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Latest podcast episodes about Utah

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
College Football Conference Championship Week DFS (Fri & Sat) | The College Football Experience (Ep. 900)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 64:05


The College Football Experience (@TCEonSGPN) on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network gives out their top Draft Kings lineups for Friday & Saturday. Pick Dundee aka (@TheColbyD) & NC Nick (@NC_Nick) give out their top college football dfs lineups for Friday & Saturday. Will Bailey Zappe continue the air success on the road in San Antonio? Will Frank Harris and UTSA be able to take advantage of a bad Western Kentucky defense? Could Brittain Covey have another special teams touchdown against the Oregon Ducks in the Pac 12 Championship? Will Sam Hartman out dual Kenny Pickett in what should be a wild ACC Championship between Wake Forest and Pittsburgh? Will Camerun Peoplesand Appalachian State get revenge on Levi Lewis and Louisiana in the Sun Belt Championship? Is Marquez Cooper of Kent State a must play in the MAC Championship against Northern Illinois? Will Jaylen Warren and Oklahoma State have the same success against Baylor as the first matchup? Can Rocky Lombardi throw for another 500 yards against a bad Kent State defense? Will Bryce Young and Alabama struggle against an amazing Georgia Bulldogs defense? Will Anthony Brown and Oregon Struggle to throw the ball against Utah? Can Cade McNamara have any air success against a tough Iowa Hawkeyes defense? Plus, the guys give out their top College Basketball DFS lineup for Friday. All on this special edition episode of The College Football Experience. Make sure you subscribe to The College Basketball Experience at sg.pn/tcbe Follow - Twitter | Instagram Watch - YouTube | Twitch Subscribe - Apple | Spotify Read - SportsGamblingPodcast.com Discuss - Slack | Reddit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Neurosurgery Podcast
Residency Spotlights: Wake Forest! McMaster! Utah!

Neurosurgery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 38:26


Conversations with Drs. Stacey Quintero Wolfe, Blake Yarascavitch, and Randy Jensen

Podcast of Champions - Pac-12 Football Podcast
Pac-12 football week 13 recap and championship game preview plus Lincoln Riley bombshell

Podcast of Champions - Pac-12 Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 99:11


This week Podcast of Champions hosts Ryan Abraham and David Woods return to recap the final week of the regular Pac-12 football season that ended up with the Oregon Ducks winning the North thanks to their victory in the game formerly known as the Civil War and Utah winning the north thanks to the rest of the Pac-12 being fairly terrible. The guys also dive into all of the Pac-12 head coaching news including Oklahoma's Lincoln Riley heading to Los Angeles plus Fresno State's Kalen DeBoer going to Washington and Jake Dickert being promoted at Washington State. The guys will also preview the Pac-12 Championship game between Oregon and Utah plus the Inconsequential Bowl featuring USC and California. There is also some NCAA Transfer Portal news to discuss including Arizona State's Jayden Daniels sticking around Tempe for another season and UW potentially getting the QB Jake train going again. We received several voicemails surrounding the Riley to USC news, but we also finally heard from the Zodiac Killer who has finally admitted that Stanford is "butt" and even raps about it on the voicemail.  Place your bets at MyBookie.com with the promo code PAC12 to get your first deposit matched! Please subscribe, give the POC a five-star rating and post a review on Apple Podcasts! The best five-star review each week will win a $100 gift card from Jockey! Sound off about Pac-12 football in our Podcast of Champions Reddit page! Send us a text or leave us a voicemail by texting or calling (424) 532-0678 or you can email us at pac12podcast@gmail.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Real Estate Marketing Dude
PPC Vs. Facebook Ads, Vs,. SEO

