Podcasts about mfk

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Best podcasts about mfk

Latest podcast episodes about mfk

Game On Wisconsin
On Brand & Off Topic - Ep 51: Are Your Friends Perverts Too?

Game On Wisconsin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 79:29


Erin, Jimmy, & Todd are back to discuss all the action from NFL's week 12! Plus they touch on news and play a round of MFK with MLS mascots! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/game-on-wisconsin/support

2 Girls 1 Multiverse: A Marvel Podcast
Black Panther Review: Wakanda Forever and Ever

2 Girls 1 Multiverse: A Marvel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 70:10


The Black Panther Wakanda Forever Review.  This week we dedicated an entire episode to Wakanda Forever.  Sam shares the history of the Black Panther character and Meghan enlightens us all with some facts from the making of Wakanda Forever. Meghan tries to recycle an MFK and Sam can't stop... smashing? Tune in for more details and everything in between! Thanks for listening nerds! Don't forget to follow to keep up with all things 2 Girls 1 Multiverse! Instagram @twogirlsonemultiverse Tweet us @2grls1multivrs Email us at TwoGirlsOneMultiverse@gmail.com Laters Gators! xoxo Sam & Meg

RB-sporten
Tore Monsen

RB-sporten

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 39:08


Tore Monsen er på besøk for å snakke om årene som materialforvalter og lagleder i MFK. Han avslutter karrieren sin i disse dager og mimrer tilbake på flauser, store endringer, rotekopper og ordenselever. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Cologne Podcast
724 By Maison Francis Kurkdjian (Audio Pulled From YouTube)

The Cologne Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 7:18


Myke and Ryan sample the new Maison Francis Kurkdjian fragrance on this YouTube episode of the podcast.Support the show

2 Girls 1 Multiverse: A Marvel Podcast

The One Where We Had To Do Two Intros. Topics this week include, James Gunn's move to DC, Werewolf By Night, Quantumania, and the Wakanda Forever premier. Meghan adds a few more games into the mix and sufficiently stumps Sam.  Who knew an MFK could create so much drama! Thanks for listening nerds! Don't forget to follow to keep up with all things 2 Girls 1 Multiverse! Instagram @twogirlsonemultiverse Tweet us @2grls1multivrs Email us at TwoGirlsOneMultiverse@gmail.com Laters Gators! xoxo Sam & Meg

Beepers After Dark
B.A.D. episode 52: "Sidesquatch, the OnlyFans Lumberjack"

Beepers After Dark

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 67:48


Maurice Christ, the pod has risen again! We back on our bullshit without Beeps to guide us. Take cover because shots are fired with a new, scathing mailbag submission. We've got MFK, we've got sexy lumberjacks, & we've got hot songs. And don't forget, the future is female, BITCHES! Featured Songs: SZA – Pretty Little Birds ft. Isaiah Rashad Yuta Orisaka – Aibiki

SoCal Restaurant Show
Show 494, October 8, 2022: Show Preview with Executive Producer & Co-Host Andy Harris

SoCal Restaurant Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 9:38


“With the full-service Lola's by MFK in the former CaliVino Wine Pub space off Katella Avenue next door to Angel Stadium, Chef Henry Pineda, 31, is celebrating his mother's Filipino and father's Guatemalan roots through the lens of his favorite … Continue reading → The post Show 494, October 8, 2022: Show Preview with Executive Producer & Co-Host Andy Harris appeared first on SoCal Restaurant Show.

SoCal Restaurant Show
Show 494, October 8, 2022: Chef Henry Pineda, Proprietor, Lola's by MFK, Anaheim Part One

SoCal Restaurant Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 11:37


“With the full-service Lola's by MFK in the former CaliVino Wine Pub space off Katella Avenue next door to Angel Stadium, Chef Henry Pineda, 31, is celebrating his mother's Filipino and father's Guatemalan roots through the lens of his favorite … Continue reading → The post Show 494, October 8, 2022: Chef Henry Pineda, Proprietor, Lola's by MFK, Anaheim Part One appeared first on SoCal Restaurant Show.

SoCal Restaurant Show
Show 494, October 8, 2022: Chef Henry Pineda, Proprietor, Lola's by MFK, Anaheim Part Two

SoCal Restaurant Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 13:16


“With the full-service Lola's by MFK in the former CaliVino Wine Pub space off Katella Avenue next door to Angel Stadium, Chef Henry Pineda, 31, is celebrating his mother's Filipino and father's Guatemalan roots through the lens of his favorite … Continue reading → The post Show 494, October 8, 2022: Chef Henry Pineda, Proprietor, Lola's by MFK, Anaheim Part Two appeared first on SoCal Restaurant Show.

Kadr Ci w oko!
Kadr Ci w oko! #170 - Tokyo Niezaldziernik

Kadr Ci w oko!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 82:58


Dzisiaj trochę pogadaliśmy sobie o Inktoberach i innych -toberach. Oprócz tego mały przedsmak niezalu, który przywieźliśmy z MFK, Tokyo revengers i omnibus o robieniu zinów! -tobery o których mówimy: Falseknees - Falsetober Grzegorz Pawlak - Noirtober Pan Kulka - Fright-Fall Qrjusz - Inktober (ze scenariuszem Jerzego Łanuszewskiego) Konrad Okoński, Bele - Disctober Paweł Jaroński - jest.trzy.rzutu Kosmiczna ekspedycja Kube - paźceglik/bricktober DWJ - rocketober Christine Larsen - Orcstober Cloaktobber Pisemko online: https://issuu.com/niemadniabezkreski/docs/all_comics_are_beautiful_acab_03_wrzesien_2022_dig Link do Oficyny Peryferie: https://oficynaperyferie.com/jakzrobiczina 00:00:00 - Wstęp 00:00:48 - Zmarł Kim Jung Gi 00:02:02 - Był gik w Gliwicach i podobno było super 00:03:55 - Złote Kurczaki wracają! 00:06:36 - Samotny wilk i szczenię 00:08:30 - Inktober plus jego warianty. O co chodzi i jakich twórców polecamy. 00:23:12 - Jaka zbiórka wariacie? 00:44:12 - Garfil 00:49:37 - Ćma #2 00:53:38 - Tokyo Revengers 01:01:17 - ACAB #3 01:06:25 - Jak zrobić zina? ---------------------------------------------------------- Podobało się? Rzuć w nas kawą! https://ko-fi.com/kadrciwoko ---------------------------------------------------------- Intro i muzyka w tle: Shklash Jesteśmy między innymi na YouTubie, Spotify czy iTunes

RB-sporten
Oppsigelser og gullbrød

RB-sporten

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 41:33


Sandefjord kan hjelpe Molde å ta gull allerede på søndag, dette er det delte meninger og følelser rundt hos gjengen denne uka. MFK får tips til hvordan de kan fylle stadion mot Rosenborg og du får høre hvorfor Pernille skal skrive oppsigelsen sin. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

No Coast Softball Podcast
Zach Schiltz

No Coast Softball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 129:06


Joined in studio by my good friend, Zach Schiltz. We blow the frost off a few Tweas, talk softball, MTSU, play M/F/K, conspiracy theories, Pujols hitting 700 while we were rolling sound but most importantly his relationship with his dad John. Thank you is an understatement Zach for sharing your story. Hope you all enjoy  

Kadr Ci w oko!
Kadr Ci w oko! #169 - Koniec września, czyli jesteśmy w Łodzi

Kadr Ci w oko!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 78:02


Myśleliście, że nie damy rady wrzucić odcinka o MFK? My też. Ale daliśmy, także słuchajcie. ---------------------------------------------------------- Podobało się? Rzuć w nas kawą! https://ko-fi.com/kadrciwoko ---------------------------------------------------------- Intro i muzyka w tle: Shklash Jesteśmy między innymi na YouTubie, Spotify czy iTunes

RB-sporten
Mathias Johan Fjørtoft Løvik

RB-sporten

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 34:26


Mathias Johan Fjørtoft Løvik forteller om alt som har skjedd det siste året. 18-åringen har fått mer spilletid enn forventet for A-laget til MFK og i denne episoden forteller han om det famøse selvmålet mot Jerv, om han har fått talentet fra mor eller far og hvorfor han tar seg tid til fansen etter kamp. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Rosemary Media
11. The Pumpkin Spice Special

Rosemary Media

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 93:42


In this one, Corey, Matt, Shawn, Megan and Brittany talk about pudding, House of the Dragon, Rings of Power, some spooky shows coming to Netflix, video games, their favorite soups and much more. They also MFK the top three holidays and answer a couple dozen Fall-themed Would You Rather questions. Meanwhile, they're sampling the Dunkin Donuts x Goldfish collab, Pumpkin Spice Oreos, Tate's Pumpkin Spice Cookies, a Pumpkin Pie Perfect Bar, and a couple Pumpkin-flavored Ciders they found at their local beer store!

Spinning Unrest Music
S03 E20 - Heavy Women In Cowboy Boots

Spinning Unrest Music

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 69:51


2 weeks in a row? TWOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!! In the final episode of season 3, we'll find out if it's easier to name 5 Male Porn Stars or 5 WNBA players, and we'll also discuss when voluntary life lessons come back to bite us right on our butt cheeks. We'll also unpack our level of hatred for car purchasing and challenge the crew to name 20 guys Beav would consider having sex with in 60 seconds. New Spin Party album review, a not so fun fact from Stump and a contentious installment of MFK to wrap it all up.. Watch On YouTube: bit.ly/3rCf1Jh Follow/Vote On Instagram: instagram.com/riotatthedogpark TikTok: @_riotatthedogpark_ Web Site: riotatthedogpark.com 5 WNBA Players or 5 Male Porn Stars - (11:40) Parental FOMO - (14:31) Mascot Brackets - (19:59) Simonize Upsell - (29:36) Spin Party - (34:57) Selfie Employed - (45:39) 20 in 60 - (53:41) Stump's Fun Fact - (55:52) Marry, F**k, Kill - (57:00)

Reasonably Spontaneous Conversations with Dennis Tardan
Reasonably Spontaneous Conversation (Part 2) with Ron Dillard Jr. and Dennis Tardan - Aug 2022

Reasonably Spontaneous Conversations with Dennis Tardan

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 29:01


Here is part 2 of my RSC with Ron Dillard as we continue to learn about one another and our art. About Ron: Rod Dillard, Jr. is a director, producer, writer and actor. In 2008, he founded Ronald Dillard Jr Entertainment, LLC, with the vision to create thought provoking entertainment by writing, producing, directing, and co-starring in the first theatrical production, I Deserve Better, followed by A Player's Last Play. In 2013, he released his first feature film, A New Mentality then wrote and produced three more award-winning festival films along with Shirod Greene; Unbrotherly Love, The Color In Your Eyes, and A Monster. Impacted by the brutal killings of Black men in America. In 2020, Ron responded by writing, co-directing, producing, and starring in the multiple award-winning film feature that depicts a police interrogation that unexpectedly slips the boot on the other foot. When We Prey On Them has been selected in over 70 festivals and has won 13 awards including- Best Short Film, Critics Choice Award, and Best Actor. His next adventure is expanding into the series landscape as a showrunner, creating three television shows—two one-hour dramas Serial, Money, Power and Respect, and one half-hour dramedy- Marc Blue. Currently under his RDJ Entertainment banner is: He has Co-produced Shirod Greene's upcoming film For Colored's Only; the feature film Unbrotherly Love is slated for release 2022; a supernatural thriller, AFAR will be directed and starring Ronald in the fall of 2023; in development are feature films, Decisions, and MFK. Additionally, Ronald gives back to his community by mentoring up-and-coming filmmakers in a variety of different aspects of filmmaking. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dennis-tardan/support

Perfume Room
64. Lighting The Way to The Soft Life (w/ Sir Candle Man!)

