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Movement that supports the creation of a Jewish homeland

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Culture Wars Podcast
E. Michael Jones on Jewish Nazis

Culture Wars Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021


Dr. E. Michael Jones returns to Our Interesting Time to discuss his article Jewish Nazis. We talk about how Zionism and National Socialism are actually kindred racial doctrines. _____ Dr. E. Michael Jones is a prolific Catholic writer, lecturer, journalist, and Editor of Culture Wars Magazine who seeks to defend traditional Catholic teachings and values from those seeking to undermine them. NEW: Jewish Revolutionary Spirit 2nd ed. BUY NOW----> fidelitypress.org/jewish-revolutionary-spirit Buy Dr. Jones books: https://www.fidelitypress.org/ Subscribe to Culture Wars Magazine: Culturewars.com Donate: https://culturewars.com/donate Follow Dr. E. Michael Jones: https://linktr.ee/EMichaelJones

Madlik Podcast – Torah Thoughts on Judaism From a Post-Orthodox Jew

Parshat Noach - Join Geoffrey Stern, Rabbi Adam Mintz and Pastor Dumisani Washington of IBSI - Institute for Black Solidarity with Israel and Christians United For Israel for a live recording of a discussion on Clubhouse Friday October 8th with the Pastor regarding his book Zionism and the Black Church: Why Standing with Israel Will Be a Defining Issue for Christians of Color in the 21st Century. We follow a less traveled path down Noah's family tree. We discover the Biblical Mission of Africa and the bond between the Children of Shem and the Children of Ham. Sefaria Source Sheet: www.sefaria.org/sheets/352058  Transcript: Geoffrey Stern  00:00 [To Reverend Dumisani Washington] Thank you so much for being with us. On on our clubhouse when you come up to the platform, we say first of all that you're coming up to the bimah [the podium or platform in a synagogue from which the Torah and Prophets are read from]. And then second of all, when we make you a presenter, we give you smicha... So that means that you are ordinated. So instead of Reverend, we'll call you Reb. Is that okay? Dumisani Washington  00:20 That sounds good to me. Sounds good, no problem. Geoffrey Stern  00:23 So anyway, welcome to Madlik. Madlik is every week at four o'clock, and we do record it and post it as a podcast on Sunday. And if you listen to it, and you'd like what you hear, feel free to share it and give us a few stars. And what we do is disruptive Torah. And what we mean by disruptive Torah is we look at the ancient text of the Torah, with maybe a new lens, or to see a new angle. And today, I'm delighted to say that we're not only looking at it through a new lens, but we're looking at it through another lens, a lens of a pastor, of a man of God, who we will learn about his mission. I heard about it on clubhouse one evening, I was scrolling, and I stumbled upon you Reverend, and you're on a mission and you see Judaism and you see Zionism from a whole new perspective. So I want to thank you for coming on. And I want to say that, as I told you, in my email that I sent you that you know, every week about Saturday on Shabbat, on Sunday, I start thinking about what I'm going to pick as a subject matter for the coming Madlik session. And I purchased your book maybe two months ago, and it was sitting by the side of my bed, and for some reason, and of course, I'm sure there are no coincidences in this world. I picked it up this Shabbat. And it starts with our portion of Noah, it starts by talking about the line less traveled by us Jews of Shem's son Ham. And I should say that nothing is written for no reason in the Bible. And when it gives you a genealogy, it's because of what comes in the future. And many of us Jews will look at the genealogy in Genesis 10. And focus on Shem... with Semites. And that's where the name comes from. And we go down that path, and your book starts. And of course, I should say that your book is called "Zionism and the Black Church, Why Standing with Israel will be a Defining issue for Christians of color in the 21st Century". And it begins by traveling down this path less taken, of Ham. Welcome to Madlik.  But if you could begin by touching upon our portion of the week, no off and and and discussing what you see in it, and maybe your mission. Dumisani Washington  03:06 Absolutely. And thank you, again, Rabbi for having me on. Yes, there are six chapters in "Zionism in the Black Church". And the first chapter is entitled The African Biblical Tie to Israel. And so we as I say, in the book started the beginning, right, we start at the beginning of the Scriptures, and so as you know, between the two portions of "Bereshi"  I believe whether the towards the end is when Noah was first introduced, but of course in "Noach" there's the explanation of the nations where all the nations of the earth come from, from Noah's three sons Shem, Ham, and Jafet. And so we recognize that in the Scriptures, it is said that Ham has four sons. And there's a couple of unique things as you know, you read the book, that the scriptures that in the law of Moses deals, Psalms and some of the prophets, there's a term that's given several times in the scripture about Ham's descendants harms the sentence differently, then either Jafet or Shem.  The land of Ham is actually something that's in the scriptures. And I don't know what that Hebrew word is ... "Aretz Ham" ... I never looked at that part of it, Rabbi but it talks about that, which is really interesting because there's not, to my knowledge, and I've kind of looked at for a little while, a similar rendering like the Land of Japhet or Land of Shem. Right? We're obviously the genealogy is there, right? But there's not the same thing that deals with the land and the peoples .... interesting and we've come to know that of the four sides of Hem, which are in order Kush, which you know, is where obviously the Hebrew for later on Ethiopia I believe is a Greek word, but from that region Mitzrayim, which is Egypt. Fut or Put which is Libya, and then Canaan, which is Canaan, right? So those four sons who come from him. But interestingly in the scriptures when it says land of Ham, it almost exclusively refers to Egypt and Ethiopia, what we would call today, Africa, right? This region. And again, you're talking about an antiquity these regions were much broader in size. And they are today if you look at the map today, you see Egypt as a small state and go down to the south, west, south east, and you'll see Ethiopia then you see Yemen, you see Kenya, well, obviously all those states weren't there that happened much later in modernity is particularly after the colonial period where those nations were carved up by a few states in Europe, and they were given certain names everything right, but these were regions in the Bible. And so Kush, the land of Kush, and the land of Mitzrayim, they're actually dealt with many, many times. Right? After the words obviously "Israel" and "Jerusalem". You have the word Ethiopia, I believe one of the Ethiopian scholar says some 54 times or something like that the word Ethiopia actually comes up in the Bible, obviously not as many times as Israel or Jerusalem but more than virtually any other nation other than Egypt. Right? So Egypt obviously that we know too. Africa plays a huge role in Israel's story right? The 430 years in slavery is in Africa, right? The Torah was received at Sinai: Africa. All these things happen in Africa. At some point God tells Jeremiah during the time of the impending doom, the exile that will happen at the hand of of Nebuchadnezzar and God says to to the Israelites to the Judeans, and "don't run down into Egypt, Egypt won't be able to save you." Why does he say that? Well, because historically the Israelites would go to Egypt when it until it got safer, right? For those Christians who may be on the call, you'll know that in the New Testament, Jesus, his parents take him down into Egypt because Herod's gonna kill him. Right? So there's this ongoing relationship between Ham and Shem, that's very intertwined. Moses, his wife, or his second wife, depending on how you interpret it....  Some of the sages. She's Ethiopian, right? She's kushite. So you have this interchangeable thing all the time, throughout the scriptures, but actually starts with the genealogy. And I'll say just one last thing, rabbis ..... we're opening up. This is also unfortunately, as I mentioned, the book as you know, the misnomer of the quote unquote, "Curse of Ham", as we know in the text, Ham is never cursed for what happens with Noah it is Canaan that is cursed. And he actually says, a curse that Canaan become a servant of servants shall he be, even though it was Ham who however you interpreted.... I've heard many different interpretations of "uncovered the nakedness he saw his father, naked," but somehow, for whatever reason, Noah cursed Canaan, not Ham.  Who is Canaan...  is one of him so's, his fourth son, as we know those who are listening, you may know that it is The Curse of Ham, quote, unquote, that has been used sadly, unfortunately, among many other things as a justification of the slavery of Africans. Right? That somehow, Africans are quote, unquote, "Cursed of Ham", therefore, the transatlantic slave trade, the trans Saharan slave trade, those things are somehow...  God prescribed these things in the Bible, the curse was making him black. That's why he's like all those things that are nowhere in the text whatsoever, right? skin color is not in the text. slavery as a descendant of Ham. None of those things are in the text. What's in the text? Is that Canaan is cursed for that? And so we start there, Rabbi, and from there trying to walk out this whole Israel Africa thing. Adam Mintz  08:47 First of all WOW... thank you so much. I just want to clarify in terms of color, I think that's a very interesting thing. It's very possible that in the biblical period, everybody was dark. Dumisani Washington  09:00 Yes, sir. I mentioned that in the book as well. But yes, sir. Yes, yeah. All right. Sorry, Adam Mintz  09:04 I didn't see that in your book. But that's important, you know, because a lot of people are caught up in this color thing. Did you know that there's a distinction, we don't know it for sure but it makes sense that everybody was dark in those periods. So that the difference in color was not significant. So when, when Moses marries goes to Ethiopia, maybe is king of Ethiopia, and marries an Ethiopian. And the idea is that he marries a foreigner. The fact that she's darker may or may not have been true.   Dumisani Washington  09:39 Yes, absolutely. No, thank you Rabbi. And I do touch on that, as well. We say in the terms in this modern term, even in my book, I use the term Christians of color and I don't usually use those terms just in when I'm speaking. I did it that way in the title so that it would be presented in a way that is going to deal with some provocative things but hopefully the people that they read it they'll see what I mean by that and if you're talking about the Israelite people, the Hebrew people they are what I call an afro Asiatic people. Israel is still at that at the point of where those two continents meet right Southwest Asia northeast Africa is landlocked with Egypt I tell people God opened up the Red Sea because he wanted to right ... He's big and bad and he can do what he wants to do but you can literally; I wouldn't recommend it obviously, but you could literally walk from Egypt to Israel and you always have been able to for 1000s of years that has always been the case and so you have a people that in terms of skin tone or whatever... Yes, absolutely, they would be what we would call today quote unquote people of color right and so unfortunately particularly in our country we all know race and colorism is such a huge topic and it's often so divisive and it's used in so many different ways and we know much of that goes back to whether slavery, Jim Crow, people being assigned work obviously based on how dark or light they are all of those things but the problem as you all know is that those things aren't in the Bible right? There's no God likes this person doesn't like this person, this person's dark this person's like, that type of thing. But again, that's what men do, we are fallen creatures, we read what we want to read into the text, and then we use it unfortunately, in a way that's not helpful. Let me just say and pause here, I can tell you that as a Christian pastor, over the years of my just delving into what we often call the Jewish roots of our faith, by studying Torah with rabbis and with other Jewish scholars, my faith has been more important to me than ever in that it helps me understand even more so right, what is the Hebrew in this word here? What do the sages say about that, that's been a fascinating journey for me, over the last 30 some odd years since I've been doing this particular work. Geoffrey Stern  11:58 So I just want to jump in, you said so many things. But there is in this verse that we are reading today, the word "ashkenaz", he was one of the children of of Shem, and you quote, an Ethiopian Rabbi named Ephraim Isaac, and this is a sample of some of the humor in your book or the sense of discovery. And somebody said to him, You don't look Jewish. And he said:, "Ethiopia is mentioned the Bible over 50 times, but Poland not once." And I feel like that was, that was a great line. And what it really talks to is our preconceptions, and your book, and your vision, and your mission breaks preconceptions of what it is to be a Jew, what the mission of a Jew is, but most importantly, what the relationship is between the Jewish people and the African people. And one of the things that you touched upon was the sense of Mitzraim and Kush , and in your book, you really talk about how many times they're interchangeable, because really, it is the same area and those of us who think about Mitzrayim, or Egypt, we focus on the Exodus story, we focus on the pharaoh story. But as you mentioned, the prophets later on, we're having to talk to the Jews about not going back, because ultimately, the experience in Egypt was always favorable, it was our neighbor, and it was our place of refuge. Abraham goes down there with Sarah twice, Jacob sends his kids down there during a time of famine. The relationship and the reference to a Ham and to Mitzrayim  and to Kush is a very positive one. And yes, it does say in our week's parsha of all of the children, it says, "b'artzetam v'goyehem" , that they have a special language, and they have a family and they have a land. So the fact that we are neighbors is so important in the biblical context. So I said if we were going to walk down this wonderful path, and I would love for a second to talk about your mission about reuniting our two peoples and some of the challenges that you have. Clearly you don't speak to groups like us very much, although I think that I'm going to have an opportunity later to say that I think you should, because there's so much that we can learn. But what is your mission? How did you discover it? And what are your challenges? Dumisani Washington  14:40 Well, I'll do it concise, just because I don't want to take up too much time to firstly touch as much as we can. I am the founder and CEO of an organization called The Institute for Black Solidarity with Israel. I started it in 2013 but for about nearly seven years, I was not as active I started it. I did a lot of touring and a lot of speaking throughout the United States, churches, sometimes synagogues as well. And with this mission, it was a mission that was really placed in my heart. Actually in 2012, my first trip to Israel, I went as a guest of Christians United for Israel, I would come later on to join the staff with CUFA. But I was a guest pastor, I knew some friends who were part of the organization. And the short version of that story was my first tip ever, I'm in Israel, I'm at the Western Wall of the kotel. And I have a very intense experience in which I feel although Africa and Israel were passions of mine already, but the fusing of those two things together and a real work in which we continue to strengthen the alliance between Israel and Africa. And then obviously, in the States in the black and Jewish community. And there and finished the first edition of the book now, what you have there Rabbi is the second edition. And we started this organization for that very purpose to do both of those things continue to strengthen the black Jewish relationship, and also the Israel Africa Alliance. And so the challenges have been probably more than any other thing disinformation, right? There's a lot of false information that's there, when it comes to those things that would seek to divide and separate when you're talking about whether Africa Israel, now we're talking about the modern state of Israel, obviously, the rebirth of Israel in 1948. Israel's close ties with African nations throughout the continent, starting especially with Golda Meir, the foreign minister, all the way up into the 70s, where you have, as I mentioned in the book, Israel has more embassies throughout Africa than any other nation other than the United States, African economy, some of them are thriving, a great deal. You have a lot of synergy between the African nations and Israel. And after the Yom Kippur War in 1973, like never before Israel's enemies target that relationship between Israel and its African neighbors for different reasons. One of those is voting in the United Nations, right? And that became very much of a challenge. So one of the greatest challenges is, is information. What we share in the book and when we do our organization, we teach what we call an organization "Authentic