half-century.” Zooquarium. Spring 2014. https://www.eaza.net/assets/Uploads/Zooquaria/ZQ85.pdf “A MOST CURIOUS ANIMAL, A CULTURAL SYMBOL, A SPECIES ON THE BRINK.” Okapi Conservation Project. https://www.okapiconservation.org/the-okapi/ “World Okapi Day.” IUCN. Oct. 18, 2021. https://www.iucn.org/news/species-survival-commission/202110/world-okapi-day “Bronx Zoo Debuts Its Baby Okapi.” WCS Newsroom. July 27, 2009. https://newsroom.wcs.org/News-Releases/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/4802/Bronx-Zoo-Debuts-Its-Baby-Okapi.aspx Brzezinski, Bartosz. “Of okapis and men: Antwerp Zoo helps preserve endangered species.” Flanders Today. Aug. 14, 2016. https://web.archive.org/web/20160814194411/http://www.flanderstoday.eu/living/okapis-and-men-antwerp-zoo-helps-preserve-endangered-species Britannica, The Editors of Encyclopaedia. "Sir Harry Hamilton Johnston". Encyclopedia Britannica, 27 Aug. 2021, https://www.britannica.com/biography/Harry-Hamilton-Johnston Raffaele, Paul. “The Pygmies' Plight.” Smithsonian. December 2008. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/the-pygmies-plight-93401092/ Lindsey, Susan Lyndaker, et al. “The Okapi: Mysterious Animal of Congo-Zaire.” University of Texas Press. 1999. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pelecanus Radio
Pelecanus News May 1 2022

Pelecanus Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 10:12


Check out these awesome headlines from the last few weeks! All podcasts can be found at Pelecanus.org, iTunes, Soundcloud, Spotify, Stitcher, Amazon Podcasts, and Google Podcasts. Long form podcasts including our series with The Smithsonian's Earth Optimism "The Possibilists" and Pelecanus Deep Dives can also be found on YouTube! Drawdown Wind Power Overtook Coal, Nuclear For First Time in U.S. on March 29 https://www.npr.org/2022/04/14/1092806582/wind-power-energy-source?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_term=nprnews&utm_campaign=npr&fbclid=IwAR1asFMF4qmNlW88UnpHbFkpcy4LbXnB83Okwk2QUdTtymhnfSSeAfJx-5c ‘Historic': global climate plans can now keep heating below 2C, study shows https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2022/apr/13/historic-global-climate-plans-can-now-keep-heating-below-2c-study-shows Legal California is investigating Big Oil for allegedly misleading the public on recycling https://www.npr.org/2022/04/28/1095305949/california-is-investigating-big-oil-for-allegedly-misleading-the-public-on-recyc Life All 4 building blocks of DNA have been found in meteorites https://www.vice.com/en/article/88gpk3/all-four-building-blocks-of-dna-have-been-found-in-meteorites

The Podcast by KevinMD
A physician's personal great resignation

The Podcast by KevinMD

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 14:46


"Before retirement, I switched everything I cared about to my personal one and unsubscribed to everything I didn't care about. For the first few months, I religiously checked my work email. Sure, I was missing important information. I finally weaned myself like a reluctant nursing baby. On the rare occasions I check my work email, it has spam, irrelevant ads, missives from my previous employer about meetings or new incentive plans I care nothing about. In contrast, my personal email has lunch invitations from friends and interesting articles from Smithsonian, National Geographic, Atlas Obscura, and NY Times. Don't get me wrong. I still read the frequent emails from the pediatric hospitalist listserv, a very busy means of communication for the nation's pediatric hospitalists. It helps me stay up to date on new therapies and new issues in pediatrics. But most of my emails now evoke pleasure, not duty." Ann F. Beach is a pediatric hospitalist. She shares her story and discusses her KevinMD article, "A physician's personal great resignation." Did you enjoy today's episode? Rate and review the show so more audiences can find The Podcast by KevinMD. Subscribe on your favorite podcast app to get notified when a new episode comes out. Reflect and earn 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 CME for this episode. Also available in Category 1 CME bundles. Powered by CMEfy - a seamless way for busy clinician learners to discover Internet Point-of-Care Learning opportunities that reward AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Learn more at about.cmefy.com/cme-info

The Photo Detective
A Case of Mistaken Identity: Sue's Wedding Photo Reunion

The Photo Detective

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 11:21


This week, Maureen Taylor, The Photo Detective, is joined by Greg Kozlick, who helped reunite a woman with long-lost wedding photos – in the story of a photo reunion that's sure to tug on the heartstrings. Related Episodes:Episode 32: The Man Behind Dead FredBonus: Lost history Discovered in the Recycling with Paul MoarLinks:Returning the SlidesSign up for my newsletter.Watch my YouTube Channel.Like the Photo Detective Facebook Page so you get notified of my Facebook Live videos.Need help organizing your photos? Check out the Essential Photo Organizing Video Course.Need help identifying family photos? Check out the Identifying Family Photographs Online Course.Have a photo you need help identifying? Sign up for photo consultation.About My Guest:Greg Kozlick has a deep passion for photography including portraiture, architectural images, and photojournalism. He is currently a student at Aurora University.About Maureen Taylor:Maureen is a frequent keynote speaker on photo identification, photograph preservation, and family history at historical and genealogical societies, museums, conferences, libraries, and other organizations across the U.S., London, and Canada.  She's the author of several books and hundreds of articles and her television appearances include The View and The Today Show (where she researched and presented a complete family tree for host Meredith Vieira).  She's been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Better Homes and Gardens, The Boston Globe, Martha Stewart Living, Germany's top newspaper Der Spiegel, American Spirit, and The New York Times. Maureen was recently a spokesperson and photograph expert for MyHeritage.com, an internationally known family history website, and also writes guidebooks, scholarly articles, and online columns for such media as Smithsonian.com. Learn more at Maureentaylor.comDid you enjoy this episode? Please leave a review on Apple PodcastsSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/photodetective)

The Not Old - Better Show
#620 The Insect Crisis - Oliver Milman

The Not Old - Better Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 28:03


The Insect Crisis - Oliver Milman The Not Old Better Science Interview Series Welcome to The Not Old Better Show on radio and podcast.  Great to be with you today on a beautiful spring day…not a cloud in the sky…birds chirping…just perfect outside…but, is it? It isn't, because the world's insect population is in decline — and that's bad news for humans. Our guest today is science and environment author Oliver Milman.  Oliver Milman will join us in a moment to discuss his new book, Insect Crisis: The Fall of the Tiny Empires That Run the World, and Oliver Milman will tell us about his devastating examination of how collapsing insect populations worldwide threaten everything from wild birds to the food on our plate. From ants scurrying under leaf litter to bees able to fly higher than Mount Kilimanjaro, insects are everywhere. Three out of every four of our planet's known animal species are insects. In The Insect Crisis, acclaimed journalist Oliver Milman dives into the torrent of recent evidence that suggests this kaleidoscopic group of creatures is suffering the greatest existential crisis in its remarkable 400-million-year history. What is causing the collapse of the insect world?  Why does this alarming decline pose such a threat to us? And what can be done to stem the loss of the miniature empires that hold aloft life as we know it? That of course is our guest today, author and science writer Oliver Milman reading from his new book, Insect Crisis, and we'll answer questions about insects as pests, they're not, the full scope of this insect loss, what the loss of pollinators means, and a portrait of a crisis that threatens to upend the workings of our collective history. Part warning, part celebration of the incredible variety of insects, The Insect Crisis is a wake-up call for us all. Please join me in welcoming to The Not Old Better Show on radio and podcast, science and environment best-selling author Oliver Milman. My thanks to science and environment best-selling author Oliver Milman, author of the new best-selling book The Insect Crisis.  My thanks to you, my wonderful Not Old Better Show audience on radio and podcast.  Please check out our website at NotOld-Better.com for all our archives, show notes and great resources.  Have a great week and remember, let's talk about better…The Not Old Better Show.  Thanks, everybody.

