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Programmed to Chill
29 - Krupp Steel pt. 12, Alfried and Arndt Krupp, or, Failson Supremacy

Programmed to Chill

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 43:53


We're at the end of the series. We talk about the sudden collapse of Krupp Steel. First, we discuss Krupp's Holocaust reparations fund, and how they somehow managed to make even that anti-Semitic. Then we talk about Arndt von Bohlen und Halbach, the useless playboy son of Alfried Krupp. He hung out with some really interesting failsons and faildaughters and got up to some hijinks, none of which even approach the horrors of his father. In discussing the collapse, we use the 'business school' approach and the 'parapolitical' approach to understanding what was going on, and hopefully tried to synthesize the two. Illiquidity and Krupp not cutting in the right people, basically, were the two root causes, possibly paired with a controlled demolition. There's also the almost unparalleled lines of credit Krupp was giving to the Eastern bloc which can't really be explained through a straight 'business school' understanding of events. Tax law is discussed, also. Krupp Steel became a foundation, and we discuss the fates of Alfried and Arndt. To finish, I created the Programmed To Chill Matrix of Business Success to quantify Krupp's many, many moral, legal, and dare I say religious failings.

The Austin Daily Drop
Austin Daily Drop - Tuesday November 23, 2021

The Austin Daily Drop

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 8:45


As local COVID numbers continue at a low ebb, interest grows in booster shots. A huge travel week at ABIA - airport officials recommend showing up 3 hours early for flights. Samsung settles on Taylor for the location for their new $17 billion microchip plant. In spite of a recent volume slowdown, Austin's real estate prices continue setting new record highs, while a study finds Austin's cost of living the highest in Texas. UT professors protest the University stopping an ongoing study of racism that involved young children. More anti-Semitic graffiti shows up at Anderson High School. Alex Jones is subpoenaed by the U.S. House committee investigating the January 6 insurrection. Texas RB Bijan Robinson says he will not transfer away from the Longhorns. Violet Crown Cinema plans a fourth location, in Dallas. The Zilker Tree will be lit for the first time, and nightly for the rest of the year, as of Saturday at 6pm. And nice weather continues ahead of a wet cold front expected on Thursday.

The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters
The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters #267

The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 91:14


Tom and Harry discuss Azeem Rafiq being called out over anti-Semitic comments, J.K. Rowling being excluded from the 20th anniversary of her own franchise, and Meghan Markle meeting the common folk.

The Austin Daily Drop
Austin Daily Drop - Monday November 15 2021

The Austin Daily Drop

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 9:09


Beto O'Rourke formally announces his candidacy for Governor of Texas. Local COVID numbers continue hovering in upper Stage 2 range as the City seeks feedback on its vaccine operations. Winter infrastructure worries: a review of last winter's death toll offers a sobering reminder as the head of PUC says power providers have two weeks to get ready. The Rally For Kindness marks Austin's resistance to recent anti-Semitic incidents. Zohaib Qadri announces his candidacy for the District 9 Austin City Council seat, while longtime Travis County Clerk Dana Debouvoir announces her retirement. Austin ISD faces a $62 million budget shortfall due to low enrollment numbers. Texas Football hits a historic low with a five-game losing streak - including the loss to injury of star RB Bijan Robinson - while Texas Women's Basketball marks a huge win over defending national champions Stanford. Westlake, Lake Travis, Vandergrift and Bowie are among local high school football teams who scored wins in the opening weekend of the championship playoffs. The Fear The Walking Dead production walks to Georgia after funding cuts by the Texas Legislature. And warm weather continues, but a cool snap is coming before the weekend.

ESV: Daily Office Lectionary
November 14: Psalms 66–67; Psalm 19; Psalm 46; 1 Maccabees 2:29-43, 49-50; Acts 28:14–23; Luke 16:1–13

ESV: Daily Office Lectionary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 6:44


Proper 28 First Psalm: Psalms 66–67 Psalms 66–67 (Listen) How Awesome Are Your Deeds To the choirmaster. A Song. A Psalm. 66   Shout for joy to God, all the earth;2     sing the glory of his name;    give to him glorious praise!3   Say to God, “How awesome are your deeds!    So great is your power that your enemies come cringing to you.4   All the earth worships you    and sings praises to you;    they sing praises to your name.” Selah 5   Come and see what God has done:    he is awesome in his deeds toward the children of man.6   He turned the sea into dry land;    they passed through the river on foot.  There did we rejoice in him,7     who rules by his might forever,  whose eyes keep watch on the nations—    let not the rebellious exalt themselves. Selah 8   Bless our God, O peoples;    let the sound of his praise be heard,9   who has kept our soul among the living    and has not let our feet slip.10   For you, O God, have tested us;    you have tried us as silver is tried.11   You brought us into the net;    you laid a crushing burden on our backs;12   you let men ride over our heads;    we went through fire and through water;  yet you have brought us out to a place of abundance. 13   I will come into your house with burnt offerings;    I will perform my vows to you,14   that which my lips uttered    and my mouth promised when I was in trouble.15   I will offer to you burnt offerings of fattened animals,    with the smoke of the sacrifice of rams;  I will make an offering of bulls and goats. Selah 16   Come and hear, all you who fear God,    and I will tell what he has done for my soul.17   I cried to him with my mouth,    and high praise was on1 my tongue.218   If I had cherished iniquity in my heart,    the Lord would not have listened.19   But truly God has listened;    he has attended to the voice of my prayer. 20   Blessed be God,    because he has not rejected my prayer    or removed his steadfast love from me! Make Your Face Shine upon Us To the choirmaster: with stringed instruments. A Psalm. A Song. 67   May God be gracious to us and bless us    and make his face to shine upon us, Selah2   that your way may be known on earth,    your saving power among all nations.3   Let the peoples praise you, O God;    let all the peoples praise you! 4   Let the nations be glad and sing for joy,    for you judge the peoples with equity    and guide the nations upon earth. Selah5   Let the peoples praise you, O God;    let all the peoples praise you! 6   The earth has yielded its increase;    God, our God, shall bless us.7   God shall bless us;    let all the ends of the earth fear him! Footnotes [1] 66:17 Hebrew under [2] 66:17 Or and he was exalted with my tongue (ESV) Second Psalm: Psalm 19; Psalm 46 Psalm 19 (Listen) The Law of the Lord Is Perfect To the choirmaster. A Psalm of David. 19   The heavens declare the glory of God,    and the sky above1 proclaims his handiwork.2   Day to day pours out speech,    and night to night reveals knowledge.3   There is no speech, nor are there words,    whose voice is not heard.4   Their voice2 goes out through all the earth,    and their words to the end of the world.  In them he has set a tent for the sun,5     which comes out like a bridegroom leaving his chamber,    and, like a strong man, runs its course with joy.6   Its rising is from the end of the heavens,    and its circuit to the end of them,    and there is nothing hidden from its heat. 7   The law of the LORD is perfect,3    reviving the soul;  the testimony of the LORD is sure,    making wise the simple;8   the precepts of the LORD are right,    rejoicing the heart;  the commandment of the LORD is pure,    enlightening the eyes;9   the fear of the LORD is clean,    enduring forever;  the rules4 of the LORD are true,    and righteous altogether.10   More to be desired are they than gold,    even much fine gold;  sweeter also than honey    and drippings of the honeycomb.11   Moreover, by them is your servant warned;    in keeping them there is great reward. 12   Who can discern his errors?    Declare me innocent from hidden faults.13   Keep back your servant also from presumptuous sins;    let them not have dominion over me!  Then I shall be blameless,    and innocent of great transgression. 14   Let the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart    be acceptable in your sight,    O LORD, my rock and my redeemer. Footnotes [1] 19:1 Hebrew the expanse; compare Genesis 1:6–8 [2] 19:4 Or Their measuring line [3] 19:7 Or blameless [4] 19:9 Or just decrees (ESV) Psalm 46 (Listen) God Is Our Fortress To the choirmaster. Of the Sons of Korah. According to Alamoth.1 A Song. 46   God is our refuge and strength,    a very present2 help in trouble.2   Therefore we will not fear though the earth gives way,    though the mountains be moved into the heart of the sea,3   though its waters roar and foam,    though the mountains tremble at its swelling. Selah 4   There is a river whose streams make glad the city of God,    the holy habitation of the Most High.5   God is in the midst of her; she shall not be moved;    God will help her when morning dawns.6   The nations rage, the kingdoms totter;    he utters his voice, the earth melts.7   The LORD of hosts is with us;    the God of Jacob is our fortress. Selah 8   Come, behold the works of the LORD,    how he has brought desolations on the earth.9   He makes wars cease to the end of the earth;    he breaks the bow and shatters the spear;    he burns the chariots with fire.10   “Be still, and know that I am God.    I will be exalted among the nations,    I will be exalted in the earth!”11   The LORD of hosts is with us;    the God of Jacob is our fortress. Selah Footnotes [1] 46:1 Probably a musical or liturgical term [2] 46:1 Or well proved (ESV) Old Testament: 1 Maccabees 2:29-43, 49-50 New Testament: Acts 28:14–23 Acts 28:14–23 (Listen) 14 There we found brothers1 and were invited to stay with them for seven days. And so we came to Rome. 15 And the brothers there, when they heard about us, came as far as the Forum of Appius and Three Taverns to meet us. On seeing them, Paul thanked God and took courage. 16 And when we came into Rome, Paul was allowed to stay by himself, with the soldier who guarded him. Paul in Rome 17 After three days he called together the local leaders of the Jews, and when they had gathered, he said to them, “Brothers, though I had done nothing against our people or the customs of our fathers, yet I was delivered as a prisoner from Jerusalem into the hands of the Romans. 18 When they had examined me, they wished to set me at liberty, because there was no reason for the death penalty in my case. 19 But because the Jews objected, I was compelled to appeal to Caesar—though I had no charge to bring against my nation. 20 For this reason, therefore, I have asked to see you and speak with you, since it is because of the hope of Israel that I am wearing this chain.” 21 And they said to him, “We have received no letters from Judea about you, and none of the brothers coming here has reported or spoken any evil about you. 22 But we desire to hear from you what your views are, for with regard to this sect we know that everywhere it is spoken against.” 23 When they had appointed a day for him, they came to him at his lodging in greater numbers. From morning till evening he expounded to them, testifying to the kingdom of God and trying to convince them about Jesus both from the Law of Moses and from the Prophets. Footnotes [1] 28:14 Or brothers and sisters; also verses 15, 21 (ESV) Gospel: Luke 16:1–13 Luke 16:1–13 (Listen) The Parable of the Dishonest Manager 16 He also said to the disciples, “There was a rich man who had a manager, and charges were brought to him that this man was wasting his possessions. 2 And he called him and said to him, ‘What is this that I hear about you? Turn in the account of your management, for you can no longer be manager.' 3 And the manager said to himself, ‘What shall I do, since my master is taking the management away from me? I am not strong enough to dig, and I am ashamed to beg. 4 I have decided what to do, so that when I am removed from management, people may receive me into their houses.' 5 So, summoning his master's debtors one by one, he said to the first, ‘How much do you owe my master?' 6 He said, ‘A hundred measures1 of oil.' He said to him, ‘Take your bill, and sit down quickly and write fifty.' 7 Then he said to another, ‘And how much do you owe?' He said, ‘A hundred measures2 of wheat.' He said to him, ‘Take your bill, and write eighty.' 8 The master commended the dishonest manager for his shrewdness. For the sons of this world3 are more shrewd in dealing with their own generation than the sons of light. 9 And I tell you, make friends for yourselves by means of unrighteous wealth,4 so that when it fails they may receive you into the eternal dwellings. 10 “One who is faithful in a very little is also faithful in much, and one who is dishonest in a very little is also dishonest in much. 11 If then you have not been faithful in the unrighteous wealth, who will entrust to you the true riches? 12 And if you have not been faithful in that which is another's, who will give you that which is your own? 13 No servant can serve two masters, for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and money.” Footnotes [1] 16:6 About 875 gallons or 3,200 liters [2] 16:7 Between 1,000 and 1,200 bushels or 37,000 to 45,000 liters [3] 16:8 Greek age [4] 16:9 Greek mammon, a Semitic word for money or possessions; also verse 11; rendered money in verse 13 (ESV)

Grimm Reading
69. The Good Bargain

Grimm Reading

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 75:22


In The Good Bargain, a peasant loses all his money and possessions to some animals. Angered, he goes to the king for justice. But instead of helping him, the king has other ideas.  This 'humorous' tale is the first one we've come across that is anti-Semitic. So, once we've finally deciphered the convoluted story, we then explore antisemitism in the Grimm's collection, putting the Grimm brothers on trial. We also look into how the Nazis co-opted the Grimms to spread propaganda in Nazi Germany.  Finally, we play a clip from a chat Matt had with Rachel O'Brien - who's recently written her thesis on the Grimms and the holocaust - where she shares her thoughts on the hidden side of anti-semitism in the Grimms.   

Pat Gray Unleashed
Somebody's Got a Case of ‘Climate Change' | Guest: Jonathon Dunne | 11/11/21

Pat Gray Unleashed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 94:53


Joe Biden's poll numbers continue to fall at a staggering pace. Kamala tries to talk in a French accent to attempt to connect with the French people. Obama seems to mix up Ireland, Scotland, and Shakespeare during a climate speech. The Kyle Rittenhouse case rages on, with continued questionable prosecution. Cara Korte tries to portray climate change as significantly affecting women's health, especially those who are pregnant. A British soccer player has been jailed due to anti-Semitic tweets. Biden thinks that the stimulus checks and inflation are actually good for people! Jonathan Dunne from Freedom's Disciple stops by to talk about what it will take to restore America. Despite our lockdowns, Dunne says that in America, he has vastly more freedom than in other places around the world. Democrat good, Republican bad is a common theme even in Ireland. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Citations Needed
Ep 148: The GOP's ‘Rightwing Populism' Rebrand (Part II) - Messaging Wars in 'White America'

Citations Needed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 80:35


“The elites are out to get you and your hard-earned pay.” “We're spending too much on protecting foreign nations and not enough defending our own borders against immigrant invaders.” “China is taking your job and will soon take over your phone.” We are consistently fed this type of “rightwing populism” –– sticking up for the working man against an array of villains: coastal elites, liberal media and foreign boogeymen - but replete with seamy audience flattery, xenophobic and anti-Semitic dogwhistles and confusing, ever-shifting definitions of what exactly constitutes “the elite” and “the media.” With the rise and eventual presidency of Donald Trump there's been no shortage of pontificating and reporting about the appeal of “rightwing populism” but one aspect worth dissecting is the way in which wealthy Republican-funded media deliberately seeks to win over confused and sometimes lefty media consumers with a clever mix of faux class warfare, vague appeals to post-partisanship and piggybacking off legitimate discontent with the Democratic party to sow nihilism and suppress voter turnout. From Jacksonian "Producerism" to Trump's fake anti-imperialism to the shameless grifts of today's billionaire-backed hucksters like JD Vance, the right has long tried to soap box about the beleaguered working man and rail against the mysterious - often urban, black, brown or Jewish - authors of his pain and suffering. In this episode, Part Two of our two-part episode on right-wing populism, we dissect three more tropes of "right-wing populism," detailing the ways the Republican messaging apparatuses seek to rebrand their stale platform every 10 years with a new, tweaked version of warmed over John Bircherism. Our guest is Poor People's Campaign co-chair Reverend Dr. Liz Theoharis.