History” is really simply telling what happened, how did something [happen]. Whether we're talking about biblically, whether we're discussing the parsha or we're talking about historically, right? We're talking about what the relationship was, and is. Why those connections there? And I'll just give one quick example if you're talking about black Jewish synergy in the United States, not just Dr. King's relationship with Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel in the civil rights community, not that it happened, right? But why, what was that synergy about? Right? So we've delve into that. We share from the documents from the Rabbinical Assembly; Dr. King's most famous words regarding Israel that were recorded 10 days before he was killed, right, why? And as a pastor, what we call a prophetic moment. Why 10 days before he's taken from us, is he telling the black community in the world to stand with Israel with all of our mind and protect its right to exist? Why is he saying these things? What's so important about it. And even the generation before? Why was it a black and Jewish man who changed the trajectory of this nation, Booker T. Washington, and Julius Rosenwald; millions of now first and second generation, slave; free slaves, right? but who had no access to education, not in a broader sense, and why that synergy saw some 5400 Rosenwald schools built throughout the segregated south. We touch on those historical points, and we delve into why that black Jewish synergy has been so powerful for so many people for so long. So that is our mission to strengthen those ties, because we believe that there's a great future ahead. Geoffrey Stern  19:05 You did such amazing research. I mean, I can tell you I never knew that Herzl said about Africa, "that once I have witnessed the redemption of Israel, my people, I wish to assist in the redemption of the Africans." And that is taking a small quote out of a full paragraph where the histories of the two people are so similar. I mean, it comes to us as a pleasant surprise, these synergies but it shouldn't because both our peoples have really traversed and continue to reverse the same pathway. And you quote Marcus Garvey and even Malcolm X and William Dubois. Malcolm X says "Pan Africanism will do for the people of African descent all over the world, the same that Zionism has done for Jews. All over the world." there was a sincere admiration for this miracle of a people returning to its land, we were talking before you came on about this whole kind of image of an ark. And it reminds you of Odesyuss... and it reminds you of all of these stories of man going on this heroic journey to find their their roots to come back, gain, experience and come back to their homeland, to their Aretz.. On the one hand, your job should be very simple. I guess, like any other fights, the closer you are, the bigger the friction can be. And there's nothing bigger than the friction between brothers. But it's such a challenge to address, as you say the misinformation. Dumisani Washington  20:51 Absolutely. And this is, again, why that's our primary goal. And then as part of what our mission is, we have launched here just recently, an initiative called The PEACE initiative. And PEACE is an acronym for Plan for Education, Advocacy, and Community Engagement, and the short version of that, again: We recruit young, black American and African young people from certain cities throughout the United States, a group of them, they go to a 16 week study course having some of the same conversations we're having now, including the modern state of Israel, ancient Israel, the United Nations, all these things that intersect when it comes to the black Jewish relations, then they will travel to Israel for about 10 days, and returned to the cities from where they've been recruited, and be the hub of black Jewish synergy in their communities. We believe with our organization that one of the reasons for the synergy that we've seen in the past, whether it was at the turn of the century with Booker T Washington, and Julius Rosenwald, or the mid part of the century with Dr. King and Rabbi Heschel, right now we are in different challenges, there are challenges that face particularly the more vulnerable black communities. And we see that that synergy could really address so many issues, whether it's education, whether it's jobs, those types of things, they can be really be addressed in a very holistic way. And really harnessing that synergy between the black and the Jewish community. And this is what we are doing. An Israel advocacy that is also rooted in these communities. And it's amazing. We see already rabbis and black pastors are working together all over the country. So that continues to happen. But we want to highlight those things even more and go even further in meeting some of the challenges what we call MC ambassadors will be leading that in different cities across the country. Geoffrey Stern  22:02 That's amazing. I want to come back to this sense of self-discovery and pride. And we always talk about it from our own perspective. So if you're African American, you want to make sure that your children believe that black is beautiful, that they come from an amazing heritage to be proud of who they are. And if you're Jewish, you want the same thing. But it seems to me, and you kind of cage the question in this way, "Why standing with Israel will be a defining issue for Christians of color", when we as Jews can see ourselves in the black community as we did during the civil rights movement that redeems us. And that empowers us. And I think what you're saying, and I don't want to put words into your mouth, but the same thing works in reverse. That in a sense, when the African community can recognize in Israel, its own story. It also can find a part of itself. Is there any truth there? Dumisani Washington  23:50 I believe so Rabbi. I believe that that's exactly as a matter of fact, what we saw was the synergy. So let me use the example and go back to the early 1900s with Booker T. Washington, Julius Rosenwald. The way that story happens, as you may know is that Booker T Washington writes his seminal book "Up From Slavery". Julius Rosenwald, who lives in Chicago at the time, is very active in his community. As a matter of fact, he was active, using his wealth; of those of you who don't know of Sears Roebuck fame, he is the one who took his company to this whole different level, economically and everything. And so with his wealth as a businessman, he's helping the Jews who are being persecuted in Russia. And one of his own testimony, I don't say this part of the book, but I kind of alluded to it, that here he is driving to work from the suburbs to where his factory is where his store is, and he's passing by throngs of black people who've left the South, right? looking for a better life, but they're living in very, very bad conditions, a lot of poverty and everything. And he says to himself, basically, if I'm going to do all of this to help Russian Jews right, way over the other side of the world, and I have this human crisis right here, where I live, I want to be able to do that and his, his Rabbi was Emile Hirsch, one of the founding members of the NAACP. Right? So his Rabbi encourages him. And we see this with our Jewish brothers and sisters all the time, see yourself, do help, do use your wealth, use your ability, right? To help. And so he reads Booker T. Washington's book he's taken with him, they begin to correspond. And Booker T. Washington says, Here's how you can help me I'm trying to build schools for my people who don't have access. And Rabbi to your point. Here is this man, this Jewish man who is very well aware of his history, he knows his People's History of persecution and struggle and triumph, right? Very much sees himself in that black story, and then he uses his ability. It's amazing even what he does; there's a Rosenwald film about Rosenwald schools, I believe his children were the ones who produced it. And they were saying that what he actually did was pretty ingenious, he put up a third of the money, the black community raised a third of the money, and then he challenged the broader white community to partner with them and bring the last third and that is how those Rosenwald Schools began.  Because what he wanted to do, he wanted to see people come together, he wanted to see them all work together. Even though Booker T. Washington passes away only three years into that, right, that venture continues on Julius Rosenwald goes and sits on the board of the Tuskegee college, Tuskegee University, right? There's this long connection that's there. So in that struggle, the black American community, and he connected with this black American leader, the one of the most prominent of the time, Booker T, Washington, and they, like I tell people, changed the world. Like, can we imagine what the United States would have been if you had those millions of now freed slaves, right? with no access, and particularly those who are living in the Jim Crow South, no access whatsoever to education, Would the Harlem Renaissance have become what it become, with the black Wall Street, whether it was in Tulsa, whether in Philadelphia, these things that explode because of the access to education to now these first and second generations of people coming out of slavery, right? So I believe that that's the case and which is why I'll say again, here today, some of those challenges are there, some of the challenges are different than they were, obviously 50, 60, 70, 80 years ago, but we believe in organization that those challenges can be met with that same amazing synergy between the black and the Jewish community. Geoffrey Stern  27:26 A lot of people would argue that the rift or the change of the relationship between the African American community and the Jewish community was when the Jews or Israel stopped being looked at as the David in the Goliath story and we won the Six Day War. And how do you ensure that the facts are told, but also as you climb out of the pit, and as you achieve your goals, you shouldn't be necessarily punished for being successful. Success is not a sin. It's an inspiration. But it seems to me that's one of the challenges that we have, especially in the Jewish community for our next generation of children, who really do see ourselves not as the minority and don't see ourselves anymore mirrored in the African American community. Dumisani Washington  28:25 But one of my favorite things about the Jewish tradition of the Seder, is that you all lean and recline in the Seder today, and you tell your children, when we had the first one, we sat with our sandals on, our staff, in our hand, our belts ....because we were slaves leaving slavery, but now we are no longer. And that whole ethos of telling children, right? There's a strong parallel in the black American community, right? The whole point of going from struggle to a place where you can live in peace or at the very least, you recognize and realize the sacrifice of the people who came before you right? And I won't step into the controversial for lots of different reasons, we'll be able to unpack it, but let me just say this, for the black American experience when you're talking I often teach this in our sermons and other things that arc .... and let me say again, no, people are monolith. Obviously we just kind of put that on the table, all the Jews arent' alike all black Americans aren't alike..... Having said that, there is an overarching story when you talk about black Americans, who, from slavery to Jim Crow, segregation, black codes, all of those types of things to the modern era. And that story cannot accurately be told without talking about God and His people. In other words, when you're talking about the spirituals "Go Down Moses". "Joshua Fit the Battle of Jericho" and I talked about that in the book, these songs that are rooted in the scriptures, most of the time in, in the Tanakh, our Jewish brothers and sisters' side of the Bible. I mean, sometimes in the New Testament, most of the time, these songs are being sung in hope. And that hope was realized, right? It's not an Negro spiritual song technically, but I put it in that category, part of the greatest one ever. I mean, how it culminates would be "Lift Every Voice and Sing" us a song that today has all these political things connected to it for lots of different unfortunate reasons. But when James Weldon Johnson wrote that song, wrote it as a poem? Those stanzas and anybody listening to this, I want to tell Google that Google Lift Every Voice and Sing"; just read the words. And this was a very powerful, very, very much God and God's love, and our hope and our faith and our trust, and our honoring the people who came before us; all of those things. And he talked about being free. Now, it's written in 1899. Right? You still have questions. I mean, there are no laws against lynching there going on, it's still crushing racism. However, he as a father in the black community is not only acknowledging what God has done, there's amazing things that are happening. One of the economist's that I quote, in my book, Thomas Sol said that the black community after slavery, and less than 50 years after slavery went from 0% literacy to almost 50% literacy, in that half a century, something economic historians say has never happened before. And now you're later on, you're talking about the black Wall Street, you're talking about black oil barons and landowners and factory owners, right? You're talking about this black middle class emerging. There's been no civil rights bill, right? There's been no Pell grants for school. These things don't even exist yet. We're talking about the 19 teens and the 1920s. You're talking about black people who had previously been slaves for hundreds of years. Why am I saying all that we as a people know full well; if we know our history, know full well what it is to come from all of those dire situations into a place of blessing, even though there may be struggles just like our Jewish brothers and sisters. We are convinced an organization that as we know, as a black community, particularly younger people that we are talking with, and teaching, as we know and appreciate our history, not the history that's regurgitated in terms of media and, and for political purposes. But truly our history, there is a great deal to be proud of about that. And to see, as I said in the sermon a couple of months ago, not only does it not a victim narrative, I descended from superheroes, my people went through slavery, Jim Crow, and still build on Wall Street still built the Tuskegee Institute. Still, we're soldiers who fighting for their own freedom in the Civil War. I mean, you're talking on and on and on things that they should have never been able to accomplish. When I consider what they accomplished with not very much help often. I recognize the greatness of the heritage that I come from, then that allows me to see an Israel rise like a phoenix from the ashes and not spurn that but recognize that our Jewish brothers and sisters have gone through millennia of this and Israel then to be celebrated, not denigrated. Adam Mintz  33:12 Thank you. We want to thank you. Your passion, and your insight is really brought a kind of a new insight to our discussion here. We really want to thank you, you know, we at Madlik we start on time and we end on time, Shabbat is about to begin in just a little while. Hopefully we'll be able to invite you back in the future as we continue this conversation. But I know I join Geoffrey and everybody on the call and everybody who's gonna listen to the podcast. Thank you for joining us and for really your insight and your passion. You really leave us with so much to think about as we begin the Shabbat. Dumisani Washington  33:51 Thank you. Thank you for having me. Adam Mintz  33:53 Thank you Geoffrey, Shabbat Shalom, everybody, Geoffrey Stern  33:55 Shabbat Shalom. And Reb Dumisani, you mentioned the songs. There's a whole chapter in your book about Negro spirituals. And as the rabbi said, w are approaching the Shabbat. And as you observe the Sunday we observed Saturday, but you know that the secret of living without a land or being on a difficult mission is that Sabbath, the strength of the Sabbath, and the connection between Noah and the word Menucha which is "rest" is obvious. And there was a great poet named Yehuda halevi. And he wrote a poem about the Yona; the dove that Noah sent out of the ark to see if there was dry land. And he he said that on Shabbat. Yom Shabbaton Eyn L'shkoach, "the day of Shabbat you cannot forget"  Zechru l'reach Hanichoach"  He also uses Reach Nichoach which is a pleasing scent,Yonah Matzah Bominoach, the yonah, the dove found on it rest v'shom ynuchu yegiah koach  and there in the Shabbat , in that ark of rest on that ark of Sunday or Saturday is where we all gain strength. So I wish you continued success in all that you do. And that this Shabbat and this Sunday we all gather the strength to continue our mission. But I really do hope that we get another chance to study Torah together. And I really hope that all of the listeners go out and buy your book, Zionism in the Black Church because it is an absolute thrill. And I understand you're coming out with a new book that's going to talk more about the Jewish people and the various colors and flavors that we come in. Dumisani Washington  35:55 Hopefully to put that out next year sometime. Absolutely. Geoffrey Stern  35:59 Fantastic. Well thank you so much so Shabbat Shalom and we are we are in your debt. Dumisani Washington  36:05 Thank you. Shabbat Shalom and looking forward to bye bye   Music: Lift Every Voice and Sing - Melinda Dulittle https://youtu.be/6Dtk9h1gZOI 