The Daily Gardener
April 29, 2022 St. Robert's Day, Henri Frederic Amiel, Agnes Chase, Jerry Seinfeld, The Brooklyn Botanic Garden, The Language of Butterflies by Wendy Williams, and Karel Ćapek

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 15:00


Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart   Podchaser Leave a Review   Support The Daily Gardener Buy Me A Coffee    Connect for FREE! The Friday Newsletter |  Daily Gardener Community   Historical Events St. Robert's Day Saint Robert of Molesme ("mo-LESS-mah") was an 11th-century herbalist, abbot, and founder of the Cistercian ("sis-TUR-shin") order - a Catholic religious order of monks and nuns that branched off from the Benedictines. They are also known as Bernardines ("BUR-nah-deen"), after the highly influential Bernard of Clairvaux, or as White Monks - a reference to the color of the cowl worn over their habits as opposed to the black cowl worn by Benedictines. They are commonly called Trappists. Many common wildflowers are named in honor of St. Robert. Some believe that Herb Robert, or Bird's Eye, the little Wild Geranium, was named in honor of St. Robert.  Another theory is that Herb Robert is named for Robin Goodfellow, a pseudonym for the forest sprite known as Puck.   1852 On this day, Henri Frederic Amiel, Swiss philosopher and poet, wrote in his journal:  I went out into the garden to see what progress the spring was making. I strolled from the irises to the lilacs, round the flowerbeds, and in the shrubberies. Delightful surprise! At the corner of the walk, half-hidden under a thick clump of shrubs, a small-leaved corchorus had flowered during the night... the little shrub glittered before me... Mother of marvels, mysterious and tender Nature, why do we not live more in thee?   1869 Birth of Agnes Chase, American botanist. Agnes was an agrostologist—a studier of grass. She was a petite, fearless, indefatigable person and entirely self-taught as a botanist. Her first position was as an illustrator at the USDA's Bureau of Plant Industry in Washington, D.C., working for the botanist Albert Spear Hitchcock. When Hitchcock applied for funding to go on expeditions, higher-ups approved the travel for Hitchcock, but not for Agnes - saying the job should belong to "real research men." Undeterred, Agnes raised her own funding to go on the expeditions. She cleverly partnered with missionaries in Latin America to arrange for accommodations with host families. She shrewdly observed, The missionaries travel everywhere, and like botanists do it on as little money as possible. They gave me information that saved me much time and trouble. During a climb of one of Brazil's highest mountains, Agnes reportedly returned to camp with a "skirt filled with plant specimens." One of her major works, the "First Book of Grasses," was translated into Spanish and Portuguese. It taught generations of Latin American botanists who recognized Agnes's contributions long before their American counterparts. When Hitchcock retired, Agnes was his backfill. When Agnes reached retirement age, she ignored the rite of passage altogether and refused to be put out to pasture. She kept going to work - six days a week - overseeing the largest collection of grasses in the world in her office under the red towers at her beloved Smithsonian Institution. When Agnes was 89, she became the eighth person to become an honorary fellow of the Smithsonian. A reporter covering the event said, Dr. Chase looked impatient as if she were muttering to herself, "This may be well and good, but it isn't getting any grass classified, sonny." While researching Agnes Chase, I came across this little article in The St. Louis Star and Times. Agnes gave one of her books on grass a biblical title, The Meek That Inherit the Earth. The story pointed out that, Mrs. Chase began her study of grass by reading about it in the Bible. In the very first chapter of Genesis, ...the first living thing the Creator made was grass. ... for grass is fundamental to life. [Agnes] said, "Grass is what holds the earth together. Grass made it possible for the human race to abandon... cave life and follow herds. Civilization was based on grass [and] this significance... still holds."   1954 Birth of Jerry Seinfeld, American stand-up comedian, actor, writer, and producer. He is best known for playing a semi-fictionalized version of himself in the sitcom Seinfeld, which he created and wrote with Larry David. He once joked, Why do people give each other flowers to celebrate various important occasions?  They're killing living creatures?  Why restrict it to plants?  "Sweetheart, let's make up. Have this deceased squirrel."   2017 On this day in 2017, The New York Times tweeted that, The Brooklyn Botanic Garden cherry blossom festival is set for today and tomorrow, regardless of when nature [decided] to push play.   Grow That Garden Library™ Book Recommendation The Language of Butterflies by Wendy Williams This book came out in 2020, and the subtitle is How Thieves, Hoarders, Scientists, and Other Obsessives Unlocked the Secrets of the World's Favorite Insect. If you're a fan of blue morpho butterflies, you're going to love the cover of Wendy's book because it is covered with a kaleidoscope of blue morpho butterflies. So it's impossibly beautiful. And Wendy's book is a five-star book on Amazon. Now Wendy is an author who loves spending time outdoors. She loves skiing. She loves horseback riding. (In fact, her first bestselling book was called The Horse. And Wendy has traveled the world. She's spent a lot of time in Africa, Europe, and North American mountain chains and prairies. But when it comes to just regular daily life, Wendy lives in Cape Cod in Massachusetts with her husband and her Border Collie, Taff. Now I love the way that Wendy writes because she's very conversational. And I also like how she organized this book into three main sections: the past, the present, and the future. And then, to show you how friendly her writing is, her chapters have very intriguing titles. In the section on the past, there's The Gateway Drug, The Number One Butterfly, and then How Butterflies Saved Charles Darwin's Bacon. (Great chapter.) And then, in the present, chapters include A Parasol of Monarchs, The Honeymoon Hotel, and On The Rain Dance Ranch. Great story there. And then, in the future section, Wendy's chapters include The Social Butterfly, The Paroxysms of Ecstasy, and The Butterfly Highway. And Wendy is right; butterflies are the world's most beloved insects. They've been called flying flowers, and gardeners are passionate about butterflies. And many gardeners today are working to help save the Monarch from extinction. Now The Washington Post said this about Wendy's book, Williams takes us on a humorous and beautifully crafted journey that explores both the nature of these curious and highly intelligent insects. And the eccentric individuals who coveted them. And, of course, most of those folks were scientists and or botanists. So I love this book, and I love all of those stories. This book is 256 pages Of butterflies. It's eye-opening and tender. It's an incredibly profound look at butterflies - it's a butterfly biography. And it examines the vital role that butterflies play in our world. You can get a copy of The Language of Butterflies by Wendy Williams and support the show using the Amazon link in today's show notes for around $2.   Botanic Spark Here's an excerpt from Karel Ćapek's chapter on The Gardener's April from his book The Gardener's Year (1984). Gardeners have certainly arisen by culture and not by natural selection. If they had developed naturally, they would look differently. They would have legs like beetles, so that they need not sit on their heels. And they would have wings - in the first place for their beauty and secondly, so that they might float over the beds. Those who have no experience can not imagine how one's legs are in the way when there's nothing to stand on. How stupidly long they are... Or how impossibly short they are if one has to reach to the other side of the bed without treading on a clump of pyrethrum (that's chrysanthemum) or on the shoots of Columbine. If only one could hang in a belt and swim over the beds. Or have at least four hands with only a head and a cap and nothing else. But because the gardener is outwardly constructed as imperfectly as other people, all he can do is to show us of what he is capable. To balance on tiptoe on one foot, to float in the air like a Russian dancer, to straddle four yards wide, to step as lightly as a butterfly or a wagtail, to reach everywhere and avoid everything, and still try to keep some sort of respectability so that people will not laugh at him.  Of course, at a passing glance, from a distance, you don't see anything of the gardener but his romp. Everything else like the head, arms, and legs is hidden underneath.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener And remember: For a happy, healthy life, garden every day.

