Podcasts about wirecutter

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  • 136PODCASTS
  • 212EPISODES
  • 55mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 18, 2022LATEST
wirecutter

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Best podcasts about wirecutter

Latest podcast episodes about wirecutter

My First Million
Brainstorming The Best Business Ideas To Start In 2022 with Noah Kagan

My First Million

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 78:31


Sam Parr (@theSamParr) and is joined by Noah Kagan (@NoahKagan) to discuss the most profitable businesses on AppSumo, the best business ideas to start in 2022, businesses you can start with zero startup costs, and much more.  _____ * Do you love MFM and want to see Sam and Shaan's smiling faces? Subscribe to our Youtube channel. * Want more insights like MFM? Check out Shaan's newsletter. _____ Show Notes: (00:30) - TheColdPlunge.com (04:15) - OkDork.com (05:55) - How to grow a YouTube channel (10:45) - TikTok vs YouTube (13:50) - Chrome extension businesses (22:20) - What Mint.com did wrong (32:45) - How to become "Wirecutter for the end of the world" (34:10) - One person businesses and businesses with zero startup costs (34:40) - The best selling AppSumo app of all time (49:30) - Noah's yearly and monthly reviews (54:17) - Best buys under $100 ----- Past guests on My First Million include Rob Dyrdek, Hasan Minhaj, Balaji Srinivasan, Jake Paul, Dr. Andrew Huberman, Gary Vee, Lance Armstrong, Sophia Amoruso, Ariel Helwani, Ramit Sethi, Stanley Druckenmiller, Peter Diamandis, Dharmesh Shah, Brian Halligan, Marc Lore, Jason Calacanis, Andrew Wilkinson, Julian Shapiro, Kat Cole, Codie Sanchez, Nader Al-Naji, Steph Smith, Trung Phan, Nick Huber, Anthony Pompliano, Ben Askren, Ramon Van Meer, Brianne Kimmel, Andrew Gazdecki, Scott Belsky, Moiz Ali, Dan Held, Elaine Zelby, Michael Saylor, Ryan Begelman, Jack Butcher, Reed Duchscher, Tai Lopez, Harley Finkelstein, Alexa von Tobel, Noah Kagan, Nick Bare, Greg Isenberg, James Altucher, Randy Hetrick and more. ----- Additional episodes you might enjoy: • #224 Rob Dyrdek - How Tracking Every Second of His Life Took Rob Drydek from 0 to $405M in Exits • #209 Gary Vaynerchuk - Why NFTS Are the Future • #178 Balaji Srinivasan - Balaji on How to Fix the Media, Cloud Cities & Crypto #169 - How One Man Started 5, Billion Dollar Companies, Dan Gilbert's Empire, & Talking With Warren Buffett • ​​​​#218 - Why You Should Take a Think Week Like Bill Gates • Dave Portnoy vs The World, Extreme Body Monitoring, The Future of Apparel Retail, "How Much is Anthony Pompliano Worth?", and More • How Mr Beast Got 100M Views in Less Than 4 Days, The $25M Chrome Extension, and More

Coaching for Leaders
563: When You Need to Fire Someone, with Alisa Cohn

Coaching for Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 33:33


Alisa Cohn: From Start-Up to Grown-Up Alisa Cohn has been named the Top Startup Coach in the World by the Thinkers50 Marshall Goldsmith Global Coaches Awards and has been coaching startup founders to grow into world-class CEOs for nearly 20 years. She was named the number one “Global Guru” of startups in 2021, and has worked with startup companies such as Venmo, Etsy, DraftKings, The Wirecutter, Mack Weldon, and Tory Burch. She has also coached CEOs and C-Suite executives at enterprise clients such as Dell, Hitachi, Sony, IBM, Google, and many more. Marshall Goldsmith selected Alisa as one of his Marshall Goldsmith 100 Coaches – a gathering of the top coaches in the world – and Inc. named Alisa one of the top 100 leadership speakers. Her articles have appeared in Harvard Business Review, Forbes, and Inc. and she has been featured as an expert on Bloomberg TV, the BBC World News and in The New York Times. She is the author of From Start-Up to Grown-Up: Grow Your Leadership to Grow Your Business*. In this conversation, Alisa and I discuss the difficult reality that most leaders need to face: saying goodbye to an employee. We detail the mindset you need in preparation for letting someone go. Alisa also helps us with specific language that will help you follow-though on a conversation and help everybody move on — and move forward. Key Points Our human tendency is often to side-step problems that we need to address. By the time you take action to fire somebody, you are likely months late. Just because someone was effective in the role previously (or in the last role) doesn't mean their role is right for them today. It's helpful to be prescriptive in conversations leading up to firing on exactly your expectations — and the actions the other party has agreed to. There's no way to fire someone without it being awkward and painful. You'll need to make peace with that before you take action. Resources Mentioned From Start-Up to Grown-Up: Grow Your Leadership to Grow Your Business* by Alisa Cohn Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Challenge Directly and Care Personally, with Kim Scott (episode 302) How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) How to Balance Care and Accountability When Leading Remotely, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 464) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

Prime Venture Partners Podcast
#81 How Founders Can Identify Blind Spots, Have Difficult Conversations and Give Productive Feedback with Startup & CEO Coach Alisa Cohn

Prime Venture Partners Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 37:56


Alisa Cohn Startup & CEO Coach chats with Amit Somani, Managing Partner Prime Venture Partners.Alisa Cohn has been coaching startup founders to grow into world-class CEOs for nearly 20 years. She is the author of From Start-Up to Grown-Up.  A onetime startup CFO, strategy consultant, and current angel investor and advisor, she was named the number one “Global Guru” of startups in 2021, and has worked with startup companies such as Venmo, Etsy, DraftKings, The Wirecutter, Mack Weldon, and Tory Burch. She has also coached CEOs and C-Suite executives at enterprise clients such as  Dell, Hitachi, Sony, IBM, Google, Microsoft, Bloomberg, The New York Times, and Calvin Klein.Listen to the podcast to learn about01:30 - Self-Evaluating as a Founder 05:00 - Blind Spots & 360 Degree Feedback13:40 - When do You Need a Coach19:40 - Imposter Syndrome & Journaling27:00 - How to Use Positive feedback & Radical Candor33:00 - Practicing self-care as a FounderClick here to read the full transcriptEnjoyed listening to a world class startup coach? Next, listen to a World Cup-winning coach  who helped the Indian Cricket Team win the ICC trophy. Right from the cricketing field, Paddy Upton provides valuable insights for entrepreneurs on personal motivation, mental fitness, mental agility, overcoming fear and cultivating the will to learn. He also talks about the nuances of team building, the characteristics of a great leader, how to make a team work, and the secret to picking people for leadership positions. Enjoyed the podcast? Please consider leaving a review on Apple Podcasts and subscribe wherever you are listening to this.Follow Prime Venture Partners:Twitter: https://twitter.com/Primevp_inLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/primevp/ This podcast is for you. Do let us know what you like about the podcast, what you don't like, the guests you'd like to have on the podcast and the topics you'd like us to cover in future episodes. Please share your feedback here: https://primevp.in/podcastfeedback

POOG with Kate Berlant and Jacqueline Novak

Christmas is upon us. Kate overslept and makes coffee on air. Jacqueline shames no one for lateness. The hags realize what they've become. They reflect on the shocking bounty of a promotional package they both received. Jacqueline has a new idea for seducing brands. Tata Harper, Soko Glam, Missha, Lubriderm and Dove are discussed. Kate purchased a new couch and contemplates another big purchase. Wirecutter versus Strategist. Jacqueline has an EZ pass joke. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Notnerd Podcast: Tech Better
Episode 312: Blue Bubble People

Notnerd Podcast: Tech Better

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 41:21


To start the podcast, we are joined by two special guests for some long-awaited, hot vacuum talk! After that, we get into our usual round-up of tech news, tips, and picks. Enjoy! Vacuum Round-Up: (00:40) Wyze Handheld Vacuum  Wyze Cordless Vacuum  World's Smallest Vacuum eufy by Anker, HomeVac H11,Cordless Handheld Vacuum Cleaner,Ultra-Lightweight 1.2lbs,5500Pa Suction Power,USB Charging, for Home Cleaning eufy by Anker, BoostIQ RoboVac 11S (Slim), Robot Vacuum Cleaner, Super-Thin, 1300Pa Strong Suction, Quiet, Self-Charging Robotic Vacuum Cleaner, Cleans Hard Floors to Medium-Pile Carpets Followup:   Wirecutter union goes on strike for Black Friday (12:20) Tile is selling to Life360 (16:50) Cryptominers in Kazakhstan causing electricity shortages (18:50) Dave's Pro Tip of the Week: What's taking up space on my hard drive? Disk Inventory X (20:20) Takes:  Apple sues NSO Group (26:55) AT&T and Verizon limiting 5G signal due to aircraft signal concerns (29:00) Google Messages will soon show iMessage reactions as emoji (29:50) Bonus Odd Take: Iceberger (31:15) Picks of the Week:  Dave: All-new Kindle Paperwhite 8 GB – Now with a 6.8" display and adjustable warm light - All-new Fire HD 10 tablet, 10.1", 1080p Full HD, 32 GB, latest model (2021 release), Olive (34:35) Nate: Philips Norelco Multigroomer All-in-One Trimmer Series 3000, 13 Piece Mens Grooming Kit, for Beard, Face, Nose, and Ear Hair Trimmer and Hair Clipper, NO Blade Oil Needed, MG3750/60 (37:00) Find us elsewhere: https://www.notnerd.com https://ratethispodcast.com/notnerd https://www.tiktok.com/@notnerdpod https://www.twitter.com/n0tnerd/ https://www.instagram.com/n0tnerd https://www.facebook.com/n0tnerd/ info@Notnerd.com Call or text 608.618.NERD(6373) If you would like to help support Notnerd financially, mentally, or physically, please contact us via any of the methods above. Consider any product/app links to be affiliate links.

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología
Es más complicado de lo que parece

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 14:55


Seúl se mete en el metaverso / eBay verificará el calzado deportivo / Twitter contra las fotos privadas / Sube el precio de las batería de coches / Sindicato de Twitcheros Patrocinador: Esta Navidad protege los ordenadores de tus seres queridos con menos habilidades informáticas instalándoles el antivirus de nueva generación de Panda Security https://www.pandasecurity.com/es/, un Brand Watchguard. Cuesta muy poco asegurarte de que siempre tienen navegación web segura, sistemas anti-phising y anti-ransomware, y mucho más. Seúl se mete en el metaverso / eBay verificará el calzado deportivo / Twitter contra las fotos privadas / Sube el precio de las batería de coches / Sindicato de Twitcheros

Consumer Talk with Michael Finney
Michael Finney: November 27, 2021: What IS the Supply Chain?

Consumer Talk with Michael Finney

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 13:33


Nathan Burrow, deals editor with Wirecutter answers, "What exactly is the global supply chain and why should you care? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Revolutions Per Minute - Radio from the New York City Democratic Socialists of America

Working class struggle continues to spread across New York City and the rest of the country. Wirecutter workers at the New York Times have launched their strike, joining the 3,000 Columbia academic workers on the picket line. 14,000 Kroger workers in Houston have authorized a strike while 24,000 academic workers at the University of California have done the same. Rank-n-file reform slate Teamsters United won a sea-changing victory in leadership elections. New leadership has promised more labor militancy and committed the 1.3 million member union to organizing Amazon facilities and drivers across the country. Earlier this month the New York Taxi Workers Alliance declared victory after a hunger strike forced the city government to acquiesce to their demand to cancel millions in debt and restructure their loan. We're joined by Jaslin Kaur and Augustine to hear about this fight and what it means for working class New Yorkers. Last week a Wisconsin court allowed Kyle Rittenhouse to walk free despite the fact that he shot, wounded, and killed protesters in Kenosha. We'll play you sounds from the streets as protesters reacted to this injustice here in Brooklyn.

TWiT Bits (Video HD)
TWiG Clip: Wirecutter Boycott For Black Friday

TWiT Bits (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 4:20


On This Week in Google, Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, and Stacey Higginbotham discuss the reasons behind the growing calls for a boycott of New York Times' Wirecutter on Black Friday later in the week. Subscribe and watch the full 'This Week in Google' podcast: https://twit.tv/twig/639 Hosts: Leo Laporte, Stacey Higginbotham, and Jeff Jarvis You can find more about TWiT and subscribe to our podcasts at https://podcasts.twit.tv/

TWiT Bits (MP3)
TWiG Clip: Wirecutter Boycott For Black Friday

TWiT Bits (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 4:18


On This Week in Google, Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, and Stacey Higginbotham discuss the reasons behind the growing calls for a boycott of New York Times' Wirecutter on Black Friday later in the week. Subscribe and watch the full 'This Week in Google' podcast: https://twit.tv/twig/639 Hosts: Leo Laporte, Stacey Higginbotham, and Jeff Jarvis You can find more about TWiT and subscribe to our podcasts at https://podcasts.twit.tv/

TWiT Bits (Video HI)
TWiG Clip: Wirecutter Boycott For Black Friday

TWiT Bits (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 4:20


On This Week in Google, Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, and Stacey Higginbotham discuss the reasons behind the growing calls for a boycott of New York Times' Wirecutter on Black Friday later in the week. Subscribe and watch the full 'This Week in Google' podcast: https://twit.tv/twig/639 Hosts: Leo Laporte, Stacey Higginbotham, and Jeff Jarvis You can find more about TWiT and subscribe to our podcasts at https://podcasts.twit.tv/

This Week in Google (Video HI)
TWiG 639: The Turducken of Cakes - Investing in creators vs. debt, Wirecutter boycott, end of call to cancel

This Week in Google (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 149:06


Investing in creators vs debt, Wirecutter boycott, end of call to cancel Slow Ventures. A Former Facebook VP Thinks Investing in Humans Is the Future of VC. Investing Directly in People Is the Future of VC. Here's How to Do It. Life Capital 2021: The Future of The Professional Creator Ecosystem. Wirecutter Thanksgiving strike and boycott is on. Citadel CEO Kenneth Griffin Outbid a Group of Crypto Investors for Copy of U.S. Constitution. Niantic raises $300M at a $9B valuation to build the 'real-world metaverse' Mouse jigglers are a thing. Pokemon Go Creator Niantic Launches Bitcoin-Hunting AR Game. The end of "click to subscribe, call to cancel"? One of the news industry's favorite retention tactics is illegal, FTC says. A Robot Wrote This Book Review. The unbearable fussiness of the smart home. Locked out of "God mode," runners are hacking their treadmills. Google Pixel 6a will run on a Tensor chip, but a lesser camera than Pixel 6. Android Auto and Pixel 6 won't play nice, but Google is working on a fix. The Pixel 5 could have actually been good if Google's chip plans had worked out. iMessage Reactions Will No Longer Annoy Android Users Thanks to Emoji Change. Google Store Black Friday 2021 deals are now live in the US, Canada, Europe, Australia Google Stadia is celebrating its second birthday with hardware for free or cheap You can now pre-order the 2nd-gen Pixel Stand from Google, ships next month Samsung to Choose Taylor, Texas, for $17 Billion Chip-Making Factory. Casper's return to private life isn't a canary for DTC companies going public. Jeff Jarvis: The Times treats an iPhone as a luxury. I hate to break it to them, but I think many people would say that these days a subscription to The Times is a luxury. Jay Last, One of the Rebels Who Founded Silicon Valley, Dies at 92. Picks: Stacey - Thanksgiving Piecaken. Jeff - What is your state's favorite Thanksgiving dish? Google shares popular searches in the US. Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, and Stacey Higginbotham Guest: Sam Lessin Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: akamai.com/twig UserWay.org/twit andela.com/for-companies

This Week in Google (MP3)
TWiG 639: The Turducken of Cakes - Investing in creators vs. debt, Wirecutter boycott, end of call to cancel

This Week in Google (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 148:24