The Land of Israel Network
The Jewish Story: Zionism is Racism

The Land of Israel Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 47:17


If Israel is meant to be a light to the nations, then how they see us offers illuminating insights. In this episode we meet the Non-Aligned Movement, Israel's relationship with Africa, President Mobutu of Zaire, Ugandan leader Idi Amin, US ambassador to the UN Daniel Patrick Moynihan, and Israeli delegate to the UN Hadassa Ben-Itto. All of them want to know whether the national liberation movement of the Jewish people is racist and akin to apartheid, and what it means for oppressed peoples of the world.

Exploring Jewish Thought
4.1 A Life Committed to Klal Yisrael- My Interview with Rav Doron Perez

Exploring Jewish Thought

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 51:13


Rav Doron and I spoke about religious Zionism, the importance of strengthening Jewish communities all over the world, and his transformation of The Mizrachi World Movement.

The Real News Podcast
The spiritual void at the heart of Israeli militarism

The Real News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 23:12


“I identify as an Arab Jew,” Hadar Cohen recently wrote in +972 Magazine. “My family has lived in Jerusalem for over 10 generations, and my other ancestral cities include Aleppo in Syria, Baghdad in Iraq, and Shiraz in Iran, along with a small village in Kurdistan.” And yet, the Zionist project has no place for Mizrahi Jews like Cohen. “There is no space for Arabness in Zionism. I need to repress, erase, and hide my Arab lifestyle and assimilate into European notions of Jewishness.”In the first segment of this week's Marc Steiner Show, we bring you the latest installment of our ongoing series “Not in Our Name,” which highlights the diverse voices of Jewish activists, artists, intellectuals, and others who are speaking out against the Israeli occupation. In this installment, Marc talks with Cohen about living as an Arab Jew in Israel's “racial caste system,” and about the crisis ofspirituality underpinning Israel's militarist occupation. Hadar Cohen is a Mizrahi feminist multi-media artist, Jewish mystic, healer, and educator. She is the founder of Feminism All Night, a project that designs communal immersive learning experiences about feminism and spirituality.

Identity/Crisis
Meir Kahane, American Radical?

Identity/Crisis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 42:31


In this episode, Yehuda Kurtzer chats with Hartman senior fellow Shaul Magid (Dartmouth University) about his new book Meir Kahane: The Public Life and Political Thought of an American Jewish Radical which offers an intellectual history of American Judaism and its political challenges – liberalism, race, communism, Zionism, radicalism – the poles through which American Jews have traveled in the past 60 years. Can the story of a radical thinker and controversial politician shed light on the Jewish experience in the US and, later, in Israel? Links: Meir Kahane debating Yitz Greenberg: https://archive.org/details/RabbiKahaneDebatesProf.Greenberg360p Meir Kahane debating Alan Dershowitz: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ykrwmaKrLg