ESV: Chronological
November 9: Luke 16–18

ESV: Chronological

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 13:48


Luke 16–18 Luke 16–18 (Listen) The Parable of the Dishonest Manager 16 He also said to the disciples, “There was a rich man who had a manager, and charges were brought to him that this man was wasting his possessions. 2 And he called him and said to him, ‘What is this that I hear about you? Turn in the account of your management, for you can no longer be manager.' 3 And the manager said to himself, ‘What shall I do, since my master is taking the management away from me? I am not strong enough to dig, and I am ashamed to beg. 4 I have decided what to do, so that when I am removed from management, people may receive me into their houses.' 5 So, summoning his master's debtors one by one, he said to the first, ‘How much do you owe my master?' 6 He said, ‘A hundred measures1 of oil.' He said to him, ‘Take your bill, and sit down quickly and write fifty.' 7 Then he said to another, ‘And how much do you owe?' He said, ‘A hundred measures2 of wheat.' He said to him, ‘Take your bill, and write eighty.' 8 The master commended the dishonest manager for his shrewdness. For the sons of this world3 are more shrewd in dealing with their own generation than the sons of light. 9 And I tell you, make friends for yourselves by means of unrighteous wealth,4 so that when it fails they may receive you into the eternal dwellings. 10 “One who is faithful in a very little is also faithful in much, and one who is dishonest in a very little is also dishonest in much. 11 If then you have not been faithful in the unrighteous wealth, who will entrust to you the true riches? 12 And if you have not been faithful in that which is another's, who will give you that which is your own? 13 No servant can serve two masters, for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and money.” The Law and the Kingdom of God 14 The Pharisees, who were lovers of money, heard all these things, and they ridiculed him. 15 And he said to them, “You are those who justify yourselves before men, but God knows your hearts. For what is exalted among men is an abomination in the sight of God. 16 “The Law and the Prophets were until John; since then the good news of the kingdom of God is preached, and everyone forces his way into it.5 17 But it is easier for heaven and earth to pass away than for one dot of the Law to become void. Divorce and Remarriage 18 “Everyone who divorces his wife and marries another commits adultery, and he who marries a woman divorced from her husband commits adultery. The Rich Man and Lazarus 19 “There was a rich man who was clothed in purple and fine linen and who feasted sumptuously every day. 20 And at his gate was laid a poor man named Lazarus, covered with sores, 21 who desired to be fed with what fell from the rich man's table. Moreover, even the dogs came and licked his sores. 22 The poor man died and was carried by the angels to Abraham's side.6 The rich man also died and was buried, 23 and in Hades, being in torment, he lifted up his eyes and saw Abraham far off and Lazarus at his side. 24 And he called out, ‘Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus to dip the end of his finger in water and cool my tongue, for I am in anguish in this flame.' 25 But Abraham said, ‘Child, remember that you in your lifetime received your good things, and Lazarus in like manner bad things; but now he is comforted here, and you are in anguish. 26 And besides all this, between us and you a great chasm has been fixed, in order that those who would pass from here to you may not be able, and none may cross from there to us.' 27 And he said, ‘Then I beg you, father, to send him to my father's house—28 for I have five brothers—so that he may warn them, lest they also come into this place of torment.' 29 But Abraham said, ‘They have Moses and the Prophets; let them hear them.' 30 And he said, ‘No, father Abraham, but if someone goes to them from the dead, they will repent.' 31 He said to him, ‘If they do not hear Moses and the Prophets, neither will they be convinced if someone should rise from the dead.'” Temptations to Sin 17 And he said to his disciples, “Temptations to sin7 are sure to come, but woe to the one through whom they come! 2 It would be better for him if a millstone were hung around his neck and he were cast into the sea than that he should cause one of these little ones to sin.8 3 Pay attention to yourselves! If your brother sins, rebuke him, and if he repents, forgive him, 4 and if he sins against you seven times in the day, and turns to you seven times, saying, ‘I repent,' you must forgive him.” Increase Our Faith 5 The apostles said to the Lord, “Increase our faith!” 6 And the Lord said, “If you had faith like a grain of mustard seed, you could say to this mulberry tree, ‘Be uprooted and planted in the sea,' and it would obey you. Unworthy Servants 7 “Will any one of you who has a servant9 plowing or keeping sheep say to him when he has come in from the field, ‘Come at once and recline at table'? 8 Will he not rather say to him, ‘Prepare supper for me, and dress properly,10 and serve me while I eat and drink, and afterward you will eat and drink'? 9 Does he thank the servant because he did what was commanded? 10 So you also, when you have done all that you were commanded, say, ‘We are unworthy servants;11 we have only done what was our duty.'” Jesus Cleanses Ten Lepers 11 On the way to Jerusalem he was passing along between Samaria and Galilee. 12 And as he entered a village, he was met by ten lepers,12 who stood at a distance 13 and lifted up their voices, saying, “Jesus, Master, have mercy on us.” 14 When he saw them he said to them, “Go and show yourselves to the priests.” And as they went they were cleansed. 15 Then one of them, when he saw that he was healed, turned back, praising God with a loud voice; 16 and he fell on his face at Jesus' feet, giving him thanks. Now he was a Samaritan. 17 Then Jesus answered, “Were not ten cleansed? Where are the nine? 18 Was no one found to return and give praise to God except this foreigner?” 19 And he said to him, “Rise and go your way; your faith has made you well.”13 The Coming of the Kingdom 20 Being asked by the Pharisees when the kingdom of God would come, he answered them, “The kingdom of God is not coming in ways that can be observed, 21 nor will they say, ‘Look, here it is!' or ‘There!' for behold, the kingdom of God is in the midst of you.”14 22 And he said to the disciples, “The days are coming when you will desire to see one of the days of the Son of Man, and you will not see it. 23 And they will say to you, ‘Look, there!' or ‘Look, here!' Do not go out or follow them. 24 For as the lightning flashes and lights up the sky from one side to the other, so will the Son of Man be in his day.15 25 But first he must suffer many things and be rejected by this generation. 26 Just as it was in the days of Noah, so will it be in the days of the Son of Man. 27 They were eating and drinking and marrying and being given in marriage, until the day when Noah entered the ark, and the flood came and destroyed them all. 28 Likewise, just as it was in the days of Lot—they were eating and drinking, buying and selling, planting and building, 29 but on the day when Lot went out from Sodom, fire and sulfur rained from heaven and destroyed them all—30 so will it be on the day when the Son of Man is revealed. 31 On that day, let the one who is on the housetop, with his goods in the house, not come down to take them away, and likewise let the one who is in the field not turn back. 32 Remember Lot's wife. 33 Whoever seeks to preserve his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life will keep it. 34 I tell you, in that night there will be two in one bed. One will be taken and the other left. 35 There will be two women grinding together. One will be taken and the other left.”16 37 And they said to him, “Where, Lord?” He said to them, “Where the corpse17 is, there the vultures18 will gather.” The Parable of the Persistent Widow 18 And he told them a parable to the effect that they ought always to pray and not lose heart. 2 He said, “In a certain city there was a judge who neither feared God nor respected man. 3 And there was a widow in that city who kept coming to him and saying, ‘Give me justice against my adversary.' 4 For a while he refused, but afterward he said to himself, ‘Though I neither fear God nor respect man, 5 yet because this widow keeps bothering me, I will give her justice, so that she will not beat me down by her continual coming.'” 6 And the Lord said, “Hear what the unrighteous judge says. 7 And will not God give justice to his elect, who cry to him day and night? Will he delay long over them? 8 I tell you, he will give justice to them speedily. Nevertheless, when the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on earth?” The Pharisee and the Tax Collector 9 He also told this parable to some who trusted in themselves that they were righteous, and treated others with contempt: 10 “Two men went up into the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. 11 The Pharisee, standing by himself, prayed19 thus: ‘God, I thank you that I am not like other men, extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. 12 I fast twice a week; I give tithes of all that I get.' 13 But the tax collector, standing far off, would not even lift up his eyes to heaven, but beat his breast, saying, ‘God, be merciful to me, a sinner!' 14 I tell you, this man went down to his house justified, rather than the other. For everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, but the one who humbles himself will be exalted.” Let the Children Come to Me 15 Now they were bringing even infants to him that he might touch them. And when the disciples saw it, they rebuked them. 16 But Jesus called them to him, saying, “Let the children come to me, and do not hinder them, for to such belongs the kingdom of God. 17 Truly, I say to you, whoever does not receive the kingdom of God like a child shall not enter it.” The Rich Ruler 18 And a ruler asked him, “Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?” 19 And Jesus said to him, “Why do you call me good? No one is good except God alone. 20 You know the commandments: ‘Do not commit adultery, Do not murder, Do not steal, Do not bear false witness, Honor your father and mother.'” 21 And he said, “All these I have kept from my youth.” 22 When Jesus heard this, he said to him, “One thing you still lack. Sell all that you have and distribute to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; and come, follow me.” 23 But when he heard these things, he became very sad, for he was extremely rich. 24 Jesus, seeing that he had become sad, said, “How difficult it is for those who have wealth to enter the kingdom of God! 25 For it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich person to enter the kingdom of God.” 26 Those who heard it said, “Then who can be saved?” 27 But he said, “What is impossible with man is possible with God.” 28 And Peter said, “See, we have left our homes and followed you.” 29 And he said to them, “Truly, I say to you, there is no one who has left house or wife or brothers20 or parents or children, for the sake of the kingdom of God, 30 who will not receive many times more in this time, and in the age to come eternal life.” Jesus Foretells His Death a Third Time 31 And taking the twelve, he said to them, “See, we are going up to Jerusalem, and everything that is written about the Son of Man by the prophets will be accomplished. 32 For he will be delivered over to the Gentiles and will be mocked and shamefully treated and spit upon. 33 And after flogging him, they will kill him, and on the third day he will rise.” 34 But they understood none of these things. This saying was hidden from them, and they did not grasp what was said. Jesus Heals a Blind Beggar 35 As he drew near to Jericho, a blind man was sitting by the roadside begging. 36 And hearing a crowd going by, he inquired what this meant. 37 They told him, “Jesus of Nazareth is passing by.” 38 And he cried out, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” 39 And those who were in front rebuked him, telling him to be silent. But he cried out all the more, “Son of David, have mercy on me!” 40 And Jesus stopped and commanded him to be brought to him. And when he came near, he asked him, 41 “What do you want me to do for you?” He said, “Lord, let me recover my sight.” 42 And Jesus said to him, “Recover your sight; your faith has made you well.” 43 And immediately he recovered his sight and followed him, glorifying God. And all the people, when they saw it, gave praise to God. Footnotes [1] 16:6 About 875 gallons or 3,200 liters [2] 16:7 Between 1,000 and 1,200 bushels or 37,000 to 45,000 liters [3] 16:8 Greek age [4] 16:9 Greek mammon, a Semitic word for money or possessions; also verse 11; rendered money in verse 13 [5] 16:16 Or everyone is forcefully urged into it [6] 16:22 Greek bosom; also verse 23 [7] 17:1 Greek Stumbling blocks [8] 17:2 Greek stumble [9] 17:7 Or bondservant; also verse 9 [10] 17:8 Greek gird yourself [11] 17:10 Or bondservants [12] 17:12 Leprosy was a term for several skin diseases; see Leviticus 13 [13] 17:19 Or has saved you [14] 17:21 Or within you, or within your grasp [15] 17:24 Some manuscripts omit in his day [16] 17:35 Some manuscripts add verse 36: Two men will be in the field; one will be taken and the other left [17] 17:37 Greek body [18] 17:37 Or eagles [19] 18:11 Or standing, prayed to himself [20] 18:29 Or wife or brothers and sisters (ESV)

An Even Bigger Fly On The Wall
1370. Music/songs, Commentary and Audiobook Preview. 11/07/21.

An Even Bigger Fly On The Wall

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 156:48


(Check out Google Audiobook: "Early Sumerian Records and Creation Myth of Antediluvian Kings" by Ryan Moorhen.) **"Newly discovered evidence inscribed on tablets from Nippur, one of the oldest and most sacred cities of Mesopotamia has changed everything we think we know about the middle east. These bizarre texts are written in Sumerian, the language spoken by the non-Semitic people whom the Semitic Mesopotamians conquered and displaced; and they include a very primitive version of the Deluge story and Creation myth, and some texts which throw new light on the age of Mesopotamian civilization and on the area within which it had its rise. In them, we have recovered some of the material from which Berosus derived his dynasty of Antediluvian kings, and we are thus enabled to test the accuracy of the Greek tradition by that of the Sumerians themselves. So far then, as Mesopotamia is concerned, these documents will necessitate a re-examination of more than one problem. **( "For Educational purposes and inspirational materials. The Producers, Artists and Creators own their music/songs, books, etc.)

The Austin Daily Drop
Austin Daily Drop - Friday November 5 2021

The Austin Daily Drop

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 9:57


Austin's COVID numbers have been in Stage 2 for 11 days now - why is the city still officially at Stage 3? Austin parents finding it hard to pin down a vaccine appointment for their kids are set for relief from their schools. Still more anti-Semitic activity, this time in San Marcos and Hays County. Austin City Council Member Greg Casar announces a run for the 35th District seat of the U.S. House of Representatives. City and county officials have released a post-mortem on Winter Storm Uri, complete with recommendations for this winter. Elon Musk's SpaceX facility at Boca Chica has run afoul of wildlife advocates. Former UT QB Sam Ehlinger makes his regular season NFL debut in a brief appearance in the 45-30 win by his Indianapolis Colts over the New York Jets. Crowdsourced data site Numbio finds Austin sixth in the entire world for quality of life. Austin, New Braunfels and Round Rock make SmartAsset's list of America's Top 50 Boomtowns. Nine Austin businesses make Inc. Magazine's list of the best-run in the country, led by Bumble who are tops for both Austin and Texas. The original Catfish Parlour on 183 will close as of this weekend after 48 years in business, while Mickelthwaite Craft Meats expands with a new food market and beer garden. The Austin Police Department is seeking volunteers for this year's Operation Blue Santa effort. And a gorgeous fall weekend is afoot - enjoy!

Citations Needed
Episode 147 - The GOP's 'Rightwing Populism'  Rebrand: How Billionaire-Backed Charlatans Pick Off Disillusioned Lefties (Part I)

Citations Needed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 71:22


“It's not about right vs left, but the people vs the elites,” “Wall Street and the media are leaching off hard working Americans like you and me who play by the rules.” “Our elite have sold us out to China.” American media consumers are routinely fed, a particular, and often confusing brand of so-called “rightwing populism” –– nominally taking on “elites”, “the media,” and “bankers” and standing up for the every man but with a suspicious mix of xenophobia, self-help audience flattery, anti-Semitic dogwhistles and a semantics cup-and-ball game about how exactly, the speaker defines “elite” or “the media”. With the rise and eventual presidency of Donald Trump there's been no shortage of pontificating and reporting about the appeal of “rightwing populism” but one aspect worth dissecting is the way in which wealthy Republican-funded media deliberately seeks to win over confused and sometimes lefty media consumers with a clever mix of faux class warfare, vague appeals to post-partisanship and piggybacking off legitimate discontent with the Democratic party to sow nihilism and suppress voter turnout. From President Andrew Jackson and Alabama governor George Wallace to today's billionaire-backed charlatans like Tucker Carlson, Saagar Enjeti, JD Vance and Josh Hawley, there is a longstanding effort to take the working man and insist the author of his suffering isn't a class of people marked by a concentration of wealth and power, but a deliberately ill-defined “elite” of snot-nosed, overeducated liberals, immigrants, Jews, secularists, women and academics out to undermine their culture and way of life. On this first part of a two-part episode, we focus on the many ways that “rightwing populism” operates to confuse and distract, to pick off independents, liberals and even leftists, exploiting real failures of the Democratic Party and use fake class war to muddy the waters of real class war. Our guest is Daniel Martinez HoSang.

The Austin Daily Drop
Austin Daily Drop - Tuesday November 2, 2021

The Austin Daily Drop

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 9:15


Travis County ranks eighth among Texas counties in COVID deaths as the statewide total reaches 70,000. Election Day is today - polls are open until 7pm - you're voting on Props A and B, and eight state constitutional amendments. Early voting got off to a slow start, but has hit a new high for off-year November turnout. Jewish leaders rally for unity in the face of recent anti-Semitic activity - the fire at Congregation Beth Israel may have involved a Molotov cocktail. Halloween weekend shootings: one in West Campus leads to confusion over police response time, and another at a north Austin H-E-B was the result of an employee intervening in a robbery in the parking lot. Also over Halloween, a Buda woman is arrested for threatening a 7-year-old trick-or-treater with a gun. Austin Energy announces failure to coordinate with LCRA to shut down the coal-fired Fayette power plant, drawing rebuke from environmentalists. The Mexican national men's soccer team will play in Austin for the first time vs. Chile at Q2 Stadium in December. La Colombe Coffee is set to make its Austin in-person debut with a shop inside the downtown Whole Foods next month. The McGuire-Moorman-Lambert Group has acquired Ski Shores Cafe and will make modifications to both locations. Austin ranks in the top 10 commercial real estate markets in the U.S. And a wet cold front arrives overnight tonight, bringing rain and much cooler temps.

The Create Your Own Life Show
Eric Rogell | Where Have All the Warriors Gone? The Case for Real Masculinity

The Create Your Own Life Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 44:54


About This Episode: Eric Rogell is the host of the popular “Warriors, Lovers, Kings, and Heroes” podcast, a sought after corporate speaker, bestselling author, a serial entrepreneur, and he helps high achieving executives and entrepreneurs build invincible relationships, inspire and engage their teams, and live with more passion and purpose in the both the boardroom and the bedroom. Making them more capable, more confident, more connected. He is an enemy of over civilization, and considers The Comfort Zone as the place dreams and passion go to die. Find out more about Eric at: Eric's Website - https://www.ericrogell.com/ LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/ericrogell/ New England Patriots' Julian Edelman writes open letter to Meyers Leonard after Miami Heat center's anti-Semitic slur - https://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/31038867/new-england-patriots-julian-edelman-writes-open-letter-meyers-leonard-miami-heat-center-anti-semitic-slur Eric Rogell Talks with Warriors, Lovers, Kings, and Heroes  - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/eric-rogell-talks-with-warriors-lovers-kings-and-heroes/id1476752772 Check out our YouTube Channel: Jeremyryanslatebiz Make Extraordinary a reality: jeremyryanslate.com/extraordinary See the Show Notes: www.jeremyryanslate.com/929 Sponsors: Gusto: This episode is sponsored by Gusto. Run your payroll the easy way, the same way we do at Command Your Brand. You'll get a. $100 Amazon Gift Card just for running your first payroll! http://www.jeremyryanslate.com/gusto MyPillow: Use the promo code: CYOL to get up to 60% off https://www.mypillow.com/ Audible: Get a free 30 day free trial and 1 free audiobook from thousands of available books. Right now I'm reading " Woke, Inc. Inside Corporate America's Social Justice Scam" by Vivek Ramaswamy www.jeremyryanslate.com/book  

The Austin Daily Drop
Austin Daily Drop - Monday November 1, 2021

The Austin Daily Drop

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 8:25


Texas Children's Pediatrics is ready to go with Pfizer shots for kids 5-11, pending tomorrow's CDC meeting. A possible anti-Semitic arson attack happened last night at Congregation Beth Israel. The Texas 36th Infantry Division gets a new commander (that's why all the helicopters). UT only investigated 6% of all sexual assault complaints last year. AISD plans to ignore questions from Rep. Matt Krause on 850 books he objects to. San Marcos Police Department is sued over last fall's traffic attack on a Joe Biden campaign bus by "Trump Train" activists. The convicted killer of an Austin police officer in 2012 has died on death row. Austin is found one of the least accessible real estate markets for buyers seeking newly built homes. Austinite Kathy Valentine and her band The Go-Go's join the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame, while the Austin City Limits Hall of Fame inducts Wilco, Alejandro Escovedo and Lucinda Williams. NBC Nightly News will be live from Austin this evening at 5:30. Tomorrow is Election Day - last chance to weigh in on Prop A and eight state constitutional amendments. And a wet cold front at mid-week will drop our low temps into the 40s.

ESV: Straight through the Bible
October 31: Luke 16–18

ESV: Straight through the Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 13:48