Real Estate Marketing Dude

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 48:43


if you've been following the show, or following our blog, or noticing some of the products we built, not too long ago, we launched a product called listing advocate. The reason why we launched this product was because everybody in the world wants a cash offer today and we just created a solution for you to compete back against big tech assholes like Zillow, and all the above. So what we want to do is bring on a guest today, who's an expert, and we're going to talk about the pros and cons of different digital marketing. Brandon Bateman has been in the game of generating motivated seller leads for almost four years now. He's spent over 10,000 hours just generating motivated seller leads and today he is going to give us his expert insight.Three Things You'll Learn in This EpisodeHow you can crack seller lead generation in your businessDifferences between Facebook, pay per click, and SEO on websiteWhat works when it comes to advertisingResourcesSchedule a call with BrandonReal Estate Marketing DudeThe Listing Advocate (Earn more listings!)REMD on YouTubeREMD on InstagramTranscript:So how do you attract new business, you constantly don't have to chase it. Hi, I'm Mike way ambassador, real estate marketing. And this podcast is all about building a strong personal brand people have come to know, like trust and most importantly, refer. But remember, it is not their job to remember what you do for a living. It's your job to remind them. Let's get startedWhat's up ladies and gentlemen, welcome another episode of the real estate marketing dude, podcast what we're going to be doing today, folks since December what we're talking about all month long shit we need to be getting into for the following year. And if you've been following the show, or following our blog, or noticing some of the products we built, not too long ago, we launched a product called listing advocate. The reason why we launched this product was because a lot of real estate agents. Everybody in the world wants a cash offer today, you have ibuyers infiltrating every single offer. And we just created a solution for you to compete back against big tech assholes like Zillow, and all the above. And amongst that, one of the hottest tickets and one of the things if you can crack, if you can crack seller, lead generation in your business is very advantageous because that's what everybody's trying to do. So what we want to do is bring on a guest today, who's an expert, and we're going to talk about the pros and cons of different digital marketing. We're going to talk about Facebook, we're gonna talk about pay per click, and then we're gonna talk about SEO on website, we're gonna disguise or call it, divide the differences between all of them, so that you can get an idea you know, off of which is right for you. Once everything goes digital things change. The truth is that 99% of you don't have the skill set to even know what the fuck we're talking about. That's why guys like this exists, because he does a lot of this stuff for you. So we're gonna get into it and show you exactly what he's doing.And see how this rolls. Brandon. Say hello to our guests. This is Brandon Bateman, ladies and gentlemen. Yeah, thank you for the introduction, Mike. Happy to be here. Why don't you tell everybody a little bit about who you are, where you're from, what you do. And then I got a bunch of questions for you. Yep, let's do it. So my name is Brandon Bateman. I live in Utah, good old coastal Salt Lake City. Anybody knows that crazy market. I have been basically in the game of generating motivated seller leads for almost four years now. A little bit less seriously at first and a little bit more seriously, in the past few years or so. And I am proud slash embarrassed to admit that I've spent over 10,000 hours just motive generating motivated seller lead myself here that makes me an expert, but it also doesn't reflect highly on my work life balance. So that's, let me just ask you a question. So he's gonna share within the next 30 minutes what he's learned in 10,000 hours, but how much of that 10,000 hours of trial and error cost you?Oh, man, I mean, like my life. And then of course, like we've spent, gosh, our company like through through the consulting projects, and companies are working with spending their budgets, like literally over $100 million in advertising spend. So folks, the students spent over $100 million in digital ads, pay attention, take notes, because we're going to sort of figure out, when you get to that level, you actually really do see what works, what it's very hard to determine what works when you're not spending a lot of money on ads, especially nowadays. So what we're going to do is dig into that. So what would you like to start with, cuz I want to hit all three of these. And I want to dumb all of this stuff down. I'd like to start with pay per click if you're cool with that. Yeah, of course. Let's talk about it. Better. Yeah. What did you start with?What did I start with? What was your What was your first and what do you think is actually it was putting this to you? What do you think is the easiest channel to start with? If you're starting in the motivated seller? If you had to pick between SEO Facebook ads, or pay per click your top three here what you're an expert in? Which one would you choose?You know, it's gonna depend a little bit on the individual situation, I think a blanket statement that would apply to the most people would be Facebook ads as a place to start. So to give you a little bit of context on that maybe we just dipped super late because I'm sure there's into all three of them because I'm sure there's some people here that don't even understand what these things are. Right? So that's uh, at least give like a high level overview.The Facebook ads is basically the the paid advertising inside of Facebook. It's where you're actually paying to have your ads show up as sponsored posts on someone's newsfeed. So if you scroll through Facebook or Instagram, you see these random posts pop up with these call to actions. That's basically that's basically what Facebook ads are. And the for real estate. And say for a lot of people, they should start with Facebook ads if they have a small budget. And the reason being a small budget stretches the far this with Facebook ads.And Facebook is a channel that that tends to get you outA lot of leads for the money that you spend on it in comparison to the other channels. It tends to get you those leads relatively quickly in comparison to say SEO that just takes a really long time, pay per click will be quick too. But like I said, less leads. Facebook also produces a lower quality lead. But the magic of Facebook ads is you'll get some junk leads. But there's good ones in there. And those good ones tend to be your largest deals in your business, we see it over and over again, our clients, our largest deals come from Facebook ads. So if you have a small budget, Facebook ads is great. The problem is if your budgets bigger, you can end up pushing Facebook ads into an area where you're just getting really diminishing returns with it. And that's where some of these other channels are better. And also from the lead quality standpoint. Because maybe Facebook ads have a little bit of a better ROI than PPC with a small budget. A lot of times with larger budget, PPC might have a better ROI. And in any circumstance, PPC produces a much better quality lead, which means even though your ROI and your money's a little bit lower, sometimes you spend a lot less time chasing down bad conversations. That is the brilliant thing about pay per click and SEO. Just so you guys understand why.We're better. Yeah. Why don't you tell them why that is? You're reaching people that based versus not intent based looky loos. Exactly, yeah, that's what it is everything else that you do. It's all people based, you're looking for people based on their situations, and you're trying to target them, there is no channel that you have in your business right now, most likely, that's intent based, meaning you're advertising to people based on the fact that they have intent to sell their house, which is just a completely changes the game, because now this is like if you could put all marketing channels on a scale from outbound to inbound, you'd have like on the far outbound side, like your text, cold call, and the middle you have like maybe direct mail, Facebook ads, stuff like that. TV, maybe like some of these channels where you like, it is still inbound, because the person is coming to you, but you went to them first still. And then you go far to the other side, you reduce inbound channels, 100% inbound, like pay per click and SEO. And it's just a whole different kind of lead that goes faster. And they tend to be more motivated. However, the this is where people get screwed up on PPC though, it's expensive, and highly competitive. So you have to be ready. Like obviously, if these people are just searching on Google and looking for ways to sell their house, and they're the most motivated leads, which they tend to beother people want those to you're not the only person who had that idea? Well, here's what a lot of times, you'll pay more. So you're saying you're gonna pay more on PPC bringing the higher quality lead Facebook and get a bunch of leads, it's gonna feel good, it might stroke your ego a little bit, however, just be prepared to work for but in exchange for spending less money. So make sense.What do you who and how do you target on Facebook nowadays? When you're targeting these people? And are you writing in being an investor? Are you writing in special ad category issues? With all of that? So let's do one first.Yeah, the basically who we're targeting, it comes down to whoever we believe to be most likely to be a motivated seller. And I know that's like, really like fluffy. But but when I answer your second question, I understand why that's so fluffy. And what you're kind of hinting at here is, I don't even know when the change has happened. It's probably a year and a half ago, there was introduced to Facebook, basically, Facebook got sued. And someone said the fact that for a housing ad, you're showing it to this person who's older, but not this person who's younger, or this person who's a male, but not the female, or the person is a good one. But as it go to all that kind of stuff. They said That's discrimination. And I think anybody listening this podcast knows that that's the joke. But that's not to be PC nowadays.And in Facebook has to play by the rules, because they've gotten in a lot of trouble not doing that before. So if anybody knows to take this stuff seriously, they do. So we have these restrictions, and a lot of people basically mark that time is the time that Facebook ads stopped working for real estate investors, because you no longer can target your target person.Here's the thing about what we do. The strategies that we use retargeting on Facebook, we used before that change, and after that change, it didn't affect anything that we were doing. We did all kinds of hyper targeting based on all these different factors on Facebook, if I can matter is the strategies that we used today, even back then worked better than the strategies that most people were using at that time. And when that change happened, it didn't affect us one bit because we weren't doing that stuff. And it might sound a little bit crazy, because I guess I'll just say it. Our number one audience that we target on Facebook ads, from a performance standpoint is a 100% broad audience restricted only by the boundaries of where you want to get leads.The the caveat to that is we don't do targeting through targeting, we do targeting through optimization. So the way that Facebook works Facebook's a very intelligent platform with some very advanced machine learning built into it. The way that it would work business, say, you know, we equate marketing campaigns to phishing. And you say that, like you're doing a direct mail campaign and to the entire ocean, what would happen is you would make a cast somewhere, you know, drive the boat down 10 feet, make another cast do that for the entire ocean, that's what a direct mail campaign a direct mail campaign to the ocean would be, when you might choose to, you know, target the areas with reliefs because you know, that there's more fish there and whatnot. Right? The The difference is, and this scenario, Facebook doesn't just cast and then go 10 feet and cast again, Facebook kind of looks at the lay of the land that uses data that you feed it to kind of determine where do we think these fish would kind of hang out. If you're smart with your Facebook ads, you can kind of put the kind of bait out there that only the right kind of fish would actually bite. And that will attract the right kind of fish. And Facebook starts to learn they when I cast neoreef, I tend to get more bites than when I cast other places. And it starts to double down. So what happens is you target the ocean, but you only fish the leaf. And that's exactly how it works on Facebook ads. So but to do that, you need to know how to put the right bait out there. And you need to make sure that you're giving quality feedback on what actually is a fish to Facebook. That's where 90% of people get it wrong. So you're saying like on on the actual targeting, you're just targeting anyone and everyone, but it's the copy and the imagery that you're using Facebook's going out there and finding them for you.Yes, it's about the it's about the copy of the imagery. It's also about the ad experience after that point.And it's about the feedback that you give to the Facebook pixel to Facebook, telling it that you had a good lead. So to give you some examples of where people go wrong with this,one scenario would be just telling Facebook that you want to get a lot of people that you reach with your ads, you know, you're gonna get, you're gonna take a lot of casts in a place that nobody wants to take a cast in the middle of the ocean with Iran bait. one's ever gonna bite that. But basically, you're going to look in Facebook, and you're like, Wow, 200,000 people. That's awesome, right? Right. But they'll give you what you asked for, you could do the same thing with link clicks, you will be amazed at how many clicks you get to your website, and how few of them actually turn into any type of revenue for you. You can even do with leads, a lot of people are using Lead forms and Facebook. And what happens is you have this form that when someone clicks on your ad, it just pops up, it auto fills with the information and click submit, it's extremely easy to do. So it's a low friction process. And it degrades your lead quality and tends to get you the wrong kinds of leads. And then you're still giving a feedback signal back to Facebook, that's not quality. The way that we like to do it is through a dedicated landing page on a website that qualifies the lead appropriately. And only when that happens, do we actually give the feedback to Facebook that it was a lead? So then we're using quality information to do that. And then it's also about the ad, like I see all kinds of people because because here's what marketers do. Marketers put out there and ads, things like get the most leads where a B testing things all the time, right? You know what happens if you do that in this in this industry, you're going to end up with everything that's flashy, and aggressive, and tends to say things like will pay more than other investors and stuff like that. And what you end up doing is attracting the wrong kind of seller, because you're you're looking for a very specific kind of seller, that's not most sellers. If you havethat makes I want you I want to repeat that really quick. So that was a big nugget for you guys. He's saying like, if I'm if I'm like, hey, we'll buy it for less, or we'll get you more money, right, you're targeting the person that wants the highest and best, which isn't quite the best option for real estate investor trying to find a rehabber flip, right? Yeah. Or even if you make it like all about the offer, for example. And then you complain when you get these leads that are calling you and saying, Hey, will you give me for your house for my house? Like I don't want that? Would you advertise for you said, everything's about, you know, let's just take another hypothetical. So let's say we'll just use my market day I'm in San Diego, I want to target motivated seller leads. So I'm guessing the ad is somewhere I have a cash offer something along that lines like that right instant offer, or we'll get to that next but whatever the ad is, but I'm going to target I live in North County. So I'm going to target all the areas that I want to work in. And that's other than that, that's the only targeting I'm using.In reality, we use multiple forms of targeting. We're always testing at least three audiences at any given time. But the highest performer that we have, on average across markets is that broad audience and it really is and they find them because I've heard that quite a bit.I've heard that with a couple of the last few guests are like dude, just let Facebook do its thing, bro. But people have said that let them do its thing. How long does it take for them to do its thingIt's astonishingly quick, actually, I'm surprised, and this is athing is you have to monitor its thing.So to give you a little bit of a picture of machine learning, a lot of people assume that if you run the same campaign twice, that you're going to get the same result. It's not true. Because the way that the machine learning based targeting works is you could say you're using the same algorithm. But the thing is, the first data points given to the algorithm determine which way it's going to go. And from there, it's a whole different story. So just imagine, you know, your, your algorithms, just trying to walk a straight line, the way that machine learning works, if it starts to veer left, it's going to spiral left. If it starts to veer, right, it's going to spiral, right, the fact that it turns left or right at the beginning is completely random, you started out going straight, it could just be like the first people you reach just happened to be of a certain type. So what we see is like, I can get in ruts. So it tends to be it tends to be pretty effective out of the gate. But you have to understand the issues that you can run into, like we commonly run into issues where suddenly, despite the ads being incredibly clear, the landing page be incredibly clear, we start getting a bunch of buyer leads and renter leads and stuff like that it happens. And we've had clients get to this point, we get like 80% of your leads are like buyers and renters. And you look at the ads, like I have no idea why some of the things that are looking at this, but it's the algorithm found that kind of person that misunderstands it and that way, and it started getting that feedback, and then it starts spiraling that direction. And what we do is we pick it up, put it right back in the middle, and we get it going straight again and hope for the best that time. And stuff like that happens all the time. So you have to do that.Would you have to switch up your ad copy in that? No, you literally would say my ad cuz I've seen that on so my answer guys, I'll target some of you guys. And I'll be like, Hey, I'm running this ad and I run the same ad. But I'll get two totally different results.You can do it because the algorithm learns differently each time. So that's where a lot of people would say like, I'm not 100% on the side of like, let Facebook completely do its thing always. Because if your feedback, signal breaks, then suddenly your Facebook ad campaigns broken. Right? If it doesn't get what you're looking for, that's the problem you have with lead generation, if you're an E commerce company, they don't have to deal with these issues. Because a purchase is a purchase, Who cares who that is. But not all leads are created equal. So you have to you have to be really careful about that. But so it's about understanding those things. And like what's just basically quality being what it is and what's you know, an actual problem that shows the algorithms and misunderstanding something. And as long as you do that letting Facebook do its thing is really powerful, you just have to understand that the feedback you're giving, it isn't like closing deals oftenmonitor it, you give it a week to start. You can we like our standard processes, we meet with our clients once a month. And we kind of review all those things and determine if we need to change course, there's other little things like you know, tweaking how much money is going to each audience in the creative and stuff like that, that just happens like throughout the time period. As a business owner, I think you need to be in it once a month. And burn from lead quality standpoint, it purely depends on your budget, but most of our clients don't have a large enough budget that they really even have a big enough sample size to measure lead quality on a weekly basis. Or else you're just going to end up making lots of like really emotional, non statistically significant, non data driven type decisions. So usually a month like gives you enough data, although we'll give our clients guidelines like if more than x number of X number of leads is of this category, let us know. And you know, we make an adjustment accordingly.What are your opinion on look alikes? Yay or Nay? Are they good? Yeah, mixed reviews on the show. Some people said they used to be good. Now they're not good.What is your opinion?They they have come down from their peak look alikes were amazing before iOS 14, they're not quite as effective since then. They're still good. In this particular industry, you can even use look alikes, technically, you have what's called a special ad audience, which is really the same thing. It just doesn't include, like you picture this model, this machine learning model has these 1000s of different features that it uses as predictors. And among those are just not age, gender, zip code, that kind of stuff, right? So I just remove those. They don't predict based on those. But the those audiences have been, I can tell you, it's a in the industry in general on Facebook, they're good. If we're talking just real estate, they've been hit or miss for us. We have some time to do well with it. On average, our broad audiences are performing better than our special ads audiences. But sometimes they work really well. If you're going to do one, I think it's great to do one that's on a previous lead list. Those are by far our most effective. So you take like for example going to your CRM, every hot lead you ever had upload that make a special as audience based on that. Those tend to be pretty effectiveand nice people. Sometimes people like to like copy and paste their strategies from other marketing channels.Like mail or cold call into digital, and try to make like those look alikes, or those custom audiences based on their cold call lists and stuff like that. That has been for the most part very unsuccessful for us. We've seen, we've seen a break here or there with like a special ads audience based on that list. Custom Audiences based on those lists have never in like 25 attempts ever produced anything. And that'sa custom audiences. You're just saying no?Pretty much. Yeah, Facebook needs room to do its thing. When you give it an audience you restrict back. Is that because of the special ads? Category? I don't think so. Because even before then we didn't have great success with it. It's, it's really about audience size, there isn't. Here, a lot of companies that are like maybe even your company, companies advertising nationally use that stuff a lot more, because you could use a 1% look alike. And that's going to be 2 million people. And that's good. But if you constructed that to just a small market, then you're just dealing with a really small audience sizes, and Facebook doesn't work well with a small audience size. It's like some big expense. And you'd like to see what the beginning of a campaign for coal but million, 2 million you want to see that II mean, that's great. Not every market makes that possible.Population 500,000 markets where it's literally impossible to have a million or 2 million. So really, like it's a factor of what you can do in your market. We definitely like to go live, like our clients that go wider, geographically, they get more leads for the money and that leads tend to be higher quality. Narrow can be okay. But it's uh, yeah, in general, I'd say. Like, for your average, like, wholesaler, I'd say if you have a buyer, if you're anywhere your buyers run your ads, because you want to get as wide as you can. You don't want to get a property under contract and not be able to do anything with it. But you want to go as wide as you can. If you're a flipper, like anywhere that you know, you can comfortably do your business well. Sometimes we have flippers that will be more narrow than our wholesalers are in targeting but in maybe they pay like a 30% higher cost per deal because of it. But they have all the operational efficiencies that more than make up for that because cost per deal is not the biggest problem you know.So you have to kind of consider it with your with your business but we do have clients doing Facebook ads successfully and markets as small as 200,000 population.We love to see more than half a millioninteresting.And then I imagine when you're you have retargeting ads you're hitting as well on these people. How many retargeting ads are you going deep and then how important is that so everybody understands?Yeah, retargeting I think is like far and away the best money you'll spend on Facebook ads. Facebook is the most robust retargeting platform that has ever been created. It's amazing. And basically that the concept if someone's not familiar with that, is if someone visits your website, you can basically flag them and then reach them later. So think of retargeting like follow up that you can do even if someone didn't fill out the form, because all the time you'll have people coming in through pay per click, and you pay $50 for this click to get someone to your website, and then they don't fill out the form. And then you can reach them for like a penny or two each time on Facebook to follow up with them. And it's like no brainer money spent. Where people go wrong with retargeting is assuming that it's going to change their business from a volume standpoint. It's a it's a really realistically for companies in real estate. It's a low volume play. You don't get tons of website traffic, or clients from retargeting get a handful of leads a month at PAX usually, it depends on your website traffic, because that's the thing. You can't just scale retargeting so you have to think of it like something that amplifies the rest of your marketing, not something where you see that you get a good return, you're going to 10 exit, because you have to text everything the next year retargetingbut it's all for free for dollar. It's great.There's so many golden nuggets in this show. If you guys are paying attention. There's just a ton I'm taking notes as we go. And we haven't gotten the PPC yet. So one more question cuz I know this is gonna ask me next video versus image on ad number one.When you say on ad number one, what do you mean on your cold audience ad? Or in Oh, God, like what are you seeing performing? But we get that question all the time. I my opinion, but I'd love to hear yours. Yeah, I have her. I apologize that this is going to be a more complex answer than you're probably looking for.The answer is both. And the reason is, there's people on Facebook ads that are more likely to respond to certain ads and others where a lot of people go wrong with Facebook ads and when it comes to like a B testingis misunderstanding the difference between predictive optimization versus an inferential form of testing which is more like statistics that everybody knows and learns about. So with Facebook ads the most powerfulway to do this kind of stuff isn't just I run ad a and I run ad B and I observed which one works better. It's to actually like when someone's going to be reached by an ad predict for that individual person, which ad is more likely to influence them. And you will find that by having images and videos, you'll get better results than by having images alone or videos. Although, that said, on average videos are performing better for us. I think they, they act, we've tracked to videos, an increase in lead quality and in the quantity because there's something amazing that especially if you're like us, where we've seen, like some brilliant results with this is if you can have like the person who's going to knock on someone's door later, be the same person who's in the video ad. Yeah, because a couple of things happened. Like you build that consistency, you build that trust that credibility, and you qualify, like a lot of people forget that you like qualify as part of your ads, if someone is just going to be because as tough as it is, that this is the case it is the case that when you see someone you generate your own bias about that person immediately. If you reach someone with the ad that sees your acquisitions person and thinks poorly of them because of how they look or they don't naturally trust them, whatever the case is, they're not going to fill out the form. Yeah, you can naturally attract the kind of people that you're going to have success with. So what happens in our business like the video doesn't create the lead you guys the video creates the humanizationand it gets people to like see you're like a living breathing being almost always comes our company and say, Hey, we want to get videos we want to generate leads. Like if you start with the mindset you're gonna generate leads off a video you already shot yourself in the foot. It's more like you need to generate attention with the videos that we're creating. And use it as a way to get people not to think you're such a frickin blood sucking investor a real estate agents with a bunch of commission breath, spitting out fire out of your mouth. That's what the average consumer feels about us. Like, especially if you're a distressed if you're breaking into bankruptcy or divorce or something, and you just get this guy wants to buy your house. Like let's be honest, the very first impression I have is this motherfucker wants to take advantage of my misfortune. Yeah, I haven't got there. Right andyeah, and when you get to know that person, you you start feeling less like that. Right? Like that's, that's what you feel. Yeah, the video helps that. Yeah, so there's a lot of value to video for sure. I think. I think brown belt I guess is the summary. I wouldn't just run with you and how many ads you have going. Last question. I got them all when you're running obviously you have your your wide ad so like when he's saying you cast in that guy's he's got ad number one. It's probably going to like couple million people or a large audience and the people who engage or visit site that's who he retargets list. So how many retargeting ads you have a retargeting funnel, so to say already just one ad is just like a one two punch. I think with retargeting variety and creative is important. Because when retargeting more so than any other place in the funnel, you're likely to get fatigue. Yep, because if you're doing retargeting, right, your frequency, which is the average number of times that each person sees the ad should be usually we're targeting something like three or four per month. Right? So with that, if you're showing the same ad over and over again, you kind of become a crazy advertiser, just assuming that you showed on that same ad for a 16th time This time, it's gonna make a difference. Yes, it's probably not. So I think I think retargeting having a good amount of variety is important. A lot of people will always think about it from the standpoint of like, I gotta change out my retargeting ads every two weeks or something. I don't think of it that way. I think of it as like, I need to have like 10 ads in there. You know, cycling through because more evergreen.One adds a ton. Yeah, and then what? What you do after that, like, I think videos are great and retargeting. I'd love to use testimonial videos, because you have to think like if someone came to my website, but they didn't fill out the form, but they came there with intent to sell their house, what would be the reason that they didn't fill out the form. The only reason would be that they don't believe that we're credible, they don't believe that they can trust us. Whatever the case is, so you just kind of have to like you know, feel those things out. And I think your videos targeted around those those things like testimonial videos, review videos, that kind of stuff can be excellent. Even if like someone already filled out the form right? Maybe that video could make your acquisitions appointment later do even better. That's part of the thing with retargeting like, it's hard to measure all the impact that it has. But our average client spends less than 50 bucks a month on it. So it's like it's a no brainer for what you get.You know that it's a bit it's producing something good. It's just not a huge volume driver. Got it? But I'm sure the quality though is there and silent about getting as many Alright dude, this was like great any I think you've frickin nailed Facebook. Let's go on to PPC. I noticed with PPC with Facebook but um alright, let's switch gears guys. So like basically let me put this in real estate layman terms. Facebook people aren't like checking out to see what the hell you ate for breakfast. But when we go to PPCWe're switching the game like people are searching you out.So one of the questions we get all the time is Hey, Mike, I'm going to SEO my website. And I'm always like, dude, do you even know what SEO means? There's a lot of work there. Like if you just SEO one blog post doesn't mean you're going to become the top of the search rankings for the rest of the world. Right and become the number one agent people are under that impression. SEO is a very long term gameof what pops up natural when people are searching, but PPC is what pops up paid. So can you walk us throughPPC? Yeah.Yeah, so really PPC, called PPC stands for pay per click. The reason is, you basically pay Google to be at the top when someone clicks, that's when they charge you. So it's, it's pretty simple in that sense. So the targeting on PPC is keywords. What are basically what are people searching? Yep. And then what you do is you write ads that are hopefully going to attract those people. And you create landing pages that are likely to turn those people once they click into leads. And that's the whole game of PPC, biggest mistakes I see people making with PPC, it's easy to just like sending PPC traffic to the homepage of your website or something. And you get a horrible conversion rate with it, I see so many people just sending traffic to their main page or website. And the problem with that is there's distractions, PPC is a really high cost, click and you want to contain it the best you can. So we like to use single action landing pages, where the only option is that someone fills out the form where they leave, and there's not really the there's not really a second option, you're going to convert, you're gonna be gone. And you get a better conversion rate doing that, you get more of those people to give you the information. And then the other thing about PPC where people go wrong, is bidding irrationally happens all the time. And this just happens in a whole bunch of ways. Because when they say pay per click, it's not like Google tells you what it costs for that click, what happens is you bid what you're willing to pay for that click, and you hopefully get clicks at that price. And there's a whole bunch of stuff that happens there. Because the price of anything is just determined based on the competition and what you're willing to pay. Those advertisers that are number one and PPC, they pay a lot more for each individual click, then the guy who's at the bottom of the page that steals a click occasionally doesn't get that much volume, but pays really low for that. So you have to understand there's like that, that diminishing return and everything. But we have clients telling us like I just want to be number one on it. Yeah, that's irrational, right? Because it has nothing to do with the value of those clicks. Sometimes the guy number one's losing money, he might do the most deals, but he's got a crazy high cost per deal. Sometimes not sometimes that's a good place to be. It depends on where the prices are. I kind of think could pay per click, almost like Wholesaling Houses. I could go into a market. And I could say I want to wholesale. And I could think well, what do I want to do, I want to make lots of money by selling the houses for top dollar. Therefore, I want to find the most expensive houses in my market that I think will sell for the most. And I'm just gonna pay really high for them. And that would be an absolutely horrible wholesale strategy. But that's exactly what people do with pay per click, they look at keywords, they think, what are those keywords that are the best keywords, and then I want to be at the top for those and a drag to the top and the price up. Realistically, what you should do in your wholesale is you don't look for houses that are high value, you look for houses that are undervalued. So it's not about what the price is, it's about what the price is compared to what it's worth. Where does the market believe? So what we do is we look in for each individual click, we're looking at what is that click worth? What do we think that's actually going to turn into in revenue. And we're bidding according to that. And sometimes the whole market is just way too high, you're gonna see a good keyword, you don't even show up, because everybody else is just paying ridiculous prices for it. They're all busy. And sometimes everybody else doesn't think it's that great. But our data shows that that's actually a really high quality click. But the whole deal is trying to like it's not about the best clicks. I don't mind paying $10 for clicks that are worth $100 Rather than paying $50 for clicks that are worth $120 What do seller leads? What are seller leads selling for right now.Right now on on pay per click our average across the whole United States is about $260 across all the markets we're in. It could tell you San Diego would not be that. Yeah.Probably, probably honestly, here's what I was. The person I want to mention this is because like people always like oh want to get a lead gen game lead gen game like you're gonna have to invest.And when people are like, like especially in the real estate industry, they don't realize $260 per lead.Well, when you're buying an opt in, you're not buying a leader buying someone who has requested a cash offeron their property, so you're buying almost an appointment or conversation. And yeah, if you guys you guys plan on spending some dough, like it's not going to be cheap, but lead generation number is as it there's a reason why Zappos and, and Bed Bath and Beyond like put so much money into marketing their past customers is because that drives more sales and acquiring new ones we talk about this every week on the show you guys. There's branding and there's there's marketing, there's advertising, they're not the same, but they sort of work together. We're talking about today's advertiser go right at that lead generation. And yes, it works. But you got to have guys like this or you got to have like the right, you got another eight ads, right copy and all that stuff before you dive into it. I've seen so many people lose a lot of money pressing like a boost button. Right? Yeah, I mean it and it just like, you don't want to do that, like Facebook from when I used to be really heavy into Facebook six years ago. And then I stopped it for about four years because I didn't have anything to really sell is building my business.And I didn't mean to build on so when I came back to it, it was night and day different dude. Night and day different. Six years. Yeah, that's that's about it. Yeah, and phases, totally reinvented itself. So like what worked back then doesn't work today. And vice versa. This stuff's always changing. You just have to know how to change with it. PPC, and when you guys log on to the backend of like Google ad platform, you know, everything you say in here, I'll verify because I could tell you that my YouTube ads and my PPC ads are more expensive, but they're way more quality. Like, I'll spend double or triple the amount of money on those platforms. But I get people they're like, Hey, Mike, what's up? Like we get, we'll get clients directly from it. And we do notice the intent based on our end, and we're not selling houses, we're selling video services, right. So um, anything else you want to add on PPC?No, really, is really just that negative copy magic. The simpler the better, like guarantee, like, walk me through some headlines that people try to get over create this stuff sometimes. And sometimes just the simplest thing is like the best, isn't it? Yeah, I guess I can tell you kind of where people go wrong. People assume that creative is better than clear. And creative is never better than clear. When you're searching for something on Google, you're scanning on the page, that thing that most closely matches what you're looking for. Yeah, you don't care if they have like a pond in their headline or something. And that can actually probably confuse you and deter you. Because you're going to give about two seconds of effort to each one of the ads, if that. So the key point there is it has to be stupid, clear how relevant what you're saying is to what the person searching for. We use that we do that a lot by putting like the exact phrase in the ad because even if you say the same thing with different words, it's harder for someone to make that connection. And then you want to do the same on your landing page. Because because you want people to feel like exactly what they find on your landing page is exactly what they searched. Other like little little tricks. We've done a lot of taking someone's precise location on on Google and displaying that to them in their ad. Because let's just say you search and like I live in Lehi in Utah, right, we're suburb sort of Salt Lake City. Most markets have a lot of that, right? You have salt lake city nearby the other areas. Let's just say I search right here. And I search for like how to sell a house fast.And one of the ad says how to sell your house fast in Utah. The other one says how to sell a house fast and in Salt Lake City. And then the next one says how to sell your house fast and Lehigh. Which one of those am I going to click all things equal? Probably the one talking about Lehigh, because that's really relevant to where I live. So that's that's another trick that we're using help help improve a lot from a copy standpoint is we will dynamically insert whatever town even if the town of 200 people, whatever town someone's in, we will insert that into the headline of the ad when someone searches from that precise location. Have you guys done any YouTube ads?YouTube? Yes, we have. However, for motivated sellers, it hasn't been our best channel lead cost has been closer to PPC lead quality closer to Facebook. So it has, it has not been our most successful channel. Maybe we just haven't cracked the code. My hypothesis is I don't think a lot of the demo target demographic is spending a lot of time on YouTube. And like the target ability, there's just as isn't working as well as like Facebook, which sort of has a similar way of doing it. But just I think targeting is a little bit better.And YouTube's a little bit tougher as a direct response platform just because the call to actions aren't quite as obvious. You probably like you think there are other companies you know about YouTube ads, you probably had a lot of awareness. Not quite as many that you've actually like, clicked through the YouTube ad to do business with. I think YouTube really shines is an awareness booking platform moreso than like a direct response lead gen platform. Nothing it doesn't work. It does work. It just in our experience has been more and more expensive. Yeah, yes. I concur.Without 100% And I'm not spending crazy amounts and I'm not like super duper marketer, digital wise, I'm just I could be all those things are saying our checkout 100% Um, let's get into SEO really quick and wrap it up.SEO What the hell does it mean Search Engine Optimization? Guys? There you go do it, how do you do it? You create a shitload of content. And you have to be creating content. And then you have to know how to keyword the content, then you need to know how to structure it. You need to know how to blog, you need to add meta tags, images, link backs, like there's a science to this. Can you walk us through that? Yeah, SEO is an interesting thing. And just to kind of like summarize what it means Search Engine Optimization. Google exists for the purpose of providing the most relevant results to someone when they search. And there are tons and tons and tons of websites, at least 10,000 that talk about selling a house for cash, or fast or we buy houses or whatever the case is? How do you convince Google that your website is more relevant for someone search than one of those other websites? That's basically the artists search engine optimization. So you need to think about what does Google want Google wants to put websites goes to the top that are the ones that provide relevant responses. And the ones that they think are, are actually like companies that they can trust. Because if people always have a bad experience with companies that they find on Google, they stopped looking on Google for companies. So it's all about being relevant and authoritative. being relevant is the content game that you just talked about. It's it's about like, like, for our clients doing SEO, we do lots of blogging. Blogging is really effective. And sometimes not even because people read the blogs. But because the blogs add strength to the other pages on the website, and those ones rank. That's a lot of what it is. There's a lot of technical stuff, like for example, if your website loads slow, Google's not going to rank it as easily as someone whose website loads quickly, because that's a better experience.It's, it's about making sure that you're technically there, you give Google a sitemap and how to crawl your website. It's an from an authority standpoint, it's kind of a popularity contest. It's about getting backlinks. And backlinks are basically links from other websites to your website. And not just a lot of them, but really good ones. Because a backlink if I have a website that Google considers to be very authoritative, and I decide to link to your website, the assumption is I'm doing that because I see something of value on our website. And I'm the popular guy that votes that this guy is worth looking at. And that tells Google that maybe it really is. Yeah, so isn't all that stuff. The reason why like like, Brandon wants to even probably appear on this podcast, he wants to link back from my site back to his site. The reason why I appear on another podcast is I want the link backs from their sites back to our so that you get that authority, but it is a long game to play. So it's just telling you guys for those your SEO, SEO SEO works, I hear it all the time. No, I'm just gonna SEO that fuck out of that page. Yo, bro, I'm just gonna go ahead and SEO the fuck out of my site. That doesn't mean anything. Like it's not it just doesn't work that way and realistic. Like, I've been blogging for frickin eight years, I actually had my real estate site up to 10,000 searches a month, organically back in the day, and Chicago.And even real estate marketing, I had to 10,000 Organic hits a month, why haven't blogged in a year and a half. So I haven't had time and my traffic slowed down a bit. Right? plummets, yeah, there's a game there. You gotta have consistency with it. And it just, most people don't have the assets or the resources to do it right as my point. Unless you're gonna pay a team to go out and do it for you. Like, if you're not a writer, you're not a content creator. It's all that stuff. There's just a lot to consider when you're doing it. I don't think it's anywhere anyone would start. I think it's a game you play over long term, if you're going to commit to it. Person, yes. For this topics and purpose. No, I agree. It's not usually a recommended starting place for a client unless, like, we would start out with an SEO strategy. If we're working with a client that really has that long term vision. And we have we have a bunch of companies like we're doing SEO, and I think 30 Something markets are now we do a lot of it, because it does produce like the thing is SEO over the long term produces the best ROI of any jazz we talked about. So it's amazing. But But what happens where people go wrong is they spend money on SEO for three months. And then they look back at it and they're like, Oh, the numbers don't lie. This doesn't give me a return on investment. And they give up. But they don't understand that the game of SEO is a really long term game and you have to be consistent with it. And you have to fund it well. So it's a it's a channel where like, I it's not cashflow friendly. But if you compare it to other long term investments, I would invest my money in SEO before buying a rental property hands down. Because SEO compared to the rental properties can perform way way better in the long term. I don't invest 50 grandAnd then to the downpayment on a rental property, and then expect that I'm going to have a 300% return next month. But people do that sweat after March. Yeah, yeah, exactly what equity. Yeah, I agree with everything that you said there. This has been awesome. We went a little bit over, but the content was so good. We just kept on going. So I want to respect your time, Brandon, we appreciate you coming up on the show. sharing all this insight ton of nuggets on there you guys go back and listen to this one more time. If you guys want more about SEO, content, research to the blog and podcast episodes, we've gotten Trevor, Trevor mock from Karen, they have an amazing SEO website platform, he's really sharp and all that we have a bunch of other individuals that you can reach out to if you want to learn more about SEO, or call Brandon here, because these guys do all that stuff, too. But dude, you are a freakin killer, amazing show. Why don't you go ahead and tell our listeners how they can reach you if they need. They can check you guys out further. Yeah, I appreciate it, Mike. So the best place to check us out would be Bateman collective comm slash our ELP. That's, that's a page and the reason I give you that page specifically is you can go right on there you can schedule a call with with me or someone on my team to talk aboutto talk about what this is for your market. The really cool thing that we have that no one else has is the largest database that exists in this industry about what generates results for motivated seller lead gen, and how that is different across different markets. So we can give you a lot of insight into what might be the best strategy for you.And also, I know there's some people listening here who have tried these channels before, and you haven't had success.Our offer for that is basically a free audit. Like we can jump right into your Google Ads account right into your facebook ads account, right into your your website for SEO purposes. And look at exactly what he did. Where people go wrong with this as they keep on just like throwing money at things and then throw money at something different and throw money at something different. And just hope it works. But they never understood why something didn't work in the first place. The first step to actually finding success, if you haven't had it yet, is figuring out where you went wrong. And we can help you figure that out. It's a free service that we provide. Brough I personally will take a look at your campaigns. So that's uh, yeah, that's something that we're willing to do and I'd love to help you out.Thank you, man. Appreciate it. Appreciate you guys. Listen to other episode of the real estate marketing podcast. You guys know where to find us connect with us on social Facebook IG connect on our YouTube channel, make sure you subscribe, and check out the rest of the content on our site. And if you're stuck trying to figure out what the hell you're going to do in 2022 and you want to build your personal brand, get your ass on video and call up a real estate marketing Dude, we will script edit and distribute your video content and we make the process really fucking simple. Don't overthink this stuff on content creation 80% of your business is going to come from the people you already know videos how you stay on top of them and nurture that audience it's very simple formula. So appreciate you guys have a great rest of the day and we'll see you guys next week. Peace. Thank you for watching another episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast. If you need help with video or finding out what your brand is, visit our website at WWW dot real estate marketing do.com We make branding video content creation simple and do everything for you. So if you have any additional questions, visit the site, download the training and then scheduled time to speak with the dude and get you rolling in your local marketplace. Thanks for watching another episode of the podcast. We'll see you next time.

