Podcasts about International studies

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  • 1,169PODCASTS
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  • Jan 10, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about International studies

Show all podcasts related to international studies

Latest podcast episodes about International studies

Chicago's Morning Answer with Dan Proft & Amy Jacobson

0:00 - Dan & John react to Walensky on Sotomayor 13:32 - Dan & John take a closer look at the COVID-SCOTUS hearing 34:01 - Dan & John weigh in on transgenders in sports 55:18 - Dan & John critique the democrats public school COVID policy  01:09:32 - Lt. Col. James Carafano, Vice President of the Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Institute for International Studies at The Heritage Foundation, can't believe Biden wasted a week on 1/6 when he should be concentrating on Russia and China. Check out Jim's most recent book  Brutal War: Jungle Fighting in Papua New Guinea, 1942 01:24:46 - Kevin R. Brock, former assistant director of intelligence for the FBI and former principal deputy director of the National Counterterrorism Center, discusses 1/6 and the FBI 01:41:29 - Dan and John share what happened to Cardinal Cupich at March for Life 01:59:20 - Hooman Noorchashm MD, PhD, physician, immunologist and public health advocate: “Biden has created a constitutional crisis by ignoring the science of immunology”. Follow Dr Noorchashm on twitter - @noorchashm See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Kazakhstan: Crackdown on protests continue as Russian troops arrive

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 4:12


Kazakhstan's former chief of intelligence was arrested on Saturday after being charged with trying to overthrow the government. The Central Asian country has seen widespread protests, which its president has blamed on terrorists. Meanwhile, the Russian military arrived after requests from the Kazakh president. Jeffrey Mankoff, senior associate at the Russia and Eurasia program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies joins. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Chicago's Morning Answer with Dan Proft & Amy Jacobson

0:00 - Dan & Amy discuss the devastating and  disturbing violence that closed out 2021 13:59 - More Chicago violence over the holidays 30:55 - Dan & Amy react to day 1 of Chicago vax mandates/passes 52:06 - Mayor of Orland Park and candidate for congress (6th district), Keith Pekau, explains why he will not enforce the Cook County Vaccine mandates. For more on Keith's congressional run - keithpekau.com 01:05:44 - Vice President of the Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Institute for International Studies at The Heritage Foundation, Lt Col James Carafano: 1/6 Commission has jumped the shark. Check out Jim's most recent book:  Brutal War: Jungle Fighting in Papua New Guinea, 1942 01:26:37 - Dr. Chad Savage, founder of YourChoice Direct Care and  policy advisor for The Heartland Institute, plays some before/after with US health officials COVID statements  01:45:12 - Dan & Amy re-celebrate NYE with CNN 01:53:38 - Alex Epstein,  Founder of Center for Industrial Progress, author of Fossil Future: Why Global Human Flourishing Requires More Oil, Coal, and Natural Gas–Not Less(4/19/22), watched “Don't Look Up” so you don't have to. Read more of Alex's work - alexepstein.substack.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

New Books in African Studies
Isaac A. Kamola, "Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary" (Duke UP, 2019)

New Books in African Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 99:25


Following World War II the American government and philanthropic foundations fundamentally remade American universities into sites for producing knowledge about the world as a collection of distinct nation-states. As neoliberal reforms took hold in the 1980s, visions of the world made popular within area studies and international studies found themselves challenged by ideas and educational policies that originated in business schools and international financial institutions. Academics within these institutions reimagined the world instead as a single global market and higher education as a commodity to be bought and sold. By the 1990s, American universities embraced this language of globalization, and globalization eventually became the organizing logic of higher education.  In Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary (Duke UP, 2019), Isaac A. Kamola examines how the relationships among universities, the American state, philanthropic organizations, and international financial institutions created the conditions that made it possible to imagine the world as global. Examining the Center for International Studies, Harvard Business School, the World Bank, the Social Science Research Council, and NYU, Kamola demonstrates that how we imagine the world is always symptomatic of the material relations within which knowledge is produced. Dr. Kamola is currently an Associate Professor of Political Science and President of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) chapter at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Sara Katz is a postdoctoral associate in the history department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-studies

New Books Network
Isaac A. Kamola, "Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary" (Duke UP, 2019)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 99:25


Following World War II the American government and philanthropic foundations fundamentally remade American universities into sites for producing knowledge about the world as a collection of distinct nation-states. As neoliberal reforms took hold in the 1980s, visions of the world made popular within area studies and international studies found themselves challenged by ideas and educational policies that originated in business schools and international financial institutions. Academics within these institutions reimagined the world instead as a single global market and higher education as a commodity to be bought and sold. By the 1990s, American universities embraced this language of globalization, and globalization eventually became the organizing logic of higher education.  In Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary (Duke UP, 2019), Isaac A. Kamola examines how the relationships among universities, the American state, philanthropic organizations, and international financial institutions created the conditions that made it possible to imagine the world as global. Examining the Center for International Studies, Harvard Business School, the World Bank, the Social Science Research Council, and NYU, Kamola demonstrates that how we imagine the world is always symptomatic of the material relations within which knowledge is produced. Dr. Kamola is currently an Associate Professor of Political Science and President of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) chapter at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Sara Katz is a postdoctoral associate in the history department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Isaac A. Kamola, "Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary" (Duke UP, 2019)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 99:25


Following World War II the American government and philanthropic foundations fundamentally remade American universities into sites for producing knowledge about the world as a collection of distinct nation-states. As neoliberal reforms took hold in the 1980s, visions of the world made popular within area studies and international studies found themselves challenged by ideas and educational policies that originated in business schools and international financial institutions. Academics within these institutions reimagined the world instead as a single global market and higher education as a commodity to be bought and sold. By the 1990s, American universities embraced this language of globalization, and globalization eventually became the organizing logic of higher education.  In Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary (Duke UP, 2019), Isaac A. Kamola examines how the relationships among universities, the American state, philanthropic organizations, and international financial institutions created the conditions that made it possible to imagine the world as global. Examining the Center for International Studies, Harvard Business School, the World Bank, the Social Science Research Council, and NYU, Kamola demonstrates that how we imagine the world is always symptomatic of the material relations within which knowledge is produced. Dr. Kamola is currently an Associate Professor of Political Science and President of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) chapter at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Sara Katz is a postdoctoral associate in the history department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Intellectual History
Isaac A. Kamola, "Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary" (Duke UP, 2019)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 99:25


Following World War II the American government and philanthropic foundations fundamentally remade American universities into sites for producing knowledge about the world as a collection of distinct nation-states. As neoliberal reforms took hold in the 1980s, visions of the world made popular within area studies and international studies found themselves challenged by ideas and educational policies that originated in business schools and international financial institutions. Academics within these institutions reimagined the world instead as a single global market and higher education as a commodity to be bought and sold. By the 1990s, American universities embraced this language of globalization, and globalization eventually became the organizing logic of higher education.  In Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary (Duke UP, 2019), Isaac A. Kamola examines how the relationships among universities, the American state, philanthropic organizations, and international financial institutions created the conditions that made it possible to imagine the world as global. Examining the Center for International Studies, Harvard Business School, the World Bank, the Social Science Research Council, and NYU, Kamola demonstrates that how we imagine the world is always symptomatic of the material relations within which knowledge is produced. Dr. Kamola is currently an Associate Professor of Political Science and President of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) chapter at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Sara Katz is a postdoctoral associate in the history department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in World Affairs
Isaac A. Kamola, "Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary" (Duke UP, 2019)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 99:25


Following World War II the American government and philanthropic foundations fundamentally remade American universities into sites for producing knowledge about the world as a collection of distinct nation-states. As neoliberal reforms took hold in the 1980s, visions of the world made popular within area studies and international studies found themselves challenged by ideas and educational policies that originated in business schools and international financial institutions. Academics within these institutions reimagined the world instead as a single global market and higher education as a commodity to be bought and sold. By the 1990s, American universities embraced this language of globalization, and globalization eventually became the organizing logic of higher education.  In Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary (Duke UP, 2019), Isaac A. Kamola examines how the relationships among universities, the American state, philanthropic organizations, and international financial institutions created the conditions that made it possible to imagine the world as global. Examining the Center for International Studies, Harvard Business School, the World Bank, the Social Science Research Council, and NYU, Kamola demonstrates that how we imagine the world is always symptomatic of the material relations within which knowledge is produced. Dr. Kamola is currently an Associate Professor of Political Science and President of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) chapter at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Sara Katz is a postdoctoral associate in the history department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in Political Science
Isaac A. Kamola, "Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary" (Duke UP, 2019)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 99:25


