Podcasts about Scott Hahn

American theologian

  • 189PODCASTS
  • 1,086EPISODES
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  • Sep 29, 2022LATEST
Scott Hahn

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Letters From Home
The Power of Our Guardian Angels - The Feast of Saints Michael, Gabriel, and Raphael

Letters From Home

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 18:02


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for the Feast of Saints Michael, Gabriel, and Raphael by Dr. Scott Hahn. Michael, Gabriel, Raphael, archangels Feast First Reading: Daniel 7: 9-10, 13-14 or Revelation 12: 7-12ab Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 138: 1-2ab, 2cde-3, 4-5 Alleluia: Psalms 103: 21 Gospel: John 1: 47-51 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
The Power of Our Guardian Angels - The Feast of Saints Michael, Gabriel, and Raphael

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 18:02


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for the Feast of Saints Michael, Gabriel, and Raphael by Dr. Scott Hahn. Michael, Gabriel, Raphael, archangels Feast First Reading: Daniel 7: 9-10, 13-14 or Revelation 12: 7-12ab Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 138: 1-2ab, 2cde-3, 4-5 Alleluia: Psalms 103: 21 Gospel: John 1: 47-51 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

Catholic Answers Live
#10822 The Holiness of God - Scott Hahn

Catholic Answers Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022


Emmaus Road Press is the publishing arm of St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology Questions Covered: 28:59 – Should I join the Catholic Church or stay in a protestant church that has a good strong loving community?  35:12 – Why did Jesus have to die on the cross?  48:39 – Why did Jesus cry? How does this fit into our understanding of who he is?  …

Letters From Home
The Truth of Holiness - Monday of the Twenty-Sixth Week in Ordinary Time

Letters From Home

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 15:46


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for Monday of the Twenty-Sixth Week in Ordinary Time by Dr. Scott Hahn. Ordinary Weekday / Cosmas and Damian, Martyrs First Reading: Job 1: 6-22 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 17: 1bcd, 2-3, 6-7 Alleluia: Mark 10: 45 Gospel: Luke 9: 46-50 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
The Truth of Holiness - Monday of the Twenty-Sixth Week in Ordinary Time

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 15:46


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for Monday of the Twenty-Sixth Week in Ordinary Time by Dr. Scott Hahn. Ordinary Weekday / Cosmas and Damian, Martyrs First Reading: Job 1: 6-22 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 17: 1bcd, 2-3, 6-7 Alleluia: Mark 10: 45 Gospel: Luke 9: 46-50 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
A Great Chasm: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Twenty-Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 3:00


Readings: Amos 6:1, 4–7 Psalm 146:7–10 1 Timothy 6:11–16 Luke 16:19–31 The rich and powerful are visited with woe and exile in today's Liturgy—not for their wealth but for their refusal to share it; not for their power but for their indifference to the suffering at their door. The complacent leaders in today's First Reading feast on fine foods and wines, reveling while the house of Joseph, the kingdom of Israel (see Amos 5:6), collapses around them. The rich man in today's Gospel also lives like a king—dressed in royal purple and fine linen (see 1 Maccabees 8:14). The rich man symbolizes Israel's failure to keep the Old Covenant, to heed the commandments of Moses and the prophets. This is the sin of the rulers in today's First Reading. Born to the nation God favored first, they could claim Abraham as their father. But for their failure to give—their inheritance is taken away. The rulers are exiled from their homeland. The rich man is punished with an exile far greater—eternity with a “great chasm” fixed between himself and God. In this world, the rich and powerful make a name for themselves (see Genesis 11:4) and dine sumptuously, while the poor remain anonymous, refused an invitation to their feasts. But notice that the Lord today knows Lazarus by name, and Joseph in his sufferings—while the leaders and the rich man have no name. Today's liturgy is a call to repentance—to heed the warning of One who was raised from the dead. To lay hold of the eternal life He promises, we must pursue righteousness, keep the commandment of love, as Paul exhorts in today's Epistle. “The Lord loves the just,” we sing in today's Psalm. And in this Eucharist we have a foretaste of the love that will be ours in the next life—when He will raise the lowly to the heavenly banquet with Abraham and the prophets (see Luke 13:28), where we too will rest our heads on the bosom of our Lord (see John 13:23).

