Podcasts about Judaism

The ethnic religion of the Jewish people

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Latest podcast episodes about Judaism

Jappy Jaws
Matter of Fact (ft. Arianna Martinez)

Jappy Jaws

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 52:59


She has fasted and she has risen! Another Thirsty Thursday in the books, but the first Yay or Nay of the season. Before hopping into the Yay or Nay breakdown, your favorite Jappy hostess with the mostest gives a little Judaism wisdom. It is the highest of holy days in the Jewish calendar year, and Lindsay felt as if it was her Jappy Jaw duty to inform the Jaw-ers of this holiday's significance. The Bachelor in Paradise world has had several storms brewing, but this week's episode recap was just the beginning. To kick off this season's segment of Yay or Nay, Lindsay put a slight twist on it. She is joinedby her good friend, Youtuber, and fellow media addict - Arianna Martinez. Starting up her YouTube channel about a year ago, Arianna has immersed herself into the world of hauls, vlogs, and YouTube challenges for subscribers to enjoy. However, she comes to not only give her two-cents on entertainment culture, but on grad school. Currently a student at WVU, studying to become an SLP, Arianna gives insight on the grad school process, adjustment, and tips on how to succeed in the best ways possible. Take notes, you'll learn a few things. Happy listening! Make sure you follow Jappy Jaws and Lindsay on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jappyjaws/ https://www.instagram.com/lindsayyanyaa/ Tik Tok: https://vm.tiktok.com/ZMJvhfqHa/ Inquiries: jappyjaws@gmail.com https://linktr.ee/lindsayyanyaa Arianna Martinez Socials: https://www.instagram.com/ariannamartinez12/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oEgJf3OPzg8&feature=youtu.be

Cultivating Place
Seasons Of Our Joy, With Rabbi Arthur Waskow

Cultivating Place

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 60:36


September, October, and November are traditional harvest celebration months in the Northern Hemisphere from variations on Octoberfests to those around the idea of Thanksgiving. The ancient Jewish harvest festival of Sukkot is celebrated from the full moon on September 20th to September 27th this year, with the Autumnal Equinox occurring on the 22nd. This week on Cultivating Place we enjoy the second of two conversations on the sacred every day and the sacred in the seasonal. We are joined from Philadelphia by Rabbi Arthur Waskow, co-founder of The Shalom Center, which equips activists and spiritual leaders with awareness and skills needed to lead in shaping a transformed and transformative Judaism that can help create a world of peace, justice, healing for the earth, and respect for the interconnectedness of all life. A long-time activist for social and environmental justice, Rabbi Waskow is also the author of Seasons of our Joy, which brings reverent renewal to the ancient agricultural and seasons-based celebrations of the Abrahamic religions. Listen in! Cultivating Place now has a donate button! We thank you so much for listening over the years and we hope you'll support Cultivating Place. We can't thank you enough for making it possible for this young program to grow even more of these types of conversations. The show is available as a podcast on SoundCloud, iTunes, Google Podcast, and Stitcher. To read more and for many more photos please visit www.cultivatingplace.com.

New Books in History
Emmanuel Navon, "The Star and the Scepter: A Diplomatic History of Israel" (Jewish Publication Society, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 43:33


The first all-encompassing book on Israel's foreign policy and the diplomatic history of the Jewish people, The Star and the Scepter: A Diplomatic History of Israel (Jewish Publication Society, 2020) retraces and explains the interactions of Jews with other nations from the ancient kingdoms of Israel to modernity. Starting with the Hebrew Bible, Emmanuel Navon argues that one cannot grasp Israel's interactions with the world without understanding how Judaism's founding document has shaped the Jewish psyche. He sheds light on the people of Israel's foreign policy through the ages: the ancient kingdoms of Israel, Jewish diasporas in Europe from the Middle Ages to the emancipation, the emerging nineteenth-century Zionist movement, and Zionist diplomacy following World War I and surrounding World War II. Navon elucidates Israel's foreign policy from the birth of the state in 1948 to our days: the dilemmas and choices at the beginning of the Cold War; Israel's attempts to establish periphery alliances; the Arab-Israeli conflict; Israel's relations with Europe, the United States, Russia, Asia, Africa, Latin America, the United Nations, and the Jewish diasporas; and how twenty-first-century energy geopolitics is transforming Israel's foreign relations today. Navon's analysis is rooted in two central ideas, represented by the Star of David (faith) and the scepter (political power). First, he contends that the interactions of Jews with the world have always been best served by combining faith with pragmatism. Second, Navon shows how the state of Israel owes its diplomatic achievements to national assertiveness and hard power—not only military strength but economic prowess and technological innovation. Demonstrating that diplomacy is a balancing act between ideals and realpolitik, The Star and the Scepter draws aspirational and pragmatic lessons from Israel's exceptional diplomatic history. Renee Garfinkel, Ph.D. is a psychologist, writer, Middle East television commentator and host of The New Books Network's Van Leer Jerusalem Series on Ideas. Write her at r.garfinkel@yahoo.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Emmanuel Navon, "The Star and the Scepter: A Diplomatic History of Israel" (Jewish Publication Society, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 43:33


The first all-encompassing book on Israel's foreign policy and the diplomatic history of the Jewish people, The Star and the Scepter: A Diplomatic History of Israel (Jewish Publication Society, 2020) retraces and explains the interactions of Jews with other nations from the ancient kingdoms of Israel to modernity. Starting with the Hebrew Bible, Emmanuel Navon argues that one cannot grasp Israel's interactions with the world without understanding how Judaism's founding document has shaped the Jewish psyche. He sheds light on the people of Israel's foreign policy through the ages: the ancient kingdoms of Israel, Jewish diasporas in Europe from the Middle Ages to the emancipation, the emerging nineteenth-century Zionist movement, and Zionist diplomacy following World War I and surrounding World War II. Navon elucidates Israel's foreign policy from the birth of the state in 1948 to our days: the dilemmas and choices at the beginning of the Cold War; Israel's attempts to establish periphery alliances; the Arab-Israeli conflict; Israel's relations with Europe, the United States, Russia, Asia, Africa, Latin America, the United Nations, and the Jewish diasporas; and how twenty-first-century energy geopolitics is transforming Israel's foreign relations today. Navon's analysis is rooted in two central ideas, represented by the Star of David (faith) and the scepter (political power). First, he contends that the interactions of Jews with the world have always been best served by combining faith with pragmatism. Second, Navon shows how the state of Israel owes its diplomatic achievements to national assertiveness and hard power—not only military strength but economic prowess and technological innovation. Demonstrating that diplomacy is a balancing act between ideals and realpolitik, The Star and the Scepter draws aspirational and pragmatic lessons from Israel's exceptional diplomatic history. Renee Garfinkel, Ph.D. is a psychologist, writer, Middle East television commentator and host of The New Books Network's Van Leer Jerusalem Series on Ideas. Write her at r.garfinkel@yahoo.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

BEMA Session 1: Torah
237: Jewish Roots — Ways Parted for a Dark History

BEMA Session 1: Torah

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 51:46


Marty Solomon and Brent Billings explore the seventh and eighth chapters of Understanding the Jewish Roots of Christianity, discussing the divergence of Judaism and Christianity, and analyzing the relationship between the two groups in the centuries since.Jewish Roots — Ways Parted for a Dark History Presentation (PDF)Understanding the Jewish Roots of Christianity by Gerald McDermottIsaac W. Oliver at Bradley University“Seeing What's Next” (Technology Adoption Rates) — AsymcoRabbi Dr. Eugene Korn — Wikipedia

New Books in Jewish Studies
Emmanuel Navon, "The Star and the Scepter: A Diplomatic History of Israel" (Jewish Publication Society, 2020)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 43:33


