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Space station in low Earth orbit

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  • May 24, 2022LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about iss

Kottke Ride Home
Tue. 05/24 - Monkeypox: How Concerned Should We Be?

Kottke Ride Home

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 23:10


Everything you need to know about monkeypox––what is it, how is it spread, and how concerned should we be? Plus, Boeing's Starliner spacecraft is returning to Earth on Wednesday, after just a few hiccups on its first successful trip to the ISS. And Coca-Cola is introducing new bottle caps that you can't remove from the bottle.Sponsors:DeVry University, Learn more at DeVry.edu/EngineeringCalm, Get 40% off a Calm Premium Subscription calm.com/coolstuffLinks:Why monkeypox isn't like Covid-19 (Vox)Rare monkeypox outbreak in U.K., Europe and U.S.: What is it and should we worry? (NPR)The symptoms and causes of monkeypox infections, which CDC calls an 'emerging issue' (NBC News)U.S. monkeypox case reported, as Spain, Portugal report infections in growing outbreak (STAT)Monkeypox global case tracker (Global.health) Monkeypox (WHO)Spread prediction from modeling expert (Thomas House, Twitter)Thread on transmission and vaccines (Bill Hanage, Twitter) The Monkeypox Virus Is Affecting Queer Men, but Has Nothing to Do With Being Queer (them)Monkeypox: UNAIDS 'concerned' about stigmatizing language against LGTBI people (United Nations)Unfair monkeypox labeling must stop before our image goes from Curious George to Typhoid Mary (USA Today)How to watch Starliner capsule return to Earth on Wednesday (Digital Trends)Boeing Starliner problems go beyond thrusters (Washington Post)Watch the Starliner capsule live (NASA)Coke's new bottle cap doesn't come off (CNN)Coca-Cola's attached bottle cap is rock bottom of hokey greenwashing (TechCrunch)Jackson Bird on TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

That IS the question. - Do we have the ability to measure the exact amount of heat arriving at the Earth from the Sun?  Here on Earth, we often talk about light as being what we can see and heat as being what we can feel. But, really any wavelength of electromagnetic radiation can raise the temperature of something that absorbs it. - If we want a lunar orbiting space station, couldn't we just send the ISS there?  Well we could, but whether it would work is another question. There's a fundamental principle that things are built-for-purpose.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

Podcasts – Weird Things
WT: Ed & Bed Buy a Hat

Podcasts – Weird Things

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022


Starliner docks to the ISS finally! Boeing is catching up to a SpaceX milestone, why aren’t there more successful copycats? How does “just-in-time” manufacturing and management leave us vulnerable? Listener RJ shares a local mystery of an animal-like mystery and we’ve got hypotheses. Foviated rendering and how technology advancements will create more sophisticated compression eventually! […]

Innovation Now
Monitoring Cell Changes

Innovation Now

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022


Tissue chips behave much like an astronaut's body in space, rapidly experiencing changes often associated with aging.

Wissenswerte | Inforadio
Vom Weltraum zurück auf der Erde

Wissenswerte | Inforadio

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 18:24


Ein Arbeitstag von zwölf Stunden, Samstag steht Sport und putzen an, nur am Sonntag hat man frei – klingt nicht so verlockend, doch "jeder Tag ist eigentlich voll mit irgendwelchen Höhepunkten", findet Matthias Maurer. Sein Job: Astronaut auf der Internationalen Raumstation. Über seine Zeit auf der ISS spricht er mit Axel Dorloff.

The Steffan Tubbs Show Podcast
The Steffan Tubbs Show - May 19, 2022 - HR 2

The Steffan Tubbs Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 53:04


Guest and forecaster from the National Weather Service, David Barkenebruck, joins the program as we brace ourselves for a heavy snowstorm tomorrow, May 20th. The Boeing Starliner spaceship takes flight and we cover the liftoff as it happens. Boeing launched the spacecraft, designed to transport astronauts to and from the International Space Station, on a test mission toward the orbiting outpost. After two prior attempts to complete such a mission failed, Boeing's goal is to show that the spacecraft can dock with the ISS. More on the passage of the abortion bill in Oklahoma. Steffan takes calls. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Forschung Aktuell - Deutschlandfunk
Wiederholungsflug in den Weltraum - Neue Testmission für die Pannen-Raumkapsel „Starliner“

Forschung Aktuell - Deutschlandfunk

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 4:21


Boeings Raumkapsel „Starliner“ wird abermals auf einen unbemannten Testflug zur Internationalen Raumstation ISS geschickt. Bisherige Versuche schlugen fehl, wodurch der US-Luft- und Raumfahrtkonzern in den Rückstand zu Elons Musks Unternehmen SpaceX geraten ist. Sollte das Andocken an die ISS diesmal gelingen, ist die Kapsel mit mehr als 200 Kilo Nachschub beladen – und soll etwa die gleiche Menge an Versuchsergebnissen zur Erde zurückbringen.Meyer, Guidowww.deutschlandfunk.de, Forschung aktuellDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

The Orbital Mechanics Podcast
Episode 359: Venus is for Louvers

The Orbital Mechanics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 63:10


Thanks to Deathkin for naming this week's episode!Spaceflight News— Rocket 4.0 unveiling (spacenews.com) — Chris Kemp asks “why can't a couple of people launch a rocket?” (youtu.be) — Astra announced a new UK launch site (spacenews.com) (en.wikipedia.org) — Astra is in the running for the TacRS-3 contract (spacenews.com)Short & Sweet— Axiom-1 putting strain on ISS (spacenews.com)— Tianzhou-4 successfully reaches Chinese Space Station (spacenews.com)— Non-GPS satellite slated for launch (spacenews.com)— JWST final steps before science career (spacenews.com) (blogs.nasa.gov) (blogs.nasa.gov)Questions, Comments, Correction Burns— Joel R. via email: Rover steering wheel, Shuttle drag chute — Further reading: Mobility Performance of the Lunar Roving Vehicle: Terrestrial Studies - Apollo 15 Results (PDF: lpi.usra.edu)— From the intro: Canoo taking on water? (spacenews.com)This Week in Spaceflight History— 19 May, 1961. First flyby of Venus, by Venera 1 (nasa.gov) (drewexmachina.com) — Launched on a Molniya 8K78 (astronautix.com) — Next week (5/24 - 5/30) in 2000: Freshly imported

Ripping The Rack Podcast
Ep. 95 Ripping The Rack Podcast

Ripping The Rack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 56:03


Welcome to Ripping The Rack Podcast. This is the longest running, bi weekly podcast mostly about the the great game of Candlepin Bowling (But we do veer off topic quite a bit) on the internet and we are happy you have found us! In today's episode (Episode 95 for those that still think about what episode number we are on) Brian, Calvin, and Tim talk about some recent results and then about some upcoming tournaments. Before they dive into a couple of questions from listeners. And yes, we know the first 6+ minutes were a little bit unorthodox or off the rails or just plain stupid, but Tim was being Tim and we all know that Tim is a little bit of an idiot. And for the record, before the IRS, FBI, CIA, ISS, ABC, NBC, etc... come looking for Tim, no he does not believe in state sponsored removal of dictators, etc... Want to know what it's about? Listen to the program! As usual, we appreciate your questions and comments, your big announcements, your big accomplishments, etc.. You can send them to rippingtherackpodcast@gmail.com or you can find us on Facebook/Twitter at Ripping The Rack Podcast.

Y'all-itics
Don't let the Hatch Hit you on the Way Out!