Investing in creators vs debt, Wirecutter boycott, end of call to cancel Slow Ventures. A Former Facebook VP Thinks Investing in Humans Is the Future of VC. Investing Directly in People Is the Future of VC. Here's How to Do It. Life Capital 2021: The Future of The Professional Creator Ecosystem. Wirecutter Thanksgiving strike and boycott is on. Citadel CEO Kenneth Griffin Outbid a Group of Crypto Investors for Copy of U.S. Constitution. Niantic raises $300M at a $9B valuation to build the 'real-world metaverse' Mouse jigglers are a thing. Pokemon Go Creator Niantic Launches Bitcoin-Hunting AR Game. The end of "click to subscribe, call to cancel"? One of the news industry's favorite retention tactics is illegal, FTC says. A Robot Wrote This Book Review. The unbearable fussiness of the smart home. Locked out of "God mode," runners are hacking their treadmills. Google Pixel 6a will run on a Tensor chip, but a lesser camera than Pixel 6. Android Auto and Pixel 6 won't play nice, but Google is working on a fix. The Pixel 5 could have actually been good if Google's chip plans had worked out. iMessage Reactions Will No Longer Annoy Android Users Thanks to Emoji Change. Google Store Black Friday 2021 deals are now live in the US, Canada, Europe, Australia Google Stadia is celebrating its second birthday with hardware for free or cheap You can now pre-order the 2nd-gen Pixel Stand from Google, ships next month Samsung to Choose Taylor, Texas, for $17 Billion Chip-Making Factory. Casper's return to private life isn't a canary for DTC companies going public. Jeff Jarvis: The Times treats an iPhone as a luxury. I hate to break it to them, but I think many people would say that these days a subscription to The Times is a luxury. Jay Last, One of the Rebels Who Founded Silicon Valley, Dies at 92. Picks: Stacey - Thanksgiving Piecaken. Jeff - What is your state's favorite Thanksgiving dish? Google shares popular searches in the US. Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, and Stacey Higginbotham Guest: Sam Lessin Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: akamai.com/twig UserWay.org/twit andela.com/for-companies

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
This Week in Google 639: The Turducken of Cakes

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 149:06


Investing in creators vs debt, Wirecutter boycott, end of call to cancel Slow Ventures. A Former Facebook VP Thinks Investing in Humans Is the Future of VC. Investing Directly in People Is the Future of VC. Here's How to Do It. Life Capital 2021: The Future of The Professional Creator Ecosystem. Wirecutter Thanksgiving strike and boycott is on. Citadel CEO Kenneth Griffin Outbid a Group of Crypto Investors for Copy of U.S. Constitution. Niantic raises $300M at a $9B valuation to build the 'real-world metaverse' Mouse jigglers are a thing. Pokemon Go Creator Niantic Launches Bitcoin-Hunting AR Game. The end of "click to subscribe, call to cancel"? One of the news industry's favorite retention tactics is illegal, FTC says. A Robot Wrote This Book Review. The unbearable fussiness of the smart home. Locked out of "God mode," runners are hacking their treadmills. Google Pixel 6a will run on a Tensor chip, but a lesser camera than Pixel 6. Android Auto and Pixel 6 won't play nice, but Google is working on a fix. The Pixel 5 could have actually been good if Google's chip plans had worked out. iMessage Reactions Will No Longer Annoy Android Users Thanks to Emoji Change. Google Store Black Friday 2021 deals are now live in the US, Canada, Europe, Australia Google Stadia is celebrating its second birthday with hardware for free or cheap You can now pre-order the 2nd-gen Pixel Stand from Google, ships next month Samsung to Choose Taylor, Texas, for $17 Billion Chip-Making Factory. Casper's return to private life isn't a canary for DTC companies going public. Jeff Jarvis: The Times treats an iPhone as a luxury. I hate to break it to them, but I think many people would say that these days a subscription to The Times is a luxury. Jay Last, One of the Rebels Who Founded Silicon Valley, Dies at 92. Picks: Stacey - Thanksgiving Piecaken. Jeff - What is your state's favorite Thanksgiving dish? Google shares popular searches in the US. Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, and Stacey Higginbotham Guest: Sam Lessin Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: akamai.com/twig UserWay.org/twit andela.com/for-companies

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
This Week in Google 639: The Turducken of Cakes

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 148:24


Investing in creators vs debt, Wirecutter boycott, end of call to cancel Slow Ventures. A Former Facebook VP Thinks Investing in Humans Is the Future of VC. Investing Directly in People Is the Future of VC. Here's How to Do It. Life Capital 2021: The Future of The Professional Creator Ecosystem. Wirecutter Thanksgiving strike and boycott is on. Citadel CEO Kenneth Griffin Outbid a Group of Crypto Investors for Copy of U.S. Constitution. Niantic raises $300M at a $9B valuation to build the 'real-world metaverse' Mouse jigglers are a thing. Pokemon Go Creator Niantic Launches Bitcoin-Hunting AR Game. The end of "click to subscribe, call to cancel"? One of the news industry's favorite retention tactics is illegal, FTC says. A Robot Wrote This Book Review. The unbearable fussiness of the smart home. Locked out of "God mode," runners are hacking their treadmills. Google Pixel 6a will run on a Tensor chip, but a lesser camera than Pixel 6. Android Auto and Pixel 6 won't play nice, but Google is working on a fix. The Pixel 5 could have actually been good if Google's chip plans had worked out. iMessage Reactions Will No Longer Annoy Android Users Thanks to Emoji Change. Google Store Black Friday 2021 deals are now live in the US, Canada, Europe, Australia Google Stadia is celebrating its second birthday with hardware for free or cheap You can now pre-order the 2nd-gen Pixel Stand from Google, ships next month Samsung to Choose Taylor, Texas, for $17 Billion Chip-Making Factory. Casper's return to private life isn't a canary for DTC companies going public. Jeff Jarvis: The Times treats an iPhone as a luxury. I hate to break it to them, but I think many people would say that these days a subscription to The Times is a luxury. Jay Last, One of the Rebels Who Founded Silicon Valley, Dies at 92. Picks: Stacey - Thanksgiving Piecaken. Jeff - What is your state's favorite Thanksgiving dish? Google shares popular searches in the US. Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, and Stacey Higginbotham Guest: Sam Lessin Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: akamai.com/twig UserWay.org/twit andela.com/for-companies

Radio Leo (Audio)
This Week in Google 639: The Turducken of Cakes

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 148:24


Investing in creators vs debt, Wirecutter boycott, end of call to cancel Slow Ventures. A Former Facebook VP Thinks Investing in Humans Is the Future of VC. Investing Directly in People Is the Future of VC. Here's How to Do It. Life Capital 2021: The Future of The Professional Creator Ecosystem. Wirecutter Thanksgiving strike and boycott is on. Citadel CEO Kenneth Griffin Outbid a Group of Crypto Investors for Copy of U.S. Constitution. Niantic raises $300M at a $9B valuation to build the 'real-world metaverse' Mouse jigglers are a thing. Pokemon Go Creator Niantic Launches Bitcoin-Hunting AR Game. The end of "click to subscribe, call to cancel"? One of the news industry's favorite retention tactics is illegal, FTC says. A Robot Wrote This Book Review. The unbearable fussiness of the smart home. Locked out of "God mode," runners are hacking their treadmills. Google Pixel 6a will run on a Tensor chip, but a lesser camera than Pixel 6. Android Auto and Pixel 6 won't play nice, but Google is working on a fix. The Pixel 5 could have actually been good if Google's chip plans had worked out. iMessage Reactions Will No Longer Annoy Android Users Thanks to Emoji Change. Google Store Black Friday 2021 deals are now live in the US, Canada, Europe, Australia Google Stadia is celebrating its second birthday with hardware for free or cheap You can now pre-order the 2nd-gen Pixel Stand from Google, ships next month Samsung to Choose Taylor, Texas, for $17 Billion Chip-Making Factory. Casper's return to private life isn't a canary for DTC companies going public. Jeff Jarvis: The Times treats an iPhone as a luxury. I hate to break it to them, but I think many people would say that these days a subscription to The Times is a luxury. Jay Last, One of the Rebels Who Founded Silicon Valley, Dies at 92. Picks: Stacey - Thanksgiving Piecaken. Jeff - What is your state's favorite Thanksgiving dish? Google shares popular searches in the US. Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, and Stacey Higginbotham Guest: Sam Lessin Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: akamai.com/twig UserWay.org/twit andela.com/for-companies

Radio Leo (Video HD)
This Week in Google 639: The Turducken of Cakes

Radio Leo (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 149:06


Investing in creators vs debt, Wirecutter boycott, end of call to cancel Slow Ventures. A Former Facebook VP Thinks Investing in Humans Is the Future of VC. Investing Directly in People Is the Future of VC. Here's How to Do It. Life Capital 2021: The Future of The Professional Creator Ecosystem. Wirecutter Thanksgiving strike and boycott is on. Citadel CEO Kenneth Griffin Outbid a Group of Crypto Investors for Copy of U.S. Constitution. Niantic raises $300M at a $9B valuation to build the 'real-world metaverse' Mouse jigglers are a thing. Pokemon Go Creator Niantic Launches Bitcoin-Hunting AR Game. The end of "click to subscribe, call to cancel"? One of the news industry's favorite retention tactics is illegal, FTC says. A Robot Wrote This Book Review. The unbearable fussiness of the smart home. Locked out of "God mode," runners are hacking their treadmills. Google Pixel 6a will run on a Tensor chip, but a lesser camera than Pixel 6. Android Auto and Pixel 6 won't play nice, but Google is working on a fix. The Pixel 5 could have actually been good if Google's chip plans had worked out. iMessage Reactions Will No Longer Annoy Android Users Thanks to Emoji Change. Google Store Black Friday 2021 deals are now live in the US, Canada, Europe, Australia Google Stadia is celebrating its second birthday with hardware for free or cheap You can now pre-order the 2nd-gen Pixel Stand from Google, ships next month Samsung to Choose Taylor, Texas, for $17 Billion Chip-Making Factory. Casper's return to private life isn't a canary for DTC companies going public. Jeff Jarvis: The Times treats an iPhone as a luxury. I hate to break it to them, but I think many people would say that these days a subscription to The Times is a luxury. Jay Last, One of the Rebels Who Founded Silicon Valley, Dies at 92. Picks: Stacey - Thanksgiving Piecaken. Jeff - What is your state's favorite Thanksgiving dish? Google shares popular searches in the US. Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, and Stacey Higginbotham Guest: Sam Lessin Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: akamai.com/twig UserWay.org/twit andela.com/for-companies

The Rebound
368: E is for Enjoy Black Friday

The Rebound

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 37:16


Apple hits back at the Pegasus spyware makers and there's a problem with Black Friday.Apple and Amazon have been fined by the Italian government.Apple is suing the NSO group.If you're too lazy to read the whole EULA, this site grades them.Jacqui Cheng explains how not to cross the Wirecutter picket line.The Analogue Pocket is a portable gaming device that plays Game Boy cartridges and others. Mark Gurman has some rumors on what's up with Apple's car initiative.If you want to help out the show and get some great bonus content, consider becoming a Rebound Prime member! Just go to prime.reboundcast.com to check it out!You can now also support the show by buying our EXCLUSIVE shirt! Tim says GOOOOD MORNNNNING to all listeners of The Rebound! (Prime members, check your email for a special deal on the shirt.)

GeekNights with Rym + Scott
GeekNights 20211123 - Holiday Gaming Gift Guide 2021

GeekNights with Rym + Scott

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021


Tonight on GeekNights, we bring you our 2021 Holiday Gaming Gift Guide. What should you buy for that gamer you know? Our list might surprise you. In the news, the Legend of Zelda Game & Watch is a huge step above the Mario one, Epic Games has acquired Harmonix, and don't cross the Wirecutter picket line.

News Du Jour
Monday, November 22nd 2021

News Du Jour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 14:33


Today on News Du Jour, we cover Austria's nation-wide vaccine mandate, Wirecutter's Black Friday strike against the NYT, the $2 billion Astroworld lawsuit, and mini stories on "water spouts" in Sicily / Kyle Rittenhouse's acquittal. Reach out to our sponsor, Bolt investments! Be sure to tell them we sent you: https://www.boltig.com — BECOME A PATRON OF OUR PODCAST: www.patreon.com/sugarfreemedia Wear our merch! www.sugarfreemedia.co/shop Connect with us: + EMAIL: team@sugarfreemedia.co + WEBSITE + SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER: www.sugarfreemedia.co + INSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/sugarfreemedia.co + TIKTOK: www.TikTok.com/@sugarfreemedia + TWITTER: www.twitter.com/sugarfree_media ☕️ News Du Jour is a short daily news recap. We condense each day's stories into a 10-15 minute format and always relay the stories in a calm, digestible format. We cover everything from politics, to fashion, to art, to business, to tech, to celebrity, to world news and more. Be sure to subscribe so you to stay up to date with day-to-day unfolding news stories. ☕️ If you enjoy the News Du Jour, be sure to leave us a review/rating! We would also REALLY appreciate you sharing our podcast with your friends/ family/ colleagues or via all your favorite social media platforms.You can also always READ the News Du Jour on our website at: https://sugarfreemedia.co/category/news-du-jour/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/newsdujour/support

The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast
Fast-track Facebook Sales Acceleration