The first all-encompassing book on Israel's foreign policy and the diplomatic history of the Jewish people, The Star and the Scepter: A Diplomatic History of Israel (Jewish Publication Society, 2020) retraces and explains the interactions of Jews with other nations from the ancient kingdoms of Israel to modernity. Starting with the Hebrew Bible, Emmanuel Navon argues that one cannot grasp Israel's interactions with the world without understanding how Judaism's founding document has shaped the Jewish psyche. He sheds light on the people of Israel's foreign policy through the ages: the ancient kingdoms of Israel, Jewish diasporas in Europe from the Middle Ages to the emancipation, the emerging nineteenth-century Zionist movement, and Zionist diplomacy following World War I and surrounding World War II. Navon elucidates Israel's foreign policy from the birth of the state in 1948 to our days: the dilemmas and choices at the beginning of the Cold War; Israel's attempts to establish periphery alliances; the Arab-Israeli conflict; Israel's relations with Europe, the United States, Russia, Asia, Africa, Latin America, the United Nations, and the Jewish diasporas; and how twenty-first-century energy geopolitics is transforming Israel's foreign relations today. Navon's analysis is rooted in two central ideas, represented by the Star of David (faith) and the scepter (political power). First, he contends that the interactions of Jews with the world have always been best served by combining faith with pragmatism. Second, Navon shows how the state of Israel owes its diplomatic achievements to national assertiveness and hard power—not only military strength but economic prowess and technological innovation. Demonstrating that diplomacy is a balancing act between ideals and realpolitik, The Star and the Scepter draws aspirational and pragmatic lessons from Israel's exceptional diplomatic history. Renee Garfinkel, Ph.D. is a psychologist, writer, Middle East television commentator and host of The New Books Network's Van Leer Jerusalem Series on Ideas. Write her at r.garfinkel@yahoo.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
Emmanuel Navon, "The Star and the Scepter: A Diplomatic History of Israel" (Jewish Publication Society, 2020)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 43:33


The first all-encompassing book on Israel's foreign policy and the diplomatic history of the Jewish people, The Star and the Scepter: A Diplomatic History of Israel (Jewish Publication Society, 2020) retraces and explains the interactions of Jews with other nations from the ancient kingdoms of Israel to modernity. Starting with the Hebrew Bible, Emmanuel Navon argues that one cannot grasp Israel's interactions with the world without understanding how Judaism's founding document has shaped the Jewish psyche. He sheds light on the people of Israel's foreign policy through the ages: the ancient kingdoms of Israel, Jewish diasporas in Europe from the Middle Ages to the emancipation, the emerging nineteenth-century Zionist movement, and Zionist diplomacy following World War I and surrounding World War II. Navon elucidates Israel's foreign policy from the birth of the state in 1948 to our days: the dilemmas and choices at the beginning of the Cold War; Israel's attempts to establish periphery alliances; the Arab-Israeli conflict; Israel's relations with Europe, the United States, Russia, Asia, Africa, Latin America, the United Nations, and the Jewish diasporas; and how twenty-first-century energy geopolitics is transforming Israel's foreign relations today. Navon's analysis is rooted in two central ideas, represented by the Star of David (faith) and the scepter (political power). First, he contends that the interactions of Jews with the world have always been best served by combining faith with pragmatism. Second, Navon shows how the state of Israel owes its diplomatic achievements to national assertiveness and hard power—not only military strength but economic prowess and technological innovation. Demonstrating that diplomacy is a balancing act between ideals and realpolitik, The Star and the Scepter draws aspirational and pragmatic lessons from Israel's exceptional diplomatic history. Renee Garfinkel, Ph.D. is a psychologist, writer, Middle East television commentator and host of The New Books Network's Van Leer Jerusalem Series on Ideas. Write her at r.garfinkel@yahoo.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

Windows Into The Bible
Understanding Paul Within Judaism with Mark D. Nanos

Windows Into The Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 91:34


In this episode, Marc sits down with renowned Paul scholar Mark Nanos, author of "Reading Paul Within Judaism" and winner of the 1996 National Jewish Book Award, to discuss and better understand the role of Paul within Judaism itself. For more information about the Windows Into The Bible Podcast visit https://witbpodcast.com/ Tweet us questions using #witbpodcast or email them to questions@witbpodcast.com To learn more about Windows Into The Bible University visit https://witbuniversity.com/ Ready to travel to the lands of the Bible again? Go to https://biblical-expeditions.com/ Credits: Host: Marc Turnage Executive Producer: Kyle M. Stefanowicz Producer: John-Michael Jalonen Audio Editing & Post Production Engineer: Mark Johnson Web/Technical: Michael Yardley Voiceover: Ashley McKay Fowler Voice Over Windows into the Bible Podcast is a product of Biblical Expeditions. For more information about Biblical Expeditions, visit Biblical-Expeditions.com. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/windowsintothebible/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/windowsintothebible/support

Rapping with Rabbi Rachel
Episode 25 - I Am Free

Rapping with Rabbi Rachel

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 21:21


In this episode Rabbi Rachel shares about Rosh Hashanah and Yom KippurSupport the show (https://secure.squarespace.com/checkout/donate?donatePageId=5826c088d2b8570fc609c7b6)

Emunah.com
Yom Kippur: Forgiveness, Atonement, and Mercy

Emunah.com

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 2:58


Around these Days of Awe, especially Yom Kippur (the Day of Atonement) it's customary to give a donation called "Pidyon Hanefesh" (Redemption of the Spirit) to a worthy individual who will pray on your behalf. This is a custom taught by the kabbalists and Hasidic masters including Rebbe Nachman of Breslov. The redemption (Pidyon) accompanied by the worthy individual's prayer on behalf of the giver, cancels and "sweetens" hash judgments, allowing for the blessing to flow into the giver's life at all levels. A formula for Pidyon attributed to Rebbe Nachman said to be found in his handwriting is printed at the beginning of his books printed by the Oddesser fund. It includes kabbalistic concepts and connections with holy names of the Creator. Part of it reads (translated): "May it be Your (God's) will, that the judgments, and harsh powers be sweetened over [name of giver and mother's name] through an upper wonder, great kindness, and complete and simple mercy, with no influence of judgment at all, amen." The Pidyon is a wonderful custom we inherited from the righteous ones before. Rav Dror solemnly performs the Pidyon Nefesh on behalf of the givers with an open heart and honest intentions. Our recommended donation amount is $180 per family, but Rav Dror is happy to perform the Pidyon Nefesh for any amount a family is able to give. This way, everyone who wants to participate in this holy custom will be able to. Please include each family members name and their mothers name in the “dedication” space on www.emunah.com/donate. Pidyon Nefesh donations recieved after Yom Kippur will be done before Sukkot. ----- Join this channel to access to Rav Dror's Exclusive Learning Program as well as perks. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtAh700VTIQb5Wsx_vdg-Pw/join Feeling inspired? Support Rav Dror: Monthly donations: https://Emunah.com/donate Cashapp- $ilpcourse Zelle- 321-440-0788 Venmo- @ilpcourse Rav Dror's books: https://Emunah.com/store Rav Dror's Exclusive Learning Program meets on Zoom every week: https://emunah.com/elp (or email info@emunah.com) Rav Dror offers private consultations for singles, couples, and families. Everything from spirituality to relationship advice, Rav Dror is happy to help. Email info@emunah.com to schedule a private consultation.

The Stoic Jew
TSJ Interlude: Vidui Yom ha'Kippurim and Memento Mori

The Stoic Jew

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 21:01


Synopsis: “Memento Mori” (remembering death) is a major theme in Stoicism and in Judaism – especially when it comes to doing teshuvah. We begin this episode by reflecting on statements by Chazal, the Rambam, and Marcus Aurelius about the sense of urgency created by the awareness of our mortality. But what can we do to incorporate this awareness into our experience of Yom ha'Kippurim? I believe that if we understand how Chazal framed the mitzvah of Vidui Yom ha'Kippurim, then we can convert it into a valuable “memento mori” tool which we can use to enhance our teshuvah on Yom ha'Kippurim. This week's Torah content has been sponsored by an anonymous donor in gratitude to the YBT community for being so welcoming to the new guys, and to the "old" guys.Sources:- Avos 2:10- Rambam: Teshuvah 7:1-2; 3:4; 2:7- Bachya ibn Paquda: Admonition- Aurelius Meditations 2:7,11; 4:17,37----------If you have questions, comments, or feedback, I would love to hear from you! Please feel free to contact me at rabbischneeweiss at gmail.----------If you've gained from what you've learned, please consider contributing to my Patreon at www.patreon.com/rabbischneeweiss. Alternatively, if you would like to make a direct contribution to the "Rabbi Schneeweiss Torah Content Fund," my Venmo is @Matt-Schneeweiss, and my Zelle/Chase QuickPay and PayPal are mattschneeweiss at gmail.com. Even a small contribution goes a long way to covering the costs of my podcasts, and will provide me with the financial freedom to produce even more Torah content for you.If you would like to sponsor an article, shiur, or podcast episode, or if you are interested in enlisting my services as a teacher or tutor, you can reach me at rabbischneeweiss at gmail.com. Thank you to my listeners for listening, thank you to my readers for reading, and thank you to my supporters for supporting my efforts to make Torah ideas available and accessible to everyone.----------YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/rabbischneeweissBlog: https://kolhaseridim.blogspot.com/Twitter: https://twitter.com/rmschneeweiss"The Mishlei Podcast": https://mishlei.buzzsprout.com"The Stoic Jew" Podcast: https://thestoicjew.buzzsprout.com"Rambam Bekius" Podcast: https://rambambekius.buzzsprout.com"Machshavah Lab" Podcast: https://machshavahlab.buzzsprout.com"The Tefilah Podcast": https://tefilah.buzzsprout.comGuide to the Torah Content of Rabbi Matt Schneeweiss: https://kolhaseridim.blogspot.com/2021/04/links-to-torah-content-of-rabbi-matt

Things I Didn't Learn In School
Rabbi Michael Friedman - Religion in the Modern World & Judaism 101

Things I Didn't Learn In School

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 43:37


What is the role of religion in the modern world? What is the day-to-day life of a Rabbi and how does one become one? What are the differences between different religions and differences within religion? Hear a thoughtful conversation. Edited and produced by Dave Manahan. 