FRONTLINE: Film Audio Track | PBS

Amid record police shootings in Utah, an investigation into the use of deadly force in the state. With local journalism partner The Salt Lake Tribune, FRONTLINE examines police training, tactics and accountability, as well as racial disparities in the way force is used.

Bomb Mom
Bomb Hair, Killer Skin, And Great Nails! BUBS Naturtuals with Sean Lake |94

Bomb Mom

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 58:12


Have you been feeling the effects of aging? Women take collagen for their hair, skin and nails. But, would that work for men? Are there other benefits to taking collagen? Meet Sean Lake Sean Lake grew up in Winchester, Massachusetts, before moving to Utah to become a professional snowboarder. Once he got that out of… The post Bomb Hair, Killer Skin, And Great Nails! BUBS Naturtuals with Sean Lake |94 appeared first on Melissa Vogel.

The Jimmy Rex Show
#11 - Real Estate Investing - Marissa Van Noy - Former Miss Utah Now Flips Homes With NFL Linebacker Husband

The Jimmy Rex Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 36:35


Guest Bio:Marissa Van Noy is a model, actress, entrepreneur, philanthropist, and wife of NFL Linebacker Kyle Van Noy.As a model and an actress she has been involved in runway, print and film; Marissa was crowned the Miss Utah title and received runner-up in the 2013 Miss USA pageant. She has been featured in Fitness Magazine, television commercials and appeared on HBO's Ballers as the hostess and ABC's What Would you Do? as an actress.Marissa and Kyle currently spend time investing in, redesigning, and flipping homes across the country. Additionally, Marissa has used her skills in home design to create a design firm, Three Golden Cranes, with her sister and mother.The Van Noy's give back to the community through the Van Noy Valor Foundation, where they encourage personal valor in the lives of adopted children, those in foster care, and disadvantaged youth by armoring them with success through resources, mentors and opportunities.

Ten12 Podcast
Championship Weekend Picks & a New Texas Tech Podcast

Ten12 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 70:54


We've got a great one today! Before we make picks, we welcome Albie Shore of Tortillas and Takes -- the new Ten12 Network Podcast -- to the show to talk about the pod and wrap up the Tech Bet with Daniel. Then, on to the picks for Championship Weekend: Pac-12: Oregon vs Utah (21:16) SEC: Alabama vs Georgia (27:44) AAC: Cincinnati vs Houston (33:23) ACC: Wake Forest vs Pittsburgh (41:45) Big Ten: Michigan vs Iowa (41:01) Big 12: Oklahoma State vs Baylor (54:49) and more! Save 15% off your first order at Gridiron Metal Works with the promo code TEN12. Get a money back guarantee up to $500, up to 90 days, with the promo code NETWORK12 at simbull.app. Don't forget to sign up for our FREE weekly Pick 3 HERE. Save 15% off your first order at Homefield Apparel with promo code NETWORK12. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram. Leave us 5-stars and a review! Find every show in the Network at Ten12Network.com. Visit The LandGrant Gauntlet for more Big 12 news and analysis. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ten12-podcast/message

Big Boy Bets
Championship Week: Georgia-Alabama blowout? Oregon revenge? Michigan is back? Best bets!

Big Boy Bets

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 44:38


Dan and Geoff deep dive the weekend's conference championship action from a betting perspective, looking at Alabama's chances to somehow unseat Georgia atop the SEC, Michigan's chance to punctuate their huge turnaround 2021 over Iowa in the Big Ten Championship, Pitt as a favorite over high flying Wake Forest in the ACC, Oregon's chance for revenge against Utah in the Pac-12, Oklahoma State's defense against a wounded Baylor in the Big 12 Championship, and a couple of choice G5 picks. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

American Birding Podcast
05-48: A Life in Raptors with Jerry Liguori

American Birding Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 33:04


Hawk-watchers are easily the most established sub-groups within the birding community, and the hawk-watching community in North America is close-knit and passionate. One of its undisputed authorities is Jerry Liguori of Salt Lake City, Utah, the author of Hawks at a Distance and Hawks from Every Angle, two of the most influential family-specific field guides in North America. He is the 2017 recipient of the ABA's Robert Ridgway Award for publications in field ornithology and his articles have appeared many times in ABA's Birding magazine. Jerry joins host Nate Swick to talk about the magic of watching hawks, his diagnosis with ALS, and what birders need to know about hawk-watching. Also, the last of our Pileated Woodpecker stories from Gaspard Tanguay-Labrosse of Montreal, Quebec, and a fascinating study that suggests that chickadees segregate by species using smell. Subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, and Google Podcasts, and please leave a rating or a review if you are so inclined! We appreciate it!

VSiN Best Bets
The LookAhead | December 2, 2021 | Hour 1

VSiN Best Bets

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 53:05


In the first hour of The LookAhead, host Scott Seidenberg previews the Thursday Night Football matchup between the Cowboys and Saints. Later in the show, Scott previews the PAC 12 Title Game between Oregon and Utah. Guest : Chris Landry Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Special Forces Gang
Pac-12 Championship: It All Comes Down To This

Special Forces Gang

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 40:37


Here we are again. Is this finally the year Utah gets over the hump and secures the first silverware of it's Pac-12 era? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Kate Dalley Radio
010121 UTAH Sophie And Jen--Henderson & Cox Gramma Requests And Odd Election Results

Kate Dalley Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 26:41


010121 UTAH Sophie And Jen--Henderson & Cox Gramma Requests And Odd Election Results by Kate Dalley

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

We've all heard of Black Friday and Giving Tuesday. But do you know about Forgiving Wednesday? Boyd's monologue looks at the power of forgiveness and how it can change your life now. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
Matthew McConaughey on True Public Service

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 8:16


Actor Matthew McConaughey recently announced that he will NOT be running for Governor of Texas. But he posted a video on Twitter discussing the true meaning of service. Boyd looks at his comments and what we can all learn from them. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
Candidates Can Ruin the Election

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 8:49


Continuing the conversation with Chris Stirewalt of The Dispatch, what are the downsides of the cult of personality surrounding some politicians? And how will COVID-19 be a factor in the upcoming elections? Chris and Boyd also discuss what Republicans and Democrats need to do in terms of messaging and fielding candidates to pull off a midterm win. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
How Will the Economy Affect the Midterms?