The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 30:49


Kevin Urrutia is Founder of Voy Media, a “growth marketing agency” focused on helping marketing executives grow their online businesses – but not from the “ground up.” Voy Media does not help companies that want to get started in online marketing, build clients' businesses, or act as any client's marketing team. Instead, the focus is on scaling successful client companies and taking them to the next level, moving them from 6 to 7 to 8 figures in monthly sales . . . and doing it fast. These clients already know what they need to do to build a business and they're doing it. They already have mature systems and processes in place for emailing prospective buyers and getting online content and reviews. Voy takes this collected information, breaks it down, and uses it to feed the creation of new ads, new videos, and new images for clients' social media – their already existing Facebook pages, Google Ads, and LinkedIn, Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter, and TikTok accounts. Kevin's background is in computer programming. During college, he started a web development consulting company. After he graduated, he moved to Silicon Valley to work for Mint.com (Intuit). In that fevered e-commerce boom era (global e-commerce sales topped $1 trillion in 2012, up 21.9% from the previous year), “I kept building things. I kept going to hackathon startup events.” Frustratingly, all that “building” and networking did not result in sales.  Then Kevin discovered “marketing.” He researched SEO, found it “interesting,” and concluded that “Everything around you is really marketing, but it's great marketing when you don't think it's marketing.” He jumped to a startup called Zaarly, and then moved to New York and did what none of his programming buddies wanted to do: He started starting his own businesses. His buddies wanted “jobs.” He wanted to own something bigger and was willing to take the risk. Kevin started an online-scheduled cleaning company. and thereafter, a number of e-commerce companies, learning the lessons on switching products to drive sales and growing teams that he, today, passes on to his clients.  In this interview, Kevin discusses how the recent iOS update, iOS 14, allows individuals to turn off tracking and limits a lot of ad options that used to be available for advertisers. Now, instead of looking at the individual platforms to get information, companies must ask the questions: “How much revenue did we make from new customers this week? How much did we spend on ads? What is the ratio between new customer revenue with ad spend?” Kevin says things are more “fluffy” in one sense, but companies do have a better grasp on their profitability. He says, “People are actually building brands again, versus like, ‘Hey I just want to make quick buck online.'”  That's a good thing, he believes, because “Building a real business takes years.” Companies need to “reinvest into the branding. You got to reinvest into ads, copy, photography.” Kevin can be reached social platforms and on his agency's website at: https://voymedia.com/ where you will find case studies, courses, and Kevin's blog. Transcript follows: ROB: Welcome to The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast. I'm your host, Rob Kischuk, and I am joined today by Kevin Urrutia, founder at Voy Media, based in New York City. Welcome to the podcast, Kevin.  KEVIN: Hey, Rob. Thanks for having me. Super excited to be here.  ROB: Great to have you on the cast. Why don't you start off by giving us an intro to Voy Media. What do you want to be known for?  KEVIN: Voy Media . . . we're growth marketing agency. Pretty typical, but the difference between us and other agencies is my background is in computer science programming. We'll talk about a little bit more of that later on. The way we help founders is by we come in to help you scale. We're not here to help you get started in online marketing. That's a different type of agency. We're more here for founders or other marketing executives that want help to grow their online business with Facebook, Twitter, Instagram. Creatives are also a big part. We're doing that now with the whole new iOS update and we're seen trying to switch around and again restructure agency to fit the market's needs too. ROB: (Laughs) I see. So, this is not, “I have an idea. I want to get the word out there.” This is “I know who my customer is but help me because I still don't know how to reach them.” Is that where you play?  KEVIN: It's a little bit after that, too, where you already spent some money and now you're saying, “Hey I have a marketing person in-house but we still need help because we want to scale” and you don't want to bring somebody new on again. So, I tell people all the time, we used to do what we said before . . . “Hey, you have a brand new idea. Let's help you” . . . and then it turned out that this was just a different type of client or customer that we didn't want to educate about what marketing was. It was just very difficult. I see some agencies do that. It's like I'm prey to you. Those clients, the ones that pay you that much, they're calling you every single day to give you an update. I think it's so funny, but like you've probably heard before, the more they pay you the less they call you. It's so true. ROB: That's amazing. What is it about a business at that stage that aligns with your talents? What's the playbook that starts to make sense at that stage that maybe isn't available sooner?  KEVIN: I think the playbook that's available is that these businesses already have systems on how to get content, how to get reviews, how to do all that stuff – just feeds our creative team to make new ads, to make new videos, to make new images for their social media, for their Facebook page. It's not like we're saying, “Hey, you should send an email out to get customer reviews.” They already are doing this, so their mindsets are already in this – “Yep, this is what we need to build a brand or a company.” It's just a different business shift of a person and for us, it's less pulling, like “Hey, we need this from you.” It's more like “Yep, this is already in our pipeline. You're gonna get it next week.” If we can, we get user-generated content every week – We just get that in the Slack channel – “Hey, guys. Here's this week's content.” They already have a process in place and we're here to help them. I tell people all the time – a lot of times business owners, in the beginning, want us to basically build their whole business for them. I say, “No, I'm your marketing team. I'm not here to build your company.”  ROB: This is our customer. What do you think? KEVIN: Yeah. I'm like, “I don't know. You have the product.” They're like, “Isn't your team supposed to do that?” Yes, but like, “I don't know exactly what you're doing” :Hey, it looks like this product. . . .like customers are complaining about this. Are you going to switch your product?” They're like, “No.” I'm like, “All right then. If your sales aren't going up, then you need to do something.” So, for me too, this comes from not just doing marketing, but because I've also had my own e-commerce companies too. So, I've had to switch products, I've had to grow a team, and that's where for me, it's like, I see you sometimes, I mean before like we work with founders, I'm like, “Hey, people are clearly complaining about this. Why aren't you switching or doing something?” And at least for me when I had my outdoor gear company – we recently sold it -- we made three to four versions of a trekking pole based on customer feedback because that's what you do as a business. You iterate over and over again. Sometimes people say, “Hey, this is a perfect product.” I'm like, “Is it a perfect product? You need to switch things around if people are complaining about it.” So, I don't know, for me, I'm trying to find people that, like I tell people all the time, the best people that we work with are people that have done it once, failed, and like, “Okay now. I know what to do because everybody has been through the trenches in the fire.” ROB: Sure. What it sounds like they have is they have a steady pipeline of content that speaks to their audience but . . . I think a lot of people's natural format is more long-form and not marketing copy, right? So, you can kind of take what they have, break it down, atomize it, align it to different channels, test some things, and then layer on a set of known tactics that work when you have legitimate content.  KEVIN: Exactly. That's what it is. It's like, “We're here to use tactics to help you grow versus help you figure out these tactics are. We can help somewhat but there's only so much time we can tell clients, “Hey, you need you see.” and they're like “Oh? why? I don't know how to go get it.” I'm like. “Send an email out.” They're like, “Oh okay I forgot this week.” I'm like, “All right. (sighs) I can't press this send button for you.” ROB: Right? Step 1 is send an email this week. Then come back and talk to me.  KEVIN: So yeah. I get it. I think for me, our agency – at least I tell people all the time – it just depends on what type of company or business you want to build. There's people that want to be in that zero to 1 stage, where it's like, “Hey, we're gonna build this system and process for you. But for me, I just don't want to be doing that. So, we're saying, we're shifting more towards – “Hey you have something and you have some sort of team. We're gonna come here implement, help you and supplement you and be that agency.” ROB: Sure. I'd be remiss if I didn't mention, I heard you mention briefly iOS 14. Obviously, the kind of individual targeting, opt-outs, all that is changing how ads run, how ads are tracked. What has been changing for you and how are you responding or suggesting people respond when it comes to the options that are no longer available to them due to those changes?  KEVIN: I think iOS 14 . . . it's interesting. I see both. For us, bad side for a lot of agencies like us is . . . I tell people, like we were, you could track everything. So, our incentives are very like, “Hey look! We spend more money. We make more money.” We see revenue going up, we can spend more money.” Because it's tracked and now that has really affected our ability to scale as an agency and again clients as well because they were spending 15k a month, now they're spending 20k, and they're just like, “Well, the results are even worse and we're not getting any sales.” So, I think, what has changed a lot is the way we're tracking because now we're so used to just looking at the platforms, Google, Facebook, say, “Yep, this is a 1 to 1 or at least pseudo 1 to 1, where right now it's even worse. I don't even know where it's coming from. So, tracking itself has changed and, at least for us, the way we're doing it now is like what people should have been doing or at least sort of had done. Which is like, “Hey, this week, how much revenue did you make from new customers? How much did we spend on ads? What is the ratio between new customer revenue with ad spend?” It's a bit more fluffy, but at least you're saying that, yes, you are profitable. So, more daily profitability sheets/ weekly profitability sheets or even monthly – like your P&L. Go into your account each month and say, “Yep, reconcile all the expenses. Were we profitable?” Great, business is still good. That is something that, at least before iOS 14, people didn't really know, which is interesting. I think any business, you have to know this stuff. People are getting a little more savvy with these numbers. At the same time, something that I've seen shift is that – I think it's good going back with my background. I think now people are actually building brands again, versus like, “Hey I just want to make quick buck online.”  ROB: Right.  KEVIN: That was something that we saw so much because it was so easy to track, like, “Hey, you like pet stuff, right? Let me make this pet niche store and for the next 3 months let me make 20K.” It wasn't like a brand where, right now, similar to any business like you probably seen . . . Building a real business takes years.  ROB: Right.  KEVIN: And there's gonna be years where you don't make money. Everybody had this weird mentality like, “Hey, if I spend a thousand bucks, I need to make 5k this month” . . . or else “You suck – not me.” This is not how you build a company. You got to reinvest into the branding. You got to reinvest into ads, copy, photography . . . I just saw this crazy, quick-flipping of businesses where ten years ago, you were actually okay, “I'm gonna mess with your cake(?) and I'm gonna make this thing a big brand and try to build something. I think that's coming back again, which is great because it's gonna be entrepreneurs that I think want to build true businesses for the long-term.  ROB: Right on. I think I may have heard this. I may have heard it wrong, but there's also an increasing challenge with now with the attribution window. Is that right? That there's actually a short, you can't, I think it's like used to be able to see if . . . so you ran an ad and somebody bought in thirty days. Mow you get what 7?  KEVIN: Yeah. You got like 7 or even like 1 day. Sometimes it's just so much tougher? Yeah.  ROB: So, it is more empirical. It's, “I spent money, am I making money? I increased my spend a little bit ago, am I making more money now?” It's trickier.  KEVIN: It's definitely trickier, like I said. I think you now need to have the stomach for it, like, “Hey, you're hoping to make money,” and I get both sides. You know there's always the side of like, “Hey, I'm not a VC-funded company.” I'm like, “Yeah, I know.” Most people aren't, but there's a reason why companies like Facebook and Google – obviously those are outliers, but other companies such as them that spend . . . like Uber, right? literally in business for ten years and every year lose money, right? There's a reason why it's like – again, that's a bigger scale but you sometimes need to think yourself as a smaller scale, say, “Hey, you're in this for the long run.” You're like, “There's a reason why everybody knows Uber, like, “Hey I'm gonna get a cab because all the brand equity of the advertising.” So, a lot of times you've probably seen business owners don't want to do that because like, “No I need to make money.” I'm like, “Yes, you should make money – but there is something to be said for reinvest into your business and saying, “Hey, I'm gonna do this as ‘quote-unquote' my life's work. It doesn't do your life, but like the next 5 to 10 years, right.  ROB: Sure. I think it's helpful. I think people are starting to get this understanding a little more – to know when you're doing brand marketing and to know when you're doing performance marketing because getting those things twisted is also a real source of misunderstanding if you . . . KEVIN: Oh yeah, there's definitely performance marketing everything and there's also brand marketing. A lot of people just want to do performance marketing but you still need to have great Instagram accounts, great Twitter accounts, great social media people. I tell people all the time, like, “Why do I need a social media manager– they don't make any money?” – But you still want people interacting with your community, talking to them. You know, some of the best companies out there do both performance and branding. Branding is one of those things that you see it when you see it. But when you're doing it, you don't see it. It's tough to put into a balance sheet but you know it when you see it. It's like Uber, you know? Lyft, you know? So it's hard. I know that for sure. ROB: And when sometimes it's even just a negative signal you're never going to see right? Somebody looks up your company. They look up your Twitter or your Instagram or your Facebook or your LinkedIn and if there's nothing there or if it's really dead, people judge that. I mean, they do. I do.  KEVIN: I know I do. I always think marketing is so funny because, like I tell people, “What do you do when you look up a business?” I know you're gonna go like look up reviews. I know you're gonna look at Instagram and then I'm like, “How come for your company you don't think you need to do that?”  ROB: Yeah.  KEVIN: They hate when it's like, “Oh, yeah. I don't know what I'm saying.” They feel dumb but I just hate saying, “I'm like you. You do this same thing, too. So why don't you do for your business? I'm like “Hey if . . . I also tell people this. I'm on calls. I'm like, “If you weren't on your website, would you buy?” And if it's a no, then, “Why do you think other customers would buy?” – So like, “I don't know.” ROB: Take us back a little bit in time here, Kevin. Where did Voy Media come from and what led you to jump off this company-building cliff.  KEVIN: Voy Media is my newest company that I started. Basically, my quick background is computer science. I was a programming major in upstate New York . . . Binghamton. All throughout college I knew I wanted to do my own startup – since I was17 – it's something I wanted to do for a long time. So, in college, I started doing one tiny bit which is my web building. I was 19 or 20. I had 2 employees working on web projects there. We were just getting customers through Craigslist – so developing stuff. For me it was mostly like I've always wanted to build a startup. After college I was like, “Okay I gotta go to Silicon Valley.” I went to work for Mint.com as a programmer and then I went to work for another startup there for 3 years. During this time, I wanted to build stuff so I kept building things. I kept going to hackathon startup events. One of the things that happened for me during this time – I have always was in this mindset of like, “Hey, if you build it, they will come.” Because, hey, if you have a great product people just naturally find you. That was the thing that programmers in Silicon Valley just said to each other. Like “Hey, if people build something great, people will just find it” is one hundred percent not true looking back – but the mindset was very different back then. So, I kept building stuff. Eventually, I was like, “Man, how come I'm not getting any customers?” And then, I started looking up “what is marketing.” I was like, “Okay, this is actually a thing.” That's when I started learning more about marketing. My initial foray into marketing was SEO, like black-hat, world-affiliate marketing, CPA stuff. That was for me very interesting. When I first discovered it, I was like, “Oh, this is very interesting.” The reason why I found it so interesting because these affiliate guys were getting these twenty dollars like, “Hey, you can make twenty dollars off this widget that you sell,” so they had to sell it for a hundred twenty bucks to make profit. So, I was like, “Oh, these guys are using cutting edge tactics.” You would join these underground forums or Skype groups of people saying like, “Hey, try this marketing message.” I was like, “Whoa!” I didn't realize marketing is like that – it was like performance for me. I always thought marketing was this branded thing. I didn't know there's this other type of marketing that was purely based on sales. That's what got me at least . . . at that point I wasn't doing ads. It opened up my eyes to this marketing world. I was like, “Oh, everything around you is really marketing, but it's great marketing when you don't think it's marketing.” Behind the scenes, there's guys pulling the levers that's doing the marketing. So, it's like one of those like realizations that you have. I was like, “Okay, this is kind of what I need to do anyways.” I came back to New York because I missed my family. I started my cleaning company called Maid Sailers and here, for this cleaning company, is where I did almost all the marketing. I did SEO. I did reviews, blogging, PPC, Yelp ads, kind of everything. I did that for about a year-and-a-half. I wanted to keep growing it but people that have a service-based company – even some like Moy media – service-based businesses can only grow as you grow people – humans, right? So, it's human capital intense kind of business, which is great to get started. So, I think I tell people, times like these are great businesses start. But if you want to grow it, I didn't think I could grow it that big. So, then I started ecommerce because at that time too I saw all my friends are doing FBA, Amazon, I was like, “I got to jump into this, right?” It's one of those things with FOMO -- I got to do it. Then I did my Montem, which is my outdoor gear company. This was more scalable because, at the time – it was much easier back then with e-commerce products like Amazon. You're selling. Then, again for Montem, when we did e-commerce, I learned so much more. This is kind of where I first started doing more Facebook ads, Google ads, review blogger reviews. We were like number 1 on Wirecutter, so we were able to do partnerships. We did retail. We were pitching retails with the events – kind of like everything involved and, at least for me, that's why I like entrepreneurship in startups because I like all this stuff I just described. If I worked for somebody, I would never be able to do it all. Because you're only stuck in 1 thing where it's like a founder you could just say, “Okay, I'm going to do it all like,” and you figured it out somehow, which is either exciting or not exciting for some people. For me, it's like, “Oh, this is awesome.” I went to China 3 times up to my factories. So that's kind of where the concept of Voy Media came – because I was doing this e-commerce stuff. And then I was like, “Okay, I want to help other founders achieve success,” – that's the inkling, the idea of Voy Media. Of course, what we are now is very different than what I thought initially because you iterate your business based on what you see. But that's how Voy Media started.  ROB: How did you navigate away from those assumptions of the business, from those predispositions that you had? I mean, candidly, folks who come from a software developer background a lot of time have a hard time taking their hands off the keyboard. They want to be writing code, right? So how did you kind of navigate to the truth of the business instead of where you started?  KEVIN: I always tell people that one of the main reasons why I always wanted to do a startup and it's something that I've always like wanted to do since I was 17. But one of the things when I was in Silicon Valley, at least for me when I was 21 or 22 – I don't know, I was probably 23 at the time – very naïve. I was looking at a lot of my friends in the space, like the programmers there, and they would just talk about stuff and I was like, “Oh, wow! These guys are really smart. I don't think I'll ever be that good. I need to do something else because these guys are just awesome programmers.” My roommate, his name was Adam. We worked at the same company and he would talk about a concept. I'm like, “Dude, I have no clue how you just got that!” I thought I was smart but that's kind of what for me I'm like, “I got figure out something else in my life because I want to make money but, clearly, you're on another level.” I was like, “Let me just do business stuff and that's kind of it for me.” Another relationship for me was that I would talk to him or talk to other people like, “Hey, why don't you start a company. You are really smart,” but they're like, “No, I just want to be an employee.” That made me think, “Hey, there's guys like me that want to have a company and then I can hire guys like him that don't want to take the risk,” and you're gonna hire these super smart people that are gonna work for you and that's where the realization came to me, “Hey, I don't have to be the smartest but there's a lot of smart people that don't want to take the risk I want to take, and they could just work for me. Yeah!”  ROB: Yeah, so that's a good lesson to pick up along the way. As you reflect on the journey so far in building the business, what are some other key lessons you might want to go back and just tell yourself if you were starting over? Some good advice.  KEVIN: Good advice is so obvious. But like hiring people – I think once you feel an inkling that a person's not going to work out, you really got to let them go because it's a drain on the company and drain on yourself. That's probably the one people always say but it's also the hardest because people with emotions and working with them. But that's really tough. I think it's getting better, at least for service-based companies, it's just getting really better at vetting the people you work with just because it's a really personal relationship and, if you already feel like they're gonna be a very demanding, upstart, they're probably gonna be demanding the whole relationship and it's just gonna be a battle to please them. That's something I tell my sales team all the time. Like any red flag. I could see an email and I'm like, “This is a red flag. I can tell already this is gonna be a terrible partner to work with. Let's not even sign them,” and they're like, “Why?” I'm like. “Trust me. This one word they said, I pretty much know what they're looking for.” I think another one that's super important, I think for me at least, it's like, “I couldn't do my theme(?) companies. Every company I've done it, it's been with a partner.” You need somebody there to talk to, to help you with the problem, because like any business they're gonna be high highs and low lows. Sometimes you need somebody else to talk to them about it because sometimes you can't tell your employees how you're feeling because then it's like, “I work for you,” and then they're like, “Oh well. If the founder's feeling this way, I can't feel that way either.” Having a partner that's on the same like equal level as you or around that area – you can like tell them the real issues and how you're feeling, so I think a partner is gonna be great. And again, it helps distribute the work depending on what you're doing and how you're splitting the stuff with the business because it's a lot of stuff to do.  ROB: Yeah, is that somebody that you had early in the business or is that somebody you brought in? Is that somebody outside the business for you? What's that look like?  KEVIN: For Voy Media, it's Wilson. I've known him since college. We've literally known each other for over ten years and we've going back to everything before like one tiny bit the Ruby on Rails company. He was my partner there, too, in Silicon Valley. When I moved there, he was in college and I just graduated. And I was like, “Yo, Wilson! I'm moving.” He's like, “I'll move there with you.” So I've known him for a long time. I tell people it really depends. There's these relationships are very . . . You need to be careful because there's a level of trust you already have so you can't really get mad at each other. But again, it's careful. Sometimes things go wrong, you get mad at each other but you know that “Hey, we're doing it because we both” . . . I I think you both need to know the goal of the business. So, it's like, “Hey, this is why I'm like upset with you. It's not that I'm upset about you personally, it's because I'm upset about the business and we both want to achieve this and we're not achieving it together. How do we get there?” So, it's a careful relationship, like any couple. Things are upsetting us. Why? Because we both want to be happy. How do we fix that issue so it's not like I'm attacking you personally? ROB: Right. And if you're partners on that, you got to solve it one way or another. You can't stay grumpy and you can't stay stuck in the mud. It can go sideways pretty quick. So, you had Wilson there really early on in the business.  KEVIN: Yeah.  ROB: What was another kind of key inflection point that you noticed, where you felt like you had to level up the capabilities of the firm? The people in the firm, the processes – were there any kind of chokepoints so far that you had to kind of reevaluate in a significant way? KEVIN: Yeah. I mean like honestly, at least for Voy Media, one of the biggest things that we made was hiring an operations person to really help clean up everything at the agency. Because from reporting to hiring, I think that really helped us. I think it's one of those things where . . . I consider one of those positions where you want to be so involved sometimes. But you need to bring on someone that can do the work for you, that's smarter than you, that you can give complete ownership. I think, with any business, that's probably the hardest part – giving up some part of the business to somebody else to run and just trusting them. That's probably some of the best things that we've done because now the agency has grown quicker. With that comes a few points. One is cash load. You have to have the money to hire somebody good or can you take a little hit on income? That way you know that this person is going to hopefully pay off in six months. As a bootstrap founder, you think about these things but hiring people like that is super helpful.  ROB: Where was the business in terms of size, however you think about it, when you made that operations move?  KEVIN: We were probably like 5 to 6 people. Now we're about 30 people. So, it's definitely grown a lot more now. But yeah, hiring those people – like higher level people are helpful because there's only so many people that are doing the work. Of course, you need those people as well. But you need people thinking about strategy, thinking about processes and systems and that's why it's helpful and again, at least for me, it's the biggest . . . honestly, one of the biggest things too is thinking about yourself as the founder, as the person running the company. What do you want to be doing? I don't want to be doing all this stuff. I want to hire somebody else to do it because that doesn't give me energy. It drains me. I want to be doing what gives me energy, which is podcasting, sales – that's exciting for me. So, I know I'm gonna do a better job and I know I'm gonna be reading books about it whereas like – “Hey, accounting, – I don't want to look this up.” Find somebody else to do it because it's going to drain you and that's going to affect your whole day.  ROB: Wow. That all makes sense. As we look ahead for Voy Media – when you look at either what the company's doing or what will be necessary in the types of marketing that you do – what's coming up that you're excited about?  KEVIN: What we're excited about right now I think, again going back to what I said before, we're working with founders building these great brands. Better for us to work with founders out in the long run – before I was quick. Like, “Hey this month sucked. You guys suck.” It's like, “Oh god, this is a stressful relationship.” It's more like, “Hey, let's build something big and great together,” and again a big thing for us too. It's gonna be the creatives. People are really open to having great images, great creatives. People are more open to trying new things now because they're seeing that Facebook isn't the only platform. There's now Facebook, there's TikTok, there's Instagram stories, like there's all this new stuff out there. It's exciting again to make content. I see that as exciting. Where before people were just like, “I just want to do Facebook ads. Okay.” “Well, TikTok.” “No, I don't know that platform.” Where people are, I think . . . I don't know . . . there's a shift there where people are more open to new stuff now.  ROB: Yeah, it's certainly a shift. It's certainly interesting in terms of openness. How do you think about the difference between what should be legitimately out of bounds for a particular brand versus what is their being flexible in a way that that is actually necessary? People have their experimental budgets. It can't all be experimental but some of it has to be.  KEVIN: I think it just depends what level you are. I think, for example, when we work with consumer companies, all the consumer platform is always great – TikTok, Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook of course. But if you're a consumer company, Linkedin doesn't make sense because that's more like professional. So, there are certain industries where it's very clear cut like, “Hey, if you're a SaaS or software or marketing company, you should be on LinkedIn because that's where quote – unquote professionals are. We think about it like that. As you get bigger and you're scaling your business, you need to think about platforms outside – like billboard ads are something that's more branded but there's a lot of ways to access those now in like easy platforms stuff. Some of my friends do that because they raise money and they say it's not effective. But I think something that brands need to think about right now is that, before, it was “you just sell online.” Now I'm seeing a big shift of online plus retail as well. So, getting into the Walmarts, the Targets, the Amazon's, the stores – everything like that is so important because it's more omnichannel versus like, “Hey I'm only direct to consumer.” I'm seeing that big shift now, too.  ROB: Right on. When you say the billboard stuff is more accessible, what does that actually look like? Can I go like buy a billboard? Can I buy it where I want it? Can I set what time of day I want to see a digital like, I don't know . . . What can I do?  KEVIN: I forgot the exact website. I'll try to find it later. But yeah, basically you can do exactly that. I think it's ClearView, one of those company that owns it. They now have a website similar to what you said where you can just say like, “Hey, for 100 bucks I want an ad near Times Square.” It makes it super simple and easy. You can just upload your creatives. Before it was kind of what you were saying . . . even subway ads now in New York City, you have to spend 30K minimum to get like one car of subway ads, where it should be self-serve, right? “Okay, I want one car, one creative . . . how much is it gonna cost? All right?” Subway ads are harder because you actually need to print the thing, where some of these new billboards are digital. So yeah, you could do it. I forgot the exact platform but it's cool. I've seen some friends do it just for experimental. It kind of works but it's one of those things where you just try it out and see.  ROB: Sure. I've thought about it. There's some ways . . . maybe it's too creepy . . . but you can almost get account-based marketing. You know a bunch of people for this company come this way, light up this billboard during the commute, leave it shut down during lunchtime – like who knows, right? KEVIN: Yeah. It's funny you're saying that because there's this company . . . they were a remote job board, right? Facebook announced, I think a few months ago, that like, “Hey, starting in 2022, everybody needs to go back to work in the office.” So, then this company took out ads on that highway to say, “Hey, don't want to go back to work? Apply for new jobs here.” But exactly what you're saying. You can know where these things are, they'll pinpoint the area, and then you can do account-based marketing that way. People do this when they launch a Walmart or Target in the city. There will be billboards around there so say, “Hey, look! We're now available at Target down the street!” So, you can do that type of stuff.  ROB: Very interesting. So much to do. So much to learn. Still, Kevin, congrats on the journey so far. Thank you for coming on and sharing with us as well. I wish you well and I know our audience will enjoy what you had to share. KEVIN: Thank you Thanks for having me. Appreciate it.  ROB: Thanks, Kevin take care. Bye 