Luke 16–18 Luke 16–18 (Listen) The Parable of the Dishonest Manager 16 He also said to the disciples, “There was a rich man who had a manager, and charges were brought to him that this man was wasting his possessions. 2 And he called him and said to him, ‘What is this that I hear about you? Turn in the account of your management, for you can no longer be manager.' 3 And the manager said to himself, ‘What shall I do, since my master is taking the management away from me? I am not strong enough to dig, and I am ashamed to beg. 4 I have decided what to do, so that when I am removed from management, people may receive me into their houses.' 5 So, summoning his master's debtors one by one, he said to the first, ‘How much do you owe my master?' 6 He said, ‘A hundred measures1 of oil.' He said to him, ‘Take your bill, and sit down quickly and write fifty.' 7 Then he said to another, ‘And how much do you owe?' He said, ‘A hundred measures2 of wheat.' He said to him, ‘Take your bill, and write eighty.' 8 The master commended the dishonest manager for his shrewdness. For the sons of this world3 are more shrewd in dealing with their own generation than the sons of light. 9 And I tell you, make friends for yourselves by means of unrighteous wealth,4 so that when it fails they may receive you into the eternal dwellings. 10 “One who is faithful in a very little is also faithful in much, and one who is dishonest in a very little is also dishonest in much. 11 If then you have not been faithful in the unrighteous wealth, who will entrust to you the true riches? 12 And if you have not been faithful in that which is another's, who will give you that which is your own? 13 No servant can serve two masters, for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and money.” The Law and the Kingdom of God 14 The Pharisees, who were lovers of money, heard all these things, and they ridiculed him. 15 And he said to them, “You are those who justify yourselves before men, but God knows your hearts. For what is exalted among men is an abomination in the sight of God. 16 “The Law and the Prophets were until John; since then the good news of the kingdom of God is preached, and everyone forces his way into it.5 17 But it is easier for heaven and earth to pass away than for one dot of the Law to become void. Divorce and Remarriage 18 “Everyone who divorces his wife and marries another commits adultery, and he who marries a woman divorced from her husband commits adultery. The Rich Man and Lazarus 19 “There was a rich man who was clothed in purple and fine linen and who feasted sumptuously every day. 20 And at his gate was laid a poor man named Lazarus, covered with sores, 21 who desired to be fed with what fell from the rich man's table. Moreover, even the dogs came and licked his sores. 22 The poor man died and was carried by the angels to Abraham's side.6 The rich man also died and was buried, 23 and in Hades, being in torment, he lifted up his eyes and saw Abraham far off and Lazarus at his side. 24 And he called out, ‘Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus to dip the end of his finger in water and cool my tongue, for I am in anguish in this flame.' 25 But Abraham said, ‘Child, remember that you in your lifetime received your good things, and Lazarus in like manner bad things; but now he is comforted here, and you are in anguish. 26 And besides all this, between us and you a great chasm has been fixed, in order that those who would pass from here to you may not be able, and none may cross from there to us.' 27 And he said, ‘Then I beg you, father, to send him to my father's house—28 for I have five brothers—so that he may warn them, lest they also come into this place of torment.' 29 But Abraham said, ‘They have Moses and the Prophets; let them hear them.' 30 And he said, ‘No, father Abraham, but if someone goes to them from the dead, they will repent.' 31 He said to him, ‘If they do not hear Moses and the Prophets, neither will they be convinced if someone should rise from the dead.'” Temptations to Sin 17 And he said to his disciples, “Temptations to sin7 are sure to come, but woe to the one through whom they come! 2 It would be better for him if a millstone were hung around his neck and he were cast into the sea than that he should cause one of these little ones to sin.8 3 Pay attention to yourselves! If your brother sins, rebuke him, and if he repents, forgive him, 4 and if he sins against you seven times in the day, and turns to you seven times, saying, ‘I repent,' you must forgive him.” Increase Our Faith 5 The apostles said to the Lord, “Increase our faith!” 6 And the Lord said, “If you had faith like a grain of mustard seed, you could say to this mulberry tree, ‘Be uprooted and planted in the sea,' and it would obey you. Unworthy Servants 7 “Will any one of you who has a servant9 plowing or keeping sheep say to him when he has come in from the field, ‘Come at once and recline at table'? 8 Will he not rather say to him, ‘Prepare supper for me, and dress properly,10 and serve me while I eat and drink, and afterward you will eat and drink'? 9 Does he thank the servant because he did what was commanded? 10 So you also, when you have done all that you were commanded, say, ‘We are unworthy servants;11 we have only done what was our duty.'” Jesus Cleanses Ten Lepers 11 On the way to Jerusalem he was passing along between Samaria and Galilee. 12 And as he entered a village, he was met by ten lepers,12 who stood at a distance 13 and lifted up their voices, saying, “Jesus, Master, have mercy on us.” 14 When he saw them he said to them, “Go and show yourselves to the priests.” And as they went they were cleansed. 15 Then one of them, when he saw that he was healed, turned back, praising God with a loud voice; 16 and he fell on his face at Jesus' feet, giving him thanks. Now he was a Samaritan. 17 Then Jesus answered, “Were not ten cleansed? Where are the nine? 18 Was no one found to return and give praise to God except this foreigner?” 19 And he said to him, “Rise and go your way; your faith has made you well.”13 The Coming of the Kingdom 20 Being asked by the Pharisees when the kingdom of God would come, he answered them, “The kingdom of God is not coming in ways that can be observed, 21 nor will they say, ‘Look, here it is!' or ‘There!' for behold, the kingdom of God is in the midst of you.”14 22 And he said to the disciples, “The days are coming when you will desire to see one of the days of the Son of Man, and you will not see it. 23 And they will say to you, ‘Look, there!' or ‘Look, here!' Do not go out or follow them. 24 For as the lightning flashes and lights up the sky from one side to the other, so will the Son of Man be in his day.15 25 But first he must suffer many things and be rejected by this generation. 26 Just as it was in the days of Noah, so will it be in the days of the Son of Man. 27 They were eating and drinking and marrying and being given in marriage, until the day when Noah entered the ark, and the flood came and destroyed them all. 28 Likewise, just as it was in the days of Lot—they were eating and drinking, buying and selling, planting and building, 29 but on the day when Lot went out from Sodom, fire and sulfur rained from heaven and destroyed them all—30 so will it be on the day when the Son of Man is revealed. 31 On that day, let the one who is on the housetop, with his goods in the house, not come down to take them away, and likewise let the one who is in the field not turn back. 32 Remember Lot's wife. 33 Whoever seeks to preserve his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life will keep it. 34 I tell you, in that night there will be two in one bed. One will be taken and the other left. 35 There will be two women grinding together. One will be taken and the other left.”16 37 And they said to him, “Where, Lord?” He said to them, “Where the corpse17 is, there the vultures18 will gather.” The Parable of the Persistent Widow 18 And he told them a parable to the effect that they ought always to pray and not lose heart. 2 He said, “In a certain city there was a judge who neither feared God nor respected man. 3 And there was a widow in that city who kept coming to him and saying, ‘Give me justice against my adversary.' 4 For a while he refused, but afterward he said to himself, ‘Though I neither fear God nor respect man, 5 yet because this widow keeps bothering me, I will give her justice, so that she will not beat me down by her continual coming.'” 6 And the Lord said, “Hear what the unrighteous judge says. 7 And will not God give justice to his elect, who cry to him day and night? Will he delay long over them? 8 I tell you, he will give justice to them speedily. Nevertheless, when the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on earth?” The Pharisee and the Tax Collector 9 He also told this parable to some who trusted in themselves that they were righteous, and treated others with contempt: 10 “Two men went up into the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. 11 The Pharisee, standing by himself, prayed19 thus: ‘God, I thank you that I am not like other men, extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. 12 I fast twice a week; I give tithes of all that I get.' 13 But the tax collector, standing far off, would not even lift up his eyes to heaven, but beat his breast, saying, ‘God, be merciful to me, a sinner!' 14 I tell you, this man went down to his house justified, rather than the other. For everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, but the one who humbles himself will be exalted.” Let the Children Come to Me 15 Now they were bringing even infants to him that he might touch them. And when the disciples saw it, they rebuked them. 16 But Jesus called them to him, saying, “Let the children come to me, and do not hinder them, for to such belongs the kingdom of God. 17 Truly, I say to you, whoever does not receive the kingdom of God like a child shall not enter it.” The Rich Ruler 18 And a ruler asked him, “Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?” 19 And Jesus said to him, “Why do you call me good? No one is good except God alone. 20 You know the commandments: ‘Do not commit adultery, Do not murder, Do not steal, Do not bear false witness, Honor your father and mother.'” 21 And he said, “All these I have kept from my youth.” 22 When Jesus heard this, he said to him, “One thing you still lack. Sell all that you have and distribute to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; and come, follow me.” 23 But when he heard these things, he became very sad, for he was extremely rich. 24 Jesus, seeing that he had become sad, said, “How difficult it is for those who have wealth to enter the kingdom of God! 25 For it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich person to enter the kingdom of God.” 26 Those who heard it said, “Then who can be saved?” 27 But he said, “What is impossible with man is possible with God.” 28 And Peter said, “See, we have left our homes and followed you.” 29 And he said to them, “Truly, I say to you, there is no one who has left house or wife or brothers20 or parents or children, for the sake of the kingdom of God, 30 who will not receive many times more in this time, and in the age to come eternal life.” Jesus Foretells His Death a Third Time 31 And taking the twelve, he said to them, “See, we are going up to Jerusalem, and everything that is written about the Son of Man by the prophets will be accomplished. 32 For he will be delivered over to the Gentiles and will be mocked and shamefully treated and spit upon. 33 And after flogging him, they will kill him, and on the third day he will rise.” 34 But they understood none of these things. This saying was hidden from them, and they did not grasp what was said. Jesus Heals a Blind Beggar 35 As he drew near to Jericho, a blind man was sitting by the roadside begging. 36 And hearing a crowd going by, he inquired what this meant. 37 They told him, “Jesus of Nazareth is passing by.” 38 And he cried out, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” 39 And those who were in front rebuked him, telling him to be silent. But he cried out all the more, “Son of David, have mercy on me!” 40 And Jesus stopped and commanded him to be brought to him. And when he came near, he asked him, 41 “What do you want me to do for you?” He said, “Lord, let me recover my sight.” 42 And Jesus said to him, “Recover your sight; your faith has made you well.” 43 And immediately he recovered his sight and followed him, glorifying God. And all the people, when they saw it, gave praise to God. Footnotes [1] 16:6 About 875 gallons or 3,200 liters [2] 16:7 Between 1,000 and 1,200 bushels or 37,000 to 45,000 liters [3] 16:8 Greek age [4] 16:9 Greek mammon, a Semitic word for money or possessions; also verse 11; rendered money in verse 13 [5] 16:16 Or everyone is forcefully urged into it [6] 16:22 Greek bosom; also verse 23 [7] 17:1 Greek Stumbling blocks [8] 17:2 Greek stumble [9] 17:7 Or bondservant; also verse 9 [10] 17:8 Greek gird yourself [11] 17:10 Or bondservants [12] 17:12 Leprosy was a term for several skin diseases; see Leviticus 13 [13] 17:19 Or has saved you [14] 17:21 Or within you, or within your grasp [15] 17:24 Some manuscripts omit in his day [16] 17:35 Some manuscripts add verse 36: Two men will be in the field; one will be taken and the other left [17] 17:37 Greek body [18] 17:37 Or eagles [19] 18:11 Or standing, prayed to himself [20] 18:29 Or wife or brothers and sisters (ESV)

The Lechem Panim Podcast
Lechem Panim #176 “Saul and Barnabas‘ First Steps” (Acts 13:2-12) Pastor Cameron Ury

The Lechem Panim Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 14:30


Hello and welcome to Lechem Panim! You will remember that last week we saw in the beginning of Acts 13 a coming together of a diverse group of leaders in Antioch. And they make a priority what every Christian leadership team ought to make a priority; they pray and fast together, seeking the will of God. And you know whenever that happens, God moves in a special way; because it says in… Acts 13:2-3 (ESV)— 2 While they were worshiping the Lord and fasting, the Holy Spirit said, “Set apart for me Barnabas and Saul for the work to which I have called them.” 3 Then after fasting and praying they laid their hands on them and sent them off. Saul & Barnabas Commissioned— And so we see that God commissions them, the church leaders confirm their commission, and Barnabas and Saul are sent forth into ministry. And that is the model that is given to us in commissioning leaders. It is God who calls, but it is the church that confirms and equips them for that calling. Now my church (Renton Park Chapel) supports a number of missions organizations. And those missions organizations send out missionaries. However, they are only "sending agencies" that help to expedite the commissioning work authorized by the local church. It is always the local church that is central and key to the whole process of sending people out into ministry. That is why churches need to be intentional about training people for ministry. John Mark, The Assistant— And we see (and we'll see more and more as we progress through the book of Acts) that Saul and Barnabas (and really all the Christians) are very intentional about making sure that leaders are being raised up in the Church; that they're discipling new believers into becoming mature followers of Jesus Christ. And we see Saul and Barnabas doing this even here in this passage. It says they take John Mark along with them as their assistant. John Mark was actually Barnabas' cousin (Col. 4:10); and John Mark's [mother's home in Jerusalem was a gathering place for the believers (Acts 12:12).] It is very likely that John Mark came to faith in Jesus Christ in and through the ministry of Peter (1 Peter 5:13). And now he was no doubt being discipled by Saul and Barnabas as he assisted them in numerous ways, helping to free them for their task of preaching and teaching the Gospel. And so as a team, Barnabas, Saul, and John Mark set out on what would be for Saul the first of three missionary journeys. You know the popular phrase “A journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step.”? Well [Scholars estimate from the journeys recorded in Acts that Paul must have covered over 10,000 miles during his missionary career.] That's a lot of miles. One Small Step— You know, a couple weeks ago I watched the movie Apollo 13, which chronicled not only the disastrous yet miraculous deliverance of the Apollo 13 space shuttle after an onboard explosion, but also helped more modern viewers to understand the weight or the gravity of what it meant for Neil Armstrong to take those first steps on the moon, which of course then led to the Apollo 13 mission, during which Armstrong said those famous words: “One small step for man; one giant leap for mankind.” Now after watching the moon landing on his television (and that famous first step), Jim Lovell (played by Tom Hanks) said (in awe): “From now on we live in a world where man has walked on the Moon.” Now, as amazing as those first steps were, I think even more so were these first steps of Paul, as this empire and then the world would soon be impacted by the ministry about to take place. It says in… Acts 13:4 (ESV)— 4 So, being sent out by the Holy Spirit, they went down to Seleucia, and from there they sailed to Cyprus.  From The Port of Seleucia— Now Seleucia was the seaport of Syrian Antioch, 16 miles (26 km) to the west and 5 miles (8 km) upstream from the mouth of the Orontes River. That was where they left Antioch to journey towards Cyprus. And it made sense for them to go to Cyprus first because that was where Barnabas' home was (Acts 4:36). It was familiar territory for them. Now they arrive at Cyprus; specifically Salamis. And it says… Acts 13:5 (ESV)— 5 When they arrived at Salamis, they proclaimed the word of God in the synagogues of the Jews. And they had John to assist them.  The Jew First— And by the way, that is how Saul would always do it; he would start in the synagogues, following the model “to the Jew first and then to the Gentile”. But there were god-fearing Gentiles in the synagogues who would also hear the message as well; and in fact would be the best types of Gentiles to reach at first. From Salamis to Paphos— Now Salamis was the great commercial center at the east end of the central plain of Cyprus. Luke gives us no details of this visit. However, they likely preached the Word of God, some people believed, and then they would have helped form a local Christian assembly. Now from here they went on to minister to the rest of the island until they reached the city of Paphos, which was the capital (and administrative center) of Cyprus on the west end of the island, 90 miles from where they started in Salamis. And it is here that they meet their first opposition. It says… Acts 13:4 (ESV)— 6 When they had gone through the whole island as far as Paphos, they came upon a certain magician, a Jewish false prophet named Bar-Jesus. 7 He was with the proconsul, Sergius Paulus, a man of intelligence, who summoned Barnabas and Saul and sought to hear the word of God. Bar-Jesus— Now in this verse I find it interesting the order in which Luke introduces the characters. He chooses to introduce the false prophet Bar-Jesus first and then the proconsul, Sergius Paulus. It's kind of like the story of Aladdin, where you are introduced first to the sorcerer Jafar before being introduced to the Sultan who is under his power and influence, being deceived by him. The Sultan is less significant to the story. The main character in focus is Jafar. Well, so it is here with Bar-Jesus, who also went by the name Elymas, which is a Semitic name that means “sorcerer”, “magician”, or “wise man” and was probably a self-assumed designation.  Magus— But the word for sorcerer here used to describe him is in fact the word “magus”, the same word used to describe Simon the Magician in Acts 8:9. And this word “magus” is actually what we translate “magi” in the birth narrative of Jesus given to us in Matthew 2. And the Magi were [Originally a religious caste among the Persians…devoted to astrology, divination and the interpretation of dreams.] They [were likely from Persia or southern Arabia, both of which lay east of the Holy Land.] However, by the first century B.C. this term “magus” was used in a more general sense to describe the various fortune tellers and people who belonged to various religious cults throughout the Mediterranean world. Leaders often kept private sorcerers. And this is what Bar-Jesus was. Now we can tell from the name Bar-Jesus that he is Jewish. Bar is a word meaning “son of” and Jesus is of course the Greek rendering of the Hebrew name Joshua (Yeshua), a very common name both then and now. But what is uncommon about Bar-Jesus is that he was a Jewish sorcerer; and that was uncommon because traditionally Jews shunned anyone who practiced demonic activities. And yet here was a Jew who was practicing these things.  Sergius Paulus— And he was influencing the Roman proconsul Sergius Paulus, who is described as: a man of intelligence, who summoned Barnabas and Saul and sought to hear the word of God. So Paul and Barnabas are sharing the Gospel with Sergius Paulus, but it says… Acts 13:8-11 (ESV)— 8 But Elymas the magician (for that is the meaning of his name) opposed them, seeking to turn the proconsul away from the faith. {And this was because [Bar-Jesus realized that if Sergius Paulus believed in Jesus, he would soon be out of a job.]} 9 But Saul, who was also called Paul, filled with the Holy Spirit, looked intently at him 10 and said, “You son of the devil, you enemy of all righteousness, full of all deceit and villainy, will you not stop making crooked the straight paths of the Lord? 11 And now, behold, the hand of the Lord is upon you, and you will be blind and unable to see the sun for a time.” Immediately mist and darkness fell upon him, and he went about seeking people to lead him by the hand.  Blindness, Round 2— Now this was a powerful thing because the Seer (the fortune teller) was now unable to see anything. He was struck with a physical blindness that matched his spiritual blindness. Now do you recognize anything familiar about this? This is exactly what had happened to Saul when he was on the road to Damascus to persecute the Christians and himself tried to stop the spread of the Gospel. It's interesting that Saul inflicts the same punishment on Elymas. Now unfortunately, Elymas does not repent as Saul did. In fact later we will see that he is instrumental in the death of Barnabas. But for now, he is humbled. And the passage closes by giving us the response of Sergius Paulus. It says… Acts 13:12 (ESV)— 12 Then the proconsul believed, when he saw what had occurred, for he was astonished at the teaching of the Lord. Wheat & Tares— Now this passage graphically illustrates what Jesus had taught in his parable of the wheat and the tares (Matt. 13:24–30, 36–43). Wherever God sows His true children (the wheat), Satan will come along to sow his counterfeits (his tares), the children of the Devil. And Paul recognized in Elymas the counterfeit; and was willing to proclaim on him the judgment of God.  Our Confronting— And you know, there is a time to be nice and kind to people; but there's also a time to boldly confront them. And it's sometimes hard to know when to do what, which is why we must always follow the leading of the Holy Spirit, which is what Saul was doing here. But we need to not be afraid to stand up for what is right, because there are people like Sergius Paulus who are depending on us to help silence the evil influences in their life and connect them with the one who truly does have all the answers for their lives. In this miracle Sergius Paulus saw by the authority they demonstrated that Barnabas and Saul were servants of the true God and that they were preaching the true message of salvation (Heb. 2:3-4). And he believed. And it is my prayer that many in our community might come to know Jesus by seeing Him at work in our lives as well. Let's demonstrate that to them. Amen.

The Austin Daily Drop
Austin Daily Drop - Thursday October 28, 2021

The Austin Daily Drop

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 8:56


COVID stats are hovering in upper Stage 2, but City health officials fear a late-year spike if precautions are relaxed too quickly - meanwhile AISD reports an 81% vaccination rate among its staff. A Circle C homeowner has died in a Wednesday SWAT standoff that resulted in the home destroyed by fire. A traveling anti-Semitic activist group that disrupted Austin over the weekend continues its public disturbances in San Antonio. Austin gas prices have hit a 7-year high, and toll road prices will be raised over 5% this January. Three stolen dinosaur statues are returned to a Bastrop park after being spotted at a UT frat house. Block 21, including ACL Live and W Austin, is being sold to the owners of the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville. The French Legation is set to re-open with a public event on Saturday. Lester Holt and NBC Nightly News will broadcast from and focus on Austin on Monday evening. The vast majority of Austin transplants lately are not Californians - they're mostly coming from other parts of Texas. Two days of early voting remain, and looks like nice sunny fall weather thru the weekend.

Celebrate Poe
Rats, Rats, Rats, Part Two

Celebrate Poe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 36:32


This episode deals with rats - in Poe's The Pit and the Pendulum - and the possibly anti-Jewish rat-like vampire in Nosferatu.   The Nosferatu vampire is especially portrayed as vermin, and some scholars believe this was subtle propaganda towards viewing Jewish people as "less than human" - and rationalizing their extermination.  All in all - a very dark (and important) episode.Do you think Nosferatu is anti-Semitic?Why is dehumanization so dangerous?In which story does Edgar Allan Poe write about rats?What are some of the reasons that pre-Hitler Germany was in turmoil?Why is it highly unlikely that F.W. Murnau intended Nosferatu to be anti-Jewish?Did Murnau die in a German death camp?How did Hitler use propaganda?According to Ken Burns, what is the role of the artist?00:00 Intro01:37 Comparison of Dracula protrayals02:38 Rats in The Pit and the Pendulum09:15 Historical background in Germany14:36  F.W. Murnau's intentions and actions20:32 The Eternal Jew "review"26:35 Dehumanization30:14 Concluding story33:52 Halloween episode34:32 Sources36:52 Outro

Biblical Archaeology Today w/ Steve Waldron

This absolutely amazing mural, dating to about 1900 BC, shows Semites coming into Egypt as an entourage. We see the clothing they wore, several types of instruments of war, a musical instrument, and livestock. A fantastic portrait of Semitic culture of the time period. God bless you and thank you for listening! Please subscribe and share with friends!

How To Love Lit Podcast
Shirley Jackson - The Haunting Of Hill House - Episode 1 - MeetThe Author And The Personal Issues That Created One Of The Best Horror Genre Books Of All Time!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 48:20