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 9:10


It's a foregone conclusion among many political analysts that Republicans will win the next election running on the economy. But Chris Stirewalt from The Dispatch is not so sure. He chatted with Boyd about how exactly the economy will play out as an issue in the upcoming midterm elections. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bet The Board
College Football Championship Week Picks and Predictions: Georgia vs Alabama, Iowa vs Michigan

Bet The Board

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 72:26


Place your Championship Week Bets at Fanduel.com/BetTheBoard and start with a FREE $1,000 College Football Week 14 is here and the boys are back to break down all the big games with Picks and Predictions.  Todd Fuhrman and Payne Insider deliver key metrics, information, coaching advantages, and matchup analysis to help you make more informed decisions at the FanDuel betting window.  Six games broken down and discussed including a Championship Week Best Bet. ▶️ Oregon vs. Utah (8:04) ▶️ Baylor vs. Oklahoma State (15:24) ▶️ Houston at Cincinnati (25:14) ▶️ Georgia vs. Alabama (33:21) ▶️ Wake Forest vs. Pittsburgh (48:29) ▶️ Iowa vs. Michigan (55:03) ▶️ BEST BET

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT SHOW: Josh Furlong, Ron Callan

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 137:55


John Canzano talks to Josh Furlong, the sports director as KSL in Utah to discuss the Utah Utes and the rematch with Oregon in the Pac-12 Championship game on Friday. Oregon State radio analyst Ron Callan joins the program in the final hour to talk about everything Oregon State Beavers athletics. We also play The Big Splash, Punch It! Audio, and the 2@2. Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT Interview: Josh Furlong

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 17:39


John Canzano talks with Josh Furlong, sports director of KSL in Utah to discuss what the feeling is in Salt Lake City right now ahead of the Pac-12 Championship game on Friday against Oregon. Canzano asks Furlong is there is anything that scares him about the rematch with the Ducks, how is the vibe from the fans leading up, what are the keys for the Utes to get the best of Oregon again, what is his prediction, and much more. Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
The President's Missed Opportunity

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 10:38


President Biden addressed the nation on the supply chain crisis today. Boyd breaks down what he said and why this was a missed opportunity for the president.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
What Utah Voters Really Want

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 7:15


As Utah grows, what issues are becoming more important to Utah voters? Christopher Collard from the Utah Foundation chatted with Boyd about the latest numbers and what state lawmakers need to focus on going forward.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
Senator Mitt Romney on D.C.'s To Do List

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 12:57


The clock is ticking for Congress to pass some important pieces of legislation. Senator Mitt Romney joined Boyd to get everyone up to date on everything from the debt limit to the Build Back Better plan.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Salt Lake Tribune's Mormon Land
A prominent architect examines the best and worst of Latter-day Saint temples | Episode 210

The Salt Lake Tribune's Mormon Land

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 33:48


Temple work may have slowed due to the pandemic, but temple-building is moving forward at an unprecedented pace. With The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints announcing multiple new temples at each General Conference, architects are busy designing these holy edifices for locales ranging from Argentina to Zimbabwe and scores of places in between. Besides creating new temples, the Utah-based faith is also renovating 10 existing ones, including the iconic Salt Lake Temple. Just last week, the church unveiled a new look for the 1970s-era Provo Temple and its Space Age design, one members have had a sort of love-hate relationship with through the years. On this week's show, Allen Roberts — a Utah architect who specializes in preservation and has worked on Latter-day Saint chapels, tabernacles and temples — discusses designs for these sacred structures, each of which members view as a “House of the Lord.” He talks about how these temples are designed, the architectural styles that are employed, and reveals some of his favorites (19th-century temples like Manti and Logan top his list along with the ones in Cardston, Alberta, and Washington, D.C.) and some of his least favorites (the current Provo Temple, for instance).

Quack 12 Podcast
Oregon State Review / Utah Preview

Quack 12 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 68:22


Hythloday, Adam and Aaron review the Civil W… errr… The Platty and also talk Utah ahead of the PAC-12 Championship game!Check out our website for more Duck-related content. Please, give us a five-star rating and review on apple podcasts!Follow us on twitter! @quack12podcastAnd our Youtube Channel!

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman
1772: Cantillion Effect, Hartman Predictive Index, Protect Yourself From Inflation, Largest Wealth Transfer, Hartman Comparison Index™ Part 2

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 48:51


Today, Jason defines luck as simply preparedness meeting opportunity, as Early Nightingale puts it. He also talks about his experience with socio-economic classes, the great wealth transfer via the Cantillion effect and the CPI for billionaires. He also encourages you to visit JasonHartman.com/Protect and learn how you can protect your assets. He also shares part 2 of his presentation at an Investment Fund Conference in Utah about his brand new index - The Hartman Comparison Index™ - a truly unique way to value real estate. In our daily lives, we constantly compare things to one another to obtain a better understanding of value and we must do the same thing with housing prices; we can't just measure them in dollars, because the dollar is a moving target and its worth is constantly changing. Listen as Jason compares house prices to commodities historically to help us understand if we really are in a housing bubble.  Key Takeaways: [1:55] In harmony with the cycles of nature [3:29] The Hartman Predictive Index & Forbes Index [5:34] Lucky breaks and my 4 great mentors: Zig Ziglar, Jim Rohn, Earl Nightingale and Dennis Waitley [6:30] Mugged at knife point; different socio-economic classes [8:08] Luck: preparedness meets opportunity [10:00] CPI for billionaires: The cost of living extremely well [11:01] 3 ways they manipulate the CPI and seeing the Cantillion effect [12:43] Get your free report on how to invest in the midst of this pandemic [13:06] Some items in the Cost of Living Extremely Well Index (CLEWI) [19:37] Asset Protection, Tax Savings & Estate Planning: http://JasonHartman.com/Protect [21:26] Don't feel sorry for the rich; follow their lead Investment Fund Conference Utah Part 2 [22:50] Inflation is a hidden tax and thief and destroys the value of our debt [26:15] Inflation is the most powerful method of wealth distribution [28:00] When the government is broke, it becomes predatory on its citizens  [29:45] People got paid to borrow money with negative interest rates [33:10] The dollar is a moving target [35:10] Cyclical, hybrid and linear markets [38:28] After 50 years, it's still a temporary solution [40:10] Case-Shiller Home Price Index vs the Consumer Price Index [42:00] The Real House Price Index: house prices are now 28.6% cheaper than they were 21 years ago [44:10] Measuring only in dollars is a mistake  [46:30] The monthly payment is more important than the overall price   Website: PandemicInvesting.com JasonHartman.com/Protect   The WEALTH TRANSFER is happening FAST! Protect your financial future now! Did you know that 25% to 40% of all dollars ever created were dumped into the economy last year???  This will be devastating to some and an opportunity to others, be sure you're on the right side of this massive wealth transfer. Learn from our experiences, maximize your ROI and avoid regrets. Free Mini-Book on Pandemic Investing: https://www.PandemicInvesting.com Jason's TV Clips: https://vimeo.com/549444172  Asset Protection, Tax Savings & Estate Planning: http://JasonHartman.com/Protect What do Jason's clients say? http://JasonHartmanTestimonials.com Easily get up to $250,000 in funding for real estate, business or anything else  http://JasonHartman.com/Fund  Call our Investment Counselors at: 1-800-HARTMAN (US) or visit www.JasonHartman.com Guided Visualization for Investors: http://jasonhartman.com/visualization    

Peristyle Podcast - USC Trojan Football Discussion
Heard It on the Sidelines: USC basketball opens Pac-12 play

Peristyle Podcast - USC Trojan Football Discussion

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 38:03


Shotgun Spratling talks about USC basketball's 6-0 start to the season as the Trojans enter conference play against Utah tonight at 8:30 p.m. He discusses USC's freshman class, the impact of Memphis transfer Boogie Ellis, how the Pac-12 stacks up, names his MVP of the first portion of the season and talks about what has been the most surprising thing so far this season. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Smart Women, Smart Power
Innovation, Leadership, and Diversity in the Military

Smart Women, Smart Power

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 30:42


In the ninth episode of our new Women in the Military series, host Beverly Kirk spoke with U.S. Air Force Colonel Jenise Carroll who is currently the Commander of the 75th Air Base Wing at Hill Air Force Base in Utah. The pair discussed her innovative work with community leadership near the base to provide affordable housing for military families, as well as her work on diversity and inclusion.   

Quack Talk
Episode 95: Keepin‘ It 55th Street

Quack Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 131:51


On this episode we discuss the latest in Ducks news, Oregon vs OSU review, Oregon vs Utah preview, Devins betting segment and in OT the usual plane into the side of the mountain. See you next week for episode 96.   SCOOOO DUCKS!!!

TRICHOMES Morning Buzz
Kentucky State Senator Pre-Files Bills To Legalize Cannabis Statewide

TRICHOMES Morning Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 4:33


Today in cannabis news: Utah cannabis advocates urge state lawmakers to remove medical cannabis patient limits imposed on clinicians; Colorado Senators issue a letter imploring the inclusion of the SAFE Banking Act to the U.S. National Defense Authorization Act; and a Kentucky state lawmaker pre-files bills to legalize cannabis statewide. It's Wednesday, December 1 and TRICHOMES.com is bringing you the top cannabis news from around the web. You can also listen on YouTube, Apple Podcasts, or Spotify–search TRICHOMES and subscribe

Messin' With Mormons
Messin' With Mormons – Episode 194 – Tony Carlson

Messin' With Mormons

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 66:06


Tony Carlson is in town from Fort Collins, CO to chat with us while he passes through during the holiday. We talk about what its like as an outsider that used to live here and how things have changed in the Salt Lake Valley. Of course, we take advantage of a little cannabis talk with our friend from next door and how the Utah market can improve. Follow us on social media! Or don't, we're just happy you're listening. Voicemail/Text: 801-252-6069 Website: http://www.messinwithmormons.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MessinWithMormons Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/messinwithmormons

Marketing Trends
Unpacking Evolving Marketing Channels Landscape with Nico Dato, EVP Marketing, Podium

Marketing Trends

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 52:36


You may not need to invest any marketing dollars in a new Tiktok channel. If you're like Nico Dato, the Executive Vice President of Marketing at Podium, you're thinking about the best ways to not only get the attention that those new well-known channels bring, but also gain the trust of SMBs in order to win them over as clients. But the reality is, there is no right or wrong answer to where you spend your ad budget. The truth is, the only thing that actually matters is what's performing. The channel mix is evolving every day and it's important to think about where your clients are and develop a relationship with them, and second, stay abreast of third-party apps that are emerging as new marketing platforms in the U.S. “We do a ton of trade shows, which is something that not a lot of people do. We do a lot of direct mail. We do radio; we do everything you can imagine. For us, it takes three or four touches on average to get someone's attention in the way that we want. A lot of times that comes from a combination of digital, traditional, radio, print… We're marketing and selling to plumbers, insurance agents, car dealers, and, and people who are out there physically working in the real world all day long. Like what a lot of people don't realize about Podium is, if I'm selling to an HVAC contractor, like most times they're like checking out Podium at like nine 30 at night, because they were fixing air conditioners all day, or unclogging toilets, Making sure we get that right channel mix is critical. [Conversions are] They're not always going to come via Google search.”In this episode of Marketing Trends, Nico and I unpack the best way to grow a team from seven to over 1,000 and peel back the curtain into how Nico has transformed himself from a marketer to a marketing leader. Staying on top of all marketing channels, new and old, is how he stays on the cutting edge. All this next on Marketing Trends. Main TakeawaysHire for People not just for Needs: When you grow and hire, sometimes there will be a temptation to hire quickly, and in your rush, you may be thinking more about hiring candidates who can help stop the bleeding, so to speak. Instead of hiring for the task you need to be done now, you should be hiring the individual who can best contribute to the company overall. Find someone who can grow with the company, that fits into the culture, and it just might take a couple of extra weeks to find them and train them up. Gaining Trust of SMBs: Small and Medium-Sized businesses are usually the subject matter experts in their communities. For example, the dentist is trusted, personally, by the people that he services. That dentist and his front office staff likely aren't marketing experts, and it takes an understanding of the trust that they themselves garner, in order to understand the level of trust you need to build with them. Their business is a passion and they need to know they can trust you to be on their team. Increased Utilization of Third-Party Apps in the US: Third-party communication apps like Whatsapp are being used with ever-increasing frequency in the U.S. which is arguably behind this trend in other countries like Brazil, and Japan. This is a whole new channel for marketers to tap into and add to their mix. Key Quotes“I've been super fortunate to learn on the fly. I didn't necessarily have all of this classical training in how to run a marketing team and how to build a comms function and a product marketing function. I've just been so fortunate that my career has just kind of snowballed. [Going from a marketer to a marketing leader] is a huge transition. When you're an individual contributor, you have control over the destiny of the thing that you own. And it's up to you to work as hard as you want, to strategize as much as you want, to learn from outside sources as much as you want. [Then] all of a sudden you're having to guide a team in doing that one thing that you think you can do really, really well. The secret is that oftentimes they know how to do it much better than you do.”“[The] transition [to leadership] was really hard. I'm not perfect at it by any means, but I think I've grown by way of leadership over the last couple of years. It's a transition that you don't need to make unless you really want to make that jump. t's not easier. There are great career paths in any of these disciplines that don't necessarily mean management.”“[Marketers] are worried about SLS. You're worried about contracts with your customers. You're worried about all of these things. The thing that our CEO has done a really good job of is that, he's tried to keep us focused on the things that matter most. As you're scaling quickly, [identify] the five priorities to align with and get all of the subsequent teams to also align to, in order to make sure that those things are perfect.”“My hiring mantra has always been to hire people, not for the role, but you need to find the right person. I would rather take a longer amount of time finding the right person than having to restart in three months or six months or, or whatever it is. My intent is to find the right person for the role and, and know that the longer-term impact of finding the right person is going to be much greater than filling the short-term need. That may just be a two or three-week difference.” “The one thing that I have found every year becomes more and more surprising -- and probably it shouldn't be a surprise because it continuously happens -- I think that the channel diversification that's happening here in the US and I should be inclusive of Canada, but largely the U.S. is changing. Historically the best way to reach them [was] via email, and then all of a sudden it started to become texts. We are a huge advocate of texting, but what's interesting is we've started to enter the world where consumers are using third-party apps as well to communicate. It's something that you see internationally; you go to Brazil, you might see it with WhatsApp; you go to Japan, you might see it with Line, and et cetera. The data shows in [our] report, 40% or something similar, are starting to use third-party apps on a daily basis to communicate with one another. It's a huge opportunity for brands. There's channel diversification that's happening, and you should take advantage of that.”“At the top of the funnel, we work to try and be everywhere and show that we are honed in, on local business for these businesses. It's why we do a ton of trade shows. We do a ton of trade publications. We do a lot of display advertisements or radio advertisements. A lot of times they just want to know you're legitimate. The hardest thing for local businesses is getting their trust; they've been burned so many times because they are so vulnerable. It's really important to us to make sure they know that we're going to be a partner to them. It's hard to do and there's not one answer that solves all.”BioNico Dato is the EVP of Marketing for Podium, the leading interaction management platform that enables companies with a local presence to conveniently connect at critical touchpoints and help them strengthen their business. Dato grew up in Bountiful, Utah, and attended the University of Utah, where he graduated in 2013 with a degree in economics. Prior to Podium, Dato helped run demand generation at Teleperformance and then managed Zane Benefits' marketing team.After joining Podium in 2015, he assisted in taking the company through Y Combinator in 2016 - becoming one of the highest revenue-generating companies ever to attend the accelerator. As a part of the executive team, he has also helped secure funding from IVP, Accel, GV (formerly Google Ventures), and Summit Partners. In his free time, Dato enjoys golfing and spending time with his wife, Rachel, and daughter, Penelope.---Marketing Trends podcast is brought to you by Salesforce. Discover marketing built on the world's number one CRM: Salesforce. Put your customer at the center of every interaction. Automate engagement with each customer. And build your marketing strategy around the entire customer journey. Salesforce. We bring marketing and engagement together. Learn more at salesforce.com/marketing.