Y'all-itics

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 37:14


Some of the fallout from Russian's invasion of Ukraine is now only 250-miles away. But it's not in Texas. It's above our heads, up in space. The Russian Federation is threatening to abandon the International Space Station. And it's a threat NASA must take seriously. Russia is one of five international partners on the ISS, along with NASA, the European Space Agency, Japan and Canada. And all four partners outside of Russia are having lengthy and serious discussions about a Plan B. But if Russia does bail on the ISS, would it just drop out of the sky? And how could NASA even begin to make up the loss? In this episode of Y'all-itics, the Jasons call up former Astronaut Chris Cassidy, who's trained extensively in Russia, with Russians and on Russian equipment. He says one of the first steps following a collapse in cooperation would be to simply close the hatch between the two modules. It would then quickly get complicated. But Cassidy tells the Jasons he thinks the Russians need us more than we need them. And he explains how it might change business at Mission Control at the Johnson Space Center near Houston, TX.

Sternzeit - Deutschlandfunk
Riskante Ausstiege aus der ISS - Die Gefahr des Ertrinkens im Weltraum

Sternzeit - Deutschlandfunk

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 2:32


Der Saarländer Matthias Maurer hat ein halbes Jahr auf der Internationalen Raumstation verbracht. Das eindrucksvollste Erlebnis war sicher das Arbeiten außen an der ISS – zugleich war es das gefährlichste.Von Dirk Lorenzenwww.deutschlandfunk.de, SternzeitDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

The Raygacy Show
EP 116: How To Turn Your LinkedIn Profile Into A Lead Magnet W/ Daniel Alfon

The Raygacy Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 72:19


Today, we've invited a wonderful entrepreneur. His name's none other than Daniel Alfon. Daniel Alfon is a LinkedIn #expert. He is the author of "Build a LinkedIn Profile for LinkedIn Success". Daniel's clients include entrepreneurs, consultants, authors, and marketers such as ISS, HP, and Burger King to name a few. He has also been featured on numerous podcasts such as The Thoughtful Entrepreneur, Frugralpreneur, Breakfast Leadership Network Show, and many more! Top 3 Value Bombs: 1) How You Should Stop Chasing The Wrong Metrics 2) Why Exposure Is Overrated on LinkedIn 3) What To Do On LinkedIn to Get Results Learn more about Daniel Alfon: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/alfon/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/DanielAlfon Website: https://www.danielalfon.com/ Learn more about Rayson: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Raygacy/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/raysonchoo Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/raygacy/ Clubhouse: https://www.clubhouse.com/@raygacy Website: www.raygacy.com Missed the other episodes- Subscribe on Itunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/.../the-raygacy-show/id1435706344 Join The Tribe of Raygacy: https://t.me/theraygacyshowfamily If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts/iTunes? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really makes a difference in helping to convince hard-to-get guests. I also love reading the reviews! Thank you! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/theraygacyshow/message

Universe Today podcasts with Fraser Cain
823: Milky Way's Supermassive Black Hole by EHT, Russia's ISS Bluff, Ingenuity's Problems | Space Bites

Universe Today podcasts with Fraser Cain

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 20:08


We finally have the SgrA* supermassive black hole image by the Event Horizon Telescope, China announces their plans to launch a space telescope, and Russia threatens to leave the ISS. 00:00 Intro 00:20 Milky Way's Supermassive Black Hole https://www.universetoday.com/155874/this-is-it-meet-the-supermassive-black-hole-at-the-heart-of-the-milky-way/ 03:48 China will launch a space telescope https://www.universetoday.com/155825/china-announces-its-new-flagship-space-telescope-mission/ 05:57 Another ISS bluff from Russia https://www.universetoday.com/155765/russia-says-itll-quit-the-international-space-station-over-sanctions-also-russia-says-a-lot-of-stuff-that-doesnt-happen/ 07:49 Support us on Patreon https://patreon.com/universetoday 08:46 Another test by Spinlaunch 09:52 Record marsquakes by Insight https://www.universetoday.com/155870/insight-just-detected-a-record-breaking-marsquake-magnitude-5/ 11:05 Ingenuity starts having problems https://www.universetoday.com/155864/martian-dust-is-starting-to-darken-ingenuitys-solar-panel/ 13:42 Total lunar eclipse https://www.universetoday.com/155691/our-complete-guide-to-this-weekends-total-lunar-eclipse/ 14:58 Starliner can finally launch on May 19th 17:16 Dreamchaser build timelapse 17:54 Channel news Fluidic Space Telescopes with Dr. Edward Balaban https://youtu.be/MJd6_-Ra6oY Dealing with Lunar Regolith with Dr. Kevin Cannon https://youtu.be/Jt8geyxhdu8 Messaging Extraterrestrials with Dr. Chris Impey https://youtu.be/1OqYanmc-4Y 19:01 Outro Join our Discord Server: https://discord.gg/bRxr4JTNqh Host: Fraser Cain Producer: Anton Pozdnyakov Editing: Artem Pozdnyakov

Raport o stanie świata Dariusza Rosiaka
Raport o stanie świata - 14 maja 2022

Raport o stanie świata Dariusza Rosiaka

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 146:13


Finlandia zapowiada, że wkrótce złoży wniosek o członkostwo w NATO. Najprawdopodobniej Szwecja zrobi to samo. Rosja zapowiada bliżej nieokreślone środki odwetowe. Co decyzja obu krajów oznacza dla przyszłości Sojuszu Północnoatlantyckiego i stosunków Zachodu z Rosją? Rosja wzmaga ostrzał Azowstalu w Mariupolu i ciągle próbuje przełamać linię frontu w Donbasie. Jak długo Rosjanie będą popierali politykę Putina, która prowadzi ich kraj do katastrofy politycznej i wizerunkowej? I czy rzeczywiście to poparcie jest bezwarunkowe? Palestyńska dziennikarka ginie zastrzelona podczas relacjonowania ataku wojsk izraelskich w mieście Dżanin na Zachodnim Brzegu. Naoczni świadkowie tragedii mówią o celowym zabójstwie dokonanym przez żołnierzy izraelskich. Talibowie nakazują kobietom zakrywanie całego ciała od stóp do głowy w miejscach publicznych. Czy Afganistan znów stał się piekłem dla kobiet? Rosja grozi, że wycofa się z prac Międzynarodowej Stacji Kosmicznej. Kto się tym przejmuje? I jeszcze wojna w Ukrainie jako medialne przedstawienie. Rozkład jazdy: (2:30) Tyrantti - Tulipyörä (5:56) Wojciech Lorenz o Finlandii i Szwecji w NATO (30:54) Piotr Skwieciński o poparciu polityki Putina przez Rosjan (1:04:28) KALUSH, Skofka - Fajna (1:07:10) Świat z boku - Grzegorz Dobiecki o wojnie jako medialnym przedstawieniu (1:11:44) W najbliższym Raporcie o książkach (1:16:38) Podziękowania (1:21:24) Łukasz Fyderek o śmierci palestyńskiej dziennikarki (1:44:28) Ludwika Włodek o piekle kobiet w Afganistanie (2:05:58) Tomasz Rożek o wycofaniu Rosji z prac przy ISS (2:21:21) Do usłyszenia (2:22:01) Haloo Helsinki! - Tulikärpäset

Nachrichten auf Deutsch leicht

Nyheter på lätt tyska i ett långsamt tempo. Tyska astronauten Matthias Maurer är tillbaka efter 2700 varv runt jorden ombord på den internationella rymdstationen ISS. Den 8 maj 1945 slutade det andra världskriget. Förbundskanslern Olaf Scholz fördömde i sitt tal Rysslands krig i Ukraina. Från 1 juni kan tyskar köpa månadskort för kollektivtrafiken för bara 9 euro. Satsningen är en reaktion på de höga bensinpriserna. Musik av Deine Freunde med låten Deine Mudder, passande till mors dag.