Following World War II the American government and philanthropic foundations fundamentally remade American universities into sites for producing knowledge about the world as a collection of distinct nation-states. As neoliberal reforms took hold in the 1980s, visions of the world made popular within area studies and international studies found themselves challenged by ideas and educational policies that originated in business schools and international financial institutions. Academics within these institutions reimagined the world instead as a single global market and higher education as a commodity to be bought and sold. By the 1990s, American universities embraced this language of globalization, and globalization eventually became the organizing logic of higher education.  In Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary (Duke UP, 2019), Isaac A. Kamola examines how the relationships among universities, the American state, philanthropic organizations, and international financial institutions created the conditions that made it possible to imagine the world as global. Examining the Center for International Studies, Harvard Business School, the World Bank, the Social Science Research Council, and NYU, Kamola demonstrates that how we imagine the world is always symptomatic of the material relations within which knowledge is produced. Dr. Kamola is currently an Associate Professor of Political Science and President of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) chapter at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Sara Katz is a postdoctoral associate in the history department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books in Economics
Isaac A. Kamola, "Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary" (Duke UP, 2019)

New Books in Economics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 99:25


Following World War II the American government and philanthropic foundations fundamentally remade American universities into sites for producing knowledge about the world as a collection of distinct nation-states. As neoliberal reforms took hold in the 1980s, visions of the world made popular within area studies and international studies found themselves challenged by ideas and educational policies that originated in business schools and international financial institutions. Academics within these institutions reimagined the world instead as a single global market and higher education as a commodity to be bought and sold. By the 1990s, American universities embraced this language of globalization, and globalization eventually became the organizing logic of higher education.  In Making the World Global: U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary (Duke UP, 2019), Isaac A. Kamola examines how the relationships among universities, the American state, philanthropic organizations, and international financial institutions created the conditions that made it possible to imagine the world as global. Examining the Center for International Studies, Harvard Business School, the World Bank, the Social Science Research Council, and NYU, Kamola demonstrates that how we imagine the world is always symptomatic of the material relations within which knowledge is produced. Dr. Kamola is currently an Associate Professor of Political Science and President of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) chapter at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. Sara Katz is a postdoctoral associate in the history department at Duke University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/economics

Federal Drive with Tom Temin
Interpreting the Biden administration's Defense budget request

Federal Drive with Tom Temin

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 21:46


The Defense budget request from the Biden administration is a bit of an outlier, as these things go. It was submitted later than ever, and is an amalgam of Biden and Trump administration priorities. It's also the first in 20 years to come with no overseas contingency fund request. Or not exactly. For the important messages the budget is sending, we turned to the Director of Defense Budget Analysis at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Todd Harrison.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Surveillance Reform After Snowden

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 90:25


From October 17, 2015: Last week, the Center for Strategic and International Studies hosted Ben, along with Laura Donohue of Georgetown Law School, former NSA Director Michael Hayden, and Robin Simcox of the Henry Jackson Society, to discuss the future of surveillance reform in a post-Snowden world. What have we learned about NSA surveillance activities and its oversight mechanisms since June 2013? In what way should U.S. intelligence operations be informed by their potential impact on U.S. on economic interests? What privacy interests do non-Americans have in U.S. surveillance? And domestically, has the third-party doctrine outlived its applicability? Tom Karako of CSIS moderated the panel.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Defense & Aerospace Report
Defense & Aerospace Daily Podcast [Dec 23, 2021] Airing of the Grievances

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 32:26


On this last episode of 2021, Byron Callan of the independent Washington research firm Capital Alpha Partners discusses the key stories of the year that will help shape 2022; and in celebration of Festivus, Todd Harrison of the Center for Strategic and International Studies discusses the top bad national security ideas of the year, airs his grievances and celebrates little miracles with Defense & Aerospace Report Editor Vago Muradian.

The Forum
Antarctic Treaty: Protecting the icy continent

The Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 38:59


It's widely regarded as the most successful treaty in the world, and it was the first arms control agreement established during the Cold War. The Antarctic Treaty, which came into force in 1961, protects what is one of the most unspoilt places on earth, from mining, from military activity and allows only scientific exploration and peaceful pursuits. It was thanks to the treaty and research carried out in Antarctica that scientists identified a hole in the ozone layer in the 1980s, but it's been most powerful as a symbol of what can be achieved to create peace between nations and give wilderness protection. So what has made this treaty so effective, and can it still hold up today in a world which is hungry for minerals and where an increasing number of states are seeking to project their technological and scientific prowess in Antarctica? Joining Bridget Kendall is Birgit Njaastad, the Chair of the Committee for the Environmental Protection of the Antarctic, and for more than 25 years a Norwegian Polar Institute environmental expert; Professor Alan Hemmings, a specialist on the geopolitics of the Antarctic from the University of Canterbury New Zealand; and Dr Jessica O'Reilly, Associate Professor of International Studies at Indiana University in Bloomington in the United States, and the author of The Technocratic Antarctic. With poetry and song about the Antarctic by the New Zealand poet Bill Manhire. Produced by Anne Khazam for the BBC World Service. (Photo: Chinstrap Penguins on Half Moon Island, South Shetlands, Antarctica. Credit: V Stokes/ iStock/ Getty Images Plus)

Business Matters
More information on the Omicron variant emerges

Business Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 52:20


Three new studies shed more light on the Omicron variant of coronavirus suggesting the risk of hospitalisation is lower than with previous variants. But there are still questions to be answered, says James Naismith, Professor of Structural Biology at the University of Oxford, about how quickly it can spread and for how long – something that will have a huge impact on recovering economies. The price of liquified natural gas is spiking around the world to around eight times what it was earlier in the year. Anne-Sophie Corbeau at the Center on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University tells us why, and Nikos Tsafos at the Center for Stretegic and International Studies in Washington, DC, explains how Chinese demand for energy is contributing to rising prices. Apple's investors want to investigate the company's behaviour in China, including allegations of forced labour in the supply chain, and they might just get that: the US financial regulator has blocked Apple's proposals to prevent shareholders from demanding those reports – Patrick McGee of the Financial Times tells us more. The BBC's Elizabeth Hotson looks at the future of high street retail, and in Hong Kong, authorities have removed a statue commemorating the Tiananmen Square massacre under cover of darkness. throughout the programme we're joined by Samson Ellis - Taipei Bureau Chief Bloomberg News and Diane Brady, Assistant Managing Editor of Forbes. Picture: A coronavirus poster on a phone box Credit: Andrew Milligan/PA Wire

Keen On Democracy
Liam Campling & Alejandro Colás on How the Sea Shaped Capitalism

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 44:34


In this episode of “Keen On”, Andrew is joined by Liam Campling and Alejandro Colás, the co-authors of “Capitalism and the Sea: The Maritime Factor in the Making of the Modern World". Liam Campling is a political economist researching the theory, politics and industrial organization of the business enterprise and global value chains; international trade policy, its negotiation and relationship to global production; and the political economy of development and environment change. He regards political economy as an interdisciplinary approach that allows me to contribute to debates in a range of fields, including Development Studies, Economic Geography, International Business, and International Political Economy. Alejandro Colás is Professor of International Relations in Birbeck University of London's Department of Politics. He has published on subjects ranging from piracy, food politics, Spanish responses to terrorism, imperialism, internationalism and global governance in journals like International Affairs, the Review of International Studies, Political Quarterly, Development and Change, Millennium, the European Journal of International Relations and Contemporary Politics Visit our website: https://lithub.com/story-type/keen-on/ Email Andrew: a.keen@me.com Watch the show live on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajkeen Watch the show live on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ankeen/ Watch the show live on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lithub Watch the show on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/LiteraryHub/videos Subscribe to Andrew's newsletter: https://andrew2ec.substack.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Defense & Aerospace Report
Northrop Grumman Cyber Report [Dec 22, 21]: Year End Review w/ Mike Rogers & Jim Lewis

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 33:53


On this final 2021 episode of the Defense & Aerospace Report's weekly Cyber Report, sponsored by Northrop Grumman, Adm. Mike Rogers, USN Ret., the former director of the National Security Agency and the commander of US Cyber Command who is now a cyber consultant and chairman of the advisory board of cybersecurity firm Claroty, and Dr. Jim Lewis, the director of the Strategic Technologies Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, discuss the key cyber events of the year that will shape 2022 with Defense & Aerospace Report Editor Vago Muradian.