Revolutions Per Minute - Radio from the New York City Democratic Socialists of America

Today we're talking with Assemblymember Phara Souffrant Forrest and her district manager Justin Freeman about how they are bringing their socialist office directly to the community they represent and are building power not just to win elections, but pass legislation that meaningful changes the lives of the working class in Brooklyn like the Less is More bill, which was signed into law this year, and Public Power and ‘Good Cause Eviction' bill which are top priorities for DSA electeds this upcoming legislative session. And it's not just the power in the halls of government that is being challenged by organizers in New York City right now. Workers are taking on one of the most powerful and influential Ivy League universities and newspapers in the country at the same time. We'll hear from RPM's own Chris Carr who is one of many union members of the Student Workers of Columbia currently on strike and from one of the New York Times' Wirecutter union members who plan to strike on Black Friday. Follow Phara and Justin on twitter @phara4assembly and @JustinR_Freemanand get involved with Phara's office at bit.ly/pharaoffice 

Business Wars Daily
Wirecutter Staffers Say They'll Strike

Business Wars Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 3:44


Today is Tuesday, November 16, and we're looking at Wirecutter vs. Reviewed.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S27E18 - The Biggest Challenge that Start-up Founders Face as They Shift into CEO Roles, with Alisa Cohn

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 28:13


In this HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonathanhwestover/) talks with Alisa Cohn about the biggest challenge that start-up founders face as they shift into CEO roles. See the video here: https://youtu.be/Fht4MWTWvb0. Named the Top Startup Coach in the World at the Thinkers50/Marshall Goldsmith Global Coaches Awards in London, Alisa Cohn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/alisacohn/) has been coaching startup founders to grow into world-class CEOs for nearly 20 years. She is the author of From Start-Up to Grown-Up, published by Kogan Page. A onetime startup CFO, strategy consultant, and current angel investor and advisor, she was named the number one “Global Guru” of startups in 2021, and has worked with startup companies such as Venmo, Etsy, DraftKings, The Wirecutter, Mack Weldon, and Tory Burch. She has also coached CEOs and C-Suite executives at enterprise clients such as Dell, Hitachi, Sony, IBM, Google, Microsoft, Bloomberg, The New York Times, and Calvin Klein.  Marshall Goldsmith selected Alisa as one of his Marshall Goldsmith 100 Coaches – a gathering of the top coaches in the world – and Inc named Alisa one of the top 100 leadership speakers, and also been named one of the top voices of thought leadership by PeopleHum for 2021.  Alisa is a guest lecturer at Harvard and Cornell Universities, Henley Business School and the Naval War College. She is the executive coach for Runway–the incubator at Cornell NYC Tech that helps post-docs commercialize their technology and build companies. She serves on the board of the Cornell Advisory Council. She has coached public and political figures including the former Supreme Court Chief Justice of Sri Lanka and the first female minister in the transitional government of Afghanistan.  Her articles have appeared in HBR, Forbes, and Inc and she has been featured as an expert on Bloomberg TV, the BBC World News and in the New York Times. A recovering CPA, she is also a Broadway investor in productions which have won two Tony Awards and is prone to burst into song at the slightest provocation. Check out Dr. Westover's new book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/bluerthanindigo. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/leadershipalchemy. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/hci-magazine. Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/performance_management_podcasts/  Ranked #6 Workplace Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/workplace_podcasts/  Ranked #7 HR Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/hr_podcasts/  Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/talent_management_podcasts/  Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/personal_development_podcasts/  Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/leadership_podcasts/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hcipodcast/support

Strategic Momentum
Ep. 100 - Leveling Up Your Leadership From Founder to CEO - with Alisa Cohn

Strategic Momentum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 51:43


Alisa Cohn is an executive coach who's been working with startup founders to grow into world-class CEOs for nearly 20 years. She's been called the #1 Startup Coach in the world and she's the author of the new book https://www.alisacohn.com/start-up/ (“From Start-Up to Grown-Up.”) Her breadth and depth of experiences working with companies like Esty, Foursquare, Invision and The Wirecutter — coupled with own personal journey — has given her valuable knowledge, insights, and perspectives on the struggles founders often face when working to lead, grow, and manage their business. In this episode she shares valuable leadership advice from her book so that founders can start to create that traction and progress from the inside out.  Learn more, and find the complete show notes, at https://www.strategicmomentum.co/episodes/65 (https://www.strategicmomentum.co/episodes/) Resources: Connect with Alisa: https://www.linkedin.com/in/alisacohn/ (LinkedIn) | https://twitter.com/AlisaCohn (Twitter) Visit https://www.alisacohn.com/ (alisacohn.com) Read: https://www.alisacohn.com/start-up/ (“From Start-Up to Grown-Up”) Subscribe to the Strategic Momentum podcast: On https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/strategic-momentum/id1261436986?mt=2 (Apple Podcasts) On the https://play.google.com/music/listen#/ps/Ime3k7finzrap7xqdhtewtqogk4 (Google Play Store) On https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/music-evo-review/strategic-momentum?refid=stpr (Stitcher Radio) On https://open.spotify.com/show/37gZozvPDvEaQwSs3fqvKl?si=gU8O7_UFScWfkFUf3x1Tmw (Spotify)

In Depth
Growing from founder to CEO: Executive coach Alisa Cohn on how to get better feedback

In Depth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 61:23


Today's episode is with Alisa Cohn, an executive coach with nearly 20 years of experience working with companies like Etsy, Venmo, InVision, The Wirecutter, Google and IBM. Her new book, From Start-Up to Grown-Up: Grow Your Leadership to Grow Your Business, just came out this week.  In our conversation today, we focus on what founders and startup leaders can learn from Alisa's experiences as a coach. We start by getting into self-awareness, and how tough it can be for executives to get truly candid feedback. As an expert in the art of conducting 360 feedback, Alisa shares the right questions to ask, as well as tips for getting at the root of what people are actually saying in their feedback.  We also dive into what to do with what you hear, from why not every piece of feedback is useful, to her tips on how to actually enact change in your day-to-day routine. Next, we tackle the most common opportunities for growth that she's seen time and time again in her coaching practice, from communication and decision-making, to how the CEO's own personality is often unconsciously reflected in the company culture. We wrap up by covering how to have effective conversations about layering and letting people go, as well as the reflection ritual that she recommends every founder incorporate into their daily routine. This episode will be helpful for those who are making the transition from scrappy founder to established CEO, but it's a great listen for any startup leader who's struggling to give away their Legos. You can follow Alisa on Twitter at @AlisaCohn.  You can email us questions directly at review@firstround.com or follow us on Twitter @FirstRound and @BrettBerson.

LEAVE YOUR MARK
Alisa Cohn on the Importance of Having Executive Presence, Building Your Social Capital and Why You Need a Vision Board

LEAVE YOUR MARK

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 41:14


Gravitas, communication, and appearance are three areas that Alisa Cohn, the #1 Start-Up coach in the world, focuses on. And before you get up in arms about the idea of judging appearance, think of it from the perspective of "playing the part." Alisa coaches both founders and executives alike on how they show up as leaders. She has worked with C-suite executives at prominent start-ups (such as Venmo, Etsy, Draft Kings, The Wirecutter, Mack Weldon, and Tory Burch) and Fortune 500 companies (including Dell, IBM, and Microsoft). Google, Pfizer, and The New York Times to name a few.) With 20 years of experience, she's dumped all her wisdom into her new book, From Start-up to Grown-up. Whether you're a founder, a corporate executive, or hope to be one day, this episode is full of insider advice on everything from Alisa's tactics on how she built her initial client base to how she coaches her clients on leadership. Alisa speaks to what they need to be effective and how to handle self-doubt, failure, and anxiety. She stresses the importance of grit and resilience and why building your track record as someone good to work with can open a host of opportunities. *** This episode of LEAVE YOUR MARK is brought to you by Madison Reed, the hair color company revolutionizing the way women color their hair. This fast-growing disruptor brand offers luxurious, Smart-8 Free hair-color formula (that's free of harsh ingredients like PPD, ammonia, and parabens), that makes your hair look and feel fabulous. Madison Reed is truly your one-stop-shop for all things hair color. Whether you're at a Hair Color Bar or coloring at home with a Radiant Hair Color kit, you get the same amazing results every time. Madison Reed's proprietary color-matching technology coupled with a team of on-call colorists help women choose their perfect shade of hair color. With over 40 Hair Color Bars in 17 markets and many more to come, Madison Reed is fast becoming the leader in hair color. The full line of products can be found online at madison-reed.com and in Madison Reed Hair Color Bars, in addition to Ulta Beauty and Ulta Beauty at Target. First time customers can use ALIZA20 20% off + free shipping on Madison-Reed.com and local Hair Color Bar services.