Nachrichten auf Deutsch

Nyheter på medelsvår tyska. Tyska astronauten Matthias Maurer är tillbaka efter 2700 varv runt jorden ombord på den internationella rymdstationen ISS. Den 8 maj 1945 slutade det andra världskriget. Förbundskanslern Olaf Scholz fördömde i sitt tal Rysslands krig i Ukraina. Från 1 juni kan tyskar köpa månadskort för kollektivtrafiken för bara 9 euro. Satsningen är en reaktion på de höga bensinpriserna. Musik av bandet Deine Freunde med låten "Deine Mudder", passande till mors dag.

About Space Today
A Few of Crew 4s Favorite Things

About Space Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 3:47


It's like the song - these are a few of Crew 4s favorite things!  Join Host Dawn Meyer and a program you don't want miss and hear from the astronauts themselves from space.

EXOPOLITICS TODAY with Dr. Michael Salla
Did ISS live camera reveal ET space fleet participating in disclosure initiative?

EXOPOLITICS TODAY with Dr. Michael Salla

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 8:28


On May 6, a formation of more than 30 UFOs was captured by one of the live cameras of the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS HD Earth Viewing Experiment gives a spectacular high altitude live feed of Earth as the ISS orbits at an altitude of approximately 250 miles (400 km) at over 17,000 mph (27,600 km/h). During the live feed a large formation of disk-shaped UFOs appeared and moved across the full visual field of the camera before disappearing. According to information received by Elena Danaan, a former professional French archeologist, the UFOs belong to cooperating extraterrestrial organizations that are part of an officially sanctioned disclosure plan being conducted with an Earth Alliance. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/exopolitics/support

Nachtmagazin (512x288)
12.05.2022 - nachtmagazin 00:06 Uhr

Nachtmagazin (512x288)

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 20:32


Themen der Sendung: Russland verhängt Sanktionen gegen Gazprom Germania, Gefahr durch russische Angriffe: Ukraine stoppt Gas-Durchleitung durch die Ost-Ukraine, Trotz weiterer Angriffe von Russland: Kiew meldet Rückeroberung einiger Gebiete rund um Charkiw, Bundesregierung hält an UN-Mission mit Beteiligung der Bundeswehr in Mali fest, Journalistin des Senders Al-Jazeera im Westjordanland getötet, China hält an Null-Covid-Strategie im Land fest, Deutscher Astronaut Maurer berichtet über seine beendete Mission auf der ISS, Das Wetter

Nachtmagazin (Audio-Podcast)
12.05.2022 - nachtmagazin 00:06 Uhr

Nachtmagazin (Audio-Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 20:32


Themen der Sendung: Russland verhängt Sanktionen gegen Gazprom Germania, Gefahr durch russische Angriffe: Ukraine stoppt Gas-Durchleitung durch die Ost-Ukraine, Trotz weiterer Angriffe von Russland: Kiew meldet Rückeroberung einiger Gebiete rund um Charkiw, Bundesregierung hält an UN-Mission mit Beteiligung der Bundeswehr in Mali fest, Journalistin des Senders Al-Jazeera im Westjordanland getötet, China hält an Null-Covid-Strategie im Land fest, Deutscher Astronaut Maurer berichtet über seine beendete Mission auf der ISS, Das Wetter

Talking Space
Episode 1404: A New Era in Commercial Space

Talking Space

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 89:19


This episode we take a unique look at the historic Axiom-1 mission to the ISS from multiple perspectives. That includes our own Sawyer Rosenstein who was at the press site for the launch and our own Mark Ratterman who viewed the launch from offsite. There was a unique oddity to the audio from this launch which you'll have to hear for yourself. We compare how this mission differs from other SpaceX missions to the ISS, typically carrying astronauts for NASA and ESA, including some pre-launch quirks. Plus, what a private mission like this does to scheduling aboard the International Space Station, especially as a long-duration crew depart and return within weeks of this all-private mission. Plus, this isn't just a tourist mission. We look at the experiments being done onboard this first all-private mission to the orbiting laboratory. In addition we also take a look at the ongoing effects of Russia's war with Ukraine on relations aboard the ISS. Finally it's a look at the Artemis program's latest concerns and announcements. That includes the roll back of the massive SLS rocket set to launch the first uncrewed test mission around the moon sometime this year after some issues appeared during a "wet dress rehearsal". Also a look at what vehicles will likely be taking astronauts to the launch pad before they depart for the moon. Show recorded: 4-15-2022 Host: Sawyer Rosenstein Panelists: Mark Ratterman & Gene Mikulka 

All Things Policy
Ukraine War's Impact on Space

All Things Policy

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 28:19


In the ongoing Ukraine conflict, the use of space has played a key role on both sides.With fears of the conflict extending into space, the status of private companies and their space assets being seen as legitimate targets by belligerents has entered the discourse.The latest economic sanctions and tech. export controls imposed on Russia have also derailed space cooperation between Russia and many Western countries and private companies. The potential fallout may also usher in delays for India's space activities and possibly decline for Russia's own space programme. Aditya Pareek joins Aditya Ramanathan to discuss the future direction of impact on space activities around the world in light of the ongoing hostilities in Ukraine. Follow Aditya Pareek on twitter : https://twitter.com/CabinMarineFollow Aditya Ramanathan on twitter : https://twitter.com/adityascripts Check out Takshashila's courses: https://school.takshashila.org.in/You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the new and improved IVM Podcast App on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/iosYou can check out our website at https://www.ivmpodcasts.com

Darkness Radio
Supernatural News/Parashare: 22 Of The Spookiest Stories Ever Edition

Darkness Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 132:26


Darkness Radio presents Supernatural News/Parashare: 22 Of The Spookiest Stories Ever Edition! It certainly has been a strange and supernatural week of NEWS stories, but Tim and Bruiser have a little surprise for you this week as well!  This week, Hi-Res photos from the 70's (isn't that an oxymoron?) clearly show a flying saucer in earth's atmosphere! We hear the sound of a giant black hole in space! And this week, we feature 20 plus stories that will send a chill down your spine!  Check out where Beer City Bruiser will be in your area: https://twitter.com/bcbwinchester Darkness Radio has partnered with the UFO Disclosure Symposium in late May! Be part of this newsworthy conference and get your tickets here: https://ufodisclosuresymposium.com/?ref=tim%40darknessradio.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Beyond the Darkness
Supernatural News/Parashare: 22 Of The Spookiest Stories Ever Edition

Beyond the Darkness

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 132:26


Darkness Radio presents Supernatural News/Parashare: 22 Of The Spookiest Stories Ever Edition! It certainly has been a strange and supernatural week of NEWS stories, but Tim and Bruiser have a little surprise for you this week as well!  This week, Hi-Res photos from the 70's (isn't that an oxymoron?) clearly show a flying saucer in earth's atmosphere! We hear the sound of a giant black hole in space! And this week, we feature 20 plus stories that will send a chill down your spine!  Check out where Beer City Bruiser will be in your area: https://twitter.com/bcbwinchester Darkness Radio has partnered with the UFO Disclosure Symposium in late May! Be part of this newsworthy conference and get your tickets here: https://ufodisclosuresymposium.com/?ref=tim%40darknessradio.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Radio Bullets
Bistecche spaziali

Radio Bullets

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 9:25


Coltivare la carne? Un'idea che sta sia in cielo che in Terra. Scopri tutto su Technomondo, la rubrica dedicata alla tecnologia di Raffaella Quadri

WLWT News 5 Beyond the Studio
Beyond The Studio - Larry Connor Part 2: A Safe Return to Earth!

