Podcasts about Sudanese

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Best podcasts about Sudanese

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Latest podcast episodes about Sudanese

Expert Voices on Atrocity Prevention
Episode 25: Muzna Alhaj

Expert Voices on Atrocity Prevention

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2023 41:03


In this episode, we sat down with Muzna Alhaj, a Sudanese activist and a member of a Khartoum-based Resistance Committee. Muzna explains the outbreak of violence in Sudan in April 2023 and how the crisis has affected the role Resistance Committees play in their communities. She also discusses the current atrocity risks faced by civilians and steps the international community can take to support local populations and address the ongoing crisis.

Daily News Brief by TRT World
September 18, 2023

Daily News Brief by TRT World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2023 2:39


*) Türkiye rejects attacks on Muslim values in name of freedom: Erdogan Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has slammed recent attacks on the Quran, saying if hostility towards Islam is not prevented, perpetrators will become more reckless. Erdogan called these actions “provocations that aim to incite people” at a dinner event organised by the Turkish American National Steering Committee in New York. He said Türkiye will not accept the justification of these attacks on the sacred values of two billion Muslims worldwide under the guise of freedom of thought. *) Four Greek aid workers killed in accident in flood-stricken Libya Four members of a Greek humanitarian aid team, sent to Libya after the devastating floods that hit Derna, have been killed in a road accident. The eastern-based government's health minister said the accident took place when a vehicle carrying the team collided with a car carrying a Libyan family. Three people in the car died and two were seriously injured, he added. This comes a week after a tsunami-sized flash flood devastated the Libyan coastal city of Derna, sweeping thousands to their deaths. The true death toll remains unknown. *) Flames engulf central Khartoum as war rages across Sudan in its 6th month An 18-storey building in the centre of Sudan's capital was engulfed in flames, and paramilitary forces attacked the army headquarters for the second day in a row, witnesses reported. Battles between the Sudanese army and the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces intensified on Saturday, resulting in key buildings in central Khartoum being set alight. Since civil war erupted on April 15 between the forces, millions of people have been displaced – fleeing the relentless air strikes, artillery fire and street battles. *) Klishchiivka village near Bakhmut recaptured — Ukraine general In the latest in the Ukraine war, the general in command of Ukraine's ground forces has said that Ukrainian forces recaptured the eastern village of Klishchiivka. Russians claimed control of the village on the southern flank of Bakhmut in January. Ukraine's interior minister also confirmed on Telegram that the village was recaptured in heavy fighting. *) UN designates Palestine's Jericho in West Bank as World Heritage Site A UN conference has voted to list prehistoric ruins near the ancient occupied West Bank city of Jericho as a World Heritage Site in Palestine. The listing refers to the Tel es-Sultan archaeological site, which contains prehistoric ruins dating back to the ninth millennium BC and is outside the ancient city. In response, the Israeli Foreign Ministry has renounced the decision. It said the decision is an indication of Palestinians' use of UNESCO and the politicisation of the organisation.

Newshour
Morocco earthquake: Race against time to save survivors

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2023 48:22


Morocco is facing a race against time to save those trapped under the rubble by Friday's earthquake, as emergency services battle to supply remote mountainous areas. The earthquake, the country's deadliest in 60 years, struck below a cluster of villages south of Marrakesh. We'll hear about trauma and heartbreak in Morocco as reports begin to emerge from the remote mountainous areas totally devastated by the earthquake. Also in the programme: After an airstrike on a market in Khartoum kills dozens of Sudanese civilians - we speak to a medic treating the wounded; and Luis Rubiales has resigned as president of the Spanish Football Federation following criticism for kissing Spain forward Jenni Hermoso at the Women's World Cup final. (Photo shows three mourners crying during a funeral in Moulay Brahim, Morocco. Credit: Reuters)

Up First
Sudanese Refugees, Texas's Floating Border Barrier, Georgia Election Case

Up First

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2023 13:07


The United Nations says as many as a million people have fled war in Sudan. NPR's Michel Martin visits refugees in Chad. A judge reeled in Texas's floating border barrier. And prosecutors in the Georgia election case want a four month trial.Want more comprehensive analysis of the most important news of the day, plus a little fun? Subscribe to the Up First newsletter.Today's episode of Up First was edited by HJ Mai, Eric Westervelt, Ben Swasey and Peter Granitz. It was produced by Shelby Hawkins, Chad Campbell and Ziad Buchh. We get engineering support from Hannah Gluvna. And our technical director is Josephine Nyounai.

The Tikvah Podcast
Yonatan Jakubowicz on Israel's African Immigrants

The Tikvah Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2023 72:33


Last Saturday, supporters and opponents of Eritrea's president, Isaias Afwerki, confronted one another in violent clashes. Yet rather than in Asmara, Eritrea's capital city, this confrontation took place in the streets of south Tel Aviv. In the second half of the 2000s, east African migration to Israel began to accelerate. Since then, in part due to changes in labor policies and law enforcement and in part to a barrier wall erected along the Egypt-Israel border, the number of new east African migrants has fallen precipitously. Nevertheless, although statistics are hard to come by with great precision, there are probably around 40,000 non-Jewish African migrants living in Israel today. What brings these mainly Ethiopian, Eritrean, and Sudanese immigrants to the cities and towns of Israel? And how does and how should Israel distinguish between those seeking humanitarian asylum and those looking for work opportunities and social benefits? These questions have become major points of debate in Israel. Some argue that the state must act in the world as a corrective to the Jewish experience of statelessness in history—that since Jews have so often been migrants and refugees and dependent on the help of others, Israel must help others in need when it can. Others argue that Israel—the political answer to the problems of Jewish statelessness—has an overriding moral obligation to welcome and to secure the lives and liberties of Jews—that it has a special obligation to pursue the ingathering of the Jewish diaspora and so to make a distinction between Jewish and non-Jewish immigrants. To discuss these issues, Yonatan Jakubowicz, formerly an advisor to Israel's Minister of Interior, and a founder of the Israeli Immigration Policy Center, joins Mosaic editor Jonathan Silver. Musical selections in this podcast are drawn from the Quintet for Clarinet and Strings, op. 31a, composed by Paul Ben-Haim and performed by the ARC Ensemble.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Humanitarian crisis becomes more dire for Sudan 5 months into violent power struggle

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2023 9:18


A report funded by the State Department paints a dire picture of the humanitarian situation in Darfur, in Western Sudan. Nearly five months ago, the Sudanese military and the insurgent Rapid Support Forces started fighting for power. Violence spilled into Darfur, where elements of the RSF were accused of genocide 20 years ago. As Nick Schifrin reports, history appears to be repeating itself. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Global News Podcast
Ukrainian generals claim they have punched through a key Russian line

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2023 29:34


The generals say Ukrainian troops have breached the first line of Russian defences in the south, near Zaporizhzhia. Also: many people killed after air strike on Sudanese capital, and Paul McCartney launches a global search for his missing Beatles' 1961 Höfner guitar.