Lez Geek Out!cast
Episode 125: Our Flag Means Death

Lez Geek Out!cast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 53:28


Our Flag Means Death: alt-history fanfic rom-com for pirates!  Andi and Lise really, really enjoyed the immensely popular first season of the HBO Max series Our Flag Means Death, which is a delightful take on the story of “Gentleman Pirate” Stede Bonnet and the legendary Blackbeard. Includes a slow-burn M/M romance, a nonbinary character (and romance!), wonderful dialogue, excellent storytelling, diverse characters. Includes great seafaring scenes, laughs, and interesting underlying messages about identity and the choices we make. Unfortunately, HBO Max has not announced plans for a second season. Andi and Lise find that…troublesome. Regardless, watch this season while you can!  Trailer HERE.  More info HERE.  Smithsonian article about Stede Bonnet HERE.  Shout-outs: Lise started watching another HBO Max series, Minx, set in 1970s Los Angeles in which a young white feminist teams up with a publisher to create the first erotic magazine for women. Lise finds the main character's evolution as a feminist a key part of the series, as the character has certain views that are challenged by reality. Meanwhile, Andi has started some seedlings for her vegetable planters and she's excited about that. Yay, gardening!  Find us on Twitter @LGOPodcast; @andimarquette; @LiseMactague. Please like and subscribe! It helps! 

I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast
The day that dinosaurs went extinct

I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 69:06


For links to every news story, all of the details we shared about Macrogryphosaurus, links from Riley Black, and our fun fact check out https://iknowdino.com/Macrogryphosaurus-Episode-387/Join us at www.patreon.com/iknowdino for dinosaur requests, bonus content, ad-free episodes, and more.Dinosaur of the day Macrogryphosaurus, the largest known elasmarian.Interview with Riley Black, a science writer and communicator, whose work has appeared in Smithsonian, National Geographic, and Scientific American. She has written a number of books, including "The Last Days of Dinosaurs: An Asteroid, Extinction, and the Beginning of Our World", which came out this week.In dinosaur news this week:There was a new response to the paper estimating there were probably billions of T. rexIn Missouri, the House recently voted to update the name of their state dinosaur from Hypsibema to ParrosaurusA group of Toronto Raptors fans dressed up in inflatable dinosaur costumes to celebrate the team making the playoffsThe Smithsonian is making exclusive products with Jurassic World: DominionPast Eons Productions is recreating the BBC Walking With Dinosaurs documentary using Jurassic World Evolution 2 mods This episode is brought to you in part by MEL Science. They offer science subscription boxes teaching STEM, chemistry, and physics for science enthusiasts of all ages. Use promo code "ikd" for 60% off your 1st month of any subscription. Act quickly, the promo code is limited and will only be active for 1 month. Get your box at https://melscience.com/sBGY/ with promo code ikd.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Honey! I'm Homeschooling The Kids
S6E125: Natural Learning Resources

Honey! I'm Homeschooling The Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 55:38


Natural Learning Resources If you are new to homeschooling, are thinking about homeschooling or need some fresh ideas, then this episode is for you! In this episode I'm sharing natural learning resources and ideas that we can use in our home education journey. This applies to all forms of Homeschooling and Unschooling. This episode is for the families that are looking to try something of the school box of learning. What I share in this episode is not expensive curriculum. There is no curriculum mentioned at all, actually! Instead, these are resources, activities and tools that are easy to find and accessible within our home or community. Where To Begin? Where to begin? First I go through important steps to consider when you are beginning your homeschooling journey or when your family needs a change. I offer questions and prompts to consider on your own and with your family. Here are a few examples:   What is important in your home learning journey? What does learning mean to you? Education? What do I value? My learning history. Where am I coming from? Do my past education and school experiences reflect my current reality? Are there things from my past learning experience that I would like to change? Why? What impact would that have? Engage with your children- What are they interested in? What would they like to see and do in their homeschool life? In their daily life? What would they like to create? To play? What would they like to Build? Envision your home learning journey together- What do we love to do? When do we feel safe? What core values do we want to carry through? Natural Learning Resources That My Family Has Loved I share activities and resources that have supported my family's learning journey in many ways. In this episode I break up the resources into "subjects" or learning outcomes that they fall into. Literacy: Family Read Alouds ~ All of the ways that it has enhanced our connection, the how, why and where it has added to our learning and suggestions Act It Out- Drama, Theatre, Dress Up & Make Believe~ Ways and resources we can enhance this at home and what it builds for our learning Audio~ Books and Podcasts Visual- Movies, Screen-time and Digital Media Math: Lego~The math foundations that it builds Maps~What we always have in our home, ways we incorporate maps and the math concepts and foundations maps build and support Natural Learning Resources and tools that support Measurement- Digital Scales, Tape Measures, Sticks and more Building~ The materials we can find around us Board Games~ Gameschooling and my favourite places to find affordable games Creating Surveys Science: Nature Journaling and Digital Apps Science Experiments~ Ideas from the kitchen Fire Science shows and documentaries~ Cosmos, Gross Science, Magic School Bus, Smithsonian, Bill Nye, Google Earth World Studies~ Food and Recipes, Geology and Geography Gardening Building and Machines~Ideas, Recycle Materials, Field Trips Space and Technology Blockchain and Cryptocurrency Social Studies: History, Geography, People, Political Science, Ecology, Economics, Law World Studies- Kitchen Studies and projects Dancing, Painting, Folklore, Mythology Ted Talks~ My daughter's favourite is Fighting Cancer With Dance Travel Family History and Family Tree Local History from Elders and Community Resource Mentions and Links Patreon~ Join my Patreon community~https://www.patreon.com/honeyimhomeschoolingthekids Honey! I'm Homeschooling Club on Clubhouse App Instagram Karla Marie Williams~ Inspired Learning Through Living and Unschooling Teens Math episodes mentioned~ Math Codes with Kohila Sivas and Learning Math with Monica Robertson Kitchen Scale- We use it often. This is the one we have that is simple and not expensive~ Digital Scale Don't forget, if you are interested in my Gameschooling Guide contact me through here, Social Media or join my Patreon where you have access to any guides and resources I create and share. Khan Academy (A Favourite in our home) Inhabit Media Inhabit Education       See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Stereo Chemistry
Bonus: There's more to James Harris's story

Stereo Chemistry

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 45:37


Chemists may know James Harris as the first Black scientist to be credited with codiscovering an element. In fact, we referenced this in a previous episode of Stereo Chemistry about making superheavy elements. But beyond this memorable factoid, details about the accomplished nuclear chemist are scarce, and most sources repeat the same superficial information. Kristen Frederick-Frost, curator of modern science at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, wants to change that. After discovering that the museum's database lacked material on Harris, she scoured archival records and sought out former colleagues, friends, and family members to fill in details of his life and career. In this bonus episode of Stereo Chemistry, host Kerri Jansen and special guest Dr. Darryl Boyd join Frederick-Frost to explore James Harris's story beyond the discoveries that made him famous. And we even get an unexpected peek into his lab, courtesy of the US National Archives. Boyd, a polymer chemist, previously researched James Harris while writing a short article for C&EN's “Black Chemists You Should Know About.” A transcript of this episode is available at bit.ly/37P0qpY. Image credit: Steve Gerber/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  © 2010 The Regents of the University of California, through the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Music credit: "Just Enough for a Heartbeat" by Roy Young Contact Stereo Chemistry by emailing cenfeedback@acs.org.