Six Pixels of Separation Podcast - By Mitch Joel
SPOS #798 - Alisa Cohn On Startups, Leadership And Growth

Six Pixels of Separation Podcast - By Mitch Joel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 60:15


Welcome to episode #798 of Six Pixels of Separation. Here it is: Six Pixels of Separation - Episode #798 - Host: Mitch Joel. Named the Top Startup Coach in the World at the Thinkers50/Marshall Goldsmith Global Coaches Awards in London, Alisa Cohn has been coaching startup founders to grow into world-class CEOs for nearly twenty years. She is the author of just-published book, From Start-Up to Grown-Up. This onetime startup CFO, strategy consultant, and current angel investor and advisor has worked with Venmo, Etsy, DraftKings, The Wirecutter, Tory Burch, and more. She is the executive coach for Runway Startups – the incubator at Cornell NYC Tech that helps post-docs commercialize their technology and build companies. She serves on the board of the Cornell Advisory Council. She has coached public and political figures. A recovering CPA, she is also a Broadway investor in productions which have won two Tony Awards and is prone to burst into song at the slightest provocation. That doesn't happen on this show (sadly). Enjoy the conversation... Running time: 1:00:14. Hello from beautiful Montreal. Subscribe over at Apple Podcasts. Please visit and leave comments on the blog - Six Pixels of Separation. Feel free to connect to me directly on Facebook here: Mitch Joel on Facebook. or you can connect on LinkedIn. ...or on Twitter. Here is my conversation with Alisa Cohn. From Start-Up to Grown-Up. From Start-Up To Grown-Up Podcast. Follow Alisa on LinkedIn. Follow Alisa on Twitter. This week's music: David Usher 'St. Lawrence River'.    

The Tim Ferriss Show
#539: Alisa Cohn on Prenups for Startup Founders, How to Reinvent Your Career, The Importance of "Pre-Mortems," and The Three Selves

The Tim Ferriss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 159:10


Alisa Cohn on Prenups for Startup Founders, How to Reinvent Your Career, The Importance of "Pre-Mortems," and The Three Selves | Brought to you by Kettle & Fire high quality, tasty, and conveniently packaged bone broths; Wealthfront automated investing; and Allform premium, modular furniture. More on all three below.Alisa Cohn (@AlisaCohn) is one of the most prominent startup coaches in the world. She has advised founders and executives at Venmo, Etsy, DraftKings, Wirecutter, Mack Weldon, InVision, Tory Burch, and others. She has also coached CEOs and C-suite executives at enterprises such as Dell, Hitachi, Sony, Google, Microsoft, Bloomberg, The New York Times Company, and Calvin Klein.She is the author of From Start-Up to Grown-Up, a guidebook for entrepreneurs on the leadership journey from founder to CEO, and host of the From Start-Up to Grown-Up Podcast. Her articles have appeared in Harvard Business Review, Forbes, and Inc. magazines, and she has been featured as an expert on Bloomberg TV, the BBC World News, and in The New York Times. A recovering CPA and one-time startup CFO and strategy consultant, she is now an angel investor and advisory board member. Outside of work, she is a (very) amateur rap artist and an investor in Broadway shows, two of which have won Tony Awards.Please enjoy!This episode is brought to you by Kettle & Fire! Kettle & Fire makes one of the highest quality, tastiest, and most conveniently packaged bone broths on the market, and I have a huge collection of their broths on my kitchen counter for easy access. I've been a fan ever since 2015, when podcast guest and ketogenesis expert Dr. Dominic D'Agostino introduced me to the company. Their products fit me and my lifestyle extremely well: bone broth is a great ‘one-stop shop' for low-carb, high-protein nutrition, and bone broth makes an excellent lower-calorie breakfast that requires no prep.It's one of the simplest ways to get many of the nutrients I need, and I simply feel better when broth is a regular part of my diet. You can save 25% off your order by going to KettleAndFire.com/Tim and using code TIM at checkout.*This episode is also brought to you by Wealthfront! Wealthfront pioneered the automated investing movement, sometimes referred to as ‘robo-advising,' and they currently oversee $20 billion of assets for their clients. It takes about three minutes to sign up, and then Wealthfront will build you a globally diversified portfolio of ETFs based on your risk appetite and manage it for you at an incredibly low cost. Smart investing should not feel like a rollercoaster ride. Let the professionals do the work for you. Go to Wealthfront.com/Tim and open a Wealthfront account today, and you'll get your first $5,000 managed for free, for life. Wealthfront will automate your investments for the long term. Get started today at Wealthfront.com/Tim.*This episode is also brought to you by Allform! If you've been listening to the podcast for a while, you've probably heard me talk about Helix Sleep mattresses, which I've been using since 2017. They just launched a new company called Allform, and they're making premium, customizable sofas and chairs shipped right to your door—at a fraction of the cost of traditional stores. You can pick your fabric (and they're all spill, stain, and scratch resistant), the sofa color, the color of the legs, and the sofa size and shape to make sure it's perfect for you and your home.Allform arrives in just 3–7 days, and you can assemble it yourself in a few minutes—no tools needed. To find your perfect sofa, check out Allform.com/Tim. Allform is offering 20% off all orders to you, my dear listeners, at Allform.com/Tim.*If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really makes a difference in helping to convince hard-to-get guests. I also love reading the reviews!For show notes and past guests, please visit tim.blog/podcast.Sign up for Tim's email newsletter (“5-Bullet Friday”) at tim.blog/friday.For transcripts of episodes, go to tim.blog/transcripts.Discover Tim's books: tim.blog/books.Follow Tim:Twitter: twitter.com/tferriss Instagram: instagram.com/timferrissFacebook: facebook.com/timferriss YouTube: youtube.com/timferrissPast guests on The Tim Ferriss Show include Jerry Seinfeld, Hugh Jackman, Dr. Jane Goodall, LeBron James, Kevin Hart, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Jamie Foxx, Matthew McConaughey, Esther Perel, Elizabeth Gilbert, Terry Crews, Sia, Yuval Noah Harari, Malcolm Gladwell, Madeleine Albright, Cheryl Strayed, Jim Collins, Mary Karr, Maria Popova, Sam Harris, Michael Phelps, Bob Iger, Edward Norton, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Neil Strauss, Ken Burns, Maria Sharapova, Marc Andreessen, Neil Gaiman, Neil de Grasse Tyson, Jocko Willink, Daniel Ek, Kelly Slater, Dr. Peter Attia, Seth Godin, Howard Marks, Dr. Brené Brown, Eric Schmidt, Michael Lewis, Joe Gebbia, Michael Pollan, Dr. Jordan Peterson, Vince Vaughn, Brian Koppelman, Ramit Sethi, Dax Shepard, Tony Robbins, Jim Dethmer, Dan Harris, Ray Dalio, Naval Ravikant, Vitalik Buterin, Elizabeth Lesser, Amanda Palmer, Katie Haun, Sir Richard Branson, Chuck Palahniuk, Arianna Huffington, Reid Hoffman, Bill Burr, Whitney Cummings, Rick Rubin, Dr. Vivek Murthy, Darren Aronofsky, and many more.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

All Of It
Kitchen Gadgets Do's and Don'ts

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 19:17


Hosts of the Wirecutter series “The Kitchen Report,” Lesley Stockton and Michael Sullivan return to continue the discussion about the current must-have gadgets for any kitchen, some of their old favorites, and they'll take listener calls.  

All Of It
Must-Have Kitchen Gadgets

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 22:33


Hosts of Wirecutter's series “The Kitchen Report” Lesley Stockton and Michael Sullivan join to discuss must-have gadgets for any kitchen, including some of their new favorites, and take listener calls.

Software Defined Talk
Episode 318: The sounds of Excel

Software Defined Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 56:39


This week we discuss Docker's new licensing, Wirecutter goes behind a paywall and Serverless COBOL. Plus, Coté explains why open source is like College Football. Rundown Docker is Updating and Extending Our Product Subscriptions - Docker Blog (https://www.docker.com/blog/updating-product-subscriptions/) New York Times' Wirecutter Product-Review Site Moves Behind Paywall (https://www.wsj.com/articles/new-york-times-wirecutter-product-review-site-moves-behind-paywall-11630436401) Serverless COBOL in Knative (https://www.triggermesh.com/blog/serverless-cobol-in-knative) Announcing VMware Tanzu Application Platform: A Better Developer Experience on any Kubernetes (https://tanzu.vmware.com/content/blog/announcing-vmware-tanzu-application-platform?utm_campaign=content-social_&utm_content=1630455965&utm_medium=social-sprout&utm_source=twitter) VMware's new Tanzu platform aims to unify Kubernetes development (https://www.infoworld.com/article/3631384/vmware-s-new-tanzu-platform-aims-to-unify-kubernetes-development.html) Databricks raises $1.6B series H funding round (https://www.zdnet.com/article/databricks-raises-1-6b-series-h-funding-round/) Relevant to your interests EXCLUSIVE Microsoft warns thousands of cloud customers of exposed databases (https://www.reuters.com/technology/exclusive-microsoft-warns-thousands-cloud-customers-exposed-databases-emails-2021-08-26/) Apple loosens rules for developers in major concession amid antitrust pressure (https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2021/08/26/apple-app-store-payment-settlement/) Introducing a16z's seed fund - Andreessen Horowitz (https://a16z.com/2021/08/27/introducing-a16zs-seed-fund/) 30 years of Linux: OS was successful because of how it was licensed, says Red Hat (https://www.theregister.com/2021/08/25/30_years_of_linux_red_hat/) Apple cares about privacy, unless you work at Apple (https://www.theverge.com/22648265/apple-employee-privacy-icloud-id) The Semiconductor Heist Of The Century | Arm China Has Gone Completely Rogue, Operating As An Independent Company With Inhouse IP/R&D (https://semianalysis.com/the-semiconductor-heist-of-the-century-arm-china-has-gone-completely-rogue-operating-as-an-independent-company-with-their-own-ip/) Microsoft sinks standalone Hyper-V Server, wants you using Azure Stack HCI for VM-wrangling (https://www.theregister.com/2021/08/31/hyper_v_server_discontinued/) NGINX Commits to Open Source and Kubernetes Ingress - The New Stack (https://thenewstack.io/nginx-commits-to-open-source-kubernetes-ingress-involvement/) CITC - About | Greylock (https://greylock.com/castles/) Decentralized Investing Platform Syndicate Raises $800K From 100 Investors (https://www.coindesk.com/business/2021/06/30/decentralized-investing-platform-syndicate-raises-800k-from-100-investors/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter_axiosprorata&stream=top) What you don't know about working with AWS (https://www.infoworld.com/article/3631376/what-you-dont-know-about-working-with-aws.html) Forrest Brazeal going to GCP (https://twitter.com/forrestbrazeal/status/1431324536096628738) Clubhouse embraces spatial audio for more lifelike conversations (https://www.theverge.com/2021/8/30/22648050/clubhouse-spatial-audio-3d-360-sound) Nonsense A (possibly fake?) high school apparently duped its way into playing on ESPN (https://footballscoop.com/news/bishop-sycamore-online-only-prep-school-espn-img-academy) Sponsors strongDM — Manage and audit remote access to infrastructure. Start your free 14-day trial today at strongdm.com/SDT (http://strongdm.com/SDT) CBT Nuggets — Training available for IT Pros anytime, anywhere. Start your 7-day Free Trial today at cbtnuggets.com/sdt (https://cbtnuggets.com/sdt) Conferences DevOpsDays Zurich (https://devopsdays.org/events/2021-zurich/welcome/), Sep 7th and 8th. DevOps World by CloudBees September 28-30 (https://www.devopsworld.com) DevOps Loop | October 4, 2021 (https://devopsloop.io/?utm_campaign=Global_P6_TS_Q322_Event_DevOpsLoop_at_VMworld&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social) - see Coté's promo video (https://twitter.com/cote/status/1425460843014131716). THAT Conference comes to Texas January 17-20, 2022 (https://that.us/activities/call-for-counselors/tx/2022) KubeCon October 11-15 Virtual and In Person (https://events.linuxfoundation.org/kubecon-cloudnativecon-north-america/) Listener Feedback Barton wants you to be a Consultant Product Manager: Cloud Native - Remote, US (https://buff.ly/3zyrKBi) at Dell SDT news & hype Join us in Slack (http://www.softwaredefinedtalk.com/slack). Send your postal address to stickers@softwaredefinedtalk.com (mailto:stickers@softwaredefinedtalk.com) and we will send you free laptop stickers! Follow us on Twitch (https://www.twitch.tv/sdtpodcast), Twitter (https://twitter.com/softwaredeftalk), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/softwaredefinedtalk/), LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/software-defined-talk/) and YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCi3OJPV6h9tp-hbsGBLGsDQ/featured). Brandon built the Quick Concall iPhone App (https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/quick-concall/id1399948033?mt=8) and he wants you to buy it for $0.99. Use the code SDT to get $20 off Coté's book, (https://leanpub.com/digitalwtf/c/sdt) Digital WTF (https://leanpub.com/digitalwtf/c/sdt), so $5 total. Become a sponsor of Software Defined Talk (https://www.softwaredefinedtalk.com/ads)! Recommendations Brandon: WATOE Wireless Charger 3 in 1 Qi Fast Charging Station (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B089G6RM6Z/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1) Matt: Broad City (https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2578560/) Coté: Short Life in a Strange World (https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/46178718-short-life-in-a-strange-world). Photo Credit (https://unsplash.com/photos/o7SvheEZoks) Photo Credit (https://unsplash.com/photos/AT77Q0Njnt0)

Accidental Tech Podcast
446: Dead From Fraud

Accidental Tech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 124:56


Please donate to St. Jude. Cancer sucks, and childhood cancer sucks a lot. Please donate any amount of money, if you can. Follow-up: Wirecutter moves behind a paywall Neven’s tweet Best blender is not a wasteland… sometimes. Cryptographic hashes vs. Apple’s CSAM Neural Hash What happens if governments get involved with CSAM detection? Reflections on Trusting Trust (PDF link) More Apple PR own-goals: Apple bans a pay equity Slack channel Music metadata MusicBrainz’s schema Marco has a request: how do you get a 9-year-old coding? Swift Playgrounds Hopscotch Roblox Video about how they rip off kids QBasic Web-based BASIC DOSBox Playdate How the Playdate Pulp IDE works Scratch Processing.js Apple’s class-action settlement with “app developers” Bloomberg Under the Radar #225: The Fragmented Future

The Rebound
356: The Pain Wall

The Rebound

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 39:30


The gang's back together and it's an Apple Watch show again.Will the iPhone 13 support LEO satellite communication?South Korea has passed a bill requiring app stores to use alternate payment methods.The Apple Watch Series 7 may be "delayed".Apple settled a court case with developers but didn't give up much.Developers will get between $300 and $30,000.Lex didn't hear about the iPhone 12 no sound service program.Dan bought a Sonos Roam.The New York Times is putting the Wirecutter behind their paywall.Mark Gurman speculates on Tim retiring.Our thanks to Indochino, where you'll find the best made to measure shirts and suits at a great price. Use the promo code "REBOUND" and get $50 off any purchase of $399 or more.If you want to help out the show and get some great bonus content, consider becoming a Rebound Prime member! Just go to prime.reboundcast.com to check it out!You can now also support the show by buying our EXCLUSIVE shirt! Tim says GOOOOD MORNNNNING to all listeners of The Rebound! (Prime members, check your email for a special deal on the shirt.)

Oh Fork It
Ofisoluciones

Oh Fork It

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 74:07


Episodio 129. ¿Usted quiere obra limpia?  ¿Incluyendo el ano? Múdese a Petare… Bastante salvaje.