Portico Church
The Christian View of Judaism

Portico Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 24:00


Israel News Talk Radio
Does Judaism Have Lucky Numbers? - The Science of Kabbalah

Israel News Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 43:11


We have entered the Yamim Noraim, the Ten Days of Awe. The period of deep repentance between Rosh HaShana - The Jewish New Year, and Yom Kippur - The Day of Atonement. There is no more significant prayer that is recited repeatedly during the month of Elul and during the final service of Yom Kippur than the 13 Attributes of Mercy. We go in depth on the number 13 and its significance to these days and to our service before the Creator. The Science of Kabbalah 14SEP2021 - PODCAST

Emunah.com
Lekutei Halachot Lessons #28 - Orach Chaim, Laws of Morning Conduct 4:9

Emunah.com

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 14:18


This class is dedicated to the memory and blessing of the soul of Kayla bat Shayna.

The Chassidic Story Project
The Rabbi Who Couldn't Sleep At Night

The Chassidic Story Project

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 9:50


A rabbi in Argentina tries to help a woman change her mind regarding marrying a non-Jew with the help of another rabbi who can't sleep at night. Also available at https://soundcloud.com/barak-hullman/the-rabbi-who-couldnt-sleep-at-night. To become a part of this project please go to https://www.patreon.com/barakhullman. Hear all of the stories at https://hasidicstory.com.

Roy Schoeman Podcasts
September 14, 2021 — Exaltation of the Cross

Roy Schoeman Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021


http://www.preces-latinae.org/thesaurus/Hymni/PangeF.html http://www.catholicchant.com/vexillaregis.html lustris sex https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LqBNF2v60ig  

Wondering Jews
Episode 57: Wiping out on Point Break

Wondering Jews

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 43:31


This week, Josh and Roy wipeout on Point Break joints. While out in no mans land, the boys rip into the headlines and then drop-in and wonder about all that phallic imagery in Judaism. After that, the boys get ragdolled on the sand and share their parenting moments of the week.   While you're reading this, help us grow the show! Check out our new  $1/month Big Spender level, and of course our $4.20/month Tokin' Supporter, and $10/month Bubbe Kush levels on Patreon!And if you dig the show, please leave a review wherever you get your podcasts. Follow us on Twitter: @JewsWondering  and become our besties on Facebook: @JewsWondering.  Or email us at WonderingJewsPodcast@gmail.com.Headlines: Moline Police Department receives grant for ‘Fatal Vision Marijuana Goggles'A Hasidic rabbi created a Shabbat jacket for carrying guns in synagoguesDungeons & Dragons has united a diverse group of rabbis. But their commitment to social justice has faced a challengeSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/wonderingjews)

Emunah.com
We're Spiritually Connected to Our Biblical Ancestors

Emunah.com

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 12:14


Rav Dror shares wisdom and advice for every soul and situation. If you like this video, please LIKE, COMMENT, and SHARE it so others can enjoy it too, and remember to SUBSCRIBE to stay connected. Support Rav Dror: Monthly and one-time donations: https://Emunah.com/donate Cashapp- $ilpcourse Zelle- 321-440-0788 Venmo- @ilpcourse Rav Dror's books: https://Emunah.com/store Rav Dror's Exclusive Learning Program meets on Zoom every week: https://emunah.com/elp (or email info@emunah.com) Rav Dror offers private consultations for singles, couples, and families. Everything from spirituality to relationship advice, Rav Dror is happy to help. Email info@emunah.com to schedule a private consultation.

Creedal Catholic
E90 The Question of Authority w/Michael Lofton

Creedal Catholic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 51:07


Thanks for tuning in to another episode! Today on the show, Michael Lofton of the Reason & Theology Show joins me to talk about his unique spiritual journey--Judaism to Protestant Christianity to Catholicism to Orthodoxy and back to Catholicism--and what he has learned about the authority of the Church along the way. It's a really good conversation. Check out more of Michael's work at https://reasonandtheology.com.

TheYeshiva.net - Most Recent Classes
Monday Class - Judaism: 3 Layers, 3 Perspectives

TheYeshiva.net - Most Recent Classes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 65:22


Chassidus: Likkutei Sichos Yom Kippur #2: This is a text based class,learning a sicha in Likkutei Sichos vol. 4, and is the second class in this series. It waspresented on Parshas Vayeilech, 7Tishrei, 5782, September 13, 2021,live from his home in Monsey, NY. The class explores three dimensions of Yom Kippur, mirroring three layers of Judaism: Torah, Teshuvah, and Yechidah. Connecting through Mitzvos; the Intrinsic Connection; and the Oneness which Transcends Connection

Kings and Generals: History for our Future
History of the Mongols SPECIAL: Religious Tolerance