WLWT News 5 Beyond the Studio

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 14:05


Larry Connor is back on earth! The Dayton area realty mogul made history as part of the first all-civilian mission to the International Space Station. He joins the Beyond The Studio Podcast a second time to talk about this experience beyond the sky and how he hopes what they accomplished will have a major impact back here on earth. 

Houston AMSAT Net Podcast
Houston AMSAT Net #1458 - 10 May 2022

Houston AMSAT Net Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 57:33


In this edition: 01. AMSAT-UK EMFcamp 2022 02. CubeSat Developers Workshop 03. Netflix TV series Yakamoz S-245 04. Raspberry PI 05. What it is like to become an astronaut 06. Join AMSAT on Discord 07. AMSAT GridMaster Award 08. AMSAT CubeSatSim PCB 09. AMSAT CubeSatSim v1.2 software 10. AMSAT-TAPR Banquet and Hamvention Tickets 11. AMSAT Volunteers Needed 12. Hamvention link 13. Donate to the GOLF program 14. 73 on 73 award 15. HO-113 tips and tricks 16. HO-113 User manual 17. 2021 AMSAT Virtual Symposium replay 18. AMSAT Keps Link 19. AMSAT Distance Records 20. AMSAT President Club 21. ISS pass prediction times 22. FO-29 Schedule 23. ARISS Operation Mode 24. AMSAT Getting Started with Amateur Satellites digital 25. AMSAT Getting Started with Amateur Satellites print 26. AMSAT News Service 27. AMSATs GOLF Program 28. AMSAT Hardware Store 29. AMSAT Gear on Zazzle 30. AMSAT Remove Before Flight Keychains 31. AMSAT Membership 32. AMSAT Donations 33. AMSAT on Twitter 34. and more.

Brews & Bruins
Brews & Bruins - E65 S3 - "Josh Frown" (feat. Chris Gere)

Brews & Bruins

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 33:25


Cam and Drew recap the Boston Bruins' resurgence in Games 3 and 4 against the Carolina Hurricanes, answer some listener questions, field listener comments and concerns, and get a satellite message from the ISS. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis counseling and referral services can be accessed by calling 1-800-GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537) (IL/IN/MI/NJ/PA/WV/WY), 1-800-NEXT STEP (AZ), 1-800-522-4700 (CO/NH), 888-789-7777/visit http://ccpg.org/chat (CT), 1-800-BETS OFF (IA), 1-877-770-STOP (7867) (LA), 877-8-HOPENY/text HOPENY (467369) (NY), visit OPGR.org (OR), call/text TN REDLINE 1-800-889-9789 (TN), or 1-888-532-3500 (VA). 21+ (18+ WY). Physically present in AZ/CO/CT/IL/IN/IA/LA/MI/ /NJ/NY/ PA/TN/VA/WV/WY only. Min. $5 deposit required. Eligibility restrictions apply. See http://draftkings.com/sportsbook for details.

Nightcap with Nightgod333
What was on the ISS Feed!!!! Sasquatch gets vocal with a long time veteran bigfoot hunte

Nightcap with Nightgod333

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 157:53


Something strange occurred about 4 nights ago on the ISS live feed. Strange anomalies began to appear all over the screen and they seemedto be traveling in unison. Could it be the Sumerian Gods are returning? Whatever or whoever they are seemed to be advanced technologically beyond our comprehension and they are apparently on a mission. Or it could have simply been space debris as well at this point we can only speculate. After a gentlemen who has been sasquatch hunting for years gets up close and personal with one and gets the vocals and audio from a special male bigfoot who was eager to communicate!!!! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nightgod333/message

This Week in Space (Audio)
TWiS 10: Best and Worst Space Movies! - OSIRIS-Rex Mission Extension, Russia and ISS, Starliner Tries Again

This Week in Space (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 81:19


This week we look at some of the best--and worst--space movies of all time, and some you've probably never heard of. Then, OSIRIS-Rex rides again, Russia will stay with the ISS, and Boeing's Starliner tries for the skies... again. Hosts: Rod Pyle and Tariq Malik Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-space. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Blueland.com/SPACE itpro.tv/twit promo code TWIT30

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
This Week in Space 10: Best and Worst Space Movies!

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 81:19


This week we look at some of the best--and worst--space movies of all time, and some you've probably never heard of. Then, OSIRIS-Rex rides again, Russia will stay with the ISS, and Boeing's Starliner tries for the skies... again. Hosts: Rod Pyle and Tariq Malik Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-space. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Blueland.com/SPACE itpro.tv/twit promo code TWIT30

Tagesschau (320x240)
06.05.2022 - tagesschau 20:00 Uhr

Tagesschau (320x240)

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 14:25


Themen der Sendung: Deutschland liefert sieben Panzerhaubitzen an die Ukraine, UN-Rettungsaktion für die Zivilisten im Asow-Stahlwerk im ukrainischen Mariupol beginnt, CDU ist Favorit in Umfragen vor Landtagswahlen in Schleswig-Holstein, Bayerischer Landtagsabgeordneter Martin Huber ist neuer CSU-Generalsekretär, Konservative Partei von Premier Johnson erleidet deutliche Verluste bei Kommunalwahlen, Vize-Sprecherin von US-Präsident Biden wird neue Chefsprecherin des Weißen Hauses, Astronaut Maurer nach sechs Monaten auf ISS zur Erde zurückgekehrt, Eintracht Frankfurt steht im Finale der Europa League, Das Wetter

Tagesschau (Audio-Podcast)
06.05.2022 - tagesschau 20:00 Uhr

Tagesschau (Audio-Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 14:25


Themen der Sendung: Deutschland liefert sieben Panzerhaubitzen an die Ukraine, UN-Rettungsaktion für die Zivilisten im Asow-Stahlwerk im ukrainischen Mariupol beginnt, CDU ist Favorit in Umfragen vor Landtagswahlen in Schleswig-Holstein, Bayerischer Landtagsabgeordneter Martin Huber ist neuer CSU-Generalsekretär, Konservative Partei von Premier Johnson erleidet deutliche Verluste bei Kommunalwahlen, Vize-Sprecherin von US-Präsident Biden wird neue Chefsprecherin des Weißen Hauses, Astronaut Maurer nach sechs Monaten auf ISS zur Erde zurückgekehrt, Eintracht Frankfurt steht im Finale der Europa League, Das Wetter

Tagesschau (512x288)
06.05.2022 - tagesschau 20:00 Uhr

Tagesschau (512x288)

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 14:25


Themen der Sendung: Deutschland liefert sieben Panzerhaubitzen an die Ukraine, UN-Rettungsaktion für die Zivilisten im Asow-Stahlwerk im ukrainischen Mariupol beginnt, CDU ist Favorit in Umfragen vor Landtagswahlen in Schleswig-Holstein, Bayerischer Landtagsabgeordneter Martin Huber ist neuer CSU-Generalsekretär, Konservative Partei von Premier Johnson erleidet deutliche Verluste bei Kommunalwahlen, Vize-Sprecherin von US-Präsident Biden wird neue Chefsprecherin des Weißen Hauses, Astronaut Maurer nach sechs Monaten auf ISS zur Erde zurückgekehrt, Eintracht Frankfurt steht im Finale der Europa League, Das Wetter