Letters From Home
A Great Chasm: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Twenty-Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Letters From Home

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 3:00


Readings: Amos 6:1, 4–7 Psalm 146:7–10 1 Timothy 6:11–16 Luke 16:19–31 The rich and powerful are visited with woe and exile in today's Liturgy—not for their wealth but for their refusal to share it; not for their power but for their indifference to the suffering at their door. The complacent leaders in today's First Reading feast on fine foods and wines, reveling while the house of Joseph, the kingdom of Israel (see Amos 5:6), collapses around them. The rich man in today's Gospel also lives like a king—dressed in royal purple and fine linen (see 1 Maccabees 8:14). The rich man symbolizes Israel's failure to keep the Old Covenant, to heed the commandments of Moses and the prophets. This is the sin of the rulers in today's First Reading. Born to the nation God favored first, they could claim Abraham as their father. But for their failure to give—their inheritance is taken away. The rulers are exiled from their homeland. The rich man is punished with an exile far greater—eternity with a “great chasm” fixed between himself and God. In this world, the rich and powerful make a name for themselves (see Genesis 11:4) and dine sumptuously, while the poor remain anonymous, refused an invitation to their feasts. But notice that the Lord today knows Lazarus by name, and Joseph in his sufferings—while the leaders and the rich man have no name. Today's liturgy is a call to repentance—to heed the warning of One who was raised from the dead. To lay hold of the eternal life He promises, we must pursue righteousness, keep the commandment of love, as Paul exhorts in today's Epistle. “The Lord loves the just,” we sing in today's Psalm. And in this Eucharist we have a foretaste of the love that will be ours in the next life—when He will raise the lowly to the heavenly banquet with Abraham and the prophets (see Luke 13:28), where we too will rest our heads on the bosom of our Lord (see John 13:23).

Pope Francis Generation
Bonus episode! The Magisterium and the Development of Doctrine

Pope Francis Generation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 96:36


Earlier this week, Dustin Quick invited me onto his podcast, "Holy Smokes: Cigars, Catholicism, and Conversation" to talk about the Magisterium and the development of doctrine! I encounter a lot of hesitancy in the Church with the idea that Church teaching changes. I used to believe the idea that the Church's teaching has stayed the same for 2,000 years and that saying anything otherwise undermines the authority of the Magisterium and even the authenticity of Catholicism itself. However, when I looked at the Church's own teaching I found out something different. Enjoy this bonus episode and be sure to check out Dustin's Youtube channel: www.youtube.com/etruth1 Also, watch for Season Two to drop in October! ABOUT DUSTIN QUICK In 2020, Dustin Quick, a convert from Protestantism and Islam, started a podcast called Holy Smokes: Cigars, Catholicism, and Conversation on YouTube. Dustin seeks to show how the Church is the restoration and fulfillment of the First Temple in Jerusalem - everything from the Liturgy, to Mariology, to the Papacy. He also delves into church history, apologetics, and contemporary church issues. Thus far, Dustin's guests have included folks like Brant Pitre, Mike Aquilina, John Bergsma, Margaret Barker, Tim Staples, Jimmy Akin, Scott Hahn, Matt Fradd, Michael Lofton, and many more! Dustin's channel can be found at www.youtube.com/etruth1 ABOUT POPE FRANCIS GENERATION Pope Francis Generation is the show for Catholics struggling with the Church's teaching, who feel like they might not belong in the Church anymore, and who still hunger for a God of love and goodness. Hosted by Paul Fahey, a professional catechist, and Dominic de Souza, someone who needs catechesis. Together, we're taking our own look at the Catholic Church– her teachings and practices- from 3 views that changed our world: the Kerygma, the forgotten doctrine of theosis, and the teachings of Pope Francis. Together, with you, we're the Pope Francis Generation. SUPPORT THIS SHOW: This show is brought to you by Pope Francis Generation, a project to explore Catholicism inspired by Pope Francis. Founded by Paul Fahey, you can follow the newsletter, join the group, and become a supporting member. Your donations allow us to create the resource you're enjoying now as well as much more. Paid subscribers get to watch each episode before everyone else, join private Q&As, and pitch ideas for future episodes! Check out: popefrancisgeneration.com ABOUT PAUL FAHEY Paul lives in Michigan with my wife, Kristina, and four kids. He's a catechist, retreat leader, counseling student, as well as a contributor and co-founder of Where Peter Is. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/popefrancisgeneration/message

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
How Wisdom Stems From Fear of the Lord - Thursday of the Twenty-Fifth Week in Ordinary Time

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 13:51


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for Thursday of the Twenty-Fifth Week in Ordinary Time by Dr. Scott Hahn. Ordinary Weekday First Reading: Ecclesiastes 1: 2-11 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 90: 3-4, 5-6, 12-13, 14 and 17bc Alleluia: John 14: 6 Gospel: Luke 9: 7-9 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