PBS NewsHour - World
Humanitarian crisis becomes more dire for Sudan 5 months into violent power struggle

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2023 9:18


A report funded by the State Department paints a dire picture of the humanitarian situation in Darfur, in Western Sudan. Nearly five months ago, the Sudanese military and the insurgent Rapid Support Forces started fighting for power. Violence spilled into Darfur, where elements of the RSF were accused of genocide 20 years ago. As Nick Schifrin reports, history appears to be repeating itself. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Superpowers School Podcast - Productivity Future Of Work, Motivation, Entrepreneurs, Agile, Creative
E108: Self-Help - War Zones to the USA: Adventures of a Journalist - Natasha Tynes (Journalist & Author)

Superpowers School Podcast - Productivity Future Of Work, Motivation, Entrepreneurs, Agile, Creative

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2023 40:01


How a seemingly mundane job interview led to a life-changing encounter with discriminatory labour laws. Through her letter to the editor published in a local newspaper, Natasha Tynes discovered the compelling power of their voice in sparking discussions and driving change. Explore how this experience ignited a passion for journalism and shed light on the transformative impact of storytelling and advocacy in society.

Africa Daily
How are displaced Sudanese rebuilding their lives?

Africa Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2023 22:16


It's been 135 days since the start of the conflict in Sudan. Four million people have been displaced since the Sudanese armed forces and the Rapid Support Forces turned their guns on each other, according to the UN Refugee Agency. More than 700,000 people have left the country, crossing the border to neighbours like, Egypt, South Sudan and Chad. Around 3.2 million are displaced within the country, making their way to areas that feel relatively safer. So, what has it been like for those who made the decision to leave? And how are they trying to rebuild their lives elsewhere? #AfricaDaily

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast
The Sudanese refugees sheltering in Chad

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2023 28:34


Kate Adie introduces correspondents' and writers' stories from the Chad/Sudan border, Hawaii's Maui island, Belize, Portugal and Azerbaijan More than a million people have fled violence in Sudan for relative safety over the border in Chad - but conditions there are harsh, and medical help running desperately short. Mercy Juma spent a week near the refugee camp in Adre hearing stories of what had driven so many from their homes in Darfur. Maui island is still reeling in shock and grief after the wildfires, fanned up by strong winds, which have ripped across it and burned the town of Lahaina to the ground. John Sudworth reflects on the anger and concern - as well as the resilience - he's heard expressed by Hawaiians over their state's emergency response. How can one of the Western Hemisphere's smallest countries, Belize, take care of one of its longest barrier reefs? In a heavily indebted nation of under half a million people that's also highly vulnerable to climate change, NGOs must often step in where the state can't enforce conservation measures. Linda Pressly took took a boat to a speck in the Caribbean called Laughing Bird Caye, to hear of the threats from fishing boats, tourists - and even drug smugglers - in these waters. Portugal's government has drawn up a plan promising the nation "More Housing" - trying to address a runaway property boom and a sense that a decent home is now out of reach for far too many people. But as Alison Roberts explains, rebalancing both rental and buyers' markets will not be easy. And in the cities of Baku and Shusha, Simon Broughton pays close attention to sounds from Azerbaijan's own classical music tradition: the genre called mugha, which mixes delicate instrumentation with poetic vocals, lively improvisation and deep human feeling. Producer: Polly Hope Editor: Bridget Harney Production Co-Ordinator: Gemma Ashman

Daily News Brief by TRT World

This is TRT World's Daily News Brief for Wednesday, August 2nd. *) Far-right populist tops Argentina's presidential primary in shock result Far-right Javier Milei rocked Argentina's political establishment by emerging as the biggest vote-getter in primary elections to choose presidential candidates. Milei says Argentina's Central Bank should be abolished, thinks the climate crisis is a lie, believes the sale of human organs should be legal and wants to make it easier to own handguns. *) France opens probe into death of six Afghan migrants in Channel shipwreck French prosecutors have taken over the investigation into the death of at least six migrants whose boat sank trying to cross the Channel between France and England. Prosecutors in the channel port of Boulogne opened an investigation on Saturday, hours after the tragedy, but the investigation was switched to Paris. Most of those on board were Afghans with some Sudanese “and a few minors”, said the French coastal authority Premar. *) Niger's military regime to ‘prosecute' President Bazoum for ‘high treason' Niger's coup leaders that toppled Mohamed Bazoum said they would “prosecute” the deposed president for “high treason” and “undermining the security” of the country. Earlier on Sunday, the head of a religious delegation of mediators said that the leader of the military junta, is ready to consider a diplomatic solution to the country's stand-off with the West African bloc ECOWAS. *)Strikes on Odessa leave 3 wounded; Zelenskyy vows justice for Kherson attack At least three people were wounded in two-waves of Russian drone and missile attacks overnight on the port city of Odessa, officials said. The Operational Command South said on Telegram that Ukraine has downed three waves of Russian missiles and drones targeting Odessa. Air defence forces repelled all the attacks, but falling debris damaged a student dormitory and a supermarket in Odessa's city centre, leaving three workers wounded. *) Google Doodle celebrates Turkish astronomer Nuzhet Gokdogan And finally, Google Doodle has commemorated the achievements of Nuzhet Gokdogan, widely hailed as one of Türkiye's earliest female astronomers. Gokdogan played a pivotal role in establishing the Turkish Astronomy Association, the Turkish Association of University Women, and the Turkish Mathematics Association, organisations that continue to shape the scientific landscape of Türkiye. And that's your daily news brief from TRT World. For more, head to trtworld.com

