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Group of museums and research centers administered by the United States government

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Best podcasts about smithsonian

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Latest podcast episodes about smithsonian

Sidedoor
Bloodsuckers!

Sidedoor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 30:35


Leeches don't get a lot of love. They're slimy, wriggly, and, well, they suck — blood that is. But there's a lot to learn about the lowly leech. Led by a troupe of Smithsonian experts, we'll discover how these toothy hangers-on wormed their way into medical practices, performance art, and EVERY human cavity. Yes, even that one. It's a journey of discovery from the swamp to the stage and deep into the vaults of the Smithsonian. And it just may leave you with a little more appreciation (dare we say, love?) for the bloodsuckers. 

The Official Do Good Better Podcast
The Official Do Good Better Podcast Season Four Ep11: Media Cause Nonprofit Marketing Expert Dan Reed

The Official Do Good Better Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 37:35


"They're people, not email addresses." Dan Reed, CFRE, is the Senior Account Director, Digital Fundraising for the nonprofit marketing agency, Media Cause. He joins Patrick today to share the most up-to-date advice on nonprofit marketing. Dan started his digital fundraising career at Us TOO International Prostate Cancer Education and Support Network, developing peer-to-peer activities for two annual Greater Chicago Prostate Cancer Run Walk & Rolls. From there, Dan spent seven years at the Smithsonian Institution, managing the digital components of the Friends of the Smithsonian direct response program, mid-level donor program and working across the different Smithsonian units, supporting their digital fundraising efforts. While at the Smithsonian, Dan earned his Masters Degree in Strategic Fundraising and Philanthropy. Next, Dan moved to World Food Program USA, building out their digital fundraising program from the ground up and developing an award winning monthly donor program over the course of three years.In 2021, Dan earned his Certified Fund Raising Executive (CFRE) designation from CFRE International and has 15 years of digital fundraising experience.Since joining Media Cause in 2018, the favorite part of his job has been the opportunity to work with a wide variety of nonprofits that are striving to make the world a better place. He's been inspired on a daily basis helping passionate clients achieve their fundraising goals.Connect with Dan: Dan@mediacause.com   More About Media Cause: https://mediacause.com/Support This Podcast! Make a quick and easy donation here:https://www.patreon.com/dogoodbetterAbout The Official Do Good Better Podcast:Each episode features (fundraising expert, speaker, event creator and author) Patrick Kirby interviewing leaders and champions of small & medium nonprofits to share their successes, their impact, and what makes them a unicorn in a field of horses. Patrick answers fundraising questions and (most importantly) showcases how you can support these small nonprofits doing great big things!iTunes: https://apple.co/3a3XenfSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2PlqRXsYouTube: https://bit.ly/3kaWYanTunein: http://tun.in/pjIVtStitcher: https://bit.ly/3i8jfDRFollow On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DoGoodBetterPodcast/Follow On Twitter: @consulting_do #fundraising #fundraiser #charity #nonprofit #donate #dogood #dogoodBETTER #fargo #fundraisingdadAbout Host Patrick Kirby:Email: Patrick@dogoodbetterconsulting.comLinkedIN: https://www.linkedin.com/in/fundraisingdad/Want more great advice? Buy Patrick's book! Now also available as an e-book!Fundraise Awesomer! A Practical Guide to Staying Sane While Doing GoodAvailable through Amazon Here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1072070359

Great Lakes Lore
E4 The Paranormal is Personal

Great Lakes Lore

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 60:23


Episode Notes In this episode, Samantha and Aaron step back from examining actual pieces of lore in order to share their own personal paranormal experiences. They examine the reasons why eye-witness testimonies of supernatural phenomena need to be handled with care, the ways their own experiences influence the way they interpret those from others, and how their training as historians has prepared them to analyze sources. Time Stamps History of Paranormal Research- 2:20 Analyzing Sources- 13:46 Personal Stories- 15:55 Legend or Lie- 39:47 Interpreting the Paranormal- 44:06 The Desire to Have an Encounter- 54:07 Sources For this episode we relied on a lot of articles to help us explain some of the thoughts we had about why people believe in the paranormal, what can influence that belief, and the power of biases. In case you'd like to look at these, we've divided them into helpful categories. On the Public's Belief in Ghosts Why do People Believe in Ghosts? (The Atlantic) [The Truth about the Paranormal] (BBC)(https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20141030-the-truth-about-the-paranormal) Why do We Like a Scary Story? (Oxford Open Learning) On Dark vs. Supernatural Tourism Dark Tourism, Explained (Washington Post) Dark Tourism: The Most Haunted Destinations in the World (Culture Trip) On Why We Like to Feel Scared Why People will Pay to Feel Scared (The Atlantic) On Cryptids So Why do People Believe in Bigfoot Anyway? (California Magazine) Have Scientists Finally Killed off the Loch Ness Monster? (The Conversation) Why Won't Scientific Evidence Change the Minds of Loch Ness Monster True Believers? (The Conversation) For a complete look at the Fox sisters and some pieces of nineteenth-century spiritualism, this Smithsonian article provides a good overview. Samantha also relied on previous research regarding the idea of a “Good Death” and the Civil War from Drew Gilpin Faust's This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War. Aaron and Samantha visited the Michigan Bigfoot Conference in this episode of The Saucer Life The quotation that begins the second part of the episode is from Aaron's book The Chaos Conundrum. (Amazon affiliate link purchases help support Great Lakes Lore!) Visit our website and follow us on... Instagram Facebook Twitter Great Lakes Lore is produced by Cheeso Media.

The Photo Detective
Victorian Mourning Curiosities with Kate Kierstead

The Photo Detective

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 32:21


There is so much confusion about which photos depict mourning and which ones don't. I thought it was time to have someone other than me weigh in on the controversy.  My guest posted on Twitter about mourning dress and it went somewhat viral. So glad she said yes to be a guest on the podcast.  Related Episodes:Episode 61: Mourning Jewelry: Fact or FictionEpisode 76: Who's That Baby? Tips for Solving Snapshot MysteriesLinks:Roses and Rue AntiquesSign up for my newsletter.Watch my YouTube Channel.Like the Photo Detective Facebook Page so you get notified of my Facebook Live videos.Need help organizing your photos? Check out the Essential Photo Organizing Video Course.Need help identifying family photos? Check out the Identifying Family Photographs Online Course.Have a photo you need help identifying? Sign up for photo consultation.About My Guest:Kate Kierstead is an antique dealer who specializes in Victoriana, with a focus on the sentimental, devotional, and unusual. She lives in the Greater Boston area, where she consumes a steady diet of books, movies, music, and art fusses over clothes, and makes wisecracks.About Maureen Taylor:Maureen is a frequent keynote speaker on photo identification, photograph preservation, and family history at historical and genealogical societies, museums, conferences, libraries, and other organizations across the U.S., London, and Canada.  She's the author of several books and hundreds of articles and her television appearances include The View and The Today Show (where she researched and presented a complete family tree for host Meredith Vieira).  She's been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Better Homes and Gardens, The Boston Globe, Martha Stewart Living, Germany's top newspaper Der Spiegel, American Spirit, and The New York Times. Maureen was recently a spokesperson and photograph expert for MyHeritage.com, an internationally known family history website, and also writes guidebooks, scholarly articles, and online columns for such media as Smithsonian.com. Learn more at Maureentaylor.comDid you enjoy this episode? Please leave a review on Apple Podcasts.

MASH Matters
Voicemails! - MASH Matters #070

MASH Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 35:16


Let's go to the phones! Jeff & Ryan unload a slew of listener voicemails. Topics include the evolving role of women on M*A*S*H, a radio show featuring the enlisted personnel, actors who have passed away, blooper reels, and the ever-changing theme song. Plus, will the Smithsonian do anything with the M*A*S*H set to celebrate the 50th anniversary? Find out on this episode of MASH Matters.

Arroe Collins
Brad Tolinski and Chris Gill Release The Book Eruption

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 11:27


When rock legend Eddie Van Halen died of cancer on October 6, 2020, the entire world seemed to stop and grieve. Since his band Van Halen burst onto the scene with their self-titled debut album in 1978, Eddie had been hailed as an icon not only to fans of rock music and heavy metal, but to performers across all genres and around the world. Van Halen's debut sounded unlike anything that listeners had heard before and remains a quintessential rock album of the era. And they would end up as one of only five rock bands with two studio albums that have sold more than 10 million copies in the US. ERUPTION: Conversations with Eddie Van Halen (10/5/21; Hachette Books; 9780306826658; $28) is a major biography by two music journalists who knew him best. Brad Tolinski and Chris Gill share with fans, new and old alike, a candid, compulsively readable, and definitive oral history of the most influential rock guitarist since Jimi Hendrix. It is based on more than 50+ hours of unreleased interviews they recorded with Eddie Van Halen over the years, most of them conducted at the legendary 5150 studios at his home in Los Angeles. The heart of .ERUPTION is drawn from these intimate and wide-ranging talks, as well as conversations with family, friends, and colleagues, including other major guitarists including Tony Iommi (Black Sabbath), Steve Vai and Steve Lukather (Toto, Michael Jackson, Ringo Starr, Elton John). In addition to discussing his greatest triumphs as a groundbreaking musician - including an unprecedented dive into Van Halen's masterpiece 1984 and the story behind playing on Michael Jackson's "Beat It" (which they did as a favor and never received a dime for) - the book takes an unflinching look at Eddie's early struggles as a young Dutch immigrant unable to speak English, which resulted in lifelong issues with social anxiety and later problems with alcohol and cocaine. . Eddie Van Halen and his older brother Al and their parents moved to the Pasadena, CA in 1962 when Eddie was 7 years old, with less than $50, some suitcases and a piano. During the nine-day boat ride over, Eddie and A played piano for spare change. "We were like a kid freak show," said Eddie. . The boys attended a segregated school in Pasadena and were ostracized because they knew little English. "My first friends in America were black," Eddie said. "It was the white kids that bullied me. The black kids stood up for me." . While words often failed him, as a child Eddie expressed himself through the piano, maintaining a rigorous practice schedule under the watchful eye of his mother. A few short years later, at the age of twelve, he would apply the same diligence to learning the electric guitar, spending countless hours locked in his bedroom developing the technique that would help him become one of the greatest players in the world. It also examines his brilliance as an inventor who changed the face of guitar manufacturing. . Eddie built his own guitar with spare parts. The guitar, known as "Frankenstein" created a trend that eventually changed the way electric guitars were made and revolutionized the guitar industry. . A handmade replica of his original guitar now resides in the permanent collection at the Smithsonian in Washington DC, and his original "Frankenstein" guitar was featured in the Play It Loud exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2019, a show inspired by Tolinski's book on the history of the electric guitar. . Eddie also invented and popularized many playing techniques on the instrument that have functioned as the backbone for guitar soloing in popular music for over to 40 years. These include "tapping," "whammy bar dives" and "chime harmonics." Over the course of more than four decades, Eddie gained renown for his innovative guitar playing, and particularly for popularizing many playing techniques on the instrument that have functioned as the backbone for guitar soloing in popular music for over to 40 years. These include "tapping," "whammy bar dives" and "chime harmonics." The book also explores the details of his life, both personal and professional. . His long and complicated marriage to Valerie Bertinelli; his close relationship with his son/bassist Wolfgang Van Halen; and his marriage to second wife and publicist Janie Liszewski, who helped him recover from substance abuse and supported him through his many cancer treatments. . His often-stormy relationships with Van Halen's trio of singers: David Lee Roth, Sammy Hagar and Gary Cherone. Unfortunately for Eddie and his legions of fans, he died before he was ever able to put his life down to paper in his own words, and much of his compelling backstory has remained elusive-until now. As entertaining as it is revealing, ERUPTION is the closest readers will ever get to hearing Eddie's side of the story when it comes to his extraordinary life.

Arroe Collins
Brad Tolinski and Chris Gill Release The Book Eruption

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 11:27


When rock legend Eddie Van Halen died of cancer on October 6, 2020, the entire world seemed to stop and grieve. Since his band Van Halen burst onto the scene with their self-titled debut album in 1978, Eddie had been hailed as an icon not only to fans of rock music and heavy metal, but to performers across all genres and around the world. Van Halen's debut sounded unlike anything that listeners had heard before and remains a quintessential rock album of the era. And they would end up as one of only five rock bands with two studio albums that have sold more than 10 million copies in the US. ERUPTION: Conversations with Eddie Van Halen (10/5/21; Hachette Books; 9780306826658; $28) is a major biography by two music journalists who knew him best. Brad Tolinski and Chris Gill share with fans, new and old alike, a candid, compulsively readable, and definitive oral history of the most influential rock guitarist since Jimi Hendrix. It is based on more than 50+ hours of unreleased interviews they recorded with Eddie Van Halen over the years, most of them conducted at the legendary 5150 studios at his home in Los Angeles. The heart of .ERUPTION is drawn from these intimate and wide-ranging talks, as well as conversations with family, friends, and colleagues, including other major guitarists including Tony Iommi (Black Sabbath), Steve Vai and Steve Lukather (Toto, Michael Jackson, Ringo Starr, Elton John). In addition to discussing his greatest triumphs as a groundbreaking musician - including an unprecedented dive into Van Halen's masterpiece 1984 and the story behind playing on Michael Jackson's "Beat It" (which they did as a favor and never received a dime for) - the book takes an unflinching look at Eddie's early struggles as a young Dutch immigrant unable to speak English, which resulted in lifelong issues with social anxiety and later problems with alcohol and cocaine. . Eddie Van Halen and his older brother Al and their parents moved to the Pasadena, CA in 1962 when Eddie was 7 years old, with less than $50, some suitcases and a piano. During the nine-day boat ride over, Eddie and A played piano for spare change. "We were like a kid freak show," said Eddie. . The boys attended a segregated school in Pasadena and were ostracized because they knew little English. "My first friends in America were black," Eddie said. "It was the white kids that bullied me. The black kids stood up for me." . While words often failed him, as a child Eddie expressed himself through the piano, maintaining a rigorous practice schedule under the watchful eye of his mother. A few short years later, at the age of twelve, he would apply the same diligence to learning the electric guitar, spending countless hours locked in his bedroom developing the technique that would help him become one of the greatest players in the world. It also examines his brilliance as an inventor who changed the face of guitar manufacturing. . Eddie built his own guitar with spare parts. The guitar, known as "Frankenstein" created a trend that eventually changed the way electric guitars were made and revolutionized the guitar industry. . A handmade replica of his original guitar now resides in the permanent collection at the Smithsonian in Washington DC, and his original "Frankenstein" guitar was featured in the Play It Loud exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2019, a show inspired by Tolinski's book on the history of the electric guitar. . Eddie also invented and popularized many playing techniques on the instrument that have functioned as the backbone for guitar soloing in popular music for over to 40 years. These include "tapping," "whammy bar dives" and "chime harmonics." Over the course of more than four decades, Eddie gained renown for his innovative guitar playing, and particularly for popularizing many playing techniques on the instrument that have functioned as the backbone for guitar soloing in popular music for over to 40 years. These include "tapping," "whammy bar dives" and "chime harmonics." The book also explores the details of his life, both personal and professional. . His long and complicated marriage to Valerie Bertinelli; his close relationship with his son/bassist Wolfgang Van Halen; and his marriage to second wife and publicist Janie Liszewski, who helped him recover from substance abuse and supported him through his many cancer treatments. . His often-stormy relationships with Van Halen's trio of singers: David Lee Roth, Sammy Hagar and Gary Cherone. Unfortunately for Eddie and his legions of fans, he died before he was ever able to put his life down to paper in his own words, and much of his compelling backstory has remained elusive-until now. As entertaining as it is revealing, ERUPTION is the closest readers will ever get to hearing Eddie's side of the story when it comes to his extraordinary life.

