Podcasts about DS

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 1,611PODCASTS
  • 10,566EPISODES
  • 1h 12mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 17, 2021LATEST

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about DS

Show all podcasts related to ds

Latest podcast episodes about DS

Game Over, el primer programa satirico sobre videojuegos.
Game Over 724, temporada 22: Deadly Premonition 2 – A Blessing in Disguise

Game Over, el primer programa satirico sobre videojuegos.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021


Sumario: Noticias. El juego de la semana: Deadly Premonition 2 – A Blessing in Disguise (Nintendo Switch). La sección de los oyentes. Descarga el programa.

Radio Free Nintendo
Episode 743: Little King's Cow Communication Network

Radio Free Nintendo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 227:05


FEATURING: (00:01:53) New Business - Metroid Dread(00:57:41) Switch OLED Model(01:23:37) Xander and the Dr. Mario World Marathon(01:36:14) RetroActive Little King's Story

UNITEDcast
UNITEDcast #538 - É tudo culpa da TETA....Treta! (Tokyo Revengers)

UNITEDcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 74:08


Olá pessoas do UNITEDcast, no episódio dessa semana nossos podcasters TETARAM junto com os personagens de Tokyo revengers. Vem tretar com a gente também!   Participantes: Ds, Ana, Kurt, Vitor   Edição: Ana Paula - Compre na nossa LOJA: Use o Cupom: unitedcast https://unitedstore.com.br – Mande seu Email: Mande um audio: Whatsapp Email: podcast@animeunited.com.br – Apoie o UNITEDcast: Compre na AMAZON pelo Nosso Link: https://amzn.to/2WjH5kMSeja um FODEROSO do nosso Apoia-se: https://apoia.se/unitedcast Assista ao vivo no nosso Canal do Youtube! – Assine o UNITEDcast: Spotify: Segue a gente por lá! iTunes: Adiciona a gente lá! Google Podcasts: Assine Agora! – Links do Episódio: Twitch do DS: https://twitch.tv/dsunited – Nos Siga: Twitter do DS: https://twitter.com/odaltonsilveira Instagram do DS: https://www.instagram.com/odaltonsilveira/ Fabebook da United: https://www.facebook.com/animeunitedoficial Twitter da United: https://twitter.com/animeunitedBR Instagram da United: https://www.instagram.com/animeunitedbr/

The All Things Nintendo Podcast
Animal Crossing Updates, Pokémon Brilliant Diamond | All Things Nintendo

The All Things Nintendo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021


Last week's debut episode was full of exciting Nintendo news, but this week might be even more jam-packed with big topics! Host Brian Shea is joined by fellow Game Informer editor John Carson to chat about all kinds of topics including the recently announced Animal Crossing: New Horizons updates, John's impressions of Pokémon Brilliant Diamond & Shining Pearl, Nickelodeon All-Star Brawl, and plenty more! If you'd like to follow the people from this episode on Twitter, hit the following links: Brian Shea (@brianpshea), John Carson (@John_Carson) The All Things Nintendo podcast is a weekly show where we can celebrate, discuss, and break down all the latest games, news, and announcements from the industry's most recognizable name. Each week, Brian is joined by different guests to talk about what's going on in the world of Nintendo. Along the way, they'll share personal stories, uncover hidden gems in the eShop, and even look back on the classics we all grew up with. A new episode hits every Friday! Be sure to subscribe to All Things Nintendo on your favorite podcast platform. The show is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Google Podcasts. 00:00:00 – Introduction 00:02:06 – First Nintendo Game/Favorite Nintendo Game 00:17:06 – Grand Theft Auto: The Trilogy – Definitive Edition 00:21:28 – Monster Hunter Rise 00:25:53 – Pokémon Legends: Arceus 00:30:26 – Animal Crossing: New Horizons 2.0 + Happy Home Paradise 00:50:55 – Pokémon Brilliant Diamond & Shining Pearl 01:07:43 – Nickelodeon All-Star Brawl 01:18:22 – Pokémon Trading Card Game: Celebrations 01:24:30 – Definitive Ranking: Gen IV Pokémon 01:30:51 – eShop Gem of the Week: Unsighted 01:33:20 – eShop Gem of the Week BONUS: Ys Origin If you'd like to get in touch with the All Things Nintendo podcast, you can do so by emailing AllThingsNintendo@GameInformer.com, tweeting to Brian (@BrianPShea), or by joining the official Game Informer Discord server. You can do that by linking your Discord account to your Twitch account and subscribing to the Game Informer Twitch channel. From there, find the All Things Nintendo channel under "Community Spaces." For more Game Informer podcasts, be sure to check out The Game Informer Show, which covers the weekly happenings of the video game industry, and Video Gameography with host Ben Reeves, which explores the history of video games – one series at a time!