Shirley Jackson - The Haunting Of Hill House - Episode 1 - MeetThe Author And The Personal Issues That Created One Of The Best Horror Genre Books Of All Time!   `Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    And I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  If you are listening to this in real time, we are well into the month of October and in the United States, the month of October means Halloween.  Halloween, as we've discussed before, is not Christy's favorite holiday.  Christy, why is that?    Because it's horrifying.  It's about death.  It's about being scared.  It's about demons.  I don't understand why we're celebrating these things.      And yet, I have seen you dress up as Wilma Flintstone; answer a door bell to a slew of terrifyingly dressed children, hand out candy and enjoy every minute of it.  For those of you who live in other parts of the world- that is what we do here in the United States on October 31st.  My son, Ben, and his wife Rachel live in a part of Memphis which is particularly serious about Halloween, so we, if we can, love to go down there on Halloween and get in on the party.      That's true- and it is wild. They have a neighbor whose yard literally looks like the set of a horror movie with graves, and ghosts and witches and everything.  It spooks me, but on the other hand,  I do love dressing up, and I love seeing all the kids dress up.  That part I'm cool with.    And yet, here we are reading a classic work described as Female Gothic or horror fiction- the work of the celebrated Shirley Jackson, perhaps her most famous novel The Haunting of Hill House.      True.  But I will say that Literary Horror is slightly different than Nightmare on Elm street.  Here's a little story about myself, so I had never watched a horror movie growing up.  My mother didn't allow it in our home, and back then these movies were rated R and the people at movie theaters really policed that sort of thing- so if you were a young child, obviously you could watch a rated R movie, but they didn't make it easy for you.  Well, anyway, when I was a sophomore in high school, this little school that I attended at the time took an overnight trip out of town to hike up this mountain, Pico da Bandeira.   After the hike, somebody pulled out the VHS of this move and we were going to watch it (I'm pretty sure it was a bootleg).  Anyway, I was so excited- most everyone in Brazil loves horror movies and Nightmare on Elmstreet was one of the most populat at the time.       Well, how did that go for you?    Not well, I'm not sure I got through 15 minutes.  I spent the rest of the night under the covers and with my hands in my ears.  I didn't even want to hear it.      HA!!  Well, what I find fascinating about Literary fiction is that it's scary for all kinds of different reasons, not the idea of someone jumping out and stabbing an unsuspecting girl.      Exactly. It's not some obvious caricature of a gore covered mummy walking around with a hatchet that defines it.  It's metaphorical; it's about the cost of seduction; it's about psychological disorders and it's very much about anxiety.      Well, you know I love it when we get psychological.  One thing I found interesting, and this is coming from the perspective that we just did an entire series kind of around women's issue with A Doll's House, but I expected Shirley Jackson's work to be more feminist than it is.  Also, the book has all this mother/daughter stuff in it.  I wasn't expecting that.    Yes- it very much has everything to do with mother/daughter relationships.  That motif starts on the first page and never lets up.  I got tired of counting mother references, and I never found an article that did the math, but there are reference to mothers endlessly- and something that drew my immediate attention- especially the first time Eleanor wakes up terrified in the middle the night yelling for her mother.  But that is just one way of looking at the book- although that's a great place to start and where we will start our discussion today as we attempt to make it all the way through chapter 1 of the book.    But in a more general sense, what Jackson was looking at was this imbalance of power that can exist in relationships between any two people.  She wants to express the seduction and betrayal of the powerless by the powerful. She expresses how one person uses the power in the relationship basically to crush another person.  And unfortunately, she understood this problem so well because it was her entire life story.  She had that experience with her mother, and then she turned around and had it again with her husband, and really she had it within the community at large of the 1950s.      And, of course, being written in the 1950s, many women of her generation quickly related to it.  In fact, in some ways, it reminds me a little bit of that very famous work by Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique, that became so important in American history but wasn't even going to be written for another ten years.    Yeah, I've heard of that book, but honestly, I don't know much about it.  What is the premise and why does it connect, in your mind to Shirley Jackson.    Well, I'll be upfront and tell you I have never read the book, so I'm speaking from second hand knowledge.  But, what I know about it from teaching and studying history is the impact it had on American culture because of the power of the argument Friedan makes in the book.     First of all I would like to point out she's interviewing women that attended Smith College, which is a very well to do private school in Massachusetts.  survey sample was not very scientific     Friedan, at her 15th college reunion, took a survey from her fellow colleagues, about how they felt about their lives.  The basic premise of her book is that society had created a myth that women were most fulfilled if they were taking care of children, staying at home,  supporting their husbands, and staying away from politics and business.  In the book, she claims that entire worldview for women is a myth- at least for many women.  I will never assume to speak for women and I certainly won't speak for all women.  But Friedan will, and she went after the 1950s stereotypical Leave it To Beaver kind of mom that had been the socially accepted lifestyle.  She said many women were absolutely miserable.  She claimed that society's pressure on women for women to succumb to what amounted to in many cases mindnumbing non-stimulating existences was causing depression.  She famously said it was a “problem that has no name”.   And whether you want to challenge her or agree with her, you have to respect that her idea absolutely resonated across America and really the entire world.  Her book was a best seller, selling over 3 million in her lifetime and has been translated into at least a dozen major languages around the world.  Many textbooks credit Friedan for sparking the second wave of feminism that was a key feature of the 60s, the kind of thing we see portrayed in movies like Forrest Gump in the character of Jenny.  This women's rights movement was not interested in voting rights; it was moving forward to the next level.  It was pushing for workplace equality, birth control, abortion rights, breaking the glass ceiling in academia and business.  Where I see it aligning with Jackson, who came much earlier, is that this book, The Haunting of Hill House is a metaphorical expression of everything Friedan wanted to say about women in the 1960s- the house is haunted, so to speak.  The house was crushing women.  It was making women crazy.     Well, you're starting to steal a little bit of my thunder –next week we are going to spend almost the entire episode discussing the house itself, but you are dead on about what Jackson is doing in her work…pardon the pun.  But, I want to say before all the men moan and groan and say, I'm turning this off if this is going to be another one of those feminist books- the book really is much more than a political commentary- in fact that's just one way of relating to it.  The metaphor most definitely can be read exactly as you have connected to the femininist movement of the 1960s, and many many people have read it just that way, but I'm not sure Jackson herself really did, although there's no doubt she was an advocate for many of the things you just enumerated. She, like Ibsen, would say her work is art and not a piece of political propaganda.  She would also likely claim, and I know I'm being presumptuous to speak for her, but I do think she would claim, that would be a very small way to understand her body of work, if that's all you thought it was. She was writing the emotions and then the reader found themselves in them.     I was also interested to see that Jackson, very much like Elizabeth Barrett Browning struggled fighting critics over the years.  Stanley Hyman, her husband and literary critic during their lives, in the preface for a book he published of her yet unpublished work after her death famously wrote, “For all her popularity, Shirley Jackson won surprisingly little recognition.  She received no awards or prizes, grants or fellowships; her name was often omitted from lists on which it clearly belonged, or which it should have led.  She saw these honors go to inferior writers.”    True, and Hyman, although I have trouble giving him credit for anything because of his and Shirley's relationship which we'll talk about in a different episode, but he predicted that Jackson's “powerful visions of suffering and inhumanity” and would be found “increasingly significant and meaningful.”  He truly always understood that her long form or serious work was more than pop fiction, or gory horror, and yet that was not the majority view of that time.    And part of that is somewhat understandable.  One thing I didn't know about her until we started reading up on her for this podcast series was that her acclaim during her day really came from two places- one was for the short story, “The Lottery”, but the other and this is what I didn't know- was her best-selling essay collection on domestic life titled Life Among the Savages.  I haven't read much of that, to be honest, but what I did read is really truly funny stuff stuff.  She was Erma Bombeck before Erma Bombeck.    Yes- and she was funny, and she was writing about her kids, house cleaning, being a mom, a member of a local community and all the craziness of middle-class life.  It was the stuff that people were living in their world, and she made it funny.  People didn't take seriously the psychological insights into issues of emotional isolation, rage, paranoia, and the fragmentation of the human mind- from a person who was a regular contributor to magazines like Good Housekeeping, Mademoiselle, McCall's and Ladies Home Journal.    No, it was just too different, and of course, you can't discount the condescension from the serious art community- I mean here was a woman writing in a genre that nobody took seriously about female protagonists- which was often not taken seriously- and was famous for cute anecdotes about the comedy of errors which is life as a house-mom raising four children in a small town.We must remember also, as a general rule, the 1950s are not that far removed from the time period where women didn't read literature at all- there was a thing called “ladies reading material” That's what women read.  Men read literature, but women writing for women was not elevated enough to actually be called “literature”- it was simply reading material for women.       Oh- well – I guess we shall make that distinction- although I will say, as a woman writing “ladies reading material” for money she did fairly well for herself.  Shirley Jackson made serious cash off of these stories- in fact, she outearned her husband- and it was the essays that were funding their lifestyles, not her novels. Her biographer Ruth Franklin, commented in an interview that she could make  over $2000 per essay which at the time was enough to fun to fund her Morris Minor collection.    Nice- well British Sports cars are always a fun thing to keep around the house.     I'll say.  But back to her legacy for a second, Jackson is like Elizabeth Barrett Browning in that her work, well after her death, found it's way into the canon and today is very much taken seriously.  In fact, we're teaching her right now to all the 11th graders at Bartlett High School, and almost all American students will at some point read  her short story “The Lottery”, the  famous short story that triggered more public outrage  in 1948 than anything published before or since by the magazine the New Yorker.  Hundreds of people cancelled their subscriptions and even more wrote the magazine totally exasperated.      Well, it's political and psychological and really even religious as well.  But back to the 11th graders at Bartlett, do you think your kids will be able to appreciate or enjoy the depth of the psychological analysis in her novel that today is the central hallmark of her work?    Yeah, I think many of them will get it.  I look forward to how they understand what she's talking about.  You know, students today live in such a different world and the ghosts and houses that haunt them look so differently than the ghosts and houses that haunted our generation or much less Shirley Jackson's.     I look forward to discussing some of these issues with them and see what fascinates them the most.      One of the things that fascinates me the most and I'm expecting to come out is Jackson's multiple direct and indirect references to the relationship between mothers and daughters.  It's clear in this book that whatever is going wrong in Eleanor's mind has something to do with her dead mother.  I have two daughters, and I really pray, I am not the kind of mother Shirley Jackson had or that my daughters ever express any of the feelings she expresses about mother/daughter relationships- nothing that would haunt and torment my children after I'm dead.      No, I'm sure none of us want to have that kind of legacy with our children.      And yet, there are women like Geraldine Jackson, Shirley's mother.  Geraldine was truly relentless in her cruelty towards her daughter.  She was cruel to her as a child and her passive aggressive disapproval was something she perpetuated all throughout Shirley's life right to her untimely death at age 48.      Yes and I think understanding Geraldine' cruelty really helps me see some of the things in Jackson's writing that I may have overlooked before.  And I know that an author's life cannot be used uncritically to explain an artist's work; obviously art speaks for itself, but maybe more than any other writer we've read together, Jackson uses her writings to express pain in artistic ways that were personal to her, but universal to many of us.  Geraldine's ruthless subtle and sometimes not so subtle demoralizing was something Jackson could not get out of her mind.  .  Geraldine's own personality disorder took a heavy toll on Shirley.    And it was always expressed with all the best of intentions- she was always so concerned.    Let's tell a little about their story and then people will know what you're talking about.     Okay, well the story starts when  Jackson was born in 1916 (although she lied about her age and claimed to have been born in 1919- which I think is funny), but anyway, she was born into an affluent family and up until she was 16 they lived in Burlingame, California.     Let me interrupt, just for context, Burlingame, to this day is one of the most expensive cities in the United States.  The median house in Burlingame costs over 2 million dollars- and I'm not talking mansions- this is the price range for what would be an average home that would cost a tenth of that in other parts of the US.  Every review on bestplaces.com talks about how unaffordable it is for most people to live in this Burlingame.     Yep, and Geraldine, Shirley's mom and her father Leslie, cultivated that cliché'd vision of the upper class  country club lifestyle.  They were into the production of this very sophisticated appearance of success and wealth, what was important was the appearance of things.   They were into competitive living, and that,  of course, still includes having perfect children.  Shirley's brother, I might add, was beautiful and competitive and made them proud, but unfortunately for Shirley, she was not- and this was just a huge disappointment for Geraldine.  She could not nor did she want to fit the mold.  Shirley was heavier than the other girls.  She didn't enjoy the same kinds of things as the other girls.  She didn't have that “All-American” barbie doll look like the other girls.  She wasn't into the deputante thing, and if she had been wasn't cute enough.    Yes, I read a couple of articles that called Jackson morbidly obese, so I googled images of her, it was true that she was heavier , but, in my mind, she falls way short of the criteria for morbidly obese by today's definition, especially in her youth. And I want to say something else about this 1950's lifestyle we've been discussing. After WW 2 there was a huge economic boom that doubled family incomes in the decade. It was the first decade of widespread middle class wealth. And one sign of that new middle class wealth was the ability to live on one income. Wives staying at home were a sign of wealth and prestige.     Maybe not, but she certainly wasn't the daughter Geraldine wanted nor could be proud of at a deputant ball.  In fact, truth be told, Geraldine was actually disappointed when she found out she was pregnant because she didn't want a child at that time.  But Geraldine's largest problem and obsession was with Shirley's weight- and her obsession with Shirley's weight never ended.  She made comments about her weight- all of the time.  They were gratuitous, just dropped in to remind her that she was fat.   Here are some quotes from a couple of Geraldine's letters to her daughter just to show you what I'm talking about. “Glad you're dieting.” “Excess weight is hard on the heart.” “You should get down to normal weight. Try non-fat milk.”  Even after the publication of what would be Jackson's final novel, Geraldine could be relied on to bring up her weight, “Why oh why do you allow the magazines to print such awful pictures of you?...I have been so sad all morning about what you have allowed yourself to look like.”      Yes, let me read the full quote for context.     If you don't care what you look like or care about your appearance why don't you do something about it for your children's sake— and your husband's. . . . I have been so sad all morning about what you have allowed yourself to look like. . . . You were and I guess still are a very wilful child and one who insisted on her own way in everything— good or bad.    This is a straight up narcissistic rant.     There was always the subtext that was no matter what Shirley did with her life, she could never live up to her mother's expectations- even if she was famous- Jackson wanted acceptance of who she was- but she wanted it on her terms, and she and wanted to prove to her mom that the way she was was a good way, and she could be good at life just by being herself- but that was never going to happen.  In fact, at one low moment, Geraldine actually told her daughter that she was a failed abortion.      Wow.  That is just hateful.  Geraldine wanted a girl in the image of what she wanted, and she was never going to compromise.  This is classically what people call today a “toxic mother”,  And this plays a terrible toll on girls who have toxic mothers.  These behaviors can destroy women's images of themselves.   And this is what seems to have happened with Jackson and her mother.        Let me just back  up and say, it's absolutely natural and healthy for a girl to look up to her mother; a mom is the original ideal of what a woman should be.  That's how we all learn to navigate in this world, and likely a mom and a daughter will have a lot in common for obvious reasons.  There is a lot of joy in that.  There is a special bond in that.  Over the years, though, as a little girl develops into a teenager, although at first she wants to be exactly like her mom, that desire kind of separates out.  In a normal relationship, as a girl transitions into a woman, she individuates.   She becomes her own person.  Some things of her mother she will keep; others she'll discard.  And healthy moms respect and encourage their daughters individuality.  A normal mom will do whatever she can to equip her daughter, make her bolder and stronger.  But as painful as it may be from a mom's perspective, healthy mom's accept daughter's choices- even the ones they think are mistakes.  That's just what they do, and if they end up being mistakes, it's okay.  We all get to live our own lives.  But in Geraldine's life, what Shirley did was a reflection on her, so she couldn't let the fact that her daughter was overweight go.      Well, how do you think she took it when Shirley told her mom she was marrying a Jew in 1940- or I should say that she had already married a Jew, she didn't even tell them she got married until several months later because they were anti-Semitic people,  I can imagine that didn't go well?        No, I'd say it probably didn't, but I really don't know.   I do want to say one other thing, Christy, don't get me wrong, I think it's pretty well-established that motherhood is by definition a lose/lose proposition- moms just can't win.  It's impossible to raise a perfect child, just like it's impossible to be a perfect person, so of course we can't raise a person in the most perfect of emotional environments.      Mom's will unrealistically be blamed for things that may or may not be their fault- the reality is no one can be perfect, we will hurt each other and there will insecurities that spring up because of the way we are raised, and that's kind of normal too- it's normal for dads; it's normal for moms.  But, that is not the same as being a toxic mom.  Geraldine was toxic.  Nothing was ever going to be good enough for Geraldine.  She was perpetually disapproving, and Shirley was never going to meet her standards.  Geraldine was also always very controlling- I read somewhere she made Shirley wear garters and high heels as a little girl.  She was constantly guilt-tripping Shirley.  She constantly made negative comments; she manipulated her emotions, and most of the time she did it passive-aggressively.  She did it under the guise of love.      And that seems to be in one sense what Jackson expresses in her writing- it's at least what lots of people have identified with in Hill House.   There is this sense that Shirley could never get her mom out of her head, and of course, she's not the only one who struggles with these kinds of things.  In Hill House,  the main character is a 32 year old young woman named Eleanor Vance. I want to add that 32 is not a young age.  She's not telling the story of a child and the abuses of a mother on a small child.  Eleanor is a fully grown adult who should be living her own independent life for quite some time.  But she hasn't.  She hasn't even had an opportunity to do so.  Eleanor has no friends and is alone. That's what we're told at the beginning and we will see all the way through to the end of the book when she tells Theo she has never been wanted, it's been how she's felt always.  We're also told Eleanor's mother is dead right here at the beginning, and that Eleanor has been taking care of her relentlessly since she was twenty years old.   Eleanor's mom is a constant presence in Eleanor's psyche, even beyond the grave.  She even buys clothes that she knows her mother hates- pants- just because her mom is dead and can't do anything about it.   Eleanor is being haunted before she ever gets to Hill House.    True, and this lack of self-esteem and then loneliness is what has resonated with so many women and men who read Jackson's stories.  It also is what directly led to a lot of the suffering Jackson experienced in her marriage to Stanley.      Stanley Hyman, there's a character.  Before I smear him, I guess I will say right off that bat that he, in many ways, was very supportive of Shirley professionally and admired her intellectually.  My problem with him is that he degraded her sexually- and that is the cruelest and most intimate and demeaning forms of degradation that there is.    For one thing he absolutely did not respect the sexual boundaries Shirley wanted in their marriage.  Besides having so many affairs with students at the school he taught but also really just anyone—he seemed to enjoy telling Jackson all about these trysts.  I've read a few of the letters he wrote about women he was sleeping with on various business trips, and I got the feeling it's almost like he was bragging a little bit.  I'd read a few quotes, but they're vulgar.  He talked about groping girls- giving details about what he had done. It's gross never mind hurtful.  And Shirley would get upset.  Although she was a free spirit and Bohemian in some ways, this was not okay with her.  She didn't want a open marriage where everyone just slept with whoever they wanted.  There are letters where she writes him and expresses how this behavior made her feel, but she never mailed these letters.  I don't even know why.  Maybe she didn't have the nerve.  Maybe she knew it made no difference.  Maybe she wanted her family and that was a price she was willing to pay.  I'm speculating.  We only know that  she just took it.  She wouldn't confront him, at least that there isa record of.  She just forced herself to accept it and moved on with her life.      And that is an indication of low self-esteem, obviously.  Jackson wouldn't have put up with that sort of thing like she did, if she didn't think, at some level, it was her fault or that she didn't deserve to be treated any better than that.  This is the legacy of a toxic parent.  Allowing people to treat you in a way that is lesser and that is not how you treat them is a direct result of low self-esteem, but I want to add that future abusive relationships is not the only symptom of low self-esteem and it isn't the only symptom of low-esteem we see in Jackson's life.   Behaviors that provoke self-harm  like over-eating, over-drinking, and pill-popping- all things Jackson did- are also a result of low esteem and indicate high levels of anxiety.  Feelings of sadness, depression, anxiety, anger, shame and guilt- are also things we see in Jackson's life.  She seems to have truly struggled emotionally.     True, but before we get too dark, Shirley was all of that, but she wasn't ONLY that.  She had a happy side too- an apparently tremendously happy side.  I say that from interviews I read that people did with her children.  When her kids write or talk about their homelife, the reports are glowing.  Her home was a happy place.  It was chaotic and topsy turvey at times, the kind of crazy that people love.  They didn't even see any tension between their parents.  For one thing, Stanley didn't have a whole lot to do with the family- lots of men didn't in the 50s, that was the mother's domain, but from the perspective of her children, her marriage to Stanley was a happy one, as was their home.  So, we see all of that going on.  Back to her biographer, Ruth Franklin, Franklin titled her biography about Jackson, “A Rather Haunted Life” kind of to reflect that idea- that she was haunted, but not entirely, just rather haunted.      Yes, and it was that dichotomy that leads to all kinds of cognitive dissonance.  I read in another article by a different biographer that Shirley, as a mother was deeply involved but also emotionally erratic.  “Her moods and anxieties colored her children's days.  No one could be more loving; no one could be meaner.”      Which brings me back to her as a writer.  One critic observed that out of over 110 different stories that Jackson wrote in her lifetime, most of them are about imperiled, divided or anxious women- and that is including both her scary and her funny stories.  And when we get to her final three novels- they are gothic completely about anxiety, entrapment and in the case of Hill House, a deeply troubled female with an inability to differentiate well between illusion and reality.      Understanding that really makes the famous first paragraph of The Haunting of Hill House  meaningful in a deeper way, at least it does to me. And I do want to emphasize this first paragraph is one of the most famous paragraphs in all of Jackson's writings:    No live organism can continue for long to exist sanely under conditions of absolute reality; even larks and katydids are supposed, by some, to dream.  Hill House, not sane, stood by itself against its hills, holding darkness within; it had stood so for 80 years and might stand for eighty more.  Within, walls continued upright, bricks met neatly, floors were firm, and doors were sensibly shut; silence lay steadily against the wood and stone of Hill House, and whatever walked there, walked alone.”    And what do you always say, when we start these books, that great writers will give their story away in the first sentence or two.    They almost always do.  This one in particular invites us to think about so much.  First of all, it starts with a negation- “no” but there are a lot of negative words here.  It's hard to understand, but something is telling us no- and when we get to the end of the book, that prophecy is fulfilled, although I won't spoil that just yet and tell you how.  But there's so much more.      Listen to the ideas she introduces-  there is the idea of being alive- of being sane- or not sane- another negative word- of standing in the darkness-in the silence- of being alone.  Of being in a house, but yet…being alone.   The alliteration highlights and brings together her key ideas- within walls- drawing attention to the idea of claustrophobia- sensibly shut; silence lay steadily I might add brings the silence and the claustrophobia together.  Then of course- whatever walked- walked alone- the w sound kind of swoshes in her head and haunts the end of that sentence.      All of her personal demons in one sentence.    Yes- and all of her personal demons getting ready to flesh themselves out metaphorically for all of us to understand and experience with her.      This assertion that she makes about absolute reality, of course is a religious or philosophical statement.  This idea that we absolutely just cannot know what is real, and if we did know what is real we would go crazy.  She's going to say that even little bird or crickets (a katydid is a cricket if you haven't heard that word yet, it's not very common)- Not even the simpliest organisms can handle a world without illusions.  We need them to protect our own sanity.    Yes- and the subtext here suggests because reality is dark; and the reality is you are alone in this world.  You can live – but perhaps you must accept a dream, perhaps an illusion that people have your back, people love you and will support you, but in reality- you are alone.  Perhaps you have to even create an entire fairyland- something to give you an escape from what you know to be true- the betrayal which is coming.  I'm speculating, obviously because I'm fleshing out what is implied with the subtext, at least implied to me-  but there is a sense that that is the direction she's leading us, and it certainly seems to be something we find in her personal story.     It's also kind of a religious statement because it speaks to the nature of reality and that is the essence of faith and walking through life not-alone.  Christy, what was her religious background.      Well, that's a very interesting question.  She was raised by members of the the Christian Science church, but later on she developed a real fascination with the occult and was even accused of being a witch.  Garry, what makes Christian scientists different from main stream Christianity?    Christian scientists, for those who are not familiar with Christianity, adopt many tenents of traditional Christianity but they break from it in a couple of ways that are obvious.  For one,  they do not accept the diety of Jesus Christ in the way traditional versions of Christianity do.  But the second is What most people know and that is the tension is the between The teachings of the Christian science church and their complicated relationship with the medical community.  They  encourage their members to pray for divine healings often perhaps instead of going to doctors.  And this has been controversial in some cases especially for family members outside of the faith.     That was certainly true for Jackson.  One time she and her brother were horsing around and her brother broke his arm, instead of going to the doctor Geraldine and her mother stayed up all night and prayed for his broken arm.  Her grandmother was a faith healer in the church and Jackson did not approve of this. So, she had this side of her, that would seem more secular- but then Jackson had her own sense of the spiritual.  She carried around tarot cards, tried to communicate with spirits later in her life, and flirted with all kinds of spiritual practices, like I said before, many accusing her of actually practicing witchcraft, ahtough I never found anything that really verified how serious she was about that.      So I can see why she might say something about absolute reality being somewhat unknowable or even a dark and lonely thing.      True, and at least in this book what we see in the the relationships that populate the lives  of the characters is that they are contrived.  In chapter 1 of The Haunting of Hill House, Dr. Montague, a title that is somewhat meant to mislead since he's really a ghost hunter, assembles a very select group of people to live with him for three months in a house that he thinks is probably haunted.  There are only four people that will be in this house- Dr. Montague himself, Luke, who is a member of the family who will own the house, Theodora who is selected because she may have extra-sensesory perspection abilities and Eleanor who as a child appeared to bring down a shower of rocks.      We will follow what happens to them from the point of view of Eleanor.  This story is written in the third person omniscient style, but it's way more akin to the free indirect discourse we saw Jane Austen create in Emma.  Laura Miller in the introduction to the book put it this way, readers "experience the novel from within Eleanor's consciousness, and however unreliable we know her to be, we are wedded to her".  And of course the farther into the novel you get, the more you understand how true this statement really is.  Most of the first chapter is really kind of a way to introduce us to Eleanor, and what we find out about her first is that she is 32, she genuinely and for good reason hated her mother until she died and now genuinely hates her sister.  Let's read this part…    Page 3    She's clearly alone and exploited by people who are supposed to be protect her.  This is further developed through the anecdote about her sister and their car.  Apparently they bought a car together but her sister never lets her drive it.  So, when Dr. Montague invites her to come to Hill House, she just takes the car and goes.  And while she's driving to Hill House, she imagines all sorts of things.  She imagines things that could never be real, like the road being an intimate friend or living in a house with a pair of stone lions and people bowing to her on the street because of these lions.  It's gives you kind of this crazy feeling- like how you would feel if you finally had escaped.    Yes, and that crazy feeling is going to intensify as the book progresses.  She's escaped her mother only to land sleeping on a cot in the nursery of a terrible sister.  She's not escaped her sister, but to go where.  At one point on her drive to Hill House she stops to admire a quarter of a mile of Oleanders.  Oleanders are beautiful flowers but they are also poisonous flowers.  She fantasizes about them about a castle with oleanders …then she gets back in her car and drives to a diner where she's going to watch a mother try to coax her daughter into drinking a cup of milk- and let me tell you know- these very same images that she sees on her drive in come back towards the end of the book as we, as readers, feel we are losing our grasp of reality.      But here in chapter 1, when she finally gets to the mansion, the care taker, Mr. Dudley flat out tells her, “You won't like it.  You'll be sorry I ever opened that gate.”    She looks at him and asks him to get away from her car…then she proceeds forward.  At the end of the chapter, we see her looking at this house and this is what she says, “The house was vile.  She shivered and thought, the words coming freely into her mind, Hill House is vile, it is diseases, get away from here at once.”      But of course she doesn't.    No, she doesn't.  That's the thing about haunting houses- they are dangerously tantalizing.  She was invited here by Mr. Montague and for better or for worse, she wants to be here.   I don't know if the Haunting of Hill House is the best example of this, but Jackson was absolutely fascinated with this- Jackson was fascinated with man's obsession with what Poe called the “imp of the perverse.”    Oh yes,  the urge to do something awful to someone and have pleasure in it.  I've seen this in kids, a kid just trips a stranger in the hall just because he can.  Paul Salkovskis, a psychology professor, suggests that it's evolutionary to have these kinds of intrusive thoughts as part of our way of problem solving for future problems.  But this idea that people have impulses to do mean things  or at least things we know we shouldn't and get joy from them.  Jackson was very interested in this idea.  So, are you saying that Dr. Montague is deliberately doing something mean.  Or that Dudley is?  Or Eleanor is?    Not really, in other stories she really demonstrates this much more poignantly, but the reason it comes to mind, besides the fact that I've been told to look for it in her writings, is that we are setting up relationships where we really can't trust each other to be there for each other.  Hill House looks like a place where you are really going to feel alone and exposed and that's where the terror comes from, but we will also see that it's soft and motherly and the people here at the beginning seem kind of exciting- it's seductive.      And I guess it does and has for many readers.  Let me just add one thing I didn't know until we started studying this book.  Horrornovelreviews.com claims that The Haunting of Hill House is the 8th scariest novel of all time.  And Paste magazine puts it into the unsorted top 30.      And so we open the gates to this terrifying place- Hill House- next episode we will look at the house itself, we'll look at the places where biographers think she got her inspiration for the house, we'll meet the other residents, explore the history of the house and begin to experience the ghosts- if that's what they are- as they manifest themselves to us through the eyes of Eleanor.                        