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Technoptimist Radio 10/13/21: CRISPR restores vision in colorblind

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 5:21


Join Teresa Carey as she breaks down the latest news on the technology that is solving the world's biggest problems. In today's show, Teresa covers how companies are trying to recycle solar panels, solar power batteries in Nigeria, and how CRISPR restored vision in colorblind people. To learn more about the topics in this episode: CRISPR partially restores vision in colorblind people Solar panel recycling: how companies will make it work Solar power batteries offer Nigerians green energy About the host: Teresa Carey is a senior staff writer at Freethink.com, where she covers genetics and the environment. She is also a US Coast Guard licensed captain and a NatGeo Explorer. In addition to Freethink her work can be found in BuzzFeed, Scientific American, PBS NewsHour, NPR Weekend Edition, Smithsonian and more. @teresa_carey The post Technoptimist Radio 10/13/21: CRISPR restores vision in colorblind first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

The Photo Detective
Rediscovered Photos of an American Medium with Sharon Carmack

The Photo Detective

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 23:18


A long time ago, my skills as The Photo Detective helped me identify photographs for press kits and textbooks. Over the years, I've located photos for my own publications and helped countless authors and historians with their image problems too.  Today's guest is an experienced genealogist and historian. When she needed help piecing together a photo mystery, she contacted me. I was happy to help. Without her guidance as an editor at Betterway Books (now Family Tree Books), there wouldn't be a Family Photo Detective book written by me.  Related Episodes:Episode 118: Eliza Hamilton Revealed with Susan Holloway ScottEpisode 22: A Murder Mystery with the Literary Detective Paul CollinsLinks:Sharon CarmackSign up for my newsletter.Watch my YouTube Channel.Like the Photo Detective Facebook Page so you get notified of my Facebook Live videos.Need help organizing your photos? Check out the Essential Photo Organizing Video Course.Need help identifying family photos? Check out the Identifying Family Photographs Online Course.Have a photo you need help identifying? Sign up for photo consultation.About My Guest:Sharon DeBartolo Carmack is a Certified Genealogist® with a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Nonfiction Writing, a Diploma in Irish Studies from the National University of Ireland–Galway, and a Diploma from the Spiritualists' National Union in the UK.As part of the adjunct faculty at Salt Lake Community College, Sharon developed and teaches five online courses: Tracing Immigrant Origins, Writing Life Stories, Genealogy and Family History Writing, and Preparing for Certified Genealogist I and II.She is also the author of twenty-four books and hundreds of articles, essays, columns, and reviews that have appeared in nearly every major genealogical journal and publication. Some of Sharon's books include Tell It Short: A Guide to Writing Your Family History in Brief, You Can Write Your Family History, and most recently, In Search of Maria B. Hayden: The American Medium Who Brought Spiritualism to the U.K., available on Amazon.com.About Maureen Taylor:Maureen is a frequent keynote speaker on photo identification, photograph preservation, and family history at historical and genealogical societies, museums, conferences, libraries, and other organizations across the U.S., London, and Canada.  She's the author of several books and hundreds of articles and her television appearances include The View and The Today Show (where she researched and presented a complete family tree for host Meredith Vieira).  She's been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Better Homes and Gardens, The Boston Globe, Martha Stewart Living, Germany's top newspaper Der Spiegel, American Spirit, and The New York Times. Maureen was recently a spokesperson and photograph expert for MyHeritage.com, an internationally known family history website, and also writes guidebooks, scholarly articles, and online columns for such media as Smithsonian.com. Learn more at Maureentaylor.comDid you enjoy this episode? Please leave a review on Apple Podcasts.

The Modern Art Notes Podcast
Hugo McCloud, Ulysses Jenkins

The Modern Art Notes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 93:46


Episode No. 518 features artist Hugo McCloud and curator Erin Christovale. McCloud's work is on view in "In Relation to Power: Politically Engaged Works from the Collection" at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, which was curated by Marshall Price and Adria Gunter, and is on view through February 13, 2022; and in "Hugo McCloud: from where I stand" at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, which was curated by Richard Klein and is on view through January 2, 2022. McCloud's work engages questions around labor, environmental impacts and global markets and politics often through materials that relate to the people, histories and issues he addresses. He has been featured in group shows at the Studio Museum in Harlem and at The Drawing Center in New York. His work is in the collection of museums such as the Detroit Institute of Arts, the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture, and the North Carolina Museum of Art. On the second segment, Christovale discusses the retrospective "Ulysses Jenkins: Without Your Interpretation," which is at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia through December 30, 2021. Christovale co-curated the exhibition with Meg Onli. Jenkins is an influential video and performance artist whose work has examined how cultural iconography and history have informed representation.The exhibition will travel to the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles next year. The exhibition catalogue was published by the two museums. Indiebound and Amazon offer it for about $40. The museums will also republish Jenkins's memoir, "Doggerel Life: Stories of a Los Angeles Griot."

The Not Old - Better Show
578 Dr. Kevin Ban - Vaccine, Flu Shot? What to Know Now

The Not Old - Better Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 30:05


Dr. Kevin Ban - Vaccine, Flu Shot? What to Know Now The Not Old Better Show Briefing... Today's show is brought to you by Chess.com “Measures like social distancing, mask-wearing and increased flu vaccinations contributed to very few flu cases last season, however, as communities return to everyday activities amid a surge in COVID-19 cases, it is critical that people remain diligent about getting their flu vaccine,” says our guest today Kevin Ban, M.D., Chief Medical Officer, Walgreens.  My thanks to Dr. Kevin Ban for his generous time and preparation today. Of course, my thanks to Chess.com for sponsoring today's episode, please check out Chess.com/notold for chess instructions, excellent games to play, and you can find me there, too. My thanks to you, my wonderful Not Old Better Show audience…please be safe, get your flu shots and your booster shot for COVID, recommend others do the same and Let's Talk About Better.  The Not Old Better Show.  Thanks, everybody.  

Building While Flying
Building the Leaders of the Future - with Gary Sheng, Civics Unplugged

Building While Flying

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 37:14


For Gary Sheng, the year 2016 kicked off a deep exploration of civics, leadership, and the future of democracy—which ultimately led him to his calling.  Gary Sheng is a Co-Founder and the COO of Civics Unplugged, a platform and movement focused on empowering the next generation to build the future of democracy. Its three-month civic leadership fellowship for high school students provides a civics foundation, teaches problem solving and effective dialoguing with others, and helps them build their “civics muscles.” With partnerships with National Geographic, Georgetown University, The Smithsonian, the Ethereum Foundation and more, the future for Civics Unplugged is bright.  In this week's episode of Building While Flying, Gary shares his personal journey from Google developer to nonprofit co-founder, and discusses why civics education and leadership development for Gen Z matters. He says that learning is a lifelong process, and being a good citizen is a lifelong exercise. He also discusses the role companies and corporations can play in civics, and how they can support organizations like Civics Unplugged to help build a better future. Other in-flight topics: How Civics Unplugged was born Impacts of the 2016 election  Building community around a movement The role of corporations in civics The future of Gen Z What's next for Civics Unplugged ...and more! Relevant Links: CU website: https://www.civicsunplugged.org/  CU Fellowship: https://www.civicsunplugged.org/fellowship  CU Insta: ​​https://www.instagram.com/civicsunplugged/  Gary's website: http://www.garysheng.com/  Gary LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/garysheng/  Gary's Tiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@garysheng

Grounded with Dinée Dorame
Episode 34 - Kyle Sumatzkuku & Duane Humeyestewa, "A Journey from Hopi to Boston"

Grounded with Dinée Dorame

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 75:50


Kyle Sumatzkuku (Hopi) is an endurance runner who qualified for the 2021 Boston Marathon and is currently raising funds for his trip. This year's marathon falls on October 11th (Indigenous Peoples' Day) and Kyle hopes to shed light on the legacy of Hopi running, represent his community, and put his longtime training to the test. Kyle's marathon journey is being fully documented by filmmaker Duane Humeyestewa (Hopi) for an upcoming project. Duane is also a lifelong distance runner who specializes in film, journalism, editing, and production. His perspective, as both a mentor to Kyle and a fellow Indigenous runner, allows him to bring depth and authenticity to Kyle's story. To support Kyle's journey and Duane's film project, please visit the link below. DONATE TO KYLE – A JOURNEY FROM HOPI TO BOSTON:  https://www.gofundme.com/f/4bgege-hopi-runner-kyle-sumatzkuku-chases-a-dream?utm_campaign=p_lico+share-sheet+spider1v&utm_medium=copy_link&utm_source=customer   In This Episode: An update from the B.A.A. on Indigenous Peoples' Day Grounded Pod Episode 11 – Women's Running Across the Generations with Kathrine Switzer, Patti Catalano Dillon, & Weini Kelati Grounded Pod Episode 1 – Jordan Marie Daniel “Jordan Marie Daniel ran and prayed for 26 #MMIW names at 26.2 mile Boston Marathon” by Vincent Schilling, com, April 23, 2019. Grounded Pod Episode 13 – Dustin Martin Support Dustin in his #RunWithWings Boston Marathon Fundraiser Wings of America Grounded Pod Episode 14 – Beth Wright Support Beth in her #RunWithWings Boston Marathon Fundraiser Grounded Pod Episode 25 – Yatika Starr Fields Support Yatika in his #RunWithWings Boston Marathon Fundraiser “Hopi endurance runner Kyle Sumatzkuku qualifies for Boston Marathon,” by Duane Humeyestewa, Navajo-Hopi Observer (Online), September 14, 2021. Lewis Tewanima (Hopi), American Indian Observer – Magazine of Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian, Summer 2012 / Vol. 13 No. 2. Reservation Dogs | Watch on FX on Hulu Boston: The Documentary (Narrated by Matt Damon) Philip Glass   Follow Kyle and Duane: Instagram (Kyle Sumatzkuku): @kylesumatzkuku Instagram (Duane Humeyestewa): @hopifilmmaker   Follow Grounded Pod: Instagram: @groundedpod Twitter: @groundedpod Facebook: facebook.com/groundedpodwithdinee   Subscribe, Listen, & Review on: Spotify | Apple Podcasts | Soundcloud | Stitcher   Music by Jacob Shije (Santa Clara Pueblo, NM). This podcast was made possible through the Tracksmith Fellowship Program.

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Technoptimist Radio 10/6/21: Star Trek's Holodeck will soon be a reality

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 5:18


Join Teresa Carey as she breaks down the latest news on the technology that is solving the world's biggest problems. In today's show, Teresa covers the smallest microfliers, a special feature of oyster reefs, and holograms you can touch. To learn more about the topics in this episode: Flying microchips the size of sand are tracking air data. Watch them fly. How oyster reefs protect against hurricane damage These holograms are so real you can touch them About the host: Teresa Carey is a senior staff writer at Freethink.com, where she covers genetics and the environment. She is also a US Coast Guard licensed captain and a NatGeo Explorer. In addition to Freethink her work can be found in BuzzFeed, Scientific American, PBS NewsHour, NPR Weekend Edition, Smithsonian and more. @teresa_carey The post Technoptimist Radio 10/6/21: Star Trek's Holodeck will soon be a reality first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

Time Sensitive Podcast
Glenn Adamson on Craft as a Reflection of Ourselves

Time Sensitive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 85:44


For curator and scholar Glenn Adamson, craft isn't a quirky hobby that sits on the outskirts of contemporary culture. Rather, it's a vital, timeless tool for teaching us about one another, and about humanity as a whole. This belief fuels his writing, teaching, and curatorial projects, which seek to unpack the many ways in which the age-old activity shapes our lives. Adamson's work shows that craft is bigger than any single skillfully handmade object—each of which itself can serve as an important symbol of the human capacity for honing expertise over time—and influences countless aspects of society, from the Japanese tea ceremony to farming robots devised by Google's parent company, Alphabet X. In this way, craft acts as a lens for understanding people and places across time.Adamson, 49, has explored the virtues of craft throughout his two-decade-long career, which has included roles at Milwaukee's Chipstone Foundation, London's Victoria and Albert Museum, and New York's Museum of Arts and Design. In his 2018 book Fewer, Better Things, he positions craft as a means of connecting with fundamental issues and ideas (as opposed to those that hold only momentary or superficial relevance), and explains why taking the time to appreciate handmade objects from a maker's or a user's perspective holds particular spiritual and psychological value. Adamson's account of the discipline in the United States, neatly laid out in his latest book, Craft: An American History (Bloomsbury), reveals how artisans—whose trade often includes people who are disempowered by their ethnicity, gender, or both—have been consistently suppressed throughout the nation's history, but, paradoxically, are integral to many of its greatest achievements. His latest endeavor takes a more forward-looking approach. “Futures,” an exhibition Adamson co-curated that opens in November at the Smithsonian's Arts and Industries Building in Washington, D.C. (on view through summer 2022), considers how craft can signal where we might be headed, and why we should be optimistic about the time to come. Over and over again, Adamson demonstrates how skilled making is about more than just beautiful objects. “Craft stands in for the whole idea of what it means to be human,” he says, “and why that matters.”On this episode, Adamson discusses the various facets of skilled making, talking with Spencer about the value of hand-formed objects, the relationship between time and craft, and the discipline's essential, often complicated role in the history of human progress.Show notes:Full transcript on timesensitive.fm@glenn_adamsonglennadamson.com(16:20): Fewer, Better Things (Bloomsbury, 2018)(52:57): Chipstone Foundation (53:33): Milwaukee Art Museum(54:16): “Postmodernism: Style and Subversion 1970–1990” (Victoria and Albert Museum, 2011)(55:56): The Journal of Modern Craft(56:04): Museum of Arts and Design(59:50): Craft: An American History (Bloomsbury, 2021)(01:17:23): “Futures” (Smithsonian Arts and Industries Building, Nov. 2021–Summer 2022)

New Books Network
Hannah Turner, "Cataloguing Culture: Legacies of Colonialism in Museum Documentation" (UBC Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 43:40


How does colonialism still shape museums today? In Cataloguing Culture: Legacies of Colonialism in Museum Documentation (UBC Press, 2020), Hannah Turner, an assistant professor in the School of Information at the University of British Columbia, reveals the complex history of cataloguing museum collections. Using a case study of The Smithsonian, the book details the material practices that underpin the contested collections of the National Museum of Natural History. Turner's research charts the early uses of ledgers and record books, through the use of drawings, card catalogues, and typed records, to computerisation of the collections' records. The analysis has important implications for contemporary debates over repatriation of collections, and the book is powerful illustration of the importance of understanding the long shadow of colonial practices and knowledges on the contemporary institution. Cataloguing Culture is essential reading for practitioners and academics, as well as for anyone interested in the past, and the future, of museums. Dave O'Brien is Chancellor's Fellow, Cultural and Creative Industries, at the University of Edinburgh's College of Art. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Intellectual History
Hannah Turner, "Cataloguing Culture: Legacies of Colonialism in Museum Documentation" (UBC Press, 2020)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 43:40


How does colonialism still shape museums today? In Cataloguing Culture: Legacies of Colonialism in Museum Documentation (UBC Press, 2020), Hannah Turner, an assistant professor in the School of Information at the University of British Columbia, reveals the complex history of cataloguing museum collections. Using a case study of The Smithsonian, the book details the material practices that underpin the contested collections of the National Museum of Natural History. Turner's research charts the early uses of ledgers and record books, through the use of drawings, card catalogues, and typed records, to computerisation of the collections' records. The analysis has important implications for contemporary debates over repatriation of collections, and the book is powerful illustration of the importance of understanding the long shadow of colonial practices and knowledges on the contemporary institution. Cataloguing Culture is essential reading for practitioners and academics, as well as for anyone interested in the past, and the future, of museums. Dave O'Brien is Chancellor's Fellow, Cultural and Creative Industries, at the University of Edinburgh's College of Art. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

BewilderBeasts
Ep 45: Bone-y and Clyde

BewilderBeasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 20:52


A Smithsonian Museum exhibit depicting the skeletal remains of Dr. Grover Krantz and his beloved Irish wolfhound, Clyde. But, who was Dr. Krantz, and why is he - and his dogs - at the Smithsonian? And, why is this photo of their posthumous posed parts circulating social media?  Resources: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-institution/grover-krantz-donated-his-body-to-science-on-one-condition-38726179/https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-institution/scientist-grover-krantz-risked-it-all-chasing-bigfoot-180970676/https://alumni.berkeley.edu/california-magazine/summer-2018-our-town/man-myth-and-legend-grover-krantzhttps://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-2002-feb-21-me-krantz21-story.htmlhttps://www.qcc.cuny.edu/socialsciences/ppecorino/phil_of_religion_text/CHAPTER_5_ARGUMENTS_EXPERIENCE/Burden-of-Proof.htm Intro and outro music is Tiptoe out the Back by Dan Liebowicz and interstitial music is by MK2. All additional music within the podcast is from Pixelbay.com, and sound effects are from freesound.orgMore about Melissa McCue-McGrath, CPDT-KA, her book, "Considerations for the City Dog", and dog training services can be found at https://melissamccuemcgrath.com, and all episodes of Bewilderbeasts can be found at https://bewilderbeastspod.com Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/BewilderBeastsPod)

The Photo Detective
Early Photographs on Headstones with Elliot Conte

The Photo Detective

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 35:24


Genealogists love going to cemeteries to view the resting place of ancestors. Information and symbolism on stones vary depending on the time period.  Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, some gravestones featured photographs.  Have you ever seen one?  My guest has. He's been wandering in rural cemeteries in Maine to find out more about the practice.   Related Episodes:Episode 21  The Gravestone GirlsEpisode 94  Dead Still: Postmortem Photography and Crime Fiction ProgramLinks:Daguerreian SocietySign up for my newsletter.Watch my YouTube Channel.Like the Photo Detective Facebook Page so you get notified of my Facebook Live videos.Need help organizing your photos? Check out the Essential Photo Organizing Video Course.Need help identifying family photos? Check out the Identifying Family Photographs Online Course.Have a photo you need help identifying? Sign up for photo consultation.About My Guest:Over the past 11 years, Elliot Conte has collected, studied, and made daguerreotypes. He gave a talk on his research on daguerreotypes in cemeteries at the Nelson Atkins Museum and wrote an article on the topic for The Daguerreian AnnualAbout Maureen Taylor:Maureen is a frequent keynote speaker on photo identification, photograph preservation, and family history at historical and genealogical societies, museums, conferences, libraries, and other organizations across the U.S., London, and Canada.  She's the author of several books and hundreds of articles and her television appearances include The View and The Today Show (where she researched and presented a complete family tree for host Meredith Vieira).  She's been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Better Homes and Gardens, The Boston Globe, Martha Stewart Living, Germany's top newspaper Der Spiegel, American Spirit, and The New York Times. Maureen was recently a spokesperson and photograph expert for MyHeritage.com, an internationally known family history website, and also writes guidebooks, scholarly articles, and online columns for such media as Smithsonian.com. Learn more at Maureentaylor.comDid you enjoy this episode? Please leave a review on Apple Podcasts.