Madlik Podcast – Torah Thoughts on Judaism From a Post-Orthodox Jew

Parshat Bereshit - Exile and Return is a seminal Jewish theme we normally associate with Exodus and the narrative of the Jewish People. We discover this theme in the first chapters of Genesis and in so doing discover the Hebrew Bible's universal message regarding the trauma of birth, the anxiety of life and the rewards of creativity and expansion. Sefaria Source Sheet: www.sefaria.org/sheets/349788 Transcript: Geoffrey Stern  00:00 Welcome to Madlik disruptive Torah. And every week, we record half an hour of what I call disruptive Torah, where we kind of look at the Torah with a new lens and maybe from a new angle and try to share that sense of discovery with our participants. So thank you all for joining. And we are going to start with Bereshit. And for those of you who have been listening and participating in clubhouse, I think you already know that one of my favorite commentators is Rashi. He wrote a commentary on all of the books of the Torah, including the Talmud, the Mishanh, I just an unbelievable encyclopedic review of the Holy Writ of the Jewish people. But it's not the expanse, it's the detail and he always brings a midrash or a quotation that is absolutely insightful and actually kind of positions the whole discussion. So the first verse of the Torah we all know "In the beginning God created the heaven in the earth." And the first Rashi starts as follows: "Rabbi Isaac said, the Torah, which is the law book of Israel, should have started with Exodus 12: 2 the first commandment "This month shall be unto you the first of the months", which is the first commandment given to Israel. "What is the reason" asks this Rabbi Isaac "then that it commences with the account of creation?" Pretty good question. We'll discuss the question in a second and its premise. And he answers "because of the thought expressed in Psalms, "God declared to his people the strength of his works, in order that he might give them the heritage of the nations.".  Rashi continues, "for should the people of the world say to Israel, 'are robbers because you took by force the lands of the seven nations of Canaan', Israel may reply to them and say, from Psalms, all the earth belongs to the Holy One, bless be he. He created it, and gave it to whom he pleased, when he willed, he gave it to them. And when he willed he took it away from them and gave it to us." So Wow, what a way to begin studying the the narratives of the cosmology, the creation of the world, and our foreparents with a question of, well, what are we even reading this for? The Torah is a book of laws. It's a book that gives us the "hora'aot" the direction, the path that we should walk down. Why are we wasting our time with this mythology? And then he gives an answer, but let's stop for a second Rabbi and discuss the premise of his very question. Adam Mintz  03:09 The premise is very problematic. The premise is that the only purpose of the book is to teach us laws. Ramban, Nachmanidies, the great Spanish scholar who lived in the 1200s. he disagrees with Rashi, here at the beginning of the Torah immediately. He says that the purpose of the book of Bereshit, of Genesis is not to teach us laws, but it's to teach us moral cause. He has a great phrase, the phrase is "Ma'aseh avot, siman l'banim" "the actions of our forefathers our models to the children", and therefore that's the reason we have all the stories in Bereshit. Rashi seems to argue with that. Rashi seems to say that, no, it's not about morality, it's about law. And if you think it's about law, there's no reason for the book of Bereshit. So Rashi needs to explain that it's to teach us about our connection to the land of Israel. So in that very first Rashi, there actually is a fundamental question about the purpose of Torah. Geoffrey Stern  04:22 So I love the fact that you quoted  "Ma'aseh avot, siman l'banim" which literally as you say means "the are stories of oure foreparents. "siman" is a sign for the children. And of course, you could expand and say "avot" could also mean as in "avot melacha" or "Pikei Avot", it could mean the most basic primary principles. So the stories of our roots, of our beginnings are is a siman is a sign for its children. But in a sense, "sign" is very similar to myth. Meaning to say that even Ramban quoting this Talmudic phrase, there's almost the recognition that we're not just telling stories here that either the stories actually occurred but they have deeper symbolic meaning. Or it's not that important that every one of them occurred because the symbolic meaning is what drives us. And if you think about that for a second, I'm not sure that is that different from what Rashi ends up answering, which is okay, the reason we need this is because these stories justify the Jewish people's coming from another place and coming into the land that was at the time that they came in occupied by another people. And the ethical, moral, or you could even say political message, the "siman" that we are getting from these stories is that you know what, no one owns anything. The earth belongs to the Lord. And he can give and he can take and that's a big message, I think for life. But but really they're all kind of on the same page from the fact that none of them, correct me if I'm wrong, is interested or believes that these stories by themselves as a historical record, belong in our holy book, they have to symbolize something, they have to inspire us in some way. Would you agree to that? Adam Mintz  06:51 I would agree. Now, the idea of myths is a fascinating idea. I actually spoke about this right before Yizkor. There's the new book by Dara Horn. the book by Dara Horn is some title like people, "Why do people love dead Jews?" It's a provocative title. But she has a collection of essays. She raises the following idea, which is a great idea. You know, we're all brought up Geoffrey with the idea that the way that we all got our American names is our forefathers, our grandparents came to Ellis Island, and they only knew Yiddish. So they were asked by the by the representative at Ellis Island: "What's your name?" And they answered, "shoyn Forgesin", which means in Yiddish "I forgot". And the representative said, okay, your name is "Shawn Fergeson"And that's how everybody got their American names. They didn't know any English so they made up something and that became their American names. Dara Horn, the author points out that that is not true. We know that that's not true. What's true is that in the 1930s, we have multiple court records about Jews who actually went to courts in America, especially in New York, to change their names, because there was so much anti semitism in America, and they couldn't get jobs and they couldn't get into schools, and they couldn't get into colleges. And therefore they they asked to change their names. She said, Where does the myth come from? The myth comes from the fact that we as American Jews want to protect America, we want to protect the Jewish relationship with America. So therefore, that myth of Ellis Island is a much better myth than the truth. And I think Geoffrey, that's a very interesting idea here. When you talk about the myth of the stories in the book of Genesis. Did they happen? Did they not happen? The point is, it doesn't make any difference whether they happened or they didn't happen. But each one of them grapples with a moral issue. And not all of them are easily resolvable. Let's take Geoffrey the most difficult one of all, God says to Abraham, I want you to sacrifice your son. Now, the question is not whether that actually happens, or not, the question is why Abraham said, Okay, I'll sacrifice my son. What right did he have to sacrifice his son even at God's Word? So the entire book of Genesis is made up of these  "Ma'aseh avot, siman l'banim" these stories, these myths that come to teach us a moral lesson. So I think Dara Horn is really on to something, that sometimes the myth is more important. Then the fact because it comes to teach us something important. Geoffrey Stern  10:05 I think that's great. And clearly, these are myths that resonated, certainly when the Torah was edited, put together, and then re-read over and over again, these are myths that work picked for a reason. And then by simply being repeated so many times they take on a life of their own. And you get to see how different generations and different people react and interact with them. I have to say, as an aside here, that Elie Wiesel wrote a book on Rashi. And it struck Elie Wiesel that the first Rabbi that Rashi quotes is named Rabbi Yitzchok. And of course Rahi's name is Shlomo ben Yitzchak. So the truth is, this is a rabbi that comes from the Yalkut Shimoni it was not his father. But again, it does give another rendering to  "Ma'aseh avot, siman l'banim" that we are looking almost like a Rorschach inkblot at the same stories that were looked at, by our forefathers, our forbearers in the case of Judaism, by Christians, by Muslims, by scholars. And that's kind of fascinating, too, I just find that the term that the stories of our past are a sign to us is so so pregnant with meaning, and makes it all so exciting. And getting back to your point about the sacrifice of Isaac, you know, another way to look at myths, and we're gonna start talking about how the psychoanalysts looked at it is like a dream as well. And, you know, the thing about a dream, especially a nightmare, is it's made to resolve certain things, talking about it, hearing it, repeating it over and over again. And then we can manufacture the ending sometimes. So the ending does become important. So I've always thought that the punch line of the sacrifice, or the binding of Isaac was that he wasn't sacrificed. But that is a story that we are going to discuss in the future. What I want to spend the rest of today's discussion talking about is something that I thought about for the first time this year. And that is that when Rashi  brings up this point, that why do we need the stories? And he answers with a seemingly very provincial, national answer saying, well, it's in order that we should not be called colonizers, because we're going to come and we're going to, at a certain point in time, take this land that we admit, we are not originally from. And we need these stories to justify that land grab, so to speak. But what it really comes down to, and this is the insight that I want to spend the rest of the day talking about, is that the earth belongs to the Lord. And I would say, it's arbitrary that we own this, or we sit here or we live there. And then there's this other issue, which I really want to focus on, which is that none of us belong to a particular place in the sense we're all alienated from it. From the beginning of the Torah, we're going to see more than I think any of us ever expected. The theme of exile, over and over again in the first, just four chapters of Genesis. And Rashi is even here talking about this concept of exile and return that comes up much later in the narrative. But he brings it to the beginning of the Torah and that I think is not provincial is not partisan, but actually is one of the primary themes of the Bible. So in terms of the Bible itself, we all know that Adam in the second chapter, it has the story of man being created by himself. Maybe he was androgynous we don't know. But after looking for a helpmeet throughout the animal kingdom, God fashioned his rib in 2: 22 And it says, "and he had taken from the man into the woman, and he brought her to the man, then the man said, this one at last is bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh, this one shall be called woman." So here you have this beautiful image of the unity of mankind of a man cleaving to his wife. And then it goes on to say, "for from men, she was taken. Hence, a man leaves his father and mother, and clings to his wife, so that they shall become one." So we have already in the second chapter, the first instance of this tension between being unitary, whole, complete, and being separated. And there's almost this sense of the separation is a necessary part of our identity. Ever think, and I'm not even talking about the amount of times in the process of creation itself. We had God is doing "havdalah" where he's creating by separating Earth from land, sky from the abode. Have you ever thought about it this way Rabbi Adam? Adam Mintz  16:21 Yeah, well, the idea of separating.... you brought up a whole bunch of different things here. Let's talk about the last thing, the idea of separating the entire story of the six days of creation, is the story about separating, separating night from day, light from darkness, animals from people, the sun and the moon, everything has its opposite. What do you make of that? Why do you think that's so important, that in the story of creation, everything has its opposite? Geoffrey Stern  17:03 Well, I think again, it gives us an insight into the biblical mind, the mind of the Bible's sense of God. And so many things about Genesis is about either dividing or choosing and when you choose, you also are selecting one thing and rejecting something else. It just seems so written in to the fabric. You can almost make the case that creation itself was not so much out of nothing, which is a Greek term, a modern term, but was this act of separating and repositioning. And it does become something that if you use it as a lens, enables you to understand much about the different narratives. In this particular case. I focused first upon man and wife, which is kind of, you know, the beginnings of society, separate from their father and mother, who is the father and mother of Adam and Eve. It's God in a sense, and of course, that story gets picked up a few verses later, in chapter three, when the famous Original Sin occurs. And at this point, God says to the woman, I will give you birth pangs, "b'etzev tilady", you shall give birth in pain, when you bear children, and your husband will rule over you, but also will struggle to pull crops from the ground, "by the sweat of your brow, shall you have bred to eat". Some of the modern day psychologists look at this whole story as the beginning of the "trauma of birth", that here, man was first created without those birth pangs. And he was first created without needing to separate the crop from the earth and to create creation, so to speak. And the first story of creation is this major separation where we are thrown out of the Garden of Eden. So again, everything that we've been talking about till now has focused on this separation. You can even call it alienation That we are torn apart. And that's how on the one hand, you could make an argument creation happens. But certainly it's the source of a lot of anxiety. Adam Mintz  20:12 I mean, there's no question that that's right. A couple of things you brought up, number one, the idea of Adam and Eve not having parents. But then you have the story in chapter three of the sin. And God really takes the position of Adam and Eve's parents in the sense that he's the one who reprimands them, and he's the one who punishes them. I was always wondering, Geoffrey, the rabbis say an amazing thing. The rabbis say that Adam and Eve were created, they were put in the Garden of Eden, but they never actually slept a night in the Garden of Eden. They couldn't even make it one night, before nightfall they had already sinned. Why do you think it is that there was somehow a need for the Torah to tell us that they sinned so quickly, that part of the nature of human beings is to sin? What do you make of that? Geoffrey Stern  21:16 Well, it's certainly the source or the intention of that type of explanation of the myth would come from the fact that it was it was just a taste, it was just so fleeting. And it happened in an instant. And I think that what I kind of come up with is, first of all, how final the divorce, how final the expulsion from the Garden of Eden was, you have these Cherubim, you have these angels with a sword, standing guard over it. It almost sounds as if it was part of the birth pang. It was a rupture, it had to occur, that everything that lies ahead, is after this fact. And that this story was there less to tell you about the bliss of the Garden of Eden, but more to focus you on the project that begins after the expulsion. That's my read. But it's true. We don't spend a whole lot of time on the pearly gates, the beauty of the Garden of Eden, it's almost as though On the flip side, the Torah doesn't spend much time, or any time at all, I would argue on describing a heaven. on describing a pearly end it's all about what lies ahead of us.. Adam Mintz  23:08 That point is such a good point. Because the Garden of Eden is much more important symbolically as the place where they will go back to, right? When we say when somebody dies, "b'gan eden t'he menuchatam"  that their resting place will be in the garden of Eden. So the Garden of Eden becomes a place we're going back to not a place that we spend very much time in. That's a fascinating idea. Geoffrey Stern  23:42 So that's a great segue for me to talk a little bit about the psychoanalytic analysts and Otto Rank, wrote two two books 10 years apart. One was called "The myth of the birth of the hero", and the other was called "The trauma of birth". And in the myth of the birth of the hero, he gives much credit to Freud and Freud actually, I wrote on this subject in a book he wrote called "Moses and Monotheism" and that is, and we'll discuss this when we get to Moses, is how almost to a "T" in every one of the ancient mythologies whether it's Romulus and Remus, or whoever. There's this story about the Royal heir, the prince who is expelled from the home, maybe it's because the father is afraid that he's going to come and usurp the throne, has to go out .... many times he's put into a raft through a boat,  is raised by animals or simple people. And then you have like Odysseus, a whole way of coming back. Ultimately, if you get to the Oedipus story, he then comes back and he kills his father. He gets his mother and all is resolved. And that's what Rank writes about in this "myth of the birth of the hero". But he makes a major change when he talks about "the trauma of birth". And what he says there is that there's something even more primal, then this, Oedipus and this hero, and what that is, we are all born of women, so to speak, we all are ruptured and thrown into the world. And we are separated from that warm place of our origins. And unlike the Oedipus myth, he claims and I think he's right, and that's why I'm bringing it up now is that it doesn't necessarily or it does necessarily not get resolved. In other words, none of us can go back into the womb. And he brings the Cherubim outside of Eden, because he does see the creation of Eve from Adam, as a way to, to kind of detour around the birth of of humans as it actually occurs. And he does talk about taking the apple off the tree as giving birth to it and separating it. And what he talks about is the whole sin, the whole original sin that all of us human beings have to try to address and not necessarily resolve is this original disruption in our lives. And what argues is that you do not go back to Eden. And I do think you're absolutely right, that we talk about "Gan Eden Mi'Kedem". And we talk about in our prayers going back to Eden, but Eden does not feature as much in Judaism as in Christianity, the Fall does not feature as much. But certainly, there's this sense that the trauma of birth is something that we can't put back, you can't put the genie back inside of the bottle. And that's what kind of is intriguing to me. And again, when we look at myths, some myths, you can wrap with a bow, and they resolve themselves, and others are ones that are just the human condition that we have to deal with. Adam Mintz  27:29 Yes, that is right. And you say that here in the in the very beginning of the Torah, we're really introduced to different kinds of myths. Now we talk about myths. Then you talk about the story of fratricide where Cain kills Abel. That's very much not a myth. That feels very real, doesn't it? Geoffrey Stern  27:56 Well, it absolutely does. But thank you for bringing it up. Because that, I would say is the fourth instance, in our parsha this week, where we have this sense of being a wanderer on the earth, the punishment that Cain gets goes back to the same thing that happened with Adam. It says, If in Genesis 412, it says, "If you till the soil, it shall no longer yield its strength to you." So this birth process will no longer be natural. And then it says you shall become a ceaseless wanderer on the earth. "Na v'nad ti'hiye b'aretz" Then he goes on to say that I "geyrashta" I will divorce you from the face of the earth. And it uses the phrase that we discovered in Deuteronomy at the end of the story, and it goes "umipanecha Ester" and I will hide my face from you. So again, these themes that we thought developed all the way at the end, were there all the way at the beginning as kernels. And then finally, where does Cain go to live and This to me is discovering humor in the Bible as well. "veYashav b'eretz Nod", and he settled he dwelt in the land of Nod.  Nod is the same word for Na v'nad", that is he settled in the land of wandering. Adam Mintz  28:05 Which means he never settled.   Geoffrey Stern  29:34 He absolutely never settled. He felt responsible for death, he had that guilt. And again, you can say yes, it's a real story. It's not a myth. But if you look at it in terms of all of the narratives that we've seen in Genesis, so far, through this lens, in the first four chapters, it's all about being sent into exile, alienated from one's source ripped away from whether it's the tree, whether it's the father, be it God or one's parents.... cleaving on to each other, to me, it just is so amazing that even though we're not talking about the story of the Jewish people that Rashi focused us on to, the idea is in humanity is this same trope of, of literally from the beginning, we are separated. And if you ask the same question that Rashi asks, from that perspective, then the answer is it needs to start here, because the journey is all about somehow regaining that unity that  wholeness, that, that completion. So what what I also discovered is this amazing essay by Bialik, and it's called "Jewish Dualism". And he looks at all of Jewish history, he picks up on where Rashi left off. And he says that, you know, we've been out of the land more than we've been in it. Every time we've left, we've expanded, we've grown. He talks about "a group which adapts itself to the ways of life of the whole world, but nonetheless remains a people dwelling apart." And that's part of the other narrative. And he talks about this strength that it gives us. And I think he wrote it in the same year, as Otto Rank, wrote his book, and they both come to an interesting conclusion. And that is that it's not all a negative thing, that from each expansion and contraction from each exile and return. We enrich ourselves and we enrich others. And Bialik, who is considered the poet Laureate of Zionism, even ends his essay with the following statement, which is mind blowing, he says "And who knows, perhaps after hundreds of years, [of living in the State of Israel], we will be emboldened to make another Exodus, which will lead to the spreading of our spirit over the world, and assiduously striving towards glory." So he really sees it as a pathway going forward of enrichment that is intrinsic to the biblical project. And Rank talks about artists and philosophers and religionists who are able to take this trauma of being born against one's will being passed out and separated from one's natural mother parents from God from this sense of unity and he sees it also as a potential for amazing creation. And He therefore doesn't call the hero the hero anymore he calls it the artist which is kind of fascinating to me so I really do think that the the question is a good one Why do we read these stories? It's a question we all have to ask ourselves and how we answer it really says a lot about ourselves and the direction we want to go in but certainly having multi generations talk about the same texts like Rashi and his father Yitzchok and like you and I and like our listeners is part of the creative project which I think brings us together so anyway, I just love discovering these themes of exile and return so early in the mythological narrative, and I hope you do as well.   Adam Mintz  34:11 What a good star Geoffrey. We thank everybody enjoy the parsha Bereshit, and we look forward to continuing Noach next week. And we look forward to a great year of studying parshiyot together with you on Madlik. So thank you, everybody. Shabbat Shalom and enjoy the parsha.