Perfume Room

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 47:36 Very Popular


Your fave candle creator, Sir Candle Man (Kudzi Chikumbu), is in the Perfume Room today! This ep has been a long time coming! Sir Candle Man and I discuss everything from his creative process for content creation, to the chance encounter in Paris that started it all, and obv, you guessed it the launch of his first-ever fragrance (in collab with L'Or de Seraphine) Soft Life! We discuss the meaning and inspiration behind Soft Life, why and how he created this candle, and of course, what it smells like. FRAGS MENTIONED: Givenchy MMW, Escentric Molecules Escentric 01, Miason Crivelli Papyrus Moleculaire, Le Labo Santal 33, Gucci: 1921, A Song for The Rose, Tears from the Moon; Lancome Idole, Givenchy Indompte, Memo Sicilian Leather, Cire Trudon Bruma, Byredo Black Saffron, Dedcool Blonde 03, MFK 724, Diptyque Tam Dao, Escentric Molecules Molecule 01, Tom Ford Ebène Fumé, MFK Au 17, Vilhelm: Mango Skin, Morning Chess; Carrière Frères: Acacia, Absinthe; Rewind Moscow Mule, JHAG Not A Candle, PF Candle Pignon Incense, Mizensir Ambre Magique ORDER SOFT LIFE: https://www.lordeseraphine.com/products/soft-life FOLLOW SIR CANDLE MAN: @sircandleman on all platforms FOLLOW PERFUME ROOM: @perfumeroompod (IG) @emma_vern (TT)

Talking Nerd.
Gurthy & Schort Detective Agency

Talking Nerd.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 63:48


The Duo tell you why Prey is the best movie in the Predator franchise, and what cereal they would be if they were cereals. Dug details why he decided to start an StG OnlyFans. And in a twist no one saw coming, Dug decides to be Ryan and bring the room down. Stay tuned for a weird MFK coming in Part Two next week!

Reasonably Spontaneous Conversations with Dennis Tardan
A Reasonably Spontaneous Conversation with Ron Dillard, Jr. and Dennis Tardan

Reasonably Spontaneous Conversations with Dennis Tardan

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 31:09


Rod Dillard, Jr. is a director, producer, writer and actor. In 2008, he founded Ronald Dillard Jr Entertainment, LLC, with the vision to create thought provoking entertainment by writing, producing, directing, and co-starring in the first theatrical production, I Deserve Better, followed by A Player's Last Play. In 2013, he released his first feature film, A New Mentality then wrote and produced three more award-winning festival films along with Shirod Greene; Unbrotherly Love, The Color In Your Eyes, and A Monster. Impacted by the brutal killings of Black men in America, in 2020 Ron responded by writing, co-directing, producing, and starring in the multiple award-winning film feature that depicts a police interrogation that unexpectedly slips the boot on the other foot. When We Prey On Them has been selected in over 70 festivals and has won 13 awards including- Best Short Film, Critics Choice Award, and Best Actor. His next adventure is expanding into the series landscape as a showrunner, creating three television shows—two one-hour dramas Serial, Money, Power and Respect, and one half-hour dramedy- Marc Blue. Currently under his RDJ Entertainment banner is: He has Co-produced Shirod Greene's upcoming film For Colored's Only; the feature film Unbrotherly Love is slated for release 2022; a supernatural thriller, AFAR will be directed and starring Ronald in the fall of 2023; in development are feature films, Decisions, and MFK. Additionally, Ronald gives back to his community by mentoring up-and-coming filmmakers in a variety of different aspects of filmmaking. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dennis-tardan/support