Tagesschau (Audio-Podcast)
05.05.2022 - tagesschau 20:00 Uhr

Tagesschau (Audio-Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 15:29


Themen der Sendung: Diplomatische Verstimmungen zwischen Steinmeier und Selenskyj nach Telefonat offenbar beigelegt, Trotz russischer Zusage für Feuerpause laut Ukraine weiterhin Angriffe auf Mariupol, Internationale Geberkonferenz sammelt sechseinhalb Milliarden Euro für Ukraine-Hilfe, Baustart des ersten LNG-Flüssiggasterminals in Wilhelmshaven, Reaktion auf Zinserhöhung der US-Notenbank: EZB bleibt vorsichtig, Landgericht München erklärt Wirecard-Bilanzen nachträglich für nichtig, Studie über Rassismus in Deutschland, Nach Schießerei in Duisburg vier Menschen verletzt, Astronaut Matthias Maurer kehrt von ISS zurück, Das Wetter

Tagesschau (320x240)
05.05.2022 - tagesschau 20:00 Uhr

Tagesschau (320x240)

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 15:29


Themen der Sendung: Diplomatische Verstimmungen zwischen Steinmeier und Selenskyj nach Telefonat offenbar beigelegt, Trotz russischer Zusage für Feuerpause laut Ukraine weiterhin Angriffe auf Mariupol, Internationale Geberkonferenz sammelt sechseinhalb Milliarden Euro für Ukraine-Hilfe, Baustart des ersten LNG-Flüssiggasterminals in Wilhelmshaven, Reaktion auf Zinserhöhung der US-Notenbank: EZB bleibt vorsichtig, Landgericht München erklärt Wirecard-Bilanzen nachträglich für nichtig, Studie über Rassismus in Deutschland, Nach Schießerei in Duisburg vier Menschen verletzt, Astronaut Matthias Maurer kehrt von ISS zurück, Das Wetter

Tagesschau (512x288)
05.05.2022 - tagesschau 20:00 Uhr

Tagesschau (512x288)

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 15:29


Themen der Sendung: Diplomatische Verstimmungen zwischen Steinmeier und Selenskyj nach Telefonat offenbar beigelegt, Trotz russischer Zusage für Feuerpause laut Ukraine weiterhin Angriffe auf Mariupol, Internationale Geberkonferenz sammelt sechseinhalb Milliarden Euro für Ukraine-Hilfe, Baustart des ersten LNG-Flüssiggasterminals in Wilhelmshaven, Reaktion auf Zinserhöhung der US-Notenbank: EZB bleibt vorsichtig, Landgericht München erklärt Wirecard-Bilanzen nachträglich für nichtig, Studie über Rassismus in Deutschland, Nach Schießerei in Duisburg vier Menschen verletzt, Astronaut Matthias Maurer kehrt von ISS zurück, Das Wetter

Darkness Radio
Supernatural News/Parashare: National Paranormal Day Edition

Darkness Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 110:06


Darkness Radio presents Supernatural News/Parashare: National Paranormal Day Edition! Not only has it been an interesting week in the Supernatural, but we also celebrated National Paranormal Day yesterday! Tim and Bruiser bring the celebration into Wednesday with some of the strange and supernatural stories from around the globe! This week, The UFO briefings have begun on Capital Hill, and Lawmakers aren't impressed! Is Shakespeare's grave cursed? and, a man who tried to marry a hologram has issues due to a software glitch... Check out where you can see Beer City Bruiser in your area: https://twitter.com/bcbwinchester Darkness Radio has partnered with the UFO Disclosure Symposium in late May! Be part of this newsworthy conference and get your tickets here: https://ufodisclosuresymposium.com/?ref=tim%40darknessradio.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Beyond the Darkness
Supernatural News/Parashare: National Paranormal Day Edition

Beyond the Darkness

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 110:06


Darkness Radio presents Supernatural News/Parashare: National Paranormal Day Edition! Not only has it been an interesting week in the Supernatural, but we also celebrated National Paranormal Day yesterday! Tim and Bruiser bring the celebration into Wednesday with some of the strange and supernatural stories from around the globe! This week, The UFO briefings have begun on Capital Hill, and Lawmakers aren't impressed! Is Shakespeare's grave cursed? and, a man who tried to marry a hologram has issues due to a software glitch... Check out where you can see Beer City Bruiser in your area: https://twitter.com/bcbwinchester Darkness Radio has partnered with the UFO Disclosure Symposium in late May! Be part of this newsworthy conference and get your tickets here: https://ufodisclosuresymposium.com/?ref=tim%40darknessradio.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Houston AMSAT Net Podcast
Houston AMSAT Net #1457 - 03 May 2022

Houston AMSAT Net Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 57:17


In this edition: 01. AMSAT/TAPR Dinner at Xenia 02. Ron, W5RKN Service 03. Ron, W5RKN Website 04. Ron, W5RKN Bio 05. AD7DB Rove 06. Ax-1 07. SLS Wet Dress Rehearsal 08. Great Solar Eclipse of 2024 09. ULA Atlas 5 rocket 10. Join AMSAT on Discord 11. AMSAT GridMaster Award 12. AMSAT CubeSatSim PCB 13. AMSAT CubeSatSim v1.2 software 14. AMSAT-TAPR Banquet and Hamvention Tickets 15. AMSAT Volunteers Needed 16. Hamvention link 17. Donate to the GOLF program 18. 73 on 73 award 19. HO-113 tips and tricks 20. HO-113 User manual 21. 2021 AMSAT Virtual Symposium replay 22. AMSAT Keps Link 23. AMSAT Distance Records 24. AMSAT President Club 25. ISS pass prediction times 26. FO-29 Schedule 27. ARISS Operation Mode 28. AMSAT Getting Started with Amateur Satellites digital 29. AMSAT Getting Started with Amateur Satellites print 30. AMSAT News Service 31. AMSATs GOLF Program 32. AMSAT Hardware Store 33. AMSAT Gear on Zazzle 34. AMSAT Remove Before Flight Keychains 35. AMSAT Membership 36. AMSAT Donations 37. AMSAT on Twitter 38. and more.

Forschung Aktuell - Deutschlandfunk
Capstone-Satellit im Weltall - NASA testet die Umlaufbahn ihrer neuen Mondstation

Forschung Aktuell - Deutschlandfunk

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 4:41


Eine neu geplante Raumstation der US-Raumfahrtsbehörde NASA soll den Mond umkreisen - anders als die ISS, die um die Erde kreist. Der unbemannte Capstone-Satellit soll die neue Mondumlaufbahn nun erstmal testweise abfliegen.www.deutschlandfunk.de, Forschung aktuellDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

The John Batchelor Show
#SpaceX: "Freedom" to ISS. Bob Zimmerman BehindtheBlack.com

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 12:21


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow #SpaceX: "Freedom" to ISS. Bob Zimmerman BehindtheBlack.com https://behindtheblack.com/behind-the-black/points-of-information/spacexs-freedom-spacecraft-docks-with-iss/

The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast
Nonfiction Dreams: Science Fiction to Reality