World Business Report
The causes of Europe's gas price surge

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 26:28


With natural gas prices surging across Europe we explore the underlying causes. Anne-Sophie Corbeau is a global research scholar at the Center on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University and gives us her take. And we consider the impact of Chinese gas demand on global supply with Nikos Tsafos, head of energy and geopolitics at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, DC. Also in the programme, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson considers the future of the retail sector, and asks whether there is a new vision emerging for shops in towns and cities. Plus, the world's biggest lottery draw, Spain's El Gordo, happened today. But ticket sellers have been striking, complaining that their commission rates haven't increased in 17 years. We find out more from Joshua Parfitt, who is a writer for Olive Press News on the Costa Blanca.

The Munk Debates Podcast
Be it resolved: The west should intervene militarily to defend Ukraine from Russia

The Munk Debates Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 46:59


Russia has moved more than 100,000 troops close to disputed areas in Ukraine, setting up fears of a new Russian military intervention following their invasion of Crimea in 2014. US officials have responded by threatening Putin both with economic sanctions and the cancellation of a planned gas pipeline to Europe. Some security experts believe that the west must do more to defend Ukraine; standing by and allowing Russia to invade the country sends a message to other aggressive powers like China that their attacks on smaller countries like Taiwan will be met with similar weak responses. Geopolitically, an independent Ukraine creates an important buffer between Russia and Central Europe and prevents military buildup in the region. Others argue that the US has no business in Ukraine. A string of failed military interventions overseas has left thousands of Americans dead and foreigners scrambling to deal with the mess left behind. Russia also has every right to feel threatened by western attempts to defend border territories and NATO's alliances with border states. Furthermore, now is not the time to start a fight with Putin when conflicts are escalating with China and Iran. Russia's fight is with Ukraine. The west, isolationists argue, need to stay out of this fight and away from this conflict. Arguing for the motion is Dov Zakheim, senior advisor at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and a former US Under Secretary of Defense in the administration of George W. Bush. Arguing against the motion is is Anatol Lieven, senior fellow at the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft and the author of Ukraine & Russia: A Fraternal Rivalry QUOTES: DOV ZAKHEIM “If Mr Putin is allowed to invade Ukraine, then everybody else is going to notice it. It will weaken the NATO alliance and the Chinese will see that perhaps we, the Americans, really are a paper tiger” ANATOL LIEVEN “If you try to defend everywhere, you end up defending nowhere, which is what America risks vis-a-vis China, when it comes to Ukraine” Sources:  NBC, DW, CNBC, BBC, MSNBC, France 24 The host of the Munk Debates is Rudyard Griffiths - @rudyardg.   Tweet your comments about this episode to @munkdebate or comment on our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/munkdebates/ To sign up for a weekly email reminder for this podcast, send an email to podcast@munkdebates.com.   To support civil and substantive debate on the big questions of the day, consider becoming a Munk Member at https://munkdebates.com/membership Members receive access to our 10+ year library of great debates in HD video, a free Munk Debates book, newsletter and ticketing privileges at our live events. This podcast is a project of the Munk Debates, a Canadian charitable organization dedicated to fostering civil and substantive public dialogue - https://munkdebates.com/ The Munk Debates podcast is produced by Antica, Canada's largest private audio production company - https://www.anticaproductions.com/ Executive Producer: Stuart Coxe, CEO Antica Productions Senior Producer: Ricki Gurwitz Editor: Reza Dahya Associate Producer: Abhi Raheja

Reimagining Black Relations
#54 PAY - Part 2 Speakers

Reimagining Black Relations

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 28:58


Four speakers from the Inaugural Pan-African Youth (PAY) Summit.Prof. Babacar Kante - President of the National Political Dialogue  Commission in Senegal, former Vice-President of the Constitutional Council/Court of Senegal, and an expert in Constitutional law and political science, will speak on Ethics and Power.  Prof. Ivelaw Lloyd Griffith, Senior Associate with the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, DC, former Vice Chancellor of the University of Guyana, President of Fort Valley State University in Georgia, Provost of universities in Virginia and New York and Dean at Florida International University spoke on Security, Political Economy of Drugs, Crime, and its impact on the Sovereignty of a Nation.  Darcy Bourne, a 20-year-old Sophomore with a joint major in Sociology and French at Duke University in North Carolina, spoke on the Perspectives of Youth in Diaspora.  Dr. Alexandria Williams , an Internal Medicine Physician at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, California, spoke on Ethics. 

Chicago's Morning Answer with Dan Proft & Amy Jacobson

0:00 - Dan & Amy react to Joe Manchin's interview with Bret Baier on Sunday 8:40 - Is this what the endemic will look like?  29:03 - Dan & Amy respond to the 6th Circuit Court upholding the vax mandate 50:58 - Dan & Amy call out Ken Griffin 01:04:16 - Vice President of the Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Institute for International Studies, Lt Col James Carafano, asks where is the connection to public health? Follow Jim on twitter -  @JJCarafano 01:18:56 - Wayne Mesmer & Friends regale Dan & Amy with Christmas songs  01:37:52 - Steven Ross Pomeroy, Editor of RealClear Science:  The Biggest Junk Science of 2021. Follow Ross on twitter - @SteRoPo 01:52:20 - Political columnist and blogger for Crain's Chicago Business, Greg Hinz, answers why he believes Dan Proft is racist. Follow Greg on twitter - @GregHinz See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Defense & Aerospace Report
Defense & Aerospace Podcast [Washington Roundtable Dec 17, 21]

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 44:19


On this Washington Roundtable episode of the Defense & Aerospace Report Podcast, sponsored by Bell, our guests are Dov Zakheim, PhD, former DoD comptroller, now with the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Dr. Patrick Cronin of the Hudson Institute, Rear Adm. Mark Montgomery, USN Ret., the executive director of the Cyberspace Solarium Commission as well as a fellow with the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies and Michael Herson of American Defense International. Topics: — Analysis of the National Defense Authorization Act passed this week by Congress — Update on appropriations and Build Back Better as Congress raises the nation's debt limit — Russia's demands as Moscow masses troops on Ukraine border and Washington and NATO work to defuse crisis — Biden administration moves against Chinese state-owned companies' ability to operate in the United States, stopping diplomats from attending Beijing Winter Olympics and the nomination of Caroline Kennedy, the former US ambassador to Japan as America's next ambassador to Australia — Update on the Iran nuclear deal as Israel deftly negotiates behind the scenes and Prime Minister Naftali Bennett makes historic visit to Abu Dhabi — Expectations of the Biden administration's upcoming 2022 and out year spending plans to be released early next year — Look at the key events of 2021 that will shape 2022

Brussels Sprouts
Relations with Russia in the Arctic, with Mikkel Runge Olesen and Flemming Splidsboel Hansen

Brussels Sprouts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 50:14


How should the U.S. and its Arctic allies approach relations with Russia in the region? In this special co-branded episode, Mikkel Runge Olesen and Flemming Splidsboel Hansen from the Danish Institute of International Studies join Jim Townsend to discuss the path toward a stable and secure Arctic. Mikkel Runge Olesen is a Senior Researcher at the Danish Institute for International Studies. His work focuses on NATO and transatlantic relations, the Arctic, Baltic Sea security, and Danish foreign policy. Flemming Splidsboel Hansen is a Senior Researcher at the Danish Institute for International Studies, where his research focuses on the post-Soviet space, including Russian foreign policy and military affairs.