Origin Stories w JJK

Nilah Magruder is an absolute joy and an uber-talented author and artist. She was the first Black woman to write for Marvel, illustrated all of the Heroes of Olympus covers for Rick Riordan's books, and worked extensively in animation. Not to mention the books that she is the sole creator of, which have proven to be legendary in my home.Jarrett: Nilah Magruder. How are you? [00:00:03] Nilah: I'm doing pretty good. How are you? [00:00:06] Jarrett: Hangin', it in there Nilah, you will forever and ever be iconic in my home because your picture book, "How to Find a Fox" has been read so many times. So many times. In our home that it is held together by like scotch tape and like bubble gum.[00:00:29] Our son, we must have read that so many times. [00:00:32] Nilah: Oh my God.[00:00:32] Jarrett: Huge home run pal and I remember we met at Comics Crossroads in Ohio and we were tabling next to each other and, like we just were chatting the whole day and I'm always looking for something to bring home to the kids to make up for being gone.[00:00:45] And wow that book, man, I'm telling you like, iconic like that, that we will read that. I will read that to my grandkids, my wife and I will be reading that to our grandkids someday. So thank you for stop and a chat with us. But of course I what the show is all about of [00:01:01] course is about getting to know how creative people in comics got to be doing what they're doing.[00:01:09] And so I like to start at the very beginning cuz I, I love the idea and I also love the idea of imagine. A young author, an artist and getting to, to hear those stories directly from some of your favorite creators. My first question for you and it might really be the only question I ask and then we're gonna get into a conversation, but what was life like for you as a kid?[00:01:29] What was your home like? What was your family set up? What kind of art and stories were you consuming? What sort of laid the groundwork to create Nilah Magruder? [00:01:39] Nilah: My home life as a child, I grew up in a house in the woods in a small community back in a time where it was largely forest and largely rural.[00:01:53] And I think that had a lasting impact on how. I think visually in how I view story, the sort of stories that I'm interested in. A lot of the things I was interested at interested in as a kid were very pastoral and natural. I loved anything featuring animals and, honestly, I was isolated for a lot of my childhood.[00:02:20] This is something that you and I have in common. I had an alcoholic parent and as a kid, I didn't like to bring friends home because then they would see my dad and, whatever state that my dad was in, it was really unpredictable. I never quite knew what I was bringing friends into. So I didn't, bring friends here very much.[00:02:44] And I didn't go to friends' houses very much. And so a lot of my time was spent at home, but we were surrounded by this woodland, all of these trees and animals and so much nature. And that's really where I spent my time as a kid. Now, what I was interested in, like what I was ingesting, we had a small video rental store in the community, and this was long before Netflix.[00:03:18] This was even before Blockbuster. We didn't have a Blockbuster within driving distance. I'm not even sure if Blockbuster existed back then. And so we had this local mom and pop rental store and they would bring in videos from all over the world. A lot of imported... movies and television series.[00:03:43] And as a kid, I was interested in anything animated. If it was a cartoon, if it was drawn, I was there. And so like any cartoon that they had, I'd be like, mom, can we get this please? And I remember once I showed her one video that I hadn't watched yet, and I was like, mom, can we get this? And she looked at it, she looked at the cover and was like, no.[00:04:05] And she put it back and we never spoke of it again. and years later, like I was an adult on the internet and I saw this title called when the wind blows and I was like, oh, that's familiar. And I looked at the summary. I looked at the art from the movie and I was like, oh my God, that's it. That's that one movie that my mom wouldn't let me watch.[00:04:27] And so when the wind blows is a British animated film about nuclear fallout, And it's about it's about this couple. I think it's like a rural couple and there's this big catastrophe in England. And the government sends pamphlets out to everyone and is every, they're just like, don't panic everyone. It's fine.[00:04:54] Just stay at home. And so basically this couple they're older, they're very trusting. They're like the government knows what's best. So we'll just stay home. And eventually radiation reach reaches them and they get sick and die. [00:05:11] So... [00:05:11] Jarrett: what a prude! What a prude! What a...[00:05:14] Nilah: I know wouldn't let me. And then another time she was also a teacher and one day she brought home the animated Animal Farm.[00:05:22] Jarrett: Wow. Yeah.[00:05:23] Nilah: And, my thing is animals, of course. And she looks at me and she's do not watch this. And then she leaves it out. [00:05:32] Jarrett: Oh... [00:05:33] Nilah: And so one day when she wasn't there, I popped it in the VCR and watched it. And I think I was like nine or 10 at the time. And I loved it. So all that to say when I was a kid, I would just watch anything.[00:05:49] And so I was, and we had this rental store that would bring over anything. And so I was getting to watch animated movies from Japan and England and Russia and Canada, like Canada had a really great experimental animation program that was supported by the government. [00:06:07] Jarrett: Yeah.[00:06:07] Nilah: And so they were producing just like wild animated shorts and half the time, I didn't understand what I was watching, but because it was moving pictures, moving drawings, I was fascinated.[00:06:21] And a lot of the stuff that I look back on that I loved as a small child, it's very experimental and dark. And then I lived in this woodland that was also creepy, a lot of animals lived here and also a lot of people in the community were like fascinated cuz our home was situated secluded.[00:06:45] And so people would come drive through late at night just to, see the house or they'd, walk through, like it was a public park here. [00:06:55] Jarrett: Oh. [00:06:55] Nilah: So I had this experience as a child of just like constantly our space just constantly being invaded by strangers. And it was like scary, you're in bed at night....[00:07:11] And headlights reflected on your wall. Yeah. And you're a little kid and you're just like, oh my gosh. [00:07:19] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:07:19] Nilah: I have this, like I have this just this little, knot from my childhood, that's very, just creepy and wild and mysterious. And then I write children's books. [00:07:34] Jarrett: Yeah. It's not easy to be a creative kid who then you when you have worries, because then your creativity, which I've only realized now as an adult, like your imagination really creates scenarios in your head.[00:07:50] Nilah: Yeah![00:07:50] Jarrett: And I wanna point out to the listeners that it's remarkable. That you had access to VHS tapes of cartoons from other countries in that time period. Sometimes when I'm book touring and I talk to readers and they said; "did you love anime when you were a teenager?" And I didn't really have access to it.[00:08:10] I grew up in a suburban, urban area and my rental shop, which was another mom and pop rental shop. They didn't have that creative, curated collection. So how remarkable that, whoever it was that was down the street from you who had this, you know, who had an appetite for this flavor of creative cartoons, because otherwise you would've just been seeing like just Disney and nothing else.[00:08:35] That's, this kinda was the only game in town back then. [00:08:38] Nilah: Yeah. [00:08:39] Yeah. It is like looking back on it. I think that too, it's very odd. [00:08:44] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:08:45] Nilah: Like, how we had so many dubs at the time, but also that this little, this little spot in rural, Maryland was getting all of these videos and yeah, it was pretty, and this was before cable too.[00:09:01] Like we didn't have cable at the time, a lot of my access to animation was through this little rental shop. [00:09:11] Jarrett: Wow. Wow. And so did you love to draw before or after? Can you, or was it simultaneous love of animation and drawing for you? [00:09:21] Nilah: I think the animation came before and I always tell people that I was.[00:09:27] Bad at art at that age. And I'm talking about when I was in kindergarten, so five or six , who's good at art at that age? But it was this I was really bad at coloring in the lines. [00:09:39] Jarrett: Oh, that showed, that did show - sorry to cut you off - but all that did was show promise.[00:09:44] Nilah: Yeah.[00:09:45] Jarrett: All that did was show promise in your work. So it sounds like you had someone somewhere to say, no, you're supposed to color in the lines. And then you're like, oh, what?[00:09:53] Nilah: It was my peers, I remember sitting at a table in kindergarten and I'm coloring. And one of the little girls next to me was like, "Nilah, do you want me to do that for you?"[00:10:04] And that, that devastated me. [00:10:07] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:10:08] Nilah: And so from a very young age, I was like, wow, I have to get better at this cuz that's embarrassing. And so from five or six years old, I was just making this conscious effort to study and practice and be better at art. And my first subjects were animals cuz that's what I was interested in.[00:10:30] We had this magazine series called ZooBooks. And it was full of photos and illustrations of animals. And I would copy these, copy this art and learn animal anatomy from that. Later we got cable and I would watch discovery channel. And then I could see like animals in motion, and I love the Peanuts.[00:10:53] I love Charlie brown and Snoopy taught me how to draw animal toes. As a kid, I was, I would draw them wrong. And I knew they looked wrong, but I didn't know why. And so I would look at Snoopy's feet and how Charles Schultz drew Snoopy's feet. And I started drawing my feet more like that.[00:11:15] And... eventually, I came to understand why the way I was drawing feet before was wrong, anatomically and like that really, that really helped me take my drawings to the next level.[00:11:30] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:11:30] Nilah: And so it wasn't until much later that I really made the connection between animation and my own drawing, I just like watching cartoons and, I also love to draw.[00:11:42] And so as I got older, I, I did process drawing as a storytelling tool and would start drawing, drawing my own stories. And much, much later I got into anime, and... Also Disney started putting out those, like "Making-Of" specials [00:12:07] Jarrett: Yes! [00:12:07] Nilah: Where they talked about how they made animated films.[00:12:11] And that's when I started to learn; " Oh, people are drawing these movies." And that made, that kind of bridged things for me that you can, like that people make comics, people make animated cartoons, like people make children's books. And, I didn't understand where those illustrations came from or anything, but like seeing the process helped me connect the dots like; "Oh, I, as a person can also do this. I can, create stories with art."[00:12:44] Jarrett: And so growing, coming up then. You had art supplies you were drawing and what were your parents' reaction to that? Do they, they thought it was cute and then you'll outgrow it? Or what was that? What was that dynamic like for you? [00:13:05] Nilah: Oh, they thought it was real cute. My dad actually was known as an artist for a while.[00:13:10] He was in the military and I think... I'll have to ask my mom this. I think the story is that he actually considered going to college for art and he went into the military instead. And...[00:13:27] Jarrett: Those are two vastly opposite things![00:13:29] Nilah: Yeah. [00:13:30] Jarrett: Right?[00:13:30] Nilah: Yeah. And so he could draw as a kid, I found some of his some of his old sketches.[00:13:36] And he had a life drawing book, and he did a mural down in the basement that terrifies my nieces, now! It's this pirate face on this cinder block wall in the basement. And I guess when my nieces were growing up, this terrified them and they still don't like it. But so my dad drew and that's something I learned a little later.[00:13:59] It's not really people saw me drawing and they were like; "Oh, your father drew too." And so I learned about it that way. [00:14:07] Jarrett: Wow. [00:14:07] Nilah: My mom was a teacher, and so she would bring home reams of paper for me, and pencils, and drawing was a way to keep me quiet. So when we're at church or when we're out in public, she would just hand me and my brother like drawing supplies and we would go to town and, we would...[00:14:30] Be behaved. And so she, she liked that aspect of it. And then I got a little older and I would keep drawing and that fascinated small children. So it also kept other children quiet.[00:14:49] Everybody, everybody was like; "Yeah, Nilah! Keeping the peace, keeping everyone disciplined!" And that's all, it was for a long time until I was in high school. And I said; "Hey, I think I wanna go to art school." And then things took a turn [00:15:02] Jarrett: And they were like; "Wait a minute."[00:15:03] No, exactly. That's always the interesting thing, where it's supported. And then and it, what I've come to, to learn since years have passed since I was that age, that it comes from love. It comes from fear. Which is love for the kid of how is this kid gonna grow up to support themselves?[00:15:24] Nilah: Yeah. [00:15:24] Jarrett: Especially if it's a world that the parent or caretaker doesn't fully understand or know. Where and maybe and could be read between the lines, but, I don't never knew your dad never didn't know his childhood, but he chose what you know, was more, would be a more practical path.[00:15:39] So while that, that, like history was echoing in you then getting to that age and you went to art school, did you went to college to study art? [00:15:47] Nilah: I did. Yeah. [00:15:48] Jarrett: What, and what was your study? What did you study when you were there? [00:15:51] Nilah: Computer animation. [00:15:53] Jarrett: Oh yeah. And so animation was your... animation was like, that was your goal then?[00:15:58] Nilah: Yeah. [00:15:58] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:15:59] Nilah: Yeah. That was ever since I was 13. That was the end game for me. [00:16:04] Jarrett: And then, so you went to, you went to college and then you graduate from college and I'm sure your parents were like; "And now do you go to work at an office? Do you get a pension? Do you get a, do you get a 401k?" [00:16:16] Nilah: Yeah they didn't understand it for a long time.[00:16:19] And it didn't really materialize for a long time. And my mother was always very honest that she could offer me no advice. Cause vice cause when she was growing up, a black woman in the forties and fifties and sixties, she would say there were three options for us. Be a nurse, be a house cleaner or be a teacher.[00:16:41] And she picked teaching. Nowadays women and black women in particular have so many more options. And I would call home about my internal struggle about what I should be doing. And she'd be like; "Yeah, that sounds hard." [00:16:57] Jarrett: But she's, " I have nothing for you because I haven't walked that path,[00:17:00] other than, being a black woman who's dealt with society." And so... Right. Exactly. And so there, so yeah, there must have been so much fear. Obviously eventually... Oh yeah. You assuage those fears because you became very successful.[00:17:13] You became the first... [00:17:14] Nilah: So... [00:17:15] Jarrett: Yeah. Oh, go ahead. Go ahead. [00:17:16] Nilah: Yeah. Yeah. [00:17:16] The thing, so basically, my, my parents could never stop me. From doing what I was gonna do. And they both knew that. So they put the pressure on, but ultimately, the reason I ended up going to art school is... So we, we tried an animation, like an art trade school, art institutes, and that didn't work out.