Podcasts about Gaza Strip

Self-governing Palestinian territory bordering Egypt and Israel

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Latest podcast episodes about Gaza Strip

UN News
UNRWA launches $1.6 billion funding appeal as humanitarian conditions worsen

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 0:05


Without $1.6 billion in funding for essential services and humanitarian aid to help Palestinian refugees this year, they could hit rock bottom, the head of the UN Relief and Works Agency – or UNRWA – said on Tuesday.In an interview with UN News's Daniel Johnson, UNRWA chief Philippe Lazzarini explains where the needs are most acute, and why the agency is an “indispensable” stabilizing force in the Middle East.

Best of God Reports Interviews
Episode 18 – Taysir Abu Saada – Palestinian Fatah fighter once hated Jews

Best of God Reports Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 9:40


He was a Palestinian fighter trained to kill Jews.  His hatred was so strong he dreamed of poisoning Jews who frequented the restaurant where he worked. “I hated the Jewish people,” says Taysir Abu Saada (“Tass”), founder of Seeds of Hope, a humanitarian organization operating in the Middle East. His objective is to bring long-term […] The post Episode 18 – Taysir Abu Saada – Palestinian Fatah fighter once hated Jews first appeared on God Reports.

History Homos
Ep. 137 - The Israeli - Palestinian Conflict ft. Tony Tudor

History Homos

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 82:43


This week we welcome "Jordan Peterson" to to the podcast to discuss the ins and outs of the conflict between the Palestinian people in the Occupied Territories of the Gaza Strip and the West Bank and the apartheid state of Israel. We cover the origins of the borders, the settlements and the pitifully one sided media depiction of the tragic situation. We also cover Jordan Peterson's stomach turning interview with Benjamin Netanyahu. Don't forget to join our Telegram channel at T.me/historyhomos and to join our group chat at T.me/historyhomoschat The video version of the show is available on Youtube, bitchute, odysee. For weekly premium episodes or to contribute to the show subscribe to our channel at www.rokfin.com/historyhomos Any questions comments concerns or T-shirt/sticker requests can be leveled at historyhomos@gmail.com Later homos --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/historyhomos/support

The Honest Report
What Is The Palestinian Media Really Saying About Israel? A Fireside Chat With Elliot Zweig, Deputy Director Of MEMRI (Middle East Media Research Institute)

The Honest Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 18:49


The ongoing issue of Palestinian incitement against Israel and Jews, in general, has long been an obstacle to peace between Israel and the Palestinians. In territories under the Palestinian Authority (PA), to say nothing of Hamas rule in the Gaza Strip, Israel is frequently and widely demonized and delegitimized as a Jewish state, and general and overt antisemitism is used as a means to attack Israel. This messaging, often coming from official Palestinian Authority outlets, is significantly at odds with the public persona put forward by PA President Mahmoud Abbas to global audiences, which is pro-peace. And if you've ever seen an Arabic-language video of a Palestinian representative being candid and less than diplomatic in speaking about Israel or Jews, there's a good chance it was from MEMRI. MEMRI, or the Middle East Media Research Institute, is a nonprofit press monitoring and analysis organization that provides translation of media outlets from a number of languages, including Arabic. MEMRI's deputy director, Elliot Zweig, is our guest on this week's podcast. Welcome to The Honest Report podcast. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thehonestreport/message

Kan English
News Flash January 4, 2023

Kan English

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 5:02


Rocket fired by Palestinians at southern Israel from Gaza Strip falls short and lands in enclave. UN Security Council expected to meet to discuss Ben Gvir visit to Temple Mount. Transport Minister Regev plans to advance aide's appointment, after vetting committee says not qualified.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

HaYovel | The Heartland Connection
Rocket Launched From Gaza Fell Inside the Gaza Strip

HaYovel | The Heartland Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 13:02


Gaza tried to launch a rocket at Israel last night, but the missile fell far short of its target, landing inside of the Gaza Strip. Were they trying to start a war? Itamar Ben-Gvir sparked international outrage this week with dozens of countries condemning him for his actions. His crime? He ascended the Temple Mount on Tuesday. The UN passed more resolutions against Israel in 2022 than all the other countries of the world combined. All this and more on today's show!

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Top blogs of 2022 & arrest of Jerusalem bombing suspect

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 19:02


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Ops&Blogs editor Miriam Herschlag and military reporter Emanuel Fabian join host Amanda Borschel-Dan on today's episode. Fabian reported yesterday on an arrest in connection to the double bombing in Jerusalem that took place on the morning of November 23 that killed two and wounded over 20. Who is currently in custody for the attack? On Monday, the Shin Bet security agency announced it foiled an attempt by terror groups in the Gaza Strip to carry out a bombing attack in Israel and arrested four West Bank Palestinians on December 14. Who was behind the planned attack? Fabian wrote a deep dive into Israel's porous border with Jordan, stating that Israeli authorities say they are beginning to gain the upper hand in a relentless battle to stymie the mass smuggling of arms into Israel and the West Bank. How is the tide turning? Herschlag compiled a list of her top dozen posts from the past year. She explains how she assembled the list and we speak about three that particularly moved us. Discussed articles include: Arab Israeli with Islamic State ties arrested for bombings at Jerusalem bus stops Shin Bet busts Gaza-directed terror cell planning ‘major' bombing in Israel On porous Jordan border, Israel starts to see success against rampant gun-smuggling Voices of 2022: A dozen posts that moved and shook us New ToI podcast miniseries: 'Israel's Judiciary: Reform or Ruin?' Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Voices of 2022 (from top left): Rachel Sharansky Danziger, Grzegorz Kwiatkowski, Mark Shinar, Tehilla Shwartz Altshuler, Karen Feuer, Guy Lieberman, Alla Borisova-Linetskaya, Ori Golan, Daniel Landes, Shira Pasternak Be'eri, Grant Arthur Gochin, Ruth EfroniSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

None of the Above
Bibi's Back: What the New Hardline Government Means for Israel, Palestine, and the United States

None of the Above

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 35:31


In early December, just weeks after Benjamin Netanyahu and his Likud party won Israel's parliamentary election (again), US Secretary of State Antony Blinken remarked that America's commitment to Israel has “never been stronger.” The incoming governing coalition that Netenyahu is forming is expected to be the most right-wing in Israeli history. What does this mean for Israel and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? Does this change US policy vis-à-vis one of its closest partners in the Middle East? This week, guest host and EGF research fellow Zuri Linetksy speaks with journalists Neri Zilber and Muhammad Shehada who help us break down what affect Bibi's new government might have on Israeli-Palestinian relations, and offer thoughts on what the United States can do to mitigate potential violence coming from both sides of the Green Line.   Neri Zilber is an Israeli journalist and analyst living in Tel Aviv, and host of the Israel Policy Pod.   Muhammad Shehada is a Palestinian journalist and analyst from the Gaza Strip. To listen to more episodes or learn more about None Of The Above, go to www.noneoftheabovepodcast.org. To learn more about the Eurasia Group Foundation, please visit www.egfound.org and subscribe to our newsletter.

Drye Aged
Eskimo Bros

Drye Aged

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 86:10


The Boys are back from your moms house tonight. They talk Barnes and Nobles douchebags and hags, porn star preparation, Gaza Strip, fleshlight friends, the naming and construction of freeways, tow truck horror stories, insurance fraud, Penis augmentation surgery, cow tipping, plastic bottle bourbon, penis penetration and the Mater Bator. 

Women World Leaders' Podcast
364. Empowering Lives with Purpose, Interview with Kimberly Hobbs