Read the Bible
October 22 – Vol. 2

Read the Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 3:22


Daniel not only interpreted the dreams of others, on occasion he himself had dreams that needed interpretation. The one described here (Dan. 7) took place in the first year of Belshazzar (Dan. 7:1), i.e., more than fifty years since Daniel had first been deported to Babylon. Not all revelation is given at once. From now to the end of the book, Daniel writes in the first person (with the exception of the note at Dan. 10:1).(1) Although the four beasts representing four kingdoms or empires are in some measure sequential (and to that extent probably to be identified with specific historical kingdoms—see below), the initial observation that these four beasts came out of the sea (proverbial for chaos and wickedness) churned up by the four winds (i.e., from the four points of the compass, or everywhere) may hint that they also represent all kingdoms that oppose God.(2) The evocative nature of these beasts must not be overlooked. The lion combined with the eagle suggests dominion, speed, and strength. The brown Syrian bear may weigh up to six hundred pounds and has a voracious appetite. The leopard is known for its extraordinarily sudden, rapid attacks; its four heads show it to be rapacious in all directions, wanting dominion everywhere. The last beast is “terrifying and frightening and very powerful … it crushed and devoured its victims and trampled underfoot whatever was left” (Dan. 7:7). Horns represent kings or kingdoms or dominion; this beast has ten of them, five times more than the natural two horns. The best identification is that the four beasts represent, respectively, the Babylonian, Medo-Persian, Greek, and Roman Empires.(3) The expression “son of man” is a Semitic way of saying “human being.” The other kingdoms are beastly and inhuman; here the reins of power rest in the hands of a human being as God meant a human being to be. Because of the parallels between verse 14 and verses 18 and 27, some have argued that “son of man” is merely a symbol for the “saints of the Most High” (Dan. 7:18). But the matter is not so simple. If “son of man” in verses 13–14 were merely a symbol of the people of God, why should the authority be given to one who is like “a son of man”? The figure in verse 12 is an individual figure, yet he has a representative role (like the Old Testament priest, cf. Ex. 19:6). He comes “with the clouds of heaven,” a common association with the glory of deity. And by using “son of man,” the vision simultaneously signals a kingship that extends beyond Israel to all of humankind and prepares the way for the incarnation. Cf. Matthew 19:28; Mark 13:26; 14:62; Revelation 1:13–16. This podcast is designed to be used alongside TGC's Read The Bible initiative (TGC.org/readthebible). The podcast features devotional commentaries from D.A. Carson's book For the Love of God (vol. 2) that follow the M'Cheyne Bible reading plan.

TonioTimeDaily
Jesus' completely naked on the crucifixion cross was misused for the sexual entertainment of others, Jesus is a survivor of sexual trauma

TonioTimeDaily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 41:52


"On this Good Friday, as on many before, I consider anew the full range of torture and humiliation to which Jesus of Nazareth was subjected, physical and sexual. The latter is so traumatizing for the Church that we have covered it up -- literally -- covering Jesus' genitals on our crucifixes. But the Romans (and others) who used crucifixion as more than a form of execution, as a form of state-sponsored terrorism -- really lynching -- to control subject populations were not inclined to respect the human or religious dignity, culture or customs of their targets. The mocking, taunting, forced stripping of Jesus was a sexual assault. He was, as so many of us are -- women and men, children and adult -- vulnerable to those who used physical force against him in whatever way they chose. Those who rush to say, "But he wasn't raped," or, "At least he wasn't raped," miss the point. The combination of various forms of sexualized violence and lethal violence are potent dehumanizing expressions of dominance as in ritual castrations combined with lynching in the American South -- and North." "It is hard to think of Jesus that way. Hard to find images that preserve that historical perspective. (I couldn't find any nudes that also portrayed Jesus as a Semitic, Afro-Asiatic man.) An Internet search is not for the faint of heart. The sexualization of a bound man or woman is an obvious and a familiar trope in pornography. The association of Jesus with BDSM (bondage, discipline/domination, submission/sadomasochism) is horrifying (for me and for many others, but clearly not for all). The line between consensual sexual encounters and assault and sexualized murder is crystal clear for me. Crucifixion, like all forms of lynching, is depraved and should make us uncomfortable whatever our sexual pleasures. The Church that has a hard time talking about sexual violence perpetrated against mere mortals has an understandably hard time thinking about the sexualized connotations of the crucifixion of the Son of God. The reason the Church has such a hard time thinking critically and talking about sexual violence is because it has a hard time thinking critically and talking about sex. The Church -- and I really mean churches, congregations and denominations -- has had and have a hard time talking honestly and publicly about good healthy sex and so they are unable to speak authoritatively about its antithesis and perversion, the use of sex as a weapon. There is so much shame associated with sex for so many Christians and those who lead, teach and preach in Christian communities, and that shame is regularly heaped on women and gay or effeminate men. Yet the scandal -- and it is scandalous -- of the Incarnation is that God pulsed into this world between a woman's thighs, in not only the spit and shit of a stable, but passed through her vagina, as Bro. Cornell West says located "between the orifices for urine and excrement." "Jesus has been carefully shielded from female and male genitalia in the tradition ever since. The idea of Jesus being in either a heterosexual or homosexual relationships are both anathema for many Christians. Even the notion of Jesus' own human sexual development -- erections and nocturnal emissions -- is taboo. And what of his own actions? Could Jesus be fully human as a teenaged boy and man without ever fantasizing or masturbating? If he was truly unmarried in a culture that married teenagers off as soon as they went through puberty in lieu of birth control because there was no controlling those hormones, how did Jesus deal with his own, natural, healthy, God-given sexual desires?" --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/support

Read the Bible
October 20 – Vol. 2

Read the Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 3:18


After Nebuchadnezzar died, the Babylonian Empire rapidly declined. In violent coups, several members of the dynasty succeeded each other. Nabonidus eventually imposed some stability, though various vassal states broke away. Nabonidus himself became a religious dilettante. He abandoned the worship of Marduk (chief god in the Babylonian pantheon) and ended up, apparently, excavating buried shrines, restoring ancient religious rituals, and fostering the worship of the moon god Sin. Probably he was on one of these strange religious quests at the time of Daniel 5. As a result he had left the care of Babylon itself in the hands of Belshazzar his son. (The NIV footnote, Dan. 5:2, 11, 13, 18, rightly observes that Nebuchadnezzar was Belshazzar's “father” only in the sense that he was his “ancestor” or possibly “predecessor”—a common use of the Semitic word, not unlike the usage in 2 Kings 2:12.)The account makes it clear that the Persian army was outside the walls of the city, but Belshazzar obviously felt that the city was impervious to assault. The bacchanalia he ordered up was worse than an orgy of self-indulgence. Bringing out the golden goblets that had been taken from the temple in Jerusalem was more than a whim. In the sequence of the two chapters, Daniel 4 and 5, it is hard not to see that this was a repudiation of what Belshazzar's “father” Nebuchadnezzar had learned about the living God. Perhaps Belshazzar thought that Babylon's fortunes had declined because of the relative neglect of the pagan deities. Nebuchadnezzar had learned to revere the God of Israel; Belshazzar was happy to spit in his eye. So they drank from the goblets and “praised the gods of gold and silver, of bronze, iron, wood and stone” (Dan. 5:4). Daniel sees the connection between the two emperors, and this forms part of his stinging rebuke: Belshazzar knew what “the Most High God” had done to Nebuchadnezzar, and how Nebuchadnezzar had come to his senses and acknowledged “that the Most High God is sovereign over the kingdoms of men and sets over them anyone he wishes”—and yet he set himself up “against the Lord of heaven” and refused to “honor the God who holds in his hand your life and all your ways” (Dan. 5:18-24). Somehow Belshazzar thought he could ignore or defy the God who had humbled the far greater Nebuchadnezzar.So what have we learned? Have we absorbed the lessons of history—that God will not, finally, be mocked or defied? That we are utterly dependent creatures, and if we fail to acknowledge this simple truth our sins are compounded? That God can humble and convert the most unlikely, like Nebuchadnezzar, and destroy those who defy him, like Belshazzar? This podcast is designed to be used alongside TGC's Read The Bible initiative (TGC.org/readthebible). The podcast features devotional commentaries from D.A. Carson's book For the Love of God (vol. 2) that follow the M'Cheyne Bible reading plan.

Savage Minds Podcast
Haim Bresheeth-Žabner

Savage Minds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 105:43


Filmmaker, photographer and film studies scholar Haim Bresheeth-Žabner discusses his latest book, An Army Like No Other: How the Israel Defense Force Made a Nation (2020) analysing the IDF within the larger project political project of Zionism. Reflecting upon his parents who survived Auschwitz, his birth in Cinecittà in a displaced persons’ camp, to his childhood and formative years in Israel growing up in an Arab house in Jaffa, Bresheeth-Žabner explains how his life and family heritage have informed his political values with a deep understanding of being displaced. Bresheeth-Žabner criticises the unnecessary formation of the Israeli state to resolve the refugee crisis after the Second World War while contending that the creation of Israel was emblematic of a state “where the value system of the army becomes the value system of a nation” noting that the IDF was never a defensive army but instead one of aggression. Discussing how international powers led to the dispossession of an entire nation of its home and the conterminous destruction that is connected to the Nakba (النكبة‎), Bresheeth-Žabner notes how Zionism was implemented to control power bases within the Middle East. Discussing recent accusations of anti-Semitism within the British Labour Party, Bresheeth-Žabner ridicules the tactics of aligning criticism of Israel with anti-Semitism and details how he reported himself to the Labour Party as “anti-Semitic” according to its regulations two years before resigning from the party. Get full access to Savage Minds at savageminds.substack.com/subscribe

Straight White American Jesus
The Real and Present Danger of Male Supremacist Terrorism

Straight White American Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 34:57


Alex DiBranco is Executive Director and Founder at Institute for Research on Male Supremacism. Alex stops by to discuss "Male Supremacist Terrorism as a Rising Threat". According to Dibranco, male supremacism is a right-wing extremist ideology that has contributed to terrorist attacks, primarily in the US, but also in Canada and Europe. Within male supremacist communities, the motivation for terrorist attacks stem predominantly from two core misogynist beliefs: 1) the belief that men are entitled to sexual access to women, and 2) the belief that feminists are a malevolent force controlling society at the expense of men, a frame similar to anti-Semitic conspiracy theories regarding Jewish elites controlling the world. Alex and Brad discuss how secular and religious male supremacisms are cut from the same cloth, the dynamics of superiority and humiliation in male supremacist terrorism, and the rise of the Proud Boys. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://swaj.supportingcast.fm

Naked Reflections, from the Naked Scientists

Following an increase in anti-Semitic postings on social media, the anti-Semitism Policy Trust looked into it and asked the Woolf Institute to analyse the material they discovered. Julian Hargreaves discusses what he found with Daniel Staetsky... Like this podcast? Please help us by writing a review

Marietta Daily Journal Podcast
Federal Disaster Loans Available for Flood Victims; School Board Passes Anti-Racism Resolution; Smyrna's Birthday Drew Record Crowd

Marietta Daily Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 15:31


Victims of September's floods in Cobb County are eligible for federal relief funds; After anti-Semitic graffiti was found at local schools Cobb's school board has passed a zero-tolerance resolution; Smyrna's birthday celebration drew a record crowd to see the Gin Blossoms and Sister Hazel perform.  #CobbCounty #Georgia #LocalNews    -            -            -            -            The Marietta Daily Journal Podcast is local news for Marietta, Kennesaw, Smyrna, and all of Cobb County.             Subscribe today, so you don't miss an episode! MDJOnline            Register Here for your essential digital news.             Find additional episodes of the MDJ Podcast here.       This Podcast was produced and published for the Marietta Daily Journal and MDJ Online by BG Ad Group on 10-15-2021 For advertising inquiries, please email j.southerland@bgadgroup.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Seven Streams Method