Weekend Roundup
Weekend Roundup 10/1

Weekend Roundup

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 40:00


On the CBS News Weekend Roundup with host Allison Keyes, there's a new oral medication to fight Covid-19. It's developer, Merck, says it can cut the risk of death or hospitalizations in half. CBS News Medical Contributor Dr. David Agus spoke with CBS Mornings. This comes as Montana deals with record coronavirus cases. CBS's Meg Oliver reports. In facilities in Kansas, patients are balking at Covid treatments. Reporter Shawn Loging tells us more. In Los Angeles, some indoor businesses may require customers to show proof of vaccination. Reporter Lesley Martin has the latest. Late Thursday, lawmakers voted to fund the federal government through December, avoiding a government shutdown. Some observers compared the back and forth on Capitol Hill to a political television drama. CBS's Debra Alfarone has the latest. After a week where President Biden's agenda was stalled by infighting among Democratic lawmakers, his popularity is taking a hit. CBS News White House Correspondent Steven Portnoy joins Allison to explain. Starting Friday, a new plan could mean more problems for mail deliveries. The Postmaster General is slowing down some deliveries and raising prices. Errol Barnett reports critics warn this will cause serious damage. In a special report for National Hispanic Heritage Month, CBS's Lisa Mateo takes a look at what is holding Latinas back in the workforce. Earlier this week, disgraced R&B superstar R. Kelly was convicted on charges including sex trafficking and racketeering. As CBS's Jericka Duncan reports, he faces more charges in two other states and may face life in prison. Meanwhile, a victory for Britney Spears, as her father, Jamie Spears, is suspended as her conservator. CBS's Laura Podesta reports that this could affect others under conservatorships in California. In this week's Kaleidoscope, Allison is joined by Paul Gardullo, Smithsonian historian and curator of the National Museum of African American History. He talks about the museums exhibition , "Make Good the Promises," which looks back at the Reconstruction era, the period after the Civil War, and what happened with Blacks and their quest for freedom. Gardullo explains that the battle for things like voting rights remain an issue today Are you having trouble lining up vet appointments for your Covid-19 era canine or feline? You're not alone. Allison hears from Mark Cushing, the founder and CEO of the Animal Policy Group, about the vet shortage in the nation. Finally a big celebration at the most magical place on Earth. CBS's Peter King has some history on the 50th anniversary of Walt Disney World. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Goizueta Effect
What Goes into Your Cup of Coffee?

Goizueta Effect

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 37:47


Peter Roberts, Professor of Organization & M anagement at Emory University's Goizueta Business School, was founding academic director of Social Enterprise @ Goizueta. He joined The Goizueta Effect Podcast to explore the vast inequities between growers and retailers/roasters, how historical movements like colonialism and slavery have shaped the origins of this industry, and what role climate change and the pandemic are playing today. He also delves into how consumers, roasters, and retailers can work together to balance the scales. Peter also serves as the academic director of specialty coffee programs for The Roberto C. Goizueta Business & Society Institute.His research focuses on how the behavior and performance of organizations evolve over time. His current projects focus on social entrepreneurs and accelerators, microbusiness development, and the global specialty coffee industry. He has been featured in the Harvard Business Review, Forbes, Bloomberg, Food and Wine, and Salon. The Magnitude of the Coffee Industry By the Numbers  In 2019, roughly two-thirds of American adults drank coffee every day.  Over the past 30 years, the specialty coffee market has expanded exponentially and now accounts for up to 40% of all coffee consumed.   In 2020, the coffee market was valued at more than $102 billion.   With 25 million families around the world responsible for growing coffee, the economic and social impacts of this industry are broad and deep.   Evolution of the Coffee Industry The global coffee industry has always been characterized by stark contrasts. Retailers, roasters, and importers often do very well financially, while those who grow coffee struggle to break even.  This is not a new phenomenon. The coffee industry only exists because of colonialism and slavery. Originally, coffee was not grown in Central and South America, but when Europe and the United States started consuming inordinate amounts of coffee, coffee plants and people were brought from Africa.  In the late 1800s, formal slave owning and colonialism went out of fashion. At this point, global markets kicked in, and coffee became a lucrative way for middlemen, such as roasters and sellers, to maintain low coffee grain prices.  Major brands like Folgers and Maxwell House dominated the first wave of coffee consumption, then Peet's and Starbucks and Caribous set up a second wave of coffee. Recently, the third wave of coffee has become popular, which is the movement focusing on small, micro lot-oriented, and direct-trade roasters.  While coffee has often been lucrative for retailers and roasters, most coffee producers in the world are not able to cover the cost of production. From Bean to Cup Consumers often assume that all the magic happens in a coffee shop. However, the people that work on coffee farms, or in beneficios, pour a lot of skill, talent, work, and time into the production of coffee. Before coffee is roasted, it's a bean. Before that, it's a cherry. And prior to this, it's on shrubs. Before the beans are ready to be harvested, the grower cares for the plant for at least three to four years. Often, at least 25 sets of hands play a role in shaping a single pound of coffee.  Coffee growers handle much of the heavy lifting and shoulder much of the risk. However, the payoff is not even. On the retail end, $15-$20 is a reasonable per-pound price for specialty coffee, but the median price that coffee growers receive is just $2.60.   Specialty Coffee Production Exchange grade coffee or commercial/commodity coffee has fairly low standards for quality, which allows for many defects. However, specialty coffee must secure a grade of at least 81, which involves cupping and scrutinizing all of its elements. This product cannot feature green beans that would change its flavor profile. The coffee has to be picked, processed, and sorted multiple times. The world of specialty coffee involves high quality expectations. All of that extra work needs to be paid for. The Effect of Climate Change on Coffee Growing Coffee production is impacted by many external forces, including climate change. In the next 20 years, 60-70 percent of the land that currently grows coffee may become ill-suited for cultivation.  For instance, in Nicaragua just a decade ago, coffee farmers set their watches by when the weather changed from wet to dry to determine when it was time to pick coffee. Now, the weather is variable, which makes it difficult for farmers to grow. Economic and social mobility proves difficult for coffee farmers who don't have hefty savings. If we don't start valuing the work that goes into coffee, paying the people that do the work, accounting for some of the investment and risk, we may not have enough coffee to satisfy demand in 10 or 20 years. Rural communities are oriented around growing and selling coffee, so their economy is built around their core industry. Farmers who are looking ahead to an unsure future can invest in climate change adaptation, using concepts such as shade-grown coffee, which shifts conventional agriculture back to growing coffee in forests. Organizations such as The Nature Conservancy are exploring coffee growing as a form of reforestation. If we can figure out how to pay farmers for growing excellent coffee the right way, there is a built-in incentive for people to reforest, contributing to both adaptation and mitigation of climate change. The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Buying Patterns, Growers, and the Coffee Industry The initial shock of the COVID-19 pandemic hit the coffee industry as hard as the general public. The industry had several concerns: If people go back to drinking coffee at home, then would they stop drinking better-produced or specialty coffee? What happens to local retailers and coffee shops? What price would consumers be able to pay? Like many products, the industry also faces multiple supply chain issues. For instance, without shipping containers for coffee coming from certain suppliers, coffee can't reach consumers quickly and its quality decreases. Industry leaders also worry about workers' and farmers' health and safety as they grow the coffee.  However, “the new normal” did introduce a few silver linings such as subscription services. As people missed specialty coffee, producers realized that people would be willing to spend more to have better coffee to brew at home. Therefore, subscription services and online sales of the specialty shops did fairly well during the pandemic. Nonetheless, the industry is still uncertain about how the specialty coffee industry will settle down over the next few years.  Coffee Movements Create a More Equitable System Many movements over the years including fair trade and direct trade have helped drive progress in the coffee industry, but they have introduced challenges as well. Today, organizations like Fair Trade, Rainforest Alliance, and Smithsonian's Bird Friendly certifications are working in the right direction. The unbalanced marketplace always puts downward pressure on prices including what the farmer gets, so the next step in the world of specialty coffee is getting consumers to pay for it. What we need is a larger share of what we spend on coffee to continue to flow back to coffee-producing countries and growers. How You Can Engage in Conscious Consumerism When addressing the issue of disparity in the coffee industry head on, the majority of the onus is not on the consumer.  Consumers have actually been paying dramatically more for coffee over the last 30 years, but the benchmarking New York C-price is lower now than it was 30 years ago. So even though consumers have been paying more for the things that producers do, we haven't figured out how to enable and empower producers to recognize their value and effectively negotiate better prices. That being said, it's important for more people to get more excited about paying more money for coffee. When looking at the wine industry, consumers are willing to spend a lot of money for a glass of wine in a restaurant or a bottle of wine in a bottle shop, and the same needs to happen for coffee. Consumers need to appreciate quality coffee and good farm stories.  While the consumer problem is being addressed, the producer problem is not. We, as consumers, expect that if you pay more, the money goes back to producers in the appropriate ratios, and the farmer gets paid. However, in the 1940s, producing countries took home about 40 percent of what consumers paid for coffee; now, it's less than 10 percent further evidence that the problem lies with empowering the producers. Educating Growers and Buyers – The Specialty Coffee Transaction Guide  The challenge in the coffee industry is that the only green price that people track is the New York C-price. The pricing for specialty coffee is still following a very low and volatile commodity C-price, but it needs better reference prices. That's where the Specialty Coffee Transaction Guide comes in. Through a partnership between Goizueta Business School and more than 80 roasters, importers, exporters, and cooperatives, the group has developed a low, medium, and average price for different kinds of coffee. The guide allows specialty coffee producers and buyers to have a critical reference point for transactions.  It also allows policymakers and advocates to determine whether coffee prices are even covering the cost of production, then use that information to drive necessary change.  In addition, many retail and roasting organizations are pledging to be more transparent and make market information widely available. For example, Onyx Coffee tells consumers everything about the producer, including what they paid for their coffee.  Goizueta's Grounds for Empowerment Program The mission of Goizueta's Grounds for Empowerment program is to provide women specialty coffee growers the business know-how, market connections, and investment funds that will allow their farms to reach full economic potential. With the help of a diverse group of advisors, including Goizueta leaders and students, farmers participate in a series of workshops and gain unique perspectives on topics like storytelling, social media, cost of production, and relationship management. Producers are also empowered with information to recognize the value of their coffees and make plans to secure prices consistent with these valuations. Participants leave with a stronger vision for the future of their farms, and with plans and connections to achieve more prosperous and sustainable businesses. To learn more about Goizueta Business School and how principled leaders are driving positive change in business and society, visit www.goizueta.emory.edu.  

STRUCK: An Aerospace Engineering & Lightning Protection Show
EP72 – Eve EVTOL Partners with Bristow; Is Airbus Back in the Urban Air Mobility Game?

STRUCK: An Aerospace Engineering & Lightning Protection Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 41:35


Eve Urban Air Mobility, owned by Embraer, has announced an agreement to sell 100 EVTOL aircraft to Bristow, the well-known helicopter operator. What will come of this partnership for the two companies? Airbus is back in the EVTOL hunt, announcing a new aircraft with a unique design. But, it has insiders scratching their heads - why now? Plus, we discuss an intricate luggage scam, Rolls Royce winning the B-52 engine contract, Bell Nexus EVTOL being featured at the Smithsonian, and more. Learn more about Weather Guard StrikeTape segmented lightning diverters and aircraft lightning protection consulting services. Follow the show on YouTube, Twitter, Linkedin and visit us on the web. Have a question we can answer on the show? Email us!

Special Lady Day
19. Hypatia and Victoria Kawēkiu Kaʻiulani Lunalilo Kalaninuiahilapalapa Cleghorn

Special Lady Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 111:27


This episode covers Hypatia: mathematician, astronomer, and philosopher, and Victoria Kawēkiu Kaʻiulani Lunalilo Kalaninuiahilapalapa Cleghorn, Hawaii's Crown Princess.Act One: The Lilith FundPlan CHypatia SourcesEncyclopedia Britannica, inc. (n.d.). Hypatia. Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved September 10, 2021, from https://www.britannica.com/biography/Hypatia Hypatia. (n.d.). Retrieved September 10, 2021, from http://penelope.uchicago.edu/~grout/encyclopaedia_Romana/greece/paganism/hypatia.html. Zielinski, S. (2010, March 14). Hypatia, ancient Alexandria's great FEMALE SCHOLAR. Smithsonian.com. Retrieved September 10, 2021, from https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/hypatia-ancient-alexandrias-great-female-scholar-10942888/. Victoria Kawēkiu Kaʻiulani Lunalilo Kalaninuiahilapalapa Cleghorn SourcesBranch, John. “'I'm Not Anti-Anything. I'm pro-Hawaii.'.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 17 May 2021, www.nytimes.com/2021/05/17/sports/olympics/olympic-surfing-hawaii-flag.html. Fahrni, Jennifer. “Princess Kaiulani Her Life and Times by JENNIFER FAHRNI.” Princess Kaiulani, Her Life and Times, A Biography, 2009, princesskaiulaniproject.com/about_princess_kaiulani.htm. Ho, Sally. “Olympic Surfing Exposes Whitewashed Native Hawaiian Roots.” AP NEWS, Associated Press, 13 July 2021, apnews.com/article/2020-tokyo-olympics-games-racial-injustice-hawaii-surfing-5048591ab4620f8796a08ff54331fec0. Ho, Sally. “Native Hawaiians 'RECLAIM' Surfing with Moore's Olympic Gold.” AP NEWS, Associated Press, 5 Aug. 2021, apnews.com/article/2020-tokyo-olympics-surfing-hawaii-carissa-moore-272e71e4203c138221e66808a87e9564. Hulstrand, Janet. “Ka'iulani: Hawaii's Island Rose.” Smithsonian.com, Smithsonian Institution, 7 May 2009, www.smithsonianmag.com/history/kaiulani-hawaiis-island-rose-131796275/. Little, Becky. “Hawai'ian Surfers Have Been Riding Waves since the 17th Century.” History.com, A&E Television Networks, 15 Aug. 2018, www.history.com/news/women-surfers-1600s-hawaii-princess-gidget.