Fringe Radio Network
Listener Communications - Snake Brothers

Fringe Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 144:17


We're back from the conference in Sedona and ready to dive into listener emails and some long-form rambling discussions, SnakeBros style. Laura also joins us in the Tangent cube for this episode.We read some great emails of experiences and encounters, questions about UFOs and spirituality, travelling the world on foot looking at ancient sites, and a visit to one of the Smithsonian's "storage" buildings.

The Chills at Will Podcast
Episode 120 with traci kato-kiriyama, Thoughtful and Reflective Artist, Creative, Historian, and Activist, and Writer of the Work of Art that is Navigating With(out) Instruments

The Chills at Will Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 79:51


Episode 120 Notes and Links to traci kato-kiriyama's Work         On Episode 120 of The Chills at Will Podcast, Pete welcomes traci kato-kiriyama, and the two discuss, among other topics, traci's upbringing with her thoughtful and well-read curators of history and art-her parents-her life as a creative, both as an individual and in collective spaces, themes from her work that are inspired by various muses within and without her family and her local communities, racism against Japanese and Japanese-American and other marginalized communities, and her creative and thought-provoking Navigating With(out) Instruments.      traci kato-kiriyama (they+she), author of Navigating With(out) Instruments--based on unceded Tongva land in the south bay of Los Angeles-- is an award-winning multi-, inter- and transdisciplinary artist, recognized for their work as a writer/performer, theatre deviser, cultural producer, and community organizer. As a storyteller and Artivist, tkk is grounded in collaborative process, collective self-determination, and art+community as intrinsically tied and a critical means toward connection and healing. She is a performer & principal writer for PULLproject Ensemble, two-time NET recipient; NEFA 2021-22 finalist for their show TALES OF CLAMOR.  tkk —presented for over 25 years in hundreds of venues throughout North America as a writer, actor, poet, speaker, guest lecturer, facilitator, Artist-in-Residence, and organizing / arts & culture consultant— has come to appreciate a wildly hybrid career (w/ presenters incl. LaMaMa Cabaret; Enwave Theatre; The Smithsonian; The Getty; Skirball Cultural Center; and Hammer Museum, to Zero Gravity; Grand Park; Whisky a Go Go; Hotel Cafe; House Of Blues Foundation Room; and countless universities, arts spaces, and community centers across the country).  Their work is also featured in a wide swath of media and print publications (incl. NPR; PBS; Elle.com; Entropy; Chapparal Canyon Press; Tia Chucha Press; Bamboo Ridge Press; Heyday Books; Regent Press). tkk is a core artist of Vigilant Love, member of the H.R. 40 Coalition and organizer with the Nikkei Progressives & NCRR joint Reparations Committee, and Director/Co-Founder of Tuesday Night Project (presenter of the Tea & Letterwriting initiative and Tuesday Night Cafe series in Little Tokyo).     traci kato kiriyama's website   Buy Navigating with(out) Instruments   traci's profile on DiscoverNikkei.org   traci's bio for Tuesday Night Project   traci reads "Remember All the Children Who Were Never Born to Me" for Poetry Lab At about 4:00, Pete asks traci about notions of the “writer as speaker,” including a profound quote from Zora Satchell   At about 6:20, traci's cat makes an appearance!   At about 6:30, traci talks about her background and her parents' focus on education and intellectual and historical curiosity, including how The Japanese American Historical Society was founded by her parents    At about 8:30, traci discusses what stories drew her interest in adolescence, including song lyrics, theater, and art of all types   At about 11:30, Pete and traci freak out over their collective love and admiration for Tori Amos   At about 12:25, traci describes the artists and writers-often playwrights-who thrilled her through high school into college and beyond, such as Wakako Yamauchi, Rumi, Yusuf, Adrienne Rich, Nikki Giovanni, and Janice Mirikitani    At about 15:30, Pete wonders about the connection between natural sociability and performance for traci   At about 17:30, traci responds to Pete's question about which artists and creatives inspires her Nancy Keystone and Kennedy Kabasares, Howard Ho, and LA and West Coast standouts Writ Large Press, Not a Cult, Kaia Press, The Accomplices   At about 21:20, traci discusses ideas of “representation,” especially with regard to her childhood and the Japanese-American communities of which she was part   At about 23:15, traci recounts her experience in seeing Sixteen Candles and the thought process that followed the viewing-regarding racist representations in Hollywood and beyond   At about 27:45, traci gives background knowledge on a poem from her collection that references her mother and Dec. 7; it is instructive about the ways in which memory works   At about 30:35, traci talks about the aforementioned incident in the school and connections to Michi Weglyn's book/if and how the story was a microcosm   At about 33:35, traci gives background on the book, includiing an impetus from Ed Lin that didn't exactly bring immediate publication   At about 34:40, traci discusses inspiration for the book's title   At about 38:00, traci discusses the idea of the “muse,” including inspiration from her grandfather, Taz Ahmed, her mom, and others   At about 40:00, traci responds to Pete's questions about the rationale for the many different forms used in her collection   At about 45:50, Pete and traci discuss “Where We Would Have Gone” and the ideas of “what if” and “predicting the past”   At about 48:10, the two talk about the spectrum of sexuality as a theme in traci's collection, as well as meanings of “queer” and pronoun usage and comfortability with names   At about 51:20, traci references her longest acronym and ideas of a “collective coming out” that comes from real life and a poem of hers   At about 53:20, traci explains some background on “Death Notes” that are featured in the collection, as well as ideas/themes associated with being close to death; she highlights editor Chiwan Choi's great help in sharing difficult and “heavy and important” moments   At about 58:00, traci discusses her use of “bury” throughout her work   At about 59:25, the two explore ideas of racism, family, and resistance in traci's family; traci shows the photo of her bearded grandfather and talks of discovering his rebellion, which is instructive in many ways   At about 1:02:55, traci talks about her mother's political awareness and Yuri Kochiyama's “massive impact”; she talks about how traci spoke at a Los Angeles memorial   At about 1:06:00, traci connects the “collectivity” of art with artists and the “continuum” of the world's people and the world's artists and activists; traci cites WorldMeter as an addictive and important website    At about 1:07:45, traci talks about the poems/letters in the collection that serve as conversations between her and Taz Ahmed, including conversations where the subject matter evolved   At about 1:09:45, traci and Pete discuss ideas of “eminent domain” that populate her work   At about 1:10:50, traci reads a poem about her grandfather/reparations after reminding listeners about the annual visits/pilgrimages to Manzanar   At about 1:14:25, traci reads “Remember All the Children who were Never Born to Me”    You can now subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, and leave me a five-star review. You can also ask for the podcast by name using Alexa, and find the pod on Stitcher, Spotify, and on Amazon Music. Follow me on IG, where I'm @chillsatwillpodcast, or on Twitter, where I'm @chillsatwillpo1. You can watch other episodes on YouTube-watch and subscribe to The Chills at Will Podcast Channel. Please subscribe to both my YouTube Channel and my podcast while you're checking out this episode.  This is a passion project of mine, a DIY operation, and I'd love for your help in promoting what I'm convinced is a unique and spirited look at an often-ignored art form. The intro song for The Chills at Will Podcast is “Wind Down” (Instrumental Version), and the other song played on this episode was “Hoops” (Instrumental)” by Matt Weidauer, and both songs are used through ArchesAudio.com.    Please tune in for Episode 121 with Michael Torres, a VONA distinguished alum and CantoMundo fellow. His first collection of poems, AN INCOMPLETE LIST OF NAMES, (Beacon Press, 2020) was selected by Raquel Salas Rivera for the National Poetry Series, named one of NPR's Best Books of 2020, and was featured on the podcast Code Switch. He teaches in the MFA program at Minnesota State University, Mankato, and through the Minnesota Prison Writing Workshop.    The episode will air on May 3. 