Latitude Adjustment
89: Rabbis Discuss Antisemitism and Anti-Zionism (2 of 2)

Latitude Adjustment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 91:06


This episode marks the second of a two-part series featuring interviews with Rabbis on the subjects of Antisemitism and anti-Zionism, and the problems that arise when the two topics are conflated, either through misunderstanding or to serve political interests. Rabbi Brant Rosen founded the Tzedek congregation in Chicago. Like Rabbi Lynn, Rabbi Brant is also a member of Jewish Voice for Peace. You can find more information about his book “Wrestling in the Daylight”, and his other works and writings, on the post for this episode at LatitudeAdjustmentPod.com Support Latitude Adjustment Podcast on Patreon  

Latitude Adjustment
88: Rabbis Discuss Antisemitism and Anti-Zionism (1 of 2)

Latitude Adjustment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 110:14


This episode marks the first of a two-part series featuring interviews with Rabbis on the subjects of Antisemitism and anti-Zionism, and the problems that arise when the two topics are conflated, either through misunderstanding or to serve political interests. Rabbi Lynn Gottlieb has the distinction of being one of the first female rabbis in the world, and her outspoken positions on Palestinian human rights have often placed her at odds with the political positions of the Israeli government and with its supporters. We'll hear about her experiences as leader in a religious community overwhelmingly dominated by men, her first encounters with Israel as a very young woman (including her argument with David Ben-Gurion as a teenager), and how her Jewish identity informs her advocacy for human rights. She's also a pretty amazing artist. Support Latitude Adjustment Podcast on Patreon

So To Speak w/ Jared Howe
S o T o S p e a k | Ep. 768 | The Florever Purge

So To Speak w/ Jared Howe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 50:55


In a new attack ad against Florida governor Ron DeSantis, leftists actually make him sound pretty good. No mask mandates, no vax mandates, lots of leftist butthurt... what's not to like? Other than the Zionism, I mean. One almost gets the sense that the media is emphasizing DeSantis not because they dislike his policies (though they certainly do), but because they want to leverage DeSantis against Trump to cause a rift among grassroots Republicans going into 2024. Meanwhile, blowback against vaccine mandates is continuing to escalate in tandem with its death toll around the world. I've got the latest! This is EPISODE 768 of So to Speak w/ Jared Howe!

The Tikvah Podcast
Yedidya Sinclair on Israel's Shmita Year

The Tikvah Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 43:55


Every week, on the seventh day—the Sabbath—observant Jews rest. They perform no labor and they dedicate the day to serving God. This idea, the Sabbath, has another application in the Hebrew Bible: God also commands the observance of a sabbatical year to be taken every seventh year and during which the land of Israel would lie fallow and debts would be remitted. For most of Jewish history, the laws of this year, known as shmita, were abstract and remote. But with the growth of modern Zionism, and then the rebirth of the sovereign Jewish state, the laws of shmita have acquired a renewed importance. Jewish farmers are obliged to let the land of Israel lie fallow every seven years, and religiously observant Jews are prohibited from consuming fruit grown on that land. Does this happen in Israel today, and if so, how? And what are the deeper ideas embedded in the practice of shmita?  The questions are not abstract; this new Jewish year, 5782, is a shmita year. So on this week's podcast, the rabbi Yedidya (Julian) Sinclair joins Mosaic editor Jonathan Silver to explain why this biblical ordinance is so important, and how it's expressed in Israel today. Recently, Sinclair translated and authored a commentary on a famous rabbinical work about shmita, Shabbat Ha'Aretz, The Sabbath of the Land, by the rabbi Abraham Isaac Kook, who is considered the father of religious Zionism and whose ideas about shmita govern much of its application in Israel today. Musical selections in this podcast are drawn from the Quintet for Clarinet and Strings, op. 31a, composed by Paul Ben-Haim and performed by the ARC Ensemble.

Haaretz Weekly
How a Palestinian prison break challenged Zionism's narrative monopoly

Haaretz Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 52:57


Host Simon Spungin talks about grassroots activism with Dina Kraft and Sally Abed – the hosts of Groundwork, a new podcast about Jews and Palestinians working in Israel's mixed cities for a better future. How the escape and recapture of six Palestinians from an Israeli prison could shake up the discourse within Israel – if the Palestinian narrative is given space alongside the Zionist one. PLUS: Jotam Confino on Angela Merkel's legacy in terms of German-Israeli relations and the fight against antisemitism. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Unpacking Israeli History
Sabra and Shatila: What Happened And Why It Matters

Unpacking Israeli History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 37:34


The story of Sabra and Shatila is a horrifying one. A paramilitary Lebanese group massacres between 800 and 2,000 refugees, many in horrifying ways. And oddly...Israel is blamed for this awful, awful crime? This week, Noam will break down the confusing and upsetting story of Sabra and Shatila, and in doing so, will ask, how does a nation deal with power and responsibility? ~~~~ Unpacking Israeli History is generously sponsored by Alan Fisher and Barbara Sommer, and Jon and Rachie Teller, and this episode is generously sponsored by Yoni & Lisa Wintner. ~~~~ Learn more about Unpacked: https://jewishunpacked.com/about/ Visit Unpacked on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/unpacked  Unpacking Israeli History about the Munich Olympics: https://jewishunpacked.com/munich-olympics-when-terrorism-won/ Unpacking Israeli History about the disengagement from Gaza: https://jewishunpacked.com/gush-katif-when-jews-expelled-jews/ ~~~~ Sources https://vimeo.com/548669557/description?fbclid=IwAR1NbzDCIl4kiYn8oWh64SkeGk8ABA45E2ulvx87AIz_SBM_JTuTd8vZ5M4 https://web.archive.org/web/20101130144018/http://www.un.int/wcm/content/site/palestine/pid/12363 https://www.thoughtco.com/black-september-jordanian-plo-civil-war-2353168 https://web.archive.org/web/20131019222951/http://legal.un.org/repertory/art98/english/rep_supp5_vol5-art98_e.pdf#pagemode=none https://www.theguardian.com/world/2008/jul/19/lebanon.israelandthepalestinians https://www.mfa.gov.il/mfa/foreignpolicy/terrorism/palestinian/pages/the%20kuntar%20file%20exposed%20-%20yediot%20aharonot%2014-jul-2008.aspx https://www.nytimes.com/2003/02/25/world/shlomo-argov-73-ex-israeli-envoy-his-shooting-prompted-an-invasion.html https://www.mfa.gov.il/mfa/aboutisrael/history/pages/operation%20peace%20for%20galilee%20-%201982.aspx https://www.jstor.org/stable/4284144 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phoenicianism http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/6932786.stm https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/background-and-overview-of-first-lebanon-war https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1982/09/15/issue.html https://sci-hub.se/https://doi.org/10.2307/2009880 https://www.theguardian.com/news/1999/oct/18/guardianobituaries https://www.firstthings.com/article/2018/05/soloveitchik-the-zionist https://scholarship.law.wm.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://en.wikipedia.org/&httpsredir=1&article=1606&context=facpubs&sei-redir=1&referer=http%3A%2F%2Fscholar.google.com.tr%2Fscholar%3Fhl%3Den%26q%3Dmassacres%2Bin%2Blebanon%26btnG%3D%26as_sdt%3D1%252C5%26as_sdtp%3D#search=%22massacres%20lebanon%22 ~~~~ Unpacked is a division of OpenDor Media

The System is Down
272: Autistic Truckers Are Our Last Hope (Dinner w. Anthony Meier)

The System is Down

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 92:55


On Saturday, I was contacted by long time listener of the show, Anthony Meier, who just happened to be passing through the neighborhood and offered to buy me dinner. Despite the fact that he's an "autistic evil ADHD Mises Jew", far be it from me to turn down free food. Even Jesus broke break with deplorables. am I right?We didn't have a discussion plan, but I'm glad I brought the travel recording gear because it was a great chat and a great time that I very much appreciated and am happy to be able to share with you. We're both pretty ADHD, so if you like rabbit trails / holes, you're in luck.Topics Discussed:* Are autistic truckers our last line of defense?* Anthony's hazardous trucking experiences from BLM riots to COVID lockdowns* Judaism vs Zionism vs Christianity* Is national secession the answer?* What's the best state to bugout to?* Why do midwesterners love ranch dressing so much?*and much more. Question everything. Stay uncomfortable.Let's get weird.Guest & Sponsor Links:Follow Anthony on Twitter: https://twitter.com/bimblyBrave Botanicals (Kratom / Delta 8 THC):https://mybravebotanicals.comPromo Code: TSIDThe Royal Green Series:Https://theroyalgreen.comBecome a Producer:Https://patreon.com/thesystemisdownContact:Call in and leave a vm: 309-716-3818Send Dan a present by Fed-Mail: PO Box 84. Aledo, IL 61231Electronic HateMail: dan@tsidpod.comJoin:For the extended bonus episode and all of our weekly bonus content, please check out and join The Downers Club athttps://patreon.com/thesystemisdown.Follow:The System is Down:http://thesystemisdown.tvThe Downers Club:http://patreon.com/thesystemisdownOdysee:https://odysee.com/@thesystemisdown:d?Twitter:https://twitter.com/tsidpodTSID Secret FB Forum:https://facebook.com/groups/679892132686869The Royal Green: theroyalgreen.comSupport the show (https://patreon.com/thesystemisdown)