The Speakeasy
Off-Centered

The Speakeasy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 48:40


Brewer, innovator and creative ADD enthusiast Sam Calagione of Dogfish Head sits down with the band to talk about the future of craft beer, pumpkin spiced everything and how a modified vibrating football set he bootstrapped into his brewery wound up in the Smithsonian.Sam recently wrote a book about his 26 years at the helm of a very off-centered brewery which you can find herePlease SUBSCRIBE and RATE the show if you can. Join us each week as industry leaders, Damon Boelte and Sother Teague, sit down with a wide range of hospitality and spirits experts from around the world to discuss everything that impacts our business. FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM:Damon Boelte @DamonBoelteSother Teague @CreativeDrunkGreg Benson @100ProofGregSpeakeasy Podcast @SpeakeasyPodcastHeritage Radio Network is a listener supported nonprofit podcast network. Support The Speakeasy by becoming a member!The Speakeasy is Powered by Simplecast.

HeightsCast: Forming Men Fully Alive
An Introduction to Natural History with Eric Heil: On the Study of Our World Fully Alive

HeightsCast: Forming Men Fully Alive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 40:41


In certain school systems, it is perhaps more common to find students dissecting samples and diagraming abstractions. The boys in the Lower School at The Heights, however, begin their scientific formation not in a lab, among dead specimens, but in nature, among living creatures. Their text book is not full of paper, but of paper's source, trees; for their primary text is the book of nature itself.  In this week's episode, Eric Heil takes us outdoors--so to speak--for a discussion of natural history. With over fourteen years of experience teaching at The Heights, in addition to having spent time as a researcher both for at the Bronx Zoo and the Smithsonian's National Zoological Park, Eric offers us thoughts both practical and lofty.  First, Eric explains what natural history is and how it differs from other ways of approaching science at the elementary level. Then, he considers what a typical natural history lesson might look like. Next, Eric expounds the elements of nature journaling, a typical exercise for a natural history class. In particular, he explains John Muir Laws' three step framework for nature journaling:  Explain what you see.  Expound on what the observed reality makes you think of.  Wonder about what you do not yet know.  Lastly, the discussion takes a turn for the transcendental, as Eric considers some of the existential fruits of natural history.   Beyond books and diagrams, and indeed even the boy's own words and sketches, the study of natural history draws students into that mystery which moves those animals they have found. Perhaps this is the reason why natural history has been deemed the most important subject taught in the Valley: the silence that it instills is the beginning of a prayer; indeed, the greatest prayer, which is gratitude.   Show Highlights What is natural history and why does it matter?  Campus as the textbook itself How is a natural history class different from other ways of teaching science at the elementary level?  Jean-Henri Fabre and the importance of direct observation The parts of a typical natural history lesson What is a nature journal and how do you make one? The benefits of studying natural history  How natural history integrates into an education for realism.  Existential goods of natural history  Why is natural history the most important subject taught in the Lower School? Suggested Reading  Handbook of Nature Study by Anna Botsford Comstock A Natural History of North American Trees by Donald Culross Peattie Nature's Events: A Notebook of the Unfolding Seasons by John Serrao Observing Insect Lives by Donald Stokes (and several other Stokes Nature Guides) Keeping a Nature Journal by Clare Walker Leslie and Charles E. Roth Botany in a Day: The Patterns Method of Plant Identification by Thomas J. Elpel Last Child in the Woods by Richard Louv The Laws Guide to Nature Drawing and Journaling by John Muir Laws (and www.johnmuirlaws.com) The Naturalist's Notebook by Nathaniel T. Wheelwright & Bernd Heinrich natureoutside.com nature journal website by Steven Stolper The Forest by Roger Caras The Tree Identification Book by George W. D. Symonds Sketching Outdoors in Autumn by Jim Arnosky Find the Constellations by H. A. Rey (of Winnie-the-Pooh fame) Insects (A Golden Guide from St. Martin's Press) Revised Peterson Field Guide to Birds of Eastern and Central North America, 6th Edition (Peterson Field Guides) Also on The Forum  Webinar: How to Keep a Nature Journal On Nature Journals and Observant Souls “Can I catch it?”: On Handling Wildlife  Reading Recommendations for Keeping a Nature Journal Why We Need Exposure to Nature Nature Deficit Disorder: The Importance of Green Time

The Irish Tech News Podcast
Platon - British Photographer on NFTs with Pussy Riot

The Irish Tech News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 47:16


Platon is one of world's most renowned portrait photographers, having photographed more world leaders than anyone else in history, including six American presidents. He has photographed over 30 covers for TIME Magazine, including their 2008 Vladimir Putin Person of The Year cover. In 2008, Platon signed on as staff photographer to the New Yorker and maintains long-term relationships with many international publications. He has published four books with subjects ranging from the power of world leaders to the dignity of those who serve in the US Military. In 2013, Platon founded The People's Portfolio, a non-profit foundation dedicated to celebrating emerging leaders of human rights and civil rights around the world. The People's Portfolio creates a visual language that breaks barriers, uplifts dignity, fights discrimination, and enlists the public to support human rights around the world. Platon is currently on the board for Arts and Culture at the World Economic Forum and serves as a steward for the Economic Growth and Social Inclusion Initiative. Platon's life's work is the subject of a Netflix documentary, Abstract: The Art of Design. His first film, My Body Is Not A Weapon, features survivors of wartime sexual violence and 2018 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Dr. Denis Mukwege. Platon's archive of prominent African American civil rights leaders and cultural leaders was acquired by the Smithsonian in 2020. He speaks today with your host Jillian Godsil on Being Curious, not Judgemental and of course on NFTs

Mailin’ It! - The Official USPS Podcast

Join us as we chat with the Smithsonian's National Post Museum curator, Lynn Heidelbaugh, to examine one of the biggest game changers in the modernization of the Postal Service—the ZIP code. We'll talk about how a seemingly innocuous string of digits helped to increase delivery performance, as well as how USPS inspired nationwide adoption of the ZIP code, including the introduction of Mr. ZIP! Hear how the ZIP code was promoted, the reception it received from the public and mailing industry. Our hosts Dale Parsan and Yasmine Di Giulio go deep into the ZIP code with Lynn Heidelbaugh on this episode of Mailin' It!

Revelations Radio Network

Canary Cry News Talk ep. 394 - 09.27.2021 - OCCULTECH MAGIK: Black Goo Greta, $ADA Mystery Religions, Anti-Jab Jocks, X-Men Nephilites - CCNT 394 Our LINK TREE: CanaryCry.Party SUBSCRIBE TO US ON: NewPodcastApps.com SUPPORT: CanaryCryRadio.com/Support MEET UPS: CanaryCryMeetUps.com Basil's other project: Ravel Podcast INTRO Biden gets booster on air Black Goo Greta Cover (Your Celeb Mag) Hamster has been trading crypto, out-performing S&P 500 (Biz Insider)   FLIPPY 0:25:31 Can football (soccer) playing robots beat world cup winners by 2050? (BBC)   GREAT RESET/CRYPTO0:37:03 Chinese News: China cuts power and production (Bloomberg) Note: Gov't must relieve supply chain turmoil (Financial Times) Huge news from Cardano $ADA during summit (Bloomberg) -Hoskinson donates $20 mil to Carnegie Mellon (Carnegie was a Mason, Mellon ties) -Partnership with Dish Network (Dishfire of NSA, $5 bil deal w/ AT&T, AWT 5G partnership) -Acala PRISM to offer DID on $ADA (PRISM of the NSA, DID traditional) -COTI to issue Djed algorithmic stablecoin on $ADA (Djed ancient Egypt) -Ouroboros PoS protocol for $ADA Australia order $14 million Ouroboros sculpture   COVID 19 JINGLE/PANDEMIC SPECIAL 1:09:46 Clip: More tyranny in Australia (Brisbane military airplane drive by) Clip: Even more tyranny in Australia (photo of mask police going viral) Clip: “Get him, he's leaving his house!” Clip: UK protest with thousands Clip: NY Gov says NG to replace unvaccinated medical Ohio State HP “aware and monitoring” possible trucker protest (Fox19) R1 Variant starting to spread (SF Chronicle) Thousands dying but not from C19 (Yahoo/Telegraph) Clip: Natural Immunity potential legal challenge to federal mandates (Yahoo)   I AM WACCINE 1:54:44 Clip: Scientist Dr. Ryan Cole, jab autopsies Headline: Court blocks NY city school mandates (WHBI) Unjabbed clash in NBA, Kyrie Irving satanic conspiracy (Sports Illustrated) Headline: GS Warriors, Andrew Wiggins denied religious exemption (NY Times)   BREAK (producer party) 2:15:31   POLYTICKS 3:20:26 Newsom Science/Alien: CA to replace the word “Alien” for “noncitizen” and “immigrant” Harry Legs: Biden purchases drones from China (National Pulse)   NEPHILIM UPDATE 3:30:55 X-Men could join MCU as Nephilites, not mutants (Screen Rant, MCL)   ADDITIONAL STORIES Church at planned parenthood permanently ordered away from clinic (Spokesman Review) Joe Rogan says Trump will probably win 2024 (DailyMail) Robot Arm milking cows (ChipPewa) Not financial advice, Airport robots to rise to $2.5 bn by 2030 (Global News Wire) Mental Health: Use economic, medical, and social data for policy (WEF) India covering up snake bite massacres (Daily Beast) Proud Boys in contact with FBI on Insurrection Day (Yahoo) Inside CIA secret war against Wikileaks (Yahoo) Facebook Ray-Ban Smart Glasses solves problem, but privacy issue (Yahoo) Will robots be able to have children, celebrate mothers day? (Analytics Insights) The Army is modeling future robots on…squirrels (Pop. Mechanics) Robot designs inspired by nature (Design Boom) Scientists create genetically modified coffee (DailyMail) Waccines C19 death toll surpasses 1918 Spanish flu estimates (Smithsonian) National Guard ready to replace health care workers (Reuters) Gates Foundation, NIH, CDC funded C19 jab effectiveness study (MedRxiv)   PRODUCERS ep. 394: Scott K**, Brian D, Anonymous, Aaron J, Sam W, Sir Sammons Knight of the Fishes, Sir Casey the Shield Knight, JC, Heatheruss, Sarah P, GiantsBane16, Brandt W, Veronica D, Big Tank, Juan A, Gail M, Doughty the Coyote, Runksmash, Ciara, Rob TIMESTAMPS: Christine C ART: Dame Allie of the Skillet Nation Sir Dove, Knight of Rustbeltia Ryan N Mike B Christine C

How'd You Get That Job?
S02E10 Inside the Digital World of The Smithsonian: Matthew MacArthur

How'd You Get That Job?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 31:00


What happens when you combine history with technology? Matthew MacArthur (MA, History, '97) combined his enthusiasm for the past with digital media to get his dream job. As the director of digital experience at the National Museum of American History at the Smithsonian, listen in for tips on taking inspiration from other fields to expand your job opportunities. For a transcript of this episode, email cgupodcasts at gmail.com and include the episode title.

Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer
Journeys of Discovery: Futurist CEO George Jacob's visions for San Francisco's new Ecotarium

Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 19:34


George Jacob, president and CEO of the Bay Ecotarium, is on the verge of bringing the future to San Francisco. Jacob has plans for the Smithsonian-affiliated Aquarium of the Bay at Pier 39: He and his team are transforming it into something even more vital to our precarious environmental situation—a startlingly unique Climate Resilience and Ocean Conservation Living Museum.

Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer
Journeys of Discovery: Futurist CEO George Jacob's visions for San Francisco's new Ecotarium

Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 19:34


George Jacob , president and CEO of the Bay Ecotarium , is on the verge of bringing the future to San Francisco. Jacob has plans for the Smithsonian-affiliated Aquarium of the Bay at Pier 39: He and his team are transforming it into something even more vital to our precarious environmental situation—a startlingly unique Climate Resilience and Ocean Conservation Living Museum. Join associate producer and host Laurie McAndish King for a visit with Jacob about the Ecotarium's artificial emotional intelligence—which allows machines to react to a human's emotional state in intelligent ways—and its “Mother Portal,” which cyber-curates live streaming environmental data from around the world, bypassing geopolitical boundaries.

The Photo Detective
Ask Maureen: September 2021

The Photo Detective

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 25:18


This month's Q & A is a themed podcast on postcards. Thank you to everyone that mailed me a postcard!  Related Episodes:Episode 143: Ask Maureen September 2021Episode 138: Ask Maureen July 2021Links:Sign up for my newsletter.Watch my YouTube Channel.Like the Photo Detective Facebook Page so you get notified of my Facebook Live videos.Need help organizing your photos? Check out the Essential Photo Organizing Video Course.Need help identifying family photos? Check out the Identifying Family Photographs Online Course.Have a photo you need help identifying? Sign up for photo consultation.About Maureen Taylor:Maureen is a frequent keynote speaker on photo identification, photograph preservation, and family history at historical and genealogical societies, museums, conferences, libraries, and other organizations across the U.S., London, and Canada.  She's the author of several books and hundreds of articles and her television appearances include The View and The Today Show (where she researched and presented a complete family tree for host Meredith Vieira).  She's been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Better Homes and Gardens, The Boston Globe, Martha Stewart Living, Germany's top newspaper Der Spiegel, American Spirit, and The New York Times. Maureen was recently a spokesperson and photograph expert for MyHeritage.com, an internationally known family history website, and also writes guidebooks, scholarly articles, and online columns for such media as Smithsonian.com. Learn more at Maureentaylor.comDid you enjoy this episode? Please leave a review on Apple Podcasts.

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Technoptimist Radio 8/11/21: Will Power Plants Move Into the Cloud?

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 4:38


Join Teresa Carey as she breaks down the latest news on the technology that is solving the world's biggest problems. In today's show, Teresa covers how a power plant could become cloud-based, the U.S.'s first electric tugboat, and what editing sugarcane's genome means for the planet. To learn more about the topics: Will power plants move into the cloud? The first U.S. electric tugboat will replace a tug that burns 30,000 gallons of diesel per year Researchers edit the sugarcane plant's genome for the first time Should We Genetically Engineer Carbon-Hungry Trees? This Genetically Modified Grass Can Clean Up Toxic Pollution About the host: Teresa Carey is a senior staff writer at Freethink.com, where she covers genetics and the environment. She is also a US Coast Guard licensed captain and a NatGeo Explorer. In addition to Freethink her work can be found in BuzzFeed, Scientific American, PBS NewsHour, NPR Weekend Edition, Smithsonian and more. @teresa_carey The post Technoptimist Radio 8/11/21: Will Power Plants Move Into the Cloud? first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network
Awakened Soul Stories with Pam Patalano

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 58:00


Awakened Soul Nicole Majik, A Mile in Her Shoes We look forward to this live interview with empowering leader, speaker and spiritual guru; Nicole Majik.  The discussion will include the latest projects she is involved in and the latest book she is mentioned in, A Mile in Her Shoes. At little something about Nicole: She has overcome many adversities in life including severe mercury poisoning while being the sole provider for her family.  Nicole is a mom of 4 with 1 girl and 3 boys - one of which is in the Air Force Special Operations training program. Nicole holds a bachelor's degree in Biology/Chemistry and a Masters in Metaphysics. She is an accomplished leadership and empowerment strategist and educator, and has created a highly effective, life-transforming empowerment program: The Alchemy of Transformation™.  She awakens your true potential by erasing limiting beliefs and showing you how to live a life you deserve without compromising who you are or what you love. Nicole has appeared on various radio shows, local TV, as a keynote speaker for international conferences and has even appeared on the Travel Channel for Greatest Mysteries:  Smithsonian as well as Beyond the Unknown. Using the strategic formulas of her empowerment program, The Alchemy of Transformation ™, she helps you permanently erase self-sabotaging beliefs and transform your obstacles into the opportunities to achieve the success you desire! Topics Erasing Limiting Beliefs/Self Sabotage Defining Your Desire Conscious Leadership Near Death Experiences Overcoming Adversity Becoming Fearlessly Authentic Social Media Links: YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSwkQFiEaIYmKEgMSsRuGhw Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/nicole_majik/ Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/majikllc LinkedIn:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/nicolemajik Learn more about Pam here: https://www.facebook.com/AwakenedSoulStories https://www.facebook.com/TreeOLife222/ Contact Pam: 401-533-1864 or pampatalano@gmail.com

Good Beer Hunting
CL-087 Theresa McCulla Helps Reconstruct a Life

Good Beer Hunting

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 29:18


As the curator of the American Brewing History Initiative at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, Theresa McCulla has access to some of the United States' most treasured brewing artifacts. It was the uncovering of one such artifact that led her to explore the life of Patsy Young, an enslaved woman, brewer, wife, and mother who fought for her freedom (twice) and who left an indelible legacy on the narrative of American brewing. In her first piece for Good Beer Hunting, titled “Patsy Young — American Brewer, Fugitive From Slavery,” which was published on September 15, 2021, McCulla unpacks the realization that there is no single part of American history that the stain of slavery has not touched. We discuss her role as a historian and her responsibility for sharing the stories many have worked hard to erase, as well as how writing for a different sort of audience was a welcome challenge, if not also an academic duty. It's only through analyzing history that we have any chance at informing the present, regardless of how difficult or traumatic the past may be, and she doesn't flinch when faced with that inescapable truth. Is there a happy ending for Patsy Young? It's hard to say. But McCulla likes to think so. Let's find out why.