Women World Leaders' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 35:41


Today's guest, Founder of Women World Leaders Kimberly Hobbs, is interviewed by Nancy Sabato, host of The Call podcast series.    Kimberly shares her personal and transparent story of walking in sin, to full surrender, to a life of serving the Lord Jesus Christ in a worldwide ministry calling.   *****   Nancy Sabato   Kimberly, welcome to the call. Thank you, Nancy, Kimberly Hobbs   It's a pleasure to be here. Hi, everybody, Nancy Sabato   How can you encourage someone who may feel that they have been left behind in their dreams of doing something great for the kingdom of God? Kimberly Hobbs   Well, we all have a story, ladies. And we come from a past. And I just believe that through sharing our stories, through being able to be open and transparent, that God will use those stories for His purpose. And when, when you can open up and share the great and powerful things that God does through your life that in turn inspires others to think that wow, if this person can overcome this, or that, you know, I can do this. And, and it just shows that our Lord is strong, he is powerful, he can do great and mighty things. And we just show them how through sharing our testimony of how we came to know him. Nancy Sabato   And that's where I bring you into this. And so what happened to you that turned you towards a heart for Jesus and transformed your life. Kimberly Hobbs   God gave me a husband at 19 years old, we fell in love. And we had two children, we were going to church faithfully, we became very involved in church and, and we lived a simplistic life. And my dream was coming true. We built a log home out on five acres of land, we just, we just loved it. And our church life was becoming very involved. And because we built this home kind of far out, we decided to take a little break from church, and we are going to stay close to God, how many of us have good intentions, right? Like, we're gonna, oh, you know, I can handle this, I'm just going to stop going to church, and we're strong in the Lord. And we're going to just do our thing for a little while, we're going to focus on getting our house and our land and build a horse barn. And you know, I'm still, you know, searching for those dreams. And so as active as we were in this very small church, did a lot we pulled out, we took that rest period. But that's exactly when the enemy got his hooks in. And everything that was our focus, which was God and family, and church, and we did everything together as a family, and it was innocent. But we allowed outside influences to start coming in. And Romans 612 says, to beware, you know, do not let sin control the way that you live, and don't give in to sinful desires, and don't let any part of your body become an instrument of evil to serve sin. And unfortunately, that's exactly what happened. And that's the beginning of the tears in my story, is that enticement of sin when we took ourselves out of that connection with God, and we didn't have that covering, you know, just going to church and just having the accountability anymore. We were left to ourselves, we're starting to spread out in our life. And we, my husband, and I became tempted in in sexual ways. And that's where the, the devil got in to destroy that Christian foundation and we had no armor for battle, because we weren't going to church. We are not reading our Bible like we should we just kind of allowed ourselves to get busy with things in the world. And that haunting memories still haunts me to this day, the pain of regret because the devil just slithered his way in. And without God's presence in our life, and just that you constantly had that struggle of temptation, you know, good and evil. We got into an entangled mess, both of us in our sanctified marriage bed became defiled. And we tried to hide from God but we really were already exposed. And it's weird when we tried to hide right, everybody like I think people can relate because you justify what you're doing. You say it's not that bad, and you try to convenience yourself, but really, you're doing wrong. And God says in Psalm 90, verse eight that all of our flaws and faults are in full view to God, everything that we want to hide God searches it out, and he exposes it by the radiance of his face. Well, he knows What we're doing right so here we are in our weakened marriage. And the enemy had a foothold. And in there was darkness all around in my life started growing into a monster of lies, deceit, wickedness. And it became like a sexual addiction. And unfortunately, our 20 year marriage began to crumble. And he went one way I went another we divorced, and all my dreams were shattered, because I truly loved him. We were married for 20 years. So the challenge is facing, you know, that perfect life and that dream were all shattered. And I was crying out to God through that time, because I'm like, God, how did this happen? You know, because everything was so beautiful. My perfect life was going perfectly, you know, until we stepped out of that, again, that covering that community. And it just seemed like God wasn't hearing my cries during that time, because I wasn't happy. I knew I was in sin. And James 22 are James 226 says that faith without works is dead, right? So I can cry out to God, but if I'm not doing anything about it, and I'm living and wallowing in that mire, and dirt and scum, what's God gonna do? That's my choice. That's our choice to stay in sin. And I knew God was there, I cried to him, but I wasn't willing to change. So my tears could have filled up buckets with that addiction of sin that weighed me down, and I cried and cried, and I wanted to be free from that sexual addiction. And I wanted my innocent life back, but it wasn't coming back. And the devil had his hooks so deeply in me. So anybody that battles addiction out there, I know what those hooks are when they get into you, because you you try and try and try and you want to escape, but you're trying on your own. So how do you get away from that, you know that the enemy is powerful, he's powerful, and he's roaming around trying to devour us. So again, I wallowed in that pity of unforeseen misery, because I didn't see it coming at all. And I tried so hard to just hold on to glimpses of my past life, and I wanted it back so bad, I wanted that happy marriage back, but I couldn't stop with that. sexual drive toward other things, now you get a taste of it, and it just wasn't coming back. And it was so intense that pain was so intense that I just wanted to die. Nothing was satisfying. I tried to go to church here and there, and but I still felt the absence of God's presence. And you might be wondering why. And again, it's because my heart wasn't willing to change or give up. I really didn't want to let go. But I kept saying, God, God, I please stop it, you know, like, like, God's the fix, I'll do all. He gives us His Word with all the instruction. But do we really look into that and make a difference with our hearts, so I wasn't willing to change and I wasn't willing to fully surrender to Him. And I wasn't obedient to God. And so the cycle continued, and there was no healing from the sin. And I was deceived one day, that my prayers might have worked. And I use that word deceived, because when you're looking, and the enemy knows you're looking for things to get you out of what you're not happy. And so I'm praying, but remember, I'm not praying the right prayers. I'm just praying, God, stop this pain, God stop all this, but I'm still going and falling back into sin. So feeling my my prayers worked, I met an extremely wealthy man. And he I started confiding in him and talking to him. And once again, the devil lured me in to another lifestyle. And this one was so strong and so intense, and the chains of bondage that had me shackled. I, before I even knew it, you know, it's like, that's how strong the lie is. Right? Nancy? Like, the devil wants us to believe that lie. So he's gonna put whatever he can in front of you to continue the misery but he's gonna mesmerized like he mesmerized me. Nancy Sabato   Yep, he will do if yes, he finds the crack. I tell people this all the time. He finds the crack in your armor, and he knows exactly where to go with it. Kimberly Hobbs   Exactly. And so I was memory mesmerized I was filled with now a complete different stimulation. And this was tantalizing to my eyes every moment my attention was a lord to money and power. Soon I was traveling to places that I only saw in movies i You couldn't even imagine in your wildest dreams. I was traveling the world, money and power places I was meeting movie stars. I was meeting presidents of the United States I met presidents dinner with presidents a breakfast with presidents. This relationship developed with this person. And before I knew it, I moved in with him and I compromised everything that I knew in God's eyes to be true because now I was being taken care of I was treated like a princess. As time progressed, I found myself being fed quantities of earthly abundance. And now it went from the sexual to now the addiction to living this lifestyle, you know that only 1% of the whole world probably gets to live I was driving Ferraris and Bentley's and Rolls Royce and I can choose from general lineup of cars in the garage of whatever car I wanted to drive. It was like I had jewels of every kind diamonds and more diamonds I had a seven carat engagement ring because he said he was going to marry me right? So all these lies, I'm just led to believe the lie and he knew enough and don't get me wrong he I believe he loved me. But the devil was going to continue to make me believe the lies I'm going to marry you here's a seven carat diamond ring you know and my goodness I had my closet was as big as people's houses. And I had every designer outfit in it you know Louie Vuitton purses, Prada, Gucci, you name it. We traveled all over the world, I had it filled. So I had magnificent show horses, you guys like I can't tell you this lifestyle because but this is going to be the power of God when I tell you the clincher. He even brought my family in and bought them everything. So that relieved a lot of my guilt that he was taking care of them too, which again held me captive in this lifestyle. But I was lonely. And the more I was given the more I started to just give to other people I was taking care of completely. So I wanted everybody else to get a taste of what I was living. So I started giving my money to everybody in need. But I still had that emptiness growing inside of me. It was like incredible, having lived through what I lived through. And I was slowly losing my identity, who I was because I belonged to somebody else. And I was so disconnected from God like you can't even imagine that disconnect. And the emptier I watched my life become I again, I just compromised everything and I became silent in this world of just opulence and festivities until one day. It was truly a miracle. Because I knew if this man just accepted Jesus will get married will live happily ever after will have a perfect life and everything's gonna be fine. So there was a church I knew that was going to Israel. And I was asked everybody I knew that was Christian to pray for my fiancee who I was living with, okay, just getting compromised everything. So I'm like, could you pray that God will touch his heart because I know if I asked him to go on this trip, he'll go because we travel everywhere in the world. I never asked him for anything. I'm gonna ask him for this one thing. And of course, he accepted. So everybody was praying for him. And I thought to myself, alright, God, you're gonna do a mighty miracle in this man's in this man's life on this trip. And so we went and as we listened every day to messages on that seven day trip. And I had been to Israel several times before, but it was in a different way. We were you know, we built an underground playground for the kids over on the Gaza Strip and but I had never been on the Christian side of it. And so he did that for me and he took me in I knew something powerful was going to happen on this trip. And I thought he's going to come to know Jesus as a savior. And as we went through message after message, God was convicting my heart. And he wanted my attention. And it was the last night of the trip. And we were in the Garden Tomb. And my fiance, was there for every message, and he gets a call, and he goes and leaves the garden. And now this was God, because God removed him. So I wouldn't sit there and think, Is he getting this? Is he hearing this? Does he understand this? God wanted my attention for that message. And that message was about surrendering your life. And we were going to take communion. And I sat there wrestling with God in that garden, the last day of the trip, because I knew everybody was watching me on that trip. And like, Who are these people that are on this trip with us? And I thought, I can't take communion God because I know what that meant. If I took communion unworthy, and I hadn't confess my sins, and what is confession mean? That we're going to turn 100%? And go the other way, right? That REPENT OF HEART, if I didn't do that, and I took that communion unworthily, what does the Bible say about all the plagues, all the damnation that's gonna come to you cannot do that. And so I had this wrestling match with God like, and God says in Psalm 37, seven, to quiet your heart, in His presence, and pray, keep hope alive as you long for God to come through for you. And I heard God speaking to me, and he asked, Do you love me? And do you trust me. And I sat there, as the communion was going around, and I was the last one in that circle of 30 people to take communion. And it seemed like forever for it to get to me. And God said, I needed to walk away from this lifestyle and repent of all of it everything. Because my entire path needed to be confessed right now in that moment, and God said, I want your heart back. But I want all of it. And I heard his voice really clear. And I was trembling with fear, because I knew whose voice I heard. And I was faced with a choice to make. Could I surrender everything to Jesus? Where are you right now in your life? Can you surrender everything in this moment to Jesus and walk away from the sin that may be consuming you right now you have a choice to make? God's not going to make that for you. He gives us the choice. So where are you we're setting in to me right now. Because how could I do this? How can I walk away this man took care of everything, and I had everything in the world. And Philippians four, six tells us Don't worry about anything. Instead, pray about everything and tell God what you need. I needed out of this life of disobedience. So simply put, Kimberly Hobbs   I surrendered it all to Jesus at that moment, and I trusted him inside that Garden Tomb that night. And I knew that God heard me. And I told him, I was sorry for everything. And I said, God, I don't know how I'm going to go forward, and I'm gonna trust you. And I know you have a purpose for my life. I don't know what it is. And I don't know how I'm gonna get out of this. But please, God, will you forgive me, and gives me a chance to go forward, I'm just going to trust you. And that's what we have to do people, we have to trust him completely surrender it all. Put yourself on the altar and give it all to Jesus. First, John one nine says that if we confess our sins, He's faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and cleanse us from all unrighteousness. And I just knew that's what I had to do. And I did it. And God forgave me. And so I had to put action on my prayer, right? We have to put action on what we say we're going to do. So Psalm 86, seven says, I'll call out to you whenever I'm in trouble. And you will answer me he's going to answer you people just like He answered me. I called out to him in that moment. I didn't know where I was going to go. I didn't know where I was going to live. I let go of everything in my life to be calm the puppet of this man, and I had no voice, but God knew. And so I needed to trust. And God says in Psalm 138, three, as soon as I pray you answer him He, you encouraged me by giving me strength. That is such a powerful verse. And God strengthened me in that moment. And I began to pray fervently. And this prayer brought healing that I started out with, if my people who are called by my name will humble themselves and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways, so I had to do both of those right, I had to seek God's face, and that garden, and I had to say, Yes, God, I'm going to turn from my wicked ways. Then he said, he would hear from heaven, and he would forgive my sins, and he was going to bring healing. And he did. So now focusing on God in His Kingdom, I had to make a change. And I had to serve Him with purpose and a plan and obedience. And God says, then you will call on me and I will come and pray, you will come and pray with me and I will listen to you. So God heard my heart that I wanted to serve Him, that I wanted to do something for him, I wanted to start my life over and be obedient to Him, in a way of service to my king. So it wasn't easy, because I had to tell somebody that I loved and that loved me and gave me a life I could only dream of he didn't do anything wrong. He didn't understand it. But I had to say, I need to go and I needed to go serve the Lord. And I need, I can't live with you anymore. I'm living in sin. And that says He will guide us, He will. So when you let go of that he's going to guide you, he's going to give you help. It wasn't easy. I'm not gonna say it was easy. It was I wanting to fall back and run back to that life of luxury that I live, you bet I was. And it was constant that I needed to rely on God. So what God told me to do was to leave Ohio, I was born and raised 45 years of my life up there. But that's where everything I knew was there. So I had to make a change. So if you're addicted to something, and you're going through something, you have to make that change, so that you're not putting yourself in that temptation over and over. So I had to get away from everything I knew. God led me to Florida. And that's where I heard his voice that he called me to write and share his story. And how important it is to start sharing our story because there is healing through it. I didn't know there was going to be healing through writing. So I left it all I came down to Florida. And I got this one bedroom, dilapidated old condo, it was my detox place, because I had to start stripping off all of the all of the stuff that I was clinging to, that I thought was my new identity. And that's not what my identity was. I knew my identity was now in Jesus and him alone. And so I had to have a completely different look of how I was living, not that I was punishing myself. Because at first when I got this little condo, and it was like from the 1950s. And everything was old in it. And I was like how am I doing? I went from a house servants and laying on iron sheets every night. No, I'm in this, this, this one bedroom place and but there is where God healed my heart. And as I started writing, my purpose started coming out. And I found so much healing and writing in writing out my story. And I encourage you, if you're listening, write your story. Talk about your story, share your story, and people will encourage you as they hear it. And Psalm 191 69 says, Oh Lord, listen to my cry. Give me the discerning mind that you promised. And during writing, I would ask him all the time, God, what do you want me to write? How do I write this? I have to be transparent for you. And so I opened the Bible one day to begin my writing and I seriously closed my eyes. I asked God, God, give me a verse that you want me to start over with that will become my life first. I had never done that before. And I closed my eyes. I opened the Bible. I was in Orlando, Florida, sitting in somebody's backyard and I looked open, I opened my eyes and it was Ephesians 320, which says unto him, who's able to do exceedingly abundantly above all we can ask or imagine according to the power that's at work within us I circled words on that scripture in my Bible. I had never seen that verse before. This was 1214 years ago, never saw that verse before. And I kept circling words, God, what is this verse mean? So for two hours, I sat there, and that verse has now become my life verse. It's our verse for women, world leaders, the ministry I'm in. Because God said He was going to do it, he was going to do exceedingly, abundantly above what I can imagine, not by what I was doing, but by what he was going to do the power of the Lord Jesus Christ, the Holy Spirit working within me, and he will do that for you, too. It's not going to be you. It's going to be him working through you, but only when you give him that permission by full surrender. And so as I communicated with Him through prayer, morning, noon, and night for four years, four years, and I was lonely, I wanted a man in my life, I pray God, I want a man in my life. I was, I wanted to go out with friends, but I knew I had to just seclude myself with God. And I'm not saying everybody could do this, your story might be different. But that's what it took for me to get in the Word, to write my story to understand what God was speaking into my heart, all the lonely days that I would cry out to God. He was doing a new work in me and he was preparing me for that man I prayed for that I could serve and travel the world with that I could do things of God. I wanted to do all those things I was doing before that I felt so empty with because I wasn't with a believer. I wasn't with the man that God wanted me to be with. But I had known in my heart he was going to provide that if I just stayed the course and stayed obedient to Him. So fight, people fight with all you can to fight that enemy in the lies that he puts in your head and you look to God every day, morning, noon, and night, Pray be in the Word. I can't. I just can't express that enough because that is what changed my life. God brought into my life, the man of my dreams, we now serve the Lord together. He's in his ministry unite and men of honor. God brought to me a vision of just there's so many women in this world that are broken and hurting, like I was an empty and messed up in their life, and they carry the shame and the guilt and they can't release it. But God, and so I had a passion to start a ministry to help women, empower them, encourage them with my story. And that's how women world leaders started. So it took time. I'm not gonna say it happens overnight. But Isaiah 6524 This vs. Awesome. God says I will answer them before they even call to me. While they are still talking about their needs. I will go ahead and answer their prayers. Isn't a beautiful Nancy like that? Nancy Sabato   Yes. He always goes before us. Well, since we're talking about women's world leaders, talk about that. What are you doing there? And you have the podcast talk about that a little as well. Kimberly Hobbs   So Women World Leaders is a group of women that have God has joined us together from around the world we connect on Facebook or through women world leaders.com You can find us on Facebook at women world leaders. But what we do is we provide ways for women to connect from wherever you are. We have opportunity for you to serve God with us. What are your gifts, what are your talents, we want to hear about them? We have different ways of serving which is we allow you to write your stories. We do books we do a magazine called voice of truth that comes out and it goes around the world. We are digitally in 70 countries we are nationally in the printed version. Our books have all gone to number one best seller and you can share your story by writing we come alongside of you and help you do that. We have podcasts where God has called us to do I do empowering lives with purpose every Monday and share women around the world their stories, their god stories, how God is moving because other women need to hear that. And then we have teaching podcasts on Wednesday where my co partner Julie Jenkins, in the ministry she's a teacher And she teaches through the word walking through the Word. And so then Fridays we have celebrating God's grace. And different women in the ministry give you just that inspiration that go into the weekend. And it's just tools, people, it's just tools to stay connected. Stay engaged. We have zoom meetings for leadership Connect. We have prayer groups, where we have 50, prayer warriors on a group knew that pray over the ministry, if you love to pray, come on board with us. And we'll put you in our prayer group. We need people that pray for our world, right? Yes, but we just do so much. And I just I love just working and sharing with women and meeting new women. And you can reach out to me at Kimberly, at women, world leaders with an s.com. And just send me an email and say, I want to connect with you. I want to talk to you and I would love, love, love to connect with you. Yes, actually, all of all of our books are on women world leaders.com, you can go to the shop. Thank you so much. And they are available on Amazon. So we have about eight books out right now. So one of the things the ministry is doing is this amazing magazine that goes out worldwide, digitally in 70 countries. It's called voice of truth. And it goes out to the US in printed version. And you can go to our website, women, world leaders, and you can look on the website and read it all the past editions are up, but look at how beautiful like it is full color, All scripture and different things in here to bless women. And it's just amazing. There's no advertising or anything. God provided this amazing coffee table quality magazine. And it's just beautiful. So yes, please go to women world leaders.com. And you can read it online. And if you like it, then you can request your copy in the mail. If you're in the United States. Nancy Sabato   Wonderful. And what would you like to leave the audience with today. Kimberly Hobbs   And the enemy is going to keep you as far from the Lord as He can because he knows that God has a great and mighty purpose for your life. And please follow after God get in His Word, pray, surrender, whatever it is in your life that is holding you captive. surrender that to God and allow him to take over in your life and know that he's going to do what you ask. He's not. He is a respectful guy, but he's not going to interfere where he's not welcome. So ask him in. surrender your life to him completely. And then seek Him with all your heart. Every every day in Scripture is a must walk with Him in prayer and communication. Let him be your best friend. Morning, noon, and night. That's how much you need him not just once a week when something happens. You need Him every day, every hour. So I just encourage you to seek Him with all your heart and He says he will be found. Nancy Sabato   I pray this program has strengthened and encouraged you. And in James 2:5 he says, Listen, my dear brothers and sisters, has God not chosen those who are poor in the eyes of the world. To be rich in faith and to inherit the kingdom he promised those who love him. You've been chosen for greatness. Pray for God to open your mind to all the great possibilities because God speaks to you every day. Are you listening to the call?  