The Late Kick with Josh Pate
Championship Weekend Preview | Late Kick Live Ep. 210

The Late Kick with Josh Pate

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 48:31


Late Kick Live Ep. 210 features Josh Pate reacting to the bombshell news out of LSU as the Tigers have named Brian Kelly head coach. This on the heels of Lincoln Riley heading to USC and Billy Napier taking over at Florida. Have we/will we ever see a coaching carousel season even close to this again? How wll Kelly fare at LSU? Josh also looks ahead to the SEC Championship Game in Atlanta as Alabama vs UGA is once again the main event for the conference crown. Will Kirby Smart and the Dawgs finally get over the hump or will Nick Saban's Crimson Tide be able to pull off the mild upset? We also preview other conference championship games including Oklahoma State vs Baylor, Oregon vs Utah, Michigan vs Iowa, and more. All that plus the latest whispers and intel on the coaching searches ongoing at Notre Dame and Oklahoma plus other jobs that could still come open AND best bets on the Ramen Noodle Express. Follow Josh on Twitter: @LateKickJosh Follow Josh on Instagram: @LateKickJosh Follow Josh on TikTok: @LateKickJosh Have a question for Josh? Email the show! Follow or Subscribe to The Late Kick with Josh Pate on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe to the 247Sports YouTube Channel! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Earth Wise
Large Solar Projects In The U.S. | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 2:00


The United States now has over 108 gigawatts of total solar generating capacity, which is enough to power about 19 million homes.  There are more than 3 million solar installations across the country, the majority of which are residential systems. The growth in solar power has been enormous over the past 13 years.  In 2008, […]

Breakfast Leadership
Featured Interview with Eva Helén

Breakfast Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 26:35


Eva Helén is a seasoned business executive and an experienced board member. She has over 20 years of experience in high tech, with international business, strategy, operations, and finance. She has refined her expertise in developing shareholder value in high growth companies, advising on business development and human capital. Eva serves as a board member of Vasion (formerly PrinterLogic), Utah, a provider of cloud printing and document handling. Eva previously served as a board member of Sanbolic, Inc., an enterprise software company focused on distributed computing and file system development for early cloud innovation, for 15 years. As a co-founder, President and COO of Sanbolic, Eva oversaw global sales and partner development in the areas of software, IT infrastructure, computing, networking, and cloud technologies, as well as the company's operation and finance. Sanbolic was acquired by Citrix in 2015. Eva previously co-founded Number One GM, Inc., a software development company and infrastructure integrator of storage solutions for the media industry, where she ran global sales. Autodesk acquired Number One GM in 1999. She began her U.S. career with international sales at Truevision, a Silicon Valley based hardware manufacturer. Eva is the CEO and founder of EQ Inspiration. Since 2017 she has influenced a broad range of technology companies to build more diverse workforces and inclusive cultures. As a speaker, coach and mentor to men and women, she is an influencer and thought leader for gender diversity, equity, and inclusion. She is currently authoring “Women in Tech, a Book for Guys”, based on her research and interviews with men in the tech industry. Eva gives generously of her time to women in business initiatives. Eva earned a Master in Business Administration degree from the University of Stockholm, Sweden, majoring in Organizational Behavior. Eva was born and raised in Sweden. Eva Helén is an entrepreneur with twenty years' experience in the technical fields. She is the founder of “EQ Inspiration,” offering keynotes, personal coaching and seminars for men and mixed groups in tech wishing to help advance women and minorities in the workplace. Social Media Links: twitter @ehelen instagram @eqinspiration2018 FB: Eva Helen and EQ Inspiration

GT’s Cash Considerations
THE BEAR Chris Fallica (@ChrisFallica) joins THE SHOW, CFB Conference Championship Weekend & NFL Odds/Analysis...THIS IS THE SHOW

GT’s Cash Considerations

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 84:03


Chris Fallica (@ChrisFallica) drops by to talk some College Football & good eats on the latest edition of the Cash Considerations Show!The Sportsbook Consigliere, Dave Sharapan - alongside his co-hosts Carl Hascall & Dan Alexander - are joined by THE BEAR before getting into CFB Conference Championship Weekend & NFL Week 13 free plays & analysis on sides, totals & props.  Come for the angles but stay for the laughs as the guys run down all the latest sports stories & action with plenty of fun along the way. Timestamps & Games Covered:Intro 00:00 -> 4:23Chris Fallica Interview 4:24 -> 26:18NBA (Warriors vs Suns) 27:00 -> 29:05CFB Layin' or Takin' Predictions (Oklahoma St vs Baylor, Georgia vs Alabama, Michigan vs Iowa, Pitt vs Wake Forest, Oregon vs Utah) 29:32 -> 37:48NFL In The Gun Odds & Analysis (Bengals vs Chargers, Arizona vs Chicago, Eagles vs Jets, Ravens vs Steelers, Raiders vs Washington, Chiefs vs Broncos & Bills vs Patriots) 37:50 -> 58:36One Total, One Side & One Prop Free Picks 38:39 -> 1:11:40Take A Minute 1:11:50 ->1:24:25

Zen Commuter
1742: John Goff

Zen Commuter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 41:40


Hailing from Utah, John Goff is a Qi Gong instructor as well as an energy work practitioner.  Even with those intensive fields, he is also a breath work specialist.  Come listen as John explains the nature of Breath and Energy work.

Walmart Radio Podcast
The Bo Show: From Savings to Shoutouts

Walmart Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 18:31


Cyber Monday is usually all about savings, but on The Bo Show, it was all about the shoutouts. They began with our Associate Caller of the Day, Brandie from Store 2710 in Ketchikan, Alaska, who gave a shoutout to the whole team. Sheila from Store 632 in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, kept the trend going by giving a shoutout to the entire store. The third time was a charm as the whole team at Store 3366 in Centerville, Utah, was recognized by Connor. More great shoutouts came in for the OGP team at Store 955 in Apopka, Florida, and Heather at Store 1090 in Jacksonville, Florida, gave a big shoutout to the Apparel team. With a day about savings and shoutouts, we also had some sensational anniversaries! Rebecca at Store 978 in Arkansas City, Kansas, celebrated 35 years with us, and both Dustin at Store 1624 in Bakersfield, California, and Randall from Club 6327 in Warren, Ohio, celebrated 30 years. Be sure to join us as we transform Cyber Monday into shoutout Monday.

Church News
Sister Uchtdorf and her daughter share how their German Christmas traditions help them celebrate the birth and life of the Savior

Church News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 28:16


Christmas is a favorite time of year for many Christians across the globe as they cherish the opportunity to celebrate the birth and life of Jesus Christ. Members of the Savior's Church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, each have unique and special Christmas traditions that come from their families, countries and cultures. This episode of the Church News podcast explores one family's Christmas traditions and the beautiful way they share them with others. Sister Harriet R. Uchtdorf and Antje Uchtdorf Evans, the wife and daughter of Elder Dieter F. Uchtdorf of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, discuss how family traditions from their German homeland help them focus on the Savior during the holiday season. They also talk about how they are sharing some of these European traditions through their service with The Christkindlmarkt at This Is The Place Heritage Park.  The Church News Podcast is a weekly podcast that invites listeners to make a journey of connection with members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints across the globe. Host Sarah Jane Weaver, reporter and editor for The Church News for a quarter-century, shares a unique view of the stories, events, and most important people who form this international faith. With each episode, listeners are asked to embark on a journey to learn from one another and ponder, “What do I know now?” because of the experience. Produced by KellieAnn Halvorsen. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Lift + Love
Is my child being LGBTQ just a phase?

Lift + Love

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 43:06


When we talk to mom's of children who just came out - this is the number one question.  Is this just a phase?  Is this a trend?  All of their friends seem to be doing this. In this episode we talk with Dr. Lacey Bagley, LMFT who owns Celebrate LGBTQIA+ Therapy Services in Provo, Utah.  She helps us break "Is this just a phase?" down and gives us some great tips on how to parent and help your LGTBQ child as they explore their identity. To contact Dr. Lacey you can reach: Website: Celebrate Therapy/Dr. Lacey Celebratetherapy Instagram or Dr. Lacey Bagley Instagram If you are looking to learn the tools and to get the coaching that will help your LGBTQ family thrive while gaining access to other families on this journey than the Lift and Love Community is the place for you.  For details on how to join go to www.liftandlove.org/community Join us for any of our free monthly Lift+Love Support Groups - link sign up at Lift+Love Support . For additional support and help please reach out to us on our IG accounts at Lift+Love and Jenie Hunter Coaching    

The Todd Herman Show
Hour 2: The Great Fauci Off

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 38:19


The Seattle King County prosecutor asked for bullet proof glass, Kevin McCarthy thinks we can fix tis country by firing Nancy Pelosi, committees in Utah are about to allow boys to play in girls sports, // The Fauci Off: John Curley vs Todd Herman Moderated by Dori Monson // JUST A FEW MORE THINGS See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

College Draft: NFL Draft Podcast
2021 - Conference Championship Preview

College Draft: NFL Draft Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 29:54


This week on the College Draft podcast, Ross Tucker & Emory Hunt discuss the College Football head coaching moves (3:00) before previewing this weekend's top games including: Conference USA - Western Kentucky at UTSA (7:25) Pac 12 - Oregon vs Utah (11:27) FCS - Holy Cross at Villanova (18:00) Big XII - Baylor vs Oklahoma State (21:38) BigTen - Michigan vs Iowa (23:45) Download the DraftKings Sports Book App and use code ROSS for a sign up bonus up to $1,000 Connect with the Pod Website -  https://www.rosstucker.com Become A Patron - https://www.patreon.com/RTMedia Podcast Twitter - https://twitter.com/RossTuckerPod Podcast Instagram -  https://www.instagram.com/rosstuckerpod/ Ross Twitter -  https://twitter.com/RossTuckerNFL Ross Instagram -  https://www.instagram.com/rosstuckernfl/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Solarpreneur
The 1 Thing That Prevents Most People From Hitting Sales Goals

The Solarpreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 19:55


DOWNLOAD SOLCIETY APP NOW!Speaker 1 (00:03):Welcome to the Solarpreneur podcast, where we teach you to take your solar business to the next level. My name is Taylor Armstrong and I went from $50 in my bank account and struggling for groceries to closing 150 deals in a year and cracking the code on why sales reps fail. I teach you to avoid the mistakes I made and bringing the top solar dogs, the industry to let you in on the secrets of generating more leads, falling up like a pro and closing more deals. What is a Solarpreneur you might ask a Solarpreneur is a new breed of solar pro that is willing to do whatever it takes to achieve mastery and you are about to become one.Speaker 2 (00:44):The 1 thing that prevents most solar salespeople from hitting their goals and closing deals. That's what we're going to be jamming on today. That and much more coming up on today's podcast. My name's Taylor Armstrong. I'm here to help you close more deals, generate more leads and referrals, and hopefully have a much better time in this great solar industry. Hope you had a happy Thanksgiving, good time with your family. Hope you took the day off. That would be a good day to go and knock. Some doors hit up some people, but I hope that you can take Thanksgiving and Christmas off at least from knocking doors, but a great Turkey day. Great time with friends and family. Hopefully you enjoyed it today. We're going to be talking about something a little bit different, and I love this topic because it's something that I have a lot to learn on. So I love hearing from experts on the topic and that is the topic of finances.Speaker 2 (01:43):Then I'm going to tie that into what that has to do with closing deals and hitting your goals. But it's actually been a big piece. That's helped me out tremendously to close more deals is thinking more about the financial side of things. And the reason we're talking about this a little bit more right now is because if you miss the big announcement we brought on our first ever sponsors of the show, and that is our friends over at Pi Syndicate. If you hadn't noticed, we brought Jerry, if you sell him the show and he started this financial mastermind basically to help people get their mind, right? When it comes to the money piece of the puzzle. So big thank you to them. And if you want to get, you know, your finances, right, definitely hit them up. Tell them you heard about them from the podcast and they're going to hook you up.Speaker 2 (02:37):They're going to take care of you. So go over to Pius in the get.com. We'll post their a website in the show notes of this, go check them out, let them know you appreciate them sponsoring the show and next up. So we're gonna actually hear from their CFO, his name's Austin. And he's going to share a little bit more about their vision and goal is with Pi Syndicate. But anyways, back to the topic at hand of the show today, and so something that prevents people from closing deals more than you think is they have no financial plan in place. And I've talked about this book a lot recently, a lot of podcasts, but closer survival guide by Grant Cardone. He lists this matter of fact is one of the top 10 reasons that closers fail is they don't have a financial plan in place. And we're going to get into what exactly is a financial plan, because I didn't even know what this was when I first read it.Speaker 2 (03:40):It's like, what is he talking about? Financial planning. What was that to do with closing deals? So I didn't expect it. Maybe you don't expect that either, but before we talked about what is a financial plan first, I just want to mention that you need to get your head right around money. If you're like, I don't know if anyone's like me, but I had an enormous scarcity mindset around money. And most you've heard my story. I was in college at Southern Utah university. I was donating plasma to pay my rent. And basically my summers, a pest control. Didn't go as well as I hoped. So I didn't even have money to pay my rent at the time as donating plasma. And I was that kid on campus that was going to every single club event, every single thing to try and get just some free food.Speaker 2 (04:36):If you've been on campuses, you know, they do those events all the time where they're handing out free pizza, where there might need to come check out the clubs. I wasted so many hours go to these events, listening to pointless meetings, just because I knew there was going to be a slice of pizza at the end. That's how desperate I was. I literally did not want us want to spend a dime out of my pocket. If I knew I'd go get free food somewhere. And that was just the tip of iceberg. I was the guy that our school had this discount card it's called disturbing student heard where every single restaurant in town, then a deal for college students was mostly like, buy one, get one free burgers. Or I don't know if some sort of like bonus you got with your meal.Speaker 2 (05:24):Every single day I went on in college. I refuse to go to any place that was not listed on this card. So I'm like, I'm not paying a dime over what I should. I'm going to get some type of deal. I'm going to get some type of discount or else I'm not going there. So that was me pretty sad. Right. And I didn't have money. So I mean, it was driven by that. That's not like, you know, that was kind of the factors when you're broke, you do pretty crazy stuff. And the craziest thing I probably did was we even went on a, we went on a trip with some buddies freshman year at college, we decided, Hey, we're going to go out to California. We're going to go to six flags. Knott's Berry farm. I dunno, a few different places. And we went there.Speaker 2 (06:13):I was so broke. I was literally finding leftover concessions on people's tables at six flags. I was going around if I saw a piece of pizza or some fries that looked like they hadn't been touched, I was snagging people's foods off tables, pretty nasty. Right? So I did some extreme stuff. I was broke and this caused me just like some crazy distress. And my head caused some crazy thoughts about money that I was never going to have money. I was always going to be short on money. I was always going to be strapped for cash. So just causes an enormous scarcity mindset. And they've seen it in a few of my friends. I didn't grow up. My parents weren't broke or anything. My dad's a dentist. So, you know, upper middle class, we always have money. We always, you know, never went hungry, nothing crazy like that, but I just never really had jobs.Speaker 2 (07:12):I was a music major. So I was always practicing my drums, my percussion. I didn't have time to go work. So if you're like me, if you had these, if you had these types of thoughts in your head, they're likely still carried over to this day. And that's part of what I struggle with now is I still find myself having these thoughts where I don't have money. I'm not going to be able to provide for my family. I'm going to be short on cash. Okay. And it's not an issue now, but they still creep up just because it was so ingrained in my head, back in my college days and back growing up that I didn't have money to, you know, buy what I wanted. Guess this is the first step before you create a financial plan, do you get your mindset right around money?Speaker 2 (08:05):It's a work in progress for me, but think how can you get your mindset right around cash. Someone that I look up to a lot that talks about this topic all the time is river Skinner. He was a guest on the podcast, but he has his whole abundance kind of movement. He calls it. He's always preaching about being more abundant. He's always going to gas stations and like cheering that he's paying four or five bucks a gallon for gas. Cause he's abundant. So think how can you be more abundant? How can you get rid of those scarcity mindset, feelings around money? Because we don't do it. It's going to be holding you back in your financial goals. It's going to make it tougher to close deals. It's going to make it tougher to have success in the solar industry. So be abundance, something that helped me is just actually having physical cash, handling it these days.Speaker 2 (09:05):Most people don't carry on physical cash. Most people don't even look at their dollar bills, right? It's all in Venmo. It's own PayPal. It's all in cash app, whatever, but they're not seeing the physical cash. So if you can't see it, how are you going to know you have the money, right? You go look at the bank account, but something that actually helped me tremendously go, don't go get a withdrawal of actual physical cash. And I kept in an envelope for a months. I shouldn't do this again would probably help now. But something I did for months, I would get, I had a hundred dollar bill, $50 bill, $200 bill, $10 bill. I would take them out and I would physically handle them every day. And I would just envision myself having extra cash. I would envision myself never being short on that money.Speaker 2 (10:00):I was handling in my hand and I was doing affirmations around it. So try that, go print out some physical data. Can you print it out, but go withdraw some physical cash, have it in an envelope and maybe get your mind, get your mind wrapped around that you have an abundance of cash. Is that step number one, make sure you get your mind right around money. And then step number two is get that financial plan in place. Ok, game Grant Cardone talks about this as one of the reasons why closers still, they don't have the plan in place. So if you have the book, it's step number seven, it's on page 66. He talks about this and go read the whole thing if you want. He just has a couple pages on it, but just to summarize it, he talks at the end, say most people correctly estimate their financial needs or never created a financial plan at all.Speaker 2 (11:04):Get a financial plan today and make sure it is going to do more than pay the bills, but also create financial freedom for you in your household, you will start closing more deals and you'll quit underestimating the amount of effort, energy, and enthusiasm. It takes to get a deal closed. The bottom line is this. If you underestimate what it takes to create real financial freedom, then it only makes sense that you will underestimate what it takes to close a deal. Mike drop right there. Right? And I can personally test to this. One of the recent best months of sales that I had recently is we were investing in this rental property. Is some of you that follow me over on Instagram. I talked about how we're getting a rental property for an Airbnb over in Utah. And that month I just had this excitement like, man, I want to go out and create this money so I can put it towards that property.Speaker 2 (12:03):In that month I had, I think it was 14 deals closed 13, 14, where the previous months I always had, I was closing, I don't know, 6, 7, 8, but I had that extra level of excitement that I was putting my money towards something that I was excited about towards an investment for my future can that's part of having a financial plan in place is your planning for how you're going to create extra income in your planning. Then miss Mintz, you're going to make with that extra income, you're planning your future with it. You're not just paying the bills. And you think of these companies that just cut costs, cut costs, cut costs, just strict budget that you'll also follow these people like Dave Ramsey, Susie Orman, who followed me into Cornell. And he bashed on them all the time because what do they talk about? They talk about just living by a super strict budget, cutting costs, cutting, chopping up your credit cards, right?Speaker 2 (13:01):And just, you know, live in his slim as you can. But I think it's super powerful, especially in sales, go out and close more deals to create your financial freedom, right? I want to live like a king and have extra money from my investments. And obviously, you know, there's a balance from it. You know, I'm going to go bolt insane amounts of money. You shouldn't be dropping thousands of dollars at the club every weekend, right? So within reason, but think how can you create that extra income to live, how you want to live and then have that extra money for your investments. So I think the first step in creating that financial plan is yes, figure out how much money you need to live. It. You do want to figure out what is your budget? What exactly you're going to do? You know, how much money do you need to live, right?Speaker 2 (13:57):And how much money do you need to fund future retirement plans, vacations children's education, all that, stuff like that. And then second Grant Cardone talks about this. Figure out how much money you actually need to bring in monthly in order to create solvency and get all that you want accomplished, which solvent seat is the ability of an entity to pay its debts with available cash. So your financial plan should include clearly state and monetary goals. Exactly how you're going to create surpluses of money, what to do with the surpluses and investments. So this is very important. Go and write down, have your financial plan written down. How much do you need to live? Hey, you should be doing that. If you haven't done that, go track, you know, figure out all your exact expenses, figuring out how much you need to live to put a week each month, but then figure out what is your surplus.Speaker 2 (14:55):So how much surplus do you want to have each month? What are you going to do with that? Write down your investments in this goes into why I think joining something like Pi Syndicates is a great idea because if you don't know, if you're like me, you don't know what 10 miss your money in it all. I'll be honest. I am not a financial group. I'm not good with investments. And that's why I never invested really in the past. That's why it still can meet, taken me until now to get my first rental properties, because I just thought, oh, I don't know where to look. I don't know. I don't know how to tell if this is a good deal or if it's going to cash flow. But if you can be around a group of people who know what they're doing, a mastermind style, like Pi Syndicate guys that have, you know, multi-multi millionaires that you know, have tons of different investments that are super successful.Speaker 2 (15:55):iThat's going to jumpstart the process. So that's why I decided to have them as the sponsor for the show is because so many people in this industry, they can make money, but what are they doing with it? And are they paying all the uncle, Sam, if that's the other thing, that's super powerful joining pipes. And they get, you're going to learn how to actually take that money. You would be given to uncle Sam and investing it and avoiding what you would probably paying taxes otherwise. So that's the two big steps of the day. And this is why a lot of people felt you don't have a financial plan. So today, wherever you are after your workout, after your ride out to area, wherever you're listening to this, sometime today, take out your notes app, take out a pad of paper, write down what is your financial plan?Speaker 2 (16:48):How much do you need to have the live every month? And then how much surplus are you going to have every month? What are you going to do with that? Write it out, get it in front of you, slap it on the mirror, put it on a vision board. If you're into that stuff, I think is super cool to have maybe print out a picture to go with it. And then that's how you're going to create this excitement. I guarantee you, if you do this, it's going to motivate you to push harder and deals than you were before. And something that I feel like I became a better closer when I had a kid actually just had my second kid. Now, when I'm in deals, I know, okay. I want to feed my kids. I want to know on for my kids' future. So it allows me to push harder to hang in deals longer than I would otherwise it's.Speaker 2 (17:40):So what's that motivation that you have? What stage you're in, how are we going to create that extra motivation to push hard in those deals? Yeah. You're not going to be pulling people's teeth, but you're going to stick in that deal and this is the way to do it. So that's the topic of today. Make sure you get your mind right around your buddy. And then step two, have that financial plan in place. It's going to change your game in solar. I promise you. So let me know what you think of this topic. Let me know if you like these financial topics. Next episode, we're going to have Austin on the show. He's going to dive in a little more. He's the expert on this stuff. So you're gonna hear from him. So don't miss out and get your finances, right? Close. Some deals deals this week and we will see you on the next episode. Peace.Speaker 3 (18:32):Hey, Solarpreneurs quick question. What if you could surround yourself with the industry's top performing sales pros, marketers, and CEOs, and learn from their experience and wisdom in less than 20 minutes a day. For the last three years, I've been placed in the fortunate position to interview dozens of elite level solar professionals and learn exactly what they do behind closed doors to build their solar careers to an all-star level. That's why I want to make a truly special announcement about the new learning community, exclusively for solar professionals to learn, compete, and win with top performers in the industry. And it's called the Solciety, this learning community with designed from the ground up to level the playing field to give solar pros access to proven members who want to give back to this community and help you or your team to be held accountable by the industry. Brightest minds four, are you ready for it? Less than $3 and 45 cents a day currently Solciety is open, launched, and ready to be enrolled. So go to Solciety.co To learn more and join the learning experience. Now this is exclusively for Solarpreneur listeners. So be sure to go to solciety.co and join. We'll see you on the inside. 