Unorthodox
Reviewing Elul: Ep. 284

Unorthodox

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 61:45


This week on Unorthodox, we have a very special guest host! Former all-star Unorthodox guest Kylie Unell joins Mark and Liel to talk about the important news of the Jews, including Mila Kunis and Ashton Kutcher's lack of showers, and Argentina's lack of tact. Enjoy a sneak peak of Kylie's upcoming Tablet podcast How to Fix a Soul in 30 Days. Get ready for Jewish Year 5782 by traveling along with Kylie as she searches for her soul. We also speak with GOTW Liam McCabe, senior staff writer for Wirecutter, about the high stakes responsibility of recommending home appliances. As always, let us know what you think of the show! Send us comments and questions at unorthodox@tabletmag.com, or leave us a voicemail at (914) 570-4869. You can also record a voice memo on your smartphone and email it to us. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to get new episodes, photos, and more. Join our Facebook group, and follow Unorthodox on Twitter and Instagram. Get a behind-the-scenes look at our recording sessions on our YouTube channel! Get your Unorthodox T-shirts, mugs, and baby onesies at bit.ly/unorthoshirt. Want to book us for a live show? Email producer Josh Kross at jkross@tabletmag.com. Check out all of Tablet's podcasts at tabletmag.com/podcasts. Sponsors: KOL Foods wants to give you a free turkey breast! Head to KOLFoods.com and use promo code UnorthodoxRH while you check out for 10% off your order. If you're one of the first 15 new customers to order, you'll get a free turkey breast The Institute for Jewish Spirituality presents The Shofar Project  an incredible, free program. It runs throughout the month of Elul, right up to Rosh Hashanah. Sign up at jewishspirituality.org. Harry's is a great shave at a great price. Get a Harry's trial shave set for just $3 at harrys.com/unorthodox. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Consumer Talk with Michael Finney
June 12, 2021: What's Different About Prime Day This Year

Consumer Talk with Michael Finney

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2021 11:45


Nathan Burrow, Deals Editor of New York Times' Wirecutter explains What's Different About Prime Day This Year See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

PhotoActive
Episode 94: All About SD Cards

PhotoActive

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 33:51


You can shoot the most amazing photos using the best gear you can afford, but it doesn't mean anything if the pixels you capture aren't saved to a storage card. In this episode, Kirk and Jeff talk about SD cards: what do the symbols on the card stand for? What speeds are good? How best to transfer images from the camera to the computer? What capacities should you buy? If your camera includes two card slots, do you write to them sequentially or for simultaneous backup? And how in the world did Jeff manage to shoot a Hawaiian sunset and end up with zero images? Hosts: Jeff's website (https://jeffcarlson.com), Jeff's photos (https://jeffcarlson.com/portfolio/), Jeff on Instagram (http://instagram.com/jeffcarlson) Kirk's website (https://www.kirkville.com), Kirk's photos (https://photos.kirkville.com), Kirk on Instagram (https://instagram.com/mcelhearn) Subscribe to the PhotoActive Instagram account (http://instagram.com/photoactive_podcast/) Show Notes: (View show notes with images at PhotoActive.co (https://www.photoactive.co/home/episode-94-sd-cards)) Rate and Review the PhotoActive Podcast! (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/photoactive/id1391697658?mt=2) SD memory cards: The features and specifications to look for (https://www.macworld.com/article/3208766/sd-memory-cards-the-features-and-specifications-to-look-for.html) Charge and connect with the USB-C port on your iPad – Apple Support (https://support.apple.com/en-gb/HT209186) The Best USB-C Memory Card Readers (https://jeffcarlson.com/2017/07/26/the-best-usb-c-memory-card-readers/) Update to My USB-C Memory Card Reader Article: Verbatim (https://jeffcarlson.com/2017/09/25/update-to-my-usb-c-memory-card-reader-article-verbatim/)   The 16 Best USB-C Cables and Adapters 2021 | Reviews by Wirecutter (https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/reviews/best-usb-c-cables/) Cig Harvey (Instagram) (https://www.instagram.com/cigharvey/) Our Snapshots: Jeff: NITECORE FX1 Digital USB Camera Battery Charger (https://amzn.to/3fG0cTk) Kirk: Blue Violet (https://amzn.to/3vR3ysa), by Cig Harvey Subscribe to the PhotoActive podcast newsletter at the bottom of any page at the PhotoActive web site (https://photoactive.co) to be notified of new episodes and be eligible for occasional giveaways. If you've already subscribed, you're automatically entered. If you like the show, please subscribe in iTunes/Apple Podcasts (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/photoactive/id1391697658?mt=2) or your favorite podcast app, and please rate the podcast. And don't forget to join the PhotoActive Facebook group (https://www.facebook.com/groups/photoactivecast/) to discuss the podcast, share your photos, and more. Disclosure: Sometimes we use affiliate links for products, in which we receive small commissions to help support PhotoActive.

Wharton FinTech Podcast
Quicken CEO Eric Dunn – Pioneering Fintech and Transforming Personal Finance Technology

Wharton FinTech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 36:34


Miguel Armaza sits down with Eric Dunn, CEO of Quicken, one of the largest personal finance software companies in the US with over 17 million clients and also one of the original fintech brands, launched over 30 years ago. In this episode, they discuss: - Eric's career and why he decided to join Intuit in 1986 as employee #4! - Becoming an investor and reflections from the years he spent in Venture Capital + how it made him a better operator - Quicken's journey and some of their challenges and reflections from 35+ years - Thought process behind Intuit's decision to spin off Quicken - His management approach and frameworks to make strategic company decisions - Analysis of a fast-growing fintech space - And a lot more! Eric Dunn Eric has served as the CEO of Quicken Inc since 2016. He has been part of the Quicken business since its early days – he joined Intuit, Quicken's previous owner, as employee #4 in 1986, when Quicken was the only Intuit software product. Over the course of his 20 years at Intuit Eric served as the CFO through the 1993 IPO and merger with ChipSoft (TurboTax); while he was CFO, he was also a software developer who worked on almost all of the early versions of Quicken; he was the first VP/general manager of the Quicken business; he was Intuit's first CTO; and then led Intuit's payments business during an additional tour of duty at Intuit in 2010-2015. Eric retired from Intuit in 2000 to pursue a second career in technology investing, first as an angel investor and then as a General Partner at Cardinal Venture Capital. Eric has served on the boards of directors of dozens of companies and organizations, including six public companies. Eric is married and has two children, both recently graduated from college and employed. In his free time, Eric plays tennis and squash and is a piano student. He is also a helicopter pilot and flies a Robinson R66. About Quicken Quicken is the #1 personal finance software in the US. For over 30 years, customers have relied on Quicken to manage all their finances, so they can lead healthy financial lives. In 2016, Quicken, formerly part of Intuit, became an independent company. Its desktop and cloud product suite includes a family of products that cater to different financial needs and device preferences — Quicken Starter Edition, Quicken Deluxe, Quicken Premier, and Quicken Home & Business, all of which can sync with Quicken's website and mobile apps — as well as Simplifi for mobile and web. Simplifi, named the "best budgeting app" by The New York Times' Wirecutter, is designed to help a new generation of mobile-first customers easily stay on top of their finances. Over 17 million people have used a Quicken product to manage their finances. Learn more at www.quicken.com.

LGOtv: Big Talk
S2E9 Alisa Cohn

LGOtv: Big Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2021 56:48


What can second acts, professional reinventions, and Broadway teach you about uncovering the best in other people?Join Laura Gassner Otting as she hosts this episode of LGOtv with special guest, Alisa Cohn - Startup Mastermind, Networking Guru, Kettlebell Queen.Named the Top Startup Coach in the World at the Thinkers50/Marshall Goldsmith Global Coaches Awards in London, Alisa Cohn has been coaching startup founders to grow into world-class CEOs for nearly 20 years. A one-time startup CFO, Alisa has worked with startups such as Venmo, Etsy, The Wirecutter, Mack Weldon, and Tory Burch. She has also coached CEOs and C-Suite executives at enterprise clients such as  Dell, Hitachi, Sony, IBM, Google, Microsoft, Bloomberg, The New York Times, and Calvin Klein.

Windows Central Podcast
Motion Sickness

Windows Central Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2021 102:49


AMD's Ryzen 5000 series mobile processors are here as Intel goes after Apple with an ad featuring Justin Long. Daniel and Zack Also have news in Windows 10 build 21337, Surface Duo March 2021 update, a review of the Xbox Wireless Headset, and more. Links: Windows 10 build 21337 rolls out to Insiders with improvements to Virtual Desktops and File Explorer | Windows Central How to pick the right AMD Ryzen 5000 Mobile processor | Windows Central Xbox Wireless Headset vs. Turtle Beach Stealth 700 (Gen 2): Battle of the Bluetooth | Windows Central 'I'm a Mac' guy swaps to PCs in Intel's latest set of attack ads | Windows Central Surface Duo receives its March 2021 Android security and firmware update | Windows Central Microsoft Teams gets trashed by Wirecutter, highlights lingering issues with consumer push | Windows Central Sponsors: Hello Fresh With HelloFresh, you get fresh, pre-measured ingredients and mouthwatering seasonal recipes delivered right to your door. Go to HelloFresh.com/wcp10 and use code wcp10 for 10 free meals, including free shipping!

Making Marketing
BenchMade Modern’s Edgar Blazona on getting customers to buy high-end furniture online

Making Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2021 33:01


When the New York Times writes about your product, sales inevitably explode. That’s at least what high-end sofa company BenchMade Modern experienced. It was featured in a trend story in 2016 and then, in 2019, became highly rated on the newspaper’s review website the Wirecutter (it remains the site’s top choice). When the Wirecutter review hit, said founder Edgar Blazona, “our web numbers spiked.” Blazona joined the Modern Retail Podcast and spoke about how he’s grown his company over the years. This isn’t his first furniture foray. In the 2000s he began selling modern children’s furniture online on websites like Wayfair. But he decided to get into the sofa game in 2015. BenchMade Modern makes furniture that averages between $3,000 and $6,000. It focuses on having as short of a lead time as possible while still being custom made. Currently, its lead time time averages five weeks, but Blazona said it can be as low as three. Unsurprisingly, the last year was big for the company. Sales did nosedive in March, which caused BenchMade Modern to temporarily pivot to manufacturing PPE. But in May, things picked back up as people were stuck at home and in need of nicer furniture. According to Blazona, revenue went up 100% year-over-year in 2020. The focus now is on keeping this growth. Blazona said the company is still facing some supply chain hiccups, but he doesn’t think demand for furniture is going to dip post-pandemic. The company has slowly been adding new products like rugs and lighting. The strategy, he said, is “just fine-tuning all of that and adding these new categories so that we can be a little bit more of a one-stop-shop.”

