Podcasts about Donetsk

City of regional significance in Donetsk People's Republic, Ukraine

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El Debate
Anexión de regiones ucranianas: ¿a qué se enfrenta Rusia con las incorporaciones?

El Debate

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 35:57


Los integrantes de la Duma, la Cámara Baja del Parlamento ruso, ratificaron de manera unánime un acuerdo para la anexión de las repúblicas populares de Donetsk y Lugansk y de las regiones de Jersón y Zaporizhia. Pese al rechazo internacional, varios organismos como la ONU, la Unión Europea, la OTAN y actores como Estados Unidos no hicieron mucho por evitar la incorporación. ¿Qué significará tanto para Rusia como para Occidente estas anexiones? Lo analizamos en nuestro programa.

Qualitative Conversations
Episode 37: Episode 37. Being a Doctoral Candidate in Times of War with Mariia Vitrukh

Qualitative Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 33:53


SUMMARY KEYWORDSukraine, war, people, ukrainian, asu, research, students, education, happening, invasion, qualitative research, february, questions, crimea, russia, universities, fled, podcast, family, momentSPEAKERSTim, MariiaTim  00:15Hello and welcome to qualitative conversations, a podcast hosted by the qualitative research SIG through AERA, the American Education Research Association. I am Tim wells, a postdoctoral research scholar at Arizona State University and guest host for this episode of the podcast. The qualitative conversations podcast doesn't have a regular host. Instead, each episode is organized by our podcast committee. Normally, my role resides in the background coordinating episodes and editing audio, but today I'm behind the mic. In conversation with Mariia Vitrukh. Mariia is a doctoral candidate in the Education Policy and Evaluation Program at Arizona State University. She serves on the QR sig's graduate student committee. In the fall of 2021, Mariia had been in conversation with myself about an episode she had hoped to record for the podcast. That podcast episode was never recorded. This is because only a few months later, on February 24 of 2022, Russia made a full scale invasion into Ukraine taking over 20% of the territory of Ukraine. Over the past few months. Maria is Ukrainian, writing her dissertation on learning experiences of Ukrainian students who moved from war areas in Ukraine and continue education in the context of forced migration. For the past year, she had been living in Ukraine, she left only a month before the invasion to teach courses at ASU and finish her dissertation proposal. The country she left has changed forever. But this hasn't stopped her from returning. I don't think that's yet research to complete. But all of our family remains in Ukraine. So instead of the original podcast that we planned in the fall of 2021, I invited Mariia to the podcast to share her experience of researching and being a doctoral student, in candidate and in times of war. Mariia, I can't thank you enough for your willingness to be on this program. Perhaps we could start with you sharing a bit more about your background for the listeners, what brought you to ASU's doctoral program. And what were you doing beforehand?Mariia  02:41Tim, thank you so much for the invitation. I really appreciate the opportunity not only to share my experience as a student, but also to talk about the ones in Ukraine.Tim  02:53So what brought you to ASU doctoral program.Mariia  02:57So, after I did my second master's degree at the University of Cambridge, in psychology and education road, I went back to Ukraine and storage, or co founded an NGO Ukrainian Educational Research Association. We did a couple of projects on education in Ukraine. And as a member of the organization I applied for grant was the US State Department. And I collaborated with displaced universities in Ukraine. And those are the universities that moved from Eastern world areas of the country. I worked with them for about three years on the project, doing workshops, and preparing conferences, interviewing people. And I think this collaboration kind of pushed me to think what can I do more to speak about the stories and share the stories of those people, and especially students, and how to say that I was really impressed with what they shared with me. And I think inspired by their example, even though their stories were not the easy ones. And this kind of inspire me to look for PhD programs. So I applied to ASU because it offered an interdisciplinary approach and had a variety of methods to look into the ongoing problems. So I thought that that's a place that where I can find a way to explore not an easy topic of war and how to research war, especially education in the context of war.Tim  04:35Yeah, thanks. That's just a little bit of background that I think might help orient the listeners to this episode and kind of your own deep knowledge and experience in Ukraine and in how this connects maybe to your own research and really builds off some of that background. So perhaps we could start with you telling us what are you doing in February of this year when the war ramped up?Mariia  05:05So I've just finished my perspectives de France. And I was planning to go back to Ukraine in March, but then to do my data collection, but then all the flights have been canceled due to the full scale invasion. Yeah, so I think that was the moment where I had to make quiet, hard decisions first, do I continue with my dissertation? Then if I do, then how do I continue? And there were a lot of personal issues as well as research questions, ethical considerations. Yeah, so had to resolve a lot of those factors.Tim  05:54I can actually remember sitting down with you early in the winter of 2022. Before the, the the invasion, and we had a conversation. And I think, some, I guess, what struck me and what I still remember about that, as you were situating, lots of the events that were kind of unfolding because this was a time when Russia had started to militarize the border, and they kind of brought this big presence of military forces right around the border. And I was just kind of asking you about this. And what you did really nicely is situate this historically, you provided some context and things. And of course, this isn't a History podcast, but maybe you can give some background about the background and history of the war. And maybe share a little bit about what happened in 2014, and how that might connect in some ways to 2020.Mariia  06:53So although there is a very common discourse, saying that the vast and by West people usually refer to the United States and NATO, saying that they put too much pressure on Russian presidents, and it caused a triggered the war. But I think it the tension began much earlier between Ukraine and Russia back in 2010, when victory and a college, very pro Russian president came to power in 2016 Ukrainian government's decision to suspend the signing of an Association Agreement with the European Union, and choosing closer ties to Russia and the Eurasian Economic Union sparked progress among the Ukrainian people. The scope of progress widened, with calls for the resignation of President victory on a college and the garment. The protests later Friday expanded into Ramadan and the Revolution of Dignity. A year later in 2014, protesters eventually occupied a government buildings in many regions of Ukraine. The uprising climaxed on 18th 20th of February 2014 and fierce fighting and cave between Milan activists and pleas resulted in deaths of almost 100 protesters and 13 police officers present in college and other government ministers fled the country to Russia. And just a week later, the so called little green man, as they were famously named in media appeared in Crimea in unmarked green army uniforms, carrying modern Russian military weapons and equipment. They took over control of strategic positions in Crimea and set Russian flags. Later in April 2014. Large parts of the Knights can Luhansk regions were seized by pro Russian terrorists backed by a Russian military since the start of the war in Ukraine in 2014. With the annexation of Crimea and invasion into Donbass, which are Donetsk and Luhansk region by Russia, Ukraine has become one of the countries with the highest number of internally displaced people worldwide. And these numbers can be compared to countries such as Iraq, Afghanistan and Sudan. And by the summer of 2014, the Ukrainian ministry for social policy had already registered close to 2 million internally displaced people, and an estimated 1 million people have fled from war zone to the Russian Federation. In terms of education, from the scarce resources available, it is known that at the beginning of the conflict about back in 2014, about 700 educational institutions suffered both higher education and school level education at the higher level education about 700,000 students and teachers for more More than three and a half 1000 educational institutions experienced psychological difficulties due to military conflict in obtaining education. And students consider about 30% of those affected by war. After the 24th of February 2022, after the full scale invasion of Russia into Ukraine, over 1000, educational institutions have suffered bombing and shelling, and about 100 of them have been destroyed completely. And these numbers are continuously increasing. almost 10 million Ukrainian refugees have fled Ukraine since this escalation. And another 7 million more have been displaced internally within Ukraine, and over 12 million have been affected in the areas hardest hit by the war. And also how to remember that throughout over 7.5 million children that now are considered Children of War, and not to mention that the humanitarian needs are constantly increasing.Tim  11:10Yeah, thanks. So what's really clear, I think in talking with you, around this is that these events are part of a much larger, longer history that extends beyond February of this year in in dates much prior to that. But maybe you can tell us, if you're open to sharing a little bit about how you've experienced the changes of the war, the escalation within since this last year, and especially maybe how you've experienced this as a doc student doing research and qualitative research.Mariia  11:52Um, I think I made quite a few interesting discoveries for me both as a researcher and a human being and Ukrainian citizen, is that it's a very non translatable experience. So you can't really explain this to someone who hasn't been through similar events. Also, the news don't really reflect what is happening day by day process. After the full invasion, I had to make a decision on whether I continue with my dissertation, because the first instinct was just to pack my luggage and go back to Ukraine. And I wanted to help in some way I just didn't know how to help. I was waking up every morning with Assad if my parents are still alive. So I was sending them text messages to check in on them. And following the news constantly to make sure that the city they were in was not bombed. Also checking on my friends and their location. And I think just very recently, maybe a few weeks ago, my sister shirts that Monday, she actually saw a missile missile flying over her head. And I think that felt very surreal, because she saw that it was so close that you could literally see it. And actually, what she shared is that the moment the bomb is like about your head flying in the air, you can't really hide anymore, because it moves so quickly, that you don't really have enough time to hide. And my mom actually turned out that she saw the missile was acquired a few times, but she never told me about this. I know that my family does not tell me even half of what they're going through. And that's on the one hand, it's disturbing. On the other hand, I kind of understand that. I think another difficult aspect is that your family and France are constantly under the threat. And the first few days, of course, were a shock. I remember when I called my parents at 7am in the morning, cave time on the 24th of February. And I told them, like because they saw on the news already that the key was bombed two hours earlier, so and they were still asleep. My father saw that that's a fake news that that's not true. And I think it was true for most of my friends and people in Ukraine. And so the bombing starts at 5am. In cave time, and I think that's the most mean time to start a war because it's before the dawn. And at times, it's hard to process what is happening, especially if you're not fully awake. And some of my friends were in queue at that time. So they try to flee the city. Or normally it takes about five to six hours to get out of this key of to the most western city. And one of my friends heard that it took her about 12 hours. And it's only because she left immediately after the bombing started. Those who tried to flee like just a few hours later. If it either took them over 24 hours or even more, or they were forced to return home just because of the traffic chance, no gas, and the panic that was in the city. Also, like even now, people have to constantly be a large. They hear the sirens literally every day they have to hide in basements on some safe, safe