New Books in Japanese Studies
Rayna Denison, "Anime: A Critical Introduction" (Bloomsbury, 2015)

New Books in Japanese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 68:42


Rayna Denison's Anime: A Critical Introduction (Bloomsbury, 2015) uses genre as a window into the evolving global phenomenon of Japanese animation. Denison's wide-ranging analysis tackles the anime themselves – including classics such as Astro Boy, Akira, Urotsukidōji, Spirited Away, and Natsume's Book of Friends – but also the mechanics behind anime production and distribution in Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Tracking anime's circulation through these locations over time reveals key differences in how generic terms such as horror, nichijōkei/slice-of-life, and even anime itself are understood. Examining production and distribution contexts like the industry and fan event, Tokyo International Anime Fair, further discloses how companies and fans contextualize and re-contextualize anime to encourage its popularization in new time periods and markets. Denison depicts anime as an intricate global phenomenon that is constantly metamorphosing even on the level of individual anime texts, which are at the extreme re-cut, re-scripted, and re-dubbed to fit new contexts in an eternal evolution. Amanda Kennell is an Assistant Teaching Professor of International Studies at North Carolina State University. She writes about Japanese media and is currently finishing up a book on Japanese adaptations of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland novels. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/japanese-studies

New Books Network
Rayna Denison, "Anime: A Critical Introduction" (Bloomsbury, 2015)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 68:42


Rayna Denison's Anime: A Critical Introduction (Bloomsbury, 2015) uses genre as a window into the evolving global phenomenon of Japanese animation. Denison's wide-ranging analysis tackles the anime themselves – including classics such as Astro Boy, Akira, Urotsukidōji, Spirited Away, and Natsume's Book of Friends – but also the mechanics behind anime production and distribution in Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Tracking anime's circulation through these locations over time reveals key differences in how generic terms such as horror, nichijōkei/slice-of-life, and even anime itself are understood. Examining production and distribution contexts like the industry and fan event, Tokyo International Anime Fair, further discloses how companies and fans contextualize and re-contextualize anime to encourage its popularization in new time periods and markets. Denison depicts anime as an intricate global phenomenon that is constantly metamorphosing even on the level of individual anime texts, which are at the extreme re-cut, re-scripted, and re-dubbed to fit new contexts in an eternal evolution. Amanda Kennell is an Assistant Teaching Professor of International Studies at North Carolina State University. She writes about Japanese media and is currently finishing up a book on Japanese adaptations of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland novels. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Art
Rayna Denison, "Anime: A Critical Introduction" (Bloomsbury, 2015)

New Books in Art

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 68:42


Rayna Denison's Anime: A Critical Introduction (Bloomsbury, 2015) uses genre as a window into the evolving global phenomenon of Japanese animation. Denison's wide-ranging analysis tackles the anime themselves – including classics such as Astro Boy, Akira, Urotsukidōji, Spirited Away, and Natsume's Book of Friends – but also the mechanics behind anime production and distribution in Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Tracking anime's circulation through these locations over time reveals key differences in how generic terms such as horror, nichijōkei/slice-of-life, and even anime itself are understood. Examining production and distribution contexts like the industry and fan event, Tokyo International Anime Fair, further discloses how companies and fans contextualize and re-contextualize anime to encourage its popularization in new time periods and markets. Denison depicts anime as an intricate global phenomenon that is constantly metamorphosing even on the level of individual anime texts, which are at the extreme re-cut, re-scripted, and re-dubbed to fit new contexts in an eternal evolution. Amanda Kennell is an Assistant Teaching Professor of International Studies at North Carolina State University. She writes about Japanese media and is currently finishing up a book on Japanese adaptations of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland novels. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/art

New Books in East Asian Studies
Rayna Denison, "Anime: A Critical Introduction" (Bloomsbury, 2015)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 68:42


Rayna Denison's Anime: A Critical Introduction (Bloomsbury, 2015) uses genre as a window into the evolving global phenomenon of Japanese animation. Denison's wide-ranging analysis tackles the anime themselves – including classics such as Astro Boy, Akira, Urotsukidōji, Spirited Away, and Natsume's Book of Friends – but also the mechanics behind anime production and distribution in Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Tracking anime's circulation through these locations over time reveals key differences in how generic terms such as horror, nichijōkei/slice-of-life, and even anime itself are understood. Examining production and distribution contexts like the industry and fan event, Tokyo International Anime Fair, further discloses how companies and fans contextualize and re-contextualize anime to encourage its popularization in new time periods and markets. Denison depicts anime as an intricate global phenomenon that is constantly metamorphosing even on the level of individual anime texts, which are at the extreme re-cut, re-scripted, and re-dubbed to fit new contexts in an eternal evolution. Amanda Kennell is an Assistant Teaching Professor of International Studies at North Carolina State University. She writes about Japanese media and is currently finishing up a book on Japanese adaptations of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland novels. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books in Popular Culture
Rayna Denison, "Anime: A Critical Introduction" (Bloomsbury, 2015)

New Books in Popular Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 68:42


Rayna Denison's Anime: A Critical Introduction (Bloomsbury, 2015) uses genre as a window into the evolving global phenomenon of Japanese animation. Denison's wide-ranging analysis tackles the anime themselves – including classics such as Astro Boy, Akira, Urotsukidōji, Spirited Away, and Natsume's Book of Friends – but also the mechanics behind anime production and distribution in Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Tracking anime's circulation through these locations over time reveals key differences in how generic terms such as horror, nichijōkei/slice-of-life, and even anime itself are understood. Examining production and distribution contexts like the industry and fan event, Tokyo International Anime Fair, further discloses how companies and fans contextualize and re-contextualize anime to encourage its popularization in new time periods and markets. Denison depicts anime as an intricate global phenomenon that is constantly metamorphosing even on the level of individual anime texts, which are at the extreme re-cut, re-scripted, and re-dubbed to fit new contexts in an eternal evolution. Amanda Kennell is an Assistant Teaching Professor of International Studies at North Carolina State University. She writes about Japanese media and is currently finishing up a book on Japanese adaptations of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland novels. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/popular-culture

New Books in Film
Rayna Denison, "Anime: A Critical Introduction" (Bloomsbury, 2015)

New Books in Film

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 68:42


Rayna Denison's Anime: A Critical Introduction (Bloomsbury, 2015) uses genre as a window into the evolving global phenomenon of Japanese animation. Denison's wide-ranging analysis tackles the anime themselves – including classics such as Astro Boy, Akira, Urotsukidōji, Spirited Away, and Natsume's Book of Friends – but also the mechanics behind anime production and distribution in Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Tracking anime's circulation through these locations over time reveals key differences in how generic terms such as horror, nichijōkei/slice-of-life, and even anime itself are understood. Examining production and distribution contexts like the industry and fan event, Tokyo International Anime Fair, further discloses how companies and fans contextualize and re-contextualize anime to encourage its popularization in new time periods and markets. Denison depicts anime as an intricate global phenomenon that is constantly metamorphosing even on the level of individual anime texts, which are at the extreme re-cut, re-scripted, and re-dubbed to fit new contexts in an eternal evolution. Amanda Kennell is an Assistant Teaching Professor of International Studies at North Carolina State University. She writes about Japanese media and is currently finishing up a book on Japanese adaptations of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland novels. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/film

The Indy
Ep. 35: Richard Falk on Public Intellectual

The Indy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 44:04


On this week's episode of The Indy, we sit down with Richard Falk, a leading international law professor, activist, and author of over 50 books describing his various encounters throughout his career in international relations, including his recently published a memoir entitled Public Intellectual: The Life of a Citizen Pilgrim. After many years of loose ties with Santa Barbara, Richard Falk is now a research fellow with the Ofalea Center for Global and International Studies at UCSB.

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
China's Greater Bay Area and Ours: Can We Collaborate?