I Don't Speak German
93: Richard Spencer Redux

I Don't Speak German

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 88:42


We revisit the subject of our very first episode, Richard Spencer, catching up with his more recent exploits, all in an attempt to emphasize that a) he's still around, b) he's still dangerous, and c) he means what he says. Content Warnings. Podcast Notes: Please consider donating to help us make the show and stay independent.  Patrons get exclusive access to one full extra episode a month. Daniel's Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/danielharper Jack's Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=4196618 IDSG Twitter: https://twitter.com/idsgpod Daniel's Twitter: @danieleharper Jack's Twitter: @_Jack_Graham_ IDSG on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/i-dont-speak-german/id1449848509?ls=1   Show Notes: Our previous episode on Richard Spencer, Episode 1 The New York Times, How a Small Town Silenced a Neo-Nazi Hate Campaign Rafi Schwartz, Discourse Blog, America's Top Nazi Is a Broke Little Booger Who Can't Get a Table The punch, which     prompted plenty of handwringing     and pearl-clutching over whether or not it's okay to     ever punch a Nazi (it sure is!), occurred during what should have     been the height of Spencer's career as a full-time racist — the     inauguration of Donald Trump. Instead, it forever branded him as     “that Nazi who got his clock thoroughly cleaned” and helped     define him as the ur-bigot of the Trump era. This, I think, is     crucial to the arc of Spencer's seeming cancelation by the people     of Whitefish. It's much easier to identify a Nazi — and identify     what should be done to them — when that Nazi has already become an     internet joke for both being a Nazi, and facing the consequences     thereof. Were Spencer not memed into oblivion as “the Nazi who got     smacked,” my guess is that it wouldn't have been quite so easy     to rally an entire community to oppose him. Yes, it would likely     still have happened in some form, thanks to the sincerely hard work     of both activists, and ordinary citizens on the ground in Whitefish     and elsewhere, but I can't help but think that the moment Spencer     got blasted in the jaw, his cancelation, or silencing, or whatever     doofy substitute for “getting what he deserves” became     inevitable. Tablet Mag, No, White Supremacist Richard Spencer Didn't Seriously Endorse Joe Biden And yet, countless credulous accounts—many on the pro-Trump     right, but also some on the anti-Biden     left—uncritically shared Spencer's posting as though     it was on the level.     That a disingenuous racist like Spencer would pretend to     support Biden in order to get attention and undercut the former vice     president is not surprising. What is surprising is how many people     still fall for Spencer's transparent trolling.     In reality, Spencer and other white supremacists have a long     history of purposely adopting their opponents' causes and     pretending to back them in order to undermine them. That's exactly     what Spencer did in 2018 by pretending to support “Zionism,”     when he actually has a long history of hate towards both Israel and     Jews, and claims that the Jewish state and its supporters control     America. Daily Progress, RIchard Spencer-led organization ordered to pay $2.4 million in Unite the RIght lawsuit The biggest sum     was awarded last week by an Ohio judge who ordered the National     Policy Institute to pay Burke $2,444,461.15 for the harm he suffered     as a result of the rally. The white supremacist think tank, which is     led by UTR participant and University of Virginia graduate Spencer,     was found to be in default approximately     a year ago. Integrity First For America, Sines v. Kessler Eat the Rich Episode 91 on William Regnery II Paul Gottfried coins the term "alternative right." Richard Spencer introduces Ron Paul at the Robert Taft Club, October 11, 2007. Richard Spencer full NPI speech 2016, the origin of "Heilgate". Full text of that speech We need to remind ourselves of these things. None of this is     natural. None of this is “normal.” This is a sick, disgusting,     society, run by the corrupt, defended by hysterics, drunk on     self-hatred and degeneracy. We invade the world and frantically     invite entire populations who despise us. We subsidize people and     institutions who make our lives worse just by the sheer fact of     their existence. We run up deficits and pretend the laws of history     simply don't apply to us because of “American Exceptionalism.”     This cannot go on any longer. And it won't.     At some level, we demand the impossible. Even those     half-joking memes about Donald Trump as God-Emperor or as the     progenitor of some glorious Imperium testify to the yearning for     something more. Yes, we should insist on our dreams – on the     conquest of space, on the development of revolutionary technology,     for a humanity that is greater than we are today, for a race that     travels forever on the upward path.     But at another level, what we want is something normal,     something almost prosaic maybe even boring.     Why is something as simple as starting a family, owning a     house, and leaving a legacy to your children seen as an almost     impossible dream for so many Americans? Why must there be two     incomes for a family simply to break even? Why is it impossible to     build a real civic society because the whim of a federal bureaucrat     or a Social Justice Warrior can impose Section 8 housing, refugee     resettlement, or some other population transfer scheme deliberately     designed to break apart functional white communities? Buzzfeed, Spencer's Wife Says in Divorce Filings that He Physically and Emotionally Abused Her The wife of Richard Spencer, the white     nationalist leader, has accused him of being “physically,     emotionally, verbally and financially abusive” throughout their     marriage, according to divorce filings in Flathead County District     Court in Montana.     Nina Koupriianova, who married Spencer in August 2010 and has     two young children with him, alleges that Spencer physically abused     her, including instances where she was “being hit, being grabbed,     being dragged around by her hair, being held down in a manner     causing bruising, and being prevented from calling for help.”     Koupriianova — who went by Kouprianova in some public     interviews and N.K. in the documents — “has been reluctant to     call police or seek an order of protection for fear of further     reprisal by” Spencer, her lawyers said in court documents. “Much     of the abuse has occurred in the presence of the parties'     children.”

CounterVortex Podcast
CounterVortex Episode 90: Anti-Semitism and propaganda -- again

CounterVortex Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 13:53


In Episode 90 of the CounterVortex podcast, Bill Weinberg examines claims from New York's Gov. Kathy Hochul and local politicians of "anti-Semitic graffiti" spray-painted along Manhattan's Harlem River Drive on the eve of Yom Kippur. The governor's press release did not tell us what the graffiti actually said. This is rather critical information, given the contemporary controversies about what constitutes an anti-Semitic slur, and the confusion between anti-Zionism and anti-Semitism. Yet most media coverage uncritically accepted Hochul's claims. Weinberg parses the facts in the case, and (as usual) finds plenty to criticize on both sides: the spray-painters and the politicians. Listen on SoundCloud or via Patreon. https://www.patreon.com/countervortex Production by Chris Rywalt We ask listeners to donate just $1 per weekly episode via Patreon. We now have 28 subscribers. If you appreciate our work, please become Number 29!

Nightside With Dan Rea
Antisemitism and the State of Israel (9 p.m.)

Nightside With Dan Rea

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 39:24


Antisemitism seems to be growing in recent years. In just the last six months alone, we've seen opposition towards the nation of Israel and its policies, even among some politicians. Is anti-Zionism a contemporary form of antisemitism? Rachel Lerman, Senior Counsel and Vice Chair of the Brandeis Center for Human Rights Under Law joins Dan to discuss.

Identity/Crisis
#69: A Conversation with the Minister of Diaspora Affairs

Identity/Crisis

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 27:13


In this episode of Identity/Crisis, Yehuda Kurtzer speaks with Nachman Shai, Israel's Minister of Diaspora Affairs, on a range of topics, including differences between Israeli and American historical consciousness, why Israel's relationship with Diaspora Jews remains important, whether Zionism allows for Diaspora to be valuable, and the possible return of a compromise around the use of the Western Wall. Links: Has Israel Let You Down?: https://www.jta.org/2021/09/01/opinion/has-israel-let-you-down-its-minister-of-diaspora-affairs-wants-to-talk-about-it

Jewish History Matters
72: Moroccan Jews and the Politics of Belonging with Alma Heckman

Jewish History Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 64:42


Alma Heckman joins us to talk about twentieth-century Moroccan Jews, and especially Moroccan Jewish communism and its broader politics, which is the focus of her recent book The Sultan's Communists: Moroccan Jews and the Politics of Belonging. Listen in as we dive into the history of Moroccan Jewish politics, the development of Zionism, communism, colonialism, and nationalism in Morocco and North Africa at large, and why it's important to think through the choices and agency that Jews in Morocco and beyond have had in determining their fate and politics throughout the twentieth century. Alma Rachel Heckman is an Assistant Professor of History and the Neufeld-Levin Chair of Holocaust Studies at the University of California–Santa Cruz. She is the author of ‌The Sultan's Communists: Moroccan Jews and the Politics of Belonging, which was published by Stanford University Press in 2021.

Testimony With Jensine Bard
Testimony - Craig Von Buseck - Combo Classic - I Am Cyrus

Testimony With Jensine Bard

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 28:29


Two Bi Guys
Bisexual Judaism & Resistance with Shiri Eisner & Jacob Engelberg

Two Bi Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 57:25


Follow Shiri Eisner on Twitter:  https://twitter.com/ShiriEisnerBuy Shiri's book: https://bookshop.org/books/bi-notes-for-a-bisexual-revolution/9781580054744Follow Jacob Engelberg on Twitter: https://twitter.com/criticalprvrsn We're back with the second part of our interview with Shiri Eisner, hosted by Jacob Engelberg, and it's the most queer-radical-Jewish episode you'll ever hear!We talked about how our bisexuality affects our Jewish identities (and vice-versa), the current situation in Israel/Palestine and Israel's persecution of Palestinians, the history of resistance to Zionism and homo-nationalism within Israel and its relationship to radical bisexual politics, how we can be connected by oppression and as a result unite in solidarity, and what Shiri is currently excited about in the world of Bi+ and queer activism. Two Bi Guys is produced and edited by Rob CohenCreated by Rob Cohen and Alex BoydLogo art by Kaitlin WeinmanMusic by Ross MintzerWe are supported by The Gotham (formerly IFP)

Ask NT Wright Anything
#81 Do Jewish people need Jesus?

Ask NT Wright Anything

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 22:07


Are Jews saved under the old covenant? How should I share my faith with Jewish people today? Does the Bible endorse Zionism?    Support the show – give from the USA or Rest of the world (and get the show e-book) ·     For bonus content, the newsletter, prize draws and to ask a question sign up at www.askntwright.com  ·     Exclusive podcast offers on Tom's books and videos from SPCK & NT Wright Online ·     Subscribe to the Ask NT Wright Anything podcast via your preferred podcast platform

Vaybertaytsh
Episode 57: Isabel Frey | איזאַבעל פֿרײַ

Vaybertaytsh

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021


What a pleasure to get to know Isabel Frey! Isabel is a Vienna-based Yiddish musician with a wonderful new-ish album called Millennial Bundist. We talked about being Jewish in Vienna, her left-wing activism and her departure from the Zionism of her youth, as well as her music and her future plans. I know you'll love her story as well as her music! Read more about her and check out her music at https://www.isabelfrey.com/

The Bitter Truth with Abe Abdelhadi
Stolen Fully Furnished. Miko Peled talks about the ongoing assault on Palestinians by Israel.

The Bitter Truth with Abe Abdelhadi

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 39:04


Activist, author, speaker and friend of the show, Miko Peled (https://www.patreon.com/mikopeled) Joins us to discuss the ongoing land grab and slaughter of Palestinians by Israel. The so-called ceasefire made the American media go to sleep, not the IDF. He details the illegal arrests and the bulldozing of Palestinian homes inside the State of Israel as well as bombing Gaza and stolen homes in the West Bank. Is Israel a true democracy or merely another Mideast theocracy, not unlike Saudi Arabia, proving yet again that we can't reform apartheid? Peled is a renowned activist for Palestinian rights and the author of the General's Son and Injustice: The Story of the Holy Land Foundation Five. Support the show through https://thebittertruth.info/merch to get fun stuff or visit https://www.patreon.com/thebittertruth

Sulha (formerly The Great Debate)
20 Questions | A Palestinian and Israeli speak w/ Rafi & Malkon #03

Sulha (formerly The Great Debate)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 134:44


Welcome everyone to 20 questions where Malkon a Palestinian & Rafi an Israeli both living in Jerusalem will ask each other a series of questions about solutions and the future of the land. ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬★ MEET OUR GUESTS ★▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬Rafi Gassel is a Jewish Israeli who lives in Jerusalem with his wife and three children. He works in Biotechnology dealing with DNA Sequencing and Diagnostics. He is also a peace activist who promotes a rational approach to dealing with the conflict incorporating novel approaches such as mutual recognition of indigenous rights and a federal state in Israel and Palestine. ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬Malkon Marizian is an Armenian Palestinian living in Jerusalem. He has a BA in psychology and an MA in Human Rights. He volunteers for Musalaha, a non-profit organization that works towards reconciliation between Israelis and Palestinians based on the Biblical principles of peace, justice, and love. He has also given a Discovery Talk for Birthright Armenia, comparing and contrasting the historic experience of the people that form his identity.Get in touch with Malkon:malkon.marizian@gmail.com▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬Sulha Socialshttps://linktr.ee/theSulha▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬Adar's Socialshttps://linktr.ee/adarw▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬Support the ShowPatreon: https://www.patreon.com/sulhaPayPal: https://paypal.me/AdarW?locale.x=en_USBTC: 3DBp9R2imyuiyXkFZfLG9KsjRUJQYdfTDRETH (ERC20): 0x63B21a81b1122e22C074b83C7BfbF32a32620B16▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬Huge shoutout to our Patreon Champion & Legendary members:- SpeedyWeedy - www.myspeedyweedy.com - Rajia

The Land of Israel Network
The Jewish Story: A Portrait of American Jewry, circa 1974

The Land of Israel Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 43:18


The changing culture of American Jewry after the Yom Kippur War in Israel and the Vietnam War meant leaving old neighborhoods, a surge in Zionism and new developments in the Jewish community like the Havurah movement. We explore the publication of the First Jewish Catalog: A Do-It-Yourself Kit edited by Richard Siegel, and Michael and Sharon Strassfeld and the shift from left-wing liberal to neo-conservative in the writings of Commentary Magazine editor Norman Podhoretz. Plus, Rav Mike gets personal and talks about his own Jewish upbringing.