The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 32:24


Mardis & Phnam Bagley, Creative Directors & Founding Partners, Nonfiction Design (San Francisco, CA)   Mardis and Phnam Bagley are Creative Directors and Founding Partners at Nonfiction Design, a company that started originally as an industrial design firm but morphed into a future-focused studio. The studio works with startups, Fortune 500 companies, and governments to solve huge, complex problems and “change the world for the better.”  Phnam says all of their clients are long term and come to them “to solve huge problems about the future of education . . . living on Mars . . . food . . . neuroscience.”. The studio strategizes with a lot of these leaders in innovation, technology, and science to help them get their products “into the hands of people that need them.” The studio pushes clients “into extremes” to solve technical, experiential, and design problems “through ergonomics, through human factors, through thinking about behavior change.”  Mardis explains one of the challenges of this work – that people have to “fight the biases of the past.” A recent project was with Movida, the School of Lifelong Learning, which wanted to rethink the future of education. Nonfiction set up two teams, one that dug into white papers from the past, and the other, a group of creatives unexposed to this data, that freely brainstormed the future of education. In the end, both groups came to the same conclusion . . . but the creatives had actionable solutions for moving forward. What did this exploratory discover about education? In this interview, Phnam outlines a few conclusions – one, that children would benefit from letting them “be and stay absurd.” She says, “Not everything in life needs to make sense, needs to be efficient.” She adds that life would be better if we sometimes spent time “doing things that don't make any sense.” She believes today's society schedules too much of children's time. Teens, especially, need “time to rest physically, to rest the brain, to talk to other people, and to be bored” in order to grow to be healthy adults. Mardis says, “Developing a solution that's completely individual to the client's needs is really, really important to how we conduct business and how we keep satisfied clients.” With an eye to the future, the studio has started working on a “more circular economy model,” where design not only takes into consideration recycling, but also repair and remanufacturing.  The Nonfiction Studio team is diverse . . . from “many different cultures, many different countries.” Mardis, with a background in industrial engineering and branding, says they don't look much at résumés or portfolios. Phnam, an industrial engineer with a master's degree in (aero)space architecture, says the studio hires people “because they have something very interesting, and most likely that thing has to do with their past – what kind of career they've been through, what kind of country they come from, what kind of past they've had.” The husband-wife team presented “Designing the Future of Everything” at South by Southwest 2022 two times due to demand. Mardis, Phnam, and Nonfiction are available on Twitter and post future of design videos on Instagram. Transcript Follows: ROB: Welcome to the Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast. I'm your host, Rob Kischuk, and I am joined today by Mardis and Phnam Bagley, Creative Directors and Founding Partners at Nonfiction Design based in San Francisco, California. We have a special two-guest episode because we had two speakers and they like to spend time with each other. Why don't you start off by telling us about Nonfiction Design, and what is your superpower? PHNAM: Sure. Phnam here. I'm the wife of the Bagley duo. Nonfiction is a design firm based in San Francisco. Originally it was started as an industrial design firm because that's both of our backgrounds, and it turned into this future-focused studio where companies from startups all the way to Fortune 500 companies to governments come to us to solve huge problems about the future. When we say huge problems, we're talking about education, we're talking about living on Mars, we're talking about future of food, and we're talking about neuroscience. This is what we do. ROB: That sounds like a wide range of things to solve. How do you go about knowing how to solve all these things? PHNAM: We are an extremely curious group of people. There is not one subject in the world that we don't want to tackle because, in the end, what we want to do is change the world for the better. Impact is really at the core of everything that we do, whether it's thinking about the future of future humans or what we need today in the medical industry. That's what drives us. That gives us the motivation to work and make other people's lives better. But also creating the foundation of a future that we want to live in, because when you look at the news, for example, a lot of things are not going according to plan. And I believe, and we believe, that designers have the power to change that. That's why we started this company. ROB: Is there an example, maybe, of a future that you have had to recently think through? And what did you think about it? MARDIS: Hi, this is Mardis Bagley. Great question. I think one of the things we like to do is shake up the status quo. When we're thinking about futures, we often have to fight the biases of the past. Stepping out of this entrenched thinking. One of the projects we worked on recently is called Movida, the School of Lifelong Learning. Thinking and rethinking education is a very, very complex problem. One of the things we did right off is we said that we don't want to step too deep into research and repeat all the past, or even bias ourselves in thinking about the opportunity of the future. So, as we do this, we're a number of creatives from all over the planet; we're a very diverse studio of men, women, many different cultures, many different countries. But we all have some sort of experience. We have a certain amount of intuition. We all have been through school on many different levels. How do we redesign education in the way we think? What we did is we started designing it straight out of the gate. We pushed research to the side, which sounds kind of crazy. We totally avoided research in redesigning this school and this education system, and we came up with these really unique ideas about how to approach school and expand the minds of young children in a way that spoke to their wellbeing. It spoke to future generations. When we're talking about designing education, we can't design education for jobs that we don't yet know what they're going to be or the technologies that are going to empower them using the thinking of education that is well over 100 years old in the process. While we're doing this wild ride of creativity and exploration on one side, we had a secondary research track talking to leaders in education from MIT and Stanford. But we never let them talk to our creatives on the other side. We let them have independent paths as they explored forward. What happened is after a few months, we ended up at the same exact location in terms of knowledge, in terms of understanding education, and how to break the norms – except for we were reading whitepapers that are decades old on one side, and on the other side is purely months of creativity. We got to the same exact location except for the creatives came out with solutions that are actionable, solutions that are ready to change young people's lives. ROB: It might have even been hard to get to those solutions starting from the whitepapers, right? You started from another place and maybe even went some places you would never go. Part of brainstorming sometimes is proposing the impossible, the inappropriate, the unacceptable, but then bringing it back in bounds. So, what's a solution that we didn't know to a problem? PHNAM: Letting children be and stay absurd. The fact that not everything in life needs to make sense, needs to be efficient, and sometimes spend your time doing things that don't make any sense. That's part of being a child. So, reintroducing that in the way you interact with yourself, you interact with others, and you interact with the architecture of a school – that's what we wanted to bring in there. There are certain aspects of the school that don't really have a means. So that's very much part of it. Another thing is that when you look at the schedule of children today, it's a lot of going to school and going to after-school, activity, activity, activity. Their schedule is packed, and their parents are just driving them from one place to another. Really spending the time to rest physically, to rest the brain, to talk to other people, and to be bored – that's very much part of human evolution. It's a need that we have that we've taken away with all the screens and all the activity. We want to integrate it back into the lives of the kids so they grow up to be healthy adults. ROB: Are they allowed to be lazy at the same time, or can they do that at different times? Because structured lazy time seems like it would still be kind of in the pattern, but somebody's going to go crazy thinking about letting each kid be lazy when they want to. How do you pull it off? PHNAM: Laziness is something that we know of. We call it laziness, but really it has a lot to do with physiological changes – in teenagers, for example. When you grow, you actually need to sleep more. You actually have to rest more. We've been forcing a schedule that's extremely unnatural onto growing young adults, and that's not really working. What that does is teaches humans to learn how to read their own body and to give their body what they need. That's very much part of growing up and learning about the world. ROB: I think adults could learn that, too. We still need to learn how to accept that permission. I've done the audience a disservice; I've failed to mention why you have a loud fan club behind you. The reason is that we are live at South by Southwest at the interactive portion of the conference, primarily, this big old festival of people getting together in Austin, Texas for the first time in three years. You both are here to present a session. You presented it twice. What people don't know if they have an event is you sign up for the session, and if it gets a lot of popularity, they schedule you for it again. So, you presented this twice because probably some combination of reputation, a good sizzling headline and summary, a following, and all these things. Your session was “Designing the Future of Everything.” What content, what frameworks, what ways of thinking – or was it more examples? What did you share with the audience? What did you want them to take away? MARDIS: I would say that at the foundation of our company, we like to say we turn science fiction into reality for a better future. If you step back and start to ask yourself what does that really mean, we as a company, Nonfiction, work with a lot of leaders in innovation and technology, technologists themselves, scientists. Oftentimes these technologies have a hard time getting out of the laboratory. They have a hard time getting into consumers' hands, into the hands of people that need them. We come in and make these technologies available to people through ergonomics, through human factors, through thinking about behavior change. Very much so, as the title suggests, we do it for everything from medical devices to consumer devices. We work in aerospace and we work on-planet and off-planet. Recently, we're happy to say that we won first place in the Deep Space Food Challenge with NASA as well as the Canadian Space Agency. ROB: Congratulations. MARDIS: Yeah, that's very exciting. We're building things that will hopefully leave planet and make future astronauts' lives better as they travel two and a half, three years into space to Mars. ROB: What's needed differently on that three-year journey? What did you have to design for in that context? MARDIS: I'll let my partner, the outer space architect, answer that one. ROB: I like that job title, too. Wow. PHNAM: Yeah. I actually went to school for that. It surprises a lot of people. 