Eyes For Ears
Residency/Fellowship Rank List Reflections

Eyes For Ears

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 84:40


For our 100th episode, we get Amanda, Andrew and Ben together to reflect on their residency and fellowship training to discuss what they thought was important and what they think is actually important in training and for their rank list. These thoughts are our own, and do not reflect the opinions of any institution we have trained or worked at. Thank you to all of our supporters and listeners on the way to episode 100!    Amanda Redfern did her residency at Yale, her neuro-ophthalmology fellowship at the Moran Eye Center at the University of Utah, and is now faculty doing both neuro-ophthalmology and comprehensive ophthalmology at the Casey Eye Institute at OHSU. Andrew Pouw did his residency at Yale, his glaucoma fellowship at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins University, and is now faculty at the University of Iowa. Ben Young did his residency at Yale, is currently doing his vitreoretinal surgery fellowship at the Kellogg Eye Center at the University of Michigan, and is signed to join the faculty at the Casey Eye Institute at OHSU.

PETPIX ACADEMY with Vasi Siedman
The bois strive every day to carry on Nigel's dream of them being next top model!

PETPIX ACADEMY with Vasi Siedman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 39:06


Aubrey is from Utah. There are four current boys: Reggie, Gibby, Brutus, and Leroy. Nigel was one of the original rats that I owned and he inspired the instagram and tiktok. If you go far enough back, youll find pictures of him on instagram! Currently Aubrey&Nigel  are working with Lucas Stowe, Ada Nieves, and Jade and Coral to design Leroy custom pet couture. We love working with Branda to showcase their products, as well. Nigel had over 40K followers in Tiktok.The bois strive every day to carry on Nigel's dream of them being next top model!Connect with Aubrey&Nigel:Instagram: @Nigel_the_ratboi Tiktok: @Nigel_the_ratboi ONE TIME ONLY!!! GET most of our courses only for $17use coupon CYBER21 - offer valid until November 30. 

Locked On Blazers – Daily Podcast On The Portland Trail Blazers
Trail Blazers cap 0-3 road trip with a loss Utah Jazz + Finding reasons for optimism

Locked On Blazers – Daily Podcast On The Portland Trail Blazers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 35:22


The Portland Trail Blazers lost to the Utah Jazz 129-107 on Monday night, capping an 0-3 road swing with a disheartening loss in Salt Lake City. Utah shredded Portland in the second half as the Blazers fell to 1-10 in road games to begin the season. But look, it's not all bad news. Anfernee Simons was a legit bright spot, Jusuf Nurkic had a nice night, uhhh the Blazers wore nice jerseys, too. Plus, the next month offers a bunch of home games with a chance to fattened up with wins in the Moda Center and build some good habits heading into 2022. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Bike Shed
317: Burn The Ships!