[00:17:42] And so I went with my mom's plan and did the whole four year college thing. I actually studied journalism and public relations. And when I finally went to Ringling College and studied animation, like I was an adult, I, at that point had a job. I had my own money. I had my own credit. And at this point my parents couldn't stop me.[00:18:06] So I went to art school under my own power and they just had to sit back and wait and see how things turned out. And yeah, there was a lot of fear and totally legitimate fear because we live in this culture that really doesn't support the arts as a career. [00:18:26] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:18:26] Nilah: Even now it's really hard to be an artist because, it's hard to get paid what we're worth. We're, we're still fighting this like societal image of artists as poor and free loaders and just an unnecessary expense. We're in a society where the arts in schools and arts foundations are constantly being defunded, and people don't really understand how much art and design impacts their everyday lives.[00:18:58] And and then, on top of that I think when you're a marginalized person, like your parents are always looking at where, what are the jobs? Where are the careers that people that look like us are thriving. And. That was not entertainment for black people. You don't see, you didn't see black people in those Disney specials. You... And nevermind that I was growing up on the east coast and we really didn't have an entertainment culture here, at least not in TV and film. Yeah. It's different in if you're growing up in California and you're surrounded by studios, who's working in those studios, but here, like there was no window to see where somebody with an animation degree could get a job.[00:19:43] Jarrett: And it's all, it is also, different when you're white, like growing up, I never had a search for characters that looked like me. I never had a search for seeing those specials. And so even though I was on the east coast, I was like; "Oh that's something I can do."[00:19:57] Nilah: Yeah. [00:19:58] Jarrett: But when growing up obviously that's ingrained if you don't see it. And because of your parents lived experience, there were, so there was, so the odds were so stacked against their daughter's favor and they want you to be happy and they want you to be healthy and they want you to succeed.[00:20:13] But you were UN you were unstoppable, you were just kept at it. And you had this love of art and story and you said, you, you said you studied journalism as well. So was like, what was your first paid gig as someone who put words on a paper? Was it journalism? Was it for a newspaper.[00:20:31] Nilah: It was journalism. It was, I think it was a food review. I think it was a restaurant review. Yeah. I worked toward the arts and entertainment department of a Western Maryland newspaper chain, which no longer exists sadly. But I got this job while I was in college. They were looking for interns and I got the internship.[00:20:52] And while I was interning the, the editor who hired me was like; "By the way, do you wanna do some writing?" And, looking back I'm like, what was the other part of this internship? Cuz all I remember is the writing. Like they, they definitely asked me to write in addition to interning, but I don't remember what the interning part was.[00:21:15] I do remember. The early writing gigs. And she was just like; "Hey, why don't you try doing a couple of food reviews?" And that was really cool. I got to go to restaurants and review, write a review. [00:21:27] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:21:27] Nilah: And then that summer there was there, was like a regime change at the paper and my editor rage quit.[00:21:37] And I was like; " I guess that's it for that job!" And so I was like that was fun. I worked for the newspaper for a few months. And then the editor who took our place called me and was like; "Hey, so I found your name on this list of freelance writers. Do you wanna keep writing for us?" And I was like; "Yeah, sure!"[00:21:59] and so he kept feeding me jobs and I didn't review restaurants again, but he would send me out to review gallery openings and to talk to local musicians and I speak to like local, owners of dance companies and theater companies and just this wide array of things. And I, my mom bought me a car cuz it was freaking her out.[00:22:24] I was basically walking around town at night to get to these jobs. And so she bought me a car. So I wouldn't do that. And so I was driving all around, Maryland, reviewing, like writing for this paper. And I did that for two years, through my junior and senior year of college. And then after I graduated and I did it up until the point that I got a full time job and just didn't have time anymore.[00:22:49] And yeah.[00:22:51] Jarrett: Moms are gonna mom forever. Never not gonna be your mom. Never not gonna be your mom looking out for you. And so you know that - granted you were pursuing degrees, but... it sounds like that was also like a whole other master's degree in, in learning about the arts. So you were studying... [00:23:08] Nilah: Yeah.[00:23:08] Jarrett: You were studying the stories of so many people who were you self-employed or making a go at, making a living via a non-traditional means. It's true. You must have met so many interesting people. I can't even, I'm sure that just yeah. Soaked into the fabric of who you became.[00:23:24] So what was your fulltime job? You said you had a full-time you said you had a full-time job. So you left that. What was your full-time case? [00:23:30] Nilah: I was a marketing writer for a health nonprofit. [00:23:34] Yeah. Sounds exciting. Was that super exciting? [00:23:38] Yes... [00:23:39] Jarrett: No? [00:23:39] Nilah: It was amazing. No, it was. So it was in like the DC Metro area and the commute was very long.[00:23:47] It was 70 minutes, one way. Ooh. On the DC beltway. And I'd have to leave home at, what, 4:30, 5 in the morning to get there before rush hour. And it was, it was a fine gig. This nonprofit runs a trade show. I think they do it every other year in Chicago. So while I was there, I got to go to Chicago and help coordinate this giant trade show which was actually that part was really cool.[00:24:17] It was, it was a fine job. It taught me, about the corporate space. It was pretty close to what I went to school to do. And they paid me well for a nonprofit. Like I had a competitive salary. It was, it was my first taste of money. [00:24:36] Jarrett: Yeah. Which is important to pay for things.[00:24:39] Nilah: Yeah.[00:24:40] Jarrett: like your basic needs and enjoyment for sure. [00:24:44] Nilah: And, at the time I was outlining this future and marketing and PR and that was gonna be it. But wow. I still, I still had this bug where I wanted to draw and write and working in marketing wasn't fully fulfilling it. And so I decided I wanted to give it another go.[00:25:06] I wanted to, I started just like poking at, looking at art programs, just, experimentally and ended up applying a lot faster than I thought I would and ended up going a lot faster than I thought I would. [00:25:25] Jarrett: And is that for a master's degree? Is that...[00:25:28] Nilah: No, a bachelor's. [00:25:29] Jarrett: For oh, for a bachelor's![00:25:31] Nilah: I have two bachelors and it feels so pointless.[00:25:35] Jarrett: Oh, here I am thinking like... Oh, I, my, like I'm always concerned. I'm not being a good listener... No, you went and got a second bachelors. [00:25:43] Nilah: I went and got a second. No one needs two bachelors. [00:25:45] Jarrett: Nilah Magruder. How are you? [00:25:49] Nilah: I'm doing pretty good. How are you? [00:25:52] Jarrett: Hangin', it in there Nilah, you will forever and ever be iconic in my home because your picture book, "How to Find a Fox" has been read so many times. So many times. In our home that it is held together by like scotch tape and like bubble gum.[00:26:14] Our son, we must have read that so many times. [00:26:18] Nilah: Oh my God.[00:26:18] Jarrett: Huge home run pal and I remember we met at Comics Crossroads in Ohio and we were tabling next to each other and, like we just were chatting the whole day and I'm always looking for something to bring home to the kids to make up for being gone.[00:26:31] And wow that book, man, I'm telling you like, iconic like that, that we will read that. I will read that to my grandkids, my wife and I will be reading that to our grandkids someday. So thank you for stop and a chat with us. But of course I what the show is all about of [00:26:47] course is about getting to know how creative people in comics got to be doing what they're doing.[00:26:54] And so I like to start at the very beginning cuz I, I love the idea and I also love the idea of imagine. A young author, an artist and getting to, to hear those stories directly from some of your favorite creators. My first question for you and it might really be the only question I ask and then we're gonna get into a conversation, but what was life like for you as a kid?[00:27:15] What was your home like? What was your family set up? What kind of art and stories were you consuming? What sort of laid the groundwork to create Nilah Magruder? [00:27:25] Nilah: My home life as a child, I grew up in a house in the woods in a small community back in a time where it was largely forest and largely rural.[00:27:38] And I think that had a lasting impact on how. I think visually in how I view story, the sort of stories that I'm interested in. A lot of the things I was interested at interested in as a kid were very pastoral and natural. I loved anything featuring animals and, honestly, I was isolated for a lot of my childhood.[00:28:05] This is something that you and I have in common. I had an alcoholic parent and as a kid, I didn't like to bring friends home because then they would see my dad and, whatever state that my dad was in, it was really unpredictable. I never quite knew what I was bringing friends into. So I didn't, bring friends here very much.[00:28:30] And I didn't go to friends' houses very much. And so a lot of my time was spent at home, but we were surrounded by this woodland, all of these trees and animals and so much nature. And that's really where I spent my time as a kid. Now, what I was interested in, like what I was ingesting, we had a small video rental store in the community, and this was long before Netflix.[00:29:04] This was even before Blockbuster. We didn't have a Blockbuster within driving distance. I'm not even sure if Blockbuster existed back then. And so we had this local mom and pop rental store and they would bring in videos from all over the world. A lot of imported... movies and television series.[00:29:29] And as a kid, I was interested in anything animated. If it was a cartoon, if it was drawn, I was there. And so like any cartoon that they had, I'd be like, mom, can we get this please? And I remember once I showed her one video that I hadn't watched yet, and I was like, mom, can we get this? And she looked at it, she looked at the cover and was like, no.[00:29:50] And she put it back and we never spoke of it again. and years later, like I was an adult on the internet and I saw this title called when the wind blows and I was like, oh, that's familiar. And I looked at the summary. I looked at the art from the movie and I was like, oh my God, that's it. That's that one movie that my mom wouldn't let me watch.[00:30:13] And so when the wind blows is a British animated film about nuclear fallout, And it's about it's about this couple. I think it's like a rural couple and there's this big catastrophe in England. And the government sends pamphlets out to everyone and is every, they're just like, don't panic everyone. It's fine.[00:30:40] Just stay at home. And so basically this couple they're older, they're very trusting. They're like the government knows what's best. So we'll just stay home. And eventually radiation reach reaches them and they get sick and die. [00:30:56] So... [00:30:57] Jarrett: what a prude! What a prude! What a...[00:31:00] Nilah: I know wouldn't let me. And then another time she was also a teacher and one day she brought home the animated Animal Farm.[00:31:08] Jarrett: Wow. Yeah.[00:31:09] Nilah: And, my thing is animals, of course. And she looks at me and she's do not watch this. And then she leaves it out. [00:31:17] Jarrett: Oh... [00:31:19] Nilah: And so one day when she wasn't there, I popped it in the VCR and watched it. And I think I was like nine or 10 at the time. And I loved it. So all that to say when I was a kid, I would just watch anything.[00:31:34] And so I was, and we had this rental store that would bring over anything. And so I was getting to watch animated movies from Japan and England and Russia and Canada, like Canada had a really great experimental animation program that was supported by the government. [00:31:52] Jarrett: Yeah.[00:31:52] Nilah: And so they were producing just like wild animated shorts and half the time, I didn't understand what I was watching, but because it was moving pictures, moving drawings, I was fascinated.[00:32:07] And a lot of the stuff that I look back on that I loved as a small child, it's very experimental and dark. And then I lived in this woodland that was also creepy, a lot of animals lived here and also a lot of people in the community were like fascinated cuz our home was situated secluded.[00:32:30] And so people would come drive through late at night just to, see the house or they'd, walk through, like it was a public park here. [00:32:41] Jarrett: Oh. [00:32:41] Nilah: So I had this experience as a child of just like constantly our space just constantly being invaded by strangers. And it was like scary, you're in bed at night....[00:32:57] And headlights reflected on your wall. Yeah. And you're a little kid and you're just like, oh my gosh. [00:33:04] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:33:05] Nilah: I have this, like I have this just this little, knot from my childhood, that's very, just creepy and wild and mysterious. And then I write children's books. [00:33:19] Jarrett: Yeah. It's not easy to be a creative kid who then you when you have worries, because then your creativity, which I've only realized now as an adult, like your imagination really creates scenarios in your head.[00:33:36] Nilah: Yeah![00:33:36] Jarrett: And I wanna point out to the listeners that it's remarkable. That you had access to VHS tapes of cartoons from other countries in that time period. Sometimes when I'm book touring and I talk to readers and they said; "did you love anime when you were a teenager?" And I didn't really have access to it.[00:33:55] I grew up in a suburban, urban area and my rental shop, which was another mom and pop rental shop. They didn't have that creative, curated collection. So how remarkable that, whoever it was that was down the street from you who had this, you know, who had an appetite for this flavor of creative cartoons, because otherwise you would've just been seeing like just Disney and nothing else.[00:34:21] That's, this kinda was the only game in town back then. [00:34:24] Nilah: Yeah. [00:34:24] Yeah. It is like looking back on it. I think that too, it's very odd. [00:34:29] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:34:30] Nilah: Like, how we had so many dubs at the time, but also that this little, this little spot in rural, Maryland was getting all of these videos and yeah, it was pretty, and this was before cable too.[00:34:47] Like we didn't have cable at the time, a lot of my access to animation was through this little rental shop. [00:34:56] Jarrett: Wow. Wow. And so did you love to draw before or after? Can you, or was it simultaneous love of animation and drawing for you? [00:35:06] Nilah: I think the animation came before and I always tell people that I was.[00:35:13] Bad at art at that age. And I'm talking about when I was in kindergarten, so five or six , who's good at art at that age? But it was this I was really bad at coloring in the lines. [00:35:25] Jarrett: Oh, that showed, that did show - sorry to cut you off - but all that did was show promise.[00:35:30] Nilah: Yeah.[00:35:31] Jarrett: All that did was show promise in your work. So it sounds like you had someone somewhere to say, no, you're supposed to color in the lines. And then you're like, oh, what?