Download Hebrews 6-9 We are in the Church Stream reading from the International Standard Version. 7streamsmethod.com | @7StreamsMethod | @serenatravis | #7Streams | Donate Commentary by Dr. Drake Travis Thank you Lord for saving our souls, for making us righteous in your Covenant written and sealed in your blood. This is our rich salvation.  Amen. This is more notes on theology and issues that pertain especially to the Hebrews.  They pertain to us as well for we are Judeo-Christians. Those who follow Christ Jesus must remain mindful of the fact that He was a Jew. Did you ever realize that? Jesus was not a Christian.  We are. We are to be learning what the Hebrews are to be learning.  "So as for you Hebrews"  ... the book continues. 6 - The immaturity was an issue that needed to be addressed.  Have you heard of people who live like the Devil all week, confess on Friday or sober up very late Saturday, get to church shabby and blurry-eyed but indeed go [out of guilt] yet consider it enough to clear them for another week of raucous mindless living?  I've actually heard a church goer excuse some ungodly tendencies, "hey, relax, we went to church last weekend. We'll go next weekend. The in-between is our time. We won't go to hell for anything. We were baptized years ago. We'll be all right."  This see-saw/yo-yo faith is not excusable. We are to grow in Christ, not vascilate in and out of Christ.  Those who are endlessly jumping in the mud so to shower off so to jump in the mud, then shower off only to jump in mud infinite amounts of times all-the-while saying they are "busy for the Lord" are fooling themselves and themselves only.  Repentance is so that we can turn our back on sin permanently, not so that we can feel fine about continually going back to sin.  There are many facets of this concept and the unpardonable sin, sins that are mortal and lead to death, sins that are lesser or more.  The arguments will never be finalized.  It's better to just hear the words of the apostle here in Hebrews, resolve to grow in our faith and service v.s. argue about how ungodly we can be and still be saved   Those arguments are fruitless. Abandon them and grow with Jesus. 7 - The biblical character Melchizedek receives the best explanation in Hebrews.  The Hebrew revered Moses, David, Elijah. Abraham got special honors from the Hebrews and since Abraham paid reverent homage to Melchizedek then this mysterious figure from 2,000 B.C. gets a 'hat-tip" as well.  The writer of Hebrews lays it out plainly that Jesus is the high priest we are to honor now.  Yes, remember and honor all these biblical characters, especially Abraham and Melchizedek. But using them to rationalize that "we're covered" and subsequently shun Jesus is not reading this right.  It's easy to guffaw what's in front of you and say things were better way back when or way over someplace else. .Remember John/Baptist telling the illicit leaders visiting from Jerusalem, "don't say 'we have Abraham as our father' (and think they can ignore the matters at hand and the fact that the grid for salvation was about to change). That was from Matt. 3:10 and Luk 3:9.  The same ethic is being explained here.  Jesus is the great high priest now.  Crooning about the good old boys and/or the good old days is hapless.  Jesus is the King of Righteousness and the matter is settled. We pray because of Him, by way of Him, and to Him now.  Some posit that Melchizedek, the mysterious and glorious priest, was Shem, Noah's middle son, the father of the Semitic peoples, who really was still alive in Abraham's time.  And some records maintain that he was the oldest man on earth at the time.   Study that further if you wish but like The Book of Hebrews and Jesus so effectively remind us, don't let older topics cloud your mind to what matters most now 8 - The New Covenant was given by Christ and in His blood and it is better; it is superior to the old covenant given through Moses.  It had to start this way and be exercised as it was but it needed to be perfected by Christ Jesus.  Therefore Christ's ministry is superior.  The old covenant was not enough to cleanse permanently.  There's an old story about a Catholic boy and a Jewish boy walking home from school and each was explaining their faith to the other.  The Jewish boy was in awe after the Catholic boy finished his part.  The Jewish boy exclaimed, "you just confess your sin and that's it!? And your guilt just goes away? Why is it so easy?  We have guilt in our faith too, but it never goes away!"  The message of Jesus is that He is our permanent priest now - Great and high and powerful and perfect and permanent in His office wherein He serves on our behalf.  Christ too now is better for covering us for glory's sake.  We see the word "better" 11 times in Hebrews - in the translation we used this week.  That also applies to this New Covenant in Christ.  It is better.  It is superior. 9 - Many of the changes from old to new are told in this chapter.  The Tabernacle and the animal sacrifices served an era and a purpose, but they never permanently saved and solved like Christ does now.  The blood of the lamb was the symbol of forgiveness.  Christ offered Himself as the sacrifice through His blood. And His sacrifice was once and for all and for all time. There are so many parallels and comparisons and the issue is that we see that Christ is better and only HE is sufficient now.  Here it is told why the new covenant was needed and put in place.  Read it again or play it again if you need to hear it again.  This is very vital. Notice that the new covenant morphs into the New Testament. Our word, "new testament" comes from right here in Hebrews 9.  A last will and testament goes into effect after a person has died. Christ's death (resurrection) put the new covenant into effect as a testament; a testament that speaks to us still.  A will and testament also transfers valuables to another person or persons.  The New Testament in Christ transfers righteousness to us. It also transfers membership to a city of gold that is being prepared for us...it transfers the citizenship of that city to us also.  The blood of goats and bulls cannot do this.  The blood of Christ received by us in faith accomplishes all of this. The Thread Through the Streams Bring what you have to God. Bring your offerings, your errors, your questions, your earnings, your life. Bring it all to God. -In Numbers 28-30 the offerings were brought to God - every season, festival, holiday, month, week, day - and it was a joyful regimen -II Chr.5ff. The Ark is brought to God in the Temple and praises erupt. Solomon brings his prayers to God before the people and God displays His wonders in awesome fashion.  [no magic - simply coming before the Lord!] - Prov.5-8, in an antithetical manner, reminds people to not bring personal needs to a prostitute. And since we need to be learning as a people, be learning from the Lord, from godly parents. Come to God with personal                       needs, financial needs (v.s. joining with hucksters,liars,hookers)  You will go somewhere with these needs so in an illustrative sense, Proverbs is telling us to go to God with all this. -Ezekiel 16-17 had some painful themes this week. He tells of how God has come to them like a bridegroom. In a sense, but Israel runs away, God asks "why will you go anywhere with anyone but you won't come to me?"                        And because you do not "bring yourselves to me, you will be plucked up and hauled away like what happens when an eagle snatches up a rodent. -Zephaniah 1 is scathing, but the passage ends this week [Zeph.2:3] with a tender urging that the people humble themselves, seek righteousness - and come to God. -In John 3 Nicodemus brings his questions to God Himself. Yes, he is coming to Jesus at night, but his questions drove him to do so even though it  jeopardized his standing with the leaders.                        I.e. come to God however you can, whichever way, and whenever you can.  Do what you must, but come to Him tonight - today. Come to Him like Nicodemus did; now. -Hebrews 6ff. urges to get off the metronome of "sin, confess, sin, confess" and come to God; grow in God. And as for the old way of coming to God, sacrifices and offerings (to Melchizedek), honoring Abraham, yeah yeah...                        COME TO JESUS!  That's how we come to God from here on.  The shady Samaritan woman found God and turned evangelist after talking it through with Jesus. Amazing week of stories, wasn't it?!

Today in PA | A PennLive daily news briefing with Julia Hatmaker

The trucker who was fatally shot by state troopers at an I-80 rest stop last week had reportedly fired at multiple vehicles beforehand. Defense attorneys have argued that the anti-Semitic comments made by the man who shot and killed 11 people at the Tree of Life synagogue building should be suppressed in court. The Wells Fargo Center has updated its code of conduct as the NBA and NHL season gets underway, emphasizing the inappropriateness of some of the rowdier behavior exhibited by fans. Lastly, a group of bobcats got recognized for being particularly photogenic. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Walking With Dante
The Poetics Of Color And Usury: Inferno, Canto XVII, Lines 46 - 78

Walking With Dante

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 32:37


We've come to what Dantista Chivacci Leonardi calls "the most colorful" bits of Dante's INFERNO. We've come to the usurers, sitting on the brink of the seventh circle of violence, looking out over the eighth circle of fraud, the deeper parts of hell. This passage is stuffed with synecdoches. Let's talk about why that is and how the poetic bones of COMEDY itself are exposed. This passage is also often overlooked, a mere footnote, because of the beast of fraud that comes before it and after it and eats up so much attention. It's also over-interpreted. There's so much effort in the commentary to name each of these bankers sitting on the burning sands. But Dante goes to some length NOT to name them. Rather, the poet implicates the families, rather than the individuals. Why spend time and energy nailing down who these guys are when the poem goes to come lengths to tell you that they are stand-ins (or yes, synecdoches!) for their families? Here are the segments of this podcast episode for Inferno, Canto XVII, lines 46 - 78 on WALKING WITH DANTE: [01:19] My English translation of the passage: INFERNO, Canto XVII, lines 46 - 78. If you'd like to read along, you can find this passage on my website, markscarbrough.com. [04:22] The usurers sit on the edge of violence and look out over the expanse of the eighth circle, the one for the fraudulent--probably because charging interest on loaned money sits right in the ethical juncture between violence and fraud for Dante. And there's another curious bit that rings underneath this passage: Dante's own family may well have been money-lenders. [12:47] The colorful purses hung around each other their necks. Let's identify the families and talk about why we don't have to name the specific sinners. [19:00] Why is this passage so colorful? [20:45] Where are the Jews? Almost any medieval reference to money-lending would always involve some anti-Semitic snark. But these are "good" Christian families. Dante seems to shy away from anti-Semitism just when we'd expect it. [24:37] These bankers are the fulfillment of Dante's own prophecy back in Canto XVI where he decried the coming of new money into Florence. [25:45] A final bestial image in the passage: the sluggish and stupid ox. [27:26] More thoughts on synecdoche. First off, the rhetorical strategy fragments the world into pieces, just as violence and fraud do. But more than that, synecdoche is the rhetorical strategy for COMEDY as a whole. Support this podcast

The Jason Rantz Show
Rantz Rewind! May 4, 2018

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 37:53


What's Trending: Union workers protest Seattle City Councilwoman Kshama Sawant over the head tax. // Jason reviews Overboard and Tully. // GUEST: Lawfare.com's Brooke Goldstein explains how Starbucks caved to the anti-Semitic wing of the Women's March movement. // GUEST: NBC News mistakenly reported that the FBI was wiretapping Michael Cohen's phone, Daily Caller reporter Saagar Enjeti explains what really happened See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch
Absurd Truth: Biden's Truman Show

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 25:11


Dana puts back on her tinfoil hat to figure out why Biden's press conference take place in a fake TV set across the street, meanwhile Sarah Silverman goes anti-Semitic and Justin Trudeau makes up letters.Please visit our great sponsors:Patriot Mobilehttps://PatriotMobile.com/DanaStand with Patriot Mobile. Free activations with promo code DANA. Patriotmobile.com/dana or call 972-PATRIOT. Kel-Techttps://KelTecWeapons.comKelTec: Creating Innovative, Quality Firearms to help secure your world. Delta Rescuehttps://deltarescue.orgGet your complete Estate Planning kit at deltarescue.org/dana today and let your passion for animals live well into the future. Black Rifle Coffee Companyhttps://blackriflecoffee.com/danatvUse code DANATV to save 20% off your first coffee club, coffee and select gear purchase. My Pillowhttps://mypillow.comBOGO Free Giza Dream Sheet Sets with Radio Specials code DANA. Superbeetshttps://DanasBeets.comBuy 2 bags of SuperBeets Heart Chews and get a bag of Vitamin D3 Chews AND a free bag of SuperBeets Heart Chews. Bonner Winehttps://conservativewines.comDana listeners now receive 50% wine and 50% shipping only at www.Conservativewines.com.Legacy Precious Metalshttps://legacypminvestments.comPick up your free guide to precious metal investments today.American Financinghttps://americanfiancing.netLearn more with no pressure or obligation. Refinance today! Call 866-574-2500

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch
Absurd Truth: Biden's Truman Show

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 25:11


Dana puts back on her tinfoil hat to figure out why Biden's press conference take place in a fake TV set across the street, meanwhile Sarah Silverman goes anti-Semitic and Justin Trudeau makes up letters.Please visit our great sponsors:Patriot Mobilehttps://PatriotMobile.com/DanaStand with Patriot Mobile. Free activations with promo code DANA. Patriotmobile.com/dana or call 972-PATRIOT. Kel-Techttps://KelTecWeapons.comKelTec: Creating Innovative, Quality Firearms to help secure your world. Delta Rescuehttps://deltarescue.orgGet your complete Estate Planning kit at deltarescue.org/dana today and let your passion for animals live well into the future. Black Rifle Coffee Companyhttps://blackriflecoffee.com/danatvUse code DANATV to save 20% off your first coffee club, coffee and select gear purchase. My Pillowhttps://mypillow.comBOGO Free Giza Dream Sheet Sets with Radio Specials code DANA. Superbeetshttps://DanasBeets.comBuy 2 bags of SuperBeets Heart Chews and get a bag of Vitamin D3 Chews AND a free bag of SuperBeets Heart Chews. Bonner Winehttps://conservativewines.comDana listeners now receive 50% wine and 50% shipping only at www.Conservativewines.com.Legacy Precious Metalshttps://legacypminvestments.comPick up your free guide to precious metal investments today.American Financinghttps://americanfiancing.netLearn more with no pressure or obligation. Refinance today! Call 866-574-2500

Brides of Frankenstein
Nosferatu: Nobody Looks Like a Person

Brides of Frankenstein

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 81:16


It's finally here - the most wonderful time of the year - SPOOKY SEASON HAS RETURNED! The Brides kick off their Halloween celebrations with yet another vampire movie, the brilliantly creepy Nosferatu! Released in 1922, F.W. Murnau's deep dive into German Expressionist horror is the first onscreen retelling of Dracula, even though the studio definitely didn't have the rights to Stoker's novel and got sued into bankruptcy by his widow. Seriously: Prana Films closed after this film because she gouged them with legal fees. And for good reason; it's Dracula. No question about it. This is a film we technically shouldn't have, and that transgressive, unsettling quality shows up in every frame. And that's before we even get to Count Orlok! Along the way we chat about the obvious anti-Semitic tropes that surround vampire lore, the baffling choice to sub a hyena for a werewolf, and debate if Herr Knock is a scarier character than Count Orlok. It's honestly closer than you think. Also, would Orlok sound like the Count from Sesame Street, or Count Chocola? Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror. 1922. Directed by F.W. Murnau. Written by Henrik Galeen. Starring Max Schreck, Greta Schröder, Gustav von Wangenheim.

Finding the Warmth of Our Sun
White Genocide Nazi-Conspiracy Theory goes mainstream GOP

Finding the Warmth of Our Sun

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 15:53


White genocide and the Great Replacement Theory, are conspiracy theories with Nazi and anti-Semitic roots. GOP reps, conservative news, and more have fully embraced these ideas, ideas that argue for genocide for all non-white people. It is becoming a normal idea for the GOP voting population too. What are these ideas and theories and where did they come from?

New Books in History
Henning Trüper, "Orientalism, Philology, and the Illegibility of the Modern World" (Bloomsbury, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 71:26


At the turn of the nineteenth century, European philologists were engaged in the study of Semitic languages and Indology, breaking with the past in many ways. To understand this period, Henning Trüper argues for the importance of a broad-ranging investigation into the production of scholarly knowledge, focusing especially on Semitic Orientalism, as a way to understand the deep epistemological crisis facing the field.  In Orientalism, Philology, and the Illegibility of the Modern World (Bloomsbury Academic Press 2020), he argues that nineteenth century philologists, in their efforts to establish the explication of linguistic meanings as scientific, prioritized certain semantic language games over others, in particular referential ones. Exploring the tensions which arise between “philology of the real” (Realphilologie) and “philology of words” (Wortphilologie) Trüper uncovers the patchwork of methods which philologists employed in an attempt to construct a universal science—concluding that these practices have reverberating implications for the humanities even in the twentieth century and beyond. Malcolm Keating is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Yale-NUS College. His research focuses on Sanskrit philosophy of language and epistemology. He is the author of Language, Meaning, and Use in Indian Philosophy (Bloomsbury Press, 2019) and host of the podcast Sutras (and stuff). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Henning Trüper, "Orientalism, Philology, and the Illegibility of the Modern World" (Bloomsbury, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 71:26


At the turn of the nineteenth century, European philologists were engaged in the study of Semitic languages and Indology, breaking with the past in many ways. To understand this period, Henning Trüper argues for the importance of a broad-ranging investigation into the production of scholarly knowledge, focusing especially on Semitic Orientalism, as a way to understand the deep epistemological crisis facing the field.  In Orientalism, Philology, and the Illegibility of the Modern World (Bloomsbury Academic Press 2020), he argues that nineteenth century philologists, in their efforts to establish the explication of linguistic meanings as scientific, prioritized certain semantic language games over others, in particular referential ones. Exploring the tensions which arise between “philology of the real” (Realphilologie) and “philology of words” (Wortphilologie) Trüper uncovers the patchwork of methods which philologists employed in an attempt to construct a universal science—concluding that these practices have reverberating implications for the humanities even in the twentieth century and beyond. Malcolm Keating is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Yale-NUS College. His research focuses on Sanskrit philosophy of language and epistemology. He is the author of Language, Meaning, and Use in Indian Philosophy (Bloomsbury Press, 2019) and host of the podcast Sutras (and stuff). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
Henning Trüper, "Orientalism, Philology, and the Illegibility of the Modern World" (Bloomsbury, 2020)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 71:26


At the turn of the nineteenth century, European philologists were engaged in the study of Semitic languages and Indology, breaking with the past in many ways. To understand this period, Henning Trüper argues for the importance of a broad-ranging investigation into the production of scholarly knowledge, focusing especially on Semitic Orientalism, as a way to understand the deep epistemological crisis facing the field.  In Orientalism, Philology, and the Illegibility of the Modern World (Bloomsbury Academic Press 2020), he argues that nineteenth century philologists, in their efforts to establish the explication of linguistic meanings as scientific, prioritized certain semantic language games over others, in particular referential ones. Exploring the tensions which arise between “philology of the real” (Realphilologie) and “philology of words” (Wortphilologie) Trüper uncovers the patchwork of methods which philologists employed in an attempt to construct a universal science—concluding that these practices have reverberating implications for the humanities even in the twentieth century and beyond. Malcolm Keating is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Yale-NUS College. His research focuses on Sanskrit philosophy of language and epistemology. He is the author of Language, Meaning, and Use in Indian Philosophy (Bloomsbury Press, 2019) and host of the podcast Sutras (and stuff). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

New Books in Intellectual History
Henning Trüper, "Orientalism, Philology, and the Illegibility of the Modern World" (Bloomsbury, 2020)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 71:26


At the turn of the nineteenth century, European philologists were engaged in the study of Semitic languages and Indology, breaking with the past in many ways. To understand this period, Henning Trüper argues for the importance of a broad-ranging investigation into the production of scholarly knowledge, focusing especially on Semitic Orientalism, as a way to understand the deep epistemological crisis facing the field.  In Orientalism, Philology, and the Illegibility of the Modern World (Bloomsbury Academic Press 2020), he argues that nineteenth century philologists, in their efforts to establish the explication of linguistic meanings as scientific, prioritized certain semantic language games over others, in particular referential ones. Exploring the tensions which arise between “philology of the real” (Realphilologie) and “philology of words” (Wortphilologie) Trüper uncovers the patchwork of methods which philologists employed in an attempt to construct a universal science—concluding that these practices have reverberating implications for the humanities even in the twentieth century and beyond. Malcolm Keating is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Yale-NUS College. His research focuses on Sanskrit philosophy of language and epistemology. He is the author of Language, Meaning, and Use in Indian Philosophy (Bloomsbury Press, 2019) and host of the podcast Sutras (and stuff). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

Lake Forest Illinois
Joe Severino for Illinois 10th Congressional District

Lake Forest Illinois

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 30:57


Pete Jansons first heard about Joe Severino when Joe spoke up at the last #115 School Board Meeting. Let's learn about Lake Forest's own Joe Severino for Congress Joseph (Joe) Severino, a resident of Lake Forest and Greek Orthodox Christian, is happily married to wife Nichole for 18 years. Together they have raised five children (Carmen, Joey, Alexa, Isabella, Arianna). Joe recently celebrated his 26th year in business as a hospitality service leader and is proud to have employed thousands of individuals over his career. The call to service is natural for Joe. In fact, while running his business, Joe went to law school and passed the California “Baby” bar exam for first year law students. Still looking to accomplish more, Joe applied and was accepted to Harvard Business School's prestigious OPM program. There he studied and graduated with 177 global leaders representing 38 countries. His greatest passion is giving back to the community. Joe started his company with a $1,000 loan from his father and has expertly navigated opportunities. Joe's mission is to take that experience and create similar opportunities in the district. Joe understands the American dream and his grandparents were immigrants from Greece and Italy, and his father was a Teamster union business organizer for 30 years. ISSUES: PRO-LIFE Joe is Pro-life and a believer in the sanctity of life in all stages. Joe would sign the born alive bill that would compel healthcare workers to render healthcare to any baby that survives an abortion. 2ND AMENDMENT Joe supports the second amendment and will fight to prevent illegal use of guns, as well as to take guns out of criminal hands. FREE SPEECH Joe believes all voices should be heard as free speech is guaranteed by the first amendment in our constitution. Currently there is an effort to stymie and quiet the speech of anyone other than radical ideologists. Additionally, Joe is against the anti-Semitic climate that is growing in America. POLICE REFORM Joe believes in police reform and opposes defunding police. Police should be better trained and governed with accountability, and they should patrol the communities in which they live. A police officer should feel free to report wrongdoing or abuse of power without fear of retaliation. Further, any officer who refrains from reporting wrongdoing should be terminated and logged in a national database to reinvigorate trust in policing. EQUAL RIGHTS Joe believes in equal rights for all. IMMIGRATION Joe believes in creating a pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrants that currently reside here. In addition, Joe believes in encouraging legal immigration which has made us a culturally rich nation. https://severinoforcongress.com/ Have an idea for a guest or topic? pete@lakeforestpodcast.com Support our show like Church of The Holy Spirit, Reverend Luke Back, and "Matt A" https://www.patreon.com/LakeForestPodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lakeforestpodcast/message

ESV: Straight through the Bible
October 4: Matthew 5–7

ESV: Straight through the Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 13:47