365 Brothers - Every Day Black Men
Marine Biologist Eric Archer Tests The Bounds of Mastery in All Things

365 Brothers - Every Day Black Men

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 58:02


Raised in Temple Hills, Maryland, just outside of Washington, D.C, a young Eric Archer frequently visited the Smithsonian museums. He fondly remembers standing underneath an iconic (now defunct) whale exhibit at the Museum of Natural History. It left quite an impression. He's now a Marine Biologist based in San Diego where he researches whale family genetics and taxonomy. He also loved visiting the Nation Air and Space Museum. Yep, he's also a pilot. And a 3rd Degree Black Belt. And plays bass. A few of his other hobbies include sailing, kayaking, scuba diving, woodworking, camping and hiking. He also drops a few jokes here and there, so maybe comedian is his next opportunity to test the limits of mastery. Favorite song:  Woman in Chains by Tears for Fears. Favorite words are an elaborated version of this quote from Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching: "Water is fluid, soft and yielding. But water will wear away rock, which is rigid and cannot yield. As a rule, whatever is fluid, soft and yielding will overcome whatever is rigid and hard. This is another paradox: what is soft is strong.”   Instagram @365brothers Are you our next guest? - Let's talk. Support us!   365 Brothers on Patreon.  Special thanks to our earliest and consistent supporters, Sonji Walker, Abigail Gonzalez, William C. Hamilton, Jr. and Shedrick Sanders!!! Check out Alitu for more ease editing, polishing and publishing your podcast. About this podcast: In each episode, a Brother reflects on his life; explores the experience of being a Black man in America; shares his interactions with law enforcement; and answers the signature question "If America was a woman, what would you say to her? You won't find a collection of conversations with Black men like this anywhere else. Hear their wisdom. Be inspired. Host, Rahbin Shyne, is an author, educator, creative and avid half-marathon walker. https://www.linkedin.com/in/365brothers/

Kottke Ride Home
Mon. 04/25 - Monopoly's Scandalous Anti-Monopoly History

Kottke Ride Home

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 14:41


The secret, anti-monopolist history of the Monopoly board game. Plus, why we're all having trouble remembering things right now, and how we can strengthen our memories going forward.Sponsors:I Am Bio, Subscribe at bio.org/podcastMunk Pack, Use code KRH at Munkpack.com for 20% off your first purchaseLinks:The Secret Left-Wing History of 'Monopoly' (Discourse Blog)Who Really Invented Monopoly? (Smithsonian, YouTube)Monopoly's Inventor: The Progressive Who Didn't Pass 'Go' (NY Times)The Board Game Trial of the Century (Mental Floss)The Monopolists: Obsession, Fury, and the Scandal Behind the World's Favorite Board Game by Mary Pilon Why We're All Forgetting Things Right Now (Wall Street Journal)Jackson Bird on TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Pangolin: The Conservation Podcast
44. Building the Conservation Nation (with Lynn Mento)

Pangolin: The Conservation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 51:28


On today's show Jack is joined by Lynn Mento, the CEO of Conservation Nation! She is here to discuss the importance of diversifying the field of conservation. The pair also talk about how Conservation Nation are helping to do this by elevating under-represented voices, inspiring the next generation, and providing educational opportunities! On top of that, Jack and Lynn also chat about some of the projects which Conservation Nation support with their grants. These include a wolf conservation project in Yellowstone National Park; a project involving bee fences and elephants; and The Giant Armadillo Conservation Project! Finally, the duo discuss Lynn's favourite animal - the somewhat frightening, but fabulous, Cassowary! Useful Links: Follow us on Twitter, Facebook & Instagram @PangolinPodcast ! Follow Conservation Nation on Twitter: @ConservNtn Follow Conservation Nation on Facebook & Instagram: @ConservationNation Check out the Conservation Nation Website to learn more: https://conservationnation.org/ Check out the Speaker Series: https://conservationnation.org/our-work/speaker-series/ More About Lynn: Lynn Mento ran Friends of the National Zoo until it separated from the Smithsonian's National Zoo in 2021. She was the first female leader of the organisation in its 63-year history. In 2016, Lynn and her team began Conservation Nation as an initiative to provide grants to Smithsonian conservation scientists working to save threatened wildlife around the world. This initiative has now expanded into the organisation she runs today! Music Credits: "Cambodian Odyssey" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com), Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ At The Shore by Kevin MacLeod, Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3389-at-the-shore License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Monkoto by Kevin MacLeod, Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4072-monkoto License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ AngloZulu by Kevin MacLeod, Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3372-anglozulu License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Savannah (Sketch) by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/4323-savannah-sketch- License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license

National Park After Dark
63 - A Martyr and a Murder. Everglades National Park.

National Park After Dark

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 83:27


In the late 1800's feathers were a huge fashion craze, to have them on your clothing was a signal of wealth and importance. To obtain these feathers, plume hunters decimated the fragile ecosystem and wading birds of the Everglades. The devastation caused an uproar and a call for conservation efforts to be put into place. Guy Bradley happily accepted the position as Game Warden and wildlife protector of the Everglades. He believed in the cause, and was willing to give his life for it. After his murder, the world finally took notice on what he was fighting so hard to protect. We love our National Parks and we know you do too but when you're out there, remember to enjoy the view but watch your back. Please take a moment to rate and subscribe from wherever you're listening to NPAD! Become part of our Outsider family on Patreon to gain access to ad-free episode, bonus content and more. Follow our socials Instagram, Facebook , and Twitter. To share a Trail Tale, suggest a story, access merch and browse our book recommendations - head over to our website. Thank you so much to our partners, check them out!   Skylight Frame: Get $10 off your purchase using code PARK Prose: 15% off your first hair care order by using our link Pretty Litter: Get 20% your first order when you use code NPAD Apostrophe: Save $15 off your first visit with code NPAD Sources: Death in the Everglades - The Murder of Guy Bradley. America's First Martyr to Environmentalism by Stuart B Melver, NPS, Smithsonian, Wild Birds Online, WLRN, Animals Mom

Science Friday
Plastics And Ocean Life, Building An Animal Crossing, Indigenous Restoration. April 22, 2022, Part 2