Kings and Generals: History for our Future

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 22:54


One of the most enduring images of the Mongolian Empire is that it was a model of religious tolerance, one where each of the Khan's subjects were free to worship as they pleased. This is not a new belief;  in the 18th century, Edward Gibbon presented Chinggis Khan as a forerunner of the enlightenment, and for modern audiences the notion was repopularized with Jack Weatherford's book Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World. Some use the notion to counter the common presentations of Mongol brutality, usually accompanying blanket terms that all religious clergy were exempted from taxation, labour and were respected- or go as far as to present the Mongols as the inspiration for modern liberal religious toleration. While there is an element of truth to be had here, as with so much relating to the Mongols, describing the Chinggisid empire as a state of religious tolerance where all religions east and west lived in harmony fails to capture the reality of the period.       Even before the founding of the empire, Chinggis Khan interacted with a variety of religions. During his war to unify Mongolia, Chinggis Khan was supported by men of various religious backgrounds: Mongolian shamanist-animists, Nestorian Christians, Buddhists and Muslims, one of whom, Jafar Khoja, was supposedly a descendant of the Prophet Muhammad, and stood with him at the muddy waters of Lake Baljuna during one of his lowest moments. The most prominent tribes in the Mongolian steppe in the 12th century were Nestorian Christians such as the Kereyid and Naiman, and on the declaration of the Mongol Empire in 1206 Chinggis Khan's army and administration were quite mixed. Chinggis Khan himself was an animist: in Mongolian belief, all things in the world were inhabited by spirits which had to be consulted and placated. It was the job of shamans to intercede with these spirits on the Mongols' behalf. Generally, shamanism is not an exclusive religion; one can consult a shaman and still practice other faiths. The shaman was not like a Christian priest or Islamic imam, but a professional one could consult with regardless of other religious affiliation. The persuasion and power of religion in the Mongol steppe  came from the charisma of specific holy men -such as shamans- and their power to convene with spirits and Heaven on the Khan's behalf in order to secure his victory.        This seems to have been the guiding principle for how Chinggis Khan, and most of his successors, approached religion. Some Mongols viewed the major religions they encountered -Daoism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam- as all praying to the same God via different methods. This was more or less the statement that in the 1250s, Chinggis' grandson Mongke Khaan provided to the Franciscan friar William of Rubruck during an interview, stating that “We Mongols believe that there is only one God through whom we have life and through whom we die, and towards him we direct our hearts [...] But just as God has given the hand several fingers, so he has given mankind several paths.”       Usually for the Khans, it did not matter who was right, as basically all of the major religions were. What mattered was that these religions should pray to God on behalf of the Chinggisids to ensure divine favour for their rule. Heaven's will was manifested through victories and rulership, while it's displeasure manifested in defeats and anarchy. Much like the concept of the Chinese Mandate of Heaven, the right to rule provided by heaven could be rescinded, and thus the Mongols hoped to continually appease Heaven.       But the Mongols' views on religion were not static and took years to develop into their political theology- and nor were they inherently tolerant, and favours were allotted more on a personal basis. For example, in 1214 Chinggis Khan, or one of his sons, had an encounter with a Buddhist monk named Haiyun. Haiyun, with his head shaved bare in accordance with his role as a monk, was told by the Khan to grow his hair out and braid it in Mongolian fashion- for at that time, the Mongols were attempting to order the general population of north China to do so as a sign of their political subordination.  Religions in China dictated how one should maintain their hair; Buddhist monks had to shave their heads, Daoist monks could keep their hair long, while the general Chinese population, on Confucian teaching, could not cut their hair in adulthood, as it was a gift from the parents, and thus was kept in topknots. Demanding that the general population adopt the unique, partly shaved Mongolian hairstyle, was therefore a decree against all of China's major religions. The Mongols did not succeed in this policy and soon abandoned it's implementation on its sedentary subjects, though other sources indicate it was enforced on nomadic Turkic tribes who entered Mongol service, indicating their submission to the Great Khan. Notably the Manchu would successfully implement such a policy after their conquest of China 400 years later, forcing the population to adopt the long queues at the back of the head. When the Chinese revolted against Manchu rule, the cutting of the queue was one of the clearest signs of rejecting the Qing Dynasty.   Back to the Buddhist monk Haiyun, who Chinggis had ordered to grow out his hair in Mongol fashion. Haiyun told Chinggis that he could not adopt the Mongol hairstyle, as growing his hair out violated his duty as a monk. Learning this, Chinggis Khan allowed Haiyun to maintain his baldness, then in time extended this allowance to all Buddhist and Daoist clergy.  Even with this first privilege, Haiyun and his master did not receive coveted tax exempt status until 1219, and then on the recommendation of Chinggis' viceroy in North China, Mukhali. This is the earliest indication of Chinggis Khan granting of such a favour, followed soon by the extensive privileges granted to the Daoist master Qiu Chuji. The Daoist had made the journey from North China to meet Chinggis Khan in Afghanistan on the Khan's urging, ordered to bring Chinggis the secret to eternal life, as the Mongols had been told Qiu Chuji was 300 years old. Master Qiu Chuji told Chinggis that not only did he not have such power, but Chinggis should also abstain from hunting and sexual activity. Not surprisingly, Chinggis Khan did not take this advice, but he did grant the man extensive privileges, tax exempt status and authority over all Daoists in China. Importantly, Chinggis' edict was directed personally at Qiu Chuji and his disciples, rather than Daoism as a whole. The value Qiu Chuji had to Chinggis was on his individual religious charisma and ability to intercede with the heavens on the Khan's behalf, as well as his many followers who could be induced to accept Mongol rule. In Chinggis' view, the fact that Qiu Chuji was a Daoist leader did not entitle him to privileges. Neither did the Mongols initially differentiate between Buddhism and Daoism. In part due to the vaguely worded nature of Chinggis' edicts, Qiu Chuji's Daoist followers used these decrees to exert authority over Buddhists as well, seizing Buddhist temples and forcing Buddhist monks to become Daoists, beginning a Buddhist-Daoist conflict that lasted the rest of the 13th century.       The point of these anecdotes is to demonstrate that the conquests did not begin with a specific policy of general religious tolerance or support for local religious institutions. Governmental support and privilege was provided on an ad hoc basis, especially when a group or individual was seen as influential with the almighty. Toleration itself was also advertised as a tool; in the Qara-Khitai Empire, in what is now eastern Kazakhstan and northwestern China, an enemy of Chinggis Khan, prince Kuchlug of the Naiman tribe, had fled to Qara-Khitai and eventually usurped power. Originally an Eastern Christian, that is a Nestorian, in Qara-Khitai Kuchlug converted to a violent strang of Buddhism and began to force the Muslim clerics, particularly in the Tarim Basin, to convert to Chrisitanity or Buddhism on pain of death. When Chinggis Khan's forces under Jebe Noyan arrived in 1217 pursuing the prince, they recognized the general resentment against Kuchlug and, in order to undermine his support, declared that anyone who submitted to the Mongols would be free to practice their religion. The announcement worked well, as the empire was quickly and successfully turned over to the Mongols, and the renegade prince Kuchlug cornered and killed. Notably, this announcement did not come with statements of privileges or tax exemptions at large for the Islamic religious leaders. It was a decree spread to deliberately encourage the dissolution of the Qara-Khitai and ease the Mongol conquest- in this region, it was a comparatively peaceful conquest, by Mongol standards. But it was not coming from any specific high-mindedness for the treatment of religion, but an intention to expand into this territory and defeat the fleeing Kuchlug.       By the reign of Chinggis' son Ogedai in the early 1230s, the Mongol stance towards religions became more solidified. A major advancement, on the insistence of advisers like the Buddhist Khitan scholar Yelu Chucai, was that privileges were to be granted on religious communities and institutions rather than based on individual charisma, which made them easier to regulate and manage. Chucai also impressed upon the Mongols that Buddhism and Daoism were distinct beliefs, though the Mongols seem to have often continually erroneously thought both creeds worshipped a supreme deity a la Christianity and Islam. Buddhist and Daoism became, alongside Christianity and Islam, the four main “foreign religions” which the Mongols would issue edicts regarding privileges. It was not an evenly applied thing. With Islam, for instance, it can be said the Mongols often had the greatest difficulties. For one thing, the rapid annihilation of the Khwarezmian empire, the world's single most powerful islamic state at the time, resulted in the deaths of perhaps millions of Muslims as well as the belief that the Mongols were a punishment sent by God- a belief the Mongols encouraged. The reduction of Islam from “the state religion” to “just another religion of the Khan's subjects,” was a difficult one for many an imam and qadi to accept. For a universalist religion like Islam, subjugation to a pagan entity was a difficult pill to swallow, and the destruction of cities, mosques, agriculture and vast swathes of the population would not have been eased by statements of how tolerant the Mongols supposedly were.        Further, it is apparent that the Mongols' rule for the first decade or two of their interaction with the Islamic world was not tolerant. Part of this comes to an inherent conflict between the sharia law of Islam, and the yassa of Chinggis Khan. The yassa and yosun of Chinggis Khan were his laws and customs set out to provide a framework for Mongol life, which regulated interactions for the state, individuals, the environment, the spirits and the heavenly. As a part of this, it was decreed that animals had to be slaughtered in the Mongolian fashion; the animal usually knocked unconscious, turned onto its back, an incision made in the chest and its heart crushed. The intention was to prevent the spilling of the animals' blood needlessly upon the earth, which could beget misfortune. Contravening this was forbidden and punishable by death. The problem was that this is inherently conflicting with halal and kosher slaughter, which entailed slitting the throat and draining the blood. At various times over the thirteenth century, this was used as an excuse to punish and lead reprisals against Muslims. A number of Persian language sources assert that Ogedai Khaan's brother Chagatai was a harsh enforcer of the yassa on the empire's Muslim population. In the 1250s ‘Ala al-Din Juvaini asserted that Muslims in Central Asia were unable to make any halal killings due to Chagatai, and were forced to eat carrion from the side of the road. The Khwarezmian refugee Juzjani meanwhile said Chagatai planned a genocide of the Muslims. While these sources like to depict Chagatai as a foil to Ogedai's more ‘friendly to islam' image, it remains clear that for many Muslims, it was felt that the Mongol government had a particular hatred for them. But Chagatai was not the only one to enforce this. Ogedai himself briefly sought to enforce this rule, and the famous Khubilai Khan grew increasingly unfriendly to religion in his old age, and in the 1280s launched anti-muslim policies, banning halal slaughter and circumcision on pain of death. The incident which apparently set him off was a refusal of Muslim merchants in Khubilai's court to eat meat prepared in the Mongolian manner, though it may also have been an attempt to appease some of the Chinese elite by appearing to reduce Islamic and Central Asian influence in his government, particularly after the assassination of Khubilai's corrupt finance minister Ahmad Fanakati.        Even Daoism, favoured early by the Mongols thanks to the meeting of Qiu Chuji and Chinggis Khan, suffered stiff reprisals from the Mongol government. As the conflict between the Daoists and Buddhists escalated, in the 1250s on the behest of his brother Mongke Khaan, prince Khubilai headed a debate between representatives of the two orders. Khubilai, inclined to Buddhism on the influence of his wife and personal conversion, chose the Buddhists as the winners. Declaring a number of Daoist texts forgeries, Khubilai ordered many to be destroyed and banned from circulation, while also reducing their privileges. This failed to abate the tensions, and in the 1280s an older, less patient Khubilai responded with the destruction of all but one Daoist text, Lau Zi's Daodejing, and with murder, mutilation and exile for the offending Daoists.       Privileges only extended to religions the Mongols saw as useful, or offered evidence that they had support from heaven. Judaism, Zoroastrianism, Manicheism and Hinduism were usually totally ignored by the Mongols and did not receive the same privileges as the Christian, Buddhist, Daoist and Islamic clergy. Judaism may have received tax exemption status in the Ilkhanate for a brief period in the 1280s  and 90s due to the influence of a Jewish vizier, Sa'd al-Dawla, while in the Yuan Dynasty it took until 1330 for Judaism to earn such a status. As these religions lacked states which interacted with the Mongols, the Mongols saw these religions as having no power from heaven, and were therefore useless to them. Without any political clout, and of small representation within the Empire, these groups largely escaped the notice of the Khans.       The Mongols were also not above ordering the annihilation of a religion or religious groups when they defied them. The most well known case was a Shi'ite sect, the Nizari Ismailis, better known as the Assassins. Due to their resistance against the Mongol advance, the sect was singled out for destruction not just politically, but religiously, as Mongke Khaan had become convinced of this necessity by his more orthodox Islamic advisers. This task fell to his brother Hulegu, who enacted his brother's will thoroughly. Soon after the destruction of the Ismaili fortresses, which was lauded by Hulegu's Sunni Muslim biographer ‘Ala al-Din Juvaini,  Hulegu famously sacked Baghdad and killed the Caliph in 1258. Juvaini's chronicle, perhaps coincidentally, cuts off just before the siege of Baghdad. This attack on Baghdad was not religiously motivated; the Caliph had refused to accept Mongol authority. As a seemingly powerful head of a religion, his independence could not be abided. It was not a specifically anti-Islamic sentiment here, but a political one. Had the Mongols marched on Rome and the Pope also refused their mandate, such a fate would have awaited him as well. The presence of Christians in Hulegu's army, many from the Kingdom of Georgia and Cilician Armenia who partook with great enthusiasm in the slaughter of Muslims on Hulegu's request at Baghdad and in his campaign into Syria, as well as the fact that Hulegu's mother and chief wife were Chrisitans, would not have been lost on many Muslims, as well as the fact that Hulegu himself was a Buddhist.  Hulegu after the conquest of Baghdad ordered its rebuilding, but placed a Shi'ite Muslim in charge of this task and sponsored the restoration of Christian churches and monasteries, and other minority religions in his majority sunni-islam territories.     When the Mongols did convert to the local religions, they were not above carrying out with zeal assaults on other religious communities in their empire. Such was the case for Khans like Ozbeg in the Golden Horde or Ghazan in the Ilkhanate, who converted to Islam and struck against Christian, Buddhist and shamanic elements in their realms. These were as a rule very brief rounds of zealousness, as the economic usage of these groups and the uneven conversion of their followers to Islam made it politically and economically more useful to abandon these measures.        This is not to say of course, that there is no basis for the idea of Mongol religious tolerance, especially when compared to some contemporary states: just that when the favours, privileges and state support were granted, they were usually done to the four main religious groups the Mongols designated: again, Muslims, Christians, Daoists and Buddhists. So entrenched did these groups become as the “favoured religions” that in the Yuan Dynasty by the 14th century it was believed these four groups had been singled out by Chinggis Khan for their favours. This is despite the fact that Chinggis Khan had no recorded interactions with any Christian holymen.   But not idly should we dismiss the notion of there being a certain level of religious toleration among the Mongols. Not without reason was Ogedai Khaan portrayed as friendly in many Islamic sources, and he regularly gave the most powerful positions in the administration of North China to Muslims.  European travellers among the Mongols, such as John De Plano Carpini, Marco Polo and Simon of St. Quentin, along with Persian bureaucrats like ‘Ala al-Din Juvaini and the Syriac Churchman Bar Hebraeus, generally reported Mongol indifference to what religions were practiced by their subjects, as long as said subjects accepted Mongol command. Sorqaqtani Beki, the mother of Mongke and Khubilai, was a Nestorian Christian famous for patronizing and supporting mosques and madrassas. Mongke Khaan held feasts to mark the end of Ramadan where he would distribute alms and at least one such feast held in Qaraqorum, listened to a qadi deliver a sermon. He show respect to his Muslim cousin Berke, and for him had halal meat at one imperial banquet. If the yassa of Chinggis Khan was upheld thoroughly, then the Khans and all princes present would have been executed. In the four level racial hierarchy Khubilai Khan instituted in China, Muslims and Central Asians were second only to Mongols and nomads, and ranked above all Chinese peoples.    Religious men visiting the Khans usually left with the belief that the Khan was about to convert to their religion, so favourably had they been received. Khubilai Khan asked Marco Polo's father and uncle to bring him back  100 Catholic priests and holy oil from Jerusalem, and likely sent the Nestorian Rabban bar Sauma to Jerusalem for similar purposes. Marco Polo then goes on to present Khubilai as a good Christian monarch in all but name. Qaraqorum, the Mongol imperial capital, held Daoist and Buddhist temples across the street from Mosques and Churches. In Khubilai's capital of Dadu and the Ilkhanid capital of Sultaniyya were Catholic archbishoprics by the early 14th century. So there certainly was a level of toleration within the Mongol Empire that contemporaries, with wonder or frustration, could remark truthfully that it was quite different from their own homelands.    Such religious syncretism survived well into the century, when claimants to the fragmenting successor Khanates in western Asia, in order to define their legitimacy amongst the largely converted Mongol armies and stand out amongst the many Chinggisids, latched onto Islamic identities. Eager to prove their sincerity, they pushed back violently against even traditional Mongol shamanism. Despite it's early difficulties, in the end Islam largely won amongst the Mongols of the western half of the empire and their descendants, overcoming the brief revitalization Nestorian Christianity and Buddhism had enjoyed thanks to Mongol patronage. Such was the final outcome of the Mongols' religious toleration     Our series on the Mongols will continue, so be sure to subscribe to the Kings and Generals podcast to follow. If you enjoyed this, and would like to help us keep bringing you great content, please consider supporting us on patreon at www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals, or sharing this with your friends. This episode was researched and written by our series historian, Jack Wilson. I'm your host David, and we'll catch you on the next one.