WAMU: Local News
Get Out There: Smithsonian's African American History Museum Turns 5

WAMU: Local News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 4:41


The Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture is celebrating five years with some impressive new exhibits.

The Not Old - Better Show
#576 The Power of Nothing to Lose - William Silber

The Not Old - Better Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 42:23


The Power of Nothing to Lose - William Silber The Not Old Better Show, Author Interview Series Welcome to The Not Old Better Show. I'm Paul Vogelzang, and today's show is brought to you by SimpliSafe.   As part of our Art of Living Author Interview Series, today's guest is Dr. William Silber.   William Silber is an expert in banking, finance, securities pricing and trading, futures and options, and financial institutions and markets. During his career, Dr. Silber has made significant contributions in economics and finance and provided expert witness testimony in class certification and at trial. Professor Silber has testified before Congress and consulted with various government agencies, including the Federal Reserve Board, the U.S. Senate Committee on the Budget, the House Committee on Banking and Financial Services, and the President's Commission on Financial Structure and Regulation.  Professor Silber has published articles in leading professional journals, and was an associate editor of the Journal of Finance and the Review of Economics and Statistics.  His book Volcker: The Triumph of Persistence was named the China Business News (CBN) 2013 Financial Book of the Year, and was a finalist for the Financial Times and Goldman Sachs 2012 Business Book of the Year Award. His latest book, "The Power of Nothing to Lose: The Hail Mary Effect in Politics, War, and Business,"  shows how presidents, generals, dictators, and ordinary people have used the power of downside protection to alter history. A simple strategy, similar to the Hail Mary pass in football, encourages risky ventures that favor the ‘deciders' but hurts innocent bystanders, causing collateral damage that requires attention. That was our guest today,  Dr. William Silber reading from his new book, "The Power of Nothing to Lose: The Hail Mary Effect in Politics, War, and Business," Nobel Laureate Milton Friedman wrote, "This book addresses an important issue that deserves a wide readership. It is lucid and clear and deals with some very important episodes in American history." Please join me in welcoming to The Not Old Better Show, Dr. William Silber. We'll be right back with our guest, Dr. William Silber, author of the new book, "The Power of Nothing to Lose: The Hail Mary Effect in Politics, War, and Business," Now back to our guest, author William Silber, who'll tell us all about incentives for our Not Old Better Show audience how to be mildly aggressive with investments and be more ‘risk-averse,' not fearful of recovering from a loss. My thanks to Dr. William Silber, author of the new book, "The Power of Nothing to Lose: The Hail Mary Effect in Politics, War, and Business.”  My thanks to SimpliSafe for sponsoring today's show.  Please support our sponsors.  My thanks to you, our wonderful Not Old Better Show audience.  Be well, be safe, and let's talk about better.  The Not Old Better Show.

Airplane Geeks Podcast
671 Pilot Mental Health

Airplane Geeks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 105:58


Pilot mental health, aerial tanker competition, Rolls-Royce electric airplane, X-Wing at the Smithsonian, 737 MAX criminal charge, Cranky Dorkfest, emergency landings, gifts for flight attendants, checked baggage.

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Technoptimist Radio 9/22/21: Artificial Clouds Could Save The Great Barrier Reef

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 5:13


Join Teresa Carey as she breaks down the latest news on the technology that is solving the world's biggest problems. In today's show, Teresa covers artificial clouds, Facebook's new smart glasses, and the true value of disposable packaging. To learn more about the topics in this episode: How artificial clouds could save the Great Barrier Reef Facebook's smart glasses are stylish and creepy Think smart about disposable packaging with this scorecard About the host: Teresa Carey is a senior staff writer at Freethink.com, where she covers genetics and the environment. She is also a US Coast Guard licensed captain and a NatGeo Explorer. In addition to Freethink her work can be found in BuzzFeed, Scientific American, PBS NewsHour, NPR Weekend Edition, Smithsonian and more. @teresa_carey The post Technoptimist Radio 9/22/21: Artificial Clouds Could Save The Great Barrier Reef first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