space in their homes. It does influence children a lot, especially their education and schooling, because a lot of schools have been turned into refugee shelters, which means that in many cities and rural areas, there is no physically space to study and most of the education is done online. I guess the word is not the same throughout the time. So the first few days and weeks were the most uncertain. It is changing over time, because you learn to process things differently. It doesn't get easier, you just I think start to navigate the context of war better. At the moment, I think it's the most like drastic things is that a lot of people are dying, both civilians and soldiers. Also, the price for food is increasing constantly. Some cities just don't have access to food, water, electricity, mobile connection or internet connection. So that's that's what concerns the more like a personal explorations and discoveries I made for myself. When it comes to research, I think that the questions I was asking myself, because I was supposed to work with displaced universities and students from displaced universities. So I wondered, like how to do research with people who are under constant physical threat or whose family is under physical threat, when the cities are being shelled, and you yourself are going through this experience, or your family members, your friends are hiding in basements and trying to survive. Is it even ethical to do this type of research? Also, I know that, especially the first two weeks, people were in shock, they were panicking, there was a lot of uncertainty. A lot of people didn't know where to go and what to do. And also, like, how do you talk to people who lost their homes. So I knew that some of the students I'm may potentially be interviewing will go through the second displacement. So the first displacement was in 2014, when they lost their homes, and they had to leave the occupied territories, territories that were under war. And then in February 2022, they were going through the second displacement, losing their homes with a second time having to leave their education space for the second time, having their group mates and professors killed or injured, as well as their family members. And of course, there were like technical issues. And I just couldn't travel to Ukraine that easily. And my methods that I was using, because I'm using Artspace methodologies and somatic practices required on site participation. So this man that I need to meet with students in person, and I kind of wondered, how do we solve this issue? Yeah,Tim  18:31I'm actually just following up and curious. So how did you solve that issue? Were you able to meet with people in person? And have you conducted that type of research since?Mariia  18:45Yeah, I think that my volunteering and advocacy work actually helped me with that. Because when I started doing some volunteering at Arizona State University, I met some of the students who were from this place to universities. And through personal networking and social service. I got connected to a group of students who was in a different country. And I was very lucky to get a grant from gpsa. And travel all the way there and work with them.Tim  19:28This was after the invasion, correct?Mariia  19:30Yeah, it was actually end of April, beginning of May. And that was something completely found plans because so I thought that most probably I will have either to change the methods, change the population. Stop doing my research completely because I didn't see how it's relevant anymore because the history took a very unexpected turn, which meant that the research I wrote just half a year ago was not relevant anymore. It became a part of history. So it was not what was happening, the universities I was describing. Most of them don't exist anymore, or they had to relocate again. So when I was talking about the second relocation for people, the same thing happened for the institutions. And when I reached out professors from displaced universities, most of them told me like, we don't know what's going to happen next. We didn't know where our students are, we didn't know where most of our colleagues are. So it's very unpredictable what is going to happen next.Tim  20:36And that's part of well, in partly in response to that, you've also, that's you've been doing your advocacy, you started advocacy work? How have you thought about your advocacy work as related or connected in any way to your research? I know you said, partly through that work, you got funded through the Student Association at it at ASU to travel to the Ukraine correct. And do research.Mariia  21:05Oh, it actually was not Ukraine, I just don't want to name the country because I'm going to expose the students. I traveled to Europe to do my data collection. I think at that moment, I didn't think about advocacy, as connected to my research at all, I just had a feeling. I think there are two things First, for those Ukrainians who are outside of Ukraine, all of us feel the sense of guilt, that you are in safe conditions, and you survived. And you don't have to go through what most people are going through in Ukraine, and at times, it gets feel unbearable. And I think it's to somehow cope with a sense of guilt, and guilt of Survivor, I think you try to do something to contribute and help. So what I was trying to do was to get together those students who were at ASU into one group and organization and see what we can together do. And that's when I started meeting people. And I also had to collaborate more on meet some people from the Aspera, Ukraine people from the Aspera. And that's when I had a chance to go and talk about issues that Ukrainian students face here at ASU and had a chance to talk about was governor of Arizona juicy and as well as ASU representatives, as well as IRC and migration office asking for help both for Ukrainian students and Ukrainian refugees. Also gave interviews to local media. And I gave talks at the conferences just sharing information or what was happening at that time in Ukraine. But it was not there was not really like a goal to connect it to my research. Rather, it was like feel of responsibility to somehow do something or help in any way I could.Tim  23:14Write Of course. So I guess I'm Yes. still curious about research and what this process is looking like in in times of war in the middle of war and how this is, so much of qualitative research is about relationships, relationships that you form and maintain. But it's also about ethical considerations. And you're kind of in the midst of all of that, how have you navigated some of that? Both relationships, ethics, the concerns that you might have have around conduct both conducting research around a topic that's at the very least adjacent and likely very relevant to the experiences of people in war, forced migration. And then, at the same time, in this context, where so much turmoil and wars going on, I'm curious, a little bit of how you think about those and how you've experienced the research work during this time.Mariia  24:24I think it was not a straightforward way. And I had a lot of hesitations how and if I should continue with my research, I mean, was my dissertation. But I think working with students at ASU actually helped me because it showed where the needs are and how can I address some of the ethical issues. And in terms of building relationship, my key question was, I didn't want to re traumatize students, I will be potentially interviewing Just asking the question that may not be appropriate in that moment. So I consulted with psychologists from Ukraine that were working with refugees in Ukraine, like what is the best way to approach if it makes sense to do this research at all? And the response that I got is that, in that particular moment, people, most people feel happy that they survived. And they do want to talk they key consideration was that I do not tell them what to do, I do not tell them how to act, how to send have to feel, etc. So if I'm there to listen, and ask some questions, then have to be respectful and empathetic about their views and beliefs. And from my experience, back in 2017, when people shared although it was in retrospect, so the people I was working with back in 2016 2017, it's been already three years since the war hit for them. And one thing they shared with me is that the most traumatic experience for them was when someone would come with curious questions and observations, and would show little or no empathy. So I think I took made a note for myself and thought that if I'm there to ask questions, I have to be prepared to listen. And I realized that most of the time, it's not going to be an easy. And another aspect was that I realized that I have to be honest about my intentions for the research and the project I'm doing. And of course, confidentiality matters a lot, because for a lot of my participants, I realized they are still in Ukraine and their family members may be in danger. And also, another aspect I kind of anticipated is that the most interesting conversations are going to happen off record. And this man's that they would have to remain of records. And even though it could be tempting to use those for the project, or for the research, I realized that I mean, this is something that is shared of records, so it stays of records. Some other ethical considerations were that for most people, as it was, for me, it tends, it's hard to navigate what is happening and find, find the words to express what you're going through. So it gets easier in retrospect, that's what I've noticed, with my previous research, but it's hard. It's harder in the moment. So I had to be aware of that. Also, different people process words differently. And there are many factors for that. A lot depends on the location of the family, their economic situation, that pre will previous beliefs, experiences, involvement in the war, and how much their family members are involved. Also, the distance and safety, very often hardly an indicator indicators about how person feels because, like, as I said, like sense of guilt. And also times even helplessness can be present, even for those who are outside of the country and are relatively safe. So I realized that when I will be interviewing my participants, I have to be always aware of that. And I think also how you ask questions matter, because if you're just picking people's brain, you see what they're going through and like trying to satisfy your curiosity, this could be a very traumatic approach. And you have to be constantly aware that that these people are continuously going through the war, even though they may themselves not be in the middle of it, but their family members most probably are their friends are. And it immediately puts them in this, like continuous processing, or continuous influence. So I think these were like my key explorations. And yeah, and while trying to navigate and I think I'm still trying to navigate how to how to approach it. I don't think that that's the process that is over for me.Tim  29:36Yeah, of course, that makes a lot of sense. In so much is still changing. And yeah, the war evolves and continues to evolve. And what's interesting or what's concerning, I think, is that we're now creeping up on six or seven months into the war. And personally, I send It's there's just a waning of interest and it starts to get lose its front page headline status. And but so as we close out the conversation I kind of on that note, but also, I'm curious what you could share or what you would share to listeners, what else you would share to listeners, as yet we hit you know this half, half of the year moment in likely this will be a conflict and war that continues. But what else would you share with whether the listenersMariia  30:39so I'm not surprised that Ukraine disappeared from the headlines. Talking about war and listening in World War on daily basis is exhausting, I think to be in the context of war is even more so. But I don't think that this is an indicator that people don't care anymore. It's just you can't be focused on world the time. In Trump's of the case of Ukraine, I believe that it opened an interesting historical consciousness. And I remember that at the very beginning on the 24th of February, the whole world was giving Ukraine about 2072 hours, and trying to predict what's going to happen next. And I think that Ukrainians refuse this bit of realization that they may lose their homeland, and they were fighting back. And we are still fighting back. Even though the whole world bugs and was waiting for Ukraine to be taking over. I think that Ukrainian population showed incredible resistance and love for their homelands. And I have no doubt that we are going to win this war, and we are going to take our lands back.Tim  31:57On that note, thank you so much for your willingness to share about your experience, the war, and also your experience conducting war research in the midst of this war. And also thanks for your service in the qualitative research SIG, so I really appreciate it. And it was great having a conversation with you.Mariia  32:18Yeah, thank you so much for inviting me. I really appreciate this time and I appreciate listeners time to even explore this topic. So thank you