Valley Beit Midrash
Reading Intolerant Texts in a Tolerant Society

Valley Beit Midrash

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 56:27


ABOUT THE SPEAKER: Rabbi Norman Solomon was born in Cardiff, South Wales, on 31 May 1933. This coincided with the Jewish festival of Shavuot and with the running of the Derby, won by Tommy Weston on Lord Derby's Hyperion. The first of these events was by far the more influential on my development, for the festival celebrates not only the First-Fruits but the proclamation of the Ten Commandments at Mount Sinai. Cardiff, capital city of Wales, was still a major port, and came under attack from the air in World War II. It was a great place to grow up, enlightened, tolerant, with a vigorous musical life in which I was able to take part. There was a small but active Jewish community, inclined to Zionism (they were fond of pointing out that Israel was comparable in size and population to Wales); they were not on the whole very religious, but I came under the influence of some families of refugee German Orthodox Jews. From Cardiff High School I entered St John's College, Cambridge in 1951 with no break; though National Service was still obligatory HM King George had declined my offer to serve in his Air Force, accusing me of being flat-footed. I read Moral Sciences for Tripos Part I and Music for Part 2, gained a teaching diploma at Bristol University, collected an ARCM in Composition, a B.Mus. degree from London, and in 1961 a Rabbinical Diploma from Jews' College, London. In the summer vacation of 1953 I spent some weeks at Gateshead Yeshiva. In 1955 I married Devora (Doris) Strauss, with whom I enjoyed 43 happy years of marriage until her death in 1998. From her I have four children and four grandchildren. In 2000 I married Hilary Nissenbaum. DONATE: www.bit.ly/1NmpbsP​​​​​​​ For podcasts of VBM lectures, GO HERE: www.valleybeitmidrash.org/learning-library/ www.facebook.com/valleybeitmi...​ Become a member today, starting at just $18 per month! Click the link to see our membership options: www.valleybeitmidrash.org/become-a-member/

Unpacking Israeli History
Is Zionism…Racism?: UN Resolution 3379

Unpacking Israeli History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 28:42


On Nov 10, 1975, the UN General Assembly passed Resolution 3379, determining that Zionism is "a form of racism and racial discrimination.” That's quite a loaded description! In this episode, Noam Weissman breaks down what led to this infamous resolution, the UN's relationship with Israel, and what it means to us, almost 50 years later. ~~~~ Unpacking Israeli History is generously sponsored by Alan Fisher and Barbara Sommer, and Jon and Rachie Teller. ~~~~ Learn more about Unpacked: https://jewishunpacked.com/about/ Visit Unpacked on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/unpacked  Teaching about this topic? Check out our relevant educator resources here: https://unpacked.education/video/un-resolution-3379-is-zionism-racism/ ~~~~ Sources https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dlr1ioQIxa4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qpC2HdL-95M https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uv8Hqlubst4&t=44s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7chKW7H6s8M https://unispal.un.org/UNISPAL.NSF/0/761C1063530766A7052566A2005B74D1 https://www.haaretz.com/.premium-nostalgic-for-the-ussr-on-the-kibbutzim-1.5233153 https://www.marxists.org/subject/jewish/caution-zionism.pdf https://www.jta.org/1952/10/07/archive/bonn-charges-ussr-exports-nazi-anti-semitic-films-to-arabs Sachar, A History of the Jews in the Modern World http://proceedings.informingscience.org/InSITE2019/InSITE19p035-070Cohen5666.pdf https://mfa.gov.il/mfa/foreignpolicy/peace/guide/pages/the%20khartoum%20resolutions.aspx https://history.state.gov/milestones/1969-1976/oil-embargo https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB106419296113226300 https://digitallibrary.un.org/record/642340?ln=en https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1973/10/23/issue.html https://content.ecf.org.il/files/M00901_UNGARes3379DebateEnglish.pdf https://www.jta.org/1975/11/12/archive/kristallnacht-at-the-united-nations-100000-in-rally-to-protest-against-anti-zionist-resolution-mass https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FuJXdAvPCrU&t=252s https://unwatch.org/moynihans-moment-the-historic-1975-u-n-speech-in-response-to-zionism-is-racism/ https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/politics/1991/12/17/un-repeals-resolution-linking-zionism-to-racism/70349a7c-ae07-40ea-b37d-ee711e0636eb/ ~~~~ Unpacked is a division of OpenDor Media

The Land of Israel Network
The Jewish Story: Survival Zionism, part VI

The Land of Israel Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 72:34


Here is part six of the live series on Survival Zionism. This episode returns to the land of Israel to look at the struggle for liberation which preceded the war for independence.

Sulha (formerly The Great Debate)
Standing Up #21: Speaking with Corey Gil-Shuster from The Ask Project

Sulha (formerly The Great Debate)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 100:29


Corey Gil-Shuster is the creator of the Ask an Israeli/Ask a Palestinian Project. The project collects questions from people around the world that Israelis and Palestinians answer. All answers are included unedited for content. The project started in 2012 and has around 1000 videos to date. Corey grew up in Canada and has lived in Israel for over 20 years. He has an MA in conflict studies from Ottawa University. He is currently the director of the International MA Program in Conflict Resolution and Mediation at Tel Aviv University.Get in touch with Coreywww.youtube.com/coreygilshuster ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬Sulha Socialshttps://linktr.ee/theSulha▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬Adar's Socialshttps://linktr.ee/adarw▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬Support the ShowPatreon: https://www.patreon.com/sulhaPayPal: https://paypal.me/AdarW?locale.x=en_USBTC: 3DBp9R2imyuiyXkFZfLG9KsjRUJQYdfTDRETH (ERC20): 0x63B21a81b1122e22C074b83C7BfbF32a32620B16▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬Huge shoutout to our Patreon Champion & Legendary members:- SpeedyWeedy - www.myspeedyweedy.com - Rajia

Tribe Talk Connection
Gordis 12 – American Jews and Israel

Tribe Talk Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 19:37


While many believe Americans always supported Zionism, Americans Jews have had conflicted feelings with Zionism throughout the years. In this episode, Dr. Rabbi Daniel Gordis discusses American Jews' relationship with Israel beginning in 1915 and continuing through present day.

Tribe Talk Connection
Gordis 3 – Zionism 2.0: Beyond Herzl

Tribe Talk Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 14:44


From the labor Zionism of Ze'ev Jabotinsky to the revisionist Zionism of AD Gordon to the spiritual Zionism of Ahad Ha'am, various interpretations and manifestations of Zionist thought developed through the 20th century and into the 21st. Dr. Rabbi Daniel Gordis sorts it all out and suggests how each informs Israeli culture and society.

Tribe Talk Connection
Gordis 2 -Who's Theodor Herzl?

Tribe Talk Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 14:04


We see his name on streets in Israel and his portrait hangs in some official buildings, but who is he? Zionism grew as a political movement within the Jewish Diaspora in the late 1800s and early 1900s – driven by this Budapest-born writer, playwright and journalist. Dr. Rabbi Daniel Gordis describes the compelling life of Herzl … Continue reading Gordis 2 -Who's Theodor Herzl? →

Tribe Talk Connection
Gordis 1 – Zionism, Fact and Fiction

Tribe Talk Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 15:49


Zionism is a movement to build a Jewish homeland, born in the mid-1800s from European Jews' sense of betrayal, heartbreak, and anguish after centuries of judgment and dislocation. Dr. Rabbi Daniel Gordis discusses Zionism's origins and how it is used – and misused – in modern political and activist discourse.

The Tikvah Podcast
Allan Arkush on Ahad Ha'am and "The Jewish State and Jewish Problem" (Rebroadcast)

The Tikvah Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 46:49


In an 1897 essay called “The Jewish State and the Jewish Problem,” the Zionist writer Aḥad Ha'am argued that “Judaism needs at present but little. It needs not an independent state, but only the creation in its native land of conditions favorable to its development: a good-sized settlement of Jews working without hindrance in every branch of culture, from agriculture and handicrafts to science and literature.” Ha'am believed that the most powerful arguments for Zionism were not economic but moral, and in his many essays he stressed the importance of forming a modern Jewish identity from authentically Jewish culture and ideas. Culture first, sovereignty later, in other words. Ha'am was born in 1856 this week by the name Asher Ginsburg, and so we thought we'd mark the occasion by rebroadcasting a conversation about him between the Tikvah Fund's executive director Eric Cohen and Allan Arkush, a professor of Judaic studies at Binghamton University and the senior contributing editor at the Jewish Review of Books. The two discuss Ha'am's background, his ideas in this essay and elsewhere, and compare them to his more politically-minded Zionist rivals, namely Theodor Herzl. Musical selections in this podcast are drawn from the Quintet for Clarinet and Strings, op. 31a, composed by Paul Ben-Haim and performed by the ARC Ensemble.

IsraelCast
Aryeh Green | Chief Strategy Officer of Gigawatt Global

IsraelCast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 52:37


Did you know that Jewish people have been in America since before the American Revolution? Meet Aryeh Green—a direct descendent of one of America's first Jewish families and of many prominent Jewish American figures in later years. Green grew up incredibly proud of both his American and Jewish identities, but had not really dived into his Zionist identity. This all changed when he moved to Israel for rabbinical school, immersed himself in the culture and realized how crucial Zionism was to Judaism as a whole. Green eventually made Aliyah and has been living in Israel for over three decades. Tune into this week's episode of IsraelCast as host Steven Shalowitz sits down with Aryeh Green to discuss the many aspects of his life in Israel, including his soul-healing trek on Israel's famed National Trail.

Unpacking Israeli History
Dimona: Israel's "Secret" Nuclear Option

Unpacking Israeli History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 38:00


Have you heard about Israel's secret nuclear weapons in Dimona? Yeah, we haven't either. In this episode, Noam digs deep into how Israel's not-so-secret nuclear program came to be, and asks, does the nuclear program make Israel safer?   ~~~~ Unpacking Israeli History is generously sponsored by Alan Fisher and Barbara Sommer, and Jon and Rachie Teller. ~~~~ Learn more about Unpacked: https://jewishunpacked.com/about/ Visit Unpacked on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/unpacked  Teaching about this topic? Check out our relevant educator resources here: https://unpacked.education/unpacking-operation-solomon-30-years-later/ ~~~~ Sources https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.2968/066004008 https://journals.sagepub.com/na101/home/literatum/publisher/sage/journals/content/bosb/2010/bosb_66_4/066004008/20170817/images/large/10.2968_066004008-img2.jpeg https://americanhistory.si.edu/subs/history/timeline/different/nuclear_deterrence.html https://www.britannica.com/place/Russia/The-Khrushchev-era-1953-64 https://books.google.com/books?id=si1oUnk5N3QC&pg=PA61#v=onepage&q&f=false https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/background-and-overview-israel-war-of-independence https://gould.usc.edu/why/students/orgs/ilj/assets/docs/18-1%20Seidman.pdf https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/israel-studies-an-anthology-israel-s-economy: https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/books/first/c/cohen-israel.html https://www.britannica.com/topic/Suez-Canal https://books.google.com/books?id=jGtVsBne7PgC https://www.jstor.org/stable/30245572?seq=1 https://encyclopedia.ushmm.org/content/en/article/france https://fas.org/nuke/guide/israel/nuke/ https://www.atomicheritage.org/history/israeli-nuclear-program jfklibrary.org/learn/about-jfk/jfk-in-history/nuclear-test-ban-treaty https://nsarchive2.gwu.edu/israel/documents/reveal/index.html https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/.premium.MAGAZINE-how-a-standoff-with-the-u-s-almost-blew-up-israel-s-nuclear-program-1.7193419?v=1623033435057 https://nsarchive.gwu.edu/dc.html?doc=5983539-National-Security-Archive-Doc-04-Director-of https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=10801564#:~:text=Eventually%2C%20a%20U.N.%2Dbrokered%20ceasefire,heavily%20populated%20Palestinian%20West%20Bank. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jan/15/truth-israels-secret-nuclear-arsenal https://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/29/world/middleeast/29nixon.html http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/june/7/newsid_3014000/3014623.stm https://www.nytimes.com/2004/04/21/international/middleeast/israeli-who-revealed-nuclear-secrets-is-freed.html https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jan/15/truth-israels-secret-nuclear-arsenal https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2010/09/the-point-of-no-return/308186/ https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/select-quotations-of-david-ben-gurion ~~~~ Unpacked is a division of OpenDor Media

None of the Above
Episode 10: The Burden of American Power (from the archive)

None of the Above

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 31:57


This week, we're bringing back an episode from Season 1 with journalist and political analyst Peter Beinart. When we spoke with Peter last spring, we discussed the questionable value of America's extensive overseas military network and the limits of America's global role. From Taiwan to Afghanistan, what price are Americans willing to pay to pursue stability and security around the globe? Does American expansionism around the globe make the U.S. more powerful and influential? While some suggest the threat or use of military intervention promotes American interests around the world, our guest insists a lack of humility in U.S. foreign policy undermines America's values, credibility, and security. From discussing the potential American withdrawal from Afghanistan to the crisis of illiberalism in Israel, and pandemic preparedness, our conversation foreshadowed some of 2021's most pressing foreign policy concerns. Peter Beinart is a CNN political commentator, a columnist for The New York Times, and an editor-at-large of Jewish Currents magazine. He is the author of The Icarus Syndrome: A History of American Hubris and The Crisis of Zionism. You can follow Peter on Twitter at @PeterBeinart  

Israel News Talk Radio
Rav A"Y HaKohein Kook - One of the Most Influential Rabbis of Modern Times - Israel Unplugged

Israel News Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 43:44


In this show following the Yahrtzeit of Rav Kook we discuss stories of the founding father of modern religious Zionism and the love he had for the Land and his fellow Jew Israel Unplugged 16AUG2021 - PODCAST

The Land of Israel Network
The Jewish Story: Survival Zionism, part V

The Land of Israel Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 75:27


Here is part five of the live series on Survival Zionism. This episode returns to the US to look at the impact of these fateful years on American Jewry.