Daily News Brief by TRT World

*) Niger waits for West African bloc's response after junta rejects ultimatum Niger waits on for a response from the West African regional bloc after coup leaders in the capital city Niamey ignored a deadline to reinstate the ousted president. The Economic Community of West African States has warned that a failure to reverse the coup could lead it to authorise a military intervention. The bloc has said it will issue a statement on its next steps in response to the junta's refusal to stand down by Sunday following the July 26 power grab. *) ​​Sudanese army strikes RSF positions near presidential palace The Sudanese Armed Forces have conducted their first aerial bombardment of positions of the Rapid Support Forces in the presidential palace - controlled by the paramilitary group since April. RSF positions in the three cities known as the tripartite capital - Khartoum, Omdurman and Bahri - also came under heavy artillery fire from the army. Intense clashes have been ongoing for over 100 days between the army and the RSF, particularly in strategic areas around the capital and in the western part of the country. *) Peace talks on Ukraine to continue following Jeddah meeting Talks in the Saudi city of Jeddah on the Ukraine conflict have concluded with participants agreeing on the importance of continuing consultations for peace efforts. More than 40 countries, including China, India, the United States and European countries, excluding Russia, took part in the Jeddah talks that ended on Sunday. Ukraine and its allies called for international support for principles that Kiev wants to be the basis for peace, including the withdrawal of all Russian troops and the return of all Ukrainian territory. Moscow called the meeting a doomed attempt to swing the Global South behind Kiev. *) Jailed former Pakistan PM Imran Khan's lawyers to launch legal challenge Former Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan's lawyers attempt to launch legal challenges against his three year-sentence for graft that has ruled him out of contesting national elections. The former international cricket star was arrested at his home on Saturday and taken to jail for charges he has previously said are politically motivated. Petitions have been filed in Islamabad and Lahore High Courts have demanded power of attorney for Khan, which would allow lawyers to challenge his conviction. And finally… *) Saudi Arabia sends its 19th aid plane to Türkiye for quake victims Saudi Arabia has sent its 19th aid plane for victims affected by Türkiye's February 6 earthquakes. The plane, carrying more than 27 tonnes of medical supplies and equipment, departed on Sunday from King Khalid International Airport in Riyadh and headed to Gaziantep Airport in southeastern Türkiye. It was sent as part of Saudi Arabia's "aid bridge" established for earthquake victims in Türkiye and Syria.

Al Jazeera - Your World
Pakistan train derailment kills 30, Sudanese army targets building held by RSF

Al Jazeera - Your World

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2023 2:23


Root of Conflict
Sudan's Political Transition | Ibrahim Elbadawi

Root of Conflict

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2023 74:04


What does an interrupted democratic transition look like? In this episode, we speak to Dr. Ibrahim Elbadawi, managing director of the Economic Research Forum and former Minister of Finance and Economic Planning in the Republic of Sudan. In May of 2023, Dr. Elbadawi joined us in Chicago at the sixth annual Reverend Dr. Richard L. Pearson Lecture to discuss Sudan's political transition and economic policymaking. The lecture took place just weeks after violent conflict erupted in Sudan. Fighting between two military factions has forced millions of Sudanese to flee the violence and cast a shadow of uncertainty over Sudan's ambitions to transition to a civilian-led democracy.Watch the Reverend Dr. Richard L. Pearson Lecture featuring Dr. Elbadawi here.This podcast is produced in partnership with the Pearson Institute for the Study and Resolution of Global Conflicts. For more information, please visit their website at ThePearsonInstitute.org Access the transcript here.Podcast Production Credits:Interviewing: Hisham Yousif and Kirgit AmlaiEditing: Nishita KarunProduction: Hannah Balikci

The Rachman Review
Sudan power struggle risks turning into civil war

The Rachman Review

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2023 23:23


The Sudanese people are being held hostage by warring generals in a power struggle that has already lasted 100 days. With no solution in sight, the fighting risks drawing in outside actors like Russia's Wagner group and destabilising neighbouring countries. David Pilling, the FT's Africa editor, discusses the state of the conflict and its repercussions for the region with political analysts Kholood Khair and Alan Boswell. Clips: Middle East Eye; VOA; Human Rights Watch; Sky News.More on this topic:Sudan's descent into violence poses new threat to volatile Sahel regionThe crisis in Sudan calls for a new model of humanitarian aid‘The garden of war': horseback killers return to DarfurSudan conflict delivers fresh blow to China's African lending strategySubscribe to The Rachman Review wherever you get your podcasts - please listen, rate and subscribe.Presented by David Pilling. Produced by Fiona Symon. Sound design is by Breen TurnerRead a transcript of this episode on FT.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Horn
The Future of Sudan's Resistance Committees

The Horn

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2023 36:59


Sudan's famed resistance committees arose in their present form during Sudan's 2019 revolution and then spearheaded the country's resistance to military rule over the subsequent years. With the outbreak of war in April between the Sudanese army and the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces, these groups are scrambling to aid Sudanese caught in the war yet also face an uncertain and challenging future. Many of their members have fled for safety abroad, and those who remain face dangers on many fronts, including from the warring parties and the dire humanitarian situation. This week on The Horn, Alan is joined by Maryam Elfaki, long and active member of the resistance committee in Sudan's northern sister city Bahri, about what is next for the revolutionary networks in the country now that they find themselves caught inside Sudan's terrible new war. They talk about the origins, structures, and internal dynamics of the resistance committees, their efforts to forge a collective political roadmap, whether anyone in Sudan can claim political legitimacy, how they view other political actors in the country, and whether resistance committees can play a direct role in any future peace talks or political process. They also talk about how resistance committees have transformed themselves into Sudan's humanitarian first responders and aim to provide the vanished services of Sudan's collapsed state. For more in-depth analysis on the conflict in Sudan, check out our Sudan country page. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The President's Inbox
Sudan's Civil War, With Michelle Gavin