Two Bi Guys
Bisexual Judaism & Resistance with Shiri Eisner & Jacob Engelberg

Two Bi Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 57:25


Follow Shiri Eisner on Twitter:  https://twitter.com/ShiriEisnerBuy Shiri's book: https://bookshop.org/books/bi-notes-for-a-bisexual-revolution/9781580054744Follow Jacob Engelberg on Twitter: https://twitter.com/criticalprvrsn We're back with the second part of our interview with Shiri Eisner, hosted by Jacob Engelberg, and it's the most queer-radical-Jewish episode you'll ever hear!We talked about how our bisexuality affects our Jewish identities (and vice-versa), the current situation in Israel/Palestine and Israel's persecution of Palestinians, the history of resistance to Zionism and homo-nationalism within Israel and its relationship to radical bisexual politics, how we can be connected by oppression and as a result unite in solidarity, and what Shiri is currently excited about in the world of Bi+ and queer activism. Two Bi Guys is produced and edited by Rob CohenCreated by Rob Cohen and Alex BoydLogo art by Kaitlin WeinmanMusic by Ross MintzerWe are supported by The Gotham (formerly IFP)

Monday Motivation
The Happiest Day of the Year- Yom Kippur! Monday Motivation 9-13-2021

Monday Motivation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 12:42


Well, it's time to rebrand Yom Kippur! The Talmud tells us that it is one of the two happiest days of the year! What?!?!? Yes, you heard me. Why? And how do we access this joyous state? Your answers are all in this edition of Monday Motivation with Rabbi Garfinkel!