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 64:15


China is rapidly connecting Hong Kong, Macao and nine cities in Guangdong Province into a regional finance, technology, manufacturing and tourism hub of 86 million people. Over the next decade, this Greater Bay Area (GBA) will mature into a global showcase for China's economic model, “One Country-Two Systems” integration, and Belt and Road development strategy. GBA hopes to partner with comparable regions worldwide, including the San Francisco Bay Area, in areas such as clean energy, health care, mobility and fintech. A new report by the Bay Area Council and the Hong Kong Trade Development Council assesses the commercial opportunities and political obstacles amid U.S.-China tensions. Join the sponsors of the report for a deeper dive into the report's findings. About the Speakers Sean Randolph is senior director of the Bay Area Council Economic Institute, where he served as president & CEO from 1998-2015, and manages its science affiliate the Bay Area Science and Innovation Consortium (BASIC). Randolph previously served as director of international trade for the state of California, and prior to that as international director general of the Pacific Basin Economic Council (PBEC), a 1,000-member Asia-Pacific business organization. His professional career includes extensive experience in the U.S. Government, where he served on congressional staffs, on the White House staff, and in senior positions at the departments of State and Energy. Dr. Randolph holds a JD from the Georgetown University Law Center, a Ph.D. from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy (Tufts and Harvard Universities), a B.S.F.S. from Georgetown's School of Foreign Service, and studied at the London School of Economics. Louis Chan is principal economist for the Global Research Team of the Hong Kong Trade Development Council. As the head of the Global Research Team, Louis provides leadership and direction for research on market developments in the Americas and Europe. To provide a macro view for SMEs to formulate export strategies, Louis and his team monitor and evaluate the performance, changing trends and competitiveness of Hong Kong's trading, manufacturing and service sector, at the industry-specific levels. To facilitate SMEs' sales efforts, they also keep a close eye on the emerging business opportunities, consumption and sourcing trends, as well as regulatory changes in the Americas, Europe and Central Asia. Moderator Scott Rozelle holds the Helen Farnsworth Endowed Professorship at Stanford University and is senior fellow and professor in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. Dr. Rozelle's research focuses on the economics of poverty—with an emphasis on the economics of education and health. Dr. Rozelle is the co-director of the Rural Education Action Project and is an adjunct professor in 8 Chinese universities. In 2008, Dr. Rozelle was awarded the Friendship Award—the highest honor that can be endowed on a foreign citizen—by Premiere Wen Jiabao. MLF ORGANIZER Lillian Nakagawa NOTES MLF: Asia-Pacific Affairs SPEAKERS Louis Chan Principal Economist (Global Research Team), Hong Kong Trade Development Council Sean Randolph Senior Director, Bay Area Council Economic Institute Scott Rozelle Helen Farnsworth Professor, Stanford University, and Senior Fellow and Professor, the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies—Moderator In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on December 9th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
China's Greater Bay Area and Ours: Can We Collaborate?

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 64:15


China is rapidly connecting Hong Kong, Macao and nine cities in Guangdong Province into a regional finance, technology, manufacturing and tourism hub of 86 million people. Over the next decade, this Greater Bay Area (GBA) will mature into a global showcase for China's economic model, “One Country-Two Systems” integration, and Belt and Road development strategy. GBA hopes to partner with comparable regions worldwide, including the San Francisco Bay Area, in areas such as clean energy, health care, mobility and fintech. A new report by the Bay Area Council and the Hong Kong Trade Development Council assesses the commercial opportunities and political obstacles amid U.S.-China tensions. Join the sponsors of the report for a deeper dive into the report's findings. About the Speakers Sean Randolph is senior director of the Bay Area Council Economic Institute, where he served as president & CEO from 1998-2015, and manages its science affiliate the Bay Area Science and Innovation Consortium (BASIC). Randolph previously served as director of international trade for the state of California, and prior to that as international director general of the Pacific Basin Economic Council (PBEC), a 1,000-member Asia-Pacific business organization. His professional career includes extensive experience in the U.S. Government, where he served on congressional staffs, on the White House staff, and in senior positions at the departments of State and Energy. Dr. Randolph holds a JD from the Georgetown University Law Center, a Ph.D. from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy (Tufts and Harvard Universities), a B.S.F.S. from Georgetown's School of Foreign Service, and studied at the London School of Economics. Louis Chan is principal economist for the Global Research Team of the Hong Kong Trade Development Council. As the head of the Global Research Team, Louis provides leadership and direction for research on market developments in the Americas and Europe. To provide a macro view for SMEs to formulate export strategies, Louis and his team monitor and evaluate the performance, changing trends and competitiveness of Hong Kong's trading, manufacturing and service sector, at the industry-specific levels. To facilitate SMEs' sales efforts, they also keep a close eye on the emerging business opportunities, consumption and sourcing trends, as well as regulatory changes in the Americas, Europe and Central Asia. Moderator Scott Rozelle holds the Helen Farnsworth Endowed Professorship at Stanford University and is senior fellow and professor in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. Dr. Rozelle's research focuses on the economics of poverty—with an emphasis on the economics of education and health. Dr. Rozelle is the co-director of the Rural Education Action Project and is an adjunct professor in 8 Chinese universities. In 2008, Dr. Rozelle was awarded the Friendship Award—the highest honor that can be endowed on a foreign citizen—by Premiere Wen Jiabao. MLF ORGANIZER Lillian Nakagawa NOTES MLF: Asia-Pacific Affairs SPEAKERS Louis Chan Principal Economist (Global Research Team), Hong Kong Trade Development Council Sean Randolph Senior Director, Bay Area Council Economic Institute Scott Rozelle Helen Farnsworth Professor, Stanford University, and Senior Fellow and Professor, the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies—Moderator In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on December 9th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Bond Buyer Podcast
Build What Better: A Greener Industrial Strategy

The Bond Buyer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 27:08


We discuss energy provisions in the new infrastructure law – how much they will fight climate change, and how far they will move America toward a carbon-free future. Peter Keating with guests Ben King (Rhodium Group), Morgan Hickman (Center for Strategic and International Studies) and Adam Stern (Breckinridge Capital Advisors).

Press the Button
The Unexpected Iran Deal Validators

Press the Button

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 32:28


On this week's episode, co-host Tom Collina sits down with Jeremy Ben-Ami, President of J Street, to discuss the growing number former Israeli officials faulting the Israeli government for opposing the Iran nuclear deal. On Early Warning, Michelle Dover is joined by Nomsa Ndongwe, co-founder of WCAPS West coast chapter & staff member at the Global Security at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies. She identifies what to look out for at the upcoming Non-Proliferation Treaty review conference.

Chicago's Morning Answer with Dan Proft & Amy Jacobson

0:00 - Dan & Amy review another crime filled weekend in Chicago 12:26 - Dan & Amy address the “hopelessly conflicted, sentimental barbarism affecting Chicago” 29:56 -Neocon Norm on the war against cultural Marxism 52:44 - Dan & Amy decipher the correct use of “latinx” 01:03:51 - Vice President of the Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Institute for International Studies at The Heritage Foundation and author of Brutal War: Jungle Fighting in Papua New Guinea, 1942, Lt Col James Carafano, says he's worried the next 9/11 will come from illegal border crossers. Follow Jim on twitter - @JJCarafano 01:19:54 - Legal Fellow, Meese Center for Legal and Judicial Studies, Amy Swearer, previews her upcoming testimony at this morning's Senate Judiciary Committee Field Hearing entitled “Combating Gun Trafficking and Reducing Violence in Chicago” Follow Amy on twitter - @AmySwearer 01:34:49 - Roger D Klein, MD, JD, expert with the Regulatory Transparency Project's FDA and Health Working Group looks for the path to coexisting with COVID 01:51:57 - Owner of Perillo Dealer Group, Joe Perillo: Enough is Enough! More on Joe Perillo here  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Defense & Aerospace Report
Defense & Aerospace Podcast [Washington Roundtable Dec 10, 21]

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 49:00


On this Washington Roundtable episode of the Defense & Aerospace Report Podcast, sponsored by Bell, our guests in segment one are Dov Zakheim, PhD, former DoD comptroller, now with the Center for Strategic and International Studies and Michael Herson of American Defense International; in segment two we talk Army-Navy with John Schofield, co-founder of theProvision Advisors PR firm and co-host of the Sing Second Sports podcast. Topics: — Update on the Senate version of the National Defense Authorization Act — Talks to raise the nation's borrowing limit, prospects for Build Back Better as inflation hits a 40-year high and a look at appropriations process — President Biden's meeting with Vladimir Putin as Russia masses troops on the Ukraine border — Biden's decision to block US diplomats from attending the upcoming winter Olympic Games in Beijing — The importance of Biden's Summit of Democracies — Latest on reviving the Iran nuclear deal and Israeli concerns with further negotiations with Tehran — Takeaways from the Reagan National Defense Forum — Special coverage of the 122nd Army-Navy Game with prominent US Military Academy and the US Naval Academy graduates on what the rivalry has meant to them as cadets and midshipmen, as officers, and as lawmakers, service chiefs and secretaries and as defense secretary, and why sports are such an important part of the service academy ethos and curriculum