The President's Inbox

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2023 31:11


Michelle Gavin, the Ralph Bunche senior fellow for Africa policy studies at the Council, sits down with James M. Lindsay to discuss the deadly struggle between the Sudanese military and the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces (RSF) for control of Sudan.   Mentioned on the Podcast   Michelle Gavin, “Seeking Urgency on Sudan,” CFR.org   Michelle Gavin, “Sudan's Two Truths,” CFR.org   For an episode transcript and show notes, visit us at: https://www.cfr.org/podcasts/sudans-civil-war-michelle-gavin

Africa Today
Situation in Sudan 100 days since fight started

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2023 28:17


One hundred days since the start of Sudan's new war -harrowing testimonies of Sudanese refugees in neighbouring Chad. Meanwhile protection and learning in child friendly spaces. A leaked memo showing the Lagos State government in South West Nigeria had approved $77,000 for a mass burial of 103 victims of the historic 2020 anti-police brutality EndSars protest has sparked outrage in the country. Plus the significance of the Lobito Corridor rail link offering an easier means of export for landlocked countries

Junubia Girl Talks
A Conversation with Manasseh Mathiang: Artist/Activist

Junubia Girl Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2023 53:23


Just like the melodies from your favorite songs, he is here, there and everywhere. It was in 1992 that Manasseh's family picked up and left Khartoum as refugees. Their destination was Nairobi Kenya. As a Sudanese growing up in Kenya, Manasseh recalls feeling foreign and knowing that his new environment wasn't exactly home. While at school, he would recite the Kenyan loyalty pledge and recognize a desire to sing the South Sudanese national anthem. Manasseh grew up in the church. His father was a pastor and his sisters sang in the choir and other occasions. His sisters' singing inspired him to experiment with his own artistic ability. His mother had a song for each of his siblings and he recalls music playing all around their home. Coming from a musical family his elder siblings nicknamed him “Jackson 6” as he would dance to the Jackson 5. Manasseh cites Bob Marley, Kanda Bongo Man, Coolio and Boys II Men as some of his earlier musical influences. In 2011, when South Sudan won its independence from Sudan, Manasseh decided to return home to be a part of a society that values and accepts him as their own. He could imagine future generations being able to sing their own national anthem. Not long after the 2011 referendum, fighting broke out in South Sudan. Many citizens believed the country had a promising future and the new conflict left them disheartened. Amongst those citizens was Manasseh. His frustration would later inspire him to become a human rights and peace activist. He became one of the co-founders of ⁠AnaTaban⁠ a youth led artist collective aiming to bring peace to South Sudan. As an Artist, Manasseh says “I do music not just to entertain, I do music to tell my story, to tell my truth.” In 2008, he released his first album Voice of My Heart which he describes as a fully gospel album that is “a conversation between me and my creator.” He took a long hiatus from music but released a few singles in 2014. In 2021, he released his second album ⁠Hagiga, the Arabic word for “truth”. Manasseh released the album while living in exile due to a government crackdown on activists. The 12 track album blends different sounds, messages and melodic moods with songs like Leadership Crisis, Gowi and Peace Sign. Some of the tracks on the album feature South Sudanese artists Natty P, Mandela DK, Kiden Lulu and a few others. In A Conversation with Manasseh Mathiang, he speaks on which South Sudanese Artists he'd like to collaborate with, mentioning his sister Ruth Mathiang and the legendary Emmanuel Kembe. He speaks on one of the most memorable performances of his career being in Nairobi where his son and nieces saw him perform and his son later joined him on stage. Manasseh hopes to influence the thoughts, culture and life of anyone who listens to his music. To learn more about Manasseh Mathiang visit his ⁠website⁠, subscribe to his ⁠youtube channel⁠ and follow him on Instagram @manassehfanan⁠ Please like, share, subscribe and write your comments. #southsudan #Sudan #Culture #African #Lifestyle #Podcast #EastAfrica #Juba #Nairobi Produced by Junubia Media LLC. For general questions, comments or concerns please contact info@junubiamedia.com --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/junubia-girl-talks/message

PBS NewsHour - World
Millions flee homes in Sudan amid reports of widespread war crimes

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2023 6:22


The conflict in Sudan has entered its fourth month with no end in sight. The fight between the Sudanese military and a rival paramilitary force has killed thousands and more than 3 million have fled their homes. As William Brangham reports, the West Darfur region is the worst hit with allegations of war crimes being committed. A warning: images and accounts in this story are disturbing. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Millions flee homes in Sudan amid reports of widespread war crimes

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2023 6:22


The conflict in Sudan has entered its fourth month with no end in sight. The fight between the Sudanese military and a rival paramilitary force has killed thousands and more than 3 million have fled their homes. As William Brangham reports, the West Darfur region is the worst hit with allegations of war crimes being committed. A warning: images and accounts in this story are disturbing. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Good News for Today
Addressing the Transgender Movement, Send Relief Helps Sudanese Refugees & Praying for Fellow Believers

Good News for Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2023 3:00


More state legislatures have enacted laws this year to protect minors and women, as well as to ensure competitive fairness in sports, in response to the transgender rights movement. Send Relief is helping feed refugees fleeing the escalating civil conflict in Sudan that international leaders say threatens a full-scale civil war. And, The IMB is asking for believers to pray for fellow believers in North Africa and the Middle East where Christian churches are illegal.