Erin Burnett OutFront
Ukraine says it has regained control of key city in Donetsk

Erin Burnett OutFront

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 41:02


Ukraine makes major gains as Putin's army falls apart. New recruits are being sent to the front lines with little to no training. Plus, at least 100 people are dead in the wake of Hurricane Ian as questions grow about why officials waited to order mandatory evacuations. Also, according to reporting from the Washington Post, Trump asked his lawyer to falsely tell the National Archives that all documents were returned.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

DW Brasil Notícias
Boletim de Notícias (04/10/22) - Segunda edição

DW Brasil Notícias

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 6:23


Ciro Gomes acompanha decisão de seu partido, o PDT, e declara apoio a Lula no segundo turno. Ouça esse e outros destaques desta terça-feira, na segunda edição do Boletim de Notícias da DW Brasil.

The Economist Morning Briefing
Ukraine retakes key positions; Britain defaults on tax promise, and more

The Economist Morning Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 3:45


Russia admitted that Ukrainian forces made a breakthrough in the southern region of Kherson, after Ukraine confirmed its full control of Lyman, a key logistics hub in Donetsk. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Bureau Buitenland
Nucleaire dreiging is terug

Bureau Buitenland

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 24:51


Reportage vanuit Oekraïne: Ten oosten van Kupyansk Niet alleen bij Lyman in de provincie Donetsk en bij het zuidelijke Cherson maakt het Oekraïense leger dus een opmars ten koste van de Russische bezetters. Ook in de regio Charkov gaat het offensief verder. In de bevrijde gebieden van Oekraïne is gebrek aan alles. En het front ligt vaak nog akelig dichtbij, merkte onze verslaggever Michiel Driebergen. Hij bezocht het bevrijde Kupjansk in de regio Charkov en de gebieden ten oosten van dat stadje, die net zijn heroverd. De nucleaire dreiging is terug Na een reeks vernederende nederlagen op het veld - en in zijn eigen land – komt Poetin steeds verder in het nauw. En daarmee komt het nucleaire scenario steeds dichterbij. Althans, dat is de zorg van de experts die beweren dat het sinds de Cuba-crisis van 1962 niet eerder zó spannend is geweest. Amerikaans oud-generaal Petraeus verklaarde op zijn beurt dat als Poetin ervoor kiest kernwapens te gebruiken op Oekraïens grondgebied, de Verenigde Staten het Russische leger daar zullen vernietigen. Met veiligheidsexpert Danny Pronk en Tom Sauer, hoogleraar internationale politiek aan de Universiteit Antwerpen bespreken we hoe serieus we deze dreiging moeten nemen. Uitgelicht: Colombiaanse vredesdino, met Edwin Koopman Presentatie: Sophie Derkzen

Newshour
Evidence of hasty Russian retreat from Lyman

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 48:57


The BBC has seen evidence of the speed at which Russian forces fled the Ukrainian city of Lyman, with soldiers bodies lying in the street and an entire convoy of burned out vehicles. Also in the programme: Elon Musk once again offers to buy Twitter; and Antarctica's new postmistress. (Picture: A paper box with the symbol Z, which is used by Russian forces as an identifying sign, lays on the ground in the recently recaptured city of Lyman, Donetsk area, Ukraine, 04 October 2022. Credit: YEVGEN HONCHARENKO/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock)

C dans l'air
POUTINE FRAGILISÉ… ET PLUS DANGEREUX ? – 04/10/2022

C dans l'air

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 62:14


LES EXPERTS : FRANÇOIS CLEMENCEAU Rédacteur en chef international - « Le Journal du Dimanche » GÉNÉRAL JEAN-PAUL PALOMÉROS Ancien chef d'état-major / Ancien commandant suprême de la transformation de l'OTAN ANNIE DAUBENTON Journaliste-essayiste Auteure de « Ukraine, les métamorphoses de l'indépendance » LUKAS AUBIN Directeur de recherche à l'IRIS Auteur de « Géopolitique de la Russie » Tout juste annexée par la Russie, la ville de Lyman dans la région de Donetsk a été reconquise par l'armée ukrainienne ce week-end. Le président Zelensky l'a confirmé dimanche, et depuis des vidéos circulent montrant le drapeau ukrainien flottant à nouveau dans le centre de la ville, des prisonniers russes et du matériel détruit ou laissé dans la fuite. Des scènes déjà vues ces derniers jours à Izioum ou dans d'autres villes reconquises par les troupes de Kiev qui avancent depuis déjà un mois dans le nord-est de l'Ukraine, et qui suscitent des remous en Russie. Nœud ferroviaire et nouveau symbole de la débande russe, la chute de la ville de Lyman n'était pas encore consommée samedi que des hauts responsables de « l'opération spéciale » russe en Ukraine ont commencé à désigner des responsables de cette nouvelle déroute. Ainsi le dirigeant tchétchène Ramzan Kadyrov s'en est pris avec virulence au général Alexandre Lapine, maître des opérations dans la ville, qui « n'a pas fourni les communications, les renforts et le ravitaillement en munitions nécessaires » mais aussi « à ceux qui le couvrent au sein de l'état-major ». Une référence claire au chef d'état-major, le général Valéri Guerassimov, et au ministre de la défense, Sergueï Choïgou qui sont de plus en plus ouvertement critiqués. Le dirigeant tchétchène en a profité aussi pour réclamer « des mesures plus radicales, comme l'utilisation d'une bombe nucléaire de faible puissance ». De son côté le ministre de la défense russe s'est félicité ce mardi que plus de 200 000 personnes ont été appelées au service militaire depuis que Vladimir Poutine a décrété une mobilisation partielle il y a deux semaines. Mais ces derniers jours des officiels de haut rang ont dénoncé les conditions dans lesquelles se déroule cette mobilisation partielle, et à la télévision russe, les deux plus ardents propagandistes de Vladimir Poutine se sont inquiétés publiquement des risques de mutinerie face aux désordres de la mobilisation, obligeant le Kremlin à reconnaître des ratés. Alors que se passe-t-il au sein de l'armée russe ? Que va décider Vladimir Poutine ? La Russie pourrait-elle utiliser ses armes nucléaires tactiques dans la guerre en Ukraine ? Quelle est la situation dans les territoires ukrainiens annexés par Moscou ? Enfin que sait-on du tir de missile balistique nord-coréen qui a survolé le Japon, poussant Tokyo à activer son système d'alerte ? https://www.france.tv/france-5/c-dans-l-air/ DIFFUSION : du lundi au samedi à 17h45 FORMAT : 65 minutes PRÉSENTATION : Caroline Roux - Axel de Tarlé REDIFFUSION : du lundi au vendredi vers 23h40 RÉALISATION : Nicolas Ferraro, Bruno Piney, Franck Broqua, Alexandre Langeard, Corentin Son PRODUCTION : France Télévisions / Maximal Productions Retrouvez C DANS L'AIR sur internet & les réseaux : INTERNET : francetv.fr FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/Cdanslairf5 TWITTER : https://twitter.com/cdanslair INSTAGRAM : https://www.instagram.com/cdanslair/

Ukraine: The Latest
Ukraine advances on all fronts & the renaissance in culture with Dr Sasha Dovzhyk

Ukraine: The Latest

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 56:54 Very Popular


Day 222Today, we discuss the latest updates from the warzone, looking at the advances made by Ukraine in Kherson, Zaporizhzhia. and Donetsk and we speak to Dr Sasha Dovzhyk about Nuclear threats, the sham referenda and Ukrainian literary culture.Contributors:David Knowles (Host). Follow David on Twitter @djknowles22Dom Nicholls (Associate Editor, Defence). Follow Dom on Twitter @DomNicholls.Francis Dearnley (Assistant Comment Editor). Follow Francis on Twitter @FrancisDearnley.With thanks to Dr Sasha Dovzhyk. Follow Sashha on Twitter @sasha_weirdsley.Email: podcasts@telegraph.co.ukSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Morning Announcements
Monday, October 3rd, 2022

Morning Announcements

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 5:27 Very Popular


Today's headlines: After hitting multiple islands and southwestern Florida last week, Hurricane Ian again made landfall on the coast of South Carolina over the weekend as a category 1 storm. In Cuba, where power for the entire country of 11 million people was knocked out by the storm, residents gathered to protest the lack of electricity. Russia attempted to unilaterally annex 4 regions of Ukraine, with Putin claiming that the annexations of Luhansk, Donetsk, Kherson and Zaporizhzhia this past Friday; Ukraine disagrees on the risk of Putin actually using nuclear weapons; Ukraine formally submitted its fast-tracked application for NATO membership. The Justice Department accused a couple of conspiring to provide the Russian government with medical information about U.S. soldiers and their relatives on Friday. Finally for today, Donald Trump escalated his war with none other than Mitch McConnell this weekend. Resources/Articles mentioned this episode: Washington Post: Florida begins cleanup in aftermath of Ian Reuters: Havana protests flare for second night as Cuba scrambles to turn on lights USA Today: Putin proclaims he's annexing four regions of Ukraine; U.S. slaps new sanctions on Russia: Sept. 30 recap NPR: The pope makes his strongest plea yet for an end to Russia's war on Ukraine NBC: Ukraine retakes a key city Putin claimed to have annexed. Here's why it matters. NBC: Johns Hopkins doctor and Army doctor spouse charged with conspiring to give U.S. soldiers' medical info to Russia Washington Post: Trump escalates attacks on McConnell with ‘DEATH WISH' post   Host: Sami Sage Producers: Amanda Duberman and Bridget Schwartz Original Music and Editing: Brandon Lee Bjornson

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano
L'Ucraina riconquista terreno sul campo dopo l'annessione a Mosca di quattro regioni

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 9:38


Nei giorni scorsi Kyev ha ripreso il controllo della città di Lyman, ma Putin appare sempre più combattivo, dopo l'annessione di Zaporizhzhia, Kherson, Donetsk e Luhansk alla Russia.

Amanpour
Special report: How far will Putin go?

Amanpour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 55:05


The US and its NATO allies are swiftly warning of retaliation and catastrophic consequences for Russia should President Putin follow through on pledges of nuclear warfare. Many are wondering just how far Putin will push it, as Ukraine continues to bust through Russian lines after weeks of a successful offensive in the east and now the south. The key city of Lyman in Donetsk is now back in the hands of Ukrainian forces. Correspondent Nic Payton Walsh was the first TV journalist to visit the city and he joins the show to discuss.  Also on today's show: US Senate Democrat Jeanne Shaheen, a senior member of both the Foreign Relations and Armed Services committees; former Brazilian Foreign Minister Celso Amorim; Scott Armstrong, author of Adrift: America in 100 Charts.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

The Takeaway
Russia Illegally Annexes Four Regions of Ukraine

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 13:06


On Friday, in a ceremony at the Kremlin, Russian President Vladimir Putin proclaimed the annexation of four regions of Ukraine: Luhansk, Donetsk, Kherson, and Zaporizhzhia. These regions make up about 15-percent of Ukrainian territory. A map from BBC showing the regions Russian President Vladimir Putin illegally annexed.  (Institute for the Study of War via BBC)   The announcement was resoundingly condemned as illegal and illegitimate by the the international community. A day after the announcement, Ukraine liberated the Donetsk city of Lyman, forcing Russian troops to retreat in another humiliating defeat in recent weeks. We speak with Ambassador Michael McFaul, former U.S. Ambassador to Russia and professor of international studies at Stanford, about how Russia's annexation announcement changes the war, and what this announcement means for growing tensions between the U.S. and Russia.