15 years ago, I got a master's degree in space architecture from the University of Houston. Back then, space architecture was very based on systems engineering, like what volume is necessary to help astronauts survive in space? But when you look at space today in 2022 with the SpaceX and Blue Origins of the world, it becomes clear that people like us are going to be part of the space industry in the future, whether as tourists or as people going to work up there. The reason why it's so important for designers and architects and creatives to be part of all of this is because we understand humans. We know how to ask the right questions and to turn these answers into solutions that actually mean something to humans. So far, we've been designing space interiors very much like spaces for survival. When you look up the ISS right now, it's not really a place you want to hang out in. So really thinking about making space more human is one of the models that we go after. We want to invite more designers, more architects, more creatives, more artists to really help us with that change. It does take a lot of disciplines to design for space because not everything works the same way. Here on Earth, opening a door is like you put your hand on it, you turn the knob and you're done. Up in space you have to hold on to something else; otherwise you're going to be pushed back. You have to think about food the same way – eating – what can be sent there, what can be safe to eat, what can protect you from cosmic radiation and things like that. What is the long-term effect of microgravity on your body? There's been the famous twin project, Mark and Scott Kelly. One of the twins went up to space and one stayed on Earth, and we saw the difference physiologically and psychologically, what's been happening between the two. So, based on that type of knowledge, how do we design better interiors and better products and better medical support for us to see ourselves in space? ROB: That seems like it must've had so many constraints to it, but also some constraints that maybe weren't actual – that you were told were constraints but weren't. What did you find was a constraint that helped you be creative and get to an unexpected solution? And what was something you were told you couldn't do that you found out you actually could? Was there anything like that? PHNAM: We believe that without constraint you can't design. You're just going to come up with something that –  ROB: “Let's just put a five-bedroom house in space and call it good, we're all happy,” right? It doesn't work that way. PHNAM: The constraint is space, of course. If it doesn't fit in the payload area of a rocket, as of today we can't bring it up. One thing that's very different between designing for space and designing for Earth is weight. When we design something for Earth, weight is limited by shipping. In space, weight is money. I think it was in 1981, bringing a kilogram of mass up in low Earth orbit was like $81,000 or something. Now it's less than $2,000, depending on what it is. So yeah, we have to think about things like this even before we design anything. ROB: Let's rewind a little bit. Where did this whole thing start? What made you all decide to bring Nonfiction Design into existence rather than just having a job? MARDIS: Well, Nonfiction has been around for six years. Phnam and I have been in the industrial design industry for well over 16 years now. I've had a previous career in branding, and Phnam in aerospace as well. But what really brought it into existence is we were contracting, working in many different agencies over the years – all the big names you might recognize. We felt like there was a culture, there was a style of working that maybe could be refined. And I'm probably being kind. [laughs] We just felt like we could do it better, or at least let's say different. We felt so compelled to give it a try. Some of the things that we wanted to fight against is we didn't see enough diversity or inclusion. I mentioned that earlier. We have a very diverse crew, and that's part of our secret sauce – listening to everybody, being very inclusive. But also breaking away from the norms of what we call industrial design now. It's not just shape development or form development. That is part of it, making beautiful things, but we're well beyond that. We're into user interactions. We're into designing for impact. We put a lot of things on the planet. Our efforts put a lot of things in people's hands, and many of them go to the landfill. It's a very linear model. We've started doing a more circular economy model where we think about designing not only for recycling, but for repair and remanufacturing. We're thinking about our impact and we're thinking about that lifecycle of a product along the way, and how can we do less negative impact and more positive impact? Positive impact would be impacting the planet in maybe an upcycling way or a regenerative way, but also impacting people's lives along the way. ROB: How much of what you do is somebody coming to you knowing they want that whole package, and how much of it is them coming to you having seen something you did and they want one thing, and you have to bring them into the bigger picture? PHNAM: A lot of our clients today come to us with a question. They're like, “How do we solve this endemic problem?” Then we strategize together on how to solve that problem, whether it's a hardware solution or a software solution or whatever. Then from there, we build this relationship. Every client we have is a long-term relationship. We push them into extremes. One extreme is hypercreativity. They came to us as a design studio because they want us to show them what they can't get themselves, number one. Number two is that we as a design firm are extremely technical. We're not afraid of going very deep into the mechanical engineering, electrical, firmware, all that stuff because it's necessary. We need to be part of the process. So really solving the technical problem at the same time as solving the experiential and the design problem is what we do well. As we do that, we take the hand of the clients and show them how it's done. We don't have a recipe that we apply to all projects. That's actually a question we get asked all the time, “What is your process?” We probably have a different process for every single client we have. ROB: Wow. PHNAM: Because each of the clients has very specific needs in time and space and in industry, so we have to craft something very specific to each of them. ROB: I heard you say that a little bit when you were talking about not wanting to look at the whitepapers when you're designing a solution. It's not your process is always to put blinders on and not look at what's out there, but sometimes it is, and it depends somewhat on the solution. It's also an interesting positioning because a lot of creative services firms are out there – it's almost like if you need some more of this work than you have capacity for, then go call these people. “I need somebody to do a little bit more paid marketing than I can do internally.” You all are positioned in a way where they probably don't have the technical knowledge, and they are literally saying, “We don't know what we don't know. Please help us.” How do you communicate that when everybody wants to put a services firm into a category? How do you help people find you when they don't know the category they're looking for, maybe? Or is there a word of like five companies like you, and everyone else is somewhere else, that they're looking for? PHNAM: It's funny because I can't really think of any company that does the things that we do at the level that we do it. That's why we started this company: we saw that hole and we were like, “We can be that.” MARDIS: Yeah. Getting back to the question you were asking earlier of – do we guide our clients or do they come to us with a very specific ask. I think we like to assist our clients in dreaming. Dreaming of something bigger than themselves. We have to shoot for the stars to land on the moon, right? Let's go really far and allow them to dream, and then we're really good at fulfilling that dream. We have a lot of resources in-house, but we also have really good partnerships. Developing a solution that's completely individual to the client's needs is really, really important to how we conduct business and how we keep satisfied clients. ROB: How do you think about what to partner on versus what to cultivate as your own capability? What's something you know you send out of house because it's not your lane, but you need a steady partner for that kind of capability? PHNAM: I think it depends on the scale of things. If you need just a little bit of touch-up on mechanical engineering, we can probably do this in-house. But if you need a whole program developing new mechanism and new testing and all of that, or very specialized knowledge in acoustics, for example, that's when we tap into our network. Another network that we have is in material science. None of us are material scientists, but we work a lot with materials. But when it comes to the science of it, the scalability of it, and the transparency behind the sustainable decisions that we make, we actually go to see scientists or a specialist of that kind. Over the years, throughout our career, we have built this amazing network of people who can pretty much answer everything we want. And if they don't know it, they will know someone who