Matthew 5–7 Matthew 5–7 (Listen) The Sermon on the Mount 5 Seeing the crowds, he went up on the mountain, and when he sat down, his disciples came to him. The Beatitudes 2 And he opened his mouth and taught them, saying: 3 “Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. 4 “Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted. 5 “Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth. 6 “Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they shall be satisfied. 7 “Blessed are the merciful, for they shall receive mercy. 8 “Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God. 9 “Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons1 of God. 10 “Blessed are those who are persecuted for righteousness' sake, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. 11 “Blessed are you when others revile you and persecute you and utter all kinds of evil against you falsely on my account. 12 Rejoice and be glad, for your reward is great in heaven, for so they persecuted the prophets who were before you. Salt and Light 13 “You are the salt of the earth, but if salt has lost its taste, how shall its saltiness be restored? It is no longer good for anything except to be thrown out and trampled under people's feet. 14 “You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden. 15 Nor do people light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a stand, and it gives light to all in the house. 16 In the same way, let your light shine before others, so that2 they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven. Christ Came to Fulfill the Law 17 “Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them. 18 For truly, I say to you, until heaven and earth pass away, not an iota, not a dot, will pass from the Law until all is accomplished. 19 Therefore whoever relaxes one of the least of these commandments and teaches others to do the same will be called least in the kingdom of heaven, but whoever does them and teaches them will be called great in the kingdom of heaven. 20 For I tell you, unless your righteousness exceeds that of the scribes and Pharisees, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven. Anger 21 “You have heard that it was said to those of old, ‘You shall not murder; and whoever murders will be liable to judgment.' 22 But I say to you that everyone who is angry with his brother3 will be liable to judgment; whoever insults4 his brother will be liable to the council; and whoever says, ‘You fool!' will be liable to the hell5 of fire. 23 So if you are offering your gift at the altar and there remember that your brother has something against you, 24 leave your gift there before the altar and go. First be reconciled to your brother, and then come and offer your gift. 25 Come to terms quickly with your accuser while you are going with him to court, lest your accuser hand you over to the judge, and the judge to the guard, and you be put in prison. 26 Truly, I say to you, you will never get out until you have paid the last penny.6 Lust 27 “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall not commit adultery.' 28 But I say to you that everyone who looks at a woman with lustful intent has already committed adultery with her in his heart. 29 If your right eye causes you to sin, tear it out and throw it away. For it is better that you lose one of your members than that your whole body be thrown into hell. 30 And if your right hand causes you to sin, cut it off and throw it away. For it is better that you lose one of your members than that your whole body go into hell. Divorce 31 “It was also said, ‘Whoever divorces his wife, let him give her a certificate of divorce.' 32 But I say to you that everyone who divorces his wife, except on the ground of sexual immorality, makes her commit adultery, and whoever marries a divorced woman commits adultery. Oaths 33 “Again you have heard that it was said to those of old, ‘You shall not swear falsely, but shall perform to the Lord what you have sworn.' 34 But I say to you, Do not take an oath at all, either by heaven, for it is the throne of God, 35 or by the earth, for it is his footstool, or by Jerusalem, for it is the city of the great King. 36 And do not take an oath by your head, for you cannot make one hair white or black. 37 Let what you say be simply ‘Yes' or ‘No'; anything more than this comes from evil.7 Retaliation 38 “You have heard that it was said, ‘An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth.' 39 But I say to you, Do not resist the one who is evil. But if anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to him the other also. 40 And if anyone would sue you and take your tunic,8 let him have your cloak as well. 41 And if anyone forces you to go one mile, go with him two miles. 42 Give to the one who begs from you, and do not refuse the one who would borrow from you. Love Your Enemies 43 “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.' 44 But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, 45 so that you may be sons of your Father who is in heaven. For he makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the just and on the unjust. 46 For if you love those who love you, what reward do you have? Do not even the tax collectors do the same? 47 And if you greet only your brothers,9 what more are you doing than others? Do not even the Gentiles do the same? 48 You therefore must be perfect, as your heavenly Father is perfect. Giving to the Needy 6 “Beware of practicing your righteousness before other people in order to be seen by them, for then you will have no reward from your Father who is in heaven. 2 “Thus, when you give to the needy, sound no trumpet before you, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets, that they may be praised by others. Truly, I say to you, they have received their reward. 3 But when you give to the needy, do not let your left hand know what your right hand is doing, 4 so that your giving may be in secret. And your Father who sees in secret will reward you. The Lord's Prayer 5 “And when you pray, you must not be like the hypocrites. For they love to stand and pray in the synagogues and at the street corners, that they may be seen by others. Truly, I say to you, they have received their reward. 6 But when you pray, go into your room and shut the door and pray to your Father who is in secret. And your Father who sees in secret will reward you. 7 “And when you pray, do not heap up empty phrases as the Gentiles do, for they think that they will be heard for their many words. 8 Do not be like them, for your Father knows what you need before you ask him. 9 Pray then like this:   “Our Father in heaven,  hallowed be your name.1010   Your kingdom come,  your will be done,11    on earth as it is in heaven.11   Give us this day our daily bread,1212   and forgive us our debts,    as we also have forgiven our debtors.13   And lead us not into temptation,    but deliver us from evil.13 14 For if you forgive others their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you, 15 but if you do not forgive others their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses. Fasting 16 “And when you fast, do not look gloomy like the hypocrites, for they disfigure their faces that their fasting may be seen by others. Truly, I say to you, they have received their reward. 17 But when you fast, anoint your head and wash your face, 18 that your fasting may not be seen by others but by your Father who is in secret. And your Father who sees in secret will reward you. Lay Up Treasures in Heaven 19 “Do not lay up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust14 destroy and where thieves break in and steal, 20 but lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust destroys and where thieves do not break in and steal. 21 For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. 22 “The eye is the lamp of the body. So, if your eye is healthy, your whole body will be full of light, 23 but if your eye is bad, your whole body will be full of darkness. If then the light in you is darkness, how great is the darkness! 24 “No one can serve two masters, for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and money.15 Do Not Be Anxious 25 “Therefore I tell you, do not be anxious about your life, what you will eat or what you will drink, nor about your body, what you will put on. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing? 26 Look at the birds of the air: they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not of more value than they? 27 And which of you by being anxious can add a single hour to his span of life?16 28 And why are you anxious about clothing? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow: they neither toil nor spin, 29 yet I tell you, even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these. 30 But if God so clothes the grass of the field, which today is alive and tomorrow is thrown into the oven, will he not much more clothe you, O you of little faith? 31 Therefore do not be anxious, saying, ‘What shall we eat?' or ‘What shall we drink?' or ‘What shall we wear?' 32 For the Gentiles seek after all these things, and your heavenly Father knows that you need them all. 33 But seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be added to you. 34 “Therefore do not be anxious about tomorrow, for tomorrow will be anxious for itself. Sufficient for the day is its own trouble. Judging Others 7 “Judge not, that you be not judged. 2 For with the judgment you pronounce you will be judged, and with the measure you use it will be measured to you. 3 Why do you see the speck that is in your brother's eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye? 4 Or how can you say to your brother, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,' when there is the log in your own eye? 5 You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your brother's eye. 6 “Do not give dogs what is holy, and do not throw your pearls before pigs, lest they trample them underfoot and turn to attack you. Ask, and It Will Be Given 7 “Ask, and it will be given to you; seek, and you will find; knock, and it will be opened to you. 8 For everyone who asks receives, and the one who seeks finds, and to the one who knocks it will be opened. 9 Or which one of you, if his son asks him for bread, will give him a stone? 10 Or if he asks for a fish, will give him a serpent? 11 If you then, who are evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your Father who is in heaven give good things to those who ask him! The Golden Rule 12 “So whatever you wish that others would do to you, do also to them, for this is the Law and the Prophets. 13 “Enter by the narrow gate. For the gate is wide and the way is easy17 that leads to destruction, and those who enter by it are many. 14 For the gate is narrow and the way is hard that leads to life, and those who find it are few. A Tree and Its Fruit 15 “Beware of false prophets, who come to you in sheep's clothing but inwardly are ravenous wolves. 16 You will recognize them by their fruits. Are grapes gathered from thornbushes, or figs from thistles? 17 So, every healthy tree bears good fruit, but the diseased tree bears bad fruit. 18 A healthy tree cannot bear bad fruit, nor can a diseased tree bear good fruit. 19 Every tree that does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire. 20 Thus you will recognize them by their fruits. I Never Knew You 21 “Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,' will enter the kingdom of heaven, but the one who does the will of my Father who is in heaven. 22 On that day many will say to me, ‘Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name, and cast out demons in your name, and do many mighty works in your name?' 23 And then will I declare to them, ‘I never knew you; depart from me, you workers of lawlessness.' Build Your House on the Rock 24 “Everyone then who hears these words of mine and does them will be like a wise man who built his house on the rock. 25 And the rain fell, and the floods came, and the winds blew and beat on that house, but it did not fall, because it had been founded on the rock. 26 And everyone who hears these words of mine and does not do them will be like a foolish man who built his house on the sand. 27 And the rain fell, and the floods came, and the winds blew and beat against that house, and it fell, and great was the fall of it.” The Authority of Jesus 28 And when Jesus finished these sayings, the crowds were astonished at his teaching, 29 for he was teaching them as one who had authority, and not as their scribes. Footnotes [1] 5:9 Greek huioi; see Preface [2] 5:16 Or house. 16Let your light so shine before others that [3] 5:22 Some manuscripts insert without cause [4] 5:22 Greek says Raca to (a term of abuse) [5] 5:22 Greek Gehenna; also verses 29, 30 [6] 5:26 Greek kodrantes, Roman copper coin (Latin quadrans) worth about 1/64 of a denarius (which was a day's wage for a laborer) [7] 5:37 Or the evil one [8] 5:40 Greek chiton, a long garment worn under the cloak next to the skin [9] 5:47 Or brothers and sisters. In New Testament usage, depending on the context, the plural Greek word adelphoi (translated “brothers”) may refer either to brothers or to brothers and sisters [10] 6:9 Or Let your name be kept holy, or Let your name be treated with reverence [11] 6:10 Or Let your kingdom come, let your will be done [12] 6:11 Or our bread for tomorrow [13] 6:13 Or the evil one; some manuscripts add For yours is the kingdom and the power and the glory, forever. Amen [14] 6:19 Or worm; also verse 20 [15] 6:24 Greek mammon, a Semitic word for money or possessions [16] 6:27 Or a single cubit to his stature; a cubit was about 18 inches or 45 centimeters [17] 7:13 Some manuscripts For the way is wide and easy (ESV)

ESV: Chronological
October 4: Matthew 5–7

ESV: Chronological

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 30:01


Matthew 5–7 Matthew 5–7 (Listen) The Sermon on the Mount 5 Seeing the crowds, he went up on the mountain, and when he sat down, his disciples came to him. The Beatitudes 2 And he opened his mouth and taught them, saying: 3 “Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. 4 “Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted. 5 “Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth. 6 “Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they shall be satisfied. 7 “Blessed are the merciful, for they shall receive mercy. 8 “Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God. 9 “Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons1 of God. 10 “Blessed are those who are persecuted for righteousness' sake, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. 11 “Blessed are you when others revile you and persecute you and utter all kinds of evil against you falsely on my account. 12 Rejoice and be glad, for your reward is great in heaven, for so they persecuted the prophets who were before you. Salt and Light 13 “You are the salt of the earth, but if salt has lost its taste, how shall its saltiness be restored? It is no longer good for anything except to be thrown out and trampled under people's feet. 14 “You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden. 15 Nor do people light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a stand, and it gives light to all in the house. 16 In the same way, let your light shine before others, so that2 they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven. Christ Came to Fulfill the Law 17 “Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them. 18 For truly, I say to you, until heaven and earth pass away, not an iota, not a dot, will pass from the Law until all is accomplished. 19 Therefore whoever relaxes one of the least of these commandments and teaches others to do the same will be called least in the kingdom of heaven, but whoever does them and teaches them will be called great in the kingdom of heaven. 20 For I tell you, unless your righteousness exceeds that of the scribes and Pharisees, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven. Anger 21 “You have heard that it was said to those of old, ‘You shall not murder; and whoever murders will be liable to judgment.' 22 But I say to you that everyone who is angry with his brother3 will be liable to judgment; whoever insults4 his brother will be liable to the council; and whoever says, ‘You fool!' will be liable to the hell5 of fire. 23 So if you are offering your gift at the altar and there remember that your brother has something against you, 24 leave your gift there before the altar and go. First be reconciled to your brother, and then come and offer your gift. 25 Come to terms quickly with your accuser while you are going with him to court, lest your accuser hand you over to the judge, and the judge to the guard, and you be put in prison. 26 Truly, I say to you, you will never get out until you have paid the last penny.6 Lust 27 “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall not commit adultery.' 28 But I say to you that everyone who looks at a woman with lustful intent has already committed adultery with her in his heart. 29 If your right eye causes you to sin, tear it out and throw it away. For it is better that you lose one of your members than that your whole body be thrown into hell. 30 And if your right hand causes you to sin, cut it off and throw it away. For it is better that you lose one of your members than that your whole body go into hell. Divorce 31 “It was also said, ‘Whoever divorces his wife, let him give her a certificate of divorce.' 32 But I say to you that everyone who divorces his wife, except on the ground of sexual immorality, makes her commit adultery, and whoever marries a divorced woman commits adultery. Oaths 33 “Again you have heard that it was said to those of old, ‘You shall not swear falsely, but shall perform to the Lord what you have sworn.' 34 But I say to you, Do not take an oath at all, either by heaven, for it is the throne of God, 35 or by the earth, for it is his footstool, or by Jerusalem, for it is the city of the great King. 36 And do not take an oath by your head, for you cannot make one hair white or black. 37 Let what you say be simply ‘Yes' or ‘No'; anything more than this comes from evil.7 Retaliation 38 “You have heard that it was said, ‘An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth.' 39 But I say to you, Do not resist the one who is evil. But if anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to him the other also. 40 And if anyone would sue you and take your tunic,8 let him have your cloak as well. 41 And if anyone forces you to go one mile, go with him two miles. 42 Give to the one who begs from you, and do not refuse the one who would borrow from you. Love Your Enemies 43 “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.' 44 But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, 45 so that you may be sons of your Father who is in heaven. For he makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the just and on the unjust. 46 For if you love those who love you, what reward do you have? Do not even the tax collectors do the same? 47 And if you greet only your brothers,9 what more are you doing than others? Do not even the Gentiles do the same? 48 You therefore must be perfect, as your heavenly Father is perfect. Giving to the Needy 6 “Beware of practicing your righteousness before other people in order to be seen by them, for then you will have no reward from your Father who is in heaven. 2 “Thus, when you give to the needy, sound no trumpet before you, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets, that they may be praised by others. Truly, I say to you, they have received their reward. 3 But when you give to the needy, do not let your left hand know what your right hand is doing, 4 so that your giving may be in secret. And your Father who sees in secret will reward you. The Lord's Prayer 5 “And when you pray, you must not be like the hypocrites. For they love to stand and pray in the synagogues and at the street corners, that they may be seen by others. Truly, I say to you, they have received their reward. 6 But when you pray, go into your room and shut the door and pray to your Father who is in secret. And your Father who sees in secret will reward you. 7 “And when you pray, do not heap up empty phrases as the Gentiles do, for they think that they will be heard for their many words. 8 Do not be like them, for your Father knows what you need before you ask him. 9 Pray then like this:   “Our Father in heaven,  hallowed be your name.1010   Your kingdom come,  your will be done,11    on earth as it is in heaven.11   Give us this day our daily bread,1212   and forgive us our debts,    as we also have forgiven our debtors.13   And lead us not into temptation,    but deliver us from evil.13 14 For if you forgive others their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you, 15 but if you do not forgive others their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses. Fasting 16 “And when you fast, do not look gloomy like the hypocrites, for they disfigure their faces that their fasting may be seen by others. Truly, I say to you, they have received their reward. 17 But when you fast, anoint your head and wash your face, 18 that your fasting may not be seen by others but by your Father who is in secret. And your Father who sees in secret will reward you. Lay Up Treasures in Heaven 19 “Do not lay up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust14 destroy and where thieves break in and steal, 20 but lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust destroys and where thieves do not break in and steal. 21 For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. 22 “The eye is the lamp of the body. So, if your eye is healthy, your whole body will be full of light, 23 but if your eye is bad, your whole body will be full of darkness. If then the light in you is darkness, how great is the darkness! 24 “No one can serve two masters, for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and money.15 Do Not Be Anxious 25 “Therefore I tell you, do not be anxious about your life, what you will eat or what you will drink, nor about your body, what you will put on. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing? 26 Look at the birds of the air: they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not of more value than they? 27 And which of you by being anxious can add a single hour to his span of life?16 28 And why are you anxious about clothing? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow: they neither toil nor spin, 29 yet I tell you, even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these. 30 But if God so clothes the grass of the field, which today is alive and tomorrow is thrown into the oven, will he not much more clothe you, O you of little faith? 31 Therefore do not be anxious, saying, ‘What shall we eat?' or ‘What shall we drink?' or ‘What shall we wear?' 32 For the Gentiles seek after all these things, and your heavenly Father knows that you need them all. 33 But seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be added to you. 34 “Therefore do not be anxious about tomorrow, for tomorrow will be anxious for itself. Sufficient for the day is its own trouble. Judging Others 7 “Judge not, that you be not judged. 2 For with the judgment you pronounce you will be judged, and with the measure you use it will be measured to you. 3 Why do you see the speck that is in your brother's eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye? 4 Or how can you say to your brother, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,' when there is the log in your own eye? 5 You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your brother's eye. 6 “Do not give dogs what is holy, and do not throw your pearls before pigs, lest they trample them underfoot and turn to attack you. Ask, and It Will Be Given 7 “Ask, and it will be given to you; seek, and you will find; knock, and it will be opened to you. 8 For everyone who asks receives, and the one who seeks finds, and to the one who knocks it will be opened. 9 Or which one of you, if his son asks him for bread, will give him a stone? 10 Or if he asks for a fish, will give him a serpent? 11 If you then, who are evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your Father who is in heaven give good things to those who ask him! The Golden Rule 12 “So whatever you wish that others would do to you, do also to them, for this is the Law and the Prophets. 13 “Enter by the narrow gate. For the gate is wide and the way is easy17 that leads to destruction, and those who enter by it are many. 14 For the gate is narrow and the way is hard that leads to life, and those who find it are few. A Tree and Its Fruit 15 “Beware of false prophets, who come to you in sheep's clothing but inwardly are ravenous wolves. 16 You will recognize them by their fruits. Are grapes gathered from thornbushes, or figs from thistles? 17 So, every healthy tree bears good fruit, but the diseased tree bears bad fruit. 18 A healthy tree cannot bear bad fruit, nor can a diseased tree bear good fruit. 19 Every tree that does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire. 20 Thus you will recognize them by their fruits. I Never Knew You 21 “Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,' will enter the kingdom of heaven, but the one who does the will of my Father who is in heaven. 22 On that day many will say to me, ‘Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name, and cast out demons in your name, and do many mighty works in your name?' 23 And then will I declare to them, ‘I never knew you; depart from me, you workers of lawlessness.' Build Your House on the Rock 24 “Everyone then who hears these words of mine and does them will be like a wise man who built his house on the rock. 25 And the rain fell, and the floods came, and the winds blew and beat on that house, but it did not fall, because it had been founded on the rock. 26 And everyone who hears these words of mine and does not do them will be like a foolish man who built his house on the sand. 27 And the rain fell, and the floods came, and the winds blew and beat against that house, and it fell, and great was the fall of it.” The Authority of Jesus 28 And when Jesus finished these sayings, the crowds were astonished at his teaching, 29 for he was teaching them as one who had authority, and not as their scribes. Footnotes [1] 5:9 Greek huioi; see Preface [2] 5:16 Or house. 16Let your light so shine before others that [3] 5:22 Some manuscripts insert without cause [4] 5:22 Greek says Raca to (a term of abuse) [5] 5:22 Greek Gehenna; also verses 29, 30 [6] 5:26 Greek kodrantes, Roman copper coin (Latin quadrans) worth about 1/64 of a denarius (which was a day's wage for a laborer) [7] 5:37 Or the evil one [8] 5:40 Greek chiton, a long garment worn under the cloak next to the skin [9] 5:47 Or brothers and sisters. In New Testament usage, depending on the context, the plural Greek word adelphoi (translated “brothers”) may refer either to brothers or to brothers and sisters [10] 6:9 Or Let your name be kept holy, or Let your name be treated with reverence [11] 6:10 Or Let your kingdom come, let your will be done [12] 6:11 Or our bread for tomorrow [13] 6:13 Or the evil one; some manuscripts add For yours is the kingdom and the power and the glory, forever. Amen [14] 6:19 Or worm; also verse 20 [15] 6:24 Greek mammon, a Semitic word for money or possessions [16] 6:27 Or a single cubit to his stature; a cubit was about 18 inches or 45 centimeters [17] 7:13 Some manuscripts For the way is wide and easy (ESV)

The Young Turks
Joe Manchin's Boat

The Young Turks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 51:46


House Democrats delayed the scheduled vote on the bipartisan infrastructure bill. Coal-baron-turned-senator Joe Manchin again threatened to kill Democrat's climate, health care and anti-poverty legislation. A woman may lose her home because she can't afford to pay $12,000 in fines that accrued when multiple 911 calls were made from her home. A Fox News host railed against literal ‘free lunches' for hungry kids. Anchorage, Alaska Mayor Dave Bronson apologizes for defending those who wore anti-Semitic symbols to protest masks.Hosts: John Iadarola, Cenk Uygur, Nina Turner See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The World According To Ben Stein
Democrats For Dinner!