Letters From Home
How Wisdom Stems From Fear of the Lord - Thursday of the Twenty-Fifth Week in Ordinary Time

Letters From Home

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 13:51


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for Thursday of the Twenty-Fifth Week in Ordinary Time by Dr. Scott Hahn. Ordinary Weekday First Reading: Ecclesiastes 1: 2-11 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 90: 3-4, 5-6, 12-13, 14 and 17bc Alleluia: John 14: 6 Gospel: Luke 9: 7-9 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

The Road to Emmaus with Scott Hahn
The Eucharist in Hebrews

The Road to Emmaus with Scott Hahn

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 38:32


Interested in more content by Scott Hahn and the St. Paul Center? Visit stpaulcenter.com today!   Click here to sign up for The Word of the Lord, a Sunday Mass Reflections bible study with Scott Hahn and John Bergsma.

The Road to Emmaus with Scott Hahn
The Eucharist in Hebrews

The Road to Emmaus with Scott Hahn

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 38:32


Interested in more content by Scott Hahn and the St. Paul Center? Visit stpaulcenter.com today!   Click here to sign up for The Word of the Lord, a Sunday Mass Reflections bible study with Scott Hahn and John Bergsma.

Letters From Home
How Love Is the Logic of the Law - Monday of the Twenty-Fifth Week of Ordinary Time

Letters From Home

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 14:57


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for Monday of the Twenty-Fifth Week of Ordinary Time by Dr. Scott Hahn. Ordinary Weekday / Januarius, Bishop, Martyr First Reading: Proverbs 3: 27-34 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 15: 2-3a, 3bc-4ab, 5 Alleluia: Matthew 5: 16 Gospel: Luke 8: 16-18 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
How Love Is the Logic of the Law - Monday of the Twenty-Fifth Week of Ordinary Time

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 14:57


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for Monday of the Twenty-Fifth Week of Ordinary Time by Dr. Scott Hahn. Ordinary Weekday / Januarius, Bishop, Martyr First Reading: Proverbs 3: 27-34 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 15: 2-3a, 3bc-4ab, 5 Alleluia: Matthew 5: 16 Gospel: Luke 8: 16-18 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

Among Wolves
Episode LII - The 2022 Las Vegas Diocesan Conference

Among Wolves

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 80:19


In this 2 parter we first talk about our good friend and Bishop GLT and his opening address to the conference including the 5 goals he would like to accomplish during the Eucharistic revival. Then we briefly discuss Dr. Scott Hahn's evening Keynote after our good buddy Garret brings us a couple glasses of wine “the finest wine of Idaho”. Key take away is that the Eucharist was a “Sacrament before it was a document” great line! There are two fantastic interviews here in part 1, the first with Tim Glemkowski, the Executive Director of the National Eucharistic Congress, and the second with the Diocese's own Anna Forsberg, the Director of Children's Ministry at Holy Spirit Catholic Church. With Tim, Neil wasn't there so I interviewed him about the Eucharistic revival and how to keep it from just being an event and how we can make it a catalyst for something in our lives. Anna talks with Neil and I about Sabbath rest and she recommends a book called The Relentless Elimination of Hurry (https://www.amazon.com/Ruthless-Elimination-Hurry-Emotionally-Spiritually/dp/0525653090.) Gratuitous Sound Clips: * All Ebony Maw Scenes (Including Endgame) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hnI5RK7NWCI)

Letters From Home
Prudent Stewards: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Twenty-Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Letters From Home

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 3:00


Readings: Amos 8:4–7 Psalm 113:1–2, 4–6, 7–8 1 Timothy 2:1–8 Luke 16:1–13 The steward in today's Gospel confronts the reality that he can't go on living the way he has been. He is under judgment. He must give account for what he has done. The exploiters of the poor in today's First Reading are also about to be pulled down, to be thrust from their stations (see Isaiah 22:19). Servants of mammon, or money, they're so in love with wealth that they reduce the poor to objects; they despise the new moons and sabbaths—the observances and holy days of God (see Leviticus 23:24; Exodus 20:8). Their only hope is to follow the steward's path. He is no model of repentance. But he makes a prudent calculation—to use his last hours in charge of his master's property to show mercy to others, to relieve their debts. He is a child of this world, driven by a purely selfish motive—to make friends and be welcomed into the homes of his master's debtors. Yet his prudence is commended as an example to us, the children of light (see 1 Thessalonians 5:5; Ephesians 5:8). We too must realize, as the steward does, that what we have is not honestly ours, but in truth belongs to another, our Master. All the mammon in the world could not have paid the debt we owe our Master. So He paid it for us. He gave His life as a ransom for all, as we hear in today's Epistle. God wants everyone to be saved, even kings and princes, even the lovers of money (see Luke 16:14). But we cannot serve two Masters. By His grace, we should choose to be, as we sing in today's Psalm, “servants of the Lord.” We serve Him by using what He has entrusted us with to give alms, to lift the lowly from the dust and dunghills of this world. By this we will gain what is ours and be welcomed into eternal dwellings, the many mansions of the Father's house (see John 14:2).