[00:35:38] Nilah: It was my peers, I remember sitting at a table in kindergarten and I'm coloring. And one of the little girls next to me was like, "Nilah, do you want me to do that for you?"[00:35:50] And that, that devastated me. [00:35:53] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:35:53] Nilah: And so from a very young age, I was like, wow, I have to get better at this cuz that's embarrassing. And so from five or six years old, I was just making this conscious effort to study and practice and be better at art. And my first subjects were animals cuz that's what I was interested in.[00:36:16] We had this magazine series called ZooBooks. And it was full of photos and illustrations of animals. And I would copy these, copy this art and learn animal anatomy from that. Later we got cable and I would watch discovery channel. And then I could see like animals in motion, and I love the Peanuts.[00:36:39] I love Charlie brown and Snoopy taught me how to draw animal toes. As a kid, I was, I would draw them wrong. And I knew they looked wrong, but I didn't know why. And so I would look at Snoopy's feet and how Charles Schultz drew Snoopy's feet. And I started drawing my feet more like that.[00:37:01] And... eventually, I came to understand why the way I was drawing feet before was wrong, anatomically and like that really, that really helped me take my drawings to the next level.[00:37:15] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:37:15] Nilah: And so it wasn't until much later that I really made the connection between animation and my own drawing, I just like watching cartoons and, I also love to draw.[00:37:27] And so as I got older, I, I did process drawing as a storytelling tool and would start drawing, drawing my own stories. And much, much later I got into anime, and... Also Disney started putting out those, like "Making-Of" specials [00:37:52] Jarrett: Yes! [00:37:53] Nilah: Where they talked about how they made animated films.[00:37:57] And that's when I started to learn; " Oh, people are drawing these movies." And that made, that kind of bridged things for me that you can, like that people make comics, people make animated cartoons, like people make children's books. And, I didn't understand where those illustrations came from or anything, but like seeing the process helped me connect the dots like; "Oh, I, as a person can also do this. I can, create stories with art."[00:38:30] Jarrett: And so growing, coming up then. You had art supplies you were drawing and what were your parents' reaction to that? Do they, they thought it was cute and then you'll outgrow it? Or what was that? What was that dynamic like for you? [00:38:51] Nilah: Oh, they thought it was real cute. My dad actually was known as an artist for a while.[00:38:56] He was in the military and I think... I'll have to ask my mom this. I think the story is that he actually considered going to college for art and he went into the military instead. And...[00:39:12] Jarrett: Those are two vastly opposite things![00:39:15] Nilah: Yeah. [00:39:16] Jarrett: Right?[00:39:16] Nilah: Yeah. And so he could draw as a kid, I found some of his some of his old sketches.[00:39:21] And he had a life drawing book, and he did a mural down in the basement that terrifies my nieces, now! It's this pirate face on this cinder block wall in the basement. And I guess when my nieces were growing up, this terrified them and they still don't like it. But so my dad drew and that's something I learned a little later.[00:39:45] It's not really people saw me drawing and they were like; "Oh, your father drew too." And so I learned about it that way. [00:39:52] Jarrett: Wow. [00:39:53] Nilah: My mom was a teacher, and so she would bring home reams of paper for me, and pencils, and drawing was a way to keep me quiet. So when we're at church or when we're out in public, she would just hand me and my brother like drawing supplies and we would go to town and, we would...[00:40:16] Be behaved. And so she, she liked that aspect of it. And then I got a little older and I would keep drawing and that fascinated small children. So it also kept other children quiet.[00:40:35] Everybody, everybody was like; "Yeah, Nilah! Keeping the peace, keeping everyone disciplined!" And that's all, it was for a long time until I was in high school. And I said; "Hey, I think I wanna go to art school." And then things took a turn [00:40:47] Jarrett: And they were like; "Wait a minute."[00:40:49] No, exactly. That's always the interesting thing, where it's supported. And then and it, what I've come to, to learn since years have passed since I was that age, that it comes from love. It comes from fear. Which is love for the kid of how is this kid gonna grow up to support themselves?[00:41:09] Nilah: Yeah. [00:41:10] Jarrett: Especially if it's a world that the parent or caretaker doesn't fully understand or know. Where and maybe and could be read between the lines, but, I don't never knew your dad never didn't know his childhood, but he chose what you know, was more, would be a more practical path.[00:41:25] So while that, that, like history was echoing in you then getting to that age and you went to art school, did you went to college to study art? [00:41:33] Nilah: I did. Yeah. [00:41:34] Jarrett: What, and what was your study? What did you study when you were there? [00:41:36] Nilah: Computer animation. [00:41:39] Jarrett: Oh yeah. And so animation was your... animation was like, that was your goal then?[00:41:43] Nilah: Yeah. [00:41:44] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:41:44] Nilah: Yeah. That was ever since I was 13. That was the end game for me. [00:41:50] Jarrett: And then, so you went to, you went to college and then you graduate from college and I'm sure your parents were like; "And now do you go to work at an office? Do you get a pension? Do you get a, do you get a 401k?" [00:42:02] Nilah: Yeah they didn't understand it for a long time.[00:42:04] And it didn't really materialize for a long time. And my mother was always very honest that she could offer me no advice. Cause vice cause when she was growing up, a black woman in the forties and fifties and sixties, she would say there were three options for us. Be a nurse, be a house cleaner or be a teacher.[00:42:27] And she picked teaching. Nowadays women and black women in particular have so many more options. And I would call home about my internal struggle about what I should be doing. And she'd be like; "Yeah, that sounds hard." [00:42:43] Jarrett: But she's, " I have nothing for you because I haven't walked that path,[00:42:46] other than, being a black woman who's dealt with society." And so... Right. Exactly. And so there, so yeah, there must have been so much fear. Obviously eventually... Oh yeah. You assuage those fears because you became very successful.[00:42:59] You became the first... [00:43:00] Nilah: So... [00:43:00] Jarrett: Yeah. Oh, go ahead. Go ahead. [00:43:01] Nilah: Yeah. Yeah. [00:43:02] The thing, so basically, my, my parents could never stop me. From doing what I was gonna do. And they both knew that. So they put the pressure on, but ultimately, the reason I ended up going to art school is... So we, we tried an animation, like an art trade school, art institutes, and that didn't work out.[00:43:27] And so I went with my mom's plan and did the whole four year college thing. I actually studied journalism and public relations. And when I finally went to Ringling College and studied animation, like I was an adult, I, at that point had a job. I had my own money. I had my own credit. And at this point my parents couldn't stop me.[00:43:52] So I went to art school under my own power and they just had to sit back and wait and see how things turned out. And yeah, there was a lot of fear and totally legitimate fear because we live in this culture that really doesn't support the arts as a career. [00:44:12] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:44:12] Nilah: Even now it's really hard to be an artist because, it's hard to get paid what we're worth. We're, we're still fighting this like societal image of artists as poor and free loaders and just an unnecessary expense. We're in a society where the arts in schools and arts foundations are constantly being defunded, and people don't really understand how much art and design impacts their everyday lives.[00:44:44] And and then, on top of that I think when you're a marginalized person, like your parents are always looking at where, what are the jobs? Where are the careers that people that look like us are thriving. And. That was not entertainment for black people. You don't see, you didn't see black people in those Disney specials. You... And nevermind that I was growing up on the east coast and we really didn't have an entertainment culture here, at least not in TV and film. Yeah. It's different in if you're growing up in California and you're surrounded by studios, who's working in those studios, but here, like there was no window to see where somebody with an animation degree could get a job.[00:45:29] Jarrett: And it's all, it is also, different when you're white, like growing up, I never had a search for characters that looked like me. I never had a search for seeing those specials. And so even though I was on the east coast, I was like; "Oh that's something I can do."[00:45:43] Nilah: Yeah. [00:45:44] Jarrett: But when growing up obviously that's ingrained if you don't see it. And because of your parents lived experience, there were, so there was, so the odds were so stacked against their daughter's favor and they want you to be happy and they want you to be healthy and they want you to succeed.[00:45:59] But you were UN you were unstoppable, you were just kept at it. And you had this love of art and story and you said, you, you said you studied journalism as well. So was like, what was your first paid gig as someone who put words on a paper? Was it journalism? Was it for a newspaper.[00:46:16] Nilah: It was journalism. It was, I think it was a food review. I think it was a restaurant review. Yeah. I worked toward the arts and entertainment department of a Western Maryland newspaper chain, which no longer exists sadly. But I got this job while I was in college. They were looking for interns and I got the internship.[00:46:38] And while I was interning the, the editor who hired me was like; "By the way, do you wanna do some writing?" And, looking back I'm like, what was the other part of this internship? Cuz all I remember is the writing. Like they, they definitely asked me to write in addition to interning, but I don't remember what the interning part was.[00:47:01] I do remember. The early writing gigs. And she was just like; "Hey, why don't you try doing a couple of food reviews?" And that was really cool. I got to go to restaurants and review, write a review. [00:47:12] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:47:13] Nilah: And then that summer there was there, was like a regime change at the paper and my editor rage quit.[00:47:22] And I was like; " I guess that's it for that job!" And so I was like that was fun. I worked for the newspaper for a few months. And then the editor who took our place called me and was like; "Hey, so I found your name on this list of freelance writers. Do you wanna keep writing for us?" And I was like; "Yeah, sure!"[00:47:45] and so he kept feeding me jobs and I didn't review restaurants again, but he would send me out to review gallery openings and to talk to local musicians and I speak to like local, owners of dance companies and theater companies and just this wide array of things. And I, my mom bought me a car cuz it was freaking her out.[00:48:10] I was basically walking around town at night to get to these jobs. And so she bought me a car. So I wouldn't do that. And so I was driving all around, Maryland, reviewing, like writing for this paper. And I did that for two years, through my junior and senior year of college. And then after I graduated and I did it up until the point that I got a full time job and just didn't have time anymore.[00:48:35] And yeah.[00:48:37] Jarrett: Moms are gonna mom forever. Never not gonna be your mom. Never not gonna be your mom looking out for you. And so you know that - granted you were pursuing degrees, but... it sounds like that was also like a whole other master's degree in, in learning about the arts. So you were studying... [00:48:54] Nilah: Yeah.[00:48:54] Jarrett: You were studying the stories of so many people who were you self-employed or making a go at, making a living via a non-traditional means. It's true. You must have met so many interesting people. I can't even, I'm sure that just yeah. Soaked into the fabric of who you became.[00:49:10] So what was your fulltime job? You said you had a full-time you said you had a full-time job. So you left that. What was your full-time case? [00:49:15] Nilah: I was a marketing writer for a health nonprofit. [00:49:20] Yeah. Sounds exciting. Was that super exciting? [00:49:24] Yes... [00:49:24] Jarrett: No? [00:49:25] Nilah: It was amazing. No, it was. So it was in like the DC Metro area and the commute was very long.[00:49:33] It was 70 minutes, one way. Ooh. On the DC beltway. And I'd have to leave home at, what, 4:30, 5 in the morning to get there before rush hour. And it was, it was a fine gig. This nonprofit runs a trade show. I think they do it every other year in Chicago. So while I was there, I got to go to Chicago and help coordinate this giant trade show which was actually that part was really cool.[00:50:03] It was, it was a fine job. It taught me, about the corporate space. It was pretty close to what I went to school to do. And they paid me well for a nonprofit. Like I had a competitive salary. It was, it was my first taste of money. [00:50:22] Jarrett: Yeah. Which is important to pay for things.[00:50:25] Nilah: Yeah.[00:50:25] Jarrett: like your basic needs and enjoyment for sure. [00:50:30] Nilah: And, at the time I was outlining this future and marketing and PR and that was gonna be it. But wow. I still, I still had this bug where I wanted to draw and write and working in marketing wasn't fully fulfilling it. And so I decided I wanted to give it another go.[00:50:52] I wanted to, I started just like poking at, looking at art programs, just, experimentally and ended up applying a lot faster than I thought I would and ended up going a lot faster than I thought I would. [00:51:11] Jarrett: And is that for a master's degree? Is that...[00:51:13] Nilah: No, a bachelor's. [00:51:15] Jarrett: For oh, for a bachelor's![00:51:16] Nilah: I have two bachelors and it feels so pointless.[00:51:21] Jarrett: Oh, here I am thinking like... Oh, I, my, like I'm always concerned. I'm not being a good listener... No, you went and got a second bachelors. [00:51:28] Nilah: I went and got a second. No one needs two bachelors.  [00:00:00] Jarrett: So hold up, you went and got a second bachelor's degree. Like...[00:00:05] Nilah: I went and got a second bachelor's.[00:00:07] Jarrett: And in what? So your first bachelor, your first bachelor's was in computer animation. [00:00:12] Nilah: My first bachelor's was in... Communications. [00:00:17] Oh...[00:00:18] Yeah.[00:00:19] Jarrett: I see. Then yeah. Two bachelors, but they're completely different.[00:00:22] Nilah: Completely different. [00:00:23] Jarrett: And what a different experience too, of being, an older student you're not fresh out of high school, you I'm sure you, your approach to the academics and what you were learning were so different, right? [00:00:35] Nilah: Yeah. Honestly, I was an older student both times.[00:00:39] I, I skipped a year when I when I graduated high school, me and my mom fought over the art school thing. And then I ended up not going to college that first year. And so I was older when I went to that first four year college, hood college. It was actually a women's college at the time.[00:00:56] So I was entering, I think at 19 instead of 18. And then when I went to Ringling, I was 25. So I was... Much, not the oldest adult student there, but I was older than all the 18 year olds coming in. Yeah. And it, it definitely, it's a different perspec- perspective for sure. This was not my first career attempt, it wasn't, at 18, like there's so much pressure to choose a career, choose it now and go to college for that career and stay in that career.