Midnight Train Podcast
Hollow Earth Shenanigans

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 109:16


Hollow Earth Theory   Well hello there passengers, and welcome to yet another exciting day aboard the MidnightTrain. Today we delve deep into the mysterious, creepy, possibly conspiratorial world that is our own. What do I mean by that? Well we are digging our way to the center of truth! Today, we learn about Hollow Earth… and for the flat earthers out there… you're gonna wanna hang out for a minute before you dip outta here… also fuck you.   (Cinematic trailer voice) In a World where there exists people who think the world is a flat piece of paper with trees growing out of it and a big guy who flips the piece of paper over to switch between day and night. One man wants to change that idea. His name… is Edmund Halley. Yes that Halley. The one known for the comet he discovered. But before we explore more about him and his findings, let's discuss what led us to this revolutionary hypothesis.   So besides idiots who believe the earth is flat, I mean stupid-endous personalities, there are other more interesting characters that believe the earth is completely hollow; or at least a large part of it. This is what we call the Hollow Earth Theory. Now where did this all come from? Well, nobody cares, Moody. That's the show folks!   Ok, ok, ok… fine. Since the early times many cultures, religions, and folklore believed that there was something below our feet. Whether it's the lovely and tropical Christian Hell, the Jungle-esque Greek Underworld, the balmy Nordic Svartálfaheim, or the temperate Jewish Sheol; there is a name for one simple idea. These cultures believed it to be where we either come from or where we go when we die. This may hold some truth, or not. Guess we will know more when the time comes.   The idea of a subterranean realm is also mentioned in Tibetan Buddhist belief. According to one story from Tibetan Buddhist tradition, there is an ancient city called Shamballa which is located inside the Earth. According to the Ancient Greeks, there were caverns under the surface which were entrances leading to the underworld, some of which were the caverns at Tainaron in Lakonia, at Troezen in Argolis, at Ephya in Thesprotia, at Herakleia in Pontos, and in Ermioni. In Thracian and Dacian legends, it is said that there are caverns occupied by an ancient god called Zalmoxis. In Mesopotamian religion there is a story of a man who, after traveling through the darkness of a tunnel in the mountain of "Mashu", entered a subterranean garden. Sounds lovely.  In Celtic mythology there is a legend of a cave called "Cruachan", also known as "Ireland's gate to Hell", a mythical and ancient cave from which according to legend strange creatures would emerge and be seen on the surface of the Earth.​​ They are said to be bald, taller than most with blue eyes and a big, bushy beard… fucking Moody. There are also stories of medieval knights and saints who went on pilgrimages to a cave located in Station Island, County Donegal in Ireland, where they made journeys inside the Earth into a place of purgatory. You guys know purgatory, that place or state of suffering inhabited by the souls of sinners who are shedding their sins before going to heaven. In County Down, Northern Ireland there is a myth which says tunnels lead to the land of the subterranean Tuatha Dé Danann, who are supposedly a group of people who are believed to have introduced Druidism to Ireland, and then they said fuck it and went back underground. In Hindu mythology, the underworld is referred to as Patala. In the Bengali version of the Hindu epic Ramayana, it has been depicted how Rama and Lakshmana were taken by the king of the underworld Ahiravan, brother of the demon king Ravana. Later on they were rescued by Hanuman. Got all that? The Angami Naga tribes of India claim that their ancestors emerged in ancient times from a subterranean land inside the Earth. The Taino from Cuba believe their ancestors emerged in ancient times from two caves in a mountain underground. Natives of the Trobriand Islands believe that their ancestors had come from a subterranean land through a cavern hole called "Obukula". Mexican folklore also tells of a cave in a mountain five miles south of Ojinaga, and that Mexico is possessed by devilish creatures who came from inside the Earth. Maybe THAT'S where the Chupacabra came from! In the middle ages, an ancient German myth held that some mountains located between Eisenach and Gotha hold a portal to the inner Earth. A Russian legend says the Samoyeds, an ancient Siberian tribe, traveled to a cavern city to live inside the Earth. Luckily, they had plenty of space rope to make it back out.  The Italian writer Dante describes a hollow earth in his well-known 14th-century work Inferno, in which the fall of Lucifer from heaven caused an enormous funnel to appear in a previously solid and spherical earth, as well as an enormous mountain opposite it, "Purgatory". There's that place, again. In Native American mythology, they believed that the ancestors of the Mandan people in ancient times emerged from a subterranean land through a cave at the north side of the Missouri River. There is also a tale about a tunnel in the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation in Arizona near Cedar Creek which is said to lead inside the Earth to a land inhabited by a mysterious tribe. It is also the belief of the tribes of the Iroquois that their ancient ancestors emerged from a subterranean world inside the Earth. The elders of the Hopi people believe that a Sipapu entrance in the Grand Canyon exists which leads to the underworld. Brazilian Indians, who live alongside the Parima River in Brazil, claim that their forefathers emerged in ancient times from an underground land, and that many of their ancestors still remained inside the Earth. Ancestors of the Inca supposedly came from caves which are located east of Cuzco, Peru. So, this is something that has been floating around a shit ton of ancient mythos for a long ass time. Well, ya know… before that silly thing called SCIENCE. Moving on. Now to circle back to our friend Edmund. He was born in 1656, in Haggerston in Middlesex (not to be confused with uppersex or its ill-informed cousin the powerbottomsex). He was an English astronomer, geophysicist, mathematician, meteorologist, and physicist; because what else was there to do in the 1600's but be a know-it-all? He was known to work with Sir Isaac Newton among other notable (but not gonna note them here) proponents to science.  In 1692 he proffered the idea that the earth was indeed hollow and had a shell about 500 miles thick with two inner concentric (having a common center, as circles or spheres… hear that flat earthers??) shells and an inner core. He proposed that the atmospheres separated the shells and that they also had their own magnetic poles and that the shells moved at different speeds. This idea was used to elucidate(shed light upon… yes pun intended) anomalous(ih-nom-uh-luhs) compass readings. He conceptualized that the inner region had its own atmosphere and possibly luminous with plausible inhabitants. MOLE PEOPLE!! He also thought that escaping gases from the inner earth caused what is now known as the Northern Lights.   Now another early ambassador to this idea was Le Clerc Milfort. Jean-Antoine Le Clerc, or known by a simpler name, Louis Milfort. Monsieur Milfort was a higher ranking French military officer who offered his services during the late 1700's. He is most notably known for leading Creek Indian warriors during the American Revolutionary War as allies of the British. I guess having a common enemy here would make sense as to why he chose this group to lead. He emigrated in 1775 to what was then known as the British Colonies of North America. But we all know there is nothing Bri'ish about us.    Now why would a higher ranking French military Officer want to emigrate from his home to a place of turmoil? Great question Moody! I knew you were paying attention. Well, a little about this French saboteur.   He was known by many aliases, but we will just stick with Louis (Louie) for all intents and purposes. Louis was born in Thin-le-Moutier, near Mezieres, France. He served in the French Military from 1764 to 1774. Now this is according to his memoir that was dated in 1802. He left France after he ended up killing a servant of the king's household in a duel. Apparently, the king's servant loved the king. So much so that when Louis read aloud a poem that he had written that included the king, the servant jumped up, tore off his glove and slapped Louis across the face not once, but 4 fucking times! This is obviously something that Louis could not just let happen, so he challenged the servant to a duel. Not just any duel, mind you. He challenged him to a duel of what was then known as a “mort de coupes de papier.” The servant died an excruciating death and Louis fled. Here is the poem that started the feud.  There's a place in France Where the naked ladies dance There's a hole in the wall Where the men can see it all But the men don't care Cause they lost their underwear And the cops never shoot Cause they think it's kind of cute There a place in France Where the alligators dance If you give them a glance They could bite you in the pants There's a place on Mars Where the ladies smoke cigars Every puff she makes Is enough to kill the snakes When the snakes all die They put diamonds in their eye When the diamonds break The dancing makes them ache When the diamonds shine They really look so fine The king and the queen Have a rubber ding-a-ling All the girls in France Have ants in their pants Yes, this is 100% bullshit… but, you'll have that shit stuck in your head for days. Now as much as we tried to find ACTUAL information as to why there was duel and why it was with a servant of the king, we couldn't find much. But after digging up some more information on Louis we found out that he ended up going back to France to be a part of the Sacred Society of Sophisians.    This group is also known as the secret society of Napoleon's Sorcerers… This may have to be a bonus episode so stay tuned for more!   Now back to the “Core” of our episode. The Creek Indians who are originally from the Muscogee [məskóɡəlɡi](Thank wikipedia) area which is southeast united states which roughly translates to the areas around Tennessee, Alabama, western Georgia and Northern Florida. Louis adapted their customs and assimilated into their Tribe.  He even married the sister of the Chief.   Now after Louis and the rest of the people in the American Revolutionary War lost to the U.S. he decided to lead the Creek Tribe on an expedition in 1781 because, well, they had nothing else to do. On this expedition they were searching for caverns where allegedly the Creek Indians ancestors had emerged from. Maybe even the Origin of Bigfoot.   Yes, the Creek Indians had believed that their ancestors lived below the earth and lived in caverns along the Red River junction of the Mississippi River. Now during the expedition they did come across these caverns which they suspected could hold 20,000 of their family in. That's pretty much all they found. They didn't have video cameras back then otherwise, I'm pretty sure they would have found footage of bigfoot though.   Another advocate was Leonhard Euler, yes, you heard right. Buehler… Buehler… No Leonard Euler. A great 18th century mathematician; or not so great if you didn't enjoy math in school unlike moody who was the biggest nerd when it came to math.    Euler founded the study of graph theory and topology. No moody, not on-top-ology. Mind always in the gutter. Euler influenced many other discoveries such as analytic number theory, complex analysis, and the coolest subject ever; Infinitesimal Calculus. Which is Latin for BULLSHIT.   But anyways I digress. This guy knew his stuff BUT he did think with all his “infinite” wisdom that the earth was in fact hollow and had no inner shells but instead had a six hundred mile diameter sun in the center. The most intriguing and plausible theory he had within this whole idea was that you could enter into this interior from the northern and southern poles. Let's hold to that cool hypothesis for right now and move along with our next Interesting goon of the hollow earth community.   With Halley's spheres and Eulers's Holes came another great man with another great theory. Captain John Symmes! Yes you know Captain Symmes. HE was a hero in the war of 1812 after being sent with his Regiment to Canada and providing relief to American forces at the battle of Lundy's Lane. He was well known as a trader and lecturer after he left the army.    In 1818 Symmes announced his theory on Hollow Earth to the World! With his publication of his Circular No. 1.   “I declare the earth is hollow, and habitable within; containing a number of solid concentric spheres, one within the other, and that it is open at the poles 12 or 16 degrees; I pledge my life in support of this truth, and am ready to explore the hollow, if the world will support and aid me in the undertaking.”— John Cleves Symmes Jr., Symmes' Circular No. 1  While there were few people who would consider Symmes as the “Newton of the West”, most of the world was less than impressed. Although his theory wasn't as popular as one would expect, you gotta admire the confidence he had.   Symmes sent this declaration at a rather hefty cost to himself to “each notable foreign government, reigning prince, legislature, city, college, and philosophical societies, throughout the union, and to individual members of our National Legislature, as far as the five hundred copies would go.”15]   Symmes would then be followed by an exorbitant amount of ridicule for his proclamation, as many intellectuals were back then. This ridicule would later influence a rather bold move, Cotton. We'll touch on this later.    What was so special about his theory that got 98% of the world not on the edge of their seats? Well, to start he believed the Earth had five concentric spheres with where we live to be the largest  of the spheres. He also believed that the crust was 1000 miles thick with an arctic opening about 4000 miles wide and an antarctic opening around 6000 miles wide. He argued that because of the centrifugal force of the Earth's rotation that the poles would be flattened which would cause such a gradual gradation that you would travel into the Hollow Earth without even knowing you even did it.   Eventually he refined his theory because of such ridicule and criticism. Now his theory consists of just a single hollow sphere instead of five concentric spheres. So, now that we know all about symmes and his theory, why don't we talk about what he decided to do with his theory?    What do you think, Moody? You think he created a cult so he could be ostracized? Or do you think he gave up and realized he was silly? Hate to be the bearer of bad news here but he decided to take his theory and convince the U.S. congress to fund and organize an expedition to the south pole to enter the inner earth.    Good news and bad news folks. Good news, congress back then actually had some people with heads on their shoulders as opposed to those today and they said fuck that noise and denied funding for his expedition. Hamilton, Ohio even has a monument to him and his ideas. Fuckin' Ohio. Next up on our list of “what the fuck were they thinking?” We have Jeremiah Reynolds. He also delivered lectures on the "Hollow Earth" and argued for an expedition. I guess back in those days people just up and went to the far reaches of the earth just to prove a point. Reynolds said “look what I can do” and went on an expedition to Antarctica himself but missed joining the Great U.S. Exploring Expedition of 1838–1842, even though that venture was a result of his craziness, I MEAN “INTEREST”. He gained support from marine and scientific societies and, in 1828, successfully lobbied the House of Representatives to pass a resolution asking then-President John Quincy Adams to deploy a research vessel to the Pacific. The president, for his part, had first mentioned Reynolds in his November 4, 1826, diary entry, writing: “Mr Reynolds is a man who has been lecturing about the Country, in support of Captain John Cleves Symmes's theory that the Earth is a hollow Sphere, open at the Poles— His Lectures are said to have been well attended, and much approved as exhibitions of genius and of Science— But the Theory itself has been so much ridiculed, and is in truth so visionary, that Reynolds has now varied his purpose to the proposition of fitting out a voyage of circumnavigation to the Southern Ocean— He has obtained numerous signatures in Baltimore to a Memorial to Congress for this object, which he says will otherwise be very powerfully supported— It will however have no support in Congress. That day will come, but not yet nor in my time. May it be my fortune, and my praise to accelerate its approach.”  Adams' words proved prophetic. Though his administration opted to fund Reynolds' expedition, the voyage was waylaid by the 1828 presidential election, which found Adams roundly defeated by Andrew Jackson. The newly elected president canceled the expedition, leaving Reynolds to fund his trip through other sources. (The privately supported venture set sail in 1829 but ended in disaster, with the crew mutinying and leaving Reynolds' ass on shore.) Per Boston 1775, the U.S. Exploring Expedition only received the green light under the country's eighth president, Martin Van Buren. As Howard Dorre explains on his Plodding Through the Presidents blog, multiple media outlets (including Smithsonian, in an earlier version of this article) erroneously interpreted Adams' description of Reynolds' ideas as “visionary” as a sign of his support for the hollow earth theory. In fact, notes Bell in a separate Boston 1775 blog post, the term's connotations at the time were largely negative. In the words of 18th-century English writer Samuel Johnson, a visionary was “one whose imagination is disturbed.” The president, adds Dorre, only agreed to support the polar expedition “after Reynolds abandoned the hollow earth idea.”  I had always heard that he was a believer in mole people and hollow earth, turns out his words were just misinterpreted. Hmm… I wonder if there are any other books out there where the overall ideas and verbage could and have been misinterpreted causing insane amounts of disingenuous beliefs? Nah!   Though Symmes himself never wrote a book about his ideas, several authors published works discussing his ideas. McBride wrote Symmes' Theory of Concentric Spheres in 1826. It appears that Reynolds has an article that appeared as a separate booklet in 1827: Remarks of Symmes' Theory Which Appeared in the American Quarterly Review. In 1868, a professor W.F. Lyons published The Hollow Globe which put forth a Symmes-like Hollow Earth hypothesis, but failed to mention Symmes himself. Because fuck that guy, right? Symmes's son Americus then published The Symmes' Theory of Concentric Spheres in 1878 to set the record straight. I think the duel would have been a better idea. Sir John Leslie proposed a hollow Earth in his 1829 Elements of Natural Philosophy (pp. 449–53). In 1864, in Journey to the Center of the Earth, Jules Verne described a hollow Earth containing two rotating binary stars, named Pluto and Proserpine. Ok… fiction. We get it. William Fairfield Warren, in his book Paradise Found–The Cradle of the Human Race at the North Pole, (1885) presented his belief that humanity originated on a continent in the Arctic called Hyperborea. This influenced some early Hollow Earth proponents. According to Marshall Gardner, both the Eskimo and Mongolian peoples had come from the interior of the Earth through an entrance at the North Pole. I wonder if they knew that.    NEQUA or The Problem of the Ages, first serialized in a newspaper printed in Topeka, Kansas in 1900 and considered an early feminist utopian novel, mentions John Cleves Symmes' theory to explain its setting in a hollow Earth. An early 20th-century proponent of hollow Earth, William Reed, wrote Phantom of the Poles in 1906. He supported the idea of a hollow Earth, but without interior shells or inner sun. Ok, no sun. Got it. The spiritualist writer Walburga, Lady Paget in her book Colloquies with an unseen friend (1907) was an early writer to mention the hollow Earth hypothesis. She claimed that cities exist beneath a desert, which is where the people of Atlantis moved. Mmmk. Deserts and Atlantis. Check. She said an entrance to the subterranean kingdom will be discovered in the 21st century. Pretty broad brush she's painting with there. Next up we're gonna talk a little about Admiral Richard E. Byrd. According to Hollow Earth theorists, Byrd met an ancient race underground in the South Pole. According to Byrd's “diary,” the government ordered Byrd to remain silent for what he witnessed during his Arctic assignment:              March 11, 1947 “I have just attended a Staff Meeting at the Pentagon. I have stated fully my discovery and the message from the Master. All is duly recorded. The President has been advised. I am now detained for several hours (six hours, thirty- nine minutes, to be exact.) I am interviewed intently by Top Security Forces and a Medical Team. It was an ordeal!!!! I am placed under strict control via the National Security provisions of this United States of America. I am ORDERED TO REMAIN SILENT IN REGARD TO ALL THAT I HAVE LEARNED, ON THE BEHALF OF HUMANITY!!! Incredible! I am reminded that I am a Military Man and I must obey orders.” After many polar accomplishments, Byrd organized Operation Highjump in 1947. The objective: construct an American training and research facility in the South Pole. Highjump was a significant illustration of the state of the world and the cold war thinking at the time. The nuclear age had just begun, and the real fears were that the Soviet Union would attack the United States over the North Pole. The Navy had done a training exercise there in the summer of 1946 and felt it needed to do more. The northern winter was coming, and Highjump was a quickly planned exercise to move the whole thing to the South Pole. Politically, the orders were that the Navy should do all it could to establish a basis for a [land] claim in Antarctica. That was classified at the time.Now Operation High jump could probably be its own episode, or is at minimum a bonus. But we'll get some of the important details on how it pertains to this episode. Some say the American government sent their troops to the South Pole for any evidence of the rumored German Base 211. Nazis were fascinated with anything regarding the Aryan race. They traveled all over the world including Antarctica to learn more of alleged origins. The Germans did make their mark in the South Pole. However, what they have discovered doesn't compared to what Byrd recorded in his diary. the time. The nuclear age had just begun, and the real fears were that the Soviet Union would attack the United States over the North Pole. The Navy had done a training exerci but was that all it was   “For thousands of years, people all over the world have written legends about Agartha (sometimes called Agarta or Agarthi), the underground city. Agartha (sometimes Agartta, Agharti, Agarath, Agarta or Agarttha) is a legendary kingdom that is said to be located in the Earth's core. Agartha is frequently associated or confused with Shambhala which figures prominently in Vajrayana Buddhism and Tibetan Kalachakra teachings and revived in the West by Madame Blavatsky and the Theosophical Society. Theosophists in particular regard Agarthi as a vast complex of caves underneath Tibet inhabited by demi-gods, called asuras. Helena and Nicholas Roerich, whose teachings closely parallel theosophy, see Shambhala's existence as both spiritual and physical. Did Byrd find it? He claims to have met “The Master,” the city's leader, who told him of his concerns about the surface world: “Our interest rightly begins just after your Race exploded the first atomic bombs over Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. It was that alarming time we sent our flying machines, the ‘Flugelrads' to your surface world to investigate what your Race had done…You see, we have never interfered before in your Race's wars and barbarity. But now we must, for you have learned to tamper with a certain power that is not for your Man, mainly that of atomic energy. Our emissaries have already delivered messages to the power of your World, and yet they do not heed.” Apparently, the government knew about Agartha before Byrd. Marshall Gardner wrote A Journey to the Earth's Interior in 1913 and published an expanded edition in 1920. He placed an interior sun in the Earth (ah ha! The Sun's back!) and built a working model of the Hollow Earth which he actually fucking patented (U.S. Patent 1,096,102). Gardner made no mention of Reed, but did criticize Symmes for his ideas. DUEL TIME! Around the same time, Vladimir Obruchev wrote a novel titled Plutonia, in which the Hollow Earth possessed an inner Sun and was inhabited by prehistoric species. The interior was connected with the surface by an opening in the Arctic. The explorer Ferdynand Ossendowski wrote a book in 1922 titled Beasts, Men and Gods. Ossendowski said he was told about a subterranean kingdom that exists inside the Earth. It was known to Buddhists as Agharti. George Papashvily in his Anything Can Happen (1940) claimed the discovery in the Caucasus mountains of a cavern containing human skeletons "with heads as big as bushel baskets" and an ancient tunnel leading to the center of the Earth. One man entered the tunnel and never returned. This dude was a sniper with the Imperial Russian Army during World War I Moody is going to love these next examples.  Novelist Lobsang Rampa in his book The Cave of the Ancients said an underground chamber system exists beneath the Himalayas of Tibet, filled with ancient machinery, records and treasure. Michael Grumley, a cryptozoologist, has linked Bigfoot and other hominid cryptids to ancient tunnel systems underground. According to the ancient astronaut writer Peter Kolosimo a robot was seen entering a tunnel below a monastery in Mongolia. Kolosimo also claimed a light was seen from underground in Azerbaijan. Kolosimo and other ancient astronaut writers such as Robert Charroux linked these activities to DUN DUN DUNNNN….UFOs. A book by a "Dr. Raymond Bernard" which appeared in 1964, The Hollow Earth, exemplifies the idea of UFOs coming from inside the Earth, and adds the idea that the Ring Nebula proves the existence of hollow worlds, as well as speculation on the fate of Atlantis and the origin of flying saucers. An article by Martin Gardner revealed that Walter Siegmeister used the pseudonym "Bernard", but not until the 1989 publishing of Walter Kafton-Minkel's Subterranean Worlds: 100,000 Years of Dragons, Dwarfs, the Dead, Lost Races & UFOs from Inside the Earth did the full story of Bernard/Siegmeister become well-known. Holy fucking book title, Batman!   The science fiction pulp magazine Amazing Stories promoted one such idea from 1945 to 1949 as "The Shaver Mystery". The magazine's editor, Ray Palmer, ran a series of stories by Richard Sharpe Shaver, claiming that a superior pre-historic race had built a honeycomb of caves in the Earth, and that their degenerate descendants, known as "Dero", live there TO THIS DAY, using the fantastic machines abandoned by the ancient races to torment those of us living on the surface. As one characteristic of this torment, Shaver described "voices" that purportedly came from no explainable source. Thousands of readers wrote to affirm that they, too, had heard the fiendish voices from inside the Earth. The writer David Hatcher Childress authored Lost Continents and the Hollow Earth(1998) in which he reprinted the stories of Palmer and defended the Hollow Earth idea based on alleged (cough… “alleged”) tunnel systems beneath South America and Central Asia. Hollow Earth proponents have claimed a number of different locations for the entrances which lead inside the Earth. Other than the North and South poles, entrances in locations which have been cited include: Paris in France, Staffordshire in England, Montreal in Canada, Hangchow in China, and The Amazon Rain Forest.   Ok, have you two gents heard of the Concave Hollow Earth Theory? It doesn't matter, we're still going to talk about this lunacy. Instead of saying that humans live on the outside surface of a hollow planet—sometimes called a "convex" Hollow Earth hypothesis—some whackamuffins have claimed humans live on the inside surface of a hollow spherical world, so that our universe itself lies in that world's interior. This has been called the "concave" Hollow Earth hypothesis or skycentrism. Cyrus Teed, a doctor from upstate New York, proposed such a concave Hollow Earth in 1869, calling his scheme "Cellular Cosmogony". He might as well have called it Goobery Kabooblenuts. See, I can make up words, too. Anyway, Teed founded a group called the Koreshan Unity based on this notion, which he called Koreshanity. Which sounds like insanity and would make far more sense. The main colony survives as a preserved Florida state historic site, at Estero, Florida, but all of Teed's followers have now died. Probably from eating Tide Pods. Teed's followers claimed to have experimentally verified the concavity of the Earth's curvature, through surveys of the Florida coastline making use of "rectilineator" equipment. Which sounds like something you use to clean out your colon.   Several 20th-century German writers, including Peter Bender, Johannes Lang, Karl Neupert, and Fritz Braut, published works advocating the Hollow Earth hypothesis, or Hohlweltlehre. It has even been reported, although apparently without historical documentation, that Adolf Hitler was influenced by concave Hollow Earth ideas and sent an expedition in an unsuccessful attempt to spy on the British fleet by pointing infrared cameras up at the sky. Oh boy. The Egyptian mathematician Mostafa “Admiral Akbar” Abdelkader wrote several scholarly papers working out a detailed mapping of the Concave Earth model In one chapter of his book On the Wild Side (1992), Martin Gardner discusses the Hollow Earth model articulated by Abdelkader. According to Gardner, this hypothesis posits that light rays travel in circular paths, and slow as they approach the center of the spherical star-filled cavern. No energy can reach the center of the cavern, which corresponds to no point a finite distance away from Earth in the widely accepted scientific cosmology. A drill, Gardner says, would lengthen as it traveled away from the cavern and eventually pass through the "point at infinity" corresponding to the center of the Earth in the widely accepted scientific cosmology. Supposedly no experiment can distinguish between the two cosmologies. Christ, my head hurts. Gardner notes that "most mathematicians believe that an inside-out universe, with properly adjusted physical laws, is empirically irrefutable". Gardner rejects the concave Hollow Earth hypothesis on the basis of Occam's razor. Occam's razor is the problem-solving principle that "entities should not be multiplied beyond necessity", sometimes inaccurately paraphrased as "the simplest explanation is usually the best one." Purportedly verifiable hypotheses of a Concave Hollow Earth need to be distinguished from a thought experiment which defines a coordinate transformation such that the interior of the Earth becomes "exterior" and the exterior becomes "interior". (For example, in spherical coordinates, let radius r go to R2/r where R is the Earth's radius; see inversive geometry.) The transformation entails corresponding changes to the forms of physical laws. This is not a hypothesis but an illustration of the fact that any description of the physical world can be equivalently expressed in more than one way.   Contrary evidence   Seismic The picture of the structure of the Earth that has been arrived at through the study of seismic waves[52] is quite different from a fully hollow Earth. The time it takes for seismic waves to travel through and around the Earth directly contradicts a fully hollow sphere. The evidence indicates the Earth is mostly filled with solid rock (mantle and crust), liquid nickel-iron alloy (outer core), and solid nickel-iron (inner core).[53]   Gravity Main articles: Schiehallion experiment and Cavendish experiment Another set of scientific arguments against a Hollow Earth or any hollow planet comes from gravity. Massive objects tend to clump together gravitationally, creating non-hollow spherical objects such as stars and planets. The solid spheroid is the best way in which to minimize the gravitational potential energy of a rotating physical object; having hollowness is unfavorable in the energetic sense. In addition, ordinary matter is not strong enough to support a hollow shape of planetary size against the force of gravity; a planet-sized hollow shell with the known, observed thickness of the Earth's crust would not be able to achieve hydrostatic equilibrium with its own mass and would collapse.   Based upon the size of the Earth and the force of gravity on its surface, the average density of the planet Earth is 5.515 g/cm3, and typical densities of surface rocks are only half that (about 2.75 g/cm3). If any significant portion of the Earth were hollow, the average density would be much lower than that of surface rocks. The only way for Earth to have the force of gravity that it does is for much more dense material to make up a large part of the interior. Nickel-iron alloy under the conditions expected in a non-hollow Earth would have densities ranging from about 10 to 13 g/cm3, which brings the average density of Earth to its observed value.   Direct observation Drilling holes does not provide direct evidence against the hypothesis. The deepest hole drilled to date is the Kola Superdeep Borehole,[54] with a true vertical drill-depth of more than 7.5 miles (12 kilometers). However, the distance to the center of the Earth is nearly 4,000 miles (6,400 kilometers). Oil wells with longer depths are not vertical wells; the total depths quoted are measured depth (MD) or equivalently, along-hole depth (AHD) as these wells are deviated to horizontal. Their true vertical depth (TVD) is typically less than 2.5 miles (4 kilometers).   Ok, then let's discuss what actual scientists, like ALL OF THEM, believe the earth is actually composed of. The inner core This solid metal ball has a radius of 1,220 kilometers (758 miles), or about three-quarters that of the moon. It's located some 6,400 to 5,180 kilometers (4,000 to 3,220 miles) beneath Earth's surface. Extremely dense, it's made mostly of iron and nickel. The inner core spins a bit faster than the rest of the planet. It's also intensely hot: Temperatures sizzle at 5,400° Celsius (9,800° Fahrenheit). That's almost as hot as the surface of the sun. Pressures here are immense: well over 3 million times greater than on Earth's surface. Some research suggests there may also be an inner, inner core. It would likely consist almost entirely of iron.   The outer core   This part of the core is also made from iron and nickel, just in liquid form. It sits some 5,180 to 2,880 kilometers (3,220 to 1,790 miles) below the surface. Heated largely by the radioactive decay of the elements uranium and thorium, this liquid churns in huge, turbulent currents. That motion generates electrical currents. They, in turn, generate Earth's magnetic field. For reasons somehow related to the outer core, Earth's magnetic field reverses about every 200,000 to 300,000 years. Scientists are still working to understand how that happens.   The mantle   At close to 3,000 kilometers (1,865 miles) thick, this is Earth's thickest layer. It starts a mere 30 kilometers (18.6 miles) beneath the surface. Made mostly of iron, magnesium and silicon, it is dense, hot and semi-solid (think caramel candy). Like the layer below it, this one also circulates. It just does so far more slowly. Near its upper edges, somewhere between about 100 and 200 kilometers (62 to 124 miles) underground, the mantle's temperature reaches the melting point of rock. Indeed, it forms a layer of partially melted rock known as the asthenosphere (As-THEEN-oh-sfeer). Geologists believe this weak, hot, slippery part of the mantle is what Earth's tectonic plates ride upon and slide across.   Diamonds are tiny pieces of the mantle we can actually touch. Most form at depths above 200 kilometers (124 miles). But rare “super-deep” diamonds may have formed as far down as 700 kilometers (435 miles) below the surface. These crystals are then brought to the surface in volcanic rock known as kimberlite.   The mantle's outermost zone is relatively cool and rigid. It behaves more like the crust above it. Together, this uppermost part of the mantle layer and the crust are known as the lithosphere. The crust   Earth's crust is like the shell of a hard-boiled egg. It is extremely thin, cold and brittle compared to what lies below it. The crust is made of relatively light elements, especially silica, aluminum and oxygen. It's also highly variable in its thickness. Under the oceans (and Hawaiian Islands), it may be as little as 5 kilometers (3.1 miles) thick. Beneath the continents, the crust may be 30 to 70 kilometers (18.6 to 43.5 miles) thick.   Along with the upper zone of the mantle, the crust is broken into big pieces, like a gigantic jigsaw puzzle. These are known as tectonic plates. These move slowly — at just 3 to 5 centimeters (1.2 to 2 inches) per year. What drives the motion of tectonic plates is still not fully understood. It may be related to heat-driven convection currents in the mantle below. Some scientists think it's caused by the tug from slabs of crust of different densities, something called “slab pull.” In time, these plates will converge, pull apart or slide past each other. Those actions cause most earthquakes and volcanoes. It's a slow ride, but it makes for exciting times right here on Earth's surface.   https://www.imdb.com/list/ls003260126/?sort=user_rating,desc&st_dt=&mode=detail&page=1   BECOME A P.O.O.P.R.!! http://www.patreon.com/themidnighttrainpodcast   Find The Midnight Train Podcast: www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com www.facebook.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.twitter.com/themidnighttrainpc www.instagram.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.discord.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.tiktok.com/themidnighttrainp   And wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts.   Subscribe to our official YouTube channel: OUR YOUTUBE   Support our sponsors www.themidnighttraintrainpodcast.com/sponsors   The Charley Project www.charleyproject.org