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
Prudent Stewards: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Twenty-Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 3:00


Readings: Amos 8:4–7 Psalm 113:1–2, 4–6, 7–8 1 Timothy 2:1–8 Luke 16:1–13 The steward in today's Gospel confronts the reality that he can't go on living the way he has been. He is under judgment. He must give account for what he has done. The exploiters of the poor in today's First Reading are also about to be pulled down, to be thrust from their stations (see Isaiah 22:19). Servants of mammon, or money, they're so in love with wealth that they reduce the poor to objects; they despise the new moons and sabbaths—the observances and holy days of God (see Leviticus 23:24; Exodus 20:8). Their only hope is to follow the steward's path. He is no model of repentance. But he makes a prudent calculation—to use his last hours in charge of his master's property to show mercy to others, to relieve their debts. He is a child of this world, driven by a purely selfish motive—to make friends and be welcomed into the homes of his master's debtors. Yet his prudence is commended as an example to us, the children of light (see 1 Thessalonians 5:5; Ephesians 5:8). We too must realize, as the steward does, that what we have is not honestly ours, but in truth belongs to another, our Master. All the mammon in the world could not have paid the debt we owe our Master. So He paid it for us. He gave His life as a ransom for all, as we hear in today's Epistle. God wants everyone to be saved, even kings and princes, even the lovers of money (see Luke 16:14). But we cannot serve two Masters. By His grace, we should choose to be, as we sing in today's Psalm, “servants of the Lord.” We serve Him by using what He has entrusted us with to give alms, to lift the lowly from the dust and dunghills of this world. By this we will gain what is ours and be welcomed into eternal dwellings, the many mansions of the Father's house (see John 14:2).

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
Why Obedience Requires Suffering - The Memorial of Our Lady of Sorrows

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 18:40


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for the Memorial of Our Lady of Sorrows by Dr. Scott Hahn. Our Lady of Sorrows Obligatory Memorial First Reading: First Corinthians 15: 1-11 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 118: 1b-2, 16ab-17, 28 Gospel: John 19: 25-27 or Luke 2: 33-35 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

Letters From Home
Why Obedience Requires Suffering - The Memorial of Our Lady of Sorrows

Letters From Home

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 18:40


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for the Memorial of Our Lady of Sorrows by Dr. Scott Hahn. Our Lady of Sorrows Obligatory Memorial First Reading: First Corinthians 15: 1-11 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 118: 1b-2, 16ab-17, 28 Gospel: John 19: 25-27 or Luke 2: 33-35 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

Letters From Home
Why We Should Embrace the Cross - The Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross

Letters From Home

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 13:00


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for the Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross by Dr. John Bergsma. EXALTATION OF THE HOLY CROSS Feast First Reading: Numbers 21: 4b-9 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 78: 1bc-2, 34-35, 36-37, 38 Second Reading: Philippians 2: 6-11 Gospel: John 3: 13-17 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
Why We Should Embrace the Cross - The Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 13:00


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for the Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross by Dr. John Bergsma. EXALTATION OF THE HOLY CROSS Feast First Reading: Numbers 21: 4b-9 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 78: 1bc-2, 34-35, 36-37, 38 Second Reading: Philippians 2: 6-11 Gospel: John 3: 13-17 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

Letters From Home
How Mary Is Like a Magnifying Glass - The Memorial of the Most Holy Name of Mary

Letters From Home

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 15:24


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for the Memorial of the Most Holy Name of Mary by Dr. Scott Hahn. Ordinary Weekday / Holy Name of Mary First Reading: Galatians 4: 4-7 Responsorial Psalm: Luke 1: 46-47, 48-49, 50-51, 52-53, 54-55 Alleluia: Luke 1: 45 Gospel: Luke 1: 39-47 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
How Mary Is Like a Magnifying Glass - The Memorial of the Most Holy Name of Mary