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 46:57


Building The World's Largest Animal Crossing Outside of LA There's a spot on Highway 101 in Agoura Hills, it's pretty inconspicuous. There's brown and green rolling hills on either side of the highway. Homes are sprinkled here and there. And then a small metal gate that leads off on a hiking trail. You probably wouldn't know it, but soon this spot will be the location of the world's largest animal crossing. This crossing will reconnect habitats that have been cut off from each other for three quarters of a century and it'll do it over a highway that is constantly buzzing with cars — 300,000 pass by this spot every single day. In this piece we're going on a geography voyage — from the north side of the highway to the south, and up the hills, above the highway, to get the real view. We'll start here — there's a big open space on the northern side of the highway. It's at the entrance to Liberty Canyon and where I meet Beth Pratt. “You have oak trees, a little creek area here. And we're listening to, actually, an Anna's hummingbird giving a little song for us that is actually resonating even over that, that noise of traffic,” Pratt said. She is the California Regional Director for the National Wildlife Federation. “For me what's kind of remarkable, but also sad. It's the last sixteen hundred feet of protected space on both sides of the freeway,” said Pratt. Read the rest on sciencefriday.com.   Life Has Found A Way On The Great Pacific Garbage Patch The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is a huge collection of trash floating in the North Pacific Ocean. It's made up mostly of plastic—things like water bottles, shoes, and fishing gear, but also a large amount of microplastics, tiny bits of broken-down plastic that can be invisible to the naked eye. A giant, swirling patch of trash seems bad. But recent research has revealed a complicating factor: Marine life has colonized the garbage patch, making the floating plastic their new homes. As the classic Jurassic Park quote goes, “Life finds a way.” Joining Ira to talk about life on the Great Pacific Garbage Patch is Linsey Haram, AAAS fellow at the U.S. Department of Agriculture based in Alexandria, Virginia. Her research on the Garbage Patch was done for the Smithsonian.   Enzymes Are Taking On Our Plastic Problem Flip over a plastic water bottle, or a takeout container, and it's very likely you'll find the number “1” stamped on the bottom. This is the sign of the problematic plastic PET, which is a large source for plastic pollution. It's estimated that only a third or less of this type of plastic is recycled into something new. Scientists are getting creative in trying to outsmart plastics that don't want to be recycled. Some are looking into enzymes that can break down plastic into its more basic molecular building blocks. The idea is that these smaller molecules are easier to turn into new things, making upcycling an easier task. Joining Ira to talk about the frontier of enzymes as recycling powerhouses is Jennifer DuBois, professor of chemistry at Montana State University in Bozeman, Montana.   Indigenous Knowledge Is Central To Climate Solutions As the United States observes Earth Day this year, many will be thinking about their personal relationship with—and responsibility to—the planet. But in an era of multiple planetary crises, including extinctions, global warming, and contaminated water, what about the Indigenous peoples whose millennia-old relationship with their land has been disrupted and sometimes severed by colonialism and other displacements? Indigenous environmental scientist and author Jessica Hernandez talks to Ira about the harms the Western science has perpetuated against colonized people, as white environmentalists created national parks on Indigenous lands and “helicopter scientists” continue to do research in the global south while using the wealth of Western institutions. And she explains why greater recognition of Indigenous science, and partnerships that center Indigenous peoples and their research questions, is good for the entire planet.   Transcripts for each segment will be available the week after the show airs on sciencefriday.com.    

DIY Photo Organising
088 | Expert tips on photo archiving (with guest Kate Jacus)

DIY Photo Organising

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 52:45


Memories can be found in printed photos, slides, negatives, photo albums, photo scrapbooks, framed photos, artwork, certificates, and other memorabilia.Knowing how to safely archive these items will help keep them preserved for future generations.Kate Jacus is our very special guest on the podcast episode today. Kate has over 13 years of experience archiving many precious items, including numerous collections at two Smithsonian museums.Today Kate brings us her practical tips and advice about how we can protect our collections at home.Also, in an effort to add more photos to our own photo collections

Brothers of the Serpent Podcast
Episode #240: Listener Communications

Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 144:17


We're back from the conference in Sedona and ready to dive into listener emails and some long-form rambling discussions, SnakeBros style. Laura also joins us in the Tangent cube for this episode. We read some great emails of experiences and encounters, questions about UFOs and spirituality, travelling the world on foot looking at ancient sites, and a visit to one of the Smithsonian's "storage" buildings.   Executive Producers: .-/  "Period Dash Slash"   Join us on the first SnakeBros Meetup: http://www.brothersoftheserpent.com/p/meetups-and-events.html     Get Darren Grimes' book, "In Their Own Words": https://www.amazon.com/Their-Own-Words-Indigenous-Residential/dp/B09XZ8J57H

The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast
Engaging Experience Design through Technology