[00:01:28] So you can pay back those student loans. And I didn't have that. I, animation was like I had my plan B already. I had my fallback career. Like I had my degree in marketing that I could always fall back on if the animation thing didn't work out. So animation was just like a fully like personal choice that I was making.[00:01:52] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:01:53] Nilah: Everything I did at that point, I, I did it as, a fully consenting adult. [00:01:58] Jarrett: And you, so then you had your second graduation and your family; "Didn't we do this seven years ago?" And... [00:02:05] Nilah: Yeah. [00:02:05] Jarrett: So you're like launching into the world a whole second time. That's like a caterpillar becoming a butterfly twice.[00:02:12] Yeah. [00:02:13] Nilah: Yeah. It was very it was very interesting. [00:02:16] Jarrett: Yeah! [00:02:16] Nilah: But... [00:02:17] Jarrett: Yeah so you, but you wow, but amazing that you had the foresight to say; "Okay, let me reset. Let me really follow the passion." Like you...[00:02:27] Nilah: Yeah. [00:02:27] Jarrett: And you learned a lot in that corporate space too, because we're artists.[00:02:31] But we still have to deal with the corporations who publish the work or help promote the work. So what was your, so then what was your first paid gig after getting a degree in animation? [00:02:42] Nilah: My first paid gig was in publishing because I couldn't get an animation job. I entered Ringling at the start of the recession.[00:02:50] Leading up to 2006, 2007, all of the feedback coming out of Ringling was come to this school and you'll get a high paid job in animation and... [00:03:06] Jarrett: Speaking of marketing. [00:03:10] Nilah: Right. And then I entered Ringling that, that year, 2007, And like we're in school, we're just watching on the news, all the jobs dry up.[00:03:24] Jarrett: Oh. [00:03:24] Nilah: And so it was basically for all of us, it was like this three or four year, wait to see, will there be jobs when we get out. And for me there wasn't. So my first job out of Ringling, I graduated in 2010, was a publisher in Maryland. And I was falling back on my previous career for that, I had, because of my earlier experiences, I had the credentials for this job.[00:03:56] I stayed for seven months. It was, it was a position that ended up being, not as advertised. And... [00:04:06] Jarrett: Yeah, yeah. [00:04:07] Nilah: And during this year that I was home was, it was difficult. My aunt died that year. And so my family needed me at home, but also so it reignited that fear my mom had of me leaving.[00:04:24] And so I was really trying to stay in Maryland. And at the same time, like there was just this thought in my head that I hadn't given animation, like a full try. Like I was trying to find work while being at home. Cuz I, I had nowhere else to go knowing that all of the work was in California. And no one would hire me here in Maryland, because most places they wanted someone right away.[00:04:59] And like, why hire someone in Maryland and wait for them to move out when you can just hire one of these thousands of people hanging around LA looking for work. So I ended up just packing all my things into my car and moving to LA that summer 2000 that fall 2011. And so at this point I'd been out of school for over a year and still did not have a job in animation.[00:05:31] And I was writing completely on my savings and the savings. Once I got to LA the savings dried up very quickly, I was completely broke and I was applying everywhere. And getting, getting nowhere. I got so desperate that I was applying for retail and that wasn't working out either. I couldn't, it was so dry.[00:05:55] I couldn't even get a retail job. I applied for a, an unpaid internship and I didn't get that either. I couldn't even get a job where I worked for free. And I was ready to throw in the towel, but I didn't have enough money to afford to move back home.[00:06:20] Jarrett: You couldn't afford to even buy the towel to throw it at that point.[00:06:23] Nilah: Yeah. [00:06:24] Yeah. Like my mom start, my mom was paying my rent. [00:06:27] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:06:28] Nilah: And she could have barely afford that. Like my parents were both retired and in January, 2012, I... I happened to see a listing on Ringling's job website for a little company in Burbank. And I got an interview there. They were, they did mostly live action work, but they were hiring their first in-house artist.[00:06:58] And the company was run by Florida state alums. I think it's Florida state. I can't remember now wow it's been a while, but oh, that's embarrassing if they watch this. But they had this Florida connection. So they, when they were hiring for this position, they decided to put a listing on the Ringling job site because Ringling is also in Florida, and I got the job.[00:07:26] Jarrett: Yes![00:07:26] Nilah: And that was my first LA job. It was the company is called Soapbox Films. and at the time they were doing a lot of like marketing and live action production, mainly for Disney. So if you ever heard of like Movie Surfers in like the early two thousands, I think they, the Disney channel had this program called Movie Surfers and Soapbox, like back in that day, Soapbox was the one developing that.[00:08:01] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:08:02] Nilah: They do a lot of production with the Muppets. They're one of a handful of studios in LA that are equipped to work with the Muppets. [00:08:10] Jarrett: Whoa. That's not an easy thing to get.[00:08:13] Nilah: Yeah, and they do what is called toolkit for animated films. Toolkit is like just it's a package of assets that the studios will use to advertise their animated films and to develop toolkit.[00:08:32] You need a storyboard artist and that's what they hired me for. [00:08:39] Jarrett: That's fantastic. So now you're getting paid to draw pictures that tell stories. [00:08:44] Nilah: Yeah. [00:08:44] Finally getting paid, just draw pictures. [00:08:47] Jarrett: You're on your way moving right along Fozzie and Kermit saying as they're driving across country. [00:08:52] Nilah: Yeah. [00:08:53] Jarrett: Oh man. And so that must have, that must have led to other things, right? [00:08:57] Nilah: It allowed me to stay in LA. [00:08:59] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:08:59] Nilah: They were, this was this was the conflict My time at Soapbox was great. I stayed there for three years, but it wasn't, it allowed me to tread water in Los Angeles, but it wasn't a stepping stone really to the next thing, because everything that I did there was so specific to what Soapbox did.[00:09:24] It didn't translate well to other jobs at other studios. So I couldn't use anything I was doing there in my portfolio. So if I wanted to, if I wanted to work in TV and film, which was still the goal, I had to develop my portfolio pieces outside of work. At this time I was, I had my day job at [00:09:50] Soapbox, but I was also still figuring out what is my career though.[00:09:55] Yeah. And there were times like I'd go through this cycle at Soapbox where I would try really hard to get out. So I'd be submitting my storyboarding portfolio to other studios and nothing would materialize. And I'd give up after six months and I'd say, you know what, let me just hunker down and focus on my time here at Soapbox.[00:10:17] And maybe this can become a long term career. And so I would really like put all of my energy into being like the best Soapbox employee I could be. And then after six months, I'd be like; "I can't take this. I can't do this anymore. I have to get out." And so I'd re-up and put all of my energy into storyboard portfolio stuff and try again.[00:10:43] And I did this for three years and meanwhile I fell into comics in children's books a little bit. Cause at this point, I was so desperate for money I was so desperate. Like I was just like clinging on by my fingernails. And I just needed something to work. And so I was, utilizing the skills I had, which were basically writing and drawing.[00:11:11] And I started a web comic and I started, I joined society of children's book, writers and illustrators, so I could learn how to make children's books. And I was doing picture book dumies and trying to write novels and looking for an agent and drawing this web comic in my spare time outside of Soapbox.[00:11:34] And, also, putting storyboard portfolios together. And so I did this for three years and then finally in 2015, everything changed. I submitted my web comic to the Dwayne McDuffy award for diversity and won that. I... [00:11:55] Jarrett: And hold on. You were the inaugural winner too! [00:11:58] Nilah: I was the inaugural winner.[00:12:00] Jarrett: You were the first person ever to win that award. [00:12:02] Nilah: It was bonkers. Yeah. I, and I was so used to losing at that point that and the competition was so stiff. I was like, I got nominated. And I was like that was a fun experience, but I'm never gonna win a little web comic with a very small following is not gonna win against all these like actual comics.[00:12:28] I was up against Ms. Marvel, and I believe Shaft by David Walker, and Hex 11. And I was just like, that's the end of the road. And, but it won MFK one. [00:12:41] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:12:41] Nilah: And it, it was the start of a very different... It was the start of things for me. [00:12:47] Jarrett: Yeah. Yeah. And and I do think film, and graphic novels, they do have a lot in common.[00:12:53] I look to film to inspire how I, I write my graphic novels and yeah. I have to say so a couple months ago, I was just, just binge watching some shows on Disney plus and they have this show that's about the history of Marvel. And then there was one episode about the women of Marvel and the women who've written for Marvel and how certainly they were there in the beginning, but they weren't necessarily writing the stories.[00:13:18] They were, they, it was everything back then in the world of comics, like most of the world too, and most of the country was, chauvinistic. And so I'm just watching and I'm so fascinated hearing these stories of these pioneers. And then you pop up on the show. I was like, wait a minute.[00:13:36] I don't need to see the, I didn't need to see the little name at the bottom. Like I know that's Nilah. And you became the first black woman to write for Marvel comics. [00:13:47] Nilah: Isn't that bonkers, like... [00:13:50] Jarrett: It is bonkers! Tell me about that. Tell me about your mom's reaction because there is something you said in something you'd said in the show was something about your back in the day.[00:14:05] Was it like your mom's was your mom's friends giving her flack or something? [00:14:09] Nilah: Oh yeah. [00:14:10] Yeah. I don't even know if I've told my mom that I'm the first black writer for Marvel, because some things I say about my career just mean nothing to her. [00:14:18] So... But... [00:14:21] Jarrett: Like I said: moms are gonna, mom.[00:14:23] Nilah: Moms are gonna mom.[00:14:24] Jarrett: No matter what.[00:14:26] Nilah: But, I didn't realize the extent of this coming up, but when I decided to go down this path like my mom's older black lady, friends in, Maryland middle class, Maryland were really judgey about it. And like one of them once asked me because I, the art school thing had not yet materialized.[00:14:46] And she was like; "Oh, so are you finally over that art hobby yet?"[00:14:51] Jarrett: Oof. [00:14:53] Nilah: And I, I didn't realize this either, but there's this other family friend that we don't speak to anymore. And I thought that we just drifted apart, but turns out like going to art school was like a point of contention for her.[00:15:08] Jarrett: Wow. [00:15:08] Nilah: And. And it's such a weird thing to think about that she would distance herself from our entire family over, over a personal choice that I made. [00:15:17] Jarrett: It's not witchcraft! It's not witch... I mean like sacrificing rabbits on the full moon or something. I don't...[00:15:24] Nilah: Right.. It's, yeah, but... [00:15:27] Jarrett: Wow. Wow. [00:15:29] Nilah: So like my mother, wasn't telling me about this.[00:15:33] She wasn't telling me that like her friends were coming down hard on her and she had to defend me [00:15:41] Jarrett: Wow![00:15:41] Nilah: And defend my choices. But when I started working for Dreamworks and Disney, she finally got her vindication, cuz she would say; "Hey, my kid works at Disney now." And they understood that. [00:15:55] Jarrett: Yes they, they certainly did.[00:15:57] Nilah: Yeah. [00:15:57] Jarrett: And run us through some of your credits of, cause I know you from the book world and I know that you've done stuff for Dreamworks and Disney, but what kind of jobs have you done over these years? [00:16:07] Nilah: So I was a storyboard revisionist on Dino Trucks at Dreamworks, and Dino Trucks is a Netflix show.[00:16:17] You can watch it on Netflix. It's just what it sounds like. It's dinosaur trucks. And it's based on a children's book.[00:16:23] Jarrett: And it's based on a children's book. You can't escape now. We're bringing you over just the same. You're in this publishing game too! [00:16:32] Nilah: At Disney, I hopped onto Tangled, the series. [00:16:36] Jarrett: Oh.[00:16:37] Nilah: Which is based on the movie. [00:16:38] Jarrett: Yeah. We love that show in my house. What did you do then? [00:16:41] Nilah: Yeah. [00:16:41] Jarrett: What did you do on the show? [00:16:43] Nilah: I was also a storyboard revisionist there. And so storyboard revisionists... They're basically the support team for storyboard artists. So they, the storyboard artists do their thing and storyboard revisionists help make sure that the storyboards are ready for the next process in the pipeline.[00:17:04] Jarrett: Okay. [00:17:05] Nilah: So we it's a lot of drawing. It's a lot of support drawing just to, to tighten things up for the animators. God what happened next? I was a writer for Cannon Busters produced by LaSean Thomas. [00:17:21] Jarrett: Wow.[00:17:22] Nilah: I was a writer for Polly Pocket.[00:17:27] Jarrett: Nice. [00:17:27] Nilah: Which is based on... [00:17:29] Iconic!. [00:17:30] Yeah. Yeah. Poly pocket is still around [00:17:33] Jarrett: Iconic. That's wild. Yeah. And you illustrated the Rick Riordan and Heroes of Olympus books too. [00:17:42] Nilah: Yeah![00:17:43] Jarrett: Goodness like that is huge. For you, you don't get bigger in publishing than Rick Riordan. [00:17:50] Nilah: It's true. Yeah.[00:17:52] Jarrett: And, And animals and fantasy. And you illustrated the covers for our friend Daniel Jose Older, the Dactyl Hill Squad books.[00:18:01] Nilah: That was my first time drawing dinosaurs in my life. [00:18:05] Jarrett: Really? I, would've never known that. I had never known that. [00:18:08] Nilah: Aside from Dino Trucks, but that was a very different thing. [00:18:11] Jarrett: Yeah. Those are more trucks than dinosaurs, right? Yeah. [00:18:13] Nilah: Yeah. It was wild. Like I had to learn dinosaur anatomy. [00:18:18] Jarrett: And so where in, where did all of that did Marvel come calling? [00:18:21] Nilah: So back in 2016, I think it all happened very fast. This was after the Dwayne McDuffy award and I never got a clear answer on how they found me. It might have been Twitter, but an editor from Marvel reached out one day and said; "Hey, would you like to write a short story for us on this new series called the Year of Marvels?" And they pitched a Rocket Raccoon -Tippy-Toe Squirrel team up and of course animals.[00:18:59] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:19:00] Nilah: So...[00:19:00] Jarrett: It's your wheelhouse! [00:19:01] Nilah: Yeah. Yeah. So I took it of course. And that kind of got things rolling. Once you're, once you write for a Marvel you're in the Marvel family. So...[00:19:09] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:19:10] Nilah: I didn't, I did that and didn't, work with them for a long while after that. And so it just so happened. I didn't know this at the time I was completely unprepared. But that ended up being their first writing credit by a black woman. And so 70 years into Marvel's history and it was just this little short di