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 41:41


Steph gives an update about RSpec focus and how she often forgets to remove the focus feature from tests. She figured out two solutions: one using Rubocop, and the other from a Twitter user, suggesting using a GitHub gist. She also suggests that if you're one of those people who misses being in an office environment, you check out soundofcolleagues.com for ambient office noise selection. Chris has been struggling to actually do any coding and is adjusting to doing more product management and shares some strategies that have been helping him. They answer a listener question about dealing with large pull requests and how it's hard to recognize a good seam to break them up when you are in the thick of one. This episode is brought to you by ScoutAPM (https://scoutapm.com/bikeshed). Give Scout a try for free today and Scout will donate $5 to the open source project of your choice when you deploy. Twitter note re: rspec-retry (https://twitter.com/jasonrudolph/status/1458416077726158852) soundofcolleagues.com (https://soundofcolleagues.com) mailcheck (https://github.com/mailcheck/mailcheck) Inertia.js (https://inertiajs.com/) Svelte (https://svelte.dev/) devise (https://github.com/heartcombo/devise) clearance (https://github.com/thoughtbot/clearance) Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of The Bike Shed! Transcript: CHRIS: One day, I'll grow up. It's fine. I look forward to that day. But today, I don't think it's that day. Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. So, Steph, what's new in your world? STEPH: Hey, Chris. Well, in some fun news, Utah started his professional training as of this morning, which I'm very excited about. Because we've been working with him to work on being good with walking on a leash, FYI, he's not, [laughs] and also being good about not jumping on people. And essentially, being a really good roommate. And he started training today, and we are using an e-collar, which initially I was really hesitant about because I don't want it to hurt him in any way. But now that I have felt the e-collar myself and we've had a first day with it, it's going super well. I'm very excited for where this is headed. CHRIS: That's very exciting. When does he start paying rent? STEPH: Ooh. I'll have to check with him, or I guess I have set those boundaries. That's my job. CHRIS: I just figured that's a core part of being a good roommate. But maybe we've got baby steps or doggy steps to get there. But that's exciting. I'm glad [laughs] that the first day of training is going well. STEPH: Yeah, it's going great. And the place that we're going to the trainer they have horses, and mules, and goats. And so now I have a very cute video of him trying to play with a goat, and the goat was having none of it. But it's still all very cute. In tech-related news, I have an update for when you and I were recently chatting about the RSpec focus and how I mentioned that I often forget to remove the focus feature from tests. And so then that goes up to a PR, and I have to rely on a kind human to let me know, and then I remove it. Or worst-case scenario, it gets merged into the main branch. And for anyone that's not on Twitter, I just wanted to share an update because I also shared something there. But the resolution for what I was looking for there's already a rule that's written into Rubocop, but it's specifically written in the Rubocop RSpec codebase. And with that rule, you can essentially just say, hey, let me know anytime that a test is using the focus metadata, and then make sure to let me know and fail. And then if you don't want to actually include all of Rubocop into your project because Rubocop is pretty opinionated, you can still add Rubocop to your project, but you can specifically add Rubocop RSpec, and then you can say, hey, all other rules disabled by default, but then you can enable that specific rule. So then, that way, you will catch all of your focus tests. There's also another approach that someone on Twitter shared with us recently from Marz Drel. And Marz shared specifically a really nice simple GitHub Gist that documents or exemplifies that you can add an environment variable that checks to say, hey, if we're in CI mode, then add a before hook. And then that before hook will look for any examples that are using that focus metadata, and then it's going to raise. And then if we're not in CI mode, then don't do anything, don't raise, and carry on. And that's just a really nice simple addition if someone didn't want to pull in Rubocop into their project. CHRIS: Both of those definitely sound like great options. I don't think we have Rubocop on the current project that I'm working on. But I think the RSpec focus thing, the metadata one, seems like it'll work great. More generally, I just want to thank folks out there who listen to the show and then write back in like, "Hey, this is probably what you want." There was a similar thread that someone shared around the RSpec::Retry stuff that I was talking about recently and the failure mode there and trying to get that into the Junit Reporter. And so they had some suggestions around that. Jason Rudolph on Twitter reached out, sharing just his initial exploration and thoughts on how it might be possible to extend the XML reports that are generated and capture a flaky test in that way. So that's really interesting. And again, just really love that folks are listening to the things that we say and then even adding on to them and continuing the conversation. So thanks to everybody for sharing those things. STEPH: Yeah, it's incredibly helpful. And then one other fun thing that I'd love to share, and I found this out from someone else at thoughtbot because they had shared it recently. But it's a neat website called soundofcolleagues.com. And I know you've got your laptop in front of you. So if you'll go visit it, it'll be neat to see as we're talking through it. For anyone else that wants to pull it up, too, we'll include a link in the show notes. But it's a neat project that someone started where you can bump up the sounds that you would normally hear in an office. So maybe you want to bump up background noise of people or an open window. There's one specifically for printers and a coffee machine, and keyboards are on there as well. [laughs] I have discovered I am partial open window and partial rain, although rain is just always my go-to. I like the sound of rain for when I'm working. CHRIS: Gentle rain is definitely nice white noise in general. I've seen this for coffee shops, but I haven't seen the particular one. Also, yes, I definitely know how to spell the word colleague on the first of three tries. Definitely didn't have to rely on Google for that one. But yeah, nice site there. I enjoy that. STEPH: I tried the keyboard option that's on there because I was like, oh yeah, I'm totally going to be into this. This is going to be my jam. I don't think it is because I realized that I'm very biased. I like the sound of my own keyboard. So I had to shush the other one and just listen to the rain and the open window. But that's some of the fun things that are going on in my world today. What's new in your world? CHRIS: I'm just now spending a moment with the keyboard sound. It's a very muted keyboard. I want a little more clackety. STEPH: A little more clackety? CHRIS: I was assuming it would be too much clackety, and that would be the problem. But it sounds more mushy. Maybe we can pipe in some of the sound here [laughs] at this point. Or we can link to these sounds, and everyone can dial up the keyboards to 100. But I, too, am partial to the sounds of my own keyboard. But what's new in my world? This past week and I think probably even a little bit more of the prior week, I've been noticing that I've been struggling to actually do any coding, which has been interesting to observe. And again, trying to observe it, not necessarily judge it, although if that's not the thing that we want to be doing, then try and improve that. But mostly trying to observe what's going on, what is taking my time. A lot of it is product management type work. So I am spending a good amount of time trying to gather the different voices and understand what is the work to be done, and then shape that into the backlog and make sure that that's clear and ready for the team to pick up. And then, thankfully, the other two developers that are working on the project are fantastically prolific. So they're often very quickly working through the work that has been set up in front of them. And so I'm trying to then be proactive and respond to the code. But there's almost a cycle to it where I'm just staying out in front of them, but they're catching up with everything that's going on. So it's something that I'm trying again to be intentional about, name, share some of that back up with the group. If there are things that I'm doing that I don't uniquely need to be doing, then let's share as much of that knowledge as possible. But one thing that I will say is the product management, shaping the backlog work is exhausting. I am astonished by just how drained I am at the end of the day. And I'm like, I don't even really feel like I did anything. I didn't write any code, but I am just completely spent. And there really is something to when the work is clear, just doing the work, I can actually find energizing. And it's fun, and I can get in flow state. And sometimes, I'll be drained in a certain way. But the work of taking a bunch of different slack threads, and communications, and meetings, and synthesizing that down, and then determining what the work needs to look like moving forward, and providing enough clarity but then not over constraining and not providing too much clarity. And there are so many micro-decisions that are being made in there. And I'm just spent at the end of the day, and I have so much...I've always had a lot of respect for product managers and folks that are existing in that interstitial space and trying to make sense of the noise, especially of a growing company, but all the more so this week as I've been feeling some of that myself. STEPH: I totally agree. I have felt that having a strong product manager really makes or breaks a project for me where even though having technical leadership is really nice, I'd prefer someone that's really strong at the product knowledge and then helping direct where the product is headed. That is incredibly helpful. Like you mentioned, the work is exhausting. There's someone that joined the thoughtbot team fairly recently, and I was chatting with them about what type of projects they would be interested in working on. And one of their responses was, "I'd love to work on a project with a strong product manager because I have been doing that a fair amount for recent years. And I would love to get back to just focusing on coding." And so I think they enjoyed some of the work, but they just recognize it's exhausting. And I'd really like to just get back to writing code for a while. CHRIS: Yeah, I'm definitely in that space. And I think there's a ton of value to spending a little bit of time, like having any developer at some point in their career spend a little bit of time managing the backlog, and you will learn a bunch from that. But I'm also in the space of I would love to just turn on some music and code for a while. That sounds fun. There's a lot of work to be done right now. I'd love to just be in there doing the work. But sometimes, out of necessity, the defining of the work is the thing that's important. And so, I think I've been correctly assessing the most important thing. And that that has consistently for a while now been the defining and responding to the work that's in process as opposed to doing it myself. But, man, I really hope I get to dive back into the code sometime and use my clackety keyboard to its fullest extent. STEPH: Have you found any particular strategies that really help you with the product management work? CHRIS: I will say that I think this is a competency. This is a skillset and a career path that...again, I've been at plenty of organizations that I don't think respected the role as much as it should be. But it's an incredibly hard role and multidisciplinary communication at the core of it. And so I don't think I'm great at it is the thing that I'll say. So everything that follows is just to be clear; I'm not saying that I'm great at this, but I have been doing some of it. So here are some thoughts that I have. I think a lot of it is in reaction to where I felt like the work was clear. So I have a sense of what it looks like when I can go to the backlog, trust that it is in a roughly solid priority order, pick up a piece of work and immediately go to work on it. And understand what are the end-user implications of this piece of work? Where would I start on it like, how technically? What's a rough approach that I would have? And getting that level of specificity just right. So it's not overconstrained, but it's not under constrained. So having experienced that on the developer side, I try and then use that to shape some of the guidance that I'm putting into, say, the Trello tickets that I'm writing up here. We recently introduced Trello epics, which is I want to say like an add-on. And that allows us just the tiniest bit of product management, like one level up. So instead of just having cards and a list that is like, here's the work to be done, we now have an epics list that is separate to it, and it links between a card and its associated epics. So it's like project and action within that project. And just that little touch of structure there has been really, really useful to help look at like, okay, what are the big pieces that we're trying to move? And then how do they break down into the smaller pieces? So a tiny, tiny bit of fanciness in our product management tool, not Jira-like not going in that direction yet for as long as I cannot. But that little bit of structure. And then thinking about what has been useful to me as I pick up tickets. And then, as always, trying to just always be cognizant of what is the user's experience here? What problem am I trying to solve for them? What is their experience going to be? How will they know how to work with this feature? And just always asking that and then framing the work to be done in the context of that. STEPH: I like how you're adamant about a little bit of fanciness but not all the way to Jira-like. I also like how you highlighted end-users. All of that, I think, is awesome when developers are able to expand their role to experience all the other facets of building software. CHRIS: Yeah, definitely. I think that whole list of all of the different facets of where our work interacts with different groups. The more empathy or, the more experience that you can have there, the better that you'll be able to understand how to communicate there, how to express things in terms, et cetera, et cetera. So a huge fan of all of those ideas. I am ready to just get back in the code for a few minutes, though. But for now, for as long as necessary, I'll do some of this work. But I am trying to find my way to other things. In terms of actual feature work that we're working on, one of the things that we're doing right now is restructuring our onboarding. So when a user comes and signs up to the website and then subsequently has to fill out a handful of other forms, there's actually an external system that we've been working with that houses some of the core data of our application. And they have a hosted application form. So we can send the user over to them, and the user fills out the rest of the application on this other system's site. And then they get redirected back to us. And everything's got nice DNS entries for a particular subdomain and whatnot. So it looks roughly consistent. There's some branding. But it's still someone else's UI, essentially. And we were feeling enough pain from that experience. We were like; you know what? It's time. We're going to bring this back in-house. We're going to do all the forms ourselves. We're going to do a nice progressive little progress bar. You can see all the steps as you're going through onboarding. We're just going to own that more because that's a core part of the experience that we're building here. So biting the bullet, deciding to do that. But there's an interesting edge case that we run into, which is we are using Devise for authentication. Totally makes sense. We're in Rails context; there we go. It's the thing to use. But Devise exists in truly the Rails world. So like HTML ERB templates, the controllers have certain expectations as to what's going on. So thus far, we've just let that exist in that world and everything else we're building in Inertia and Svelte. But we're just now starting to feel enough of the pain, and that Devise exists in this other context. And for a while, we just kept saying, "You know what? It's not worth the effort to port it over. It's fine." Because we're using Tailwind, we have a consistent design language that we can use across them. That said, the components are drifting a little bit. And it's like, oh, this one's got a rounded corner like this, and that one's got this color. And we don't have the disabled style. But it is nice that it's not completely distinct. But we have finally decided it is time. We need to port this thing over because we feel like the onboarding and authentication type flows; they're actually a big part of the user experience or at least the first run user experience when someone's signing up to our site. So we want to own that a little bit more. One of the things that I ran into as I was trying to introduce Mailcheck, which is a library that I've talked about, I think in a previous episode...but basically, you can have it observe a field and if someone types in like, user@gmaip.com, you can like, did you mean gmail.com? And then go from there. And I think there's more subtlety. They can maybe even look up MX records and things like that. But basically validate an email address heuristically and offer the nice, very friendly to a user, "Hey, did you mean this instead?" So not a full validation that says, "No, you cannot put your email address," because maybe you have a weird one that sounds like Gmail but isn't. But that's a little bit trickier to implement both on the Devise side and then in any other place that we have an email input. And so what we want to do is port over to Inertia and Svelte, and then everything's in our nice, happy context with all our components and all the other work that we're doing. And it really does just highlight how much I've come to enjoy working with Inertia and Svelte. They are fantastic technologies. And now I just want absolutely everything to be in them. So we're finally going to bite the bullet, and I think port those over a little bit after we get the current batch of work done. But soon, soon, that's the goal. STEPH: I'm having a bit of déjà vu where I feel like there was a project that you were working on that was using Devise, and then removing Devise and replacing it with something else was a challenge. Does that ring a bell? CHRIS: Yes, that is accurate. So I had a project that I worked on where we had both Devise and Clearance was actually what was going on. There were basically two different applications that existed; one was using Clearance, the later one used Devise. But then we folded those two applications back together. And by virtue of that, I tried to unify the authentication schemes, and it was like, nope, not going to happen. And then we didn't. STEPH: And then we didn't. [laughs] I like that ending. CHRIS: Well, sometimes you don't. [laughs] STEPH: Yeah, I love that ending because it reflects reality. Sometimes that just happens. In fact, I'm going to segue for just a moment because you're reminding me that there's something I don't think I've shared with you yet. On my previous project, there was a particular feature. It was a big feature that someone had picked up and worked on. And at one point, we were essentially playing hot potato with this feature because we hadn't gotten it to the point that it was merged. There was too much that was happening in that pull request, although then we ended up merging it. But then we found lots of bugs. And it was just one of those features that we couldn't really get across the finish line. There was always something else that was wrong with it or needed to be done or needed to be considered. And we'd reach that point where Chad Pytel, who is on the project, was like, "We're either going to finish this, or we're going to throw it away." And I felt a little guilty saying this, and I was like, "I vote we throw it away. I have lots of concerns about this. We are essentially reimplementing another complex workflow. But now, we are implementing it pretty differently in another portion of the application. It's going to be hard to manage. The cost of adding this and maintaining this is a really high concern." And so he talked with the rest of the team and came back, and he's like, "Yep, we're going to throw it away." And so then he issued a PR, and we removed it. And it was one of those moments of like; this isn't great because then we have invested hours into this, and now we are taking it away. But it also felt really good that that's always an option. And that was the better option because it was either we're going to continue sinking more time into this, or we can stop it now. And then we can move on to more important work. CHRIS: Sunk costs and all that. STEPH: Yeah. I feel like it's so rare when that really happens because then we just feel dedicated to like, well, we're going to make this valuable to somebody. We're going to keep this. And in this case, we just threw it away. It's very nice. CHRIS: There's a similar anecdote that I remember. Actually, I think it's happened more than once. But very particularly, we were working on a system. And this was with our friend, Matt Sumner, a friend of the show, as well been on a few times. And Matt was working on the project. And we got to a point where we had two competing implementations of a given workflow, and we were opting to go with the new one. But there were folks that were saying, "Let's keep the code around for the old one." And Matt was like, "Absolutely not. If we do that, we might go...no, this will be bad. Then we have to maintain that code. We need to burn the ships," as he said. And he actually named the pull request burn the ships where he just removed all the code. And I was like, I like your style, man. You made a decision here. We collectively made a decision. And then this is a classic Matt Sumner move. But he did the thing that we said we were going to do. And he just held that line. And I really appreciated it. And it's a voice that I have in the back of my head often now, which is just like, no, burn the ships. If we need it, it'll be in Git history. We can recover it. But it's going to need to be handled in the interim. We don't want to have to support that code right now and for however long until we actually decide to remove it from the codebase. So let's get rid of it. And if we really need it, well, then we'll resurrect it, but for now, burn the ships. And I like that. STEPH: I like that too. I think it's one of those areas where it takes experience to feel that pain too. If you're pretty new to writing code, you're going to think, well, we can keep it around. There's no harm. And so it often has to be that sage, that person who's been around long enough and felt some pain from making that decision in prior centuries or years. And he's like, "No, we're not going to do this." The WE collective of developers who have experienced the pain from this understand that that's not a good choice. And so we're going to burn the ships instead. But it is one of those that if you're newer, you won't think that way. And I think that's totally reasonable that you wouldn't think that immediately. CHRIS: I think that tacit knowledge that oh, I've gone through this before, and I've experienced the pain, and now let me tell you about that. And let me try and share that with you because there's always the cost-benefit trade-off. Because if that code stays in the codebase, then we know it works because we've kept it around for that whole time. And so there's a nicety to that, but there's a cost, that maintenance cost. And being able to express that well and being able to say, "I've been here, and let me tell you a tale," but do it in a way that doesn't sound overly condescending or explainy or things like that. I think that's a very subtle skill and a very important one, and frankly, really hard one to get right. I'm not sure I always hit the mark on that where I'm just like, "No, can't do it. It's bad." I think it's very easy to end up in a space where you're just like, "No, it's bad." And they're like, "But why?" And you're like, "Because it's bad. Trust me." It's like, well, I feel like you do need to be able to explain the stories, the experiences that you've had in the past, the anecdotes that you've heard, the blog posts that you've read that have really informed your thinking. But I think that is a big part of what it means to continue on in this profession and be able to do the work and make those subtle trade-offs, and the it depends because, at the end of the day, it all depends. STEPH: Or you just issue a pull request and title it burn the ships. [laughs] CHRIS: Burn the ships. Indeed, that is, in fact an option. And actually, while we're on the topic of pull requests, this might be a perfect segue into a listener question that we have. Mid-roll Ad And now a quick break to hear from today's sponsor, Scout APM. Scout APM is leading-edge application performance monitoring that's designed to help Rails developers quickly find and fix performance issues without having to deal with the headache or overhead of enterprise platform feature bloat. With a developer-centric UI and tracing logic that ties bottlenecks to source code, you can quickly pinpoint and resolve those performance abnormalities like N+1 queries, slow database queries, memory bloat, and much more. Scout's real-time alerting and weekly digest emails let you rest easy knowing Scout's on watch and resolving performance issues before your customers ever see them. Scout has also launched its new error monitoring feature add-on for Python applications. Now you can connect your error reporting and application monitoring data on one platform. See for yourself why developers call Scout their best friend and try our error monitoring and APM free for 14 days; no credit card needed. And as an added-on bonus for Bike Shed listeners, Scout will donate $5 to the open-source project of your choice when you deploy. Learn more at scoutapm.com/bikeshed. That's scoutapm.com/bikeshed. CHRIS: As always, thanks to everyone who sends in listener questions. We so appreciate getting them. They help direct the conversation and give us something to chat about. So this question comes in from Bryan Robles. And Bryan writes in about large pull requests. And Bryan writes in with, "My toxic trait is large pull requests. Any tips on when you get into a place where you're fixing or refactoring something, and it ends up cascading to many more changes than you want it to? I sometimes can go back and break it up. But it's hard to recognize a good seam when you're in the thick of it." So, Steph, what do you think? Large pull requests and finding yourself in them after [laughs] certain amounts of time. STEPH: Yeah, speaking of that knowledge that often comes from experience, this is something that I'm certainly always striving to get better at. I think it does take practice. There are some things that I do that I can share. And I categorize them really into a before, and I guess midway. So there's the before I set sail and set off to deeper waters list that I will think through as I'm starting a new task, and then there's the I'm lost at sea. And then, I need to figure out how I'm going to organize this change. So in the first category, when I'm first starting off a task, I consider what sort of changes need to be made, and are there any obvious roadblocks? So an obvious roadblock may be changing or updating a model that has one relationship, and I need to change it to has many relationships. Or perhaps there's a part of the application that is untested. And before I make any changes, I need to document that existing behavior. And that really falls neatly within Kent Beck's advice where he said, "First make the change easy (warning: this might be hard) and then make the easy change." So I try to think upfront what are some of the small, incremental changes that I can make first that will then make the final change easy? And then I separate that mentally into PRs. Or I may separate it into tickets, whatever is going to help me stay organized and communicate how I'm breaking up that work. And then the other thing that I'll do is I'll consider what's my MVP? So what's my minimum viable pull request? What set of changes include just enough changes to be helpful to users or to other developers? Which, by the way, is also a helpful mindset to have when you're breaking down work into tickets. So, as an example, let's say that I need to fix some bad data that's causing a site to error. So my first step could be to write a task to fix the bad data. And then, step two, prevent bad data from being created. And then probably step three, I need to rerun the task to fix data that was created during step two. But I can think through each of those steps and separate them into different pull requests. And then there may also be the question of well, how small is too small? Like you're saying, what's a minimum viable pull request? How do I know if I am not delivering value? And that one gets a little trickier and vague. But ultimately, I will think, does it pass CI? Is this change deployable? And then I do have to define what value I'm delivering. And I think that's a common area that folks struggle because we'll think of delivering value as delivering a whole new feature or adding complete test coverage for an untested interface. But delivering value doesn't have to represent that end goal. It may be that you added one test for an untested interface. And that's still delivering really great value to your team, same for delivering a feature to a user. You may be able to speak with that wonderful product manager and find what's the smallest bit of value that you can deliver instead of the whole feature set? I think the smallest PR I can think of that I've issued is either fixing a typo or removing a focus metadata from an RSpec test. So that's my starting point. That's the before I set sail. Those are some of the things I think about. I have more for the I'm lost at sea. But what are your thoughts? CHRIS: First, that was a great summary that you gave. So I totally agree with everything that you just said. I think part of the question I would have...So Bryan wrote this in and described this as his toxic trait. So he's identifying this as something that seemingly consistently plagues him. So I would ask, is there a way that you can introduce something? Like, are there natural breaks in your day? And can you ask the question at those breaks? Like, hey, I've been working on a thing for a little while. Is there a version that I could...like, could I close off a body of work at this moment? When you break for lunch, if you go grab coffee in the morning, when you're leaving at the end of the day, use those natural breakpoints. I'm not sure exactly what you mean when you say large pull requests. But if those are spanning multiple days, in my mind, if anything starts to span more than a day, I will start to ask that question to myself. And that's a reflex that I built up over time by feeling the pain of large pull requests and putting it up, and feeling apologetic. And then having my colleagues gently, professionally kindly ask me to break it down into smaller pieces. And me saying, "I really don't want it. All right, fine, fine, fine, I'll do it." And then I do it. And it's one of those things that I never want to do in the first place, but I'm always happy to have done after the fact. But it is work. And so, if I can get better at pulling that thinking and pulling that question earlier in the process, that I think is really useful. Similarly, I will try to, again, as friendly as I can; if I notice someone mentioning the same body of work at stand up for a few days, I might gently ask, "Hey, is there a way that we can find a shippable version of a portion of that of a subset? Can we put it up behind a feature flag and get something out there just to try and keep the PR small, et cetera?" And so gently nudge in that direction. And then I think the other side of that is being very okay with one character PRs. Like, that's it. We changed one character. It turns out we need to pluralize that word, or we need one-line changes are great. That's fine. And more pull requests, in my mind, are better than fewer, larger pull requests. And so really embracing that and having that be part of the core conversation and demonstrating that throughout the team is a way to share this idea. So that's perhaps more in the process or person point of view on this as opposed to the technical, but that's part of the consideration that I would have. I am interested, and I'll bounce back to, Steph, what you were saying of now that you're out at sea, what do you do? STEPH: So I need to react positively to some of the things that you just said because you made me think of two things. One of them is I've never had someone say, "Hey, Steph, that PR is too small. Could you add some more changes to it? Could you do some more work?" I have had people say, "Hey, that PR was hard to review." But even then, sometimes getting that feedback from folks is hard because nobody really wants to say, "I had a hard time reviewing your PR." That's something that, over time, you may become really comfortable saying to someone. But I think initially, people don't want to say, "Hey, that was hard to review," or "There were a lot of changes in that. Would you break it down?" Because that's a lot of complex emotions and discussion to have there. But yeah, I just figured I'd share that I have never had someone complain that a PR is too small, and I've issued a single character change. And then I love, love how much you asked the question of what's the problem we're trying to solve? And so there's this ambiguous idea of a large PR. But what does that mean? What are the pain points? What are we actually looking to change about our behavior? And then how is that going to impact or benefit the team or benefit ourselves? And so, going back to the question of how do we measure this? How do I know I'm starting to break up my changes in a helpful way? We may need to circle back to that because I don't have answers to it. But I just really like asking that question. As for the I'm lost at sea part, or maybe you're not lost at sea, but you've caught too many fish, and the fish warden is going to fuss at you if you bring too many fish back to dock. I don't think this is a real nautical example. But here we are. CHRIS: Was that the fish warden? STEPH: Yeah, the fish warden. You know, the fish warden. [laughs] CHRIS: Sure, I do, yeah. Yeah, I know about that, well-versed in fish law. STEPH: [laughs] Got to know your fish law. If we're going to talk about pull requests, you got to introduce fish law. But I'm actually going to quote Joël Quenneville, a fellow thoughtboter, because they shared a thoughtful thread on Twitter that talks a lot about breaking up your changes and how to break up your pull requests and your commits. And I'll be sure to include a link in the show notes because it's really worth reading as there's a lot of knowledge in that thread. But one of the things that Joël says is get comfortable with Git, and it makes a world of difference. In particular, you want to get really good at git add --patch, git reset, and git rebase interactive. And that is so true for me. Once I have gotten really good at using those commands, then I feel like I can break up anything. Because often when I am helping someone break something up, it's often they want to, but they're like, "I don't know how. And this is going to take so much of my time. It doesn't feel efficient and the right thing to do." And they're probably right. If you don't know how to break it up, then it may take you too long. And maybe it's not worth it at that point. But if you can ask a friend, and they can help walk you through this process, or if you can learn on your own, that's going to be a game-changer because you will start to think about how can I separate these commits? And I can reorder them, and then issue separate PRs, or just keep them in separate commits, whatever process you're looking to improve. In fact, there's a really great course on Upcase called Mastering Git written by someone who is co-host of this podcast. And it has a lot of great videos and tutorials that will help you get really good at these Git commands and then will help you split up your commits. CHRIS: Oh yeah, I did do that. Warning: it's like three and a half hours long. But it is broken up into, I believe, 10 or 11 videos. So you can find just the ones that you want. There's a couple in the middle that I think are particularly useful talking about the object model of Git. Git is weird, unfortunately. And so I spent a bunch of time in that course. Also, thank you for the kind words, Steph. [laughs] But I spent a bunch of time in that course trying to make Git less weird or understandable. If you look under the hood, it starts to make more sense. But if you really want to get comfortable with manipulating Git history, which I think is a really useful skill for this conversation that we're having, that's the only way I found to do it, just memorizing the steps. It's always going to feel a little bit foreign. But once you understand the stuff under the hood, that's a really useful thing for being able to manipulate and tease apart a pull request and break it into different things, and port things from one branch to another, and all those fun activities. Yeah, man, that was a bunch of years ago too. I wonder what I look like in it. Huh. STEPH: I really liked that episode, the one you just mentioned, the Git Object Model. Now that you've mentioned it, I remember watching it, and it's very interesting. So yeah, thank you for making all this helpful content for folks. There's also a blog post that we can include in the show notes as well that is a really nice overview of using git interactive, and rebase, and squash and amend those types of behaviors as well. So will be sure to include both so folks can check those out. And then to round things out, one of the other things that I will do is I will ask a friend. I will ask someone for help. So we've talked about some of these behaviors, or some of these processes that we have are really built up from experience and practice. And you can watch a lot of helpful content, and you can read blog posts. But sometimes, it really just takes time to get good at it. I know, as I'd mentioned earlier, I am always still looking to improve this particular skill because I think it's so valuable. And one of the ways I do that is I will just phone a friend. And I'll say, "Hey, can we chat for a bit? I would like to show you my changes. I want to hear from you if you see something in here that's valuable that you think can be shipped independently, so that way we can get it delivered faster." Or it may be a change that's just like a test improvement or something. And we can go ahead and get that immediately released to the team, and it will benefit them. Or you may want to do this at the start of a ticket. If I am new to a project or when I am new to a project, I will often ask someone to break down a ticket with me if I'm feeling a little bit uncertain. Or just say, "Hey, do you see any clean lines of division here? I feel like there's a lot in this ticket. You're more familiar with the codebase. What would you ship? How would you ship this incrementally?" and have someone else walk through the process with you. CHRIS: Yep, the phone a friend and/or, as always, pairing is a wonderful tool in these sorts of situations. The one other thing that comes to mind for me is part of the question was about sometimes it's difficult to find a clear parting line within a larger body of work, within a larger change. And that can definitely be true. I think there are certain standouts of like is this a refactoring that can be shipped separately? Is this a test change that would be useful on its own? Is there a model change that we could break out and have just that go out? So there's a bunch of mechanical questions that we can ask and say; here's categories of things that might fit that bill. But to flip this to the other side, the question was asked by Bryan very much as an I struggle with this thing. This is my toxic trait is the phrase that he used, which I thought was really interesting. And that can be true. This can be something that if you're consistently and uniquely within the team producing these giant PRs and then folks find that difficult to review, then I think that is absolutely something to work on. But if this is something that is happening between members like, other members of the team are also finding that they keep ending up with PRs that are bigger than they expected and taking longer and harder to review, there is a question of is the codebase actually in a shape that makes it harder to do small changes? There's the phrase shotgun surgery, which refers to a codebase that is so entangled and coupled that any change requires modifying ten files just to make one small alteration. And I think that's a worthwhile question to step back and ask, actually, is it not me? Is it actually the codebase? It could be both certainly. But there is a version of your codebase is coupled in a way that means that any even small, tiny change requires touching so many different places in the code. And if that's true, that's at least worth naming and worth highlighting and maybe talking about in retro and saying, hey, this feels like it's true. So maybe we start to get intentional about refactoring, and breaking out, and starting to add those dividing lines within the code such that hopefully, down the road, small changes can, in fact, be small changes. So that is the one last thing that I would consider here. Also, anecdotally, this is just a thing that came to mind. As I've worked with strongly-typed languages, systems that have a compiler, and have a type system, and the ability for the compiler to keep an eye on the whole codebase, I've noticed that it's very easy to do this sort of thing where I just start with one small data model change, and then the compiler is like, oh, you got to go fix it here, and here, and here, and here. And I found that because the compiler is your friend and will just point you to all the places you need to make the change, it is very easy to just keep going because some of that mechanical work is happening on your behalf. And it's a wonderful facet of typed languages and of having a compiler and being able to have that conversation with the compiler. But I found that for me, it is much easier to end up in this mode where I'm like, oh no, this PR is way too large. When I'm working in a system that has types, that has a compiler, that frankly makes it a little bit easier to chase down all the places you need to make a change. So that's also a consideration. It's not necessarily a good or a bad thing, just something that I've observed that feels like it's adjacent to this conversation. But yeah, I think those are my thoughts. STEPH: Yeah, those are great points. I've certainly worked on projects where that felt very true where it's a small change, but it would cascade throughout the project. And all the changes were necessary. It wasn't something that I could split into smaller PRs. So checking if it is the codebase that's really making it hard to have small PRS is a really great idea. CHRIS: Who'd have thunk such a little question could get us rambling for so long? Oh, wait, I would have thunk that. STEPH: And so far, reflecting on the things that we've talked about so far, I think I've talked a good game of where I'm saying, "Oh, I identify the seams upfront, and then I organize and create different tickets." And that is very much not the case. That's the really ideal outcome. But often, I am in the thick of things where like you just said...and it's this moment of, oh, I've done a lot in this PR. And how can I break this up? And that does take time. And it becomes a conversation of trade-off, which is why those Git skills really come in handy because then it will lower the cost of then splitting things out for others. But for people that are struggling with creating smaller PRs, I do think it's very fair to ask your team for help. I think it's also fair that if you issued a large pull request and folks have already reviewed it, and it's gotten approved, and someone makes a comment like, "Oh, this would be great as two PRs instead of one," to say, "Awesome, thank you for letting me know. I will take that forward with me, but I'm not going to do it for this PR." I wouldn't recommend making that a habit. But just know that that is something that you can say to someone to say, "I think this one is good to go at this point. But I will keep that in mind for future PRs. And I may even reach out to you for help if I feel like I'm having trouble splitting up a PR." And bring that person into your progress and use them as an accountability buddy. They can be someone that helps you down that path towards smaller PRs. CHRIS: Yeah, I definitely agree with that, although it becomes a very subtle line. Saying, "Thank you, but no thank you," in a pull request or to feedback is delicate. It's difficult. That's a whole thing. But I agree there have been times where I have either been the one making that decision or suggesting that or being like, "We probably should have broken this up. But we're far enough along now. Let's get this merged. And then we'll iterate on it after the fact." One last thing, actually. I thought I was done, but I have one more thing, which is I feel like there's a strong parallel between test-driven development and this question in that, often, I hear folks saying, "I don't know how to write tests upfront. I don't know how to do that. I know after the fact I can write tests, and I can add them after." And that can definitely be true. It can become more obvious after you've written the code how you could then write a test that would constrain that behavior that would interact with the system. But I think the useful thing that you can do there is take a moment and pause there and say, "Okay, now that I have written the test, what would it look like if I had written this in the first place?" Or if you really want to go for it, throw away the code, try again. Start with the test first and then rebuild it. That's maybe a little much. But that thing of taking these moments of maybe you don't know upfront how to break the work into smaller pieces, but then you get to the end, and you have that conversation with someone. And they highlight where some parting lines would be, or you figure it out after the fact. Stay there in that moment. Meditate on it a bit and try and internalize that knowledge because that's how moving forward, you might know how to do this in the future. So take those moments, whether it be with TDD or with pull requests, or breaking up a ticket into smaller tickets, anything like that. And spend a moment there and try and internalize that knowledge so that you have it proactively moving forward. STEPH: You know how Slack has status? I really like the idea of there being a status that's meditating on...and you can fill it in. And the example that you just provided, meditating on splitting up a pull request or meditating on how to write a test first, [laughs] I think that would be delightful. CHRIS: I, too, think that would be delightful. But with that long, adventurous answer to what seemed like a simple question, and they always do, but here we are, shall we wrap up? STEPH: Let's wrap up. CHRIS: The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. STEPH: This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. CHRIS: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review in iTunes, as it really helps other folks find the show. STEPH: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me on Twitter @SViccari. CHRIS: And I'm @christoomey STEPH: Or you can reach us at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. CHRIS: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. All: Byeeeeeeeeeee! Announcer: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