The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 29:21


Josh Goldblum, Founder and CEO, Blue Cadet (Philadelphia, PA and New York City, NY) Josh Goldblum is Founder and CEO at Blue Cadet, an experience design studio with around 30 employees in Philadelphia and 15 in New York.  Twenty-odd years ago, Josh worked in-house at the Smithsonian Institution, producing digital products and integrating technology into physical environments. Unfulfilled because big projects only came around every few years, Josh left and freelanced for a number of museums, doing single-touch Flash design and development. As his on-man Blue Cadet operation became a growing team, projects expanded to encompass touch tables, touch walls, and projection; technology evolved and became increasingly more sophisticated; and the organization's internal systems had to be more formalized to meet the needs of the larger business. Today's experience technology is far more powerful, interesting, and relevant than that in the past. Flash has been replaced by Real Engine, Unity, and JavaScript. The Blue Cadet studio continues to design large-touch surfaces and build immersive experiences but now works with augmented reality, haptics (touch-related communication), and using technology and digital products to make cultural content in physical spaces more immersive, engaging, and “magical.”  Although much of the firm's work is for museums, it has recently expanded to provide these immersive services for executive briefing centers and such brands as Nike and Google. Josh says it's important that the studio creates a “content experience that's not just decorative, but actually tells a story that feels true to the space.” In working with clients, Josh finds it helpful to carve out a little paid research at the beginning of a project to prepare an ideation spread where the studio can research client needs and present ideas. At the end of this initial period, the client can either work with Blue Cadet or take the ideas Blue Cadet developed and work with another studio. Josh says, “It's better to carve off a little space to redirect (the project) than to get into that death march of implementing something that's just not going to be that great.” That time upfront also helps Blue Cadet discover what it is that a client really wants, whether they can provide what the client wants, whether they want to do the project, and whether the parties can develop a solid working relationship. Josh participated in a panel session discussion of Trends and Challenges for Experiential Culture at the 2022 South by Southwest Interactive Festival. He says he is most active on LinkedIn, where he shares a lot of concept prototype material. ROB: Welcome to the Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast. I'm your host, Rob Kischuk, and I'm joined live today at South by Southwest Interactive Festival by Josh Goldblum, Founder and CEO at Blue Cadet based in Philadelphia and New York. Welcome to the podcast, Josh. JOSH: Thanks for having me. ROB: Excellent to have you here. Why don't you start off by telling us about Blue Cadet and what is your superpower? What is your calling card? What do people come to you for? JOSH: Blue Cadet is an experience design studio. Most of us are based in Philadelphia. There's about 30 in Philadelphia, another 15 up in New York, and then actually, when I say “us” based in Philadelphia, we just moved out to LA. So my family moved to LA. We're the only ones out there. We're mostly known for experience design in the cultural space, and also really a lot of technology in physical space. Twenty-odd years ago, I was inhouse at Smithsonian doing digital product work, but also integrated technology into physical environments. So we've been in that experience design space, figuring out how you marry technology into public spaces, how you take cultural content and make it interesting. That's what we've been doing, and we do it across physical space; we also do it across digital products.  ROB: Got it. It rings of museums or themed places, but I can also imagine a building that wants to have something and not just be a hollow shell. What does a typical space look like for you? JOSH: We do a lot of work in the museum space, like the traditional museum space. All the big museums are generally our clients. We've worked with a lot of them. Everything from like science centers to history museums to art museums. We did a Van Gogh projected experience with the Art Institute of Chicago way before they were doing all these projections. ROB: All the immersive experiences. JOSH: Yeah, we've been doing that for a long time. But then recently we've been moving more into brand work. We've been doing some work with Nike, which has been really exciting. We've done work with Google. trying to take a lot of that museum flair, which is an obsession with content and making sure that what we're saying is true, and trying to figure out what's interesting about a brand and giving it that treatment where you're elevating the personalities, elevating the science. You're making something that's smart but also engaging. ROB: Where are they doing those things? JOSH: These are executive briefing centers, sometimes. These are museums or brands. Some of these are online. And then we started doing a little bit of work for real estate companies, just trying to – it's not for me. [laughs] Just to activate some of their public spaces as well. Again, trying to bring in content experience that's not just decorative, but actually tells a story that feels true to the space. ROB: When I think about this space, I start off thinking about the sleepy old kiosk that became a touchscreen and the keyboard is broken. Did it start there and proceed from there? JOSH: Yeah, I would say when we started out – Blue Cadet was my freelance handle. I was at the Smithsonian; I did a pretty cool project there that got a lot of attention. The Smithsonian being what it is, they only had big projects every few years. I was getting kind of bored, so I left and I started going around museum to museum. I was essentially picking up jobs doing Flash design and development. When we first started out, it was a lot of those single touchscreens and those things that were kind of cheap. No one was going to lose their job if we really screwed up. But we overdelivered. We did really great stuff, and we grew on the backs of those reputations and then started doing touch tables and touch walls and projection mapping. These days, we still do a lot of large touch surfaces and things like that, but a lot more thinking about the technologies that are more interesting or relevant. Now we're doing a lot more with AR, things that are haptics, camera vision. Also just trying to figure out how to make an environment more engaging and magical. ROB: Some of the advantage, even, of the march of technology is that probably some of those early Flash things you were doing were still rather expensive and still took a big commitment. I think some of this has allowed the technology to come down into simpler spaces. My team's done really simple electron-based kiosks with a little bit of sound, a little bit of animation, and it makes it more available to more places. JOSH: Yeah. It's interesting because Flash was an amazing tool. Flash really allowed you to do a lot of very, very cool things. When Steve Jobs killed Flash, essentially – which he pretty much singlehandedly did – there was actually a little bit of a lull in experience design where the tools had to catch up. But now you see things like Real Engine, Unity – but even what you can do with JavaScript. You can do everything that you used to be able to do in Flash now to the nth degree. And it's much better. Flash probably should've died. ROB: How often does as client come to you with an idea of what they want? How often do they come to you with a topic – “Here's this topic, here's what we want to show people; surprise us”? Or is it more “We have an idea and a direction”? Do you know how much space you're dealing with? It seems like there's a lot of variables in there. JOSH: A lot of times if we're dealing with a museum client, they might have a big exhibit or something like that. Or even a brand, they have their stories, they know what they want to convey, they have the space. But then they come to us and they're like, “How do we tell the story? How do we do this?” A lot of times even if they come in with very, very fully baked ideas, we'll roll it way back into strategy and be like, let's create a little bit of space to figure out what you can do with contemporary technology, with contemporary tools. What can you do to make sure that content or experience really shines in a way that's not been done in the same way with different content six months before? ROB: It sounds like it's really a consultative opportunity, right? To show them – maybe they start somewhere, but sometimes they don't know what they don't know, in a very good way. You have a broader span of the industry. That's why they come to you. You bring some extra ideas to the plate. JOSH: Yeah. And usually what we do – we've been doing these things called ideation spreads. Sometimes someone will come to us with a pretty big budget and we'll be like “Hey, instead of having to sign the SOW for this real big thing, give us 10% of it and give us three weeks, and let us do a bunch of sprints where we reconceptualize it and see if we land in a better place.”  Sometimes it's better, particularly if you get a brief that you're like, “This is not going to end well. This is not something we want to be working on for the next six months.” It's better to carve off a little space to redirect it than to get into that death march of implementing something that's just not going to be that great. ROB: Right. Do you ever engage in that competitive sales process where you're competing over the big pie and you take the little pie? Does that happen? JOSH: Absolutely. I would say particularly as we were earning our market position and earning our reputation, we weren't always the safe choice. We were always known for doing the creative thing and for doing something cool and new, but there were a lot of people who had done it a million times. And it was riskier for them to work with us. So that was a great way. We'd come in and do these ideation spreads and say, “Look, you don't have to trust us with this giant thing. Bring us in here and let's see if we can set the vision. You're not even obligated to work with us after that.” ROB: Right, “You own the work, go ahead and take it.” I think every creative firm benefits when they find ways essentially to get paid for discovery instead of trying to do all this guesswork upfront. But there's always the tension between “How much are we spending on this?” versus “How likely are we to get the work?” Nobody wants to be in that tension. So, the 10% strategy there makes a lot of sense. JOSH: Also, I'd much rather do that than do spec on RFPs. You don't know anything about the client and really what they want. You don't really know what the problem set is. So if you're doing spec on an RFP, you're really just shooting in the dark. Whereas if you carve out a little bit of space where you can actually collaborate with a client, you usually come up with better creative; you're actually solving the problem. But then also, you get to build that relationship and the rapport, and that's usually what carries you forward. Or you sit there and you're like, “Okay, there's not great relationship or rapport here.” ROB: You can dodge a bullet. JOSH: Yeah, you can be like, “Okay, you really did want that thing. God