Cosmic Reality Podcast
"COSMIC CREATING", Jan Shaw 10/1/22 - Nord Stream 2, Ukraine, vaccine narrative fails

Cosmic Reality Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 60:54


"Cosmic Creating Show” Current Affairs with Jan Shaw SHOW PHOTO The Success Alchemist: Success Coach | Business & Marketing Strategist (970) 852 4450 / (512) 487 2980. https://www.TheSuccessAlchemist.net Twitter @CoachJanShaw Telegram - https://t.me/usukpatriot/56 Jan's Podcast Station: https://pod.co/cosmic-creating-with-jan-shaw "Cosmic Creating" is seen 5-6 pm EST every Saturday http://www.cosmicreality.com/radio.html Jan is also seen on every second Saturday 6-8 pm EST on the “Say What Radio Show” at http://www.cosmicreality.com/radio.html PODCASTS https://pod.co/cosmic-reality-radio Archives: https://www.cosmicreality.com/archives.html LINKS: Nord Stream Pipelines Sabotaged, and Only One Country Benefits Guess Who Threatened to Take the Russian Nord Stream Pipelines Offline Before They Were Sabotaged This Week? Trump Offers to Step in and Mediate a Peace Deal Between Russia, Ukraine and the US Putin's Speech Analysis: Bioweapons and Human Experimentation in Ukraine Signing of treaties on accession of Donetsk and Lugansk people's republics and Zaporozhye and Kherson regions to Russia Putin Charges West with “Satanism”, Offers Cease-Fire in Ukraine – Zelensky Refuses, Vows to Keep Fighting Top doctor who once promoted COVID vaccines on TV, now says they should be halted UNFORGIVABLE: At least 163 Children dead, 1.2k disabled, 15k hospitalised & 58k injured due to Covid-19 Vaccination in the USA according to CDC Experts estimate 20 million are already dead due to COVID Vaccination & over 2 billion injured Fifth COVID Shot Recommended Without Safety or Efficacy Data

Podcast Internacional - Agência Radioweb
Ucrânia diz ter recuperado assentamentos na região de Donetsk

Podcast Internacional - Agência Radioweb

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 1:14


O governo da Ucrânia informou ter recuperado do domínio da Rússia, no último final de semana, cinco assentamentos situados na localidade de Lyman, na região de Donetsk, no leste ucraniano, perto da zona de fronteira. Os assentamentos estão situados dentro de um dos quatro territórios ucranianos que a Rússia busca anexar.

BYLINE TIMES PODCAST
Russia's 'Annexation' - Ukraine's Fightback

BYLINE TIMES PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 26:17


Adrian Goldberg talks to Zarina Zabrisky in Odessa about Vladmir Putin's annexation of four regions of Ukraine - and what that means for the war. Russia recently held fake 'referendums' in Donetsk, Luhansk, Zaporizhzhia, Kherson - areas it has seized in the south and east of the country - seeking to justify its invasion. Ukraine has already retaliated on the battlefield winning back the strategically important city of Lyman in the Donetsk region; and there are reports that Kherson is in the process of being reclaimed.Produced in Birmingham by Adrian Goldberg.Funded by subscriptions to Byline Times. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Ochtendnieuws | BNR
Ochtendnieuws | Doema buigt zich over annexatie Oekraïense regio's

Ochtendnieuws | BNR

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 24:18


Deze week buigt de Doema, het Russische parlement, zich over de inlijving van Donetsk, Loehansk, Cherson en Zaporizjade. Maar ondertussen lijken de Oekraïense strijdkrachten aan terrein te winnen. 'De grondwettelijke procedure is volkomen verhaspeld', zegt Rusland-correspondent Joost Bosman vanuit Moskou. En in den Haag wordt het een hete week: het PBL noemt de uitkoop van boeren onrealistisch; de Kamer roept Kamervoorzitter Vera Bergkamp op matje in de zaak-Arib en de Inspectie Overheidsinformatie en Erfgoed publiceert het onderzoek naar de manier waarop premier Rutte zijn sms'jes verwijdert en archiveert. Politiek verslaggever Leendert Beekman gaat het druk krijgen. Over deze podcast In Ochtendnieuws hoor je in 20 minuten het belangrijkste nieuws van de dag. Abonneer je op de podcast via bnr.nl/ochtendnieuws, de BNR-app, Spotify en Apple Podcasts. Of luister elke dag live via bnr.nl/live.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Narrative Control
HIMARS as Miracle Weapons

Narrative Control

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 101:16


War is complicated. At the beginning of the Ukraine conflict, I listened to a lot of people who I thought made very plausible arguments that Russia had an overwhelming advantage and would ultimately prevail. At this point, it seems to me that one has to be pretty disconnected from reality to still be bullish on Russia. But I've been wrong before, so who knows?No longer confident in my own ability to forecast military events, I've figured that the best I can do is listen to those who have been right up to this point. You may remember Chris Nicholson from our Better Call Saul podcasts. What you don't know is that he also loves thinking and talking about war.He told me very early in the conflict – it might've been as early as March – that he thought Ukraine would eventually take back all the land Russia had won, and even move into pre-February 24 territory. At the time I thought he was crazy. Sure, the Russian push into Kiev had failed, but Ukraine had not proved it could go on the offensive, and most observers thought that when the Russian military concentrated its efforts on the territory it held, it could at least maintain its current position. This view was reinforced when during the summer we saw Russia still making real, albeit slow and incremental, gains in Donetsk and Luhansk.Then, practically overnight, in early September it was pushed out of Kharkiv province, losing ten percent of the Ukrainian territory it had taken since February 24. The speed with which this happened was shocking to me, as I had been used to watching Russia struggle for weeks and months against heavy resistance to take a series of cities and towns it was now giving up without a fight. All of this had me rethink what Chris had been telling me at the start of the war, and frankly gave me a lot more trust in his ability to clearly understand what is happening in a very complicated battlefield environment. He thought that Ukraine's will to fight plus open-ended and unlimited support from the West meant that time was on its side. The Russian collapse in Kharkiv appears to only have been the beginning of what will be a much longer process. One day after Putin announced that Russia was annexing four provinces of Ukraine, his troops lost Lyman in Donetsk. Some of the residents of the town, having been cut off from electricity and the internet, were apparently surprised when they were informed that they had been residents of Russia for a day. Ukraine is making gains on multiple fronts, and it is possible that there might be another breakthrough by the time you read this. I recently speculated that Russia may have been annexing territory in order to justify soon using nuclear weapons, based on the theory that they are currently on the defensive and it would be too humiliating to claim land and then immediately lose it. But Russia isn't even being clear about what the borders of its “new territories” are, which indicates that they're not in fact committing to anything concrete and instead sort of stumbling along. It's difficult to explain all of this in any way without giving at least some credence to the idea that the regime really is as corrupt and incompetent as its worst critics allege. Given where we are, I decided to have a chat with Chris about the war so far and where it's going. As you'll see, he thinks Russia is in deep trouble. We get into the technical details as to why, with Chris explaining to me how artillery works and the game changing nature of HIMARS. We also discuss whether the Russian war effort can be saved by the recent mobilization of personnel and which strategies make sense for Putin at this point. I ask Chris why, if things are as bad as he suggests, Russia wouldn't just roll the dice and decide that going nuclear is its only option. He replies by arguing that there are still steps that the US can take on the escalatory ladder, which leads me to ask whether that means Putin can game things out and realize that threatening to destroy the world might be his only card to play. Near the end, we converge on a reasonable explanation of Russia's seemingly puzzling decision to annex territory it either does not control or is in the process of losing.This was a frightening but ultimately fascinating and productive conversation, and before long I hope to have Chris on again to talk about the war.Links:Wikipedia: M142 HIMARS.The New York Times on GMLRS rockets. Video demonstration of the weapon. Article on the subject.BBC article comparing HIMARS to other weapons in terms of range.Liveuamap.The Washington Post: “Russia's spies misread Ukraine and misled Kremlin as war loomed.” The New York Times: “The Kremlin, after trumpeting annexation, admits it doesn't know where the borders are.” This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit richardhanania.substack.com/subscribe

The Takeaway
Russia Illegally Annexes Four Regions of Ukraine

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 13:06


On Friday, in a ceremony at the Kremlin, Russian President Vladimir Putin proclaimed the annexation of four regions of Ukraine: Luhansk, Donetsk, Kherson, and Zaporizhzhia. These regions make up about 15-percent of Ukrainian territory. A map from BBC showing the regions Russian President Vladimir Putin illegally annexed.  (Institute for the Study of War via BBC)   The announcement was resoundingly condemned as illegal and illegitimate by the the international community. A day after the announcement, Ukraine liberated the Donetsk city of Lyman, forcing Russian troops to retreat in another humiliating defeat in recent weeks. We speak with Ambassador Michael McFaul, former U.S. Ambassador to Russia and professor of international studies at Stanford, about how Russia's annexation announcement changes the war, and what this announcement means for growing tensions between the U.S. and Russia.

Daily News Brief by TRT World

*) Ukraine says key eastern town 'cleared' of Russian troops Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelenskyy has said that Lyman, a key town located in one of four Ukrainian regions annexed by Russia, has been "cleared" of Moscow's troops. The recapture of Lyman marks the first Ukrainian military victory in a territory the Kremlin has claimed as its own and vowed to defend by all possible means. Ukraine's army said it had entered Lyman, a strategic railway hub in the eastern Donetsk region, on Saturday, prompting Moscow to announce the "withdrawal" of its troops. *) Brazil braces for runoff as Bolsonaro beats expectations Brazil's presidential election is headed for a runoff on October 30, with incumbent Jair Bolsonaro finishing a closer-than-expected second to front-runner Lula da Silva. Lula, the veteran leftist seeking a presidential comeback, had 48.4 percent of the vote to 43.2 percent for Bolsonaro. Over 99 percent of polling station results were in. It was an unexpectedly strong result for Bolsonaro — and for Brazil's far-right, which also had surprise good showings in a series of key Congressional and governors' races. *) Indonesia orders stadium disaster 'perpetrators' punished Indonesia's government has called on the country's police to identify and punish whoever was responsible for a stampede that left 125 people dead in a football stadium. The tragedy on Saturday night in the city of Malang also saw 323 people injured after officers fired tear gas in a packed stadium to quell a pitch invasion, triggering the stampede. Seventeen children were among the victims of what has turned out to be one of the deadliest disasters in the history of football. *) Yemen ceasefire ends without extension as UN envoy urges calm A six-month truce in Yemen's war has expired without being extended, United Nations' special envoy Hans Grundberg has said. He said efforts to extend the ceasefire for a further six months had not been successful. Grundberg urged calm and added that negotiations are continuing. The ceasefire, enacted for two months in April and renewed twice, has brought a sharp drop in fighting between Iran-backed Houthi rebels and a Saudi-supported pro-government coalition. And finally… *) 'Excited' Kyrgios focused on Japan Open on eve of court case Maverick tennis player Nick Kyrgios has said it is "not difficult at all" to focus on this week's Japan Open, despite his court hearing at home in Australia for alleged common assault. The world number 20 is due to have his case heard at a court in Canberra, on the same day he is scheduled to play in Tokyo. The temperamental Kyrgios, at his first tournament since losing in the quarter-finals of the US Open last month, said he was "super excited" to be back in action in Tokyo.