HaYovel | The Heartland Connection
Israeli Air Force DESTROYS Hamas Rocket Factory in Gaza

HaYovel | The Heartland Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 18:40


Palestinian Terrorists ram through a security barrier at the Ben Gurion Airport in Tel Aviv causing the airport to go into lockdown. Gaza fired a rocket into Israel Saturday night prompting a swift response from the IDF. The air force destroyed a large rocket factory inside of the Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip. A tour guide in Samaria escaped a deadly stoning attack on the highway by driving through a roadblock of burning tires. If the media headlines are correct, an Israeli Police Officer killed a Palestinian in cold blood in Huwara last week. . .The question is: Is this what actually happened? Find out on today's show! Donate to The Israel Guys and help us keep these shows coming: https://theisraelguys.com/donate/ Follow The Israel Guys on social media: Twitter: https://twitter.com/theisraelguys Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theisraelguys Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theisraelguys/ Purchase TIG Merch: Heartland Tumbler: https://shop.theisraelguys.com/store/heartland-tumbler/ “Israel” Leather Patch Hat: https://shop.theisraelguys.com/store/israel-star-cap/ Next Level T-shirt: https://shop.theisraelguys.com/store/israel-guys-next-level/ Source Links: https://www.newsrael.com/posts/05yv46rlyds https://www.newsrael.com/posts/71y1u5njx3t https://www.newsrael.com/posts/v9iddtj1p1h https://www.jns.org/israeli-defense-minister-condemns-un-mideast-envoys-response-to-hawara-terror-incident/ https://www.israelnationalnews.com/news/363836 https://www.israelnationalnews.com/news/363849 https://twitter.com/muhammadshehad2/status/1598751329106550785 #theisraelguys #israelnews #gaza

The Mondoweiss Podcast
48. One year of organizing tech workers against Israeli Apartheid

The Mondoweiss Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 47:50


Mondoweiss has been covering the “No Tech for Apartheid” movement for over a year now. In October 2021 hundreds of workers at Google and Amazon published an open letter in The Guardian condemning Project Nimbus, a billion dollar contract between the two tech companies and the Israeli government. The deal helps provide cloud services to the Israeli Defense Forces. The letter reads: “We cannot look the other way, as the products we build are used to deny Palestinians their basic rights, force Palestinians out of their homes and attack Palestinians in the Gaza Strip – actions that have prompted war crime investigations by the international criminal court.” A lot has happened since that letter ran, as the No Tech for Apartheid movement has continued to grow. Our U.S. correspondent Michael Arria checked in with two organizers to talk about its current state and what might come next. Ariel Koren is an activist and was formerly a product marketing manager at Google for Education. Earlier this year Koren was forced out of her job after facing retaliation from the company over her activism. Bathool Syed is an activist and content strategist at Amazon. We'll also hear some testimonials from Google and Amazon workers from a video the campaign published a few months ago. - - - - - Support our work Help us continue our critical independent coverage of events in Palestine, Israel, and related U.S. politics. Donate today at https://mondoweiss.net/donate Articles and Links mentioned in the show No Tech for Apartheid campaign website Organized labor vs. Project Nimbus, Mondoweiss Podcast Google worker says company tried to relocate her to Brazil after she criticized contract with Israel, Michael Arria Google worker who protested Israel contract says she was forced to quit, Michael Arria How Google advances the Zionist colonization of Palestine, Yarden Katz Google and Amazon workers want companies to end contracts with Israeli military, Michael Arria Subscribe to our free email newsletters. Share this podcast Share The Mondoweiss Podcast with your followers on Twitter. Click here to post a tweet! If you enjoyed this episode, head over to Podchaser and leave us a review and follow the show! Follow The Mondoweiss Podcast wherever you listen Amazon Apple Podcasts Audible Deezer Gaana Google Podcasts Overcast Player.fm RadioPublic Spotify Stitcher TuneIn YouTube Our RSS feed We want your feedback! Email us Leave us an audio message at SparkPipe More from Mondoweiss Subscribe to our free email newsletters: Daily Headlines Weekly Briefing The Shift tracks U.S. politics Palestine Letter West Bank Dispatch Follow us on social media Facebook Mastodon Twitter Instagram YouTube LinkedIn Tumblr

Veterans for Peace Radio Hour
Veterans for Peace Highlight Margaret Flowers Interview with VFP Icon Ann Wright

Veterans for Peace Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 61:03


Veterans for Peace Radio Hour and Podcast are real fans of Margaret Flowers's Pod Cast Clearing the Fog. When we saw that Margaret was interviewing Ann Wright, VFP Icon, we just had to share. Margaret Interviews Ann about the Gaza Freedom Flotilla, the project to try to break the Israeli blockade of Gaza and provide the occupied Palestinian populace with much-needed supplies and a little hope. Ann talks about the ruthless and often deadly Israeli policy toward the Palestinian public in both the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. Ann talks about the efforts of the flotilla, the violent response by Israel, and the purposeful ignorance of the US Government. To hear the whole interview go to popularresistance.org and look for Clearing the Fog!

Dj Silver Nail
the Gaza Strip ft. Silver Nail - ТУМАН (Synopsis Extended Mix)

Dj Silver Nail

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 5:38


Кавер на одну из песен группы "Сектоор Газа", Релиз оригинала состоялся в августе 1995 года. Автором текста песни и основной аранжировки, выступил Юрий Клинских, он же Юра Хой.

This Is Palestine
Palestinian Who's Who: Malak Mattar, Palestinian Artist from Gaza

This Is Palestine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 18:40


Follow the IMUE on Instagram Follow Host Diana Buttu on Twitter Follow Malak Mattar on Instagram 

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
How rise of far-right challenges Israel's global relationships

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 16:25


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Diplomatic correspondent Lazar Berman and military correspondent Emanuel Fabian join host Amanda Borschel-Dan on today's episode. Early Friday morning, the Israeli military struck a rocket factory in the Gaza Strip, hours after four rockets were launched at Israel from the Hamas-run Palestinian enclave. What sparked this most recent exchange of fire? We hear about ripple effects from the recent November 1 election, starting with a recent statement from Bahrain. The British government said on Thursday that it would not relocate its embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, backing away after a pledge made by former prime minister Liz Truss to weigh the matter, shortly before she left office last month. Any surprise here? A US-based Orthodox Jewish nonprofit on Wednesday announced a new partnership with the Israeli military to provide kosher food and other supplies to soldiers who arrive in the country for joint training and other activities with American forces. Is kosher food so hard to find in the US? Discussed articles include: Israel strikes ‘rocket factory' in Gaza after rockets launched at south Allies may worry over far-right's election gains, but few can afford to shun Israel Paralyzed Nation no more? ToI experts break down Israel's election results After Netanyahu's win, Bahrain pledges to ‘continue building' Israel partnership With far right ascendant in Israel, Blinken tells Abbas US committed to 2 states UK backs away from possible Jerusalem embassy move floated by ex-PM Truss Orthodox nonprofit teams up with IDF to aid religious troops stationed in US Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. Illustrative image: Secretary of State Antony Blinken, left, and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu arrive for a joint statement after a meeting at the Prime Minister's office, May 25, 2021, in Jerusalem, Israel. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, Pool)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Debate
Israel votes again: Netanyahu to return or Lapid to remain?

The Debate

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 45:05


By holding its fifth election in less than four years, can Israel break the stalemate? Prime Minister Yair Lapid hopes to remain in power after his coalition collapsed in June, but veteran politician Benjamin Netanyahu, now 73 years old and on trial for corruption, is eyeing a comeback. Many say the country's proportional representation system does not help stability in the Knesset. Meanwhile, some one million Palestinian voters make up 17 percent of the Israeli electorate but are historically disenfranchised. What will this election hold for them?