Newshour
War crimes investigation launched into Sudan's Darfur

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2023 48:25


The International Criminal Court has opened a new investigation into alleged war crimes in the Darfur region of Sudan. Ethnic violence has surged there as part of the conflict between the Sudanese army and the paramilitary RSF. Our correspondent has been speaking to refugees who have fled to neighbouring Chad. Also in the programme: the Indian space agency which has successfully launched a rocket that will attempt to land a rover on the moon; and France has posthumously awarded the Legion d'Honneur to a journalist killed working in Ukraine. (Picture: Sudanese refugees gather as Doctors Without Borders teams assist the war-wounded from West Darfur in a hospital in Chad in June. Credit: Mohammad Ghannam/MSF/Handout via REUTERS)

Newshour
ICC opens a new war crimes investigation in Darfur

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2023 49:28


The International Criminal Court has opened a new investigation into alleged war crimes in the Darfur region of Sudan. Ethnic violence has surged there as part of the conflict between the Sudanese army and the paramilitary RSF. The court's chief prosecutor -- Karim Khan -- said the reports included attacks on civilians, mass rapes, and the burning of homes and markets. Also in the programme: Nigeria's President announces a state of emergency as the country battles severe food crisis; and Hollywood actors start the first industry-wide walk-out in more than six decades. (Photo: FILE PHOTO: A Sudanese man who fled the conflict in Sudan's Darfur region. CREDIT: REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra/File Photo).

PRI's The World
Turkey clears path for Sweden to join NATO

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2023 48:23


After months of blocking Sweden's efforts to join NATO, Turkey has agreed to support Swedish membership in the Western military alliance. Also, the UN secretary-general warned this week that Sudan is on the brink of a “full-scale civil war.” USAID Chief Samantha Power tells us about global efforts to assist increasingly desperate Sudanese civilians. And, with extreme weather events proliferating across the globe, we discuss how parts of the world are becoming less and less habitable. Plus, a look at a 22-pound waxy chunk of what's known as ambergris discovered in a sperm whale on Spain's Canary Islands that could fetch some $550,000.

PBS NewsHour - Science
News Wrap: Russian shelling takes more Ukrainian lives on 500th day of war

PBS NewsHour - Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2023 2:43


In our news wrap Saturday, Ukraine marked 500 days since the start of Russia's invasion, Sudanese officials say at least 22 people died in an airstrike in Omdurman, a small business jet crash in Southern California killed at least 6 people, and more dangerous temperatures are forecast for much of the South and Southwest. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
News Wrap: Russian shelling takes more Ukrainian lives on 500th day of war

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2023 2:43


In our news wrap Saturday, Ukraine marked 500 days since the start of Russia's invasion, Sudanese officials say at least 22 people died in an airstrike in Omdurman, a small business jet crash in Southern California killed at least 6 people, and more dangerous temperatures are forecast for much of the South and Southwest. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
News Wrap: Russian shelling takes more Ukrainian lives on 500th day of war

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2023 2:43


In our news wrap Saturday, Ukraine marked 500 days since the start of Russia's invasion, Sudanese officials say at least 22 people died in an airstrike in Omdurman, a small business jet crash in Southern California killed at least 6 people, and more dangerous temperatures are forecast for much of the South and Southwest. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Newshour
Ukraine's commanders captured by Russia return home after Zelensky's visit to Turkey

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2023 49:16


President Zelensky says he's returned home from a visit to Turkey with five Ukrainian commanders captured by Russia. The commanders had been transferred to Turkey under a prisoner swap brokered by Ankara in September. Moscow said Turkey had violated the prisoner exchange terms and had failed to inform Moscow. Also in the programme: A Sudanese army airstrike has killed more than twenty people in Omdurman; and a group of Angolan giraffes have returned to live in their historical homeland. (Photo: Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (R) and Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelensky shake hands during a joint press conference. Credit: Reuters).

The Horn
Fearing the Worst in Darfur, Again

The Horn

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2023 36:44


Since the outbreak of the war in Sudan, the West Darfur region has seen a dramatic resurgence in violence. While the RSF and the Sudanese army have focused their war effort on the capital Khartoum, fighting has erupted between Arab and non-Arab militias and paramilitary groups in West Darfur. Reports of mass atrocities and displacement share unsettling similarities to the brutal war that devastated Darfur 20 years ago. With the main conflict actors in Sudan being seemingly no closer to a peace deal after more than two months of fighting, the violence seems unlikely to subside. This week on The Horn, Alan Boswell speaks with Jerome Tubiana, writer, researcher, and a former Sudan analyst for Crisis Group, about the escalating violence in West Darfur. They discuss the history of conflict in Darfur, factors that played into escalating tensions on the eve of Sudan's new war, and how the outbreak of conflict in April has led to a rapid deterioration of stability in the region. They highlight the brutal tactics of armed groups in the region and the devastating toll that has taken on civilians. They talk about the actors involved and how the RSF and the Sudanese army view the conflict in Darfur. They also address if the fighting in Darfur might spread further in the region and into Chad and why peace in Khartoum might not be enough to end the violence in Sudan's peripheries. For more in-depth analysis on the conflict in Sudan, check out our latest briefing “A Race against Time to Halt Sudan's Collapse” and our Sudan country page. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Epstein Chronicles
The Violence That Is Once Again Plaguing Darfur (7/2/23)