RNZ: Morning Report
Ukranian forces retake Lyman city from Russia

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 5:45


Days after Putin declared the Ukrainian city of Lyman was Russia's forever, it has been retaken by Ukrainian forces. Capturing the city in the Donetsk region is Kyiv's most significant battlefield gain in weeks, and could provide a staging post for further success in the east. Donetsk is one of four regions annexed by Russia following spurious "referendums". Ukraine correspondent for the BBC James Waterhouse spoke to Corin Dann.

The Economist Morning Briefing
Russia troops retreat from Lyman; storm Ian batters the Carolinas

The Economist Morning Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 3:43


Russian troops retreated from Lyman, a key logistics hub in Donetsk, hours after Ukrainian forces entered the city. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Le Nouvel Esprit Public
Guerre en Ukraine, après l'annexion de quatre régions / Peut-on dépenser sur tous les fronts ? / n°265 / 2 octobre 2022

Le Nouvel Esprit Public

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 66:09


Connaissez-vous notre site ? www.lenouvelespritpublic.frUne émission de Philippe Meyer, enregistrée en public à l'École alsacienne le 2 octobre 2022.Avec cette semaine :Nicolas Baverez, essayiste et avocat.Jean-Louis Bourlanges, président de la Commission des Affaires étrangères de l'Assemblée nationale.Marc-Olivier Padis, directeur des études de la fondation Terra Nova.Lucile Schmid, membre du comité de rédaction de la revue Esprit. GUERRE EN UKRAINE, APRÈS L'ANNEXION DE 4 RÉGIONS Face aux succès de la contre-offensive ukrainienne, notamment entre Kharkiv et Izioum, ces dernières semaines, Vladimir Poutine a choisi l'escalade. Après avoir annoncé la tenue de référendums dans quatre régions ukrainiennes contrôlées par Moscou en Ukraine, après avoir décrété le 21 septembre la « mobilisation partielle » des réservistes de son armée, entre 300.000 et 1 million d'hommes selon les sources - une initiative sans précédent depuis la Seconde Guerre mondiale – le président russe a de nouveau procédé à un chantage nucléaire.L'appel à la mobilisation a provoqué un vent de panique en Russie : des manifestations contre l'appel sous les drapeaux se sont déroulées dans une quarantaine de villes du pays, notamment au Daguestan, dans le Caucase, l'une des régions ayant payé le plus fort tribut à la guerre en Ukraine en hommes tombés au front. Plusieurs centres d'appel sous les drapeaux à Nijni-Novgorod, Orenbourg et Saint-Pétersbourg, ont été incendié. Plus de 2.400 personnes ont été arrêtées depuis l'annonce de la mobilisation. Des milliers de jeunes Russes se sont rués dans les aéroports et aux frontières pour tenter d'échapper à l'enrôlement. Cette nouvelle vague d'exode a déferlé sur les pays voisins, telle la Géorgie, avant que certains ne ferment leurs frontières, à l'exemple de la Finlande et des pays Baltes. Le Kazakhstan a indiqué mardi que 98.000 Russes avaient déjà trouvé refuge sur son territoire.Les scrutins ont été organisés en urgence du 23 au 27 septembre, dans les régions de Zaporijjia, Kherson, Louhansk et Donetsk. Mardi, les autorités prorusses revendiquaient la victoire avec 93%, 87%, 98% et 99% de « oui » à l'annexion à la Russie. Les fraudes et les pressions ont été patentes : les agents électoraux se sont déplacés au domicile des électeurs, accompagnés de soldats ; les bureaux de vote, également placés sous haute surveillance, ne disposaient souvent pas d'isoloirs. Qualifiés de « mascarades » par Paris et de « simulacres » par l'Ukraine, ils ont suscité de la réprobation jusqu'à Pékin et Ankara.Vendredi Poutine a officialisé l'annexion des quatre régions ukrainiennes et promis de les défendre « par tous les moyens possibles » tout en se disant prêt à retourner à la table des négociations. Il s'est ensuite livré à une diatribe non plus contre Kiev mais contre l'Occident tout entier, accusant les Etats-Unis et l'Union européenne d'être des puissances « russophobes », « haïssant la vérité » et « colonisatrices », qui imposent un « diktat sur le monde » en usant de « racisme », de « barbarie » et même de « satanisme ».Peu après, le président ukrainien Volodymyr Zelensky a annoncé que son pays était candidat à rejoindre au plus vite l'Otan. Pour Tatiana Kastouéva-Jean, directrice du Centre Russie-Nouveaux Etats indépendants, à l'Institut français des relations internationales, « le risque d'une confrontation potentielle directe entre la Russie et l'OTAN n'a jamais été si élevé ».***PEUT-ON DÉPENSER SUR TOUS LES FRONTS : DÉFENSE, ÉCOLOGIE, ÉDUCATION, SANTÉ ? Le 26 septembre, le ministre de l'Économie Bruno Le Maire a présenté un budget 2023 de « protection » et de « plein emploi », calculé « à l'euro près ». Le projet de loi de finances entérine une hausse de 24 milliards des crédits ministériels et une augmentation des effectifs de l'État de plus de 10.000 postes l'an prochain. Le bouclier tarifaire sera reconduit en 2023, mais les particuliers devront encaisser une augmentation de 15 % des factures de gaz et d'électricité.Le ministère du Travail et de l'Emploi en passant de 14,5 à 20,7 milliards d'euros, bénéficie de la hausse de crédits la plus importante. Ses effectifs devraient aussi gonfler d'un millier de personnes. L'éducation voit son budget renforcé et passe de 56,5 milliards d'euros à 60,2 milliards. Avec la dégradation spectaculaire de l'équilibre international, le budget des armées a été augmenté de 3 milliards et atteindra 43,9 milliards d'euros. Le ministère de l'Agriculture sera doté d'un budget de 5,987 milliards d'euros, en hausse de plus de 20%. Dans ce budget qui fait la part belle aux ministères régaliens, celui de la Justice voit sa dotation passer de 8,9 à 9,6 milliards d'euros. Cette augmentation s'explique principalement par le recrutement de 2.300 personnels supplémentaires. Le budget 2023 du ministère des Outre-mer est en hausse de 11%, atteignant les 2,4 milliards d'euros de crédits budgétaires, avec notamment une augmentation des crédits du service militaire adapté. Avec la création de 3.100 postes supplémentaires, le ministère de l'Intérieur est celui qui enregistrera la plus grande hausse d'effectifs en 2023. Le budget alloué aux « Sécurités » passe ainsi de 14,7 à 15,8 milliards d'euros. Les quelques rares ministères perdants sont celui de l'Économie qui voit ses crédits passer de 4,1 à 3,7 milliards d'euros et la suppression de 508 postes ; le budget du ministère des Anciens combattants passe, lui, de 2,1 à 1,9 milliard d'euros. Enfin, certains plans d'investissements vont réduire la voilure en 2023.Au total, l'exécutif prévoit un bond des dépenses de près de 40 milliards d'euros entre la loi de finances initiale en 2022 et le projet de loi de finances 2023 passant de 461,5 milliards d'euros à 500,2 milliards d'euros l'année prochaine. Cette enveloppe pourrait être amenée à gonfler en fonction de l'évolution du contexte géopolitique et des prix de l'énergie. Le Haut Conseil des finances publiques, un organisme indépendant rattaché à la Cour des comptes a jugé « peu ambitieuse » la trajectoire de maîtrise des finances publiques sur les cinq prochaines années. Il estime que « l'effort de la maîtrise de la dépense n'est que partiellement documenté ». En 2022, le taux d'endettement public est de 116 % du PIB, le déficit public de l'ordre de 5,5 % du PIB.Plusieurs partis d'opposition (Nupes, Rassemblement national) ont déjà fait savoir qu'ils n'allaient pas voter ce budget.Vous pouvez consulter notre politique de confidentialité sur https://art19.com/privacy ainsi que la notice de confidentialité de la Californie sur https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Nuacht Mhall
1 Deireamh Fómhair 2022 (An Dún)

Nuacht Mhall

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 4:23


Nuacht Mhall. Príomhscéalta na seachtaine, léite go mall. * Inniu an chéad lá de mhí Dheireadh Fómhair. Is mise Siubhán Nic Amhlaoibh. Fógraíodh buiséad nua in Éirinn Dé Máirt, ina leagadh amach roinnt beart chun dul i ngleic leis an ghéarchéim chostais maireachtála. Gheobhaidh gnólachtaí suas le deich míle euro sa mhí chun cuidiú le billí fuinnimh agus gheobhaidh achan líon tí sé chéad euro de chreidmheas leictreachais. Beidh níos mó ná ceithre chéad míle duine breise i dteideal cúram saor in aisce ó dhochtúirí teaghlaigh a fháil ó mhí Aibreáin an bhliain seo chugainn, agus beidh cáin nua ar thithe folmha. Gheobhaidh tionóntaí creidmheas cánach de luach cúig chéad euro agus ardófar an tairseach don ráta cánach ioncaim is airde ó tríocha a seacht míle euro go daichead míle euro. In ainneoin na n-athruithe, is dócha go mbeidh a lán deacrachtaí i ndán don chuid is mó de dhaoine sa gheimhreadh. San Úcráin, reachtáladh reifrinn i gceithre réigiún ina bhfuil smácht ag arm na Rúise. Cáineadh na reifrinn go hidirnáisiúnta agus mhol rialtas na hÚcráine dá shaoránaigh gan páirt a ghlacadh sa phróiseas, ós rud é nach reifrinn shaora atá iontu. Dé Céadaoin d'iarr ceannairí Luhansk agus Donetsk ar Putin na réigiúin seo a ionghabháil. Meastar gur mhaith le Putin teorainn na Rúise a bhogadh ionas go mbeidh sé in ann a rá gur cogadh cosanta atá ar siúl aige, ach go dtí seo níor ghlac tír ar bith eile le torthaí na reifreann ná iarrachtaí Putin críocha na Rúise a leathadh. Mhol rialtais Mheiriceá, na Polainne agus na Bulgáire dá saoránaigh an Rúis a fhágáil láithreach. Tuairiscítear go bhfuil mic thíre, béir dhonna agus iolair mhara i measc na gcreachadóirí atá tagtha ar ais ar an fhód ar fud na hEorpa. Rinneadh taighde ar chaoga speiceas fiadhúlra a bhfuil méadú tar éis teacht ar líon agus dáileadh na n-ainmhithe agus is léir go bhfuil tionchar ag cosaint dhleathach, athchóiriú gnáthóige agus athbhunú ainmhithe ar an athrú. É sin ráite, tá fhadhb mhór fós ann maidir le cailliúint bithéagsúlachta. Táthar ag súil go rachaidh dlí nua Eorpach um athchóiriú dúlra i ngleic leis an fhadhb. I measc na n-athruithe atá molta ná laghdú ar úsáid lotnaidicídí ceimiceacha. * Léirithe ag Conradh na Gaeilge i Londain. Tá an script ar fáil i d'aip phodchraolta. * GLUAIS creidmheas cánach - tax credit tairseach - threshold ionghabháil - annexe cogadh cosanta - defensive war mic thíre, béir dhonna agus iolair mhara - wolves, brown bears and white-tailed eagles athchóiriú gnáthóige - habitat rehabilitation athbhunú ainmhithe - reintroduction of animals lotnaidicídí ceimiceacha - chemical pesticides