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 15:24


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for the Memorial of the Most Holy Name of Mary by Dr. Scott Hahn. Ordinary Weekday / Holy Name of Mary First Reading: Galatians 4: 4-7 Responsorial Psalm: Luke 1: 46-47, 48-49, 50-51, 52-53, 54-55 Alleluia: Luke 1: 45 Gospel: Luke 1: 39-47 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

Letters From Home
Seeking the Lost: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Twenty-Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Letters From Home

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 3:00


Readings: Exodus 32:7–11, 13–14 Psalm 51:3–4, 12–13, 17, 19 1 Timothy 1:12–17 Luke 15:1–10 The episode in today's First Reading has been called “Israel's original sin.” Freed from bondage, born as a people of God in the covenant at Sinai, Israel turned aside from His ways and fell to worshipping a golden calf. Moses implores God's mercy, just as Jesus will later intercede for the whole human race. Just as He still pleads for sinners at God's right hand and through the ministry of the Church. Israel's sin is the sin of the world. It is your sin and mine. Ransomed from death and made His children in Baptism, we fall prey to the idols of this world. We remain a “stiff-necked people,” resisting His will for us like an ox refuses the plowman's yoke (see Jeremiah 7:26). Like Israel, in our sin we push God away and reject our divine sonship. Once He called us “my people” (see Exodus 3:10; 6:7). But our sin makes us “no people,” people He should, in justice, disown (see Deuteronomy 32:21; 1 Peter 2:10). Yet in His mercy, He is faithful to the covenant He swore by His own self in Jesus. In Jesus, God comes to Israel and to each of us—as a shepherd to seek the lost (see Ezekiel 34:11–16), to carry us back to the heavenly feast, the perpetual heritage promised long ago to Abraham's children. “Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners,” Paul cries in today's Epistle. These are the happiest words the world has ever known. Because of Jesus, as Paul himself can testify, even the blasphemer and persecutor can seek His mercy. As the sinners do in today's Gospel, we draw near to listen to Him. In this Eucharist, we bring Him the acceptable sacrifice we sing of in today's Psalm—our hearts, humbled and contrite. In the company of His angels and saints, we rejoice that He has wiped out our offense. We celebrate with Him that we have turned from the evil way that we might live (see Ezekiel 18:23).

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
Seeking the Lost: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Twenty-Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 3:00


Readings: Exodus 32:7–11, 13–14 Psalm 51:3–4, 12–13, 17, 19 1 Timothy 1:12–17 Luke 15:1–10 The episode in today's First Reading has been called “Israel's original sin.” Freed from bondage, born as a people of God in the covenant at Sinai, Israel turned aside from His ways and fell to worshipping a golden calf. Moses implores God's mercy, just as Jesus will later intercede for the whole human race. Just as He still pleads for sinners at God's right hand and through the ministry of the Church. Israel's sin is the sin of the world. It is your sin and mine. Ransomed from death and made His children in Baptism, we fall prey to the idols of this world. We remain a “stiff-necked people,” resisting His will for us like an ox refuses the plowman's yoke (see Jeremiah 7:26). Like Israel, in our sin we push God away and reject our divine sonship. Once He called us “my people” (see Exodus 3:10; 6:7). But our sin makes us “no people,” people He should, in justice, disown (see Deuteronomy 32:21; 1 Peter 2:10). Yet in His mercy, He is faithful to the covenant He swore by His own self in Jesus. In Jesus, God comes to Israel and to each of us—as a shepherd to seek the lost (see Ezekiel 34:11–16), to carry us back to the heavenly feast, the perpetual heritage promised long ago to Abraham's children. “Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners,” Paul cries in today's Epistle. These are the happiest words the world has ever known. Because of Jesus, as Paul himself can testify, even the blasphemer and persecutor can seek His mercy. As the sinners do in today's Gospel, we draw near to listen to Him. In this Eucharist, we bring Him the acceptable sacrifice we sing of in today's Psalm—our hearts, humbled and contrite. In the company of His angels and saints, we rejoice that He has wiped out our offense. We celebrate with Him that we have turned from the evil way that we might live (see Ezekiel 18:23).