Up Next In Commerce
Building the Ultimate DTC Marketplace

Up Next In Commerce

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2021 41:05


If it seems like a new DTC brand is launching every day, that’s because it’s true. In every industry, across every vertical, on every channel, the next “big thing” is competing for your attention, your clicks and your cash. As a consumer, sifting through all that noise and filtering out which companies are worth your time can be a daunting task. And as a brand, it begs the question: how do you set yourself apart from the ever-growing pack?One option is to find a trusted source to vouch for you. Matthew Hayes can be that source, and his new marketplace, The Fascination, is where he wants to lift up some of the most worthy DTC brands coming to market.The Fascination is a product recommendation and reviews publication focused on emerging and purpose-driven direct-to-consumer brands, large and small. Users of the platform have the ability to filter through vetted brands, digest the company’s story, and even transact all in one place.On this episode of Up Next in Commerce, Matthew dives into lessons he learned while building Leesa Sleep, why curation is so important in the rapidly expanding direct to consumer space, and gives his take on why the convergence of media and commerce will be the one thing that impacts ecommerce the most. Plus, I even pull out a few stories from his trip to Richard Branson’s Necker Island.Main Takeaways:Curation Station: The saturation of the market with a new DTC brand every day is creating issues for consumers and brands alike. With so much clutter, it’s hard to stand out. Through measurable metrics, in-depth reviews, and by holding brands up to certain benchmarks, The Fascination created a space that customers can trust, and brands want to be listed. Layers of Use: For a brand to stand out, The Fascination has found that being mission-driven, promoting social good, and leaning into and highlighting the unique aspects of your business will be the most effective strategy. Lessons Learned: While not everyone can pick the brains of the biggest entrepreneurs in the world, when you get the chance, it’s wise to listen. Matthew was able to visit Necker Island and spend time with Daymond John, Marie Forleo, Tim Ferris, Seth Godin, and Richard Branson. Tune in to hear what advice they gave that has been helping him to this day.For an in-depth look at this episode, check out the full transcript below. Quotes have been edited for clarity and length.---Up Next in Commerce is brought to you by Salesforce Commerce Cloud. Respond quickly to changing customer needs with flexible Ecommerce connected to marketing, sales, and service. Deliver intelligent commerce experiences your customers can trust, across every channel. Together, we’re ready for what’s next in commerce. Learn more at salesforce.com/commerce---Transcript:Stephanie:Hey everyone. And welcome back to Up Next in Commerce. This is your host, Stephanie Postles, co-founder at mission.org. Today, I'm chatting with Matthew Hayes, the co-founder at The Fascination and previously on the founding team at Leesa Sleep. Matt, welcome to the show.Matthew:Thanks for having me.Stephanie:Yeah, I'm very glad to have you on. So I was hoping we could start with maybe Leesa Sleep. Because when I saw that I'm like, "Whoa, you were like an OG in the D-to-C space," and I thought they'd be a good jumping off point.Matthew:Yeah. So I was part of the founding team at Leesa. Yeah, we launched it back in 2014 before everything exploded. Right? So we were very early. We were one of the first BedInABox brands to get out there, Tuft & Needle came maybe, I don't know, six months to a year before us. Casper was literally right before us. And then we were out right around Thanksgiving of 2014 and that whole industry just exploded under our feet. We had the wind at our back for most of our tenure, especially our growth years. But things are a lot different now and t's a different ball game in terms of launch and growing a D-to-C brand in 2021.Stephanie:Good. Tell me a bit about the differences. I mean, obviously the world is very different and there's a lot of new trends coming out about what to expect over the next couple of years, but are there any lessons that you took away from Leesa that are still relevant or is the world just like in such a different place now?Matthew:No, I think it's still really relevant. I think a lot of the stuff that we were learning as we grew is incredibly relevant to the way that we launched The Fascination, the way that brand founders are thinking about things now. When we first launched in 2015, cost of acquisition were beautiful. Like all day we could scale the auctions across Facebook and Google, were very, maybe a fifth of what they are now just in terms of competitiveness. Just, I mean the mattress industry specifically there was 180 entrants after we launched, so a huge amount of volume coming into that space and just generally in D-to-C. So the cost of acquiring just pure play digital customers was going up and people were seeing the writing on the wall and starting to diversify into brick and mortar.Matthew:And so I think that was one of the things that we realized, is we've got to have a diverse channel mix. And so we struck the partnership with West Elm, we leaned more into Amazon. We looked more at international and we actually set up our own brick and mortar stores. So I think the combination of that brand awareness and exposure helped our brand tremendously. Whereas a lot of brands stuck it out, stayed pure plays and they learneD-to-Costly less and overspending on acquisition.Stephanie:Yeah, that's definitely the biggest thing that I see from the past couple of years or past decade is like before you could just focus on paid acquisition, like throw a bunch of money at it and one's really, they're going to come to you either way. And then now it seems like a lot of the, I guess the brands that are ahead are more media companies now, and there's a big spectrum between paying for people versus organic or versus starting a community and then launching a product to them. So it does feel like a definitely a different world than just like pay, and grow, and scale up as you go.Matthew:Yeah. I mean, we're seeing that a lot actually. And I think our notion of how to build a profitable business with The Fascination is quite a bit different. No, we're not a pure play own D-to-C brand selling our own products, we're essentially a marketplace, but what we've done is we've seen the success that media companies have had in building an audience that's super loyal whether that's The Hustle, or Morning Brew or The Scam, all of this audience aggregation and demand with these customer demos, there's so much that you can do with it. And so, we saw a bit of an opportunity and the fragmentation that was happening across D-to-C brand for popping up literally every day. And you start to become a little leery of, is this a good brand? Is this is a good product? Does this align with my values and tastes? And we saw this need for curation across all spectrums of D-to-C really. And we saw an opportunity to really create a media platform and a commercial platform around that.Stephanie:So let's dive into The Fascination a bit. So it's a marketplace. You guys are curating D-to-C brands. I saw you have filters focused on the product technical quality, also the soul of the company. Tell me a little bit more about The Fascination. How do you allow brands into the marketplace? Yeah. And any other details around the platform?Matthew:Yeah, so I mean, people are basically referring to it as a marketplace meets magazine, which I think is an accurate description. It's basically at its core, it's a product recommendation and reviews publication specifically focused on emerging and purpose-driven direct to consumer brands. So in much the same way that Wirecutter or the strategists reviews top products and writes those objective third-party reviews and recommendations, as a media publisher we're really doing that, but we're focusing in on a subset of these D-to-C brands that are new and emerging and have purpose driven values.Matthew:And the idea is to create a single platform where people can come and discover new brands, they can read reviews and research those brands and products, and they can shop deals all in one place. So it's a linear play from discovery all the way through to purchase.Stephanie:Yep. So who are some of your favorite brands on the platform right now?Matthew:There's so many good ones.Stephanie:[inaudible].Matthew:Yeah, I know I'm going to get in trouble for this. We've got badges across the site, which are really cool. The badges call out things like women and minority led businesses, or organic, or made in the USA. And so like Girlfriend Collective is one of our women and minority led brands. Haus is another-Stephanie:Even Haus on, yeah.Matthew:... Yeah, they deal the [inaudible] and great products, great brand story.Stephanie:Delicious.Matthew:Delicious. Yeah. I was just chatting with the founders of Huron, which is a men's skincare line. Awesome story. And then we've got the big names that you'd expect. Like we've got Allbirds on the platform. We've got Warby joining soon if they're not up already any day now. We've got UNTUCKit so, those it's a nice mix of the old school D-to-C incumbents with a lot of really cool emerging brands that honestly I'm intimately involved in direct consumer and a lot of these brands I hadn't heard of for the first time.Matthew:So if you think about like, as it broadens out the halo from the bulls-eye of our tightest demos, there's going to be so many people that are discovering these brands for the first time. And that's really what we want. We want some of these big names to attract people into the site, and then we want a lot of our awesome emerging brands and products to be discovered while you're there.Stephanie:Yeah. That's great. So how are you convincing these larger brands to join the platform? Because I'm thinking your space, I think also is very competitive. I mean, the world right now is headed to a place where everyone wants curated collections. I mean, they don't want to spend a bunch of time everywhere. They want it all in one place. We had the CEO of Fast on talking about, you need the one-click checkout and be able to allow people just to check out instantly and not have to bulk it into a cart. It seems like your space is very competitive too. How are you convincing the Warby Parkers? And the older brands who probably are approached by quite a few marketplace platforms to, "Oh, join us." Why are these brands going with you?Matthew:Well, I think we've really a ton on the story and the user experience and just the overall look and feel of our digital product and what we stand for. I think it's also in our favor that we have been D-to-C operators ourselves and we can really empathize to what these founders need. And we've been fortunate to be in the community for several years now. So we had a few close partners that our spring pad, if you will. Not to mention Nick Sharma as an advisor, who's great at pulling in brands.Stephanie:He was on our show too, man, I was just-Matthew:Yeah, I know.Stephanie:... fortunate.Matthew:And so yeah, between that, and we had some really amazing brands reach out the first day that just totally shocked us. We have a type form application that comes through and we had a couple of 100 brands, including some of the biggest names in the space on day one, which it was super exciting. And just a lot of founders getting really excited by seeing their brands mentioned in our round ups, or seeing products being shared. So I think that the validation that we're starting to provide, and really empathizing with what brand founders need is something that they're really clamoring for. And I think word it gets out fast.Stephanie:Yeah. That's great. So is there any trends you're seeing right now around what customers are most excited about? I mean, I'm guessing you have all this data now and you can see, okay, a bunch of people are coming on during quarantine and buying Haus. We need another type of Appertiff or something to offer that's similar because we see so much engagement there, any trends?Matthew:I think that one of the things that we've seen that's really interesting is our roundup pieces on brands that are making an impact and just the social impact stories are really, really resonating with consumers. And the brands are sharing the stories, which is just amplifying the message that much more. So the general consumer sentiment that we're getting from a qualitative perspective is that a platform like this is very much needed and like, thank you for building it. So I don't think it's even halfway to where we want it to be, or it could be in terms of the overall product development evolution, but we're going to get there quickly.Stephanie:Yep. So how, when you're... You just said that certain stories that you're telling around the brands and the social good aspect of it are really resonating. Is that your main play when it comes to acquiring new customers on your platform is by writing good pieces of content, having the brand share it to get in front of their audiences as well, or how do you think about acquiring new customers?Matthew:Yeah, I mean, customer acquisitions, it's always a challenge for a marketplace like this. And that's why from day one, we didn't approach it as a pure play commercial marketplace where you're just aggregating and selling products. From a consumer perspective, that's really not serving the overall need that we're trying to address, which is discovery, research, and shop and convert. And so the research aspect of that is really where we're going to focus a lot of time and attention and work. And what I mean by that is writing really in depth, thorough product reviews that are authentic, that are meaningful, that consumers value and ultimately Google values that content really highly as well. And so, what I'm getting at is the SEO and organic traction and such. It's going to be a big part of how we grow organically, keep our acquisition costs low.Matthew:There's a lot of performance marketing things that we can and will be doing. Brands have had tremendous interest in doing paid marketing partnerships, whether that's white listing on Facebook, or sponsoring newsletters, or any sponsorships. I think there's a tremendous amount of demand for that. And we really are just dipping our toes into the very first test there. And then I think PR and having, as I said, our brands amplify, our content is also, it's just going to be a latent, organic way to continue to build low cost audience. I mean, I think if you think about the way that Leesa scaled and a lot of those 2015 brand scaled, we know that we can't run the same playbook and build a sustainable business.Matthew:And so as we were launching in early days, it's like being a media company is really hard, right. Coming up with really engaging content every single day, pumping it out, like the Morning Brews and Web Smith's of the world, I take my hat off to those guys because it's not easy, but I think you can already start to see the rewards that we're going to reap from that.Stephanie:Yeah. So what channels are you... Well, maybe actually first, let me talk about the content piece, because that's top of mind for me is, a lot of people say you just need to create good content and that's the key to finding great people. How do you go about brainstorming something that will resonate? Are you actually going through maybe search trends and starting there to see what's going on in the industry, and then writing articles around that? Or is it purely, just like, I want to talk about Haus's story and we're going to talk about what they're doing behind the scenes? Like, how do you brainstorm content?Matthew:It's a mix of all of that actually. So we've got a number of things that we're covering at any one time. A lot of it is when we have new brands onboarded, we've got to write the brand story and we've got to review their products. That's phase one. And that's like an ongoing process as we get up and running. But yeah, we're also looking at industry trends, category wide trends, search trends around specific products or competitive products to see how we can write really compelling content that meets that need.Matthew:And then we're thinking about the cultural relevance, things that are happening topically in everyday life. And we've got a couple of different personas that we look at. And so what are our personas caring about, what's their headspace, and then what are the things that are happening in their specific lives at this very moment in mid January? So as we think through those things, you start to surface really relevant content ideas, and that's where our social content, a lot of our editorial content comes from. And that's generally how we do it.Stephanie:Cool. And what are some of the channels that you're most excited about right now, or you think that there's untapped potential? Are you sticking with the Facebook where of course stick the Facebook? How is sticking with-Matthew:Afterthought.Stephanie:I like that. Hey, they used to be though. Right?Matthew:Yeah. Drop that.Stephanie:Yeah. I mean, when? It's still pretty relevant, but yeah. Are you sticking with Facebook? A lot of other brands still say that's the best place to reach customers. Are you trying out a bunch of new channels and experimenting? How are you thinking about that?Matthew:So Facebook isn't a priority for us right now other than to the extent that we use it for paid social advertising. I would say it's there. Of course it's there. But when we're thinking about building audience, Twitter has been a nice surprise for me, I'm really bummed that I didn't get myself on Twitter several years ago, but Sharon, our audience development team's doing an awesome job of engaging that really passionate community.Matthew:I think LinkedIn has sneaky, organic reach and potential. And we found that a lot of our brand founders are sharing our content there and we're getting a lot of engagement.Stephanie:They're more organic then, right, because LinkedIn is super expensive when it comes to advertising.Matthew:Yeah. All organic. And then stuff like TikTok is interesting as we look at really organic product reviews doing things with founders, I think that's something that we're going to be looking at as well as Clubhouse.Stephanie:Yeah. Clubhouse. I think that's where it's at. I'm on there. I listen to people. I think you can connect with a lot of great people on there. I'm still not sure about the unstructured format sometimes where things can go on for hours and hours, but yeah, it seems like there's a lot of potential there to at least connect with new people. I don't know about selling.Matthew:A lot of untapped potential.Stephanie:Yeah. So I saw that you were also an investor in GRIN. Right. And that's the influencer platform, which is... That's the right brand. Right?Matthew:Yup. [inaudible].Stephanie:Okay. So our guest yesterday that we had on was, that's her favorite new tool that she's looking into and I had not heard of it before. And I'm interested to hear a little bit about how are you thinking about influencers? What attracted you to GRIN, where's that market headed over the next couple of years?Matthew:Yeah. I mean, we've been doing influencer marketing since 2012, honestly. And I think there's going to be a lot more regulation around it for one. So you've got to be buttoned up as you execute itMatthew:So I think that's just part of the industry growing up. A lot of these minors are now celebrities in their own right with huge followings and PR teams. And so the days of just engaging with an influencer that way are over. It's really about adopting a micro/nano strategy where you're activating pockets of a couple thousand followers up to 50 to 100,000 followers and doing it more strategically at scale. And that's where I see a lot of brands and agencies having success doing this stuff. So GRIN is just a really awesome tool for managing that entire workflow. Keeping you really on top of things, you can search for look alikes of an influencer. So if you have someone or something that you want to find influencers around, it's great for that.Stephanie:That's awesome. And how did you think about attribution and analytics around utilizing influencers and seeing if you're really getting the most bang for your buck?Matthew:Yeah. I mean, well, especially with iOS 14 and everything that's going on there, it's always been an imperfect science, we never assume that we would have even close to perfect attribution on influencer activations. So we always treated it very top of funnel and you do what you can in terms of attribution. So you give them trackable UTM parameters, you give them a bespoke promo codes with their name. You give them a landing page experience, everything that you can do to cookie the user on your website and get them into what feels like an authentic customized experience for that loyal following. That's going to increase conversion, I think as much as anything.Matthew:And the vast majority of influencer activity is probably happening on mobile anyway. So wherever you're sending them, it's got to be very mobile optimized because if they switch over, your attribution's lost at that point.Stephanie:Yeah. And I think that authentic piece you're saying, I mean, it has to fit your brand. The person has to not just be saying something just to say it. And I think taking that longer-term approach more of like a partnership and someone who is going to be a part of your brand, even if they start out smaller and grow with you, will be way better than just trying to target a big name, because I normally don't really put any weight in products that large celebrities are showcasing, just because I'm like, I just know how much money you're getting paid and I highly doubt you're using that teeth whitener.Matthew:Yeah, I mean to that point and a lot of grants are basically incentivizing on the CPA or per sale basis with, like you're saying a subset of really loyal influencers and affiliates that they can send that influencer their fall collection of bags and apparel or whatever, and they can get 10 or 15 posts out of it if the influencer continues to see performance. And so I think that's the new way of doing things nowadays.Stephanie:Okay. So yeah, viewing it from a content generation perspective of, they're not just posting once trying to get their product off, but they're also creating an article or blog posts that you can repurpose and pull quotes from or whatever it may be.Matthew:Yeah. And more frequency drives more conversion. So the more you get that brand in front of your audience, the more likely it is they'll finally take action.Stephanie:Yep. So I want to talk a bit about mentorship, which I always love asking questions around this. I saw that you went to Necker Island a few days ago... a few years ago [crosstalk], really? Few years ago. And of course Richard Branson's Island. So I want to hear, what did you learn there? What advice did you hear? I saw, I think Damon John was there, Tim Ferriss, Seth Godin, Marie Forleo, a bunch of great people to learn from. And I want to hear about the stories behind going there. What did you learn, all that?Matthew:Yeah, I mean, it was a life changing experience for sure. Damon is still pretty close to us in the business. He got involved with Leesa after we met, especially with their 110 program, and I really just learn from him the hustle, the grind. He told his story about how he came up with FUBU and really built that business from zero. And so, talking about fundraising with him is a different thing.Matthew:Tim was on the Island too. I was fanboying out when I met Tim actually, because I was obsessed with four hour workweek, four our body and here I'm chatting with him in person. We actually started talking about going up against Casper. At the time, we were pushing pretty heavily into podcasts and Casper was buying up literally every podcast that we could find, that we wanted to go after. And funnily enough, he would really push a micro strategy to us. He said, "You need to go after these very small podcasts that aren't affiliated yet, that have nascent, but growing followings." And we did, we found 10 of those, especially in comedy and gaming, and we stayed with them for years and they ended up crushing for us.Stephanie:Oh, that's great. And did you secure long-term partnerships with this company?Matthew:Yeah, I think we're still working with a few of them honestly.Stephanie:Oh, that's great.Matthew:We just completely sapped the audience, an everyone's got a Leesa now. Yeah. And then we talked with Seth. David and I chatted with Seth Godin, who's a marketing genius. He's like the professor of modern day marketing. And at the time, we had done around 30 million in our first year of sales, which was just crazy. And he was talking about making this leap called crossing the chasm. Basically when you're attacking the early adopter market and you're doing quite well, there's a point at which you have to "cross the chasm" and reach the broader demographic of people. And so I don't remember the tactics that he talked about, but he always impressed that idea of our okay, now we've got to broaden our sphere of influence. We still use that phrase today.Matthew:And then Marie Forleo was there and we had a lot of really good, we like chatted one-on-one several times, because I was incredibly anxious. I've always dealt with anxiety issues in my career, in my past. And so we had some frank chats about vulnerability and putting yourself out there. And once you do that, it just eases the tension, eases the anxiety. And I still use that to this day.Stephanie:Yeah. I was going to say, does it help now? Because I mean, I definitely feel that too. I remember when we first sold this podcast, then they're like, "Oh, Stephanie can new host it?" And just being like, oh, I usually always would have our other team members host the shows and yeah, I liked working behind the scenes and it definitely was hard being like, okay, you just have to do it. You have to get yourself out there. Did it help afterwards thinking through about her advice?Matthew:Yeah, it totally did. And I always think of this idea of demonstrated performance, where it's like, you're nervous about something, you're anxious, you step on stage or you sit in the seat, you put yourself out there and you have a really good performance. And then that just gives you one more step, one more piece of confidence and you keep going and building. And now stuff that I do every day without even looking at my calendar is stuff that I would have just freaked out about all day five years ago. So I think it's just about experience.Stephanie:Yeah. Now I agree. I remember even just thinking about doing video meetings, like when I first was starting out in the corporate world and being like, "Oh, my gosh, my first meeting." I was just so scared and sweaty and nervous and then now taking like 10 a day and being like, not even thinking twice. So yeah, I think just doing the work and pushing past and knowing you'll probably fail a couple of times and who cares?Matthew:Exactly.Stephanie:That's great. And did you meet Richard Branson when you were there?Matthew:Yeah. We met briefly. He gave us a talk which was awesome. He talked a lot about Virgin's impact program, and what he's doing there. And so that was really important to us at the time, because we were setting up our Leesa 110 program and that was cool to hear from him.Stephanie:That's great. So where do you see the next couple of years headed for The Fascination? What are you guys building for? What are you doing in stealth mode right now? What are you planning for the world to look like in a couple of years?Matthew:Yeah, I mean, right now we're really heavily focused on getting the digital product where it needs be to really deliver on a full transactional marketplace that's cutting edge for consumers. So in the next couple of years, we want to have a destination that is super engaging. We want to have brand founders engaging with consumers real time in the platform. We want to have people shopping and reading and researching brands and products all seamlessly, and to be able to buy those products in one click, right? Right on The Fascination.com. And so a lot of things have to happen in the background to obviously make that work.Matthew:And then we're always thinking about, how can we acquire the best customers, bring them in most cost-effectively? And it's always on my mind of like, delivering really solid, meaningful content to the audience, not just fluff stuff, but stuff that's really, really valuable. And so that's what I think we're trying to win.Stephanie:Well. Yeah. It also seems like there's such an opportunity to... I mean, when you have all these brands and they have access to a lot of insights on their customers or who's coming to their website to then build lookalike audiences off of those brands, and then all of a sudden you have access to customers and you're coming from a different angle where maybe if Leesa would have already gotten in front of a customer two times and they're like, "Nah," they then see The Fascination comes in and they're like, "Hey, check out this mattress. It's like a third touch point. That's very separated." But it seems like there's a lot of opportunity there to get insights at a much more accelerated rate than you would get just by yourself.Matthew:Yes. That is the goal. Yeah, there's a whole data infrastructure that we really need to put in place to get the most out of it. And honestly, coming from Leesa for so long, I'm still trying to wrap my head around what that all looks like in terms of affiliate click attribution and how we create audiences and how we do product recommendations. So we're only a month old, but we'll get there. And I can tell you that there is such tremendous demand for what you're talking about. Just leveraging lookalike audiences, leveraging audiences across categories that aren't competitive with one another. At the end of the day, everyone that comes to The Fascination as an interested consumer if we do it right, it's always going to have similar demographic profiles, right. Whether they're a man or a woman. So as you aggregate that at scale, there's a ton of value for brands to be able to tap into that.Stephanie:Yeah. It seems like eventually they'll have to be tools for the merchants as well, to be able to interact with all the platforms they're on. Or like, I mean a lot of sales are moving towards the edge. There's a lot of people say and how do you keep track of that? Like, how do these merchants they're selling on The Fascination, they're selling on Fancy, they're selling on not that Fancy is the same, but there are quite a few places popping up where these brands might be like, "Yeah, I want to sell on that platform or over here," but I don't know if enough tools exist right now to keep track of what you're doing and consolidating it all in one place.Matthew:Yeah. I mean, it's got to be a challenge for these fairly young brands. There's product feed software that'll handle some of that, but at the end of the day there's manual stuff that's always needed once you're drop shipping and wholesaling and you have retail partners. So yeah, we're going to be thinking about it from the other side, just the same, how do you manage 100, 200, 300 merchants and keep them happy?Stephanie:Yeah. Crazy. All right. Well, let's shift over to the lightning round. Lightning round is brought to you by Salesforce commerce cloud. This is where I'm going to ask you a question and you have a minute or less to answer. Are you ready, Matt?Matthew:Yes.Stephanie:One minute to answer. All right. Yeah. Prepare, drink your drink, whatever that may be. All right. First thing, what one thing will have the biggest impact on ecommerce in the next year?Matthew:I think the convergence of content and commerce is, is going to have one of the biggest impacts. You've got media companies that are converging in the commerce, they all want to be transactional. They all want a bigger slice of the pie. They all want more lifetime value extraction from their readership. And then I think on the commerce side you see brands and retailers who are obviously seeing the cost rising of customer acquisition in the traditional sense and creating really rich content. It's the only way to do that. So we're diving in right at the intersection with what we're doing at The Fascination and that's where we saw it going. And that's why I think we're bullish on where we're headed.Stephanie:Yeah. Well, it'll also be interesting to do a recap episode on what's happened since some of these brands got into mixing media with commerce. I mean, I'm thinking about NBC, I think did a whole shoppable TV thing. And I remember seeing them launch that maybe in February or April last year, but I don't know what actually happened. So it'd be fun to do a recap of like, here's who launched in 2020 when it came to mixing media and commerce and here is status update.Matthew:Hopefully we will be one of the givers.Stephanie:Yeah. Hopefully. What's one thing from 2020 that you hope sticks around in 2021?Matthew:I think that we've all had to embrace things like this, just getting on video conferences, not having to present ourselves through this façade, in the office I would have never thought about wearing my hat backwards and rolling around in athleisure. And now that's just the norm for everybody. And kids are on work calls and it's just, the whole thing feels a lot more familial. And even if we do go back to offices, I really have loved that work now feels a little bit closer to home because you're in your home, but also because just the interactions, you see more than you would if everyone was in an office environment.Stephanie:Yeah, I agree. And I think it definitely brings a more human perspective too. Like you're saying, working together, knowing someone's kids, seeing them in the background, and then you also have more, I guess, empathy when a mom or dad's like, "Hey, I got to go do this with my kids." It's like, "Oh yeah, I saw your kid connection." Of course you can, whereas I'd say prior to this. Yeah. Not as much of a leniency, I guess for that. Yeah. That's a good one.Stephanie:What is the funniest story or best story you can think of when it comes to either building up Leesa or building up The Fascination where you're like, "Oh, this is a good time or a good story that really sticks in my brain from those years."Matthew:We've done so many like gimmicky things at Leesa. We were growth hacking like crazy and we were throwing stuff against the wall and not all of it stuck. We did a ton of stuff with Barstool Sports. We maybe did a few influencer integrations that wouldn't go over so well today with certain influencers.Stephanie:And with Barstool, I feel like they're so edgy that they can get you in trouble all these days anyways.Matthew:They're very edgy and we purposely like with all of those podcasters and creators, we're like, go be very authentic. And so you can't tell Barstool like, tame it down and not be authentic. But they were a huge converter for Leesa for several years.Stephanie:That's fun.Matthew:So we did a lot of fun stuff. We sponsored Larry at the gambling goldfish, which was a gold fish swimming around in a tank on Barstool sets, they pulled a mattress behind a truck with a Santa Claus riding on it. But we've also done a lot more admirable things, like we did a sleep out for the homeless. We've done a lot of cool things at Leesa just in the experientials side of things that made it fun.Stephanie:Yeah. I mean I have a love for the gambling goldfish. I want to go check that out. That actually sounds pretty funny.Matthew:Yeah. One more thing that we did is I think it was the 2017 NFL Draft, it's shown on ESPN and all the players are interviewed in their homes. And so we sent the players that we knew would be interviewed on TV, on ESPN Leesa mattresses. And we had them put their Leesa mattress boxes behind them and their families. And we got millions of impressions that night because we had Leesa mattresses all over the air on ESPN Draft.Stephanie:Oh, that's fun. See, I love creative stuff like that, where I mean, as long as it actually converts too, I always have the question about TV, does it actually convert or what happened after everyone saw the mattress behind them? Did you guys see a big uptick in sales, or?Matthew:I don't remember if we did or not. I think we saw a bit of an uptick, but I mean, it was such a low cost stunt to do that. It wasn't a swing for the fences, but we also did a ton of TV in heyday at Leesa. And you can really see the brand awareness effects the TV has even though it's insanely hard to track.Stephanie:Yeah. I agree. What is next on your reading list?Matthew:I'm probably going to do Shoe Dog by Phil Knight.Stephanie:Such a good one. I love that book. Yeah. So inspirational. I highly recommend. If you were to have a podcast, what would it be about and who would your first guest be?Matthew:Well, that's an interesting question because we may very well have one soon.Stephanie:Oh, nice.Matthew:Yeah, I don't know in what format it will be. It may be a podcast. It may just be like Instagram TV stories, but we really want to interview, just do flash interviews with our brand founders, asking about their origin story, asking about what makes their products different, fun facts. And I think a groundswell of really interesting stories like that would be fun.Stephanie:Cool. That sounds good. And then the last one, what's the nicest thing anyone's ever done for you?Matthew:Oh, that's tough. I mean, I there's been so many instances of generosity. I think honestly, giving me a chance to make the career switch that I did, and this is a bit of a shout out to David my co-founder, but he really took a chance on me. He's been super supportive of me for years, and it's really gotten me to where I am today in terms of my career and the place that we're at collectively. So him and the people around me that pushed me to make that leap out of the traditional corporate world of consulting. I was really hesitant to do that coming right out of my MBA and looking at a nice salary, and he was one of those people that pushed me over the top to do that. And I'm thankful for it.Stephanie:That's really cool. Great story. All right, Matt. Well, thanks so much for coming on the show. Where can people find out more about you and The Fascination?Matthew:So about me, you can find me on Twitter at MattDHayes, all one word, and then The Fascination.com. Go check it out.Stephanie:Awesome. Thanks for joining us, Matt.Matthew:All right. Thank you.