PBS NewsHour - Segments
News Wrap: Ukraine retakes city in area Putin illegally declared part of Russia

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 2:36


In our news wrap Saturday, Russian forces are retreating from the city of Lyman in the Donetsk region of eastern Ukraine, the Biden administration secured a prisoner swap with Venezuela that freed seven Americans, Las Vegas marks the five-year anniversary of the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, and former president Jimmy Carter turns 98. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Newshour
Ukraine forces ‘completely surround' Russian-held town

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 47:50


The Ukrainian military says it has encircled Russian forces in the strategic eastern town of Lyman, in the Donetsk region. Video posted by President Zelensky's chief of staff showed soldiers waving a Ukrainian flag near a welcome sign on the town's outskirts. Also in the programme: We have a report from Tunisia where the cost of living is soaring; and after 2 years of political chaos - what's next for Bulgaria ahead of fresh elections? (Photo: Video posted by President Zelensky's chief of staff showed soldiers waving a Ukrainian flag near a welcome sign on the town's outskirts.)

VOV - Việt Nam và Thế giới
Tin quốc tế: Tổng thống Putin đã ký thỏa thuận về việc sáp nhập các vùng lãnh thổ mới vào Nga

VOV - Việt Nam và Thế giới

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 1:24


- Hôm qua 30/9, tại Điện Kremlin, Tổng thống Nga Putin và những người đứng đầu các khu vực Donetsk, Lugansk, Kherson và Zaporozhie đã ký thỏa thuận về việc sáp nhập các lãnh thổ này vào Nga với tư cách là chủ thể mới. Trước đó, Nga đã công nhận độc lập của họ trong ranh giới hành chính. Tác giả : Anh Tú/VOV Moscow Chủ đề : nga ký thỏa thuận, sáp nhập --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/vov1tintuc/support

Radiant Fire Radio
Elections for Luhansk, Donetsk, Zaporizhzhia and Kherson, Citizens say goodbye to Ukraine... (Audio)

Radiant Fire Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 11:09


Christopher shares thoughts and insights about the recent Ukranian Elections that took place on September 27, 2022. Russia says 87% to 99% of voters in four occupied swathes of Luhansk, Donetsk, Zaporizhzhia and Kherson want to join Russia. They voted they are getting what they want and now Biden is going to take into World War III because he has to save face with Zelensky. We are being dragged into a nuclear war. Our American Press is not telling us the truth about this situation. All we hear is how evil Putin is. Listen Christopher shares on how we are on the wrong side of history. For Video click here Podcast intro and outro from Jeremy Marsan and link to https://jeremymarsan.com/. 476070__jjmarsan__hello-user-bright-cheery-intro-music; Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0) 117592__soundmary__aplause-short-burst & 472688__silverillusionist__fire-burst

Le journal de 18h00
Les ukrainiens ont atteint la ville de Lyman, dans la région de Donetsk

Le journal de 18h00

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 9:46


durée : 00:09:46 - Journal de 18h - Les ukrainiens ont atteint la ville stratégique de Lyman, dans l'Est.

PBS NewsHour - World
News Wrap: Ukraine retakes city in area Putin illegally declared part of Russia

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 2:36


In our news wrap Saturday, Russian forces are retreating from the city of Lyman in the Donetsk region of eastern Ukraine, the Biden administration secured a prisoner swap with Venezuela that freed seven Americans, Las Vegas marks the five-year anniversary of the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, and former president Jimmy Carter turns 98. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Newshour
Russian troops forced out of eastern town of Lyman

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 46:26


Russia has withdrawn its troops from the strategic Ukrainian town of Lyman, in a move seen as a significant setback for its campaign in the east. The retreat came amid fears thousands of soldiers would be encircled in the town, Russia's defence ministry said. Also in the programme: Burkina Faso's self-declared leader says the man he ousted a day ago in a coup is plotting a counter-attack; and Denmark and Greenland launch an investigation into pregnancy prevention practices carried out in the 1960s and 70s. (File Photo: An Ukrainian soldier looks out from a tank, amid Russia's invasion of Ukraine, in the frontline city of Lyman, Donetsk region. Credit: Reuters).

Global News Podcast
Russia's President Putin annexes four areas of Ukraine

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 31:50 Very Popular


The territory is in occupied parts of Donetsk, Luhansk, Kherson and Zaporizhzhia. Mr Putin promised to defend Russia's lands with every means available. Also: Hurricane Ian leaves a trail of devastation and death in Florida and, can listening to background noise help you relax?

Strait Talk
Putin Announces Annexation of Nearly a One-Fifth of Ukraine

Strait Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 14:32


Russian President Vladimir Putin has announced the annexation of four Ukrainian regions that make up nearly a fifth of the whole country's territory. Earlier this week, the regions of Donetsk, Luhansk, Zaporizhzhia, and Kherson voted overwhelmingly to formally join the Russian federation. But the referendum was denounced by most of the west, with allegations that residents had been pressured to approve Russia's annexation. Türkiye, which has been mediating between Kiev and Moscow, has called for dialogue and diplomacy to settle this latest crisis and the overall conflict. So what impact will the referendum and annexation have? Guests: Amanda Paul Senior Policy Analyst at the European Policy Centre Andreas Umland Analyst at Stockholm Centre for Eastern European Studies

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann asks, “How should we respond?”

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 35:57


Are we impotent? Russian President Vladimir Putin on Friday recognized the independence of Kherson and Zaporizhzhia, hours before holding a signing ceremony to incorporate them into the Russian Federation. Putin signed a decree recognizing the two southern Ukrainian regions as independent states on Friday. He also signed a similar decree earlier in February, when he recognized two breakaway regions in the east of Ukraine, Luhansk and Donetsk, as independent states. Kyiv and Western powers do not recognize the two self-proclaimed republics of Donetsk and Luhansk as sovereign states.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Nessun luogo è lontano
Le nuove 4 regioni russe e il futuro della guerra

Nessun luogo è lontano

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022


Le forze militari di Kiev sono avanzate in modo decisivo verso Lyman, snodo cruciale nella regione di Donetsk che proprio oggi il presidente russo Putin annetterà alla Federazione russa, insieme a quelle di Luhansk, Kherson e Zaporizhzhia. Ne abbiamo parlato conEleonora Tafuro Ambrosetti di Ispi e Jacopo Giliberto del Sole 24Ore. Domenica 3 ottobre il Brasile voterà il suo presidente. I due contendenti sono il presidente uscente Jair Bolsonaro, populista e di destra, e l'ex presidente di sinistra Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva. Ne abbiamo parlato con Roberto Da Rin, inviato del Sole 24Ore in America Latina.

Newshour
Putin announces annexation of parts of Ukraine

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 0:44


President Putin has announced at the Kremlin that occupied parts of four regions of Ukraine - Luhansk, Donetsk, Kherson and Zaporizhzhia - are now parts of Russia. Ukraine, its allies, and the United Nations Secretary General have all denounced the claim as an escalation and illegal under international law. We hear from a Russian MP and a Ukrainian MP, and from an unhappy resident of occupied Kherson. And we report from Zaporizhzhia, where at least 25 people were killed after a humanitarian convoy was shelled by Russian forces. Also in the programme: we hear from the Afghan capital Kabul, where a suicide bomber has killed at least nineteen people, most of them female students, at an educational centre in the Hazara area of the city. (Image: Russian President Vladimir Putin delivers a speech during a ceremony to declare the annexation of the Russian-controlled territories of four of Ukraine"s regions, Moscow, Russia, September 30, 2022 . Credit: Sputnik/Grigory Sysoyev/Kremlin via Reuters)

Blocked and Reported
Episode 134: Russian Trolls Have Foiled Our New Advice Segment

Blocked and Reported

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 52:22


TOUR TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE:FREE SHOW: 10/22, 5:00 PM at Dartmouth University — Herbert Faulkner West Auditorium in Carpenter Hall. With Carole Hooven!Boston, 10/24: https://wl.seetickets.us/event/Blocked-andReportedPodcast-800pm/506613?afflky=LaughBostonArlington, Virginia (late), 10/29: https://www.arlingtondrafthouse.com/shows/188752After some followups and corrections involving J.K. Rowling's new book and Jesse's heaving knockers, Jesse tells Katie about a New York Times article which attempts to partially pin the blame for the travails experienced by the Women's March — a super competent, super well-run organization that has never generated any controversies — on *RUSSIAN TROLLS*. Then the hosts take listeners' advice for the very first time. Few lessons are learned, other than that Jesse is extremely dumb.Links:Herzog on everyone getting the new Rowling book wrong (thread)How Russian Trolls Helped Keep the Women's March Out of Lock Stephttps://www.nytimes.com/2022/09/18/us/womens-march-russia-trump.htmlJesse's article on Louis Farrakhan and the Women's Marchhttps://nymag.com/intelligencer/2018/03/is-it-so-hard-to-denounce-louis-farrakhans-anti-semitism.htmlCNN article also addressing this topichttps://edition.cnn.com/2018/02/28/politics/louis-farrakhan-speech/index.htmlWoman's March co-chair Linda Sarsour discusses “waging jihad” against “white supremacists and Islamophobes reigning in the White House”https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2017/07/07/muslim-activist-linda-sarsours-reference-to-jihad-draws-conservative-wrath/Jesse != smartImage: Russian President Vladimir Putin gives a speech during a ceremony formally annexing four regions of Ukraine Russian troops occupy - Lugansk, Donetsk, Kherson and Zaporizhzhia, at the Kremlin in Moscow on September 30, 2022. (Photo by Grigory SYSOYEV / SPUTNIK / AFP) (Photo by GRIGORY SYSOYEV/SPUTNIK/AFP via Getty Images) This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.blockedandreported.org/subscribe