Ask Dr. Julie Hanks
How can I feel confident in my life as a single adult in the LDS church?

Ask Dr. Julie Hanks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 28:04


In this episode, Dr. Julie Hanks coaches Lindsay and addresses the question “How can I feel confident in my life as a single adult in the LDS church?” Lindsay shares that she joined the church in hopes of creating a family she didn't have growing up, and as that hasn't happened yet, she's blaming herself. During this episode, Dr. Hanks guides Lindsay through her feelings of failure, of sadness and loneliness, and how her childhood experiences may be impacting how she feels about herself today. If you have found this information helpful, you can find additional resources on this topic in my podcast and my online courses. Connect with me on social media @drjuliehanks, browse DJH merch, and work with me through joining DJH membership at drjuliehanks.com. For therapy in Utah visit wasatchfamilytherapy.com.

Cougar Sports with Ben Criddle (BYU)
11-29-21 - Darnell Dickson, Daily Herald - How big was BYU basketball's win at Utah on Saturday?

Cougar Sports with Ben Criddle (BYU)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 25:16


Today's Co-Hosts: Ben Criddle (@criddlebenjamin) Subscribe to the Cougar Sports with Ben Criddle podcast:Apple Podcastshttps://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/cougar-sports-with-ben-criddle/id996764363Google Podcastshttps://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuc3ByZWFrZXIuY29tL3Nob3cvMTM2OTkzOS9lcGlzb2Rlcy9mZWVkSpotifyhttps://open.spotify.com/show/7dZvrG1ZtKkfgqGenR3S2mPocket Castshttps://pca.st/SU8aOvercasthttps://overcast.fm/itunes996764363/cougar-sports-with-ben-criddle-byuSpreakerhttps://www.spreaker.com/show/cougar-sports-with-ben-criddleStitcherhttps://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=66416iHeartRadiohttps://www.iheart.com/podcast/966-cougar-sports-with-29418022TuneInhttps://tunein.com/podcasts/Sports-Talk--News/Cougar-Sports-with-Ben-Criddle-p731529/

Anna Faris Is Unqualified
Amanda Seales

Anna Faris Is Unqualified

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 83:06


Amanda Seales [Insecure, Get Your Life, Smart Funny & Black, The Real, I Be Knowin'] talks with Anna about the future of America, humanity, versions of crazy, sexual firsts, past relationships and the one that took 20-years to happen.In this week's Unqualified segment, Anna and Amanda first talk with CJ, a British expat who, after recently moving to his husband's hometown in Utah, isn't quite ready to make new friends. Their next call is with Jordan doesn't know what to do when his career choice has resulted in a long-distance marriage.State Farm Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. Call or go to Statefarm.com for a quote today.Masterclass This holiday, give one annual membership and get one free! Go to MASTERCLASS.com/ANNA today. Terms apply.Jenni Kayne Find your forever pieces at jennikayne.com and get 15% off your first order when you use code ANNA at checkout.Peacock See this exclusive crossover event now, and watch new episodes every Thursday. Plus, stream more of your reality favorites on Peacock — including all past seasons of The Real Housewives — hit movies and shows, exclusive Originals, live sports, news, and more. Go to PeacockTV.com to sign up.Skylight Frames You can get $10 off your purchase of a Skylight Frame when you go SkylightFrame.com and enter code FARIS .Ring.com This holiday season, deck the halls, walls, doors and windows with the best deals of the year on the award winning Ring Alarm. Go to Ring.com/UNQUALIFIED to get a great deal on a Ring Alarm security kit today!Netflix is a Joke Netflix is a Daily Joke is a podcast that brings you a joke a day, every day, from your favorite comedians. And maybe introduce you to your new faves!  Subscribe to Netflix is a Daily Joke on Apple, Spotify, and all the podcast places.Please subscribe to Anna Faris is Unqualified on Apple Podcasts and follow us on social media:Instagram @UnqualifiedTwitter @UnqualifiedFacebook @Anna Faris is UnqualifiedMusic by: Mondo Cozmo @mondocozmoProducers: Michael Barrett, Rob Holysz, Jeph Porter, Kasper SelvigResearcher: Margot BarrettProduction Services: Rabbit Grin Productions rabbitgrinproductions.comDistributed by: Simplecast