new york canada science japan russian china moving american mexico america german master elements man hindu smithsonian origin brazil north earth south tibet men race ireland chief congress samuel johnson english dead french italian north america kansas world gods house west theory mind england british france president south america phantom pacific batman hell hiroshima united states nazis buddhist tribe tennessee oil arizona beasts holy adams jungle cinematic ages pluto alabama baltimore north pole sun ohio natives mississippi river scientists iroquois supposedly egyptian caves bigfoot inferno dragons reynolds sphere gardner mexican cuba peru montreal latin atlantis hamilton holes navy northern lights edmund interior red river cotton antarctica memorial chupacabra lucifer beneath northern ireland grand canyon patent moody soviet union adolf hitler fahrenheit amazing stories napoleon thousands himalayas central asia rama ramayana purgatory pentagon r2 extremely dwarfs presidents incredible jesus christ inca mongolia hopi bengali md arctic ancestors remarks officer mcbride siberian heated cuzco john quincy adams thin newton bullshit bri ancients lyons shenanigans nickel mongolian shambhala martin gardner deserts ufos hanuman massive byrd drilling south pole nah druidism jules verne taino politically geologists moutier celsius lundy poles national security topeka missouri river regiment madame blavatsky staffordshire azerbaijan caucasus abdelkader middlesex ray palmer shaver shaver mystery hyperborea hawaiian islands leonhard euler mole people hollow earth theory wild side tide pods creek indians ancient greeks andrew jackson martin van buren occam fuckin nagasaki anything can happen shamballa dero ahd american revolutionary war hollow earth cedar creek nicholas roerich sir isaac newton ravana euler highjump tvd temperatures pressures medical team all of them estero americus muscogee william reed staff meeting eskimos pontos gotha human race dacian tuatha d danann natural philosophy british colonies military man tibetan buddhists county donegal mandan in native american amazon rainforest vajrayana buddhism northern florida eisenach john cleves symmes theosophists operation highjump edmund halley agartha david hatcher childress cruachan theosophical society lakshmana teed symmes colloquies
Badass Women at Any Age
097: Lives Well Lived with Sky Bergman

Badass Women at Any Age

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 32:31


Inspired by her 100 year old grandmother's workout routine, Sky Bergman decided to document her unbelievable routine and lifestyle.  Realizing the positive impact of her grandmother's example, Sky set out in search of other positive and inspiring stories of aging.  The overwhelming response inspired her badass trailblazing journey to becoming a filmmaker.  Now playing on PBS, her directorial debut film, “Lives Well Lived”, celebrates the lives of our elders, sharing  40 inspiring stories of older adults.  Sky is an accomplished, award winning photographer and artist.  Her artwork is included in permanent collections at the LA County Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum , Seattle Art Museum, Santa Barbara Museum of Art and the Bibliotheque Nationale de France.  Her commercial work has appeared  on book covers from Random House and Farrar, Straus and Giroux Inc. as well as magazine spreads in Smithsonian, Arthur Frommer's Budget Travel, Reader's Digest and Archeology Odyssey.    Sky is currently a professor of photography and video at Cal Poly State University in San Luis Obispo.   What You Will Hear in This Episode:  Sky's grandmother's influence and inspiration as an active 90+ woman. How the Lives Well Lived project began and the personal accounts and stories that inspired Sky to turn her project into a film. Lives Well Lived timeline, creative financing, process, team and success.  10 years in the making. Asking for help.  Being kind, genuine and authentic in your purpose. 3 common themes amongst older adults 1) Everyone needs a sense of purpose. 2) Good sense of community 3) Sense of resilience. Ageism and staying relevant as we age. The impact and importance of intergenerational connections. Diversity, equity and inclusion. Advice on following your passion. Quotes: “Instead of saying “why?” say, “why not?”.” “If I don't know how to do something it's ok to admit that I don't know how to do it.” “Happiness is a state of mind, you can be happy with what you have or miserable with what you don't have, you decide.” - Dr. Louis Tedone “Lucky Louis” “The last 100 years is the first time in human history that we've looked to anyone other than our elders for advice.” - Huffington Post Mentioned: Lives Well Lived PBS Intergenerational projects Dr. Louis Tedone Not Done Yet! Not Done Yet! Amazon Bonniemarcusleadership.com The Politics of Promotion Fb @Bonnie.Marcus LinkedIn: @Bonniemarcus Twitter: @selfpromote IG: @self_promote_ Bonniemarcusleadership.com  

The Photo Detective
Using Twitter for a Photo Reunion

The Photo Detective

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 31:41


Twitter is a social media platform that folks either love or hate. It doesn't generate too much of an in-between feeling. It's known for short posts and hashtags. It's the place you go for breaking news and some groups like #GenChat use it to inspire collaboration and social interaction in the genealogy world. There are photo historians on Twitter too. But I was surprised to see a photo reunion trending. Historian and author Victoria Johnson maximized her Twitter reach by encouraging her students and twitterstorians (historians on Twitter) to share an unidentified photo she found in a used book. It caused a flood of comments, resulted in a reunion and landed Victoria in the national spotlight of CNN and ABC News. It's made me reevaluate the power of Twitter for family history ( and it might make you take a look at the social media platform).  Related Episodes:Episode 142: Vintage Aerial PhotosEpisode 101: Rediscovering an American Community of ColorLinks:Story on CNNABC News StorySign up for my newsletter.Watch my YouTube Channel.Like the Photo Detective Facebook Page so you get notified of my Facebook Live videos.Need help organizing your photos? Check out the Essential Photo Organizing Video Course.Need help identifying family photos? Check out the Identifying Family Photographs Online Course.Have a photo you need help identifying? Sign up for photo consultation.About My Guest:Victoria Johnson is a historian and Professor of Urban Policy and Planning at Hunter College of the City University of New York. Her most recent book, American Eden, a biography of the New York doctor who served at the duel between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr (yes, he has a small part in the musical!) was a finalist for the 2018 National Book Award in Nonfiction and for the 2019 Pulitzer Prize in History.About Maureen Taylor:Maureen is a frequent keynote speaker on photo identification, photograph preservation, and family history at historical and genealogical societies, museums, conferences, libraries, and other organizations across the U.S., London, and Canada.  She's the author of several books and hundreds of articles and her television appearances include The View and The Today Show (where she researched and presented a complete family tree for host Meredith Vieira).  She's been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Better Homes and Gardens, The Boston Globe, Martha Stewart Living, Germany's top newspaper Der Spiegel, American Spirit, and The New York Times. Maureen was recently a spokesperson and photograph expert for MyHeritage.com, an internationally known family history website, and also writes guidebooks, scholarly articles, and online columns for such media as Smithsonian.com. Learn more at Maureentaylor.comDid you enjoy this episode? Please leave a review on Apple Podcasts.

Museum Confidential
The Smithsonian Goes Hip-Hop

Museum Confidential

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 27:39


The long-awaited Smithsonian Anthology of Hip-Hop and Rap just dropped. The set includes 129 tracks on 9 discs and a hefty 300–page book with original design by Cey Adams, acclaimed artist and founding creative director of Def Jam Recordings. From his early subway graffiti days alongside Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat to designing classic albums for Beastie Boys and LL Cool J, Adams has been at the epicenter of hip-hop culture. He spoke to us from his studio in New York City.  

The Not Old - Better Show
#575 Brain Health Trainer - Ryan Glatt

The Not Old - Better Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 38:28


Brain Health Trainer - Ryan Glatt Art of Living Healthy Aging Month interview series Welcome to The Not Old Better Show.  Today's show is brought to you by NORD VPN, and Inside Tracker.   As part of our Art of Living Healthy Aging Month interview series, we have a great interview with Ryan Glatt.   Ryan Glatt is a psychometrist and Brain Health Coach at the Brain Health Center in the Pacific Neuroscience Institute. With a strong background in exercise science and human health, Ryan Glatt develops curricula specifically targeted towards those with dementia, Parkinson's disease, Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), and traumatic brain injury, coaching individuals towards optimal brain health. We will be discussing brain health, cognitive decline, specific exercises to prevent cognitive decline, including what Ryan Glatt refers to as ‘exer-gaming,' and the modern solutions that come from video game playing! Please join me in welcoming to The Not Old Better Show, Brain Health Director from the Pacific Neuroscience Institute, Ryan Glatt. My thanks to NORD VPN and Inside Tracker for sponsoring today's show.  Please check out our show notes for details on both sponsors, and please support our show sponsors.  My thanks to Ryan Glatt for his generous time, expertise, and depth of preparation today.  Of course, my thanks to you, my wonderful Not Old Better Show audience.  Please be safe, stay well, politely promote vaccinations to those not yet vaccinated and talk about better.  The Not Old Better Show.  Thanks, everybody.

Unthinkable with Jay Acunzo
Maker Monsters

Unthinkable with Jay Acunzo

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 32:04


Maker monsters often creep in at the least opportune times, drag us backwards, convince us of defeat, fill us with self-doubt, so where do we go from here?  And what does that mean for our creative, professional work? We hear from Smithsonian's Sidedoor podcast host and producer Lizzie Peabody and poet and keynote speaker, Tucker Bryant, about how their maker monster, perfectionism, creeps into their creative work. We dive into how they conquer, co-exist, or accept defeat with their own internal monsters and explore how we can each carve out ways to find joy in our work and continue to make what matters.*   *   *KEEP LEARNING + SUPPORT THE SHOWSubscribe to my free newsletter: jayacunzo.com/newsletterBuy a book: jayacunzo.com/booksHire me to speak to your organization or event: jayacunzo.com/keynotes*   *   *FEATURED IN THIS EPISODE:Lizzie Peabody: https://twitter.com/LizziePeabody and https://www.lizziepeabody.com/Lizzie's podcast, Sidedoor: https://twitter.com/SidedoorPod and https://www.si.edu/sidedoorTucker Bryant: https://twitter.com/tucksbryant Tucker's speaking site: https://tuckerbryant.me/*   *   *THANKS FOR LISTENING AND SUPPORTING!Keep making what matters.-Jay

The Tim Ferriss Show
#532: Sheila Heen of The Harvard Negotiation Project — How to Navigate Hard Conversations, the Subtle Art of Apologizing, and a Powerful 60-Day Challenge