TV Guidance Counselor Podcast
TV Guidance Counselor Episode 488: Jackie Michele Johnson

TV Guidance Counselor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 99:02


This week Ken welcomes host of the Natch Beaut podcast, and fellow Alison Rosen is Your New Best Friend pre-Apocalypse guest, Jackie Michele Johnson to the show. Ken and Jackie discuss good closets, personal space in a marriage, Sex and the City, converting to Judaism, Ken's blank spot that is 2004, the Reality TV Boom, how full hair and make up is a Texas thing, how who shot JR was technically a dream, Grey's Anatomy, multiple helicopter crashes, the tragic life and death of Anna Nicole Smith, Trim Spa Baby, being ok with spoilers if they are sad, do people in NYC dress cooler?, Dean Cain, Scott Peterson, Dean Cain's terrible facial hair disguise, central time, The Ring, horror flicks and pizza, Ernest Goes to School, MTV Cribs, finding Pimp My Ride Cars in 2021, everyone's Jaime Kennedy story, how Jennifer Love Hewett is too good for him, watching basketball, Average Joe Hawaii, LA's hot chick + mediocre guy phenomenon, Fear Factor, twins, Scare Tactics, Las Vegas, being a background actor, method background actors, Punk'd, The Terminator, Tracy Morgan: Crazy Person, 30 Rock, Ed, Gary Oldman, Sid & Nancy, How The Prisoner is the only show Alex Cox likes, The Hills, Laguna Beach, The O.C., how Blondie isn't The GoGos, debating if watching more or less of The Apprentice may have saved America, Friends, Extreme Makeover, Extreme Makeover: Home Edition, visiting the set of Dawson's Creek, Joshua Jackson's hot wife and how he's a good dude, the secrets of Queer Eye for the Straight Guy, The 100 Hottest Hotties of 2004, Jack Osbourne replacing Sharon, the big deal of reality show marriages, and Barry Bostwick on Scrubs.

Daily Jewish Thought
Let it GO! A Pre Yom Kippur Lecture on Forgiveness

Daily Jewish Thought

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 39:42


A Special Pre-High Holidays Sermon and Workshop with Rabbi Yisroel BernathThis year has been a difficult one for all of us. We find ourselves searching for ways to forgive and forget, searching for answers, inspiration and meaning. We want to love ourselves and other. We want to understand what this all means. What does it all really mean? How do we let it all go? What do we hold onto and what don't we hold onto? Who do we forgive and how will we be forgiven?Join Rabbi Yisroel Bernath for this incredible High Holiday journey. You will learn simple secrets for healing yourself and and other this new year.Sign up for High Holidays Here http://www.jewishndg.com/highholidays2021Resources for High Holidays at Home https://www.jewishndg.com/templates/articlecco_cdo/aid/4876001/jewish/Resources-for-High-Holidays-at-Home.htmHow to do Kapparot with money https://medium.com/@loverabbi/how-to-do-kaparot-with-money-ffd2988f4a24Support the show (http://www.jewishndg.com/donate)

Emunah.com
The Essence of Reality is Divine (Kabbalah)

Emunah.com

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 18:47


Rav Dror shares wisdom and advice for every soul and situation. If you like this video, please LIKE, COMMENT, and SHARE it so others can enjoy it too, and remember to SUBSCRIBE to stay connected. Support Rav Dror: Monthly and one-time donations: https://Emunah.com/donate Cashapp- $ilpcourse Zelle- 321-440-0788 Venmo- @ilpcourse Rav Dror's books: https://Emunah.com/store Rav Dror's Exclusive Learning Program meets on Zoom every week: https://emunah.com/elp (or email info@emunah.com) Rav Dror offers private consultations for singles, couples, and families. Everything from spirituality to relationship advice, Rav Dror is happy to help. Email info@emunah.com to schedule a private consultation.

Rogue Table Talks
RTT 121 - Whose Gospel?

Rogue Table Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 36:08


RTT 121 - Gospel from God Galatians 1:11-24 Paul Called by God 11 For I would have you know, brothers, that the gospel that was preached by me is not man's gospel. 12 For I did not receive it from any man, nor was I taught it, but I received it through a revelation of Jesus Christ. 13 For you have heard of my former life in Judaism, how I persecuted the church of God violently and tried to destroy it. 14 And I was advancing in Judaism beyond many of my own age among my people, so extremely zealous was I for the traditions of my fathers. 15 But when he who had set me apart before I was born, and who called me by his grace, 16 was pleased to reveal his Son to[e] me, in order that I might preach him among the Gentiles, I did not immediately consult with anyone; 17 nor did I go up to Jerusalem to those who were apostles before me, but I went away into Arabia, and returned again to Damascus. 18 Then after three years I went up to Jerusalem to visit Cephas and remained with him fifteen days. 19 But I saw none of the other apostles except James the Lord's brother. 20 (In what I am writing to you, before God, I do not lie!) 21 Then I went into the regions of Syria and Cilicia. 22 And I was still unknown in person to the churches of Judea that are in Christ. 23 They only were hearing it said, “He who used to persecute us is now preaching the faith he once tried to destroy.” 24 And they glorified God because of me. _______ The gospel that was preached to me is not man's gospel … Last week - no other gospel … This week - it isn't made up by people … divine source I received this gospel through a revelation of Jesus Christ Validated as the same gospel as the other apostles Quick overview of what Paul's gospel is … Creation / Fall / Redemption / Recreation Sin - Wrath - Sacrifice - Grace - Faith - Transformation - New Life A quick primer on Epistemology … how do we know things? Post truth world … everyone has their own truth … live your truth … But - as Pilate asked - “What is Truth?” Definition How we get it … God reveals it to us … Why we need revelation (general and special) Our ability to find truth is dependent on God's enablement to find it Another reason the gospel is a gospel of grace: Initiative - God called him by grace before he was born … foreknew Humiliation Sacrifice Continued transformation through our fallenness … The revelation of the gospel … The evidence of the true gospel - Paul's life change … --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/roguetabletalks/message

18Forty Podcast
Yabloner Rebbe: The Rebbe of Change [Teshuva 5/5]

18Forty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 84:04


In this episode of the 18Forty Podcast, we talk to Rabbi Pini Dunner and Rav Moshe Weinberger about the Yabloner Rebbe and his astounding story of teshuva.The Yabloner Rebbe was a chassidishe rebbe who helped found Kfar Chassidim. He disappeared and went to Los Angeles, where he went off the derech, but he later returned to Judaism and Kfar Chassidim in a remarkable example of teshuva.- Who was the Yabloner Rebbe?- Why did he leave his faith?- What inspired him to return?Tune in to hear a conversation about the astounding story of the Yabloner Rebbe.References:The God of Loneliness by Philip Schultz https://www.amazon.com/God-Loneliness-Selected-New-Poems/dp/0547249659The Amazing Return of the Yabloner Rebbe by Rabbi Pini Dunner https://www.tabletmag.com/sections/arts-letters/articles/amazing-yabloner-rebbeThe Astonishing Story of the Yabloner Rebbe by Rabbi Pini Dunner https://rabbidunner.com/the-astonishing-story-of-the-yabloner-rebbe/Rabbi Pini Dunner Website https://rabbidunner.com/Mavericks, Mystics & False Messiahs by Rabbi Pini Dunner https://www.amazon.com/Mavericks-Mystics-False-Messiahs-Episodes/dp/1592645100 For more, visit https://18forty.org/podcast/teshuva.

Temple Beth Am Podcasts
Shabbat Teaching: Shabbat Shuvah Afternoon Learning

Temple Beth Am Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 29:42


Rabbi-Cantor Hillary Chorny's Shabbat Teaching at Temple Beth Am, Los Angeles, on September 11, 2021. (Youtube/Zoom)

Roy Schoeman Podcasts
September 11,2021 — The Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary and Rosh Hashanah

Roy Schoeman Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 56:25


Roy Schoeman clean 56:25 Jesus: The Promised Messiah of Judaism on Radio MariaEpisodes From Roy's Show on Radio Maria. All "p

Temple Beth Am Podcasts
Shabbat Sermon: Remembering 9/11

Temple Beth Am Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 11:45


Rabbi Adam Kligfeld, Rabbi-Cantor Hillary Chorny, and Rabbi Rebecca Schatz 's remembrance of 9/11. (Youtube/Zoom)

Temple Beth Am Podcasts
Shabbat Sermon: Vayeilech - Remembering 9/11

Temple Beth Am Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 13:47


Dr. Erica Rothblum's Shabbat Sermon at Temple Beth Am, Los Angeles, on September 11, 2021. (Youtube/Zoom) Special Guest: Dr. Erica Rothblum.