Modern Minorities
Palestine's required (comics) reading

Modern Minorities

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 46:05


“Reading a comic book isn't going to solve peace in the Middle East. But I do think part of the solution is understanding both sides.” Often times real life is scarier than anything else we can dream about. PALESTINE is Joe Sacco's seminal work of cartoon journalism - which Raman & Ryan read (on his other podcast Quarantined Comics) to commemorate Al Nakba* First published in 1993, PALESTINE covers Sacco's travels thru occupied Palestine territory - and Israel - to embed himself with the Palestinian people - hearing their stories first-hand to understand how they lived their every day lives. Sacco wanted to get around the sanitized story the Western Media was portraying — to emphasizes the history and plight of the Palestinian people, as a group and as individuals. In PALESTINE Sacco positions himself as the westerner confronting a reality unfamiliar to most Americans at the time - concentrating on his personal experience and perspective, as well as the stories of the people he encounters, with some light history thrown in for good measure. Conversations are documented over tea, roadblocks, police action, taxis and checkpoints - which become all too familiar set pieces in Sacco's narrative journey. The book was published as 9 issues by Fantagraphics from 1993 to 1995, with a graphic novel published later to a much wider audience. Palestine is the recipient of the American Book AWard, and was named as one of the Top 100 English-Language Comics of the last Century. Sacco has since gone on to publish numerous other works of cartoon journalism - covering the Middle East, Bosnia/Serbia, and the Native American plight. for which he's received recognition from TIME Magazine, the Eisners, the Harveys, and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize *Al Nakba literally translates to "the Catastrophe" — referring to the destruction of the Palestinian homeland in May of 1948, leading to the mass exodus of at least 750,000 Arabs from Palestine. While for many historians the process began decades earlier, to many in the region it refers to the ongoing persecution, displacement, and occupation of the Palestinians, both in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip — as well as in Palestinian refugee camps throughout the region. LEARN MORE PALESTINE (2001): goodreads.com/book/show/769712.Palestine Joe Sacco (Comics Journalist): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Sacco Quarantined Comics: qtdcomics.com This episode is sponsored by the Department of Health & Human Services, who's encouraging you and your community to make sure you've got the COVID-19 Vaccine & Booster. We can do this, together. Find vaccines and boosters near you @ VACCINES.gov Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Kan English
News Flash October 31, 2022

Kan English

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 5:32


Polls open in less than 24 hours for national elections, general closure to be clamped on crossings from Judea, Samaria and the Gaza Strip, IDF gets new deputy chief of general staffSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Shortwave Report
The Shortwave Report October 28, 2022

The Shortwave Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 29:00


This week's show features stories from France 24, Radio Deutsche-Welle, Radio Havana Cuba, and George Galloway. http://youthspeaksout.net/swr221028.mp3 (29:00) From FRANCE- Press reviews on the inauguration of the new Prime Minister of Italy, Giorgia Meloni, the first female leader of the country. The Lancet, a British medical journal, focused on the health effects of climate change and the use of fossil fuels. Then several press reviews that cover the Lancet report as well as the publication of the Climate Book by Greta Thunberg and other leading climate activists. From GERMANY-- In a week the 27th UN Climate Change Conference, COP 27, will open in Egypt- a new UN report points out that the world's current climate pledges will not limit the global temperatures as agreed at the 2015 Paris Climate Conference. The International Energy Agency, the IEA, says global emissions should peak by 2025 with strong development of renewable energy sources, spurned on by rising prices for fossil fuels- a German analyst discusses how big a change needs to occur by 2030 and that more nuclear power plants will not be part of the solution. From CUBA- The Colombian Senate has approved parts of a bill by President Gustavo Petro that intends to create a total peace policy in the country. Amnesty International has called on the International Criminal Court, the ICC, to investigate possible war crimes during Israeli attacks on the Gaza Strip in August. The state of New Jersey is suing 5 oil and gas companies and a lobbying group for lying about harm caused by fossil fuels. A Viewpoint on this Sunday's Presidential election in Brazil. From GEORGE GALLOWAY- George Galloway's Mother of All Talk Shows. First, former London Mayor Ken Livingstone gives his opinion of the creation and purpose of NATO and who it serves. Then George sarcastically expresses his congratulations to the new Prime Minister of the UK, Rishi Sunak. Available in 3 forms- (new) HIGHEST QUALITY (160kb)(33MB), broadcast quality (13MB), and quickdownload or streaming form (6MB) (28:59) Links at outfarpress.com/shortwave.shtml PODCAST!!!- https://feed.podbean.com/outFarpress/feed.xml (160kb Highest Quality) Website Page- < http://www.outfarpress.com/shortwave.shtml ¡FurthuR! Dan Roberts "Life would be infinitely happier if we could only be born at the age of eighty and gradually approach eighteen." --Mark Twain Dan Roberts Shortwave Report- www.outfarpress.com YouthSpeaksOut!- www.youthspeaksout.net

The Daily Good
Episode 658: Gaza’s beaches reopen for swimming, Lewis Carroll’s “Jabberwocky”, the Maldives create a floating city, Phil Rosenthal visit’s Oahu’s “Pig and the Lady”, Vince Guaraldi plays “Autumn Leave

The Daily Good

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 17:35


Good News: The formerly hazardously polluted beaches of the Gaza Strip are open for swimming again, Link HERE. The Good Word: Listen to Lewis Carroll’s classic poem, Jabberwocky. Good To Know: A fun historical fact about Hershey’s Chocolate bars with Almonds. Good News: The Island nation of the Maldives is building a floating city to […]

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
UN releases 2nd damning Israel report; soaring real estate

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 17:58


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Diplomatic correspondent Lazar Berman and real estate reporter Danielle Nagler join host Amanda Borschel-Dan. Berman discusses a 28-page report by The United Nations' ongoing Commission of Inquiry investigating rights abuses in Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip following last year's 11-day fight between Israel and Hamas in Gaza that was released on Thursday. What crimes does it accuse Israel of -- and does the report have teeth? Ukrainian President Zelensky's chief of staff Andriy Yermak held a virtual meeting with leaders of Jewish organizations and prominent Russian-speaking Israelis, asking them to push Jerusalem to provide Kyiv with air defense systems. However, according to a Channel 13 news report over the weekend, Israel has indeed proposed to supply Ukraine with an alert system for aerial threats. We hear why Kyiv is perhaps unhappy with the offer. Israeli housing prices soared a record 19% over the last year, according to a report by the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), the largest year-on-year jump since price tracking began. Nagler digs in. The former Dan Pearl hotel, which sits just next to Mamilla, has sat empty for some 15 years. Nagler describes how things may soon change. Discussed articles include: UN report denounces Israel's ‘unlawful occupation,' demands prosecution of officials Top Zelensky aide asks Jewish leaders to press Israel on Ukraine weapons Report: Ukraine not cooperating with Israel on proposed missile alert system Israeli housing prices keep soaring, up a record 19% from last year Plans underway for new Jerusalem hotel after city gets okay to raze central eyesore Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: The United Nation flag waves in the wind on the top of an UN building in Geneva, Switzerland, June 14, 2021. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber, File )See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

This Being Human
Malak Mattar, Driven to Painting By War

This Being Human

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 35:03


Malak Mattar was born and raised in the Gaza Strip. She started to paint as a teenager while taking shelter from an attack on her city. Before long, her paintings were being sold and exhibited around the world. She talks about her drive to document life in Gaza, access to art in Palestine, and how leaving her home country affected her work and perspective.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Why Israel likely won't send the Iron Dome to Ukraine

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 17:27


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Diplomatic correspondent Lazar Berman and military correspondent Emanuel Fabian join host Amanda Borschel-Dan on today's podcast. We begin with a discussion of renewed requests for Israel to send the Iron Dome anti-missile defense systems to Ukraine. Berman and Fabian explain why that's a complicated ask. Berman talks about the use of Iranian drones in Ukraine is not a good look for Russia or Iran. We hear security updates from over the weekend from Fabian, including the case of a terrorist-aligned Palestinian doctor who was killed. And finally, TikTok bans upstart Nablus terrorist group The Lions' Den. Why this may or may not matter. Discussed articles include: As West works on Ukraine missile defense needs, Israel shows no sign of pitching in US presses allies, including Israel, to assemble patchwork air defenses for Ukraine Israel said providing Kyiv with intel on Iranian suicide drones ‘It was a miracle,' says Israeli who was only lightly injured in West Bank shooting IDF drone crashes in Nablus due to malfunction; armed faction captures it Palestinian killed, another seriously wounded in clash with IDF in West Bank Palestinian doctor, claimed as terror group member, dies in Jenin gun battle TikTok bans account of Palestinian armed group behind West Bank shootings Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Iron dome anti-missile system fires interception missiles as rockets fired from the Gaza Strip to Israel, in Ashkelon on August 7, 2022. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

On the Nose
Gaza Under Blockade

On the Nose

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 55:23


For 15 years, Israel has imposed an air, land, and sea blockade on the Gaza Strip, barring most Palestinians in the coastal enclave from leaving the area under any circumstances. Fishermen who venture out past an Israeli-imposed limit are https://www.middleeasteye.net/news/israel-palestine-gaza-fishermen-wounded-navy-off-coast (shot at) and arrested, while Palestinian farmers have been http://mezan.org/en/post/23919/News+Brief%3A+Al+Mezan+Issues+a+report%3A+Farming+in+a+Buffer+Zone%2C+The+conditions+Gaza+farmers+face+under+closure (killed by soldiers) for working land that lies near the boundary fence. Israel also tightly controls the entry and exit of goods, and its restrictive policies have devastated the Gazan economy and led to an https://www.worldbank.org/en/results/2022/08/09/mobilizing-private-finance-to-generate-jobs-in-the-west-bank-and-gaza (unemployment rate) of about 50%. In the same period, Israel has waged five military assaults on Gaza, killing thousands of Palestinians, the majority of whom were civilians. To discuss Israel's severe restrictions on Palestinian movement from Gaza and what it's like to live under blockade and bombardment, Jewish Currents staff reporter Alex Kane interviewed Kholoud Balata, a lecturer, poet, and writer from Gaza and a contributor to Jewish Currents, and Miriam Marmur, the director of public advocacy for https://gisha.org/en/about-gisha/ (Gisha—Legal Center for Freedom of Movement,) the leading Israeli group focusing on Israel's blockade of Gaza.  This episode also features a special segment from Palestinian think tank https://al-shabaka.org/en/ (Al-Shabaka's) podcast https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/rethinking-palestine/id1537774938 (Rethinking Palestine) that analyzes Israel's extrajudicial killings of Palestinian fighters in Nablus and the psychology of the new generation of Palestinian armed resistance fighters. ARTICLES MENTIONED https://jewishcurrents.org/ramadan-in-gaza (“Ramadan in Gaza,”) Kholoud Balata, Jewish Currents https://jewishcurrents.org/a-butterfly-in-gaza (“A Butterfly in Gaza,” )Kholoud Balata, Jewish Currents https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/from-jenin-to-gaza-to-nablus-palestinian-resistance/id1537774938?i=1000577669630 (“From Jenin to Gaza to Nablus: Palestinian Resistance Under Attack,”) Rethinking Palestine, Al-Shabaka Thanks to Jesse Brenneman for producing and to Nathan Salsburg for the use of his song “VIII (All That Were Calculated Have Passed).”

The Current
A remarkable Byzantine mosaic discovered in the Gaza Strip

The Current

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 15:47


A farmer in the Gaza Strip has uncovered a Byzantine mosaic that offers a window into the past. We hear about the find — and the race to protect it — with Ahmed Zakot, a journalist in Gaza; and Emily L. Spratt, a professor in art history at Sotheby's Institute of Art in New York.