The Tim Ferriss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 119:30


Sheila Heen of The Harvard Negotiation Project — How to Navigate Hard Conversations, the Subtle Art of Apologizing, and a Powerful 60-Day Challenge | Brought to you by LinkedIn Jobs recruitment platform with 750M users, Eight Sleep's Pod Pro Cover sleeping solution for dynamic cooling and heating, and Public Goods high-quality everyday essentials. More on all three below.Sheila Heen is a New York Times best-selling author, founder of Triad Consulting Group, and a deputy director of the Harvard Negotiation Project at Harvard Law School, where she has been a member of the faculty for 25 years. Sheila specializes in particularly difficult negotiations, where emotions run high and relationships become strained. She often works with executive teams, helping them to resolve conflict, repair professional relationships, and make sound decisions together. In the public sector, she has provided training for the New England Organ Bank, the Singapore Supreme Court, the Obama White House, and theologians struggling with disagreement over the nature of truth and God.Sheila is co-author of the New York Times bestsellers Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most and Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well (even when it's off base, unfair, poorly delivered and, frankly, you're not in the mood). She has written for the Harvard Business Review and the New York Times — as a guest expert and contributor to the “Modern Love” column — and she has appeared on NPR, Fox News, CNBC's Power Lunch, and shows as diverse as Oprah and The G. Gordon Liddy Show. She has spoken at the Global Leadership Summit, the Nordic Business Forum, the Smithsonian, Apple, Google, and Microsoft. Sheila is a graduate of Occidental College and Harvard Law School. She is schooled in negotiation daily by her three children.Please enjoy!This episode is brought to you by Eight Sleep! Eight Sleep's Pod Pro Cover is the easiest and fastest way to sleep at the perfect temperature. It pairs dynamic cooling and heating with biometric tracking to offer the most advanced (and user-friendly) solution on the market. Simply add the Pod Pro Cover to your current mattress and start sleeping as cool as 55°F or as hot as 110°F. It also splits your bed in half, so your partner can choose a totally different temperature.And now, my dear listeners—that's you—can get $250 off the Pod Pro Cover. Simply go to EightSleep.com/Tim or use code TIM. *This episode is also brought to you by Public Goods! Public Goods is the one-stop shop for sustainable, high-quality, everyday essentials made from clean ingredients at an affordable price. Public Goods searches the globe to find healthy, eco-friendly, and innovative products and then packages them using a single, streamlined aesthetic for your home so you can get all of your premium essentials in one place and avoid buying from a bunch of mismatched, single-product brands. Multiple people on my team were already using Public Goods, and now, so am I.Visit PublicGoods.com/Tim to receive $20 off the products in your first Public Goods order using code TIM, with no minimum purchase required! *This episode is also brought to you by LinkedIn Jobs. Whether you are looking to hire now for a critical role or thinking about needs that you may have in the future, LinkedIn Jobs can help. LinkedIn screens candidates for the hard and soft skills you're looking for and puts your job in front of candidates looking for job opportunities that match what you have to offer.Using LinkedIn's active community of more than 750 million professionals worldwide, LinkedIn Jobs can help you find and hire the right person faster. When your business is ready to make that next hire, find the right person with LinkedIn Jobs. And now, you can post a job for free. Just visit LinkedIn.com/Tim.*If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts/iTunes? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really makes a difference in helping to convince hard-to-get guests. I also love reading the reviews!For show notes and past guests, please visit tim.blog/podcast.Sign up for Tim's email newsletter (“5-Bullet Friday”) at tim.blog/friday.For transcripts of episodes, go to tim.blog/transcripts.Discover Tim's books: tim.blog/books.Follow Tim:Twitter: twitter.com/tferriss Instagram: instagram.com/timferrissFacebook: facebook.com/timferriss YouTube: youtube.com/timferrissPast guests on The Tim Ferriss Show include Jerry Seinfeld, Hugh Jackman, Dr. Jane Goodall, LeBron James, Kevin Hart, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Jamie Foxx, Matthew McConaughey, Esther Perel, Elizabeth Gilbert, Terry Crews, Sia, Yuval Noah Harari, Malcolm Gladwell, Madeleine Albright, Cheryl Strayed, Jim Collins, Mary Karr, Maria Popova, Sam Harris, Michael Phelps, Bob Iger, Edward Norton, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Neil Strauss, Ken Burns, Maria Sharapova, Marc Andreessen, Neil Gaiman, Neil de Grasse Tyson, Jocko Willink, Daniel Ek, Kelly Slater, Dr. Peter Attia, Seth Godin, Howard Marks, Dr. Brené Brown, Eric Schmidt, Michael Lewis, Joe Gebbia, Michael Pollan, Dr. Jordan Peterson, Vince Vaughn, Brian Koppelman, Ramit Sethi, Dax Shepard, Tony Robbins, Jim Dethmer, Dan Harris, Ray Dalio, Naval Ravikant, Vitalik Buterin, Elizabeth Lesser, Amanda Palmer, Katie Haun, Sir Richard Branson, Chuck Palahniuk, Arianna Huffington, Reid Hoffman, Bill Burr, Whitney Cummings, Rick Rubin, Dr. Vivek Murthy, Darren Aronofsky, and many more.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

google jim collins art seth godin tim ferriss apple smithsonian npr god new york times oprah winfrey matthew mcconaughey hugh jackman microsoft darren aronofsky entrepreneurship vince vaughn terry crews neil gaiman michael pollan obama white house lebron james productivity powerful multiple power lunch startups bob iger chuck palahniuk fox news arianna huffington sia ken burns jordan peterson malcolm gladwell ramit sethi negotiation jane goodall elizabeth gilbert arnold schwarzenegger timothy ferriss cnbc kevin hart bill burr day challenge jamie foxx sam harris doris kearns goodwin dan harris tony robbins jerry seinfeld edward norton navigate apologizing bren brown michael lewis jocko willink yuval noah harari esther perel modern love mary karr michael phelps kelly slater elizabeth lesser vitalik buterin cheryl strayed jim dethmer harvard law school harvard business review whitney cummings rick rubin eric schmidt amanda palmer global leadership summit triad consulting group dax shepard subtle art occidental college neil strauss maria popova madeleine albright naval ravikant brian koppelman daniel ek lifestyle design sir richard branson ray dalio reid hoffman marc andreessen feedback the science receiving feedback well sheila heen difficult conversations nordic business forum joe gebbia howard marks tim ferriss show maria sharapova hard conversations harvard negotiation project discuss what matters most tools of titans public goods vivek murthy grasse tyson 750m katie haun peter attia discover tim timferrissfacebook longform interviews
Built To Go! A #Vanlife Podcast
092 Freak Flag! Kohree Fridge, Butt Connectors, Old Sow, Speedometer Pro, Not Broke Down, NO insulation

Built To Go! A #Vanlife Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 27:08


Stealth no more! Let that freak flag fly! And we'll visit a wet, noisy place, play with an app that tells you how fast your going (!), live without insulation, review the Kohree fridge/freezer, connect some butts, and find a way NOT to be broken down. FIND US: We're on Facebook (Built to Go Group), Instagram (@collegeofcuriosity), Twitter (@colofcuriosity), and we have a Discord server (invite at top of main page at builttogo.com.) Product Review - Kohree Fridge  Kohree makes camping products, and this fridge is mostly freezer. And it's big. And cheap.  https://amzn.to/3hBgqgP A Place to Visit: Old Sow It's a natural whirlpool. You can visit! And you might survive.  Nice article from Smithsonian. Resource Recommendation: Speedometer Pro Why do you need another speedometer? You don't, but you might like all the other stuff this app can do.  iTunes: https://appadvice.com/app/speedometer-55-gps-speed-hud/557871911 Similar program for Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=pl.mobiem.android.speedometer2&hl=en_US&gl=US Some links are affiliate links. If you purchase anything from these links, the show will receive a small fee. This will not impact your price in any way. 

The Not Old - Better Show
#573 William Faulkner and the Civil War - Michael Gorra

The Not Old - Better Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 36:35


William Faulkner and the Civil War - Michael Gorra The Not Old Better Show, Smithsonian Associates Series Welcome to The Not Old Better Show on KSCW.  That's Barbara Dane and The Chambers Brothers playing ‘It Isn't Nice” their version of the popular politically charged gospel and civil rights song.  I hope you're enjoying a wonderful Saturday morning.  So great to be with you today, following, of course,  another excellent Community Chat with Gary Cohen, and good morning and welcome to the Not Old Better Show on KSCW.  As part of our Smithsonian Associates Art of Living series, we have another excellent interview today for you with author, historian, award-winning, Pulitizer Prize finalist writer Michael Gorra.  Michael Gorra will be presenting at the upcoming Smithsonian Associates program via Zoom, Sept 27, 2021, and details, and more information can be found on our website, and we'll be talking about another author, William Faulkner.   He was an uncompromising modernist, a great chronicler of the American South, and inspiration—as well as an immovable obstacle—for the generations of writers who followed. William Faulkner (1897–1962) stands as one of the greatest, and one of the most problematic figures in American literature. Faulkner was Mississippi-born—a white man of his time and place who did not always rise above it. Yet his work also provides a burning account of the intersection of race, region, and remembrance: a probing analysis of a past that we have never yet put behind us. He set almost all his work in what he called an “apocryphal” territory, the imaginary Yoknapatawpha County in northern Mississippi. He carried characters and plotlines over from one book to another, as if the land itself were sprouting a story in which everything and everyone was connected.  Michael Gorra will be reading to us from his new book, ‘The Saddest Words,' so stick around for this enlightening, historical interview with Michael Gorra.   My thanks to Michael Gorra for his time, expertise, and thoughtful preparation in joining me today. My thanks to   My thanks, always, to the Smithsonian team for all they do to support the show.  Of course, my thanks to you, our wonderful Not Old Better Show audience here on KSCW.  Please keep your emails coming to me at info@notold-better.com.  Remember, let's talk about better.  The Not Old Better Show on KSCW.  Thanks, everybody. "But what really matters in his Mississippi isn't finally the lost war, the Lost Cause; nor is it the quarrel between the mythic grace of the Old South and the grasping hands of the New. What matters are all of the wasted years since. What matters is the century between the Emancipation Proclamation and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. The legacy--the final meaning--of the Civil War lives on in the things undone, the work unfinished and the wounds unbound; it lives in the continued resistance to any attempt at amelioration. It lives in our quarrels; it lives today in the battle of the blue and the red." FOR MORE DETAILS, PLEASE CLICK HERE:  https://smithsonianassociates.org/ticketing/subscriptions/series/?id=175498&utm_source=SI-Trumba-Calendar&utm_medium=SIWeb&utm_campaign=2021FY-Trumba-SA-ev&utm_content=SA-Trumba-event&tmssource=254086

The Forum
Louder! How the electric guitar conquered popular music

The Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 39:39


Whether it be a kerrang, a chop, a blistering solo, some finger picking or a subtle flange, the electric guitar is one of the defining sounds of the 20th century. Without it – and its constant companion, the amplifier - popular culture would be unrecognisable today: no big gigs, no stadium concerts. And almost certainly no rock music. But why was it needed and how was it created? Who were the pioneers of the technology and who were the early-adopting exponents? Rajan Datar and his three guest experts delve into the roots of this iconic instrument. Monica Smith is Head of Exhibitions and Interpretation for the Smithsonian's Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation. Among the many projects she has curated at the museum is From Frying Pan to Flying V: The Rise of the Electric Guitar. Paul Atkinson is professor of Design and Design History at Sheffield Hallam university and the author of Amplified: A Design History of the Electric Guitar. HP Newquist is the founder of the National Guitar Museum in the United States. He has written numerous books on the guitar and its history, and was the editor-in-chief of Guitar Magazine. [Image: electric guitars. Credit: ilbusca/Getty Images]

Futility Closet
357-Scenes From an Earthquake

Futility Closet

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 33:45


The San Francisco earthquake of 1906 is remembered for its destructive intensity and terrible death toll. But the scale of the disaster can mask some remarkable personal stories. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll describe the experiences of some of the survivors, which ranged from the horrific to the surreal. We'll also consider a multilingual pun and puzzle over a deadly reptile. Intro: In the 1600s, a specialized verb described the carving of each dish. The Earls of Leicester kept quiet in Parliament. An iconic image: The quake toppled a marble statue of Louis Agassiz from its perch on the second floor of Stanford's zoology building. Sources for our feature: Malcolm E. Barker, Three Fearful Days, 1998. Gordon Thomas and Max Morgan-Witts, The San Francisco Earthquake: A Minute-by-Minute Account of the 1906 Disaster, 2014. Louise Chipley Slavicek, The San Francisco Earthquake and Fire of 1906, 2008. Richard Schwartz, Earthquake Exodus, 1906: Berkeley Responds to the San Francisco Refugees, 2005. Gordon Thomas, The San Francisco Earthquake, 1971. Edward F. Dolan, Disaster 1906: The San Francisco Earthquake and Fire, 1967. William Bronson, The Earth Shook, the Sky Burned, 1959. Charles Morris, The 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fire: As Told by Eyewitnesses, 1906. Alexander Olson, "Writing on Rubble: Dispatches from San Francisco, 1906," KNOW: A Journal on the Formation of Knowledge 3:1 (Spring 2019), 93-121. Susanne Leikam, "The 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fire," Journal of Transnational American Studies 7:1 (2016). Penny Allan and Martin Bryant, "The Critical Role of Open Space in Earthquake Recovery: A Case Study," EN: Proceedings of the 2010 NZSEE Conference, 2010. Brad T. Aagaard and Gregory C. Beroza, "The 1906 San Francisco Earthquake a Century Later: Introduction to the Special Section," Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America 98:2 (2008), 817-822. Jeffrey L. Arnold, "The 1906 San Francisco Earthquake: A Centennial Contemplation," Prehospital and Disaster Medicine 21:3 (2006), 133-134. "... and Then the Fire Was Worse Than the Earthquake ...," American History 41:1 (April 2006), 34-35. Andrea Henderson, "The Human Geography of Catastrophe: Family Bonds, Community Ties, and Disaster Relief After the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fire," Southern California Quarterly 88:1 (Spring 2006), 37-70. Kristin Schmachtenberg, "1906 Letter to the San Francisco Health Department," Social Education 70:3 (2006). Laverne Mau Dicker, "The San Francisco Earthquake and Fire: Photographs and Manuscripts From the California Historical Society Library," California History 59:1 (Spring 1980), 34-65. James J. Hudson, "The California National Guard: In the San Francisco Earthquake and Fire of 1906," California Historical Quarterly 55:2 (Summer 1976), 137-149. Michael Castleman and Katherine Ellison, "Grace Under Fire," Smithsonian 37:1 (April 2006), 56-60, 64-66. Jack London, "Story of an Eyewitness: The San Francisco Earthquake," Collier's Weekly (May 5, 1906), 107-13. "San Francisco and Its Catastrophe," Scientific American 94:17 (April 28, 1906), 347. Bob Norberg, "A City in Flames," [Santa Rosa, Calif.] Press Democrat, April 13, 2006. "The Ground Shook, a City Fell, and the Lessons Still Resound," New York Times, April 11, 2006. "Eyewitness to History," San Francisco Examiner, April 18, 1996. "The San Francisco Earthquake," [Beechworth, Victoria] Ovens and Murray Advertiser, June 23, 1906. "The Call-Chronicle-Examiner," [Hobart, Tasmania] Mercury, May 30, 1906. "Earthquake at San Francisco," Fitzroy City Press, May 25, 1906. "The San Francisco Earthquake," Singleton [N.S.W.] Argus, April 24, 1906. "Flames Unchecked; Whole City Doomed," Richmond [Ind.] Palladium, April 20, 1906. "Beautiful Buildings That Lie in Ruins," New York Times, April 20, 1906. "The Relief of San Francisco," New York Times, April 20, 1906. "Over 500 Dead," New York Times, April 19, 1906. "Disasters Suffered by San Francisco," New York Times, April 19, 1906. "City of San Francisco Destroyed by Earthquake," Spokane Press, April 18, 1906. "Loss of Life Is Now Estimated at Thousands," Deseret Evening News, April 18, 1906. San Francisco 1906 Earthquake Marriage Project. Listener mail: "Virginia philology ...," New Orleans Daily Democrat, June 12, 1878. "Many old English names ...," [Raleigh, N.C.] News and Observer, Sept. 20, 1890 "'Darby' -- Enroughty," Richmond [Va.] Dispatch, Nov. 26, 1902. "A Virginian of the Old School," Weekly Chillicothe [Mo.] Crisis, Feb. 9, 1882. Leonhard Dingwerth, Grosse und mittlere Hersteller, 2008 Rachael Krishna, "Tumblr Users Have Discovered a Pun Which Works in So Many Languages," BuzzFeed, Feb. 2, 2016. "The pun that transcends language barriers," r/tumblr (accessed Aug. 28, 2021). This week's lateral thinking puzzle was contributed by listener Michelle Carter. Here are two corroborating links (warning -- these spoil the puzzle). You can listen using the player above, download this episode directly, or subscribe on Google Podcasts, on Apple Podcasts, or via the RSS feed at https://futilitycloset.libsyn.com/rss. Please consider becoming a patron of Futility Closet -- you can choose the amount you want to pledge, and we've set up some rewards to help thank you for your support. You can also make a one-time donation on the Support Us page of the Futility Closet website. Many thanks to Doug Ross for the music in this episode. If you have any questions or comments you can reach us at podcast@futilitycloset.com. Thanks for listening!