NWR Connectivity
Episode 294: Metroid Dread Spoilercast

NWR Connectivity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 142:32


In which we spoil Metroid Dread. Don't listen to this if you don't want us to spoil Metroid Dread. No really. Connectivity has joined Twitter, so be sure to follow @ConnectivityNWR to be up to date on any announcements. We are wanting more listener participation, so feel free to ask questions, they may show up in the show! Please send in some hard-hitting questions for the Connectivity gang to ponder over: the address is connectivity@nintendoworldreport.com

Giant Bomb Presents
Giant Bomb Presents: Jeff Bakalar and Matt Rorie on Discord 2

Giant Bomb Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021


Rorie and Bakalar dip into the Giant Bomb Discord to chat with the fine folks over there to answer their burning questions, again!

The Game Informer Show
Back 4 Blood Review And Pokemon Legends: Arceus Isn't Open World? | GI Show

The Game Informer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021


We're back with another exciting episode of The Game Informer Show! Join us on another busy week in the industry where we break down our review thoughts on Back 4 Blood, discuss the news that Pokémon Legends: Arceus isn't exactly open world, and preview Pokémon Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl! We also chat about our time in the Halo Infinite test flight and Battlefield 2042 Open Beta with special guest Kahlief Adams from Spawn On Me and Riot Games! As always, we round out the show with another fun round of community emails in one of the sillier episodes we've had in a while. Follow the crew on Twitter: Alex Stadnik (@Studnik76), Alex Van Aken (@itsVanAken), John Carson (@John_Carson), and Kahlief Adams (@KahliefAdams) The Game Informer Show is a weekly gaming podcast covering the latest video game news, industry topics, exclusive reveals, and reviews. Join hosts Alex Stadnik and Alex Van Aken every Thursday to chat about your favorite games – past and present – with Game Informer staff, developers, and special guests from all around the industry. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app. Check out the timestamps below to jump to a particular point in the discussion: 00:00:00 – Introduction 00:01:55 – Reintroducing Special Guest Kahlief Adams 00:14:05 – Pokémon Legends: Arceus Is Not Open World 00:31:35 – Back 4 Blood Review Discussion 00:57:18 – The Playlist 00:57:52 – Pokémon Brilliant Diamond And Shining Pearl 01:07:35 – Battlefield 2042 01:16:46 – Halo Infinite 01:33:45 – Listener Emails

Talk Nintendo Podcast
Episode 266: Our Romance Game Is Hello Neighbor

Talk Nintendo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 97:32


It's Metroid Dread week and the entire gang has been jamming out to this fantastic game! Alex has been doing so on his brand new OLED Switch and has impressions of the new hardware. And FINALLY the long awaited return of Mystery Reversery! Hosted by Perry Burkum (@PBurkum), Casey Gibson (@Case_Jets), and Alex Culafi (@culafia) Will update once Jerry wakes up and sends 'em my way. Thank you for listening! We can tell that you are a good-looking person. Peep the discord: https://discord.gg/XPByvgvByQ Please write in to the show at TNP@NintendoWorldReport.com Tweet us @TalkNintendoPod and Instagram us at talknintendopodcast Please consider supporting us on Patreon! For just $1 you can get access to tons of exclusive content! Check us out at www.patreon.com/nwr

WOE.BEGONE
42: Absence makes the heart grow fond.