The Next Page
Hidden Figures in Women‘s International Human Rights, with Ellen Chesler, Fatima Sator and Dan Plesch

The Next Page

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 40:54


Today's episode brings us on a journey of archaeology. Not the type with shovels and brushes, but rather a restorative archaeology that sheds light on the stories of women who are not well known in the history books. We speak with Fatima Sator, Ellen Chesler and Dan Plesch, two of the authors and the co-editor of a new book published this year called Women and the UN: A New History of Women's International Human Rights. It documents the stories of influential women, many from the global south, who dedicated their work to ensuring women's human rights were recorded in UN conventions,  treaties and documents. Despite this work, there is very little known about them and their contribution.   Fatima Sator is a communications specialist at International Committee of the Red Cross, author and gender equality researcher at School of Oriental and African Studies University of London, or SOAS.  Ellen Chesler is an author and Senior Fellow at CUNY's Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies. They both contributed chapters to the book.   Dan Plesch is a co-editor of this volume, together with Rebecca Adami. He is the Director of the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy at SOAS.  We talk about why documenting these stories of women in our history matters for our understanding of multilateralism, and consider how we define multilateralism might to evolve to fully comprehend the  contribution of women to key multilateral decisions and documents that exist today.  Open Access Book “Women and the UN: A New History of Women's International Human Rights” - Open Access version online: https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/oa-edit/10.4324/9781003036708/women-un-rebecca-adami-dan-plesch   Book Resources  Project Page for Women and the UN:  https://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/research/women-in-diplomacy/women-in-the-un-charter/  Open Global Rights article on the book:  https://www.openglobalrights.org/women-and-the-un-a-new-history-of-womens-international-human-rights/?lang=English  TEDx PlaceDesNations talk with Fatima Sator and Elise Diettrichson - "These women changed your life": These Women Changed Your Life | Elise Luhr Dietrichson & Fatima Sator | TEDxPlaceDesNationsWomen  "Women founders of the UN" - SOAS conference with Rebecca Adami  Women and Girls Rising: Progress and resistance around the world, edited by Ellen Chesler and Terry McGovern:  https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/edit/10.4324/9781315708379/women-girls-rising-ellen-chesler-terry-mcgovern  Content Speakers: Ellen Chesler, Fatima Sator and Dan Plesch Host: Natalie Alexander Editor & Producer: Natalie Alexander Social media designs: Natalie Alexander Recorded & produced at the United Nations Library & Archives Geneva  

Paid Vocation with Lupe Prado
Why Mindset Matters | Amy Norman

Paid Vocation with Lupe Prado

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 34:29


Episode #56: This week on the podcast I am thrilled to have Amy Norman. Amy is the founder and CEO of Little Passports, a series of award-winning and one-of-a-kind activity kits designed to awaken kids' curiosity about geography, culture, science, and art. Founded in 2009, Little Passports now has five subscription kits and a line of complementary standalone toys, games, and activity kits. Amy's sense of adventure began at an early age as she frequently moved between the US and England with her family, and was exposed to various cultures and traditions.  In addition to studying Spanish and International Studies at The Lauder Institute at the University of Pennsylvania, Amy's countless travel experiences throughout her life further ignited her passion for learning about the world and sharing that excitement of knowledge with young children.  Drawing on this background, Amy designed Little Passports to give children the opportunity to see the world in a new way, via hands-on activities, exciting games, and stories that draw from science, nature, and global experiences. Amy is a well-versed leader with over 25 years of experience in general management, strategy, and finance from leadership roles at McKinsey and eBay. She is a member of the Small and Medium Business Council at Facebook, was recognized as an Ernst and Young Winning Woman, was a finalist for Entrepreneur Of The Year in 2019, and is a member of the Young Presidents' Organization.  I loved this conversation so much. Amy shares some of the personal struggles that she was going through in her life as she launched little passports. She also shares how mindset impacts what we accomplish in our lives. I was so inspired by listening to Amy's story. I can't wait for you to listen. Connect with Amy: Website Instagram Connect with Lupe: Website Instagram

RNZ: Morning Report
Russia - US appoint representatives to discuss Ukraine

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 4:04


Russia says it is expecting to begin a "discussion of strategic security on the continent" with the US after the high-stakes talks between President Vladimir Putin and US President Joe Biden yesterday, which centered on Ukraine. A Kremlin spokesperson said the two leaders had agreed to appoint representatives to discuss the situation. Russia has an estimated 100,000 troops within striking distance of Ukraine. Andrew Lohsen is a fellow in the Europe, Russia, and Eurasia Program at the Centre for Strategic and International Studies. He spoke to Susie Ferguson.

The Lawfare Podcast
Making Sense of the Crisis in Ethiopia

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 46:46


For the past year, the country of Ethiopia has been embroiled in a brutal civil war. At the center of it is Tigray, a region that has played a prominent role in the evolution of Ethiopia's modern ethnofederalist state. Just weeks ago, rebels seemed to be on the verge of seizing the capital city of Addis Ababa, leading foreign governments to urge their nationals to evacuate the country as soon as possible. Today, the city remains in government hands, and rebel forces appear to be on the retreat, though how long they will stay that way is anyone's guess. To put this dynamic conflict in context and give us a sense of where it may be headed, Scott R. Anderson spoke with Professor Michael Woldemariam of the Pardee School of Global Studies at Boston University and Professor Hilary Matfess of the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. They discussed the origins of Ethiopia's ongoing civil war, what it's meant for civilians living there and how it might shape the country's future.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Wajahat Ali and Aaron David Miller Episode 493

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 102:19


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more also please donate to GiveWell.org/StandUp and start a store or shop at Shopify.com/Standup   27 mins.  Wajahat Ali is a columnist at The Daily Beast and a Senior Fellow at The Western States Center and Auburn Seminary. He has previously been a New York Times contributing op-ed writer, CNN commentator, host for Huff Post, and co-host of Al Jazeera America's The Stream. He is also a recovering attorney and playwright. He is currently working on his first book, "Go Back To Where You Came From: And, Other Helpful Recommendations on How to Become American" scheduled for Spring 2022 publication. He makes Pakistani food and Lego sets "for his kids" during his free time. You can send him hate mail at wajahatmali@protonmail.com     1:08. Aaron David Miller is a senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, focusing on U.S. foreign policy. He has written five books, including his most recent, The End of Greatness: Why America Can't Have (and Doesn't Want) Another Great President (Palgrave, 2014) and The Much Too Promised Land: America's Elusive Search for Arab-Israeli Peace (Bantam, 2008). He received his PhD in Middle East and U.S. diplomatic history from the University of Michigan in 1977. Between 1978 and 2003, Miller served at the State Department as an historian, analyst, negotiator, and advisor to Republican and Democratic secretaries of state, where he helped formulate U.S. policy on the Middle East and the Arab-Israel peace process, most recently as the senior advisor for Arab-Israeli negotiations. He also served as the deputy special Middle East coordinator for Arab-Israeli negotiations, senior member of the State Department's policy planning staff, in the Bureau of Intelligence and Research, and in the office of the historian. He has received the department's Distinguished, Superior, and Meritorious Honor Awards. Miller is a member of the  Council on Foreign Relations, and formerly served as resident scholar at the Georgetown Center for Strategic and International Studies. He has been a featured presenter at the World Economic Forum and leading U.S. universities. Between 2003 and 2006 he served as president of Seeds of Peace, a nonprofit organization dedicated to empowering young leaders from regions of conflict with the leadership skills required to advance reconciliation and coexistence. From 2006 to 2019, Miller was a public policy scholar; vice president for new initiatives, and director of the Middle East program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Miller is a global affairs analyst for CNN. His articles have appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, Politico, Foreign Policy, USAToday, and CNN.com. He is a frequent commentator on NPR, BBC, and Sirius XM radio.   Check out Barry and Abigail Hummel's Podcast  Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page

Flow Research Collective Radio
Remembering Csikszentmihalyi 2: Mark Csikszentmihalyi Remembering His Father, The Influence He Had & How Csikszentmihalyi Practiced What He Preached | Flow Research Collective Radio

Flow Research Collective Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 46:09