Kan English
Israeli producer wins two Emmy's for news report on Jerusalem

Kan English

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 5:39


Israeli documentary film maker and producer Oren Rosenfeld has won, not one, but two Emmy Awards for news. The awards were handed out last week in New York City and Rosenfeld's  “The battle for Jerusalem” on VICE news won for outstanding video journalism news and for also for news reporting. Rosenfeld told reporter Arieh O'Sullivan that the coronavirus pandemic put many challenges on covering the story, but that the tensions in Jerusalem set in the midst of rocket attacks from the Gaza Strip and internecine violence turned it into a very explosive news documentary, found worthy of television's highest award. (photo: courtesy) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Biblical Mind
Growing Up Christian in the Gaza Strip (Khalil Sayegh)

The Biblical Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 30:17 Very Popular


In this week's episode, Khalil Sayegh shares his experience as a Palestinian Christian. The territory of Palestine contains two regions: the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. Though they share a people and a history, the two areas are separated by the country of Israel and are ruled by two different governments (the West Bank by the Palestine Liberation Organization and the Gaza Strip by Hamas). Khalil discusses the modern political and religious dynamics at play in the Gaza Strip, including the relationships between Israel and Hamas and between Islam and Christianity. He also surveys Christianity in Palestine, from its use of Scripture to its approach to evangelism. Khalil Sayegh is a Fellow at the Philos Project. He grew up in the Gaza Strip and currently lives in the West Bank. His public work focuses on challenging the negative perceptions of Jewish people in Palestinian society and promoting peace among the various religious groups in the region. He has studied at Bethlehem Bible College and American University. Show notes: 0:00 Growing up in Gaza 1:54 War, mobility, and Christianity in Gaza 5:35 Sunni Islam and political parties 7:24 Gaza's Christian churches 9:15 Interactions between Christianity and Islam 11:03 Political power in Gaza 14:36 Christmas, Hamas, and public Christianity 16:27 Conditions for visiting the West Bank 19:30 Views of Christian Scripture in Palestine 26:11 Evangelism and responses to conversion 28:22 Cultural distinctives of the Palestinian church Show notes by Micah Long

Finding Inspiration Show
Surfing4Peace Transcends Israeli/Arab Conflict

Finding Inspiration Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 10:06 Transcription Available


In the words of the late Doc Paskowitz, “People who surf together, can live together.”In episode #23 the co-founder of Surfing4Peace shares how the mutual love of surfing,  creates bonds that may, even for a moment, transcend the longstanding conflict between Arab and Jew.  Arthur Rashkoven shares the amazing story of how he founded Surfing4Peace alongside Dorian "Doc" Paskowitz, the grandfather of Israeli surfing, and how a group of surfers from Tel Aviv managed to gain worldwide attention."On July 27, 2007, The Los Angeles Times published an article by Louise Roug detailing the plight of Palestinian surfers living in the Gaza Strip and forced to share a single surfboard between them.  Within hours, Doc Paskowitz was on the phone with Arthur in Tel Aviv. They decided then and there that something had to be done.  After a few short weeks, the team had gathered 14 used surfboards from Israeli surf companies, for donation to the small but passionate surfing community in Gaza. "  In 2007, Surfing4Peace entered the fortresslike Erez crossing in Gaza to bring surfboards to Arab Surfers. That area was a volatile security situation, and nobody had been allowed into the Gaza Strip since Hamas took over.  Since the militant group seized control of Gaza, the main commercial crossing has been closed, and many local industries have collapsed.  All of this makes the story of Surfing4Peace even more compelling.  I'm Jennifer Weissmann. Please join me for this inspiring story; it's the best ten minutes you'll spend today. PLEASE LISTEN AND SHARE IT WITH FRIENDS AND ON YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA.Transcript Reading Time: 3-Minutes. https://tlv1.fm/weekend-edition/2015/05/30/meet-the-israelis-surfing-for-peace/https://www.theinertia.com/surf/how-an-israeli-made-it-his-lifes-mission-to-support-fellow-surfers-in-gaza/https://surfing4peace.org/historyhttps://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/22/world/middleeast/22mideast.htmlhttps://www.jpost.com/jewish-world/jewish-features/jewish-surfing-guru-from-hawaii-brings-hope-and-boards-to-gaza-surfers#Surfing4peace#Klinikatlv

This Is Palestine
The Fight Against Israel's Medical Apartheid

This Is Palestine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 9:22


In this episode, we hear from Mohamed Hamed, the executive director and founder of the Mariam Foundation based in Nazareth. The Mariam Foundation provides assistance to Palestinian cancer patients from the West Bank and Gaza Strip, treated in Israeli hospitals. The Mariam Foundation is named after Mohamed's sister, Mariam, who passed away at nine years old from leukemia. Mohamed vowed to devote his life and time to Palestinian children treated in Israeli hospitals. We hear from Mohamed about the work of the Mariam Foundation, and how the Mariam Foundation works to ensure that Palestinians -from the river to the sea- are afforded medical care.

Beyond the Headlines
How climate change is affecting bees – and why we should all be worried

Beyond the Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 16:27


Gaza has only one honey-producing season, which begins with the onset of the warmer weather in March and lasts until the first week of May. This usually sets up Gaza'a honey production for the year, with 200 tonnes produced. But this year the weather stayed cold with unexpected downpours until the second week of April, and then became unusually hot.   The prolonged cold affected the blossoming of Gaza's many citrus orchards and vegetable crops, leaving the bees with fewer flowers from which to collect nectar when the weather turned warmer and then too hot. These wild swings in the weather have cut honey production in the Gaza Strip by almost a third and are threatening the territory's bee population.    On this episode of Beyond the Headlines, host Ahmed Maher looks at how the decline of the bee population is threatening food security and whether climate change is to blame.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
IDF releases Abu Akleh report; was PM Golda Meir a feminist?

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 17:20


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Military correspondent Emanuel Fabian and news editor Amy Spiro join host Amanda Borschel-Dan. Shots were fired at a bus carrying Israeli soldiers on a major highway in the Jordan Valley on Sunday, injuring seven people. Footage published Monday showed the moments after the attack. What do we know about the victims and the search for the gunmen? The IDF finally released a long-awaited report of an internal investigation that looked into the death of Al Jazeera journalist Shireen Abu Akleh. What were the findings and how did the United States react? 54-year-old Maj. Gen. Herzi Halevi was named the next IDF chief of staff. What do we know about him as a soldier -- and a person? The IDF also announced the appointment of Lt. Col. Yarden Shukron Yifrah as head of the 498th Shahar (Dawn) Battalion. Yifrah will be the first woman to command a Home Front Command search and rescue unit. Why is this significant? Pnina Lahav's new biography of prime minister Golda Meir, "The Only Woman in the Room," asks whether she was a feminist or not. Why isn't this question clear-cut? Spiro tells us about “Mo,” a new sitcom from comedian Mohammed Amer. Worth watching? And to close the program, she delves into the "tragic" break-up of musicians Static and Ben-El. Discussed articles include: 7 injured as soldiers' bus comes under fire by Palestinian gunmen in Jordan Valley Footage shows chaotic moments after attack on soldiers' bus in Jordan Valley IDF probe finds ‘high probability' soldier accidentally killed Shireen Abu Akleh US says IDF review of Abu Akleh killing ‘welcome,' stresses need for accountability Herzi Halevi, Kohavi's deputy, named as next IDF chief of staff In first, IDF appoints woman to command search and rescue battalion New Netflix series ‘Mo' tells story of a Palestinian refugee family in Texas Pop music duo Static and Ben-El announce split after seven years Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. Image: Students carry a mock coffin as they hold a symbolic funeral for slain Al Jazeera journalist Shireen Abu Akleh, at al-Azhar University in Mughraqa, central Gaza Strip, May 16, 2022. (AP Photo/Adel Hana, File)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Gorbachev as anti-Pharaoh; foreigners declare coupledom in PA

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 15:00


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Editor David Horovitz and military correspondent Emanuel Fabian join host Amanda Borschel-Dan. An Israeli soldier was moderately hurt in a stabbing attack near the West Bank city of Hebron Friday afternoon just before Shabbat, close to the settlement of Kiryat Arba, the military and medics said. The attacker was shot dead. What is his status now? Russia has demanded that Iran and its militias withdraw from positions across Syria, amid an apparent uptick in airstrikes attributed to Israel in recent weeks, according to a report on Friday. What does this mean for Israel? Sunday morning the Hamas terror group announced that it had executed five Palestinians in the Gaza Strip, including two for “collaboration” with Israel. What else do we know about these two men? New Israeli rules set to take effect next week require foreigners entering the West Bank to declare if they have “formed a couple” with a Palestinian and are in a relationship with them. What is the intention here? The final leader of the Soviet Union Mikhail Gorbachev died last Tuesday. Horovitz tells us more who this man was to the Jewish People. Discussed articles include: Israeli soldier stabbed near Hebron, moderately hurt; attacker shot dead Russia said to tell Iran to leave Syrian sites amid rise in apparent Israeli strikes Hamas executes 5 Palestinians in Gaza, including 2 for ‘collaborating' with Israel Foreign West Bank visitors must tell Israel if they ‘form a couple' with Palestinian On Jews and Israel, Gorbachev's legacy is under threat Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Former Soviet president Mikhail Gorbachev places a yarmulke, a skullcap, on his head as he enters the Hall of Remembrance at Yad Vashem, Israel's Holocaust Museum and memorial on June 16, 1992 in Jerusalem. (AP Photo/Jacqueline Arzt)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Libertarian Christian Podcast
Ep 290: Naked Empire: Scott Horton Exposes American Interventionism

The Libertarian Christian Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 70:46


Scott Horton, director of the Libertarian Institute and editorial director of Antiwar.com, joins Dr. Norman Horn to discuss war and the U.S Government's failed foreign interventionism. They discuss several key current events, including ongoing tensions between Israel and Palestine, the Russian invasion of Ukraine, and whether China is truly poised to be the next world power.   Horton illuminates the history behind the recent violence in the Gaza Strip that killed 44 people, including 15 children, and injuring 311. The history of the Israel-Palestine conflict is muddled with intentionally confusing narratives since the State of Israel was established in 1947. Horton makes clear that this involved a violent cleansing of about 750,000 Palestinians to maintain a 80/20 Israeli political majority. Palestine has been under Israeli control since 1967. Horton also references 2005 where then Prime Minister Ariel Sharon disengaged the Gaza Strip, but did so to prevent any further discussions of a two-state solution for Israel and Palestine.   Dr. Horn draws out the connection with Horton about how US foreign aid has contributed to the destruction of nations, both in Palestine and across the world in numerous conflicts, including the Middle East, Eastern Europe, and South Asia. Horton brings into focus the reality that Israel really keeps picking fights and then gets the US involved to do the dirty work. Israel's PR campaign in America involves continuing to persuade American evangelicals that God wants them to support poor Israel.   Let's not forget China! Many have wondered if the Communist Party in China is in a position to become the next world power. Scott Horton says no! He explains China's own military position and how it's ill-equipped to fulfill the monumental task of becoming a dominating global power militarily. Horton explains how America was only in position to become a global power after World War II due to our economic wealth. Other nations in the world had been pummeled (comparatively) by the war.   While America may have had some greater moral high ground at the end of WWII, they certainly exhausted it in the past several decades, turning it into a moral hazard. The US Government also had to paint perpetually new narratives to sell its foreign interventionism to the American people. They milked the post-WWII victory for all they could while simultaneously becoming the very monster they said they were fighting: global authoritarianism.   You can only "keep the peace" if you ignore all the violence. - Scott Horton   Listen to this episode especially if you haven't been in the loop on foreign affairs. It is an eye-opening episode that should leave you embracing an end to all entangling alliances, as founders like George Washington insisted.     Main Points of Discussion: 00:00 Introduction 03:04 About the Libertarian Institute 05:14 Israeli bombing of Gaza Strip 14:24 Why foreign aid destroys nations 21:50 The history of the US Govt continually switching sides in the Middle East 27:09 Russian invasion of Ukraine and who really provoked it 30:20 Why were their no negotiations for peace? 36:56 What should we do about the war hawks? 41:05 Stopping the flow of aid and diplomatic support to Israel 45:50 Is China the next world power? 1:00:50 How the state drives wedges between peaceful people 1:06:45 Closing comments     Resources Mentioned: Libertarian Institute Anti-war Radio Antiwar.com ScottHorton.org Scott's Books: Fool's Errand: Time to End the War in Afghanistan Enough Already: Time to End the War on Terrorism The Great Ron Paul: The Scott Horton Show Interviews 2004–2019 Hotter Than the Sun: Time to Abolish Nuclear Weapons Scott Horton interviews Daniel Ellsberg, Seymour Hersh, Gar Alperovitz, Hans Kristensen, Joe Cirincione, and more.