WOE.BEGONE

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 23:06


Mike always gets to talk, but he never gets to listen. He usually doesn't want to listen, but it would be nice to at least have the option. (Next week will be an intermission!) Vote for WOE.BEGONE in the Audioverse Awards: http://audioverseawards.com/vote WOE.BEGONE: Music From The Podcast Season 2 is now available for $5+ patrons and on bandcamp at http://woebegonepod.bandcamp.com . Listen to 20 songs from the season 2 soundtrack remixed, remastered, and fleshed out. I'm taking questions for a monthly Q&A for $2+ patrons! Get access to early episodes, instrumentals, extra art, The Diary of Aliza Schultz spinoff podcast, exclusive Discord channels, clips of my cat meowing during recording, and full-length director's commentary on episodes on Patreon. http://patreon.com/woe_begone PATREON: http://patreon.com/woe_begone ALIZA SCHULTZ: http://anchor.fm/alizaschultz TRANSCRIPTS: http://WOEBEGONEPOD.com TWITTER: @WOEBEGONEPOD REDDIT: /r/DOGCATCHER and /r/WOEBEGONE MUSIC: http://woebegonepod.bandcamp.com DISCORD: https://discord.gg/pn9kjTBYPD Thanks to all of my patrons: Aaron Richardson, Alex LeMire, Allison Bourgeois, Anthony Ess, Ashley Moo, Austin Sleeper, Ben Rowe, BertBert, Brendon Liner, Broro, Brynne C, C(l)ow(n)girl, Catherine Draper, CeCe Byrnes, Charlie Kininmonth, Chris McDaniel, Christopher Fox, clydmica haley, cookiedoughgelato, Cooper Dukes, D S, Dairy the A.I. Union Representative, Daniel Jenkins, David Ault, EleanorInTheWoods, Elizabeth Kirkman, Elliott K, Erin G, Erinna, fbt, Giles Barton-Owen, goodoledev, Grey, harrison minnix, HarveyJane, Indrid Cold, Jason Li, Jay, Jaz Vallin, jean, Jesse Grace, Jessica Longaker, JMaths, johnny bazookatone, Julia B, KateSherrod, Kevin Berrey, Kiesha Hill, Lekha Shupeck, Lucia Dubra, Maple Autumn, marie koo, Marn S., Matthew Robertson, Melvis Grey Mystery, Mitch Gerads, Monica Quirk, Morgan Jackson, n13e86, Nora V., Paul Ainsworth, Paul Harvey, Paul S, Pineapple, Plumule, Rick Platinum, Risky Coffee, Rowan, Ryan is bitter about Mike's Scruff messages, S. R. Jenkins, Samantha Töpfer, Seanability, Shannon M, Shy Ruff, Si !!, Sophie, SRaye96, Sydney D'Agostino, Tarabyte3, Toasty warm hamster, Tom P, and weiing.

Side Retired Podcast
Series Recap: Astros advance to ALCS

Side Retired Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 15:31


Dylan is joined by White Sox semi Fan Joe Bannon and Houston Native James Taussig as the 3 discuss the Astros-White Sox ALDS. Topics include Grandal's controversial lean, the horrible AL Central, can the Astros ever be trusted? Plus, who should Yankee fans root for in the ALCS? And finally the guys give their predictions for the ALCS.  This is episode 2 of the 4 part DS recaps, episode 1 is below this regarding the Red Sox - Rays, the 2 National League series' will be released when the series' conclude!  To join the fun, interact with the guys and be a part of a future episode, reach out @SideRetiredPod on twitter, our DMs are always open! 

Renewable Energy SmartPod
The 'Three Ds' Driving the Energy Transition

Renewable Energy SmartPod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 35:40


Bob Yeager, President of Emerson's Power and Water Solutions, joins the show to outline the three Ds that will play a huge role in future of the energy industry: Decarbonization, Decentralization and Digitalization (3:41).Bob delves into how FERC Order No. 2222 stands to reshape the power sector (12:18), how improved analytics might have reduced the severity of the Texas energy crisis (19:30) and how the process for purchasing energy might one day come to resemble ordering an Uber -- on your phone and whenever you need it. PODBRIEFRead more about Bob Yeager's Uber-istic vision for the future of power.Nick Ferris from Energy Monitor on the reliability of fossil fuel energy sources, or lack thereof.Email me your COP26 Insights - sean.mcmahon@futurenet.comSign up for the Renewable Energy SmartBriefEmerson - Consider It Solved