TODAY´S EPISODE IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE FLOW RESEARCH COLLECTIVE Are you an entrepreneur, a leader, or a knowledge worker, who wants to harness the power of flow so you can get more done in less time with greater ease and accomplish your boldest professional goals faster? If you´ve answered this question with “hell yes” then our peak-performance training Zero to Dangerous may be a good fit for you. If this sounds of interest to you all you need to do is go to getmoreflow.com right now, pop in your application and one of our team members will be in touch with you very soon.  --- "Nothing was drudgery. There was always a way to make a game out of something. To make it a challenge." ~ Mark Csikszentmihalyi ABOUT THE GUEST: Mark Csikszentmihalyi, Professor and Eliaser Chair of International Studies, has an AB in East Asian Languages and Civilizations (Harvard) and a Ph.D in Asian Languages (Stanford). He uses both excavated and transmitted texts to reconstruct the religions, philosophies, and cultures of early China. Recent books include Material Virtue: Ethics and the Body in Early China (2004) and Readings in Han Chinese Thought (2006). He is currently translating a set of Song dynasty essays on the Zhuangzi. He is Editor of the Journal of Chinese Religions. --- If you order Steven's new book, The Art of Impossible, right now, you'll get $1,500 of free bonuses immediately dropped into your inbox.  They include secret chapters he has never released, masterclasses on key skills to help you jack up motivation, heighten creativity, and accelerate learning. You'll also get an entirely free training to help you fight distraction and spend more time in flow.  So click the link here, snag yourself a copy of The Art of Impossible, and let's get after it.

In The Moment podcast
116. David Bosco with Steve Scher: The Struggle to Govern the World's Oceans

In The Moment podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 64:57


Oceans cover about 71% of the earth's surface. Can something so vast and fluid be governed? Humanity has long attempted to create rules for the oceans of the world while honoring the “freedom of the seas” — a maritime principle first introduced in 1609 that stresses the freedom to navigate the oceans in times of peace. But as David Bosco describes in his latest book, The Poseidon Project: The Struggle to Govern the World's Oceans, building effective ocean rules while preserving maritime freedoms remains a daunting task. Bosco addresses past and present maritime disputes and developing tensions around ocean governance. Past wars, new environmental concerns, and the expanded reach of national governments into oceans have all contributed to the erosion of freedom of the seas. In the 116th Episode of Town Hall's In the Moment podcast, Chief Correspondent Steve Scher talks with David Bosco about the controversies surrounding control of the world's oceans. David Bosco is Associate Professor of International Studies at Indiana University's Hamilton Lugar School of Global and International Studies. He is the author of previous books on the UN Security Council and the International Criminal Court, Rough Justice and Five to Rule Them All. He also writes the Multilateralist blog. Previously, he served as a senior editor at Foreign Policy magazine and worked in post-war Bosnia on refugee issues. Steve Scher is a podcaster and interviewer and has been a teacher at the University of Washington since 2009. He worked in Seattle public radio for almost 30 years and is Senior Correspondent for Town Hall Seattle's In The Moment podcast. Buy the book: The Poseidon Project: The Struggle to Govern the World's Oceans Presented by Town Hall Seattle. To become a member or make a donation click here. 

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
Solving the Port Problem with Lauren Beagen

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 65:36


Solving the Port Problem with Lauren Beagen Lauren Beagen and Joe Lynch discuss solving the port problem. Lauren is a seasoned maritime attorney and the founder of Squall Strategies, a boutique maritime consulting and legal solutions company and offers a wide range of consulting services to serve a variety of businesses and clients. About Lauren Beagen  Lauren M. Beagen is a seasoned maritime attorney and the founder of Squall Strategies, LLC. Ms. Beagen is often called on for her industry expertise by major media networks, including recent features on CNBC and FreightWaves. Ms. Beagen has extensive experience in oceanborne commerce and maritime law, with specific emphasis on maritime transportation, Shipping Act issues, supply chain management, international antitrust law, and port and terminal operations. Notable appointments include work in the federal government as Attorney-Advisor (International Affairs) in the Office of the General Counsel at the Federal Maritime Commission and work at a public port authority as Maritime Project Manager for the Port of Boston at the Massachusetts Port Authority. Ms. Beagen received a Bachelor's degree in International Political Science and International Studies from Hope College, a Master of Marine Affairs degree from the University of Rhode Island, and a Juris Doctorate from Roger Williams University School of Law. She is an avid sailor and recreational fisherman and holds a US Coast Guard Merchant Mariner Credential (50 ton) for Great Lakes and Inland Waters. About Squall Strategies Squall Strategies is a boutique maritime consulting and legal solutions company and offers a wide range of consulting services to serve a variety of businesses and clients. Whether you're a small, local business or a multinational corporation, we can help you reach new levels of success. Squall Strategies is available for advice and consultation on potential federal regulatory impacts on your business, federal regulatory review and analysis, advice and consultation on supply chain and ocean freight movement, Federal Maritime Commission related inquiries (including FMC mock audit/review), advice and consultation on demurrage, tariff/schedule reviews, cargo movement and shipping insight, foreign tariff and trade expertise, and emerging markets and offshore wind analysis. Our team is also available for advisory boards, leadership recruitment, and corporate speaking engagements. Key Takeaways: Solving The Port Problem Lauren M. Beagen is a seasoned maritime attorney and the founder of Squall Strategies, which is a boutique maritime consulting and legal solutions company and offers a wide range of consulting services to serve a variety of businesses and clients. In the podcast interview, Joe and Lauren discuss solving the port problem. The number of ships waiting to enter the biggest U.S. gateway for trade with Asia reached the highest since the pandemic began, exacerbating delays for companies trying to replenish inventories during one of the busiest times of the year for seaborne freight. The port problem first became noticeable in the Port of Los Angeles and the Port of Long Beach, the ports where the majority of shipments from Asia are received. Other ports around the USA have also seen delays and disruptions. The port problem was caused by the following factors: Increased demand by US consumers who went on a buying spree. Because restaurants were closed, vacation travel restricted, and many big purchases delayed because of pandemic-driven shortages – bored, house-bound consumers bought a lot of stuff that had to be made in Asia and shipped to America's West coast ports (Los Angeles and Long Beach). Consumer spending also received a bump from government money that was generously distributed during the first year of the pandemic. While American consumers went shopping, particularly online, the Asian factories and supply chains that produce the goods were broken due to labor and materials shortages. Access to vaccines, medical care, and family issues contributed to the shortages. Labor problems in the USA exacerbated the problem as people left the workforce in large numbers due to COVID infection, money from the government, homeschooling of children, and caring for family members. The port congestion may have also been caused by a lack of digitization and technology at the ports. The National Shipper Advisory Committee (NSAC) is a team made up of both public and private sectors organizations tasked with solving the port problems. The NSAC is led by the Federal Maritime Commission (FMC), which is the independent federal agency responsible for regulating the U.S. international ocean transportation system for the benefit of U.S. exporters, importers, and the U.S. consumer. The NSAC is actively working to identify and eliminate bottlenecks. The NSAC is also working on a number of initiatives to improve the ports including: demurrage/detention standards, data standards, transparency, and digitization. Lauren and the Squall Strategies team helps shippers and logistics providers navigate Federal Maritime Commission related issues (including FMC mock audit/review), federal regulatory reviews, advice and consultation on potential federal regulatory impacts, general maritime consulting, advice and consultation on demurrage, cargo movement and shipping insight, foreign tariff and trade expertise, and emerging markets and offshore wind analysis.  Learn More About Solving The Port Problem Lauren Beagen LinkedIn Squall Strategies LinkedIn Squall Strategies Website Squall Strategies Captain's Log - YouTube Channel Captain's Log: Demurrage... aka keep 'er movin' "How Amazon Beat Supply Chain Chaos With Ships, Containers and Planes", CNBC (Beagen as featured industry expert) Federal Maritime Commission The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