Radical Lifestyle
Brian Schrauger (Losing a Son and Gaining a Vision)

Radical Lifestyle

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 39:51


Brian shares the inspiring story of how his son passed away, and how that led him on a personal journey to Israel.- Slide show about Taylor: https://youtu.be/SKl8pkLKqSw- Brians my book, Walking Taylor Home: https://www.amazon.com/Walking-Taylor-Home-Brian-Schrauger/dp/0849917034- Brians op-ed for the Jerusalem Post: https://www.jpost.com/opinion/op-ed-contributors/why-i-am-a-zionist-355307YouTube Version: www.youtube.com/channel/UCQGRMndISia448cFZr_XLYw- Telegram channel and discussion: Click HereYou can also follow Andrew and Daphne on their social media platforms:Andrew Kirk: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | ParlerDaphne Kirk: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | ParlerTo support the channel: Click Here- UK only Donations here: Click Here

Unpacking Israeli History
Ingathering of Exiles: From Ethiopia to Israel

Unpacking Israeli History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 31:07


You might have heard of the Beta Israel, the community of Israel's Ethiopian community. In this episode, Noam Weissman tells their story - not only their rich Jewish heritage and history, but also the story of how they got to Israel, in Operation Solomon, and their integration into Israeli society over the last thirty years. It's thrilling, inspiring, but also complicated, and difficult at times. In other words, it's a microcosm of the entire state of Israel, and the Jewish community the world over. ~~~~ Unpacking Israeli History is generously sponsored by Alan Fisher and Barbara Sommer, and Jon and Rachie Teller. ~~~~ Learn more about Unpacked: https://jewishunpacked.com/about/ Visit Unpacked on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/unpacked  Teaching about this topic? Check out our relevant educator resources here: https://unpacked.education/unpacking-operation-solomon-30-years-later/ ~~~~ Sources https://www.timesofisrael.com/after-backlash-barkan-winery-says-ethiopian-workers-to-work-as-usual/ https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/05/11/10-key-findings-about-jewish-americans/ft_2021-05-11_jewishkeyfindings_01/ https://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-32813056 https://www.britannica.com/topic/Beta-Israel https://www.myjewishlearning.com/article/the-history-of-ethiopian-jewry/ https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/timeline-of-ethiopian-jewish-history https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/who-are-the-ethiopian-jews https://minorityrights.org/minorities/beta-israel/ https://tamidnyc.org/passover-around-world/ https://www.timesofisrael.com/outcry-as-barkan-winery-shuns-ethiopian-workers-over-doubts-of-their-jewishness/ https://www.baltimoresun.com/news/bs-xpm-1996-07-29-1996211101-story.html https://blogs.timesofisrael.com/ethiopian-jewry-no-longer-a-lost-tribe/ https://www.jpost.com/opinion/op-ed-contributors/rabbi-ovadia-yosef-and-the-ethiopian-jews-328178 https://www.rabbinicalassembly.org/sites/default/files/public/halakhah/teshuvot/19861990/saltzman_ethiopian.pdf https://www.aish.com/sp/so/My-Treacherous-Journey-across-the-Ethiopian-Desert.html https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/.premium-israel-lifts-sweeping-ban-on-ethiopian-israeli-blood-donations-1.5483820 https://www.timesofisrael.com/ministry-lifts-ban-on-ethiopian-blood-donations/ https://www.enp.org.il/en/background.php https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kebra_Nagast https://www.torahmusings.com/2017/12/rav-ovadya-yosef-whether-ethiopian-jews-need-reconvert/ https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/05/11/10-key-findings-about-jewish-americans/ft_2021-05-11_jewishkeyfindings_01/ Lewin-Epstein, Noah; Cohen, Yinon (18 August 2019). "Ethnic origin and identity in the Jewish population of Israel". Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies. 45 (11): 2118–2137. Steven Kaplan, "A Brief History of the Beta Israel", in The Jews of Ethiopia: A People in Transition ~~~~ Unpacked is a division of OpenDor Media

The Charles Mizrahi Show
A Critical Perspective on Humanity's Greatest Hatred — Rabbi Joseph Telushkin

The Charles Mizrahi Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 59:26


His perspective is unparalleled … Rabbi Joseph Telushkin is the ultimate expert on Jewish literacy and values. His nonfiction bestsellers trace the roots of anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism. These texts span lessons from the ancient world to the Holocaust to the current crisis in the Middle East. He discusses anti-Semitism in the Democratic Party, how it will impact Jewish life in America and bilateral support for Israel with Charles Mizrahi. Topics Discussed: An Introduction to Joseph Telushkin (00:00:00) Origins of Anti-Semitism (00:02:32) Three Pillars of Judaism (00:09:02) Lasting Animosity (00:20:44) A Serious Moment in History (00:32:28) Need for Bilateral Support (00:36:46) Strong Jewish Influence (00:46:35) The Potential Flashpoint (00:50:04) Goodwill in America (00:52:24) Guest Bio: Rabbi Joseph Telushkin is a spiritual leader, lecturer and bestselling author. Raised in Brooklyn, NY, Rabbi Telushkin was ordained at Yeshiva University and studied Jewish history at Columbia University. To date, he's written over 18 books on Jewish literacy, ethics and values. One of his earliest works, Why The Jews? The Reason for Antisemitism, was co-authored by writer and talk show host Dennis Prager. In addition, his book Rebbe was both a New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestseller. Resources Mentioned: https://www.amazon.com/Why-Jews-Antisemitism-Dennis-Prager/dp/0743246209 (Why the Jews? The Reason for Antisemitism) https://www.amazon.com/Rebbe-Teachings-Menachem-Schneerson-Influential/dp/0062318993 (Rebbe: The Life and Teachings of Menachem M. Schneerson, the Most Influential Rabbi in Modern History) Transcript: https://charlesmizrahi.com/podcast/ (https://charlesmizrahi.com/podcast/)

Divrei Torah
Shiur for Bochurim in Camp on Zionism

Divrei Torah

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 67:09


The Promised Podcast
The “Bodies of Evidence & Evidence of Bodies” Edition

The Promised Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 85:09


Times of Israel Ops & Blogs editor Miriam Herschlag, Ohad Zeltzer-Zubida and Noah Efron discuss three topics of incomparable importance and end with an anecdote about something in Israel that made them smile this week. Hear the Extra-Special, Special Extra Segment on Patreon   —If It Please the Court— Is it time for Israeli courts to stop allowing improperly gotten evidence? A newly proposed law would outlaw “the fruit of the poisonous tree.” —Gold— What do the Olympics tell folks here about what it means to be an Israeli? —Under Another Sun— What does an award-winning documentary about growing up on a kibbutz tell us about what it means to be an Israeli? —Your Only Choice Is Zionism Or Anti-Zionism. Which One Do You Choose?— For our most unreasonably generous Patreon supporters, in our extra-special, special extra discussion, we discuss an essay in Tablet by Liel Liebovitz called, “Us & Them: Your only two choices are Zionism and Anti-Zionism, Pick Wisely”, asking: Are those really our only two choices? Can't we be Yiddishists? Can't we be Vegans or Kantians or Olivia Rodrigo fans? All that and Yoni Poliker!

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch
Tuesday August 3 - Full Show

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 100:24


New York's Justice Department finds Andrew Cuomo sexually harassed multiple women. New York City will mandate vaccines to patronize or work in public settings. The White House asks TikTok stars for their help getting the youth vaccinated. Andrew Cuomo doubles down, denying allegations. Andy McCarthy joins us to discuss the Cuomo investigation, the eviction moratorium and much more. Dana criticizes the government's role in extending the eviction moratorium. Billie Eilish gets accused of Zionism after a tweet about Israel. “Muppet Babies” introduces a non-binary character.Please visit our great sponsors:Patriot Mobilehttps://PatriotMobile.com/DanaPut your trust in Patriot Mobile. Now get 50% off the first 2 months OR $100 off any phone in stock with a 1-year commitment, as well as free premier activation with promo code Dana. Patriotmobile.com/dana or call 972-PATRIOT. Kel-Techttps://KelTecWeapons.comKelTec: Creating Innovative, Quality Firearms to help secure your world. Delta Rescuehttps://deltarescue.orgGet your complete Estate Planning kit at deltarescue.org/dana today and let your passion for animals live well into the future. Black Rifle Coffee Companyhttps://blackriflecoffee.com/danatvUse code DANATV to save 20% off your first coffee club, coffee and select gear purchase.

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch
Tuesday August 3 - Full Show

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 100:24


New York's Justice Department finds Andrew Cuomo sexually harassed multiple women. New York City will mandate vaccines to patronize or work in public settings. The White House asks TikTok stars for their help getting the youth vaccinated. Andrew Cuomo doubles down, denying allegations. Andy McCarthy joins us to discuss the Cuomo investigation, the eviction moratorium and much more. Dana criticizes the government's role in extending the eviction moratorium. Billie Eilish gets accused of Zionism after a tweet about Israel. “Muppet Babies” introduces a non-binary character.Please visit our great sponsors:Patriot Mobilehttps://PatriotMobile.com/DanaPut your trust in Patriot Mobile. Now get 50% off the first 2 months OR $100 off any phone in stock with a 1-year commitment, as well as free premier activation with promo code Dana. Patriotmobile.com/dana or call 972-PATRIOT. Kel-Techttps://KelTecWeapons.comKelTec: Creating Innovative, Quality Firearms to help secure your world. Delta Rescuehttps://deltarescue.orgGet your complete Estate Planning kit at deltarescue.org/dana today and let your passion for animals live well into the future. Black Rifle Coffee Companyhttps://blackriflecoffee.com/danatvUse code DANATV to save 20% off your first coffee club, coffee and select gear purchase.

The Land of Israel Network
The Jewish Story: Survival Zionism, part IV

The Land of Israel Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 74:44


Here is part four of my live series on Survival Zionism. This episode tells the story of the Warsaw Ghetto. If you like the live style, sign up for this year's online class click here: http://jewishstory.co/registerclass/ Photo Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ooocha/2614459424

The Land of Israel Network
The Jewish Story: Survival Zionism, part III

The Land of Israel Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2021 75:59


Here is part three of my live series on Survival Zionism. This episode takes us to Europe in the war years and explores the evolution of the Final Solution, which served as the great selection of European Jewry. If you like the live style, sign up for this year's online class click here: http://jewishstory.co/registerclass/ . Photo Credit: Caricature of Hermann Göring detail with text of "Gestapo reports 2,000,000 Jews executed- Heil Hitler" by Arthur Szyk (1894-1951). We're Running Short of Jews (1943), New York (cropped).jpg.

The Dishcast with Andrew Sullivan
Peter Beinart On Zionism, China, Apartheid

The Dishcast with Andrew Sullivan

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 110:32


Peter is a long-time friend and fellow former editor of The New Republic. His latest book is The Crisis of Zionism, and he’s the editor-at-large for Jewish Currents and the creator of his own substack, The Beinart Notebook. In this episode we focus on foreign affairs — China, Israel, and South Africa — as well as our shared apostasy when it comes to Iraq and neoconservatism. In the last half-hour of the pod, we get into a heated debate over the merits of racial diversity and viewpoint diversity in magazines and op-ed pages. For three clips of our conversation — on how the U.S. should deal with China; on whether Zionism has failed; and how Peter has dealt with the Jewish-American tribalism — check out our YouTube page. Get full access to The Weekly Dish at andrewsullivan.substack.com/subscribe