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
Why Authentic Friendship Is Important - The Memorial of St. Peter Claver

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 10:48


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for the Memorial of St. Peter Claver by Dr. John Bergsma. Peter Claver, Priest, Religious, Missionary Obligatory Memorial First Reading: First Corinthians 9: 16-19, 22b-27 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 84: 3, 4, 5-6, 12 Alleluia: John 17: 17b, 17a Gospel: Luke 6: 39-42 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

Letters From Home
Why Authentic Friendship Is Important - The Memorial of St. Peter Claver

Letters From Home

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 10:48


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for the Memorial of St. Peter Claver by Dr. John Bergsma. Peter Claver, Priest, Religious, Missionary Obligatory Memorial First Reading: First Corinthians 9: 16-19, 22b-27 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 84: 3, 4, 5-6, 12 Alleluia: John 17: 17b, 17a Gospel: Luke 6: 39-42 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

Letters From Home
Why Jesus Was Born in Bethlehem - The Feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Letters From Home

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 24:42


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for the Feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary by Dr. Scott Hahn. Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary Feast First Reading: Micah 5: 1-4a or Romans 8: 28-30 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 13: 6ab, 6c Gospel: Matthew 1: 1-16, 18-23 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
Why Jesus Was Born in Bethlehem - The Feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 24:42


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for the Feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary by Dr. Scott Hahn. Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary Feast First Reading: Micah 5: 1-4a or Romans 8: 28-30 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 13: 6ab, 6c Gospel: Matthew 1: 1-16, 18-23 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

Letters From Home
The Urgency of the Gospel - Wednesday of the Twenty-Third Week of Ordinary Time

Letters From Home

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 13:11


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for Wednesday of the Twenty-Third Week of Ordinary Time by Dr. John Bergsma. Ordinary Weekday First Reading: First Corinthians 7: 25-31 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 45: 11-12, 14-15, 16-17 Alleluia: Luke 6: 23ab Gospel: Luke 6: 20-26 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
The Urgency of the Gospel - Wednesday of the Twenty-Third Week of Ordinary Time

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 13:11


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for Wednesday of the Twenty-Third Week of Ordinary Time by Dr. John Bergsma. Ordinary Weekday First Reading: First Corinthians 7: 25-31 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 45: 11-12, 14-15, 16-17 Alleluia: Luke 6: 23ab Gospel: Luke 6: 20-26 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

The Road to Emmaus with Scott Hahn
The Transforming Power of God's Holiness in Scripture

The Road to Emmaus with Scott Hahn

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 38:39


WHAT IS HOLINESS? Catholics are taught to prize holiness—to admire it in others and to strive for it in their own lives. But we're never quite told what holiness is. In Holy Is His Name: The Transforming Power of God's Holiness in Scripture, Scott Hahn seeks to define the term in order to help us better understand our relationship with holiness. Tracing the meaning of holiness first through the Old Testament and then the New, Hahn masterfully reveals how God gradually transmits his holiness to his people—through creation, right worship, and more—and ultimately transforms them through the sharing of his divine life.

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
Why Excommunication Is an Act of Mercy - Monday of the Twenty-Third Week of Ordinary Time

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 19:40


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for Monday of the Twenty-Third Week of Ordinary Time by Dr. Scott Hahn. Ordinary Weekday / Labor Day First Reading: First Corinthians 5: 1-8 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 5: 5-6, 7, 12 Alleluia: John 10: 27 Gospel: Luke 6: 6-11 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

Letters From Home
Why Excommunication Is an Act of Mercy - Monday of the Twenty-Third Week of Ordinary Time

Letters From Home

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 19:40


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for Monday of the Twenty-Third Week of Ordinary Time by Dr. Scott Hahn. Ordinary Weekday / Labor Day First Reading: First Corinthians 5: 1-8 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 5: 5-6, 7, 12 Alleluia: John 10: 27 Gospel: Luke 6: 6-11 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

Cafeteria Catholics
Dr. Scott Hahn: Steubenville Talk #6

Cafeteria Catholics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 58:15


www.cafeteriacatholicscomehome.comhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m35t68b4me8

Cafeteria Catholics
Dr. Scott Hahn: Steubenville Talk #4

Cafeteria Catholics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 54:18


www.cafeteriacatholicscomehome.comhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m35t68b4me8

Letters From Home
Counting the Cost: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Twenty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time