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2915 - Wrongful Incarceration In Missouri; The Fight In Gaza w/ Chris Pomorski & Amjad Iraqi

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 83:33


Sam and Emma host freelance journalist Chris Pomorski to discuss his recent piece in The New Republic "When Innocence Isn't Enough." Then they are joined by Amjad Iraqi, editor at 972 Magazine, to discuss the recent violence in the Gaza Strip. Emma and Sam begin by covering updates on the DOJ search warrant for Mar-a-Lago, the continuing emergency in Jackson, the success of South Carolina's abortion ban and the fall of Arkansas' trans healthcare ban, before tackling the continued Fox & Frenemies infighting between Doocy and Kilmeade. Chris Pomorski then dives into the story of Christopher Dunn's wrongful imprisonment, beginning in St. Louis, 1990 when an 18-year-old Christopher Dunn was charged and convicted for the murder of a 14-year-old boy based solely on the eyewitness testimony of two other children that would later recant, citing pressure and intimidation from the police. After tackling the failures of Dunn's public defender (largely grounded in racism), Pomorski then dives into what happened in the wake of Dunn's innocence becoming clear, why the judge determining his case believe him to be wrongfully convicted, and how Missouri law prohibits overturning convictions that aren't death sentences. Wrapping up, they look at where Dunn can go from here, as Missouri executive representatives (Governor and AG) refused to step in while the legislature passed a law putting his future exclusively in the hands of the prosecutors that incarcerated him in the first place. Then, Amjad Iraqi parses through the lasting effects of last May's Palestinian uprising in the face of heightened Israeli violence and oppression, first walking through the two core struggles that arose during Ramadan as Israeli police assaulted worshipers in Jerusalem and at key religious locations like Damascus Gate and Al-Aqsa mosque, and Israeli and American Jewish settlers began forcibly removing Palestinians and their belongings from their houses as part of their genocidal gentrification project. Next, Amjad, Emma, and Sam, discuss the solidarity among Palestinians that this inspired, how it bolsters a growing nascent collective consciousness among Palestinian youth, and where Palestinian organizing might go from here. Wrapping up, they also cover the evolution of Israel's genocidal project, from periods of more front-facing violence to attempts to obscure the blood they shed, with the latter coming back to the fore as Israel attempts to force NGOs and journalists out of Gaza. And in the Fun Half: Sam and Emma tease a surprise for this Friday, before diving deep into Jordan Peterson's ridiculous, violent, and obviously hypocritical reasoning behind his recent “controversial” tweets, the shameless man he is, also walking through the effects of this stochastic rhetoric from the likes of him, Matt Walsh, and Libs of TikTok, as Boston Children's Hospital was forced to clear out in the wake of bomb threats over its trans-inclusive care. They also cover Rob Schneider's World War II allegory to express his willingness to be canceled, plus, your calls and IMs! Check out Chris's piece here: https://newrepublic.com/article/166767/christopher-dunn-missouri-murder-innocent Check out Amjad's work at 972 Magazine here: https://www.972mag.com/writer/amjad/ Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com: https://fans.fm/majority/join Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here: https://am-quickie.ghost.io/ Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store: https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ Get the free Majority Report App!: http://majority.fm/app Check out today's sponsors: Established Titles: Thanks to Established Titles for sponsoring today's video. They are now running a Labor Day Sale! Go to https://establishedtitles.com/MAJORITY to get an additional 10% off on any purchase with code MAJORITY Aura: Protect yourself from America's fastest-growing crime. Try Aura for 14 days for free: https://aura.com/majority Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/leftreckoning Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Get your last round of free COVID tests here: https://www.covid.gov/tests The Majority Report with Sam Seder - https://majorityreportradio.com/

On Point
The college educators behind the push to speak freely on campus

On Point

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 46:06


Steven Salaita was a rising star in the field of American Indian studies. In the fall of 2012, he applied for a job at the University of Illinois. Then, he lost everything. “I had taken to Twitter and other forms of social media to condemn Israel's bombardment of the Gaza Strip in Palestine," Salaita remembers. "And suddenly, I got an email out of the blue informing me that the job offer had been pulled." Academic freedom on American campuses. Keith Whittington joins Meghna Chakrabarti.

CounterSpin
Ahmad Abuznaid on Palestine Human Rights Crackdown, Andrew Perez on Dark Money Donation

CounterSpin

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 27:52


The corporate media narrative on Israel/Palestine makes it hard to make sense of the recent assault by Israeli forces on the Gaza Strip. The post Ahmad Abuznaid on Palestine Human Rights Crackdown, Andrew Perez on Dark Money Donation appeared first on FAIR.

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
The Mental Health Crisis in Gaza w/ Dr. Yasser Abu Jamei of Gaza Community Mental Health Programme

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 56:30


On this edition of Parallax Views, we return to the issue of the struggles faced by people living in the Gaza Strip. Specifically, we are honing in on the mental health crisis in Gaza, especially in regards to children. Joining us is Dr. Yasser Abu Jamei, a Palestinian clinical neuro-psychiatrist and the Director General of the Gaza Community Mental Health Programme. This is a sobering conversation in which Dr. Jamei details how trauma, fear, and poverty have coalesced in Gaza to create mental health for its inhabitants. We'll be discussing the effects of the Israeli occupation, air-strikes, difficult socio-economic conditions, and the biopsychosocial model as they relate to these matters. Additionally, Dr. Jamei will discuss the issue of education and universities in Gaza, the differences in challenges face by men and women/boys and girls in Gaza, Gaza and human rights (and framing the issues around human rights rather than religious conflict), the discourse around Gaza in Western media, and much, much more.

Rania Khalek Dispatches
Israel vs Axis of Resistance: A New Era of Mutually-Assured Destruction, w/ Ali Abunimah & Rania Khalek

Rania Khalek Dispatches

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 79:32


The occupation of Palestine continues with no end in sight, and this remains the primary political struggle in the region as America's client states normalize with Israel. But now there's a new backdrop: the war in Ukraine exposing Western double standards alongside the US-China New Cold War. Fundamental to US geostrategic aims in the region is taming the “axis of resistance” stretching from Iraq to Iran to Syria to Lebanon and Palestine. This played out in yet another Israeli bombing campaign against the besieged Gaza Strip. Here to help us understand the state of the resistance in Palestine and beyond, and the shifting regional alliances in the Middle East is Ali Abunimah, executive director of the Electronic Intifada and author of “The Battle for Justice in Palestine.”Follow the Electronic Intifada on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/electronicintifadaListen to every episode of Rania Khalek Dispatches anywhere you get podcasts.Apple: https://apple.co/3zeYpeW Spotify: https://spoti.fi/3za9DRKTIME CODES0:00 Intro2:11 Palestine as central to anti-imperialist resistance 5:15 Why does Israel keep killing Palestinians? “Mowing the lawn” 15:33 Why is Israel attacking the West Bank?23:49 Armed resistance & Ukraine double standards34:26 What is the right to resist?  45:06 Iran backs the resistance Resistance Axis stronger than ever 47:54 Potential war? Hezbollah warns Israel not to steal Lebanon's offshore gas59:23 Salman Rushdie1:08:50 The Edward Said & Obama photo: Have progressives learned their lesson? 

The Tikvah Podcast
Jonathan Schanzer on Israel's Weekend War against Islamic Jihad

The Tikvah Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 36:35 Very Popular


Earlier this month, Israeli forces captured the head of Palestinian Islamic Jihad (PIJ) in the West Bank city of Jenin after he had been involved in planning a number of terrorist attacks. Infuriated, PIJ threatened to fire anti-tank weapons at Israeli towns from its home base in Gaza. In response, the IDF struck PIJ's chief of operations in the northern Gaza Strip and killed his counterpart in the south. After that, the Iranian-backed terrorist group began bombarding Israel with rockets and mortars, firing nearly 1,000 rockets, of which nearly 200 fell short and landed in Gaza itself—causing the deaths of several civilians there. An Egyptian-brokered ceasefire took effect after about three days of fighting. To talk about the weekend war, we've invited analyst Jonathan Schanzer, who pays close attention to Gaza and writes about Middle East politics in Commentary and Mosaic, as well as in several books. (One just last year, Gaza Conflict 2021, carefully analyzed the previous blowup there). Here, Schanzer, in conversation with Mosaic editor Jonathan Silver, looks at this month's conflict in that political context, explains how it was like and unlike past rounds of conflict, thinks about how its timing relates to the current nuclear negotiations with Iran, and speculates about the future of Hamas in Gaza. Musical selections in this podcast are drawn from the Quintet for Clarinet and Strings, op. 31a, composed by Paul Ben-Haim and performed by the ARC Ensemble.

HaYovel | The Heartland Connection
Is it ILLEGAL to be a Jew?

HaYovel | The Heartland Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 22:18


Another Jewish settlement was evacuated, and last night, Jews were shot at while going to Joseph's Tomb in Shechem. More and more, the world is coming against Jews who want to be….Jewish. A Jew living in Judea. A Jew visiting the tomb of his forefathers. A Jew dressing like a Jew. Is it illegal for a Jew to simply be a Jew?   Today we explore the topic of why the world seems to have such an obsession with hating the Jewish people. Whenever Israel or the Jews have tried to appease the world by giving in to their demands, it has never ended well. Take the Gaza Strip for example. After forcefully evicting their own people and giving Gaza to the Palestinian Arabs, all that Israel received in return was more than 20,000 rockets fired at its citizens.    As supporters of Israel, it is more and more important that we stand up with a strong, loud voice in support of the Jewish people and the land of Israel.