Red Hairing: A Batwoman Podcast
RH: A Batwoman Podcast - "Prior Criminal History"

Red Hairing: A Batwoman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2021 49:40


In this episode, we talk about Batwoman season 2, episode 2, “Prior Criminal History”. This episode has everything: bats in chest cavities, bats in buses, blood bags in coats, casual car stabbings - it was action packed! We are loving Ryan, but not liking how she is being treated, Julia has a really rough episode, and Alice’s plan to get Safiyah’s attention is crazy! We have an idea for a new podcast and we think it has a lot of potential.        Endorsements:   Shelley - Banana Republic face masks based on their review in a New York Times  Wirecutter article - on Banana Republic’s website it says $25, but the discount is applied at checkout https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/reviews/best-cloth-face-masks/    https://bananarepublic.gap.com/browse/product.do?pid=100795012&irgwc=1&clickid=TH4VFaTVsxyOUBGwUx0Mo38XUkEW%3ASX5RUHIwY0&ap=6&tid=braff9298&siteID=brafcid821952#pdp-page-content       Erin - The Beths https://thebeths.com/    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoobMAB47QLLWOs2_uw33Rw        You can find us on Twitter!    Shelley is @schop23    Erin is @erniegreenbean    The show’s Twitter page is @RedHairingPod    You can also contact us via email at redhairingpod@gmail.com  

Leaders Of Transformation | Leadership Development | Conscious Business | Global Transformation

Named the Top Startup Coach in the World at the Thinkers50/Marshall Goldsmith Global Coaches Awards in London, Alisa Cohn has been coaching startup founders to grow into world-class CEOs for nearly 20 years. A onetime startup CFO, strategy consultant, and current angel investor and advisor, she was named a top 30 “Global Guru” and has worked with startups such as Venmo, Etsy, The Wirecutter, Mack Weldon, and Tory Burch. She has also coached CEOs and C-Suite executives at enterprise clients such as Dell, Hitachi, Sony, IBM, Google, Microsoft, Bloomberg, The New York Times, and Calvin Klein. Alisa is a sought after speaker and has keynoted events for companies such as IBM, PwC, Dell, Standard Chartered Bank, and Citi. Inc named Alisa one of the top 100 leadership speakers. Alisa is a guest lecturer at Harvard and Cornell Universities, Henley Business School and the Naval War College. Marshall Goldsmith selected Alisa as one of his Marshall Goldsmith 100 Coaches - a gathering of the top coaches in the world. She is the executive coach for Runway--the incubator at Cornell NYC Tech that helps post-docs commercialize their technology and build companies. She serves on the board of the Cornell Advisory Council. She has coached public and political figures including the former Supreme Court Chief Justice of Sri Lanka and the first female minister in the transitional government of Afghanistan. Her articles have appeared in HBR, Forbes, and Inc and she has been featured as an expert on Bloomberg TV, the BBC World News and in the New York Times. A recovering CPA, she is also a Broadway investor in productions which have won two Tony Awards and is prone to burst into song at the slightest provocation. What We Discuss with Alisa Cohn in This Episode How she became the #1 Startup Coach in the world Scaling your leadership and your startup company How startup CEOs need to show up differently than founders Maintaining the same family culture as your startup grows Managing and pivoting through the COVID pandemic Questions to shift your mindset The mind-body connection and peak performance Episode Show Notes: https://tinyurl.com/4qlnovqo

Wicked Writers
Thom Dunn_Musician and Writer_January 26, 2021

Wicked Writers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2021 45:14


Thom Dunn is a Boston-based writer, musician, and utterly terrible dancer. He is currently a staff writer for the New York Times' Wirecutter and a blogger at BoingBoing, as well as the singer/guitarist of the Roland High Life. As a journalist and political commentator, Thom has appeared on several national and international radio programs discussing issues ranging from gun violence to climate change to the Irish language, and his writing has appeared on Upworthy, the Weather Channel, Vice, and more. He is also a Huntington Playwriting Fellow, whose work has been commissioned by Cornell University and performed and read in cities from Boston to New York to Hollywood to Alaska. Visit his website at www.thomdunn.info and find him on social @thomdunn. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/wickwriters/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/wickwriters/support

HomeKit Insider
Special Interview with Molekule CEO Jaya Rao

HomeKit Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2020 37:20


Logitech released its first HomeKit Secure Video doorbell, the Circle View and we have a special interview with Molekule Co-Founder and CEO, Jaya Rao. We discuss the negative review from The Wirecutter given at their launch, and what sets Molekule apart form other air purifiers. Send us your HomeKit questions and recommendations with the hashtag homekitinsider. Tweet and follow our hosts at @andrew_osu and @stephenrobles or email us here. Find us in your favorite podcast player by searching for "HomeKit Insider" and support the show by leaving a 5-Star rating and comment in Apple Podcasts. Subscribe and listen to our AppleInsider Daily podcast for the latest Apple news Monday through Friday. You can find it on Apple Podcasts, Overcast, or anywhere you listen to podcasts. Links from the show AppleInsider 2020 HomeKit Holiday Gift Guide Air Purification, Reinvented by Molekule Molekule Air Mini+ on Amazon Logitech releases HomeKit Secure Video-enabled smart doorbell Logitech Circle View Wired Doorbell | Apple Store Pronouncing Meross Those interested in sponsoring the show can reach out to us at: andrew@appleinsider.com

The Next Track
Episode #197 - I'm Not an Audiophile, But...

The Next Track

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2020 30:48


A comment by a tech reviewer incited us to discuss who is qualified to pass judgment on the audio quality of devices. We discuss this with our favorite audiophile, Chris Connaker. Help support The Next Track by making regular donations via Patreon. We're ad-free and self-sustaining so your support is what keeps us going. Thanks! Support The Next Track (https://www.patreon.com/thenexttrack). Guest: Chris Connaker (https://audiophilestyle.com) Chris Connaker on The Next Track (https://www.thenexttrack.com/guests/chris-connaker) Show notes: Apple HomePod mini Review: Siri in a Compact Speaker (Kirk's review) (https://www.intego.com/mac-security-blog/apple-homepod-mini-review-siri-in-a-compact-speaker/) A New Listening Room Part One (https://audiophilestyle.com/ca/bits-and-bytes/a-new-listening-room-part-one-r751/) A New Listening Room Part Two: Acoustics, Speakers, DSP (https://audiophilestyle.com/ca/bits-and-bytes/a-new-listening-room-part-two-acoustics-speakers-dsp-r863/) The Next Track: Episode 167, Tuning the Perfect Music Listening Room (https://www.thenexttrack.com/170) Apple HomePod Review - An Audiophile Perspective (https://audiophilestyle.com/ca/reviews/apple-homepod-review-an-audiophile-perspective-r697/) Can a Good Soundbar Rival a True Surround-Sound System in a Blind Listening Test? (Wirecutter) (https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/blog/soundbar-vs-surround-sound-system/) Amazon Music HD Is Still Lossy (https://audiophilestyle.com/ca/bits-and-bytes/update-amazon-music-hd-is-still-lossy-r961/) Episode #159 - Has Lossless and High-Resolution Audio Finally Come to the Masses? (https://www.thenexttrack.com/162) Josh.ai (https://www.josh.ai) Our next tracks: Brian Eno: Film Music 1976 - 2020 (https://amzn.to/33gGVRF) Spooky Tooth: Spooky Two (https://amzn.to/362iCZj) If you like the show, please subscribe in iTunes (https://itunes.apple.com/podcast/the-next-track/id1116242606) or your favorite podcast app, and please rate the podcast. Special Guest: Chris Connaker.

All Of It
Making the Most of WFH

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2020 13:28


With remote work looking like it may last into next summer, and schools on the verge of going all remote, Wirecutter senior staff writer Melanie Pinola, who specializes in remote work settings, will share some ways to make the most of working from home and offer suggestions to help children with remote learning. 

Screaming in the Cloud
Great Managers Are Elastic with Courtney Wilburn

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2020 33:12


Courtney Wilburn is the engineering manager of cloud SRE tooling at Elastic. She brings more than 15 years of experience to the role, having previously worked as a lead DevOps engineer at Wirecutter, a developer at O3 World, a programmer analyst at Wharton Business School, and a systems analyst at the University of Pennsylvania, among other positions. Join Corey and Courtney as they talk about how great a service Wirecutter is but why it’s also sorta creepy at the same time; why it’s exciting to work at Elastic; Courtney’s experience being a Black woman in tech and how she’s forged her own path to get to where she is; how Courtney believes that Elastic is walking the walk when it comes to building a warm, inclusive work environment; what Courtney does as the engineering manager for cloud SRE tooling at Elastic; the lackluster logos of AWS products; the joys of building mechanical keyboards; and more.