Daily News Brief by TRT World
September 30, 2022

Daily News Brief by TRT World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 2:34


*) Putin to annex four Ukraine territories with 'major speech' as West fumes Russia is set to formally annex four occupied regions of Ukraine at a ceremony that the Kremlin says will feature a major speech by President Vladimir Putin. In a presidential decree, Putin has already recognised the independence of Zaporizhzhia and Kherson. He made a similar move in connection with Donetsk and Luhansk in February. Kiev and its Western allies have denounced the annexation, describing the Moscow-backed separatist votes that preceded it as a sham and an attempt at unlawful land grab. *) Suicide attack at tutoring centre in Afghan capital kills 19 A suicide attack at a learning centre in the Afghan capital has killed at least 19 people. There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the blast. The incident happened in a neighbourhood of western Kabul that is a predominantly Shia Muslim area home to the minority Hazara community. Students were preparing for an exam when a suicide bomber struck at the educational centre, police said, adding that over 20 people have suffered injuries. *) Hurricane Ian veers toward Carolinas after pummeling Florida A resurgent Hurricane Ian has barrelled north toward a second landfall in South Carolina, a day after carving a path of destruction across central Florida. Ian, which had weakened to a tropical storm, regained Category 1 hurricane strength while churning toward South Carolina above the Atlantic Ocean. Ian first came ashore in Florida on Wednesday as one of the most powerful storms ever to hit the US mainland. President Joe Biden has said that preliminary reports suggested a "substantial" loss of life. *) Iran ups pressure on celebrities, media over Mahsa Amini protests Iran has stepped up pressure on celebrities and journalists over the recent wave of protests, which has been backed by filmmakers, athletes, musicians and actors. Iran's warnings came after almost two weeks of demonstrations across Iran and a deadly crackdown that rights groups say has been marked by violence by security forces. Public anger has flared since authorities announced the death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini, who had been held for allegedly wearing a hijab headscarf in an improper way. And finally… *) FIFA World Cup: Fans won't need Covid jabs but negative tests required Coronavirus vaccinations will not be mandatory for the million-plus fans going to Qatar for the football World Cup that starts on November 20. But all visitors aged over six will have to produce negative Covid-19 tests before taking flights to Qatar. Players and match officials may be forced into a secure "bio-bubble" if Covid-19 cases take off again. The tournament will be the first major global sporting event with fans since the eruption of the Covid pandemic in December 2019.

Orientering
Orientering: Rusland annekterer 4 ukrainske regioner - 30. sep 2022

Orientering

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 109:48


Med en officiel ceremoni, en præsidentiel underskrift og en tale erklærede Ruslands præsident Putin for et par timer siden, at fire ukrainske regioner nu er en del af Rusland. Annekteringen var ventet, efter at den russiske besættelsesmagt tidligere på ugen gennemtvang en række såkaldte "folkeafstemninger" i de fire ukrainske regioner Luhansk, Donetsk, Zaporizjzja og Kherson. Regeringen har i dag fremlagt sin længe ventede 2030-plan. Planen blev fremlagt af finansminister Nicolai Wammen - og er altså regeringens bud på, hvordan den økonomiske politik skal se ud de næste otte år. Afghanistan: Kina og andre rykker ind i tomrummet efter USA og NATO. Værter er Mette Vibe Utzon og Henrik Lerche. Erik Weir redigerer. www.dr.dk/lyd/p1/orientering

C dans l'air
POUTINE : L'ANNEXION… « POUR TOUJOURS » ? – 30/09/22

C dans l'air

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 65:27


EXPERTS BRUNO TERTRAIS Politologue spécialiste de l'analyse géopolitique et stratégique Directeur adjoint de la FRS TATIANA KASTOUÉVA-JEAN Directrice du Centre Russie / NEI - IFRI Institut Français des Relations Internationales ANNIE DAUBENTON Journaliste-essayiste Auteure de « Ukraine, les métamorphoses de l'indépendance » NICOLAS TONEV Rédacteur en chef spécialiste de la Russie – « Europe 1 » C'est désormais officiel. Le président russe Vladimir Poutine a proclamé l'annexion des quatre régions ukrainiennes de Donetsk, Lougansk, Zaporijia et Kherson contrôlées, en partie ou en totalité, par l'armée russe. Le Kremlin organisait cet après-midi une cérémonie pour célébrer l'événement. Vladimir Poutine a tenu un discours offensif. S'il a affirmé que son pays "n'aspire pas" à restaurer l'URSS, l'autocrate a indiqué que les habitants des régions ukrainiennes annexées seront des "citoyens pour toujours". Il a également appelé l'Ukraine à "cesser immédiatement les hostilités". Des festivités pour célébrer l'annexion doivent se dérouler cet après-midi sur la très symbolique place Rouge, qui jouxte le Kremlin. L'annexion de ces régions et les référendums sensés la légitimer sont dénoncés comme étant des "simulacres" par Kiev et ses alliés occidentaux. Dans le même temps, les forces ukrainiennes ne cessent de gagner du terrain et seraient sur le point d'encercler la ville stratégique de Lyman, au nord-est du pays. Depuis l'annonce de la mobilisation partielle par Vladimir Poutine le 21 septembre dernier, les Russes sont nombreux à vouloir quitter le pays. Des flots immenses de véhicules et de piétons affluent aux frontières. Moscou estime à 261 000 le nombre d'hommes exilés en l'espace d'une semaine. Parmi les destinations privilégiées figurent la Géorgie, l'Arménie, le Kazakhstan, l'Ouzbékistan et la Mongolie. Pour ce qui est des entrées dans l'Union européenne de citoyens russes, l'Agence européenne de garde-frontières et de garde-côtes Frontex a évoqué le chiffre de 66000 personnes sur les sept derniers jours (du 19 au 25 septembre) dans un rapport publié mardi. Une donnée en hausse de 30 % par rapport à la semaine précédente. Ces Russes qui fuient la mobilisation sont considérés comme des déserteurs par le régime et risquent jusqu'à dix ans de prison. La stratégique militaire de Vladimir Poutine est donc loin de faire l'unanimité au sein de la population russe. À l'international, les décisions du dirigeant semblent également l'isoler plus que jamais. Alors que le conseil de sécurité de l'ONU doit se prononcer ce soir sur une résolution qui condamne les référendums d'annexion des quatre régions ukrainiennes, les votes de la Chine et de l'Inde seront suivis avec attention. Accusés par les Occidentaux d'être trop conciliants avec la Russie, notamment au début du conflit, les deux géants se sont depuis plusieurs fois prononcés en faveur de l'arrêt des hostilités et du respect des frontières. Pékin, officiellement neutre, a répété cette semaine son appel au respect de l'intégrité territoriale "de tous les pays". Les deux pays, qui importent énormément de gaz russe, s'étaient abstenus en février au lendemain de l'invasion de Moscou. Vont-ils cette fois aller jusqu'à désavouer Moscou ? Comme si la Russie n'était pas suffisamment isolée, le Kazakhstan, ancienne république soviétique, s'est également fortement éloigné de Moscou depuis le début du conflit. Quelles seront les conséquences sur les opérations militaires en Ukraine de l'annexion par la Russie de quatre régions du pays ? Les Russes vont-ils continuer à fuir le pays ? La Chine et l'Inde vont-elles voter à l'ONU contre les annexions annoncées par Moscou ? DIFFUSION : du lundi au samedi à 17h45 FORMAT : 65 minutes PRÉSENTATION : Caroline Roux - Axel de Tarlé REDIFFUSION : du lundi au vendredi vers 23h40 RÉALISATION : Nicolas Ferraro, Bruno Piney, Franck Broqua, Alexandre Langeard, Corentin Son, Benoît Lemoine PRODUCTION : France Télévisions / Maximal Productions Retrouvez C DANS L'AIR sur internet & les réseaux : INTERNET : francetv.fr FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/Cdanslairf5 TWITTER : https://twitter.com/cdanslair INSTAGRAM : https://www.instagram.com/cdanslair/

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann asks, “How should we respond?”

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 35:57


Are we impotent? Russian President Vladimir Putin on Friday recognized the independence of Kherson and Zaporizhzhia, hours before holding a signing ceremony to incorporate them into the Russian Federation. Putin signed a decree recognizing the two southern Ukrainian regions as independent states on Friday. He also signed a similar decree earlier in February, when he recognized two breakaway regions in the east of Ukraine, Luhansk and Donetsk, as independent states. Kyiv and Western powers do not recognize the two self-proclaimed republics of Donetsk and Luhansk as sovereign states.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Kevin Jackson Show
Ep. 22-300 - Voting Bloc

The Kevin Jackson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 38:40


In this episode, Biden winning at number of vacation days. Hospitals posting near-record profits, while patients are drowning in medical debt. Biden disconnected from millenials and Gen Z's.