The Epstein Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2023 16:45


The genocide in Darfur, Sudan, refers to a conflict that began in the early 2000s and resulted in the mass killings, displacement, and widespread human rights abuses targeting the Fur, Masalit, and Zaghawa ethnic groups, among others. While the conflict has its roots in complex historical, political, and socioeconomic factors, it is primarily characterized by the systematic and deliberate violence perpetrated by the Sudanese government-backed Janjaweed militia against civilian populations.Background: Darfur, a region in western Sudan, has a long history of tensions between nomadic Arab herders and sedentary African farmers over land and resources. However, the conflict escalated in 2003 when rebel groups from the marginalized Fur, Masalit, and Zaghawa communities launched attacks against government targets, accusing the central government of neglect and discrimination.Government Response: In response to the rebel uprising, the Sudanese government, under the leadership of President Omar al-Bashir, initiated a brutal counter-insurgency campaign. Instead of targeting the rebel groups directly, the government-backed Janjaweed militia was mobilized to carry out attacks against civilian populations suspected of supporting the rebels. The government's tactics included aerial bombardments, village burnings, mass killings, rape, and forced displacement.Genocide and Ethnic Cleansing: The violence in Darfur quickly escalated into a full-blown humanitarian crisis. The Janjaweed militia, comprised of Arab militias, often attacked African villages, looting properties, killing men, women, and children, and subjecting women to widespread sexual violence. The scale and brutality of the attacks led to allegations of genocide and ethnic cleansing by the Sudanese government and its Janjaweed proxies. The government's systematic targeting of specific ethnic groups for extermination or displacement provided evidence of their genocidal intent.International Response: The international community responded to the crisis in Darfur with varying degrees of urgency and effectiveness. The United Nations (UN) deployed peacekeeping forces, known as the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID), to protect civilians and facilitate humanitarian aid.However, the mission faced numerous challenges, including insufficient resources and constraints imposed by the Sudanese government.The International Criminal Court (ICC) took action by issuing arrest warrants for several Sudanese officials, including President Omar al-Bashir, who was indicted on charges of war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide. However, al-Bashir remained in power and was not extradited to the ICC, further complicating efforts to hold perpetrators accountable.Humanitarian Crisis: The violence in Darfur resulted in one of the largest and most protracted humanitarian crises in recent history.The conflict displaced an estimated 2.7 million people, with many seeking refuge in internally displaced persons (IDP) camps or fleeing to neighboring Chad. The displacement led to severe food shortages, lack of clean water, inadequate healthcare, and outbreaks of diseases, causing immense suffering and loss of life.Peace Efforts and Current Situation:Over the years, various peace agreements and initiatives have been attempted to resolve the conflict in Darfur. The most notable of these was the Doha Document for Peace in Darfur (DDPD), signed in 2011 between the Sudanese government and a major rebel group. However, the DDPD has not fully implemented, and sporadic violence and clashes between different armed groups continue to pose challenges to lasting peace in the region.Now, hostilities are flaring and the Janjaweed have started to torment the ethnic africans all over again. (commercial at 12:24)to contact me:bobbycapucci@portonmail.comsource:China, Myanmar and now Darfur ... the horror of genocide is here again (msn.com)This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5003294/advertisement

Beyond The Horizon
The Violence That Is Once Again Plaguing Darfur (7/2/23)

Beyond The Horizon

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2023 16:45


The genocide in Darfur, Sudan, refers to a conflict that began in the early 2000s and resulted in the mass killings, displacement, and widespread human rights abuses targeting the Fur, Masalit, and Zaghawa ethnic groups, among others. While the conflict has its roots in complex historical, political, and socioeconomic factors, it is primarily characterized by the systematic and deliberate violence perpetrated by the Sudanese government-backed Janjaweed militia against civilian populations.Background: Darfur, a region in western Sudan, has a long history of tensions between nomadic Arab herders and sedentary African farmers over land and resources. However, the conflict escalated in 2003 when rebel groups from the marginalized Fur, Masalit, and Zaghawa communities launched attacks against government targets, accusing the central government of neglect and discrimination.Government Response: In response to the rebel uprising, the Sudanese government, under the leadership of President Omar al-Bashir, initiated a brutal counter-insurgency campaign. Instead of targeting the rebel groups directly, the government-backed Janjaweed militia was mobilized to carry out attacks against civilian populations suspected of supporting the rebels. The government's tactics included aerial bombardments, village burnings, mass killings, rape, and forced displacement.Genocide and Ethnic Cleansing: The violence in Darfur quickly escalated into a full-blown humanitarian crisis. The Janjaweed militia, comprised of Arab militias, often attacked African villages, looting properties, killing men, women, and children, and subjecting women to widespread sexual violence. The scale and brutality of the attacks led to allegations of genocide and ethnic cleansing by the Sudanese government and its Janjaweed proxies. The government's systematic targeting of specific ethnic groups for extermination or displacement provided evidence of their genocidal intent.International Response: The international community responded to the crisis in Darfur with varying degrees of urgency and effectiveness. The United Nations (UN) deployed peacekeeping forces, known as the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID), to protect civilians and facilitate humanitarian aid.However, the mission faced numerous challenges, including insufficient resources and constraints imposed by the Sudanese government.The International Criminal Court (ICC) took action by issuing arrest warrants for several Sudanese officials, including President Omar al-Bashir, who was indicted on charges of war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide. However, al-Bashir remained in power and was not extradited to the ICC, further complicating efforts to hold perpetrators accountable.Humanitarian Crisis: The violence in Darfur resulted in one of the largest and most protracted humanitarian crises in recent history.The conflict displaced an estimated 2.7 million people, with many seeking refuge in internally displaced persons (IDP) camps or fleeing to neighboring Chad. The displacement led to severe food shortages, lack of clean water, inadequate healthcare, and outbreaks of diseases, causing immense suffering and loss of life.Peace Efforts and Current Situation:Over the years, various peace agreements and initiatives have been attempted to resolve the conflict in Darfur. The most notable of these was the Doha Document for Peace in Darfur (DDPD), signed in 2011 between the Sudanese government and a major rebel group. However, the DDPD has not fully implemented, and sporadic violence and clashes between different armed groups continue to pose challenges to lasting peace in the region.Now, hostilities are flaring and the Janjaweed have started to torment the ethnic africans all over again. to contact me:bobbycapucci@portonmail.comsource:China, Myanmar and now Darfur ... the horror of genocide is here again (msn.com)This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5080327/advertisement

Hold Your Fire!
Bonus Episode: What Egypt Wants in Sudan

Hold Your Fire!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2023 45:05


Today we're bringing you a bonus episode on Egypt and Sudan from Crisis Group's The Horn podcast.The conflict in Sudan between the country's armed forces and the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces (RSF) has been a major source of concern for its northern neighbour Egypt. Cairo, a backer of Sudan's army, now faces both a humanitarian crisis that is spilling over into its borders and an increasingly challenging geopolitical landscape with Sudan, an ally since the fall of Omar al-Bashir in 2019, descending into chaos.This week on The Horn, Alan talks with Michael Hanna, Crisis Group's U.S. Program director, about Egypt's role in the war in Sudan. They look at the historical ties between the two countries, current political dynamics, and Egypt's response to the 2019 popular uprising and political transition in Sudan. They discuss what is behind Cairo's support for the Sudanese armed forces and how it positioned itself toward the current conflict in Sudan. They also discuss Cairo's views of U.S.-led diplomacy and the role of Gulf powers Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates in Sudan and the Horn of Africa more generally. They also talk about the long-running dispute between Egypt and Ethiopia over the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam and how the war in Sudan might affect Cairo's diplomacy in the region more broadly. For more in-depth analysis on the topics discussed in this episode, check out our Sudan and Egypt country pages. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Al Jazeera - Your World
Wagner chief in Belarus, Sudanese army announces Eid ceasefire

Al Jazeera - Your World

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2023 2:35


The CyberWire
Two sets of China-linked cyberespionage activities. Mirai's new vectors. A Cozy Bear sighting. Anonymous Sudan gets less anonymous.