The World According To Ben Stein

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 65:00


Ben Stein and host Judah Friedman with guests Adam King of “The Truth” and Ben Boychuk of “American Greatness” (www.amgreatness.com) marvel at how the Democrats are consuming themselves like angry pit bulls over $4.5 trillion in spending. Also: Kamala Harris reveals her anti-Semitic tendencies, Jewish Democrats reveal their stupidity, and the late, great Angelo M. Codevilla, author of “The Ruling Class,” is remembered.

Rich Zeoli
Rich's Afternoon Podcast - Thursday, September 23, 2021

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 46:14


Rep. Rashida Talib is an anti-Semitic disgrace and Democrats should kick her out of the party. Why are they banning the use of horses at the border? Because it will make the job of border patrol agents even tougher and that's exactly their goal.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

ESV: Digging Deep into the Bible
September 23: Psalm 53; 2 Samuel 13; Ezekiel 13; Luke 16–17:10

ESV: Digging Deep into the Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 36:20


Psalms and Wisdom: Psalm 53 Psalm 53 (Listen) There Is None Who Does Good To the choirmaster: according to Mahalath. A Maskil1 of David. 53   The fool says in his heart, “There is no God.”    They are corrupt, doing abominable iniquity;    there is none who does good. 2   God looks down from heaven    on the children of man  to see if there are any who understand,2    who seek after God. 3   They have all fallen away;    together they have become corrupt;  there is none who does good,    not even one. 4   Have those who work evil no knowledge,    who eat up my people as they eat bread,    and do not call upon God? 5   There they are, in great terror,    where there is no terror!  For God scatters the bones of him who encamps against you;    you put them to shame, for God has rejected them. 6   Oh, that salvation for Israel would come out of Zion!    When God restores the fortunes of his people,    let Jacob rejoice, let Israel be glad. Footnotes [1] 53:1 Probably musical or liturgical terms [2] 53:2 Or who act wisely (ESV) Pentateuch and History: 2 Samuel 13 2 Samuel 13 (Listen) Amnon and Tamar 13 Now Absalom, David's son, had a beautiful sister, whose name was Tamar. And after a time Amnon, David's son, loved her. 2 And Amnon was so tormented that he made himself ill because of his sister Tamar, for she was a virgin, and it seemed impossible to Amnon to do anything to her. 3 But Amnon had a friend, whose name was Jonadab, the son of Shimeah, David's brother. And Jonadab was a very crafty man. 4 And he said to him, “O son of the king, why are you so haggard morning after morning? Will you not tell me?” Amnon said to him, “I love Tamar, my brother Absalom's sister.” 5 Jonadab said to him, “Lie down on your bed and pretend to be ill. And when your father comes to see you, say to him, ‘Let my sister Tamar come and give me bread to eat, and prepare the food in my sight, that I may see it and eat it from her hand.'” 6 So Amnon lay down and pretended to be ill. And when the king came to see him, Amnon said to the king, “Please let my sister Tamar come and make a couple of cakes in my sight, that I may eat from her hand.” 7 Then David sent home to Tamar, saying, “Go to your brother Amnon's house and prepare food for him.” 8 So Tamar went to her brother Amnon's house, where he was lying down. And she took dough and kneaded it and made cakes in his sight and baked the cakes. 9 And she took the pan and emptied it out before him, but he refused to eat. And Amnon said, “Send out everyone from me.” So everyone went out from him. 10 Then Amnon said to Tamar, “Bring the food into the chamber, that I may eat from your hand.” And Tamar took the cakes she had made and brought them into the chamber to Amnon her brother. 11 But when she brought them near him to eat, he took hold of her and said to her, “Come, lie with me, my sister.” 12 She answered him, “No, my brother, do not violate1 me, for such a thing is not done in Israel; do not do this outrageous thing. 13 As for me, where could I carry my shame? And as for you, you would be as one of the outrageous fools in Israel. Now therefore, please speak to the king, for he will not withhold me from you.” 14 But he would not listen to her, and being stronger than she, he violated her and lay with her. 15 Then Amnon hated her with very great hatred, so that the hatred with which he hated her was greater than the love with which he had loved her. And Amnon said to her, “Get up! Go!” 16 But she said to him, “No, my brother, for this wrong in sending me away is greater than the other that you did to me.”2 But he would not listen to her. 17 He called the young man who served him and said, “Put this woman out of my presence and bolt the door after her.” 18 Now she was wearing a long robe with sleeves,3 for thus were the virgin daughters of the king dressed. So his servant put her out and bolted the door after her. 19 And Tamar put ashes on her head and tore the long robe that she wore. And she laid her hand on her head and went away, crying aloud as she went. 20 And her brother Absalom said to her, “Has Amnon your brother been with you? Now hold your peace, my sister. He is your brother; do not take this to heart.” So Tamar lived, a desolate woman, in her brother Absalom's house. 21 When King David heard of all these things, he was very angry.4 22 But Absalom spoke to Amnon neither good nor bad, for Absalom hated Amnon, because he had violated his sister Tamar. Absalom Murders Amnon 23 After two full years Absalom had sheepshearers at Baal-hazor, which is near Ephraim, and Absalom invited all the king's sons. 24 And Absalom came to the king and said, “Behold, your servant has sheepshearers. Please let the king and his servants go with your servant.” 25 But the king said to Absalom, “No, my son, let us not all go, lest we be burdensome to you.” He pressed him, but he would not go but gave him his blessing. 26 Then Absalom said, “If not, please let my brother Amnon go with us.” And the king said to him, “Why should he go with you?” 27 But Absalom pressed him until he let Amnon and all the king's sons go with him. 28 Then Absalom commanded his servants, “Mark when Amnon's heart is merry with wine, and when I say to you, ‘Strike Amnon,' then kill him. Do not fear; have I not commanded you? Be courageous and be valiant.” 29 So the servants of Absalom did to Amnon as Absalom had commanded. Then all the king's sons arose, and each mounted his mule and fled. 30 While they were on the way, news came to David, “Absalom has struck down all the king's sons, and not one of them is left.” 31 Then the king arose and tore his garments and lay on the earth. And all his servants who were standing by tore their garments. 32 But Jonadab the son of Shimeah, David's brother, said, “Let not my lord suppose that they have killed all the young men, the king's sons, for Amnon alone is dead. For by the command of Absalom this has been determined from the day he violated his sister Tamar. 33 Now therefore let not my lord the king so take it to heart as to suppose that all the king's sons are dead, for Amnon alone is dead.” Absalom Flees to Geshur 34 But Absalom fled. And the young man who kept the watch lifted up his eyes and looked, and behold, many people were coming from the road behind him5 by the side of the mountain. 35 And Jonadab said to the king, “Behold, the king's sons have come; as your servant said, so it has come about.” 36 And as soon as he had finished speaking, behold, the king's sons came and lifted up their voice and wept. And the king also and all his servants wept very bitterly. 37 But Absalom fled and went to Talmai the son of Ammihud, king of Geshur. And David mourned for his son day after day. 38 So Absalom fled and went to Geshur, and was there three years. 39 And the spirit of the king6 longed to go out7 to Absalom, because he was comforted about Amnon, since he was dead. Footnotes [1] 13:12 Or humiliate; also verses 14, 22, 32 [2] 13:16 Compare Septuagint, Vulgate; the meaning of the Hebrew is uncertain [3] 13:18 Or a robe of many colors (compare Genesis 37:3); compare long robe, verse 19 [4] 13:21 Dead Sea Scroll, Septuagint add But he would not punish his son Amnon, because he loved him, since he was his firstborn [5] 13:34 Septuagint the Horonaim Road [6] 13:39 Dead Sea Scroll, Septuagint; Hebrew David [7] 13:39 Compare Vulgate ceased to go out (ESV) Chronicles and Prophets: Ezekiel 13 Ezekiel 13 (Listen) False Prophets Condemned 13 The word of the LORD came to me: 2 “Son of man, prophesy against the prophets of Israel, who are prophesying, and say to those who prophesy from their own hearts: ‘Hear the word of the LORD!' 3 Thus says the Lord GOD, Woe to the foolish prophets who follow their own spirit, and have seen nothing! 4 Your prophets have been like jackals among ruins, O Israel. 5 You have not gone up into the breaches, or built up a wall for the house of Israel, that it might stand in battle in the day of the LORD. 6 They have seen false visions and lying divinations. They say, ‘Declares the LORD,' when the LORD has not sent them, and yet they expect him to fulfill their word. 7 Have you not seen a false vision and uttered a lying divination, whenever you have said, ‘Declares the LORD,' although I have not spoken?” 8 Therefore thus says the Lord GOD: “Because you have uttered falsehood and seen lying visions, therefore behold, I am against you, declares the Lord GOD. 9 My hand will be against the prophets who see false visions and who give lying divinations. They shall not be in the council of my people, nor be enrolled in the register of the house of Israel, nor shall they enter the land of Israel. And you shall know that I am the Lord GOD. 10 Precisely because they have misled my people, saying, ‘Peace,' when there is no peace, and because, when the people build a wall, these prophets smear it with whitewash,1 11 say to those who smear it with whitewash that it shall fall! There will be a deluge of rain, and you, O great hailstones, will fall, and a stormy wind break out. 12 And when the wall falls, will it not be said to you, ‘Where is the coating with which you smeared it?' 13 Therefore thus says the Lord GOD: I will make a stormy wind break out in my wrath, and there shall be a deluge of rain in my anger, and great hailstones in wrath to make a full end. 14 And I will break down the wall that you have smeared with whitewash, and bring it down to the ground, so that its foundation will be laid bare. When it falls, you shall perish in the midst of it, and you shall know that I am the LORD. 15 Thus will I spend my wrath upon the wall and upon those who have smeared it with whitewash, and I will say to you, The wall is no more, nor those who smeared it, 16 the prophets of Israel who prophesied concerning Jerusalem and saw visions of peace for her, when there was no peace, declares the Lord GOD. 17 “And you, son of man, set your face against the daughters of your people, who prophesy out of their own hearts. Prophesy against them 18 and say, Thus says the Lord GOD: Woe to the women who sew magic bands upon all wrists, and make veils for the heads of persons of every stature, in the hunt for souls! Will you hunt down souls belonging to my people and keep your own souls alive? 19 You have profaned me among my people for handfuls of barley and for pieces of bread, putting to death souls who should not die and keeping alive souls who should not live, by your lying to my people, who listen to lies. 20 “Therefore thus says the Lord GOD: Behold, I am against your magic bands with which you hunt the souls like birds, and I will tear them from your arms, and I will let the souls whom you hunt go free, the souls like birds. 21 Your veils also I will tear off and deliver my people out of your hand, and they shall be no more in your hand as prey, and you shall know that I am the LORD. 22 Because you have disheartened the righteous falsely, although I have not grieved him, and you have encouraged the wicked, that he should not turn from his evil way to save his life, 23 therefore you shall no more see false visions nor practice divination. I will deliver my people out of your hand. And you shall know that I am the LORD.” Footnotes [1] 13:10 Or plaster; also verses 11, 14, 15 (ESV) Gospels and Epistles: Luke 16–17:10 Luke 16–17:10 (Listen) The Parable of the Dishonest Manager 16 He also said to the disciples, “There was a rich man who had a manager, and charges were brought to him that this man was wasting his possessions. 2 And he called him and said to him, ‘What is this that I hear about you? Turn in the account of your management, for you can no longer be manager.' 3 And the manager said to himself, ‘What shall I do, since my master is taking the management away from me? I am not strong enough to dig, and I am ashamed to beg. 4 I have decided what to do, so that when I am removed from management, people may receive me into their houses.' 5 So, summoning his master's debtors one by one, he said to the first, ‘How much do you owe my master?' 6 He said, ‘A hundred measures1 of oil.' He said to him, ‘Take your bill, and sit down quickly and write fifty.' 7 Then he said to another, ‘And how much do you owe?' He said, ‘A hundred measures2 of wheat.' He said to him, ‘Take your bill, and write eighty.' 8 The master commended the dishonest manager for his shrewdness. For the sons of this world3 are more shrewd in dealing with their own generation than the sons of light. 9 And I tell you, make friends for yourselves by means of unrighteous wealth,4 so that when it fails they may receive you into the eternal dwellings. 10 “One who is faithful in a very little is also faithful in much, and one who is dishonest in a very little is also dishonest in much. 11 If then you have not been faithful in the unrighteous wealth, who will entrust to you the true riches? 12 And if you have not been faithful in that which is another's, who will give you that which is your own? 13 No servant can serve two masters, for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and money.” The Law and the Kingdom of God 14 The Pharisees, who were lovers of money, heard all these things, and they ridiculed him. 15 And he said to them, “You are those who justify yourselves before men, but God knows your hearts. For what is exalted among men is an abomination in the sight of God. 16 “The Law and the Prophets were until John; since then the good news of the kingdom of God is preached, and everyone forces his way into it.5 17 But it is easier for heaven and earth to pass away than for one dot of the Law to become void. Divorce and Remarriage 18 “Everyone who divorces his wife and marries another commits adultery, and he who marries a woman divorced from her husband commits adultery. The Rich Man and Lazarus 19 “There was a rich man who was clothed in purple and fine linen and who feasted sumptuously every day. 20 And at his gate was laid a poor man named Lazarus, covered with sores, 21 who desired to be fed with what fell from the rich man's table. Moreover, even the dogs came and licked his sores. 22 The poor man died and was carried by the angels to Abraham's side.6 The rich man also died and was buried, 23 and in Hades, being in torment, he lifted up his eyes and saw Abraham far off and Lazarus at his side. 24 And he called out, ‘Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus to dip the end of his finger in water and cool my tongue, for I am in anguish in this flame.' 25 But Abraham said, ‘Child, remember that you in your lifetime received your good things, and Lazarus in like manner bad things; but now he is comforted here, and you are in anguish. 26 And besides all this, between us and you a great chasm has been fixed, in order that those who would pass from here to you may not be able, and none may cross from there to us.' 27 And he said, ‘Then I beg you, father, to send him to my father's house—28 for I have five brothers—so that he may warn them, lest they also come into this place of torment.' 29 But Abraham said, ‘They have Moses and the Prophets; let them hear them.' 30 And he said, ‘No, father Abraham, but if someone goes to them from the dead, they will repent.' 31 He said to him, ‘If they do not hear Moses and the Prophets, neither will they be convinced if someone should rise from the dead.'” Temptations to Sin 17 And he said to his disciples, “Temptations to sin7 are sure to come, but woe to the one through whom they come! 2 It would be better for him if a millstone were hung around his neck and he were cast into the sea than that he should cause one of these little ones to sin.8 3 Pay attention to yourselves! If your brother sins, rebuke him, and if he repents, forgive him, 4 and if he sins against you seven times in the day, and turns to you seven times, saying, ‘I repent,' you must forgive him.” Increase Our Faith 5 The apostles said to the Lord, “Increase our faith!” 6 And the Lord said, “If you had faith like a grain of mustard seed, you could say to this mulberry tree, ‘Be uprooted and planted in the sea,' and it would obey you. Unworthy Servants 7 “Will any one of you who has a servant9 plowing or keeping sheep say to him when he has come in from the field, ‘Come at once and recline at table'? 8 Will he not rather say to him, ‘Prepare supper for me, and dress properly,10 and serve me while I eat and drink, and afterward you will eat and drink'? 9 Does he thank the servant because he did what was commanded? 10 So you also, when you have done all that you were commanded, say, ‘We are unworthy servants;11 we have only done what was our duty.'” Footnotes [1] 16:6 About 875 gallons or 3,200 liters [2] 16:7 Between 1,000 and 1,200 bushels or 37,000 to 45,000 liters [3] 16:8 Greek age [4] 16:9 Greek mammon, a Semitic word for money or possessions; also verse 11; rendered money in verse 13 [5] 16:16 Or everyone is forcefully urged into it [6] 16:22 Greek bosom; also verse 23 [7] 17:1 Greek Stumbling blocks [8] 17:2 Greek stumble [9] 17:7 Or bondservant; also verse 9 [10] 17:8 Greek gird yourself [11] 17:10 Or bondservants (ESV)

Marietta Daily Journal Podcast
More Anti-Semitic Graffiti in Cobb Schools; NAACP President Celebrates 85th Birthday; Cobb Leaders Talk Defense Industy

Marietta Daily Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 20:10


Lassiter High School is the latest Cobb school to find swastikas and anti-Semitic slogans written on the walls of the bathroom; NAACP President Deane Bonner celebrated a late 85th birthday; Cobb leader spoke with leaders at the Georgia Tech Research Institute about the future of the defense industry.    #CobbCounty #Georgia #LocalNews      -            -            -            -            -            The Marietta Daily Journal Podcast is local news for Marietta, Kennesaw, Smyrna, and all of Cobb County.              Subscribe today, so you don't miss an episode! MDJOnline             Register Here for your essential digital news.             Find additional episodes of the MDJ Podcast here.              This Podcast was produced and published for the Marietta Daily Journal and MDJ Online by BG Ad Group on 9-17-2021.           For advertising inquiries, please email j.southerland@bgadgroup.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

What A Time To Be Alive
#199 Two Big Mans

What A Time To Be Alive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 84:11


Folks, on this week's episode we learn why cows were airlifted in Europe, an anti-Semitic mix up over a plane banner, why a cube of chicken meat went through airport security, why the Federal Trade Commission is taking a look at broken McFlurry machines, and why viper venom could replace horse paste as the new COVID cure for morons We are on Patreon! Become a patron for weekly bonus eps and more stuff!: www.patreon.com/whatatimepod Check out our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/whatatimetobealive Get one of our t-shirts, or other merch, using this link! https://whatatimepod.bigcartel.com/ whatatimepod.com Join our Discord chat here: discord.gg/jx7rB7J @pattymo // @kathbarbadoro // @eliyudin // @whatatimepod © 2021 What A Time LLC

Conspiracy Unlimited: Following The Truth Wherever It Leads
620: Anti-Zionism on College Campuses

Conspiracy Unlimited: Following The Truth Wherever It Leads

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 35:49


EPISODE #620 ANTI-ZIONISM ON COLLEGE CAMPUSES Richard welcomes an author, businessman and community volunteer who tackles the thorny question of how otherwise brilliant minds are willingly come to embrace and espouse anti-Semitic and anti-Zionist conspiracy theories. Guest: Scott A. Shayis a leading businessman, thought leader and author of several widely read books. Scott is a founder and executive chairman of Signature Bank; a New York lender catering to local middle-market businesses and one of the financial success stories of the past decade. He dedicates a large part of his time to Jewish community work—the Chai Mitzvah movement, the local Jewish Federation, his Modern Orthodox synagogue Kehilath Jeshurun. Book: Conspiracy U: A Case Study SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS!!! BetterHELP -Professional Counselling with a Licensed Therapist. You Deserve to Be Happy! Get 10% off your first month at betterhelp.com/Unlimited Smile Brilliant - www.smilebrilliant.com Professional teeth whitening & oral care products customized just for you.   Use code CONSPIRACY for an exclusive Conspiracy Unlimited discount! C60EVO -The Secret is out about this powerful anti-oxidant. The Purest C60 available is ESS60.  Buy Direct from the Source.  Buy Now and Save 10% – Use Coupon Code: EVRS at Checkout! Strange Planet Shop - If you're a fan of the radio show and the podcast, why not show it off?  Greats T-shirts, sweatshirts, mugs, and more.  It's a Strange Planet - Dress For It! BECOME A PREMIUM SUBSCRIBER FOR LESS THAN $2 PER MONTH If you're a fan of this podcast, I hope you'll consider becoming a Premium Subscriber.  For just $1.99 per month, subscribers to my Conspiracy Unlimited Plus gain access to two exclusive, commercial-free episodes per month. They also gain access to my back catalog of episodes. The most recent 30 episodes of Conspiracy Unlimited will remain available for free.  Stream all episodes and Premium content on your mobile device by getting the FREE Conspiracy Unlimited APP for both IOS and Android devices... Available at the App Store and Google Play. To become a subscriber CLICK HERE or go to www.conspiracyunlimitedpodcast.com and click on Get Access to Premium Episodes