24 horas
Isidro Sepúlveda, experto en Relaciones Internacionales: "Con la petición de negociación, Putin pretende que Ucrania reconozca la cesión de los territorios ocupados"

24 horas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 9:10


Tras los referéndums ilegítimos celebrados en las regiones ucranianas ocupadas, Vladímir Putin ha proclamado oficialmente la anexión a Rusia de Donetsk, Lugansk, Zaporiyia y Jersón. Durante su discurso en la sala de San Jorge del Palacio del Kremlin, ha pedido al gobierno de Ucrania que vuelva a la mesa de negociación. Según explica Isidro Sepúlveda, experto en Relaciones Internacionales y Seguridad Internacional, lo que el mandatario ruso pretende con esta petición es que Zelensky reconozca la cesión de los territorios ocupados: "Es algo muy semejante a lo que intentó hacer Adolf Hitler cuando concertó en Múnich a los grandes dirigentes europeos para que le dieran la legimiación de la ocupación del centro de Europa". Poco después de la ceremonia en Moscú, el presidente ucraniano, Volodímir Zelensky, ha pedido formalmente la adhesión acelerada a la OTAN. El secretario general de la Alianza, Jens Stoltenberg, ha respondido diciendo que esa decisión corresponde a todos los estados miembros y que ahora la prioridad es "ofrecer ayuda inmediata a Ucrania para defenderse". El profesor Sepúlveda cree improbable que esto ocurra, ya que supondría "activar de forma automática los artículos cuatro y cinco de la OTAN y declarar la guerra a Rusia". Escuchar audio

Daily News Brief by TRT World
September 29, 2022

Daily News Brief by TRT World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 2:46


*) Kremlin proxies in Ukraine plead to Putin for annexation Kremlin-backed officials in Ukraine have appealed to Russian President Vladimir Putin to annex regions under their control, after the territories held votes that Kiev and its allies denounce as a "sham". Ukraine has called on the EU to hit Russia with more sanctions and NATO to send more weapons to the frontline, with the Moscow-backed separatist votes significantly raising the stakes. Russia is looking to annex Kherson and Zaporizhzhia in Ukraine's south, and Donetsk and Luhansk in the east. The areas represent around 15% of Ukraine's territory. *) US does not act fairly when it comes to NATO allies: Turkish president Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has criticised the US for its tilted stance amid tensions between Türkiye and Greece, calling out Washington for its unequal treatment of NATO allies. In a TV interview, he also said that according to drone footage, there are armoured vehicles stationed on Greek islands that are supposed to be demilitarised — a move he described as "unacceptable." Ankara has warned the US and Greece over the military deployments and sent a letter to the UN, Erdogan said, reminding the US that it “cannot find another ally like Türkiye”. *) Iran launches deadly attacks on Kurdish region of northern Iraq Iran's Revolutionary Guard has launched deadly attacks on the Kurdish region of northern Iraq targeting armed rebel groups, Iranian state media have reported. Iran's attacks targeted Koysancak (Koy-san-jak), also known as Koya — east of Iraq's Erbil — killing at least nine people and wounding 32 others, according to Kurdish regional authorities. The strikes come at a time when Iran is rocked by protests over the death of Mahsa Amini, a 22-year-old Iranian Kurdish woman who was detained by the Iranian morality police. *) Hurricane Ian pounds Florida as a monster storm Hurricane Ian has plunged much of coastal southwest Florida into darkness, with the monster storm bringing massive storm surges, wind and flooding. Authorities said the eye of the "extremely dangerous" hurricane made landfall just after 1900 GMT. Footage showed floodwaters surging into beachfront homes, submerging roads and sweeping away vehicles. More than two million people are without electricity in Florida. The US Border Patrol said 20 migrants were missing after their boat sank. *) Coolio, rapper behind hit 'Gangsta's Paradise,' dies at 59 Coolio, the US rapper best known for the chart-topping 1995 song "Gangsta's Paradise," has died, his manager has said. He was 59 years old. The Grammy-winning musician died in Los Angeles. No cause of death was immediately provided. He was found unresponsive in the bathroom of a friend's house on Wednesday. Born on August 1, 1963 in Pennsylvania, the artist spent most of his life in Compton, California, attending community college and working jobs including airport security before finding success in rap.

Newshour
Russia set to formally annex four regions of Ukraine

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 47:46


Moscow says President Putin will complete the annexation of four Ukrainian territories on Friday, following referendums deemed a sham by most of the rest of the world. Also on the program, there are reports of fatalities in Florida following Hurricane Ian's landfall Wednesday night, and the rapper Coolio has died. (Photo: Members of an electoral commission count ballots at a polling station in Donetsk. Reuters/Alexander Ermochenko)

The Two-Minute Briefing
The Morning Briefing: Thursday, September 29

The Two-Minute Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 2:27


Inside story: How Truss and Kwarteng were warned of danger before pound nosedived | Live blog: Pound slumps again as Mark Carney accuses Truss of ‘undercutting' Bank | Your money: What the Bank of England's intervention means for your pension | Hurricane Ian tracker: Storm batters Florida as two million left without power | Late Queen: No room for statue in Trafalgar Square, rules Sadiq Khan | Ukraine latest: Russian forces on brink of encirclement in Donetsk town | First orders: Why 6pm is now the trendiest time to book a restaurant | Read all these articles and stay expertly informed anywhere, anytime with a digital subscription. Start your free one-month trial today to gain unlimited website and app access. Cancel anytime. Sign up here.We'd like to ask you a few questions about the ads in this podcast. Please click here to take a quick survey.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Russia-Ukraine War Report
Russia-Ukraine War Update for September 28, 2022

The Russia-Ukraine War Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 45:04 Very Popular


The Malcontent News Russia-Ukraine War Update is a truth-based, fact-checked update on events happening on and off the battlefield in Ukraine. Our team reviews hundreds of sources of information a day to help you stay informed. Today's update with your host Linnea Hubbard, covers:1:25 DAILY ASSESSMENT3:22 KHERSON COUNTEROFFENSIVE & MYKOLAIV8:06 DNIPROPETROVSK & NORTHERN ZAPORIZHIA10:25 SOUTHWESTERN DONETSK11:22 BAKHMUT12:33 NORTHEAST DONETSK & LUHANSK19:13 KHARKIV21:26 CHERNIHIV & SUMY REGION21:42 BLACK SEA, CRIMEA & ODESA22:46 RUSSIAN FRONT23:21 THEATERWIDE AND OUTSIDE OF UKRAINE26:59 RUSSIAN MOBILIZATION & MILITARY STATUS32:15 WAR CRIMES & HUMAN RIGHTS37:06 GEOPOLITICS AND ECONOMICSSupport the show

C dans l'air
GAZODUC : LE SABOTAGE... ET L'ESCALADE – 28/09/22

C dans l'air

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 65:18


EXPERTS ALAIN BAUER Professeur au CNAM Responsable du pôle sécurité, défense et renseignement ELSA VIDAL Rédactrice en chef de la rédaction en langue russe – « RFI » FRÉDÉRIC ENCEL Docteur en géopolitique Maître de conférences à Sciences Po Paris et Paris School of Business Auteur de « Les voies de la puissance » DAPHNÉ BENOIT Correspondante Défense – « AFP » Ancienne correspondante au Pentagone 93,11% à Zaporijjia, 87,05% à Kherson, 98,42% à Lougansk, 99,23% à Donetsk. Sans surprise, Moscou a annoncé mardi que le « oui » l'emportait largement lors des référendums d'annexion de ces quatre régions ukrainiennes. Un résultat balayé d'un revers de main par la communauté internationale, tant le caractère fantoche et illégal saute aux yeux. "Une mascarade", a commenté la ministre des affaires étrangères française, Catherine Colonna. De son côté, le président Zelensky a affirmé que son pays "agira pour défendre son peuple" dans les régions occupées. Le chef de l'Etat a aussi considéré impossible de négocier avec Moscou après ces référendums. Pendant ce temps, des fuites sont soudainement survenues ce lundi et mardi sur les deux pipelines Nord Stream 1 et 2 reliant la Russie à l'Allemagne. Des fuites qui seraient la conséquence d'"actes délibérés", selon la Première ministre danoise, Mette Frederiksen. L'Union européenne, par le biais de son chef de la diplomatie Josep Borell, évoque quant à elle un "sabotage" et met en garde aujourd'hui, contre toute attaque ciblant ses infrastructures. Alors que les doigts sont pointés vers la Russie, le Kremlin rejette toute responsabilité et pointe du doigt les Etats-Unis. Les tensions s'accentuent donc, dans un contexte de mobilisation partielle décrétée par Vladimir Poutine il y a une semaine. Des milliers de jeunes Russes tentent depuis de quitter le pays pour éviter d'aller de force au front. Les frontières n'étant pour le moment pas fermées, ces hommes fuient massivement vers les pays ne demandant aucun visas, comme en Géorgie. Ce petit pays à l'est de la Mer Noire se retrouve donc malgré lui pays d'accueil. Dans ce contexte, l'efficacité des sanctions européennes envers la Russie est remise en question. Si les prévisions indiquent une chute de 11% du PIB de la Russie, et une inflation à 22%, les effets ne sont pas aussi forts qu'attendus. La Russie a su notamment rediriger ses exportations de gaz vers l'Asie, en Chine et en Inde. L'économie russe résiste donc mieux que prévu, poussant ainsi l'Occident a accentuer encore ses sanctions. Ursula von der Leyen, qui estime cependant que la Russie est "quasiment en état de cessation de paiement", se positionne pour des mesures plus fortes encore. Alors, quelles seront les conséquences de ces référendums d'annexion organisés par la Russie ? Qui est derrière les fuites de Nord Stream 1 et 2 ? Les jeunes Russes vont-ils pouvoir continuer à fuir leur pays ? Les sanctions envers Moscou sont-elles insuffisantes ? DIFFUSION : du lundi au samedi à 17h45 FORMAT : 65 minutes PRÉSENTATION : Caroline Roux - Axel de Tarlé REDIFFUSION : du lundi au vendredi vers 23h40 RÉALISATION : Nicolas Ferraro, Bruno Piney, Franck Broqua, Alexandre Langeard, Benoît Lemoine PRODUCTION : France Télévisions / Maximal Productions Retrouvez C DANS L'AIR sur internet & les réseaux : INTERNET : francetv.fr FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/Cdanslairf5 TWITTER : https://twitter.com/cdanslair INSTAGRAM : https://www.instagram.com/cdanslair/

Corriere Daily
Il referendum in Ucraina: una farsa di cui avere paura?

Corriere Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 11:55


Come ampiamente previsto il 95% dei votanti di Donetsk e Lugansk, le regioni occupate militarmente dall'esercito di Mosca il 24 febbraio, si è detto favorevole all'integrazione nella Federazione russa. Un esito scontato, visto il clima d'intimidazione in cui si è svolta la consultazione, come racconta l'inviato Francesco Battistini. Ma adesso, per Putin (e solo per lui), lo status di quelle terre cambia: con quali conseguenze sulla guerra? A rispondere è il professor Piero Graglia, che insegna Storia delle Relazioni internazionali all'Università statale di Milano.Per altri approfondimenti:- L'imbroglio del voto per diventare “russi”: soldati alle spalle, schede aperte e lavatrici in premio https://bit.ly/3xZ4deg- Ucraina, ai referendum-farsa vincono i sì: che cosa cambia ora https://bit.ly/3rhot7c- La Cina sui referendum in Ucraina: il messaggio a Putin e il “passo di lato” di Xi Jinping https://bit.ly/3rfbwL1