love ya, go on with it.” ROB: We talked a little bit about the origin story, about you going around to museums. When did you realize it was a thing and you said, “You know what, this is my job now”? What was the inflection point? JOSH: For a while, Blue Cadet was just my freelance handle. I was living in D.C. because I was still at the Smithsonian and I was picking up odd jobs. It was fun. I enjoyed it. The projects I'd get weren't huge budgets, but I was actually making way more money than I was at the Smithsonian. But I finally got a project – a couple friends and I got this grant to do an interactive documentary, like a Flash-based documentary on the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. This was something where we came up with the idea, we went to a foundation, and we were like “Hey, can you pay us some money to put this thing together?” The timeline was such, the budget was such that I kind of had to hire a team. We had videographers, we had professional sound people. We were basically following this high school class – it was the only high school class to reopen after Hurricane Katrina. We were down there basically weeks after the hurricane. It was decimated. But when I was on that project – it was called Yearbook 2006 – I was like, oh man, if I bring in other people, it works way better. I was still doing the stuff that was too expensive to outsource, but I outsourced some other things and it ended up being really successful. It became really popular. I was like, okay, I want to start a studio. So that was the first point where I wanted to do a studio. Then that same team, we got another project the year after that for the Pulitzer Center and we ended up winning a News and Documentary Emmy, which was a pretty big deal at the time. We beat Wolf Blitzer or something. That put us on the map, and that snowballed to where we started getting a lot of work, and I was able to start building the team from there. ROB: It seems like something in that documentary space – of all the things you can fractionalize and take some people, do a project, get done with it, it seems like something in that video space, people are kind of used to it. That's the drill; that's what you do. You film something, then you move on to the next thing. JOSH: Yeah. Basically what happened was I was living in D.C. but I was from Philadelphia; I was turning 30. I was like, okay, I'm getting to an age where maybe I'm ready to settle down a little bit. I didn't really want to settle down in D.C. So I moved up to Philly and I made my first hire. It was someone straight out of college. She actually still works for me, 15 years later. ROB: Wow. JOSH: But that was the thing. We were hiring junior people and training them up, and then we grew very linearly, 20% year over year. There were weird inflection points along the way, but yeah, that's how we got to where we are now. ROB: What's a weird inflection point? JOSH: As you're growing a studio, there are always these different points where the wheels get real shaky and the systems that were working fine in this phase don't really work as well in the next phase. There's a point where you have to get really professional about bill pay, about HR, benefits. You just have to start layering in a lot of systems at various points. And those are the points where you start getting more professional and you start having to have an org chart. You can't just have a bunch of super creative people scrambling around all over the place. ROB: How have you digested that change? Is it something that comes well to you? Is there somebody, or many people, maybe a role that's been integral to making the jumps? JOSH: Yeah, my partner Troy. We both worked as new media specialists at the Smithsonian. He was like my sixth hire or something like that at Blue Cadet. He was living in Denver quite happily, and I sort of dragged him across country to move to Philadelphia and start things. But I love Troy. I'm one of these people who can talk a really good game and I can set a vision or get really excited about the idea and what this thing can be. Troy's the kind of guy who can sit down and actually make it happen. He can actually do it. So, he's invaluable. Over the years, we've been very selective. I spend a lot of time recruiting the people that I want into the team. Very few people necessarily applied to Blue Cadet, particularly at the leadership level. I always sought out people that I thought would really fit into the studio and scale out our capabilities. ROB: That's a great opportunity, because those strategic roles are also the ones where you could actually justify bringing a recruiter to, which you can't always do in the services world. But to find those people and recruit them in . . . . JOSH: I never used a recruiter. Where you find the best people is just like here at SXSW, you're meeting people. Or you meet clients. One of the people I recruited to Blue Cadet, who actually left to take over digital at the Obama Library, was client side, and she left midway through the project and everyone was like, “Oh my God, this place is going to fall apart without her. She is so instrumental to the studio.” This was a studio I was working with, and I was like, “That sucks; the project's going to go sideways.” But then I was like, “I'm going to poach her at some point. I'm going to get her on my team.” And she was fantastic. So, I'm always looking for people that I'm like, “Wow, that person's way smarter than me or better that me at these things.” ROB: That's excellent, especially when you know the capabilities you don't quite need yet, or you don't need another person in that capability yet, and you can keep your head on the swivel, keep the mental library going of who's next. It's a fun journey to have that wish list and then fulfill on it. JOSH: Yeah. ROB: So, you're here and you have a session coming up. It is “Trends and Challenges for Experiential Culture.” What are you looking for people to get out of that? JOSH: Obviously, I've been speaking about experience design for a very, very long time. I was talking about how things were getting completely disrupted with physical space pre-pandemic. I was talking about Meow Wolf and Museum of Ice Cream and the changing face of retail and also some of the things that were happening with museums, and this was like 2018-2019. I was like, man, stuff's really going to change. I saw the trends, I saw this stuff happening. And then obviously the pandemic has accelerated everything. Who knows where the chips are going to fall, but one of the things we're seeing is a lot of people wanting to get back into physical space. Places like SXSW are now filling up again. People want to be around each other. But what are the spaces that bring out the best in us? How could those spaces operate to create better connections between people? That's the sort of thing we're really interested in. And then also, how do you discard the old stuff that doesn't work anymore? Honestly, I love museums but I also kind of hate them. Also, I know for my kids, they're not dying to go to the old-fashioned museum and read a bunch of wall labels. They're really interested in culture because they're my children, our children, but they want to consume it differently. And I want to make sure that they're consuming culture in a way that feels good to them, that's enjoyable and interesting to them. ROB: What do you think they're going to want? Where is it headed? JOSH: It's so funny; my kids like Roblox, they like all those things. I've taken them to a million museums. I've taken my son to Epcot and Disney and all the different – sometimes the things they like are the cheesy, colorful, fun Museum of Ice Cream rip-offs. But also, they would eat candy all day if I let them do that, too. So, it's figuring out, okay, what are the things that have a personality, that are fun, that are interesting, that are enjoyable, but also are not just mind-numbing or consumptive? ROB: Right. Even some of the newish stuff – I'm sure you'll see a lot of it around here at SXSW; there's different activations. There's some integration of different assets, even into the little doodles activation over here that's NFTs plus an actual physical space. How do you think about the difference between using a technology for the sake of the technology and using it because it's actually right for the environment? JOSH: I actually really like the doodles space. I thought they did a really nice job. I think part of it is a lot of times I talk to these museums and I'm like, “You should be looking more to that marketing. You should be taking a lot more inspiration from them,” because they move really fast, they put these things together really quick, they're not super, super precious, they don't expect it to be up in 5 years, let alone 10 years, let alone 2 weeks, and they're able to take more risks. Because it's sort of a one-and-done, they don't have to make sure that it feels the same 10 years from now. Obviously, that marketing is a very different business model than a museum, but I think there are things that can be borrowed. And personally, I think even that doodles exhibit – there were a lot of nods to themed entertainment. There was a lot of stenography, there was a lot of sculptural pieces. There were some really nice light applications of technology. I thought it was really successful. I would like to see museums looking more like that. ROB: Got it. I think there's times when we've probably all seen AR for AR's sake, VR for VR's sake. How do you filter “This is a good place for VR, this is not”? Or “It could be done this way but not that one”? JOSH: I used to take a much harder line on this in the past. Honestly, some of these things, you look at some of these AR experiences and you're like, what's the point? It's not doing anything except demonstrating the technology. It's like, okay, if you've never seen AR, awesome. That's really awesome. But if you have seen AR, you don't care. Same with some of these projection experiences. It's like, if you're never been in a giant room filled with Christie projectors, it's really exciting to be at the Van Gogh and see all this stuff. But then you go back and it's the same thing, but with Klimt or Picasso or Monet; it's like, “I've seen it.” So, I think part of it is I'm actually okay with technology for technology's sake where it serves a spectacle, where you've never seen it before. It makes people excited and engaged. I think where it gets old is where it's already been done before. You're not even doing that. You're just being lazy. The thing I always look at, too, is either you've got to really, really be serving that content in a way that's compelling and really getting people into it – and sometimes that is spectacle. Spectacle gets people excited. It gets them interested. But if you fail at the spectacle and then you don't provide the content, it's just a wasted experience. ROB: It seems like you're very adjacent to not only event marketing, but also perhaps even to entertainment, theme park, that kind of thing. How do you decide where you go and where you don't go in those markets, and where you compete and where you choose to stay in your lane? JOSH: It's funny; I used to be very selective about the types of clients I would take on. I was like, “I'm not working with brands. I'm working with museums and nonprofits and higher ed. That's my tribe.” The thing I realized is sometimes your tribe is not aligned to a sector. It's really just a way of being. There are people at Nike that have way, way more in common with me and how I see technology, how I see content, how I see culture th