RB-sporten
Molde kan være på vei mot play-off

RB-sporten

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 36:57


Martin, Calle og Knut Anders diskuterer kampen som ga Molde en fin 3-0 seier mot Kisvárda FC i går. De snakker seg også gjennom kjøpet av Kristian Eriksen, hvilke flere posisjoner MFK bør sikre fremover og om laget er rustet til å tåle 30 grader i Ungarn når returoppgjøret spilles kommende torsdag. Det går så bra med Molde om dagen at de ser litt inn mot play-off og du får høre hvorfor Calle og Knut Anders vurderer å kommentere kampen mot Kristiansund på søndag, i Molde. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

RDR Media & Entertainment
Delco Model Rising | Bridges Out in Delco

RDR Media & Entertainment

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 80:01


28,800 hopeful Maxim Models entered, but only a few remain... Just one is from #Delco. Laura Thompson is battling vote for vote for that top spot in the quarterfinals. She needs your clicks to move on. (Link to vote below), and tune in to catch up and update on the journey to get the 610 on the modeling map. We also do Delco version M-F-K that will leave you speechless. Bridges down in Delco, but is it just the blame game? #Maxim | #DelcoLive www.DelcoLive.com

Champs Drink Champs
It's My Birthday B*tches!

Champs Drink Champs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 61:08


It's Chelby's birthday week, y'all!!! Tayler came up with some random questions to grill the birthday girl with - some are funny, and some are a bit more serious. Tune in and get to know the birthday girl better and find out who she'd like to MFK out of Tayler's 3 favorite celebrity men. Oh, and if you really want to honor your girl, listen with a fresh ass glass of champagne! Happy Leo season, bitches!

RB-sporten
Dobbel seier mot Elfsborg

RB-sporten

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 27:08


Denne uken får du svar på spørsmål som: Kan Molde og Borås være vennskapsbyer etter de to Europa-kampene mellom Elfsborg og MFK, hvem er Kisvarda FC og hvorfor er det så viktig at Molde vinner Eliteserien i år? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Talking Nerd.
Welcome to the Biscuitorium, Part the Second

Talking Nerd.

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 64:33


The dramatic conclusion of the mind-numbing first part you listened to last week. It's more cool stuff about things that don't matter, including an ontological session of MFK, like that episode of Quantum Leap where Sam leaps into his past self except it's X-rated…because of violence.

Talking Nerd.
Welcome to the Biscuitorium, Part the First

Talking Nerd.

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 66:07


The Duo discuss the important things in life, like OB1, why Roblox is like listening to other people describe their dreams, and whether Ryan should eat a dog biscuit. This is part one of a special two-part episode. Like and subscribe for next week's extra-long MFK!

Food Sex Politics
FMK with Brooke Rosenfeld

Food Sex Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 59:08


Dave and Nicole welcome her work wife, Brooke Rosenfeld, MS, RD for a tough round of MFK. www.instagram.com/food.sex.politics/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/foodsexpolitics/message

RB-sporten
Eirik Hestad

RB-sporten

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 34:29


Eirik Hestad er hjemme på sommerferie og tar en tur innom RB-sporten for å snakke om hvordan det går i Kypros, hva han tenker om Træff sine prestasjoner og MFK sine muligheter. Det blir også noen turistanbefalinger, et og annet utdrikningslag og litt sladder om gamle lagkamerater- See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

F-Buddies with Mike & Andy
Episode 037 - Hot Dogs (F-Buddies with Mike & Andy)

F-Buddies with Mike & Andy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 68:50


Mike Wendt and Andy Ferg discuss the "Perfect Vessel for Toppings," a Hot Dog. Plus, a Food Network version of M-F-K and Andy vs. Mandy's dieting habits. Andy also asks Mike for advice on his first big hosting gig. This ain't your average food show... it's F-BUDDIES! Special THANKS to Paddy Kellys of Peabody, The Gary Girolamo Group, Channel Marker Brewing and Ben Franklin Print Co. for sponsoring this week's episode! Thanks to the very talented Mark DiChiara for the original F-Buddies theme music.

Dick Talk podcast
Took a hit of it

Dick Talk podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 36:25


US open, golf, weather, shitty jobs, sleeping naked, fire, whippits, homeless cartel, power rangers, The Boys, Transgenders, twisted teas, MFK, blackface, goodwill

Spinning Unrest Music
S03 E13 - The Baby's Gay

Spinning Unrest Music

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 58:26


Topics today include an update on the Seth Green NFT fiasco, most heartbreaking band break ups EVER, and our favorite memories about being low down and dirty music pirates. We'll also deep dive into another full album during our weekly "Spin Party" and find out if the boys can tell the difference between a Nick Cage movie role and an obscure rapper. Final round of the elite 8 of the TV Series Brackets and an MFK that teaches us more than a few things about our current sexual disposition. - Watch On YouTube: bit.ly/3rCf1Jh Follow/Vote On Instagram: instagram.com/riotatthedogpark TikTok: @_riotatthedogpark_ Web Site: riotatthedogpark.com Jokes On Us Seth - (12:41) Breaking Up Is Hard To Do - (17:30) TV Series Brackets - (23:58) Music Pirate Memories - (30:29) Spin Party - (36:40) Obscure Rapper or Nick Cage Role - (42:10 20 Black People in 40 Seconds - (46:31) Sump's Fun Fact - (47:22) Marry, F**k, Kill- (49:04)

The Glue Guys: A Brooklyn Nets Podcast
Coffee, Roadtrip, and Leave on Red

The Glue Guys: A Brooklyn Nets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 48:49


A special new game, the Glue Guys version of MFK: coffee, roadtrip or leave on red. TGG run through six different scenarios involving the Brooklyn Nets and determine essentially an MFK situation. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Orange And Blue Thing
OABT S6 E9: The Mets Stroking Out West

Orange And Blue Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 54:43


- But wait, when do the Mets start playing the good teams? - The Mets are stroking out West - CYCLE for Escobar! 10K's for Cookie! - Darren hit a +5040 bet - Will "BIG DRIP" Megill back this weekend?!? vs Noah?!?!? When The 7 Line Army is there?!? - M/F/K any Mets team - Coney Island Brewing x The 7 Line! - The pool is open and more Darren Meenan and Julia Quadrino Live from T7LHQ! RATE, REVIEW, AND SUBSCRIBE. Thank to Coney Island Brewing Company! The official craft beer of Orange and Blue Thing and proud parter of the New York Mets! Visit their portable bar in section 114 at Citi Field, hit up www.coneyislandbeer.com to see where you can pick up some tasty beers, or visit their brewery at the home of the Brooklyn Cyclones in Coney Island! Text “CONEYMETS” to 855-933-4223 to be in the running for (2) free season tickets for 2023 at Citi Field! Hit up www.TickPick.com to grab tickets to your next Mets game! No fees, instantly transferred to your MLB Ballpark App, and hassle free. With ticket prices 10% lower than their largest competitor, they've saved their customers millions.

Men With Mics
Mozart Invented Guitar Hero

Men With Mics

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 54:01


Don Chenz and Casey Drake begin the episode discussing Casey's road trip to his friend's wedding, where he is the best man. Casey also is obsessed with bananas after his recent attendance at the Savannah Bananas baseball game. Later, Chenz goes off about a child prodigy piano player and how classical piano music is not good. The guys later debate which utensil they would get rid of...and do a bizarre MFK along with it. Chenz and Casey also come up with their own version of QAnon. Corners of the Internet include Twitter execs caught saying that Twitter employees are all commies, Adam Schefter's completely unnecessary tweet, and NYC removed its last pay phone booth.   Subscribe to our YouTube channel HERE for full episodes, clips, and bonus content.   DM us @menwithmicspod on Instagram or Twitter with your opinion on this week's Debate the Internet (which utensil would you get rid of) for your chance to win a free sample bottle of Porkslut Hot Sauce and Men With Mics stickers.   Hotline to leave a voicemail to be featured on the show: 908-969-1230.   Follow us on TikTok, Instagram, and Twitter: TikTok - @menwithmicspod IG - @menwithmicspod Twitter - @menwithmicspod   Chenz: TikTok - @don_chenz IG - @don_chenz Twitter - @DonChenz   Casey: TikTok - @kc_aubreygraham IG - @kc_aubreygraham Twitter - @kc_aubreygraham

4 Average Males
Special Guests Mama B & Becki B

4 Average Males

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 112:41


Join hosts Aaron, Jeremy & Josh along with special Guests Mama B & Becki B as we explore another round of MFK, toilet paper getting stuck in your pubes, how to properly reenact American Pie plus many more.

Fess Up!
Fess Up #39: ...At Night!

Fess Up!

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 60:06


In this episode, see what the Fesses are like after hours! Ena and Marissa cause chaos as they stay up past their bedtimes and Amy (of all people!) is forced to try and reign them in! The Fess Girls talk about new animals for Medusa's head, new games for Squid Games: America Edition, and a new genre of soup! Enjoy the experience of Fess Up ...at night!

The Best Ceats Podcast
#83 - Henry Pineda Follows the Flavors of Family

The Best Ceats Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 43:08


Family is everything, and many know that statement to be gospel. I myself am a firm believer in that those you surround yourself with and call family - blood-related or otherwise - help to shape your life. Chef/Owner Henry Pineda of Lola's by MFK in Anaheim, CA has had his career shaped by his family. He is now set to open a new location of his beloved Modern Filipino Kitchen, dedicated to, and inspired by his roots. We sit down to talk about how he nearly left the industry after a devastating 2020, his influences in the kitchen, and how he is incorporating the emerging NFT market into his restaurant.This is a special one.Enjoy!The Best Ceats Podcast brings unprecedented access to the Orange County hospitality industry each and every episode. Bringing you the best stories, and the people behind them with every interview, The Best Ceats Podcast showcases the very best of Southern California's bars, restaurants, and beyond.You can find more information at https://thebestceats.comFollow Host Crawford McCarthy at https://www.instagram.com/thebestceats/To support content like The Best Ceats Podcast, please consider supporting The Best Ceats, at: https://patreon.com/thebestceats To learn more about Ali Coyle, as well as her debut track “Trust Me,” please see her official website: https://alicoylemusic.com To find out more about our sponsors for this episode, please visit the following:https://www.heirloompotager.comhttps://www.lawinefest.comhttps://amass.com

Spinning Unrest Music
S03 E02 - Dudes Enjoying Burritos

Spinning Unrest Music

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 56:06


Today the boys discuss the latest developments in the saga that is Tom Brady's career and also decide whether or not it's time to cancel Netflix. (It's time). They'll also find out exactly how far their respective friend circles have shrunk and see how good they are at guessing someone's occupation from nothing more than a selfie. Final brackets in round one of the Fast Food Championship and a set of MFK's involving a couple sets of the most annoying trios in history. Watch On YouTube: bit.ly/3rCf1Jh Follow/Vote On Instagram: instagram.com/riotatthedogpark Web Site: riotatthedogpark.com Swimming With The Fish - (14:06) Netflix Can Eat A Dick - (17:44) Fast Food Brackets - (24:44) Shrinking Circles - (30:57) Selfie Employed - (35:09) Swimming With The Fish (Update) - (43:51) Marry, F**k, Kill - (45:52)

First Print - Podcast comics de référence
Mutafucast - Chapitre 4 : Mutafukaz Tome 5, ou le danger du burnout