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2023 34:01


An update on Barracuda ESG exploitation. Camaro Dragon's current cyberespionage tools spread through infected USB drives. The Mirai botnet is spreading through new vectors. Midnight Blizzard is out and about . Ukraine is experiencing a "wave" of cyberattacks during its counteroffensive. Karen Worstell from VMware shares her experience with technical debt. Rick Howard speaks with CJ Moses, CISO of Amazon Web Services. And Anonymous Sudan turns out to be no more anonymous or Sudanese than your Uncle Louie. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/12/120 Selected reading. Barracuda ESG exploitation (Proofpoint) Beyond the Horizon: Traveling the World on Camaro Dragon's USB Flash Drives (Check Point Research) Chinese malware accidentally infects networked storage (Register) Akamai SIRT Security Advisory: CVE-2023-26801 Exploited to Spread Mirai Botnet Malware (Akamai). Mirai botnet targets 22 flaws in D-Link, Zyxel, Netgear devices (BleepingComputer)  Neuberger: Ukraine experiencing a ‘surge' in cyberattacks as it executes counteroffensive (Record)  Microsoft warns of rising NOBELIUM credential attacks on defense sector (HackRead). Anonymous Sudan: neither anonymous nor Sudanese (Cybernews)

The Horn
What Egypt Wants in Sudan

The Horn

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2023 44:25


The conflict in Sudan between the country's armed forces and the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces (RSF) has been a major source of concern for its northern neighbour Egypt. Cairo, a backer of Sudan's army, now faces both a humanitarian crisis that is spilling over into its borders and an increasingly challenging geopolitical landscape with Sudan, an ally since the fall of Omar al-Bashir in 2019, descending into chaos.This week on The Horn, Alan talks with Michael Hanna, Crisis Group's U.S. Program director, about Egypt's role in the war in Sudan. They look at the historical ties between the two countries, current political dynamics, and Egypt's response to the 2019 popular uprising and political transition in Sudan. They discuss what is behind Cairo's support for the Sudanese armed forces and how it positioned itself toward the current conflict in Sudan. They also discuss Cairo's views of U.S.-led diplomacy and the role of Gulf powers Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates in Sudan and the Horn of Africa more generally. They also talk about the long-running dispute between Egypt and Ethiopia over the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam and how the war in Sudan might affect Cairo's diplomacy in the region more broadly. For more in-depth analysis on the topics discussed in this episodes, check out our Sudan and Egypt country pages. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters
What Sudan's Refugee Crisis Teaches Us About Africa's Borders

Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2023 24:28


Since fighting broke out in Sudan on April 15th this year, more than million people have been displaced internally and internationally. Many of the borders across which Sudanese have fled are not functional borders -- that is, there is no process to register or screen people who are entering a country. According to my guest today, non-functional porous borders are exacerbating an aleady dire humanitarian crisis.  Margaret Monyani is a senior migration researcher at Institute for Security Studies in South Africa. We kick off discussing why the African Union is focusing more heavily on border control and administration before having a longer conversation about what Sudan's refugee crisis tells us about African borders today. 

Anderson Cooper 360
CNN exclusive: testimonies detail atrocities by Wagner-backed militia in Sudan

Anderson Cooper 360

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2023 40:46


Sudanese rights organizations say atrocities are being committed in Darfur and CNN has uncovered evidence that the Russian mercenary group Wagner is complicit, continuing to support Sudan's Rapid Support Forces (RSF) paramilitary throughout the months of fighting despite calls by the U.S and others for support to cease. In an exclusive investigation, CNN uncovered the Russian supply lines prolonging the conflict between the RSF and Sudan's armed forces that has displaced around two-million people since mid-April and pushed the country further into a humanitarian crisis. The RSF denies links to Wagner and any involvement in mass rape. As part of this investigation, CNN verified and corroborated incidents of rape perpetrated by the RSF, including one which was captured on video. We warn you the content is graphic and disturbing. CNN's Nima Elbagir has the story. And, in 2000 and 2016, some Democrats feared Green Party candidates took enough votes from the Democratic nominees to swing the election. Could it happen in 2024? Dr. Cornel West announced he's now running for the Green Party nomination. He joined the program to talk about his run. To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Newshour
Silvio Berlusconi dies at 86

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2023 49:39


Italy's billionaire former prime minister Silvio Berlusconi has died at the age of 86. We will hear from one of his supporters and the man who replaced him. Also on the programme: life in the Sudanese capital Khartoum; and Japan rethinks how to address sexual violence against women. (Picture: Silvio Berlusconi giving a speech in Rome in 2009. Credit: Reuters / Remo Casilli.)

Global News Podcast
The Happy Pod: Rescue mission in Sudan

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2023 26:35


Around 300 children and babies rescued from an orphanage in the Sudanese capital, Khartoum. Also: We hear from one of the researchers helping a paralysed man to walk again, and why some people in Japan are relearning how to smile.

Our American Stories
One Mother's Escape From A Sudanese Death Sentence... to America

Our American Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2023 20:18


On this episode of Our American Stories, our next story comes to us from Mariam Ibrahim, who lives in Virginia. But the story begins far from there. Support the show (https://www.ouramericanstories.com/donate)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Africa Daily
How were hundreds of children evacuated from a Khartoum orphanage?