Chicago's Morning Answer with Dan Proft & Amy Jacobson

0:00 - Dan & Amy react to Chicago's violent weekend including the juvenile MOB hit at Michigan Ave and Millennial Park. 12:32 - Dan & Amy look into Big Blue City violence 32:33 - Dan & Amy respond to OPRF's plan to ban winter sports 48:20 - Should the Oxford MI shooter's parents be charged under Michigan law? 01:04:14 - Vice President of the Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Institute for International Studies at The Heritage Foundation and author of Brutal War: Jungle Fighting in Papua New Guinea, 1942, Lt Col James Carafano, critiques Biden's COVID response and policies. Follow Jim on twitter - @JJCarafano 01:18:59 - Dan & Amy take callers reaction to the possible gun regulations proposed after the Oxford MI school shooting 01:31:09 - American economist, author, professor, and co-director of the Program on the American Economy and Globalization at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, Donald J Boudreaux, asks Is Free Trade Elitist? Check out Professor Boudreaux's latest -  cafehayek.com01:44:07 - Kris Kobach, former Kansas Secretary of State, currently General Counsel of the Alliance for Free Citizens and candidate for Kansas Attorney General, discusses his fight against the OSHA vaccine mandate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Trend Following with Michael Covel
Ep. 1030: Jonathan Hillman Interview with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio

Trend Following with Michael Covel

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 40:22


From the ocean floor to outer space, China's Digital Silk Road aims to wire the world and rewrite the global order. Taking readers on a journey inside China's surveillance state, rural America, and Africa's megacities, Jonathan Hillman reveals what China's expanding digital footprint looks like on the ground and explores the economic and strategic consequences of a future in which all routers lead to Beijing. If China becomes the world's chief network operator, it could reap a commercial and strategic windfall, including many advantages currently enjoyed by the United States. It could reshape global flows of data, finance, and communications to reflect its interests. It could possess an unrivaled understanding of market movements, the deliberations of foreign competitors, and the lives of countless individuals enmeshed in its networks. However, China's digital dominance is not yet assured. Beijing remains vulnerable in several key dimensions, the United States and its allies have an opportunity to offer better alternatives, and the rest of the world has a voice. But winning the battle for tomorrow's networks will require the United States to innovate and take greater risks in emerging markets. Networks create large winners, and this is a contest America cannot afford to lose. Bio: Jonathan E. Hillman is a senior fellow with the economics program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, the director of the Reconnecting Asia Project, and the author of The Emperor's New Road: China and the Project of the Century. In this episode of Trend Following Radio: Digital Technology China Tech Industry EU Regulations Negative v. Positive About China China's Global Infrastructure QR Codes

Defense & Aerospace Report
Defense & Aerospace Podcast [Washington Roundtable Dec 03, 21]

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 41:04


On this Washington Roundtable episode of the Defense & Aerospace Report Podcast, sponsored by Bell, our guests are Dov Zakheim, PhD, former DoD comptroller, now with the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Dr. Patrick Cronin of the Hudson Institute, Rear Adm. Mark Montgomery, USN Ret., the executive director of the Cyberspace Solarium Commission as well as a fellow with the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies and Michael Herson of American Defense International. Topics: — Congress averts a government shutdown, but NDAA, full-year Continuing Resolution and debt limit increase loom — Analysis of what we know about the Biden administration's Global Posture Review that was embraced by President Biden but remains classified — Former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's warning to China that it faces economic devastating if it miscalculates over Taiwan — Administration efforts to bring region together to better deter Beijing — Russia's continued massing of forces on the Ukraine border — Israel's call that Washington end a new round of nuclear negotiations with Iran — What our roundtable expects to hear from participants in this year's Reagan National Defense Forum — Results of latest RNDF national security poll that shows declining American public support for the US military

Your Path to Nonprofit Leadership
134: Why Corporations Should Look at Philanthropy in a New Way (Holly Welch Stubbing)

Your Path to Nonprofit Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 49:06


134: Why Corporations Should Look at Philanthropy in a New Way (Holly Welch Stubbing)SUMMARYNonprofit organizations worldwide study ways to capitalize on corporate relationships in their fundraising efforts.  Having been on both sides of this equation, Holly Welch Stubbing, the President & CEO of E4E Relief, identifies specific challenges she sees as nonprofits try to connect with corporate leaders. She shares her thoughts on how corporations can look at philanthropy differently given the competing agendas they are constantly having to manage. In episode 134 of Your Path to Nonprofit Leadership, we'll explore how to better align the mission of both the corporation and your nonprofit, and how implementing a plan around relationship building will improve that partnership.  As a strong nonprofit leader, educating yourself on corporate practices, governances, and structure will enable a better understanding when developing community philanthropic campaigns.ABOUT HOLLYHolly Welch Stubbing serves as President & CEO of E4E Relief, an international nonprofit organization that provides disaster and hardship grants to individuals worldwide and is a leading provider of employee relief programs for multinational corporations headquartered in the U.S.  Holly previously worked for Foundation For The Carolinas for over 20 years in advancement, investment and legal affairs and is a nationally recognized leader in charitable tax matters and serves or has served on key public policy committees representing nonprofits and philanthropy on the Hill and in the state of North Carolina. She is a past Strategy leader for the Alliance for Charitable Reform and serves professionally on the Merrill Lynch Bledsoe/Cathcart Group Advisory Council and the Seymour Legacy Trust Board of Trustees. She also serves on nonprofit boards for Wake Forest University Charlotte, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library Foundation and Trinity Episcopal School.  Holly is a German Marshall Fund Marshall Memorial Fellow and is a recipient of the Charlotte Business Journal's Women in Business Award and 40 Under 40 recognitions. She was the Charlotte AFP's Fundraiser of the Year Award winner in 2013, and holds a Global Executive MBA from Georgetown University's McDonough School of Business, a J.D. from the University of Dayton School of Law and a B.A. in Speech Communications and International Studies from Wake Forest University.  Holly is a member of the North Carolina and Tennessee Bar Associations.  EPISODE TOPICS & RESOURCESReed Hoffman's book Masters of Scale Learn more about E4E ReliefReady for a Mastermind?  Apply Today!

Two Teachers Talking™
143. Teaching While Black in Japan

Two Teachers Talking™

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 77:51


Three very special guests join us to discuss being a black educator in Japan: hiring (and leaving), student interaction, staff interaction, peer interaction, teaching materials, stereotypes of the English teacher…and, most importantly, how we can improve things. Avril Haye Matsui is an educator, activist, researcher, and Ph.D. candidate, studying the status and roles of black women in ELT. You can view one of her JALT presentations here: The Changing Face of ELT: Black Women in ELT, https://youtu.be/8nO3fLcq-OQ Rachel Patterson serves as the Assistant Academic Director and instructor at the Berlitz-ELS program at the Kindai University Faculty of International Studies. Her focus is on teacher training and development, study abroad, and formal assessment. She lives in Nara and spends her free time gardening, studying Japanese, and wood burning. Professional Development Through Language Conferences: https://bit.ly/PDTLC-RP Davina Robinson is an educator, narrator, and singer living in Osaka. Tony and Davina go waaaaay back. https://davinarobinson.com

Under The Skin with Russell Brand
#214 Are We in a Totalitarian Regime and Don't Even Know It?! (With Dr. Brad Evans)

Under The Skin with Russell Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 10:55


This week I'm joined again by Dr. Brad Evans. Brad is a professor of Political Violence at the department of Politics, Languages & International Studies at the University of Bath. His latest book is called Ecce Humanitas: Beholding the Pain of Humanity. In this conversation we discuss the state of the world now: What are the issues we are facing? Who is controlling the narrative of our time? Are there any solutions? Are we trapped in a totalitarian regime and don't know it? Brad has an incredible mind that understands the inner workings of power, violence, and subjugation. More Info: Get a copy of Brad's new book here: https://www.waterstones.com/book/ecce-humanitas/brad-evans/jake-chapman/9780231184632 Come see me live; check out upcoming dates: https://www.russellbrand.com/live-dates/ My meditation podcast, Above the Noise, is out now, only on Luminary. I release guided meditations every Wednesday. Please check it out: http://luminary.link/meditate Elites are taking over! Our only hope is to form our own. To learn more join my cartel here https://www.russellbrand.com/join and get weekly bulletins too incendiary for anything but your private inbox. (*not a euphemism) Subscribe to my YouTube channel, I post four videos a week including video clips from these episodes!  https://www.youtube.com/russellbrand Subscribe to my YouTube side-channel for more wellness and spirituality: https://www.youtube.com/c/AwakeningWithRussell Instagram: http://instagram.com/russellbrand/ Twitter:  http://twitter.com/rustyrockets