The Lucky Few
136. Health & Fitness.. but make it simple. (Ft. Megan Libassi, Oxygen Fitness Coaching)

The Lucky Few

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 30:29


Raise your hand if you feel like you have no time or energy to work out! And maybe you spend so much time caring for your kiddos that you put your own health on the back-burner. And let's face it, after a full day of therapies or an intense IEP meeting, the last thing you want to do is head to the gym. We're so grateful we found Megan Libassi, a fitness coach and a mom to a little one with Down syndrome, who created Oxygen Fitness Coaching! She specializes in work out programs for mamas of children with DS that are sustainable and stress-free, because she gets it! And on today's episode, Megan is sharing tips for health and wellness + why it's so important to care for your health (our kids are watching us!) Remember friends, you are not alone in your parenting journey, or your fitness journey! We are cheering for you! -- SHOW NOTES Sign up for one of Megan's awesome fitness programs! Use code THELUCKYFEW for a discount! Instagram: @oxygenfitcoach Facebook: facebook.com/oxygenfitcoach LET'S CHAT Email hello@theluckyfewpodcast.com with your questions and Good News for future episodes. HELP US SHIFT THE NARRATIVE Interested in partnering with The Lucky Few Podcast as a sponsor? Email hello@theluckyfewpodcast.com for more information! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/theluckyfewpod/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theluckyfewpod/support

Radio Free Nintendo
Episode 742: Sora and His Attorney Join the Contractually Dictated Non-Violence

Radio Free Nintendo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 140:48


FEATURING: (00:02:43) Sora in Smash(00:55:29) New Business - Lost Judgment.(01:13:59) Super Metroid(01:23:45) Metroid Fusion(01:36:15) Metroid Dread(01:46:27) Castlevania Advance Collection

Game Over, el primer programa satirico sobre videojuegos.
Game Over 723, temporada 21: Cyberpunk 2077

Game Over, el primer programa satirico sobre videojuegos.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021


Programa especial final de temporada 21. Juego de la semana: Cyberpunk 2077 (PC, PS4, XBox One, Stadia). Descarga el programa.

Mouthin Off Sports
Fixin' To Talk Sports Episode 48

Mouthin Off Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 63:35


Ryan and DS preview the Division Series round for the MLB postseason as well as give their reactions to the Wild Card games and picks for the rest of the playoffs! Make sure you follow us @FixinTalkSports as well as the rest of the podcasts under the Mouthin Off Sports umbrella: Foxborough Files @FilesFoxborough The Cool Zone @TheCoolZonePod Mouthin Off Sports Show @MouthinOffRadio

The All Things Nintendo Podcast
Sora In Smash, Metroid Dread, Switch OLED, And The Recent Direct | All Things Nintendo

The All Things Nintendo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021


Welcome to the very first episode of the All Things Nintendo podcast! Join host Brian Shea as he welcomes fellow Game Informer editors Alex Stadnik and Ben Reeves to talk about all the latest in the world of Nintendo. The crew kicks off the episode talking about the games that made them a Nintendo fan in the first place before talking about their favorite Nintendo games of all time. From there, they launch into a discussion of the biggest news that came out of the recent Nintendo Direct, plus discussions about Sora from Kingdom Hearts coming to Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, Metroid Dread, and the new Nintendo Switch OLED model. If you'd like to follow the people from this episode on Twitter: Brian Shea (@brianpshea), Alex Stadnik (@Studnik76), Ben Reeves (@benjaminreeves) The All Things Nintendo podcast is a weekly show where we can celebrate, discuss, and break down all the latest games, news, and announcements from the industry's most recognizable name. Each week, Brian is joined by different guests to talk about what's going on in the world of Nintendo. Along the way, they'll share personal stories, uncover hidden gems in the eShop, and even look back on the classics we all grew up with. A new episode hits every Friday! Be sure to subscribe to All Things Nintendo on your favorite podcast platform. The show is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Google Play (coming soon!). 00:00:00 – Introduction 00:02:10 – First Nintendo Game/Favorite Nintendo Game 00:19:51 – Kirby and the Forgotten Land 00:26:00 – Splatoon 3 00:32:52 – Bayonetta 3 00:36:07 – N64 & Genesis Games on Switch 00:41:49 – Sora in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate 00:51:27 – Switch OLED 01:02:00 – Metroid Dread 01:13:00 – eShop Gem of the Week: Cruis'n Blast If you'd like to get in touch with the All Things Nintendo podcast, you can do so by tweeting to Brian (@BrianPShea) or by joining the official Game Informer Discord server. You can do that by linking your Discord account to your Twitch account and subscribing to the Game Informer Twitch channel. From there, find the All Things Nintendo channel under "Community Spaces."