Temple Beth Am Podcasts
Exploring the Parasha: Vayelech

Temple Beth Am Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 50:01


Rabbis Rebecca Schatz and Matt Shapiro lead a discussion of the most interesting stories, verses and themes in the weekly parasha. This discussion was conducted at Temple Beth Am Los Angeles via Zoom on September 10, 2021 Special Guest: Rabbi Matt Shapiro.

Here's Tom with the weather...
Islam & The Alcoholics Anonymous 12 Steps

Here's Tom with the weather...

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 76:04


Today we're talking … about Islam as it applies to the 12 Steps - with Andrea Travers. Andrea Travers was born in New York, where she was also ordained in 2003. Aside from her doctor's degree in ministry, which she acquired in 2010, she also has a bachelor's degree in journalism and a master's degree in mass communication from the University of Oregon and University of Portland respectively. Married with three children, she now lives in the city of Wilsonville in Oregon with her family.Andrea's study of Islam was conducted as part of her doctoral work that studied the eight faith traditions as well as two years at an interfaith seminary in New York City where she was ordained. She is an author of several books including theTwelve Wisdom Steps: Unifying Principles of the 12 Steps of A.A. Found in the Wisdom Traditions,is described as thus:Beneath the well-known twelve steps of Alcoholics Anonymous (A.A.) are the universal principles of spiritual practice as they are expressed in traditional religions and wisdom traditions; including Buddhism, Christianity, Cosmology, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Native American Spirituality, and Taoism. This wisdom expressed itself in the 20th century movement known as A.A. The purpose of her book is to ensure that seekers from all faith traditions have an opportunity to realize and appreciate the universality of transformative spiritual practices.https://www.12wisdomsteps.com/Help us Keep Tom going – please donate a few bucks/quid/sheckels here at Paypal: Gilwriter@hotmail.co.uk See us every Friday at zoom https://us02web.zoom.us/j/88215498348Zoom ID 882 1549 348 password TomOur website is at www.HTWTW.comJoin our Facebook Page ‘Here's Tom with the weather' at https://www.facebook.com/groups/314088509589654To see past episodes, join the ‘Here's Tom with the Weather' Youtube Channel here: https://youtube.com/channel/UCdW7K07ZZUPZZ-t0s7XmURQ

Temple Beth Am Podcasts
Meditation and Mindfulness with Rabbi Adam Kligfeld

Temple Beth Am Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 17:22


Rabbi Adam Kligfeld offers up short bursts of meditation infused with the imagery, wisdom, and the rhythms of our Jewish calendar including selected verses from the Torah. Many of these meditations are performed in sitting positions; some standing. Simply find yourself a comfortable space and let Rabbi Kligfeld's voice and direction guide you into a world of serenity and tranquility.

Keep the Faith with Shammai Engelmayer
Episode No. 66—Another look at abortion and Jewish law

Keep the Faith with Shammai Engelmayer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 17:54


There are good reasons why the Supreme Court will not uphold Texas' new anyi-abortion law, but the odds are slim. It's all up to how convincing John Roberts can be in arguing with his conservative colleagues. Meanwhile, here is an updated version of Episode No. 18 from July 2020 on Judaism's take.Support the show (http://www.shammai.org)

The Secret Teachings Archives
The Secret Teachings 9/9/21 - Fire

The Secret Teachings Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 59:43


The Bible speaks of fire as baptizing in relation to the Holy Spirit, but also as destructive as a tool of God. It can be seen figuratively as a substance that burns away the old and unusable to allow for the rebirth of a Phoenix rising from the ashes. This occurs in nature, too, particularly natural wildfires that precede a forest's rebirth and growth. Fires can be caused by man for reasons that are both politically negligent and socially irresponsible, making Smokey very upset. Fire can also be seen as consciousness and will. Traditionally, the wand represents the will and air; the chalice or cup represents intuition and water; the sword represents mind and fire; and the pentacle represents the bodily temple or earth. Other traditions assign the wand to fire and sword to air. This wand of association with fire is the direction of will which is itself an expression of fiery consciousness. Fire can be as destructive as it is necessary to creation and life. From Daniel in the den of solar creatures - lions - to the concept of the magi, fire is a driving elemental force. Salamanders are elementals of fire. Commonly referred to as genies, and especially prevalent in Persian belief such as the cults of Zoroastrianism and Mithraism, they provided a framework for the formation of demons in Christianity, Islam and Judaism. Material fire was made of their essence and could not exist otherwise. What is cold and dark - Earth - is warmed and illuminated through the Sun. Those seeking forgiveness for their sins, having been harassed by guilt, are burning with the same desire that may have been responsible for their actions.  Support this podcast

Seay the Future Podcast
Michael Eisenberg, Israel Venture Capitalist

Seay the Future Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 54:33


Michael Eisenberg is co-founder and General Partner at Aleph, an early stage venture capital fund with over $500 million under management. Michael has been a venture capitalist for twenty-five years. Aleph focuses on partnering with great Israeli entrepreneurs to build large, meaningful companies and impactful global brands. Since its founding in 2013, Aleph has invested in more than forty companies, including Melio, Lemonade, Bringg, JoyTunes, Healthy.io, and Nexar.Since 2006, Michael has been writing the blog Six Kids and a Full Time Job, on topics ranging from politics to technology, Judaism, and macroeconomics. He was a contributor to TheMarker, a Hebrew-language daily business newspaper, and is the author of the “The Hummus Manifesto,” the seminal piece on Israel's innovation scene. Michael has also published five books in Hebrew: The Vanishing Jew, Ben Baruch, The Tree of Life and Prosperity, Everyone can be Moses, and Roaring Tribe. He lectures frequently on venture capital, Israel, and entrepreneurship. He serves on the board of the nonprofit organization Yeshivat Har Etzion and is the chairman of The Shomer Hachadash. Michael lives in Jerusalem with his wife and eight children.

The Chassidic Story Project
The Unholy Spirits' Full Stomachs

The Chassidic Story Project

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 10:24


The Baal Shem Tov saves a family from debtors prison and asks the husband of the family to tell them what happened while they were there. Also available at https://soundcloud.com/barak-hullman/the-unholy-spirits-full-stomachs. To become a part of this project please go to https://www.patreon.com/barakhullman. Hear all of the stories at https://hasidicstory.com.

Unpacking Israeli History
The Story Of Israel's Black Panthers

Unpacking Israeli History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 30:11


The modern country of Israel is a country of immigrants, and many are Mizrahi, ie Jews from North Africa and the Middle East. They came, often running for their lives, from countries like Yemen, Morocco, Iraq, Egypt, and Syria, where they had lived -- and often, been oppressed. In this episode, Noam confronts the difficult history of the Mizrahi integration into Israel, and the formation of the Panterim Shchorim movement that emerged from that painful period. ~~~~ Unpacking Israeli History is generously sponsored by Alan Fisher and Barbara Sommer, and Jon and Rachie Teller. ~~~~ Learn more about Unpacked: https://jewishunpacked.com/about/ Visit Unpacked on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/unpacked  See more about the Yemenite Children Affair: https://unpacked.education/the-yemenite-children-affair-unpacked/ See more on Mizrahi culture: https://unpacked.education/video/mizrachi-music/ https://unpacked.education/video/how-mizrahi-music-took-over-israeli-pop/ See the full season of Unpacking Israeli History here: https://jewishunpacked.com/podcast-series/unpacking-israeli-history/ ~~~~ Sources https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/immigrants-to-israel-1948-1952 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vA2q9yyLlX4 https://www.haaretz.com/jewish/1.5280465 https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt21h4xqw.9?seq=1#metadata_info_tab_contents   https://www.haaretz.com/jewish/1.5280465   https://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-3316015,00.html   https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/.premium-this-haifa-quarter-symbolizes-dispossession-first-of-palestinians-then-of-jews-1.8187863   https://www.jta.org/1960/01/22/archive/leader-of-haifa-riots-released-from-jail-under-presidential-amnesty   https://books.google.com/books?id=YxJbEgx6X8kC&pg=PA29#v=onepage&q=Musrara&f=false   https://www.pbs.org/hueypnewton/actions/actions_platform.html   https://sci-hub.se/https://doi.org/10.5325/studamerjewilite.35.1.0077   https://www.jta.org/1969/02/24/archive/jerusalem-supersol-re-opens-for-business-2-young-bombing-victims-are-buried   https://web.archive.org/web/20071227064213/http://news.independent.co.uk/people/obituaries/article3284869.ece   https://sci-hub.se/https://doi.org/10.1080/17541320802063554   https://sci-hub.se/https://doi.org/10.1177/0044118X84016002002   https://www.nli.org.il/en/newspapers/dav/1971/03/04/01/article/20/?e=-------en-20--1--img-txIN%7ctxTI--------------1   https://reuters.screenocean.com/record/549772   https://israeled.org/israeli-black-panthers/   https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:PikiWiki_Israel_15327_Musrara_neighborhood_Jerusalem.jpg   http://israelsdocuments.blogspot.com/2013/05/the-black-panthers-arent-nice.html   https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/.premium.MAGAZINE-the-guerrilla-filmmaker-who-caught-israel-s-black-panthers-on-tape-1.5975793?lts=1624818943350   https://www.haaretz.com/1.4970675   https://electronicintifada.net/content/when-israels-black-panthers-found-common-cause-palestinians/26821   https://people.socsci.tau.ac.il/mu/noah/files/2018/07/Ethnic-origin-and-identity-in-Israel-JEMS-2018.pdf   https://www.cjnews.com/perspectives/rise-mixed-ethnicity-israelis ~~~~ Unpacked is a division of OpenDor Media