Letters From Home

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 3:00


Readings: Wisdom 9:13–18 Psalm 90:3–6, 12–17 Philemon 1:9–10, 12–17 Luke 14:25–33 Like a king making ready for battle or a contractor about to build a tower, we have to count the cost as we set out to follow Jesus. Our Lord today is telling us up front the sacrifice it will take. His words aren't addressed to His chosen few, the Twelve, but rather to the “great crowds”—to anyone, to whoever wishes to be His disciple. That only makes His call all the more stark and uncompromising. We are to “hate” our old lives, to renounce all the earthly things we rely upon, to choose Him above every person and possession. Again He tells us that the things we have—even our family ties and obligations—can become an excuse, an obstacle that keeps us from giving ourselves completely to Him (see Luke 9:23–26, 57–62). Jesus brings us the saving wisdom we are promised in today's First Reading. He is that saving Wisdom. Weighed down by many earthly concerns, the burdens of our body and its needs, we could never see beyond the things of this world; we could never detect God's heavenly design and intention. So in His mercy He sent us His Spirit, His Wisdom from on high, to make straight our path to Him. Jesus Himself paid the price to free us from the sentence imposed on Adam, which we recall in today's Psalm (see Genesis 2:7; 2:19). No more will the work of our hands be an affliction; no more are we destined to turn back to dust. Like Onesimus in today's Epistle, we have been redeemed. We have been given a new family and a new inheritance, made children of the Father, brothers and sisters in the Lord. We are free now to come after Him, to serve Him—no longer slaves to the ties of our past lives. In Christ, all our yesterdays have passed. We live in what the Psalm today beautifully describes as the daybreak, ready to be filled with His kindness. For He has given us wisdom of heart and taught us to number our days aright.

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
Counting the Cost: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Twenty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 3:00


Readings: Wisdom 9:13–18 Psalm 90:3–6, 12–17 Philemon 1:9–10, 12–17 Luke 14:25–33 Like a king making ready for battle or a contractor about to build a tower, we have to count the cost as we set out to follow Jesus. Our Lord today is telling us up front the sacrifice it will take. His words aren't addressed to His chosen few, the Twelve, but rather to the “great crowds”—to anyone, to whoever wishes to be His disciple. That only makes His call all the more stark and uncompromising. We are to “hate” our old lives, to renounce all the earthly things we rely upon, to choose Him above every person and possession. Again He tells us that the things we have—even our family ties and obligations—can become an excuse, an obstacle that keeps us from giving ourselves completely to Him (see Luke 9:23–26, 57–62). Jesus brings us the saving wisdom we are promised in today's First Reading. He is that saving Wisdom. Weighed down by many earthly concerns, the burdens of our body and its needs, we could never see beyond the things of this world; we could never detect God's heavenly design and intention. So in His mercy He sent us His Spirit, His Wisdom from on high, to make straight our path to Him. Jesus Himself paid the price to free us from the sentence imposed on Adam, which we recall in today's Psalm (see Genesis 2:7; 2:19). No more will the work of our hands be an affliction; no more are we destined to turn back to dust. Like Onesimus in today's Epistle, we have been redeemed. We have been given a new family and a new inheritance, made children of the Father, brothers and sisters in the Lord. We are free now to come after Him, to serve Him—no longer slaves to the ties of our past lives. In Christ, all our yesterdays have passed. We live in what the Psalm today beautifully describes as the daybreak, ready to be filled with His kindness. For He has given us wisdom of heart and taught us to number our days aright.

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
Why We Can't Judge Someone's Heart - Friday of the Twenty-Second Week of Ordinary Time

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 11:34


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for Friday of the Twenty-Second Week of Ordinary Time by Dr. John Bergsma. Ordinary Weekday First Reading: First Corinthians 4: 1-5 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 37: 3-4, 5-6, 27-28, 39-40 Alleluia: John 8: 12 Gospel: Luke 5: 33-39 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

Letters From Home
Why We Can't Judge Someone's Heart - Friday of the Twenty-Second Week of Ordinary Time

Letters From Home

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 11:34


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for Friday of the Twenty-Second Week of Ordinary Time by Dr. John Bergsma. Ordinary Weekday First Reading: First Corinthians 4: 1-5 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 37: 3-4, 5-6, 27-28, 39-40 Alleluia: John 8: 12 Gospel: Luke 5: 33-39 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
How To Respond to God With Obedience and Trust - Thursday of the Twenty-Second Week of Ordinary Time

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 13:19


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for Thursday of the Twenty-Second Week of Ordinary Time by Dr. Scott Hahn. Ordinary Weekday First Reading: First Corinthians 3: 18-23 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 24: 1bc-2, 3-4ab, 5-6 Alleluia: Matthew 4: 19 Gospel: Luke 5: 1-11 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

Letters From Home
How To Respond to God With Obedience and Trust - Thursday of the Twenty-Second Week of Ordinary Time

Letters From Home

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 13:19


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for Thursday of the Twenty-Second Week of Ordinary Time by Dr. Scott Hahn. Ordinary Weekday First Reading: First Corinthians 3: 18-23 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 24: 1bc-2, 3-4ab, 5-6 Alleluia: Matthew 4: 19 Gospel: Luke 5: 1-11 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
Why Prayer Should Be a Priority - Wednesday of the Twenty-Second Week of Ordinary Time