AJC Passport
The Forgotten Exodus: Egypt

AJC Passport

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 34:17 Very Popular


One of the top Jewish podcasts in the U.S., American Jewish Committee's (AJC) The Forgotten Exodus, is the first-ever narrative podcast to focus exclusively on Mizrahi and Sephardic Jews. In this week's episode, we feature Jews from Egypt.   In the first half of the 20th century, Egypt went through profound social and political upheavals culminating in the rise of President Gamal Abdel Nasser and his campaign of Arabization, creating an oppressive atmosphere for the country's Jews, and leading almost all to flee or be kicked out of the country. Hear the personal story of award-winning author André Aciman as he recounts the heart-wrenching details of the pervasive antisemitism during his childhood in Alexandria and his family's expulsion in 1965, which he wrote about in his memoir Out of Egypt, and also inspired his novel Call Me by Your Name.  Joining Aciman is Deborah Starr, a professor of Near Eastern and Jewish Studies at Cornell University, who chronicles the history of Egypt's Jewish community that dates back millennia, and the events that led to their erasure from Egypt's collective memory. Aciman's modern-day Jewish exodus story is one that touches on identity, belonging, and nationality: Where is your home when you become a refugee at age 14? Be sure to follow The Forgotten Exodus before the next episode drops on August 22. ___ Show notes: Sign up to receive podcast updates here. Learn more about the series here. Song credits:  Rampi Rampi, Aksaray'in Taslari, Bir Demet Yasemen by Turku, Nomads of the Silk Road Pond5:  “Desert Caravans”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI), Composer: Tiemur Zarobov (BMI), IPI#1098108837 “Sentimental Oud Middle Eastern”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI), Composer: Sotirios Bakas (BMI), IPI#797324989. “Frontiers”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI); Composer: Pete Checkley (BMI), IPI#380407375 “Adventures in the East”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI) Composer: Petar Milinkovic (BMI), IPI#00738313833. “Middle Eastern Arabic Oud”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI); Composer: Sotirios Bakas (BMI), IPI#797324989 ___ Episode Transcript: ANDRÉ ACIMAN: I've lived in New York for 50 years. Is it my home? Not really. But Egypt was never going to be my home. It had become oppressive to be Jewish. MANYA BRACHEAR PASHMAN: The world has overlooked an important episode in modern history: the 800,000 Jews who left or were driven from their homes in Arab nations and Iran in the mid-20th century. This series, brought to you by American Jewish Committee, explores that pivotal moment in Jewish history and the rich Jewish heritage of Iran and Arab nations as some begin to build relations with Israel. I'm your host, Manya Brachear Pashman. Join us as we explore family histories and personal stories of courage, perseverance, and resilience.  This is The Forgotten Exodus. Today's episode: leaving Egypt. Author André Aciman can't stand Passover Seders. They are long and tedious. Everyone gets hungry long before it's time to eat. It's also an unwelcome reminder of when André was 14 and his family was forced to leave Egypt – the only home he had ever known. On their last night there, he recounts his family gathered for one last Seder in his birthplace. ANDRÉ: By the time I was saying goodbye, the country, Egypt, had essentially become sort of Judenrein.  MANYA:  Judenrein is the term of Nazi origin meaning “free of Jews”. Most, if not all of the Jews, had already left. ANDRÉ: By the time we were kicked out, we were kicked out literally from Egypt, my parents had already had a life in Egypt. My mother was born in Egypt, she had been wealthy. My father became wealthy. And of course, they had a way of living life that they knew they were abandoning. They had no idea what was awaiting them. They knew it was going to be different, but they had no sense. I, for one, being younger, I just couldn't wait to leave. Because it had become oppressive to be Jewish. As far as I was concerned, it was goodbye. Thank you very much. I'm going. MANYA: André Aciman is best known as the author whose novel inspired the Oscar-winning film Call Me By Your Name – which is as much a tale of coming to terms with being Jewish and a minority, as it is an exquisite coming of age love story set in a villa on the Italian Riviera.  What readers and moviegoers didn't know is that the Italian villa is just a stand-in. The story's setting– its distant surf, serpentine architecture, and lush gardens where Elio and Oliver's romance blooms and Elio's spiritual awakening unfolds – is an ode to André's lost home, the coastal Egyptian city of Alexandria.  There, three generations of his Sephardic family had rebuilt the lives they left behind elsewhere as the Ottoman Empire crumbled, two world wars unfolded, a Jewish homeland was born, and nationalistic fervor swept across the Arab world and North Africa. There, in Alexandria, his family had enjoyed a cosmopolitan city and vibrant Jewish home. Until they couldn't and had to leave.  ANDRÉ: I would be lying if I said that I didn't project many things lost into my novels. In other words, to be able to re-experience the beach, I created a beach house. And that beach house has become, as you know, quite famous around the world. But it was really a portrait of the beach house that we had lost in Egypt.  And many things like that, I pilfer from my imagined past and dump into my books. And people always tell me, ‘God, you captured Italy so well.' Actually, that was not Italy, I hate to tell you. It was my reimagined or reinvented Egypt transposed into Italy and made to come alive again. MANYA: Before he penned Call Me By Your Name, André wrote his first book, Out of Egypt, a touching memoir about his family's picturesque life in Alexandria, the underlying anxiety that it could always vanish and how, under the nationalization effort led by Egypt's President Gamel Abdel Nassar, it did vanish. The memoir ends with the events surrounding the family's last Passover Seder before they say farewell.   ANDRÉ: This was part of the program of President Nasser, which was to take, particularly Alexandria, and turn it into an Egyptian city, sort of, purified of all European influences. And it worked.  As, by the way, and this is the biggest tragedy that happens to, particularly to Jews, is when a culture decides to expunge its Jews or to remove them in one way or another, it succeeds. It does succeed. You have a sense that it is possible for a culture to remove an entire population. And this is part of the Jewish experience to accept that this happens. MANYA: Egypt did not just expunge its Jewish community. It managed to erase Jews from the nation's collective memory. Only recently have people begun to rediscover the centuries of rich Jewish history in Egypt, including native Egyptian Jews dating back millennia. In addition, Egypt became a destination for Jews expelled from Spain in the 15th Century. And after the Suez Canal opened in 1869, a wave of more Jews came from the Ottoman Empire, Italy, and Greece. And at the end of the 19th Century, Ashkenazi Jews arrived, fleeing from European pogroms. DEBORAH STARR: The Jewish community in Egypt was very diverse. The longest standing community in Egypt would have been Arabic speaking Jews, we would say now Mizrahi Jews. MANYA: That's Deborah Starr, Professor of Modern Arabic and Hebrew Literature and Film at Cornell University. Her studies of cosmopolitan Egypt through a lens of literature and cinema have given her a unique window into how Jews arrived and left Egypt and how that history has been portrayed. She says Jews had a long history in Egypt through the Islamic period and a small population remained in the 19th century. Then a wave of immigration came. DEBORAH: We have an economic boom in Egypt. Jews start coming from around the Ottoman Empire, from around the Mediterranean, emigrating to Egypt from across North Africa. And so, from around 5,000 Jews in the middle of the 19th century, by the middle of the 20th century, at its peak, the Egyptian Jews numbered somewhere between 75 and 80,000. So, it was a significant increase, and you know, much more so than just the birth rate would explain. MANYA: André's family was part of that wave, having endured a series of exiles from Spain, Italy, and Turkey, before reaching Egypt. DEBORAH: Egypt has its independence movement, the 1919 revolution, which is characterized by this discourse of coexistence, that ‘we're all in this together.' There are images of Muslims and Christians marching together.  Jews were also supportive of this movement. There's this real sense of a plurality, of a pluralist society in Egypt, that's really evident in the ways that this movement is characterized. The interwar period is really this very vibrant time in Egyptian culture, but also this time of significant transition in its relationship to the British in the various movements, political movements that emerge in this period, and movements that will have a huge impact on the fate of the Jews of Egypt in the coming decades. MANYA: One of those movements was Zionism, the movement to establish a Jewish state in the biblical homeland of the Jews. In 1917, during the First World War, the British government occupying Egypt at the time, issued a public statement of support for the establishment of a "national home for the Jewish people" in Palestine, still an Ottoman region with a small minority Jewish population. That statement became known as the Balfour Declaration. DEBORAH: There was certainly evidence of a certain excitement about the Balfour Declaration of 1917. A certain amount of general support for the idea that Jews are going to live there, but not a whole lot of movement themselves. But we also have these really interesting examples of people who were on the record as supporting, of seeing themselves as Egyptians, as part of the anti-colonial Egyptian nationalism, who also gave financial support to the Jewish project in Palestine. And so, so there wasn't this sense of—you can't be one or the other. There wasn't this radical split. MANYA: Another movement unfolding simultaneously was the impulse to reclaim Egypt's independence, not just in legal terms – Egypt had technically gained independence from the British in 1922 – but suddenly what it meant to be Egyptian was defined against this foreign colonial power that had imposed its will on Egypt for years and still maintained a significant presence. DEBORAH: We also see moves within Egypt, toward the ‘Egyptianization' of companies or laws that start saying, we want to, we want to give priority to our citizens, because the economy had been so dominated by either foreigners or people who were local but had foreign nationality. And this begins to disproportionately affect the Jews.  Because so many of the Jews, you know, had been immigrants a generation or two earlier, some of them had either achieved protected status or, you know, arrived with papers from, from one or another of these European powers. MANYA: In 1929, Egypt adopted its first law giving citizenship to its residents. But it was not universally applied. By this time, the conflict in Palestine and the rise of Zionism had shifted how the Egyptian establishment viewed Jews.   DEBORAH: Particularly the Jews who had lived there for a really long time, some of whom were among the lower classes, who didn't travel to Europe every summer and didn't need papers to prove their citizenship, by the time they started seeing that it was worthwhile for them to get citizenship, it was harder for Jews to be approved. So, by the end, we do have a pretty substantial number of Jews who end up stateless. MANYA: Stateless. But not for long. In 1948, the Jewish state declared independence. In response, King Farouk of Egypt joined four other Arab nations in declaring war on the newly formed nation. And they lost.  The Arab nations' stunning defeat in that first Arab-Israeli War sparked a clandestine movement to overthrow the Egyptian monarchy, which was still seen as being in the pocket of the British. One of the orchestrators of that plot, known as the Free Officers Movement, was Col. Gamel Abdel Nassar. In 1952, a coup sent King Farouk on his way to Italy and Nassar eventually emerged as president. The official position of the Nassar regime was one of tolerance for the Jews. But that didn't always seem to be the case. DEBORAH: Between 1948 and ‘52, you do have a notable number of Jews who leave Egypt at this point who see the writing on the wall. Maybe they don't have very deep roots in Egypt, they've only been there for one or two generations, they have another nationality, they have someplace to go. About a third of the Jews who leave Egypt in the middle of the 20th century go to Europe, France, particularly. To a certain extent Italy. About a third go to the Americas, and about a third go to Israel. And among those who go to Israel, it's largely those who end up stateless. They have no place else to go because of those nationality laws that I mentioned earlier, have no choice but to go to Israel. MANYA: Those who stayed became especially vulnerable to the Nassar regime's sequestration of businesses. Then in 1956, Egypt nationalized the Suez Canal, a 120-mile-long waterway that connected the Mediterranean Sea to the Indian Ocean by way of the Red Sea – that same waterway that created opportunities for migration in the region a century earlier. DEBORAH: The real watershed moment is the 1956 Suez conflict. Israel, in collaboration with France, and Great Britain attacks Egypt, the conflict breaks out, you know, the French and the British come into the war on the side of the Israelis. And each of the powers has their own reasons for wanting, I mean, Nasser's threatening Israeli shipping, and, threatening the security of Israel, the French and the British, again, have their own reasons for trying to either take back the canal, or, just at least bring Nassar down a peg. MANYA: At war with France and Britain, Egypt targeted and expelled anyone with French and British nationality, including many Jews, but not exclusively. DEBORAH: But this is also the moment where I think there's a big pivot in how Jews feel about being in Egypt. And so, we start seeing larger waves of emigration, after 1956. So, this is really sort of the peak of the wave of emigration.  MANYA: André's family stayed. They already had endured a series of exiles. His father, an aspiring writer who copied passages by Marcel Proust into his diary, had set that dream aside to open a textile factory, rebuild from nothing what the family had lost elsewhere, and prepare young André to eventually take over the family business. He wasn't about to walk away from the family fortune – again. DEBORAH: André Aciman's story is quite, as I said, the majority of the Jewish community leaves in the aftermath of 1956. And his family stays a lot longer. So, he has incredible insights into what happens over that period, where the community has already significantly diminished. MANYA: Indeed, over the next nine years, the situation worsened. The Egyptian government took his father's factory, monitored their every move, frequently called the house with harassing questions about their whereabouts, or knocked on the door to issue warrants for his father's arrest, only to bring him in for more interrogation. As much as André's father clung to life in Egypt, it was becoming a less viable option with each passing day. ANDRÉ: He knew that the way Egypt was going, there was no room for him, really. And I remember during the last two years, in our last two years in Egypt, there wAs constantly references to the fact that we were going to go, this was not lasting, you know, what are we going to do? Where do we think we should go? And so on and so forth. So, this was a constant sort of conversation we were having. MANYA: Meanwhile, young André encountered a level of antisemitism that scarred him deeply and shaped his perception of how the world perceives Jews. ANDRÉ: It was oppressive in good part because people started throwing stones in the streets. So, there was a sense of ‘Get out of here. We don't want you here.' MANYA: It was in the streets and in the schools, which were undergoing an Arabization after the end of British rule, making Arabic the new lingua franca and antisemitism the norm. ANDRÉ: There's no question that antisemitism was now rooted in place. In my school, where I went, I went to a British school, but it had become Egyptian, although they taught English, predominantly English, but we had to take Arabic classes, in sort of social sciences, in history, and in Arabic as well. And in the Arabic class, which I took for many years, I had to study poems that were fundamentally anti-Jewish. Not just anti-Israeli, which is a big distinction that people like to make, it doesn't stick. I was reading and reciting poems that were against me. And the typical cartoon for a Jew was a man with a beard, big tummy, hook nose, and I knew ‘This is really me, isn't it? OK.' And so you look at yourself with a saber, right, running through it with an Egyptian flag. And I'll never forget this. This was, basically I was told that this is something I had to learn and accept and side with – by the teachers, and by the books themselves.  And the irony of the whole thing is that one of the best tutors we had, was actually the headmaster of the Jewish school. He was Jewish in very sort of—very Orthodox himself. And he was teaching me how to recite those poems that were anti-Jewish. And of course, he had to do it with a straight face. MANYA: One by one, Jewish neighbors lost their livelihoods and unable to overcome the stigma, packed their bags and left. In his memoir, André recalls how prior to each family's departure, the smell of leather lingered in their homes from the dozens of suitcases they had begun to pack. By 1965, the smell of leather began to waft through André's home. ANDRÉ: Eventually, one morning, or one afternoon, I came back from school. And my father said to me, ‘You know, they don't want us here anymore.' Those were exactly the words he used. ‘They don't want us here.' I said, ‘What do you mean?' ‘Well, they've expelled us.'  And I was expelled with my mother and my brother, sooner than my father was. So, we had to leave the country. We realized we were being expelled, maybe in spring, and we left in May. And so, for about a month or so, the house was a mess because there were suitcases everywhere, and people. My mother was packing constantly, constantly. But we knew we were going to go to Italy, we knew we had an uncle in Italy who was going to host us, or at least make life livable for us when we arrived. We had obtained Italian papers, obtained through various means. I mean, whatever. They're not exactly legitimate ways of getting a citizenship, but it was given to my father, and he took it. And we changed our last name from Ajiman, which is how it was pronounced, to Aciman because the Italians saw the C and assumed it was that. My father had some money in Europe already. So that was going to help us survive. But we knew my mother and I and my brother, that we were now sort of functionally poor. MANYA: In hindsight, André now knows the family's expulsion at that time was the best thing that could have happened. Two years later, Israel trounced Egypt in the Six-Day War, nearly destroying the Egyptian Air Force, taking control of the Gaza Strip and the entire Sinai Peninsula, as well as territory from Egypt's allies in the conflict, Syria and Jordan. The few remaining Jews in Egypt were sent to internment camps, including the chief rabbis of Cairo and Alexandria and the family of one of André's schoolmates whose father was badly beaten. After three years in Italy, André's family joined his mother's sister in America, confirming once and for all that their life in Egypt was gone. ANDRÉ: I think there was a kind of declaration of their condition. In other words, they never overcame the fact that they had lost a way of life. And of course, the means to sustain that life was totally taken away, because they were nationalized, and had their property sequestered, everything was taken away from them. So, they were tossed into the wild sea. My mother basically knew how to shut the book on Egypt, she stopped thinking about Egypt, she was an American now. She was very happy to have become a citizen of the United States.  Whereas my father, who basically was the one who had lost more than she had, because he had built his own fortune himself, never overcame it. And so, he led a life of the exile who continues to go to places and to restaurants that are costly, but that he can still manage to afford if he watches himself. So, he never took cabs, he always took the bus. Then he lived a pauper's life, but with good clothing, because he still had all his clothing from his tailor in Egypt. But it was a bit of a production, a performance for him.  MANYA: André's father missed the life he had in Egypt. André longs for the life he could've had there. ANDRÉ: I was going to study in England, I was going to come back to Egypt, I was going to own the factory. This was kind of inscribed in my genes at that point. And of course, you give up that, as I like to say, and I've written about this many times, is that whatever you lose, or whatever never happened, continues to sort of sub-exist somewhere in your mind. In other words, it's something that has been taken away from you, even though it never existed.  MANYA: But like his mother, André moved on. In fact, he says moving on is part of the Jewish experience. Married with sons of his own, he now is a distinguished professor at the Graduate Center of City University of New York, teaching the history of literary theory. He is also one of the foremost experts on Marcel Proust, that French novelist whose passages his father once transcribed in his diaries. André's own novels and anthologies have won awards and inspired Academy Award-winning screenplays. Like Israel opened its doors and welcomed all of those stateless Egyptian Jews, America opened doors for André. Going to college in the Bronx after growing up in Egypt and Italy? That introduced him to being openly Jewish.  ANDRÉ: I went to Lehman College, as an undergraduate, I came to the States in September. I came too late to go to college, but I went to an event at that college in October or November, and already people were telling me they were Jewish.  You know, ‘I'm Jewish, and this and that,' and, and so I felt ‘Oh, God, it's like, you mean people can be natural about their Judaism? And so, I began saying to people, ‘I'm Jewish, too,' or I would no longer feel this sense of hiding my Jewishness, which came when I came to America. Not before. Not in Italy. Not in Egypt certainly. But the experience of being in a place that was fundamentally all Jewish, like being in the Bronx in 1968, was mind opening for me, it was: I can let everything down, I can be Jewish like everybody else. It's no longer a secret. I don't have to pretend that I was a Protestant when I didn't even know what kind of Protestant I was. As a person growing up in an antisemitic environment. You have many guards, guardrails in place, so you know how not to let it out this way, or that way or this other way. You don't speak about matzah. You don't speak about charoset. You don't speak about anything, so as to prevent yourself from giving out that you're Jewish. MANYA: Though the doors had been flung open and it felt much safer to be openly Jewish, André to this day cannot forget the antisemitism that poisoned his formative years. ANDRÉ: I assume that everybody's antisemitic at some point. It is very difficult to meet someone who is not Jewish, who, after they've had many drinks, will not turn out to be slightly more antisemitic than you expected. It is there. It's culturally dominant. And so, you have to live with this. As my grandmother used to say, I'm just giving this person time until I discover how antisemitic they are. It was always a question of time. MANYA: His family's various displacements and scattered roots in Spain, Turkey, Egypt, Italy, and now America, have led him to question his identity and what he calls home. ANDRÉ: I live with this sense of: I don't know where I belong. I don't know who I am. I don't know any of those things. What's my flag? I have no idea. Where's my home? I don't know. I live in New York. I've lived in New York for 50 years. Is it my home? Not really. But Egypt was never going to be my home. MANYA: André knew when he was leaving Egypt that he would one day write a book about the experience. He knew he should take notes, but never did. And like his father, he started a diary, but it was lost. He started another in 1969.  After completing his dissertation, he began to write book reviews for Commentary, a monthly American magazine on religion, Judaism and politics founded and published, at the time, by American Jewish Committee.  The editor suggested André write something personal, and that was the beginning of Out of Egypt. In fact, three chapters of his memoir, including The Last Seder, appeared in Commentary before it was published as a book in 1994.  André returned to Egypt shortly after its release. But he has not been back since, even though his sons want to accompany him on a trip. ANDRÉ: They want to go back, because they want to go back with me. Question is, I don't want to put them in danger. You never know. You never know how people will react to . . . I mean, I'll go back as a writer who wrote about Egypt and was Jewish. And who knows what awaits me? Whether it will be friendly, will it be icy and chilly. Or will it be hostile? I don't know. And I don't want to put myself there. In other words, the view of the Jews has changed. It went to friendly, to enemy, to friendly, enemy, enemy, friendly, and so on, so forth. In other words, it is a fundamentally unreliable situation.  MANYA: He also doesn't see the point. It's impossible to recapture the past. The pictures he sees don't look familiar and the people he used to know with affection have died. But he doesn't want the past to be forgotten. None of it. He wants the world to remember the vibrant Jewish life that existed in Cairo and Alexandria, as well as the vile hatred that drove all but a handful of Jews out of Egypt. Cornell Professor Deborah Starr says for the first time in many years, young Egyptians are asking tough questions about the Arabization of Egyptian society and how that affected Egyptian Jews. Perhaps, Israel and Zionism did not siphon Jewish communities from the Arab world as the story often goes. Perhaps instead, Israel offered a critical refuge for a persecuted community. DEBORAH: I think it's really important to tell the stories of Mizrahi Jews. I think that, particularly here we are speaking in English to an American audience, where the majority of Jews in North America are Ashkenazi, we have our own identity, we have our own stories. But there are also other stories that are really interesting to tell, and are part of the history of Jews in the 20th and 21st centuries. They're part of the Jewish experience. And so that's some of what has always motivated me in my research, and looking at the stories of coexistence among Jews and their neighbors in Egypt. MANYA: Professor Starr says the rise of Islamist forces like the Muslim Brotherhood has led Egyptians to harken back toward this period of tolerance and coexistence, evoking a sense of nostalgia. DEBORAH: The people are no longer living together. But it's worth remembering that past, it's worth reflecting on it in an honest way, and not, to look at the nostalgia and say: oh, look, these people are nostalgic about it, what is it that they're nostalgic for? What are some of the motivations for that nostalgia? How are they characterizing this experience? But also to look kind of critically on the past and understand, where things were working where things weren't and, and to tell the story in an honest way. MANYA: Though the communities are gone, there has been an effort to restore the evidence of Jewish life. Under Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi, Egypt's president since 2014, there have been initiatives to restore and protect synagogues and cemeteries, including Eliyahu Hanavi Synagogue in Alexandria, Maimonides' original yeshiva in old Cairo, and Cairo's vast Jewish cemetery at Bassatine. But André is unmoved by this gesture. ANDRÉ: In fact, I got a call from the Egyptian ambassador to my house here, saying, ‘We're fixing the temples and the synagogues, and we want you back.' ‘Oh, that's very nice. First of all,' I told him, ‘fixing the synagogues doesn't do anything for me because I'm not a religious Jew. And second of all, I would be more than willing to come back to Egypt, when you give me my money back.' He never called me again. MANYA: Anytime the conversation about reparations comes up, it is overshadowed by the demand for reparations for Palestinians displaced by the creation of Israel, even though their leaders have rejected all offers for a Palestinian state. André wishes the Arab countries that have attacked Israel time and again would invest that money in the welfare of Palestinian refugees, help them start new lives, and to thrive instead of using them as pawns in a futile battle.  He will always be grateful to HIAS, the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, for helping his family escape, resettle, and rebuild their lives. ANDRÉ: We've made new lives for ourselves. We've moved on, and I think this is what Jews do all the time, all the time. They arrive or they're displaced, kicked out, they refashion themselves. Anytime I can help a Jew I will. Because they've helped me, because it's the right thing to do for a Jew. If a Jew does not help another Jew, what kind of a Jew are you? I mean, you could be a nonreligious Jew as I am, but I am still Jewish.  And I realize that we are a people that has historically suffered a great deal, because we were oppressed forever, and we might be oppressed again. Who knows, ok? But we help each other, and I don't want to break that chain. MANYA: Egyptian Jews are just one of the many Jewish communities who in the last century left Arab countries to forge new lives for themselves and future generations. Join us next week as we share another untold story of The Forgotten Exodus. Many thanks to André for sharing his story. You can read more in his memoir Out of Egypt and eventually in the sequel which he's working on now about his family's life in Italy after they left Egypt and before they came to America.  Does your family have roots in North Africa or the Middle East? One of the goals of this series is to make sure we gather these stories before they are lost. Too many times during my reporting, I encountered children and grandchildren who didn't have the answers to my questions because they had never asked. That's why one of the goals of this project is to encourage you to find more of these stories.  Call The Forgotten Exodus hotline. Tell us where your family is from and something you'd like for our listeners to know such as how you've tried to keep the traditions alive and memories alive as well. Call 212.891-1336 and leave a message of 2 minutes or less. Be sure to leave your name and where you live now. You can also send an email to theforgottenexodus@ajc.org and we'll be in touch. Atara Lakritz is our producer, CucHuong Do is our production manager. T.K. Broderick is our sound engineer. Special thanks to Jon Schweitzer, Sean Savage, Ian Kaplan, and so many of our colleagues, too many to name really, for making this series possible. And extra special thanks to David Harris, who has been a constant champion for making sure these stories do not remain untold. You can follow The Forgotten Exodus on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts, and you can sign up to receive updates at AJC.org/forgottenexodussignup. The views and opinions of our guests don't necessarily reflect the positions of AJC.  You can reach us at theforgottenexodus@ajc.org. If you've enjoyed this episode, please be sure to spread the word, and hop onto Apple Podcasts to rate us and write a review to help more listeners find us.