Star Trek and the Jews
For You Were Strangers

Star Trek and the Jews

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 59:04


Refugees, Judaism and Star Trek, examined through the lens of DS9 Sanctuary. How has Star Trek depicted refugees? What obligations do we as Jews have to welcome refugees? Guests Jodi Block and Naomi Kramer of JIAS Toronto, a Jewish agency dedicated to the settlement of immigrants and refugees. -- HSHW: DS9 Sanctuary (2x10) -- Music Attribution Feather Waltz by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3743-feather-waltz License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license

Born to Win Podcast - with Ronald L. Dart

Even if you are not Jewish, you are probably aware of the two main Jewish holidays in the autumn of every year: the Jewish New Year, and Yom Kippur. But you may not be aware that these are also Christian holidays. Around the end of the first century, there was a lot of persecution of the Jews in and around Rome, and the church began to differentiate themselves from the Jews in every way they could. A lot of practices that were very common in the early church disappeared in the smoke of an oppression of the Jews. But why would the early church have paid any attention to what we know as Jewish holidays?For one thing, Christians and Jews shared the same God. In its earliest years, Christianity was viewed by the world, not as a separate religion, but as a sect of Judaism. The earliest Christians were Jewish, and they had no consciousness of starting a new religion. Rather they saw what they were doing as a restoration of a purer faith. Judaism, in the Christian view, had gone astray and they were going to put it right. There is nothing strange about that; nearly every new sect of religion sees itself as a restorer of lost paths.And so the first Christians, who were Jewish, continued to observe the holidays they had observed all their lives, and they taught the Gentile converts to do the same. But it was inevitable that they should begin to see new significance in these days that transcended the Jewish/historical meaning of the days. To put it simply, the early Christians saw Christ in the Jewish holidays. And now, 2,000 years later, you and I come along and wonder, What did they see?

Unorthodox
The Apology Episode, 5782: Ep. 287

Unorthodox

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 68:30


Welcome to our annual apology episode! As we do every year, we searched far and wide for stories about apologies, forgiveness, and repentance. We hope this episode inspires you to approach Yom Kippur with some new insights and appreciation for making amends. First, we speak with legal scholar and Former Dean of Harvard Law School Martha Minow about US law and forgiveness, and whether the justice system should perhaps be more forgiving. Then, Rabbi Jonathan Spira-Savett, host of the new podcast Tov!, speaks with Producer Robert about the concept of teshuva, repentance, and the source he believes can educate us all on repentance--NBC's The Good Place, starring Kristen Bell and Ted Danson. Next, writer Simone Ellin recounts her experience confronting her childhood bullies, and uncovers the surprising truth about how others remember events that were so traumatic to her. We hear from author Susan Shapiro about her new memoir, The Forgiveness Tour, which explores many of the subjects we talk about when we talk about apologies--should you forgive someone who doesn't apologize, what Judaism has to say about forgiveness, and whether some sins are truly unpardonable. And you know it isn't an Unorthodox apology episode without a visit from our favorite apology expert, former Tablet colleague and Founder of the blog SorryWatch, Marjorie Ingall. Sorry, not sorry. As always, let us know what you think of the show! Send us comments and questions at unorthodox@tabletmag.com, or leave us a voicemail at (914) 570-4869. You can also record a voice memo on your smartphone and email it to us. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to get new episodes, photos, and more. Join our Facebook group, and follow Unorthodox on Twitter and Instagram. Get a behind-the-scenes look at our recording sessions on our YouTube channel! Get your Unorthodox T-shirts, mugs, and baby onesies at bit.ly/unorthoshirt. Want to book us for a live show? Email producer Josh Kross at jkross@tabletmag.com. Check out all of Tablet's podcasts at tabletmag.com/podcasts. Sponsors: AJWS supports activists working with vulnerable communities around the globe throughout the ongoing pandemic. Make your double-matched, tax-deductible donation today at AJWS.org/unorthodox. Harry's is a great shave at a great price. Get a Harry's trial shave set for just $3 at harrys.com/unorthodox.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Kehillat Israel Podcasts
Rabbi Bernstein's Rosh Hashanah Sermon 2021: Standing Together Listening

Kehillat Israel Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 21:04


Roy Schoeman Podcasts
September 4, 2021 — Music and Prayers of Rosh Hashanah (rebroadcast)

Roy Schoeman Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 56:12


Roy Schoeman clean 56:12 Jesus: The Promised Messiah of Judaism on Radio MariaEpisodes From Roy's Show on Radio Maria. All

Sicha Discourse, Rabbi Ari Shishler
Chelek 19, Vayeilech 02

Sicha Discourse, Rabbi Ari Shishler

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 46:46


Every Jewish spiritual leader brings a unique dimension to Judaism. Support this podcast

Kehillat Israel Podcasts
Rabbi Reuben's Erev Rosh Hashanah Sermon 2021: You Already Know the Answer

Kehillat Israel Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 24:44


Our Foundations Podcast
3.12 Moral Strategies for Liberty

Our Foundations Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 57:45


There are many strategies for achieving more liberty in our lives and in society writ large that do not involve participating in immoral systems or means. The first discussed is agorism and the counter economy. Next is the Second Realm perspective with TAZ's (temporary autonomous zones), pseudonyms, crypto anarchy, and proxy merchants. Vonu is next (VOluntary Not vUlnerable) with a focus on self sufficiency and building resilience from the coercion of the State. Mutual aid groups and mutual assistance groups are brought up following that. The next strategy comes from Vaclav Benda and Vaclav Havel out of the Charter 77 movement. This is the Parallel Polis strategy that defines the building out of a parallel society through a list of "pillars" of the Parallel Polis. Finally, I mention the original Church and their strategy of building out a parallel society as a response to their opposition to being involved with the State (Rome), mainstream culture, and the dominant institutional religion (Judaism).    Our Foundations podcast:  - Website - http://www.ourfoundations.podbean.com/ - Email - ourfoundations@protonmail.com - SubscribeStar to support/ donate - https://www.subscribestar.com/ourfoundations - Patreon to support / donate - https://www.patreon.com/ourfoundations - Twitter - https://twitter.com/Foundationspc - Medium - https://medium.com/@OurFoundations - Bitcoin Address - 1AZFLCvmfXasChaaecgYMP3vtnUrnLJoY7 - Litecoin - LcXEqTS4ooNed1sxkbonuTrwM21ubWf2qi - Ethereum - 0x409D0F2766e208C1Ea97fF2429D38a3D9E3abd3a - Zcash - t1SZKfocBcghVMWVCsbSA9zAHr5fzsxi62H - Pivx - D7ziutb5gGNnJ5pXngwa3w9zJj2P1iNzUT - Bitcoin Cash - bitcoincash:qprk7ppzepzdnczvl6lffz8f5zcnjh0hyvwlgm983x - Nano - nano_16gh7igt8zb1cntbmq1hrnmnc9ea9qrj3zycscqywhak5dgtx1gwommekt7r  - Music :  - Pied Piper by Shaolin Dub is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 License. - Jet Fueled Vixen Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License  - Hard Fragility by Bisou is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial License  - Gjallar by Alexander Nakarada | https://www.serpentsoundstudios.com Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.com Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/