Africa Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2023 12:49


When fighting broke out between the Sudanese army and Rapid Support Forces in mid April, there were just over 360 children - including many infants - living in the Mygoma orphanage in Khartoum. Like most of the population, they were trapped. In the time since, 67 of the children have died of malnourishment or illness. Those caring for them couldn't get enough food. Some of their regular carers couldn't reach them. And hospitals were destroyed or inaccessible. But now, all these weeks later, a coordinated effort by a number of agencies has finally got them out to safety. So what's the story of the children of the Mygoma orphanage? For #africadaily, Alan Kasujja speaks to Unicef's child protection expert in Sudan, Osman Abu Fatima, who was in charge of setting up their new home.

VOMRadio
SUDAN: Christians in Jeopardy as Fighting Continues

VOMRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2023 28:21


It's been more than a month since fighting broke out in the capital city of Sudan. Christians and non-Christians alike are dealing with extreme hardship, difficulty, and terror as the battle between two warring Islamist factions continues. For our Christian brothers and sisters in Sudan, war has made life even more difficult than usual as they try to survive the fighting, find food and shelter and still face persecution for their faith in Christ. Brad Phillips, founder and president of Persecution Project Foundation (PPF), began working in Sudan in 1997 and has partnered with The Voice of the Martyrs to serve Sudanese Christians since 2002. Listen as he explains the current fighting and tells how our Christian family members are being affected. Brad and the PPF team are daily hearing stories of tremendous loss in the church, yet also stories of heroism as persecuted Christians risk their lives to serve others in this season of upheaval and need. Others are trying to flee major cities for the Nuba Mountains—which previously was a site of great persecution and repeated bombings by the Sudanese military. Listen as Brad shares how to pray for persecuted Christians in Sudan, and invite a Christian friend to pray with you for followers of Jesus caught in the crossfire there. Never miss an episode of VOM Radio! Subscribe to the podcast. Or you can listen each week—and get daily reminders to pray for persecuted Christians—in the VOM App for your smartphone or tablet.

Global News Podcast
US sanctions Sudanese firms for fuelling war

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2023 32:25


The US government said the sanctions would cut off key financial flows to the Sudanese army and the Rapid Support Forces. Also: Donald Trump reportedly caught on tape talking about keeping classified document after leaving office, and a Nepali guide saves the life of a climber found in the "death zone" on Mount Everest.

PRI's The World
Sudanese in limbo as conflict continues

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2023 47:45


The United Nations says more than 1 million people have been displaced by the conflict in Sudan. Despite on and off ceasefires, the fighting between the country's armed forces and paramilitary has shown no signs of ending soon. And, Nigeria has only about 1 doctor for every 5,000 residents. Members of Nigerian Parliament are backing a new bill that will medical graduates to work in the country for five years to limit the medical brain drain. Also, a spacecraft with an all-private astronaut team splashed down off Texas in the Gulf of Mexico late Tuesday. Two of the four astronauts on board are from Saudi Arabia including the first Arab woman to go into orbit. Plus, a the $70 billion deal that could impact the future of cloud gaming.

Global News Podcast
Australia rolls out rock star welcome to Indian prime minister

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2023 31:38


Narendra Modi is there to boost economic ties. Also: People living in the Sudanese capital, Khartoum, say for the first time in more than five weeks there appears to be relative peace following the latest ceasefire, and Hong Kong's flagship airline Cathay Pacific has apologised after its flight attendants were alleged to have made fun of passengers who didn't speak English.

Poetry Unbound
Safia Elhillo — Ode to My Homegirls

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2023 12:09


Friendships deserve praise songs, and here's a praise song — an ode — to friends that have crossed continents for each other, and would go further if needed.Sudanese by way of D.C., Safia Elhillo is the author of Girls That Never Die, The January Children, and Home Is Not a Country, and is co-editor of the anthology Halal If You Hear Me. Winner of the Sillerman First Book Prize for African Poets, the Arab American Book Award, and the Brunel International African Poetry Prize, she is also the recipient of a Cave Canem Fellowship, a Wallace Stegner Fellowship from Stanford University, and a Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Fellowship from The Poetry Foundation. Her work has appeared in Poetry magazine, The Atlantic, and the Academy of American Poets' Poem-a-Day series, among others.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.We're pleased to offer Safia Elhillo's poem, and invite you to connect with Poetry Unbound throughout this season.

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
The economic ripples of conflict in Sudan

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2023 14:33


Weeks of violence between the Sudanese army and a powerful paramilitary group in Sudan has triggered an urgent humanitarian crisis and devastated the country's economy. One listener called to ask how the conflict might impact the global economy. We'll get into it and answer more of your questions about the U.S. treasurer’s job and how Netflix might dispose of its enormous DVD inventory. Plus, why the end of the helium shortage is still up in the air. Here’s everything we talked about today: “As Sudan’s conflict continues into its second week, here’s what to know” from NPR “Sudan conflict deals new blow to stagnant economy” from Reuters “Analysis: UAE, Egypt closer to different sides in Sudan conflict” from Al Jazeera “If Sudan's Conflict Spreads to Chad, the Whole Sahel Is at Risk” from Foreign Policy “What the new U.S. Treasurer could mean for Indian Country” from Marketplace “History of the Treasury” from the U.S. Department of the Treasury “Um … what’s a DVD again?” from Marketplace “Netflix Will End Its DVD Service, 5.2 Billion Discs Later” from The New York Times “Redbox wants to save Netflix's DVD business” from The Verge “Helium’s been rising — in price — and it’s bringing businesses down” from Marketplace “Helium shortage 4.0 – Continuing uncertainty in the market” from Gasworld “With helium in short supply, scientists are worried” from Marketplace If you've got a question about business, tech or the economy, give us a shout. We're at 508-U-B-SMART, or email us at makemesmart@marketplace.org.

Global News Podcast
Sudan truce talks underway as fighting continues

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2023 29:10


Saudi Arabia has confirmed that the first face to face talks between representatives from the Sudanese army and the Rapid Support Forces are taking place. We hear from Renk in South Sudan, a small town civilians have fled to. Also: The United Nations has called on the Taliban to stop public stoning, flogging and executions, and the BBC unveils a new way of broadcasting.