First Print - Podcast comics de référence

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 66:38


Le Mutafucast est de retour !! On vous a fait un peu patienter puisque, vous l'aurez constaté, on a eu énormément d'invités différents en ce début d'année, et parce qu'on tient à chacun de ces podcasts et à ce qu'ils ne se cannibalisent pas trop entre eux, on a préféré mettre notre maxi-série en "pause" juste le temps de pouvoir vous proposer nos autres contenus. Mais à l'heure actuelle, sachez qu'il ne nous reste qu'un seul épisode à enregistrer (sur MFK 2 Tome 1), donc pas d'inquiétude : votre saga Mutafucast va finir dans vos oreilles quoi qu'il en soit !  Un nouveau chapitre du Mutafucast apparaît !  Ce cinquième épisode du Mutafucast vient clore la première grande partie de notre maxi-série, en terminant le tour d'horizon du premier arc de Mutafukaz. On revient donc sur le tome 5 de cette première série, et surtout de tout le contexte de sa création, à l'heure où notre invité, Run, évoque beaucoup de choses (d'un point de vue professionnel autant que personnel) à prendre en compte dans le contexte de création de cet album. Un plongée dans les coulisses qui permet de voir tout ce qui peut arriver lorsqu'on fait de la bande dessinée, et qui rend à notre sens cet épisode, et la conclusion de cet arc, encore plus précieux.   On vous le rappelle, First Print a besoin de votre soutien pour pouvoir exister, il sera donc important que vous partagiez nos émissions si le travail que l'on vous produit vous plaît. Ca ne vous prendra pas beaucoup de temps, et c'est un geste qui, à notre échelle, est primordial. Nous avons toujours une page Tipeee également ouverte si vous voulez participer à rendre le podcast pérenne dans le temps ! Merci encore de votre écoute, et à bientôt pour le prochain épisode !  --  Soutenez nous sur Tipeee : https://fr.tipeee.com/first-print  Ne manquez aucun rendez-vous : https://podcast.ausha.co/firstprintfra  Retrouvez nous sur Facebook : https://facebook.com/FirstPrintFRA  sur Instragram : https://www.instagram.com/firstprintfra  et sur Twitter : https://twitter.com/FirstPrintFRA 

First Print - Podcast comics de référence
Mutafucast - Chapitre 1 : Mutafukaz Tome 1, l'aventure est lancée

First Print - Podcast comics de référence

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2022 56:02


Chose promise, chose due : chaque semaine en ce début d'année, vous allez avoir droit à un nouvel épisode du Mutafucast ! Il s'agit d'une nouvelle mini (maxi ?) série produite avec la complicité du Label 619, dont on fête la venue aux éditions Rue de Sèvres et la sortie du premier tome de MFK 2, le retour de la saga Mutafukaz de Run. Pour accompagner tout cela, ce podcast vous propose de revenir sur toute la saga en compagnie de son créateur. Elle est pas belle la vie ?      Dans les coulisses de Mutafukaz Tome 1  Après le Chapitre 0 qui ouvrait la voie à la création de Mutafukaz avant que le titre n'existe officiellement, ce nouvel épisode (et donc, Chapitre 1) vous invitera à replonger dans le tome 1 de cette aventure, et Run vous explique les choix narratifs qu'il a faits, son rapport au réel qui se déverse dans la bande dessinée, et tout un tas de choses dans une émission qui, on l'espère, vous régalera ! Si c'est le cas ? Faites le savoir. On a besoin de vos retours et de vos partages, pour ce que ce genre d'initiative existe et perdure sur les ondes ! Bonne écoute à vous, et à la semaine prochaine pour la suite !   --  Soutenez nous sur Tipeee : https://fr.tipeee.com/first-print  Ne manquez aucun rendez-vous : https://podcast.ausha.co/firstprintfra  Retrouvez nous sur Facebook : https://facebook.com/FirstPrintFRA  sur Instragram : https://www.instagram.com/firstprintfra  et sur Twitter : https://twitter.com/FirstPrintFRA 

First Print - Podcast comics de référence
Mutafucast - Chapitre 0 : l'avant Mutafukaz

First Print - Podcast comics de référence

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 53:31


Hé non ! Vous ne rêvez pas ! First Print est ravi de vous annoncer une nouvelle collaboration avec le Label 619 ! Si vous aviez apprécié les Chroniques de Doggybags, alors vous êtes au bon endroit pour découvrir cette nouvelle saga audio, le Mutafucast !  Mutafukaz de A à Z  Pour célébrer la sortie du premier tome de MFK 2, nouveau cycle de la longue saga de Run qui démarre aux éditions Rue de Sèvres, toujours avec le Label 619, nous sommes allés à la rencontre de ce dernier pour retracer en long et en large tout l'historique de cette bande dessinée iconique, des touts débuts jusqu'à ce nouveau cycle. C'est cela, le Mutafucast ! On abordera donc le premier acte, mais aussi les différents spin-offs ou encore le film d'animation. Le programme s'annonce chargé, et on commence tout de suite avec ce chapitre zéro dans lequel Run nous conte ses débuts d'artiste et d'où est parti Mutafukaz avant même que le nom soit trouvé.  Au cours de ce podcast, un mystérieux carnet de croquis est évoqué, et nous vous proposons quelques photos prises du dit objet pour que vous puissiez identifier de quoi il s'agit (à retrouver sur notre site) Comme d'habitude, on espère que les efforts que nous faisons pour vous apporter des podcasts de la sorte vous plaisent, et on insiste plus que jamais : ce genre d'entreprise nous demande énormément de travail et si vous souhaitez que ça continue, vos partages sont plus importants que tout ! Partager ces podcasts, c'est à la fois soutenir notre travail, mais aussi mettre en avant celui de nos invités, des auteurs/artistes et des éditeurs qui sortent ces bande dessinées. Vous pouvez soutenir avec un simple geste du doigt, pensez y ! En vous souhaitant une très bonne écoute, on vous dit rendez-vous la semaine prochaine pour la suite du Mutafucast !   --  Soutenez nous sur Tipeee : https://fr.tipeee.com/first-print  Ne manquez aucun rendez-vous : https://podcast.ausha.co/firstprintfra  Retrouvez nous sur Facebook : https://facebook.com/FirstPrintFRA  sur Instragram : https://www.instagram.com/firstprintfra  et sur Twitter : https://twitter.com/FirstPrintFRA 

First Print - Podcast comics de référence
MFK2, Les Sept Secrets, Matrix, Batman : Ego et du Whaf If Spider-Man : les comics VF du moment ! [Back Issues VF

First Print - Podcast comics de référence

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 74:16


Le début d'année 2022 est particulièrement chargé du côté des comics VF, avec plusieurs lancements très attendus, notamment d'un point de vue production française (dont on va parler quand même parce qu'on ne se ferme jamais les portes à un peu plus de diversité), mais aussi du côté plus classique des super-héros. Aussi, on vous donne rendez-vous dans une nouvelle émission du format Back Issues !   Les comics VF du début d'année !  Avec la venue imminente de The Batman, plusieurs titres autour du Chevalier Noir ressortent chez Urban Comics, dont un petit chef d'oeuvre d'un certain Darwyn Cooke qu'on ne pouvait laisser passer. Mais l'indé se porte là aussi toujours bien sous nos latitudes, avec des comics Matrix qui ressortent en intégrale, la nouvelle série Les Sept Secrets de Tom Taylor qui fait irruption chez Delcourt, une touche de Panini avec le What If piloté par Chip Zdarsky, et surtout le retour très attendu de Run sur l'univers de Mutafukaz avec MFK 2, qui marque le lancement du Label 619 aux éditions Rue de Sèvres. Bref, un programme diversifié pour vous parler bande dessinée de toutes sortes, on espère que vous apprécierez !  Si c'est le cas, n'hésitez pas à le faire savoir, à réagir dans l'espace commentaire du site et sur nos réseaux sociaux, mais aussi en partageant ces podcasts le plus loin possible, ou en contribuant sur notre petite page Tipeee. Quel que soit le geste que vous puissiez faire ou le temps que vous nous accordiez, il sera bénéfique au final pour la longévité de ce podcast. Très bonne écoute et à bientôt pour la suite des hostilités !  Le programme  Les liens vous renvoient chez notre partenaire Comics Zone. Une commande chez eux marquera votre soutien à un libraire indépendant, et nous filera aussi un petit coup de pouce !  Batman : Ego - 01:18 Spider-Man : l'Ombre du Symbiote - 15:30 Matrix : l'intégrale des comics - 27:35 Les Sept Secrets tome 1 - 38:22 MFK 2 Tome 1 - 51:14  --  Soutenez nous sur Tipeee : https://fr.tipeee.com/first-print  Ne manquez aucun rendez-vous : https://podcast.ausha.co/firstprintfra  Retrouvez nous sur Facebook : https://facebook.com/FirstPrintFRA  sur Instragram : https://www.instagram.com/firstprintfra  et sur Twitter : https://twitter.com/FirstPrintFRA 

Bad Dirty Fun
Episode 153 - MFK Janice Soprano, Peggy Hill, Lois Wilkerson

Bad Dirty Fun

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 70:18


Chris enters the playoffs with an 11 game lead over John, who is not mathematically eliminated. Chris is your BDF 2021/22 NFL Picks Champion. Hazzaaa!! Anyways, we still have the playoffs. Plus we talk wrestling and some fun MFK situations.

Football on the 40
E6: Mid-Season Report Card

Football on the 40

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 67:58


This week, we begin with a recap of another demoralizing loss from the Longhorns, concluding the segment with our MFK's for this week. Andrew then takes us through another Legendary Longhorn Moments segment, followed by a mid-season assessment of the program with Jake & Andrew playing "good cop" and Bowen & Kevin playing "bad cop" of our season so far. We wrap-up that segment with our grades of the offense, defense, and special teams. Finally, we end this week's episode with another segment of Gambling Corner, with Bowen returning as host amid high tensions following Kevin's huge, risky bet while Bowen was gone last week. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

This Is Happening with Mark Zito and Ryan Sampson
MFK/Taylor Swift & Politics/Thank You Notes/Aaron Lewis

This Is Happening with Mark Zito and Ryan Sampson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 52:31


Mark and Ryan talk about the weird way Ryan plays MFK, Taylor Swift's quasi-involvement with a Virginia election, random thank you notes, and a new song from Aaron Lewis.

Wasted Potential
Episode 22 - We Hate Portland (Zanky spotlight)

Wasted Potential

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 46:34


Sorry for the hiatus, Pat had some surgery, Max finished moving, and we just hate our fans. But seriously thank you to everyone checking in on us and asking when the next episode was coming, it's finally here! We (mostly Pat) bitches about Portland and State Theatre, some fantasy football talk, serial killers, and of course, our esteemed MFK segment. Check out our spotlight, Zanky, on instagram @zankyofficial for all your EDM remixes. He is a very talented artist who takes a lot of time creating his songs, so show him so love.

F-Buddies with Mike & Andy
Episode 006 - Sandwiches (F-Buddies with Mike & Andy)

F-Buddies with Mike & Andy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 73:10


This week on F-Buddies, Mike Wendt and Andy Ferg some spots for sandwiches, where to eat in Disney World, strip club pizza, and Andy's bad experience out eating. Plus, a Letterkenny version of M-F-K. As always, with these F-BUDDIES, the F is for Food! Special THANKS to Paddy Kellys of Peabody for sponsoring this week's episode. Thanks to the very talented Mark DiChiara for the original F-Buddies theme music.

Wasted Potential
Episode 21 - Robo Pat

Wasted Potential

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 44:14


Pat finally peaked and has to get surgery, sports are still wild, and "yo mother" are still in. Bit of a discrepancy with the MFK but we don't think the FBI is listening anyway. As always, big shoutout to Walk the Plank art for not wasting his potential as an artist. Book your pieces with him on IG for any upcoming birthdays, anniversaries, or parole hearings. Thanks for all the love!

Wasted Potential
Episode 20 - Ben Baker Music

Wasted Potential

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 45:55


Do you like making new friends? Neither do we. You can find out why this episode along with understanding how long you have to wait to make a joke about something, coming back to the real world, and, of course, another MFK. BIG SHOUTOUT to @ben_bakermusic on instagram on this episode's spotlight.