John Solomon Reports
Ex-Israeli ambassador to US: Biden affirming his support for Israel contradicts his Iran Nuclear Deal efforts

John Solomon Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 57:24 Very Popular


Michael Oren, former Israeli ambassador to the United States, discusses tensions flaring this past weekend between Israel and the Gaza Strip, and efforts by the Biden Administration to re-enter the Iran Nuclear Deal. The Ambassador comments that when President Biden was in Israel, this past May, he affirmed Israel's right to security, commenting, while thats nice to hear, "the only problem is that on one hand, the administration is reassuring us of its commitment to our security, on the other hand, it's undermining our security by seeking a renewed JCPOA, the Iran nuclear deal, which we regard is the greatest threat facing Israel and facing the entire region." Oren saying, "so it's giving with one hand and taking away with the other."See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Economist Morning Briefing
Ceasefire in Gaza; US Senate passes signature climate bill, and more

The Economist Morning Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 3:47 Very Popular


A ceasefire between Israel and Palestinian militants in the Gaza Strip, brokered by Egypt, took effect on Sunday evening. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Economist Morning Briefing
Taiwan accuses China of simulating invasion; escalation on the Gaza strip, and more

The Economist Morning Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 4:22 Very Popular


Taiwan scrambled jets to deter 20 Chinese aircraft, 14 of which had crossed the Taiwan Strait's median line, as part of China's most provocative military drills in decades See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Newshour
Hopes for ceasefire in Gaza after talks

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 49:45


There are hopes a ceasefire will hold between Israel and Palestinian militants, after three days of violence left at least 43 people dead. The latest violence is the most serious flare-up between Israel and Gaza since an 11-day conflict in May 2021. Also in the programme: A London museum has agreed to return to Nigeria artefacts that were looted in the nineteenth century from the Kingdom of Benin; and the race is on to rescue a malnourished beluga whale which has swum into France's River Seine. (PICTURE: A Palestinian policeman inspects a destroyed house after an Israeli air strike in the Gaza Strip. CREDIT: Mohammed Saber.)

Newshour
Reported talks underway for Israel-Palestine ceasefire

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 49:50


Talks are reported to be underway to achieve a ceasefire between Israel and Palestinian militants on the latest conflict which has killed at least thirty-one Palestinians since Friday. Israeli media say Egypt is mediating the talks. Also in the programme: Donald Trump speaks at conservative conference; and Colombia's first ever left-wing President. (Photo: An Iron Dome anti-missile system fires an interceptor missile as a rocket is launched from the Gaza Strip towards Israel. CREDIT: REUTERS/Amir Cohen TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)