knows. That's very helpful. ROB: That makes sense. Sometimes the fastest way to the solution is just saying out loud that you don't know and throwing it out into the world and somebody points you there. But when you're struggling, you're like, “How are we going to do this?” You don't know how you're going to do it and you feel trapped. PHNAM: Not knowing is actually where you have to start, in our book. If you start a project and you know exactly what you're going to do for the rest of the project, you're probably going to do what someone else has already done. But if you don't know, or if you're in a very uncomfortable space where you're like, “Oh my God, this project is so big, I don't know where to start” – that's a good sign. ROB: You mentioned you all have been in this business for six years. What are some things you've learned in that time that you wish you could go back and tell yourself? A lesson or two, maybe “rethink this” or do it a little differently? PHNAM: I can give you one quick answer. Business development is extremely difficult to find externally. We've had people who helped us and it was not very successful. We realized two or three years ago that Mardis and I are actually much better at it than people who have that on their business cards, for our particular company, because we have the vision. We know what our company should be doing and what it should not be doing, and we know how to speak about it with passion. We can also modify our spiel to be a little bit more business-oriented, to be a little bit more design-oriented or future-oriented. That connects a lot better with the audience that we're going after. We don't sound like salespeople. We really go deep in conversations with potential clients very quickly, and I think they see that authenticity and they're willing to go deeper with us immediately. ROB: There's a credibility in your experience. There's the founder authority in knowing the heart of the business. What do you think, Mardis? What would you say you might do differently? MARDIS: I do think Phnam nailed it. That would be by far the biggest thing. ROB: How do you think about growth, then? Do you feel like you grow by scaling your influence together and larger engagements? Do you think there's a place where you find a “mini Mardis” or a “mini Phnam” to come in, somebody who actually does have – I mean, that intersection. I've seen folks say it before. It's like, learn how to build something, learn how to sell something, and you'll be unstoppable. You all are in that “technical but sellable” lane. So how do you scale, or do you want to? MARDIS: I don't think either Phnam or I could handle a mini Mardis or a mini Phnam. Let's just be outright about that. [laughs] Again, respect to so many other talented people that might come to work for us. We love diversity. We love having clients of all different sizes, different shapes, as we've mentioned, in different verticals. This is all really fun and exciting to us. We take knowledge and apply one aspect from one category to another all the time. In a funny way, we kind of ebb and flow with the clients, and we select them as they come. PHNAM: And I think it's kind of like the same way we hire people. We could hire people who think like us and act like us, have the same hard skills as us, and just apply them. But what we look for is people who think differently but have the same drive as us. The way we choose concepts to go forward with is not. “What do I like as the founder of Nonfiction?”, because that's pretty limited after a while. What we look for is, “What is going to blow our minds so it can blow the client's mind, so then it can blow the user's mind?” We always go for that. And then, once we've made that decision, we turn very quickly into “let's prototype it, let's test it” mode. Every time we're uncomfortable with a solution, that's usually the nugget of something extraordinary. We design the future. The future is not here yet. If we're comfortable with everything that we do, we're not doing our job. We need to make ourselves uncomfortable within our team first, welcome our clients to do it, so the rest of the world can do it too. ROB: Is there any signal that you might be just slightly too far in the future? Obviously, 20 years out might be too soon for a lot of things. How do you know when you need to pull it back just a couple of notches? How do you get there? PHNAM: Nonfiction at its core is the merging of five different disciplines. It's business, technology, science, art, and design. When you practice all of this, specifically business, you always have to make sure that whatever decision you make makes sense from the business perspective. If I'm coming out with a product in two years and the people who we're designing for can only afford $300, I cannot come up with a concept that's going to cost $2,000. So, we have to make decisions like that, check in often, and make sure that what we come up with makes sense, because in the end we are not here just to come up with concepts. Honestly, anybody can come up with concepts. Even non-designers. But the magic is how do you turn a concept into something that's real, into something that's attainable, into something that has the potential to change people's lives? That's why we call our company Nonfiction. Science fiction has been around for a very long time. We all want it. But who is going to turn that into the real thing? It's going to be people like us. ROB: That's a great positioning: to build near science fiction, but call it nonfiction to make it concrete. It's an excellent place to be. You mentioned hiring for diversity. If you look in the creative services world, I think diversity is often achieved, but perhaps it's achieved by optimizing for some people in some roles, some people in some other roles. You have 90% of this role are guys, 90% of this role are women. All your ethnic diversity is over here, all these people are white Americans. How do you think about diversity in roles and hiring for people in positions that are harder to find diversity in? MARDIS: I do think that we're very lucky that we're a small enough team where we don't have the large diversity challenges. Not to say that it doesn't exist, but we do challenge our team members to adapt different skillsets, to step outside their comfort zone, to think about it in a different way. PHNAM: Another thing is that we're not doing diversity for the sake of checking some boxes. It actually came very naturally. We don't hire people just because they're not white men. That's weird. We hire people because they have something very interesting, and most likely that thing has to do with their past – what kind of career they've been through, what kind of country they come from, what kind of past they've had. When we interview people, really what we want to hear is what kind of crazy stories they have to tell us. Do they have a sense of humor? Are they able to tell stories that I've never heard before? And then the skills are just going to come, because everything we do is for the first time anyway. As long as you have the bare minimum, you can figure it out. MARDIS: I'd say when we do hire people – it's funny; we have a joke around the office. We don't really look at resumes or portfolios that much. We look at them a little bit, but really it's a conversation. Talking to people, understanding what they're about, who they are, their personality. This is a great way to filter through people that will work in a smaller team and won't work in a smaller team. You don't always have that ability when you're in a really large organization. You're being filtered by AI or some sort of online tool long before it gets to a human, and the human has all the different constraints. With us, we have great conversations. We go out for cocktails. It makes sense. We're doing a lot of filtering long before we've got them in the office. ROB: It's very interesting. It makes sense. Even if you go back to what you're talking about with the lifelong learning school, that's going to get to the right solution when you talk about everybody's experience in school – what baggage do they feel like they're carrying from that? What do they wish school had done for them? You can get a diverse set of experiences in a lot of ways there. So I can certainly see how that would come in handy. Mardis, Phnam, when people want to find you, when they want to find Nonfiction Design, how should they find and connect with you? PHNAM: We're actually very active online. On Twitter, you can follow both Mardis and me and Nonfiction. Our Instagram is quite active as well. We post our video series on it. We have a video series on future of design. Basically, it's years of experience that Mardis and I have accumulated over time – we're just sharing that very transparently with everyone, and we're doing it in layman's terms. You can be a child, you can be someone who has nothing to do with design, you can be an engineer, you can be the head of a company – it doesn't matter. You can connect with us as designers, not as Nonfiction, as just plain designers. We share our methodologies. We share our way of thinking, and we share our vision of what the future of many industries is. ROB: I encourage people to go check all of that out. I love how you've open-sourced a lot of that. People are so scared about what they share, but there's the total package that you all have put together that delivers for clients, but there's little seeds of thinking that still help other people. They're not going to go steal your lunch money. Mardis, Phnam, thank you for coming on the podcast. Thank you for meeting up. Congratulations on the encore session here at SXSW, and I wish you all excellent travels back to San Francisco. MARDIS: Excellent. Thank you. It's been our pleasure. PHNAM: Thank you for inviting us. ROB: Thank you. Take care. Thank you for listening. The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast is presented by Converge. Converge helps digital marketing agencies and brands automate their reporting so they can be more profitable, accurate, and responsive. To learn more about how Converge can automate your marketing reporting, email info@convergehq.com, or visit us on the web at convergehq.com.

TODAY
April 27: Pfizer asks FDA to authorize booster for children 5 to 11. New concerns about the economy. Inside the craze behind new app “Be Real.”

TODAY

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 32:32


Pfizer is now asking the FDA to approve a booster for children ages 5 to 11, just as Vice President Kamala Harris tests positive for COVID-19. Plus, a closer look at the driving forces behind a wild day on Wall Street – Hallie Jackson has the latest on the economic impact for consumers. Also, we're taking you inside the “Be Real” craze and what makes it different from other social media apps.