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 10:24


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for Wednesday of the Twenty-Second Week of Ordinary Time by Dr. John Bergsma. Ordinary Weekday First Reading: First Corinthians 3: 1-9 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 33: 12-13, 14-15, 20-21 Alleluia: Luke 4: 18 Gospel: Luke 4: 38-44 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
Why We Need To Imitate St. John the Baptist - The Memorial of the Passion of St. John the Baptist

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 16:15


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for the Memorial of the Passion of St. John the Baptist by Dr. Scott Hahn. Martyrdom of John the Baptist Obligatory Memorial First Reading: Jeremiah 1: 17-19 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 71:1-2, 3-4a, 5-6ab, 15ab, and 17 Alleluia: Matthew 5: 10 Gospel: Mark 6: 17-29 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
To Go up Higher: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Twenty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 3:00


Readings: Sirach 3:17–18, 20, 28–29 Psalm 68:4–7,10–11 Hebrews 12:18–19, 22–24 Luke 14:1, 7–14 We come to the wedding banquet of heaven by way of humility and charity. This is the fatherly instruction we hear in today's First Reading, and the message of today's Gospel. Jesus is not talking simply about good table manners. He is revealing the way of the kingdom, in which the one who would be greatest would be the servant of all (see Luke 22:24–27). This is the way, too, that the Father has shown us down through the ages—filling the hungry, sending the rich away empty, lifting up the lowly, pulling down the proud (see Luke 1:52–53). We again call to mind the Exodus in today's Psalm—how in His goodness the Lord led the Israelites from imprisonment to prosperity, rained down bread from heaven, made them His inheritance, becoming a “Father of orphans.” We now have also gained a share of His inheritance. We are to live humbly, knowing we are not worthy to receive from His table (see Luke 6:7; 15:21). We are to give alms, remembering we were ransomed from sin by the price of His blood (see 1 Corinthians 6:19–20). The Lord promises that if we are humble we will be exalted and find favor with God; that if we are kind to those who can never repay us, we will atone for sins and find blessing in the resurrection of the righteous. We anticipate the fulfillment of those promises in every Eucharist, today's Epistle tells us. In the Mass, we enter the festal gathering of the angels and the firstborn children of God. It is the liturgy of the heavenly Jerusalem in which Jesus is the high priest, the King who calls us to come up higher (see Proverbs 25:6–7).

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
How Jesus Wants Us To Use Our Talents - The Memorial of St. Monica

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 12:24


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for the Memorial of St. Monica by Mr. Clement Harrold. Monica, Married Woman Obligatory Memorial First Reading: First Corinthians 1: 26-31 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 33: 12-13, 18-19, 20-21 Alleluia: John 13: 34 Gospel: Matthew 25: 14-30 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
Why People Reject the Gospel - Friday of the Twenty-First Week of Ordinary Time

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 11:37


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for Friday of the Twenty-First Week of Ordinary Time by Dr. John Bergsma. Ordinary Weekday First Reading: First Corinthians 1: 17-25 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 33: 1-2, 4-5, 10-11 Alleluia: Luke 21: 36 Gospel: Matthew 25: 1-13 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
Why We Give God Praise - Thursday of the Twenty-First Week of Ordinary Time

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 16:26


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for Thursday of the Twenty-First Week of Ordinary Time by Dr. Scott Hahn. Ordinary Weekday / Louis of France, Married Man / Joseph Calasanz, Priest, Religious Founder First Reading: First Corinthians 1: 1-9 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 145: 2-3, 4-5, 6-7 Alleluia: Matthew 24: 42a, 44 Gospel: Matthew 24: 42-51 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

The Road to Emmaus with Scott Hahn

Scott Hahn discusses his latest book Holy Is His Name: The Transforming Power of God's Holiness in Scripture alongside guest host Rob Corzine. His book focuses on the meaning of holiness and how God gradually transmits His holiness to His people. Subscribe to The Road to Emmaus at Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or wherever you listen to podcasts.    Learn More  Pre-Order Scott Hahn's book, Holy Is His Name: The Transforming Power of God's Holiness in Scripture. Read more about holiness in this blog post by Scott Hahn. Ralph Martin discusses the call to holiness in the blog.

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
How the Apostles Are the Foundation of the Church - The Feast of St. Bartholomew

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 14:23


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for the Feast of St. Bartholomew by Dr. John Bergsma. Bartholomew, Apostle Feast First Reading: Revelation 21: 9b-14 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 145: 10-11, 12-13, 17-18 Alleluia: John 1: 49b Gospel: John 1: 45-51 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com