UNITEDcast
UNITEDcast #537 - Vem COMER meu RABO (Kobayashi-san no Maid Dragon)

UNITEDcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 73:49


Olá pessoas do UNITEDcast, no episódio dessa semana nossos podcasters serviram varios rabos para nossos ouvintes se deleitarem. Vem se servir com este também!   Participantes: Ds, Ana, Kurt, Vitor   Edição: Ana Paula - Compre na nossa LOJA: Use o Cupom: unitedcast https://unitedstore.com.br – Mande seu Email: Mande um audio: Whatsapp Email: podcast@animeunited.com.br – Apoie o UNITEDcast: Compre na AMAZON pelo Nosso Link: https://amzn.to/2WjH5kMSeja um FODEROSO do nosso Apoia-se: https://apoia.se/unitedcast Assista ao vivo no nosso Canal do Youtube! – Assine o UNITEDcast: Spotify: Segue a gente por lá! iTunes: Adiciona a gente lá! Google Podcasts: Assine Agora! – Links do Episódio: Twitch do DS: https://twitch.tv/dsunited – Nos Siga: Twitter do DS: https://twitter.com/odaltonsilveira Instagram do DS: https://www.instagram.com/odaltonsilveira/ Fabebook da United: https://www.facebook.com/animeunitedoficial Twitter da United: https://twitter.com/animeunitedBR Instagram da United: https://www.instagram.com/animeunitedbr/

Gamers on the Go
Episode 90: Metroid: Samus Returns

Gamers on the Go

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021


Download the episode here or listen on SoundCloudHappy Metroid Dread day for all the 2D Metroid fans in the house. To celebrate, Matt “Giggysan” Giguere joins as we look back on Nintendo and MercurySteam's previous foray into the series - Metroid: Samus Returns. Is it the best remake of Metroid II? Does it inform us about anything that Metroid Dread might have in store? Does Chase like Metroid now? Tune in to this episode for answers to all these questions and more. Show Notes:Mark Brown of Game Maker's Toolkit does a great breakdown of how both Metroid II remakes attempt to recreate the original Game Boy game. Looking for Metroid Dread content? Check out The Casual Hour on Twitch and YouTube for quick looks and impressions.Find more of Giggysan's work on his Twitch as well as his occasional guest spot on the Abstract Japan podcast.And if you like energy beams and mechanized armor, Chase has been playing through all of Super Robot Wars X on his YouTube channel.

NWR Connectivity
Episode 293: Metroid Fusion and Other M

NWR Connectivity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 108:52


As we celebrate the launch of Metroid Dread, the gang assembles what we thought would be the most divisive 2D Metroid. Turns out we all love it. Metroid Other M on the other hand... Connectivity has joined Twitter, so be sure to follow @ConnectivityNWR to be up to date on any announcements. We are wanting more listener participation, so feel free to ask questions, they may show up in the show! Please send in some hard-hitting questions for the Connectivity gang to ponder over: the address is connectivity@nintendoworldreport.com

RPG Backtrack
RPG Backtrack 243 – Domo Arigato Solatorobo

RPG Backtrack

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 74:03


It's time to give some love to CyberConnect2's passion project, Little Tail Bronx. Josh Carpenter and Casandra Ramos join the show to chime in about this adorable little DS game, Solatorobo: Red the Hunter.

Talk Nintendo Podcast
Episode 265: Where In The World Is Balex Bulafi

Talk Nintendo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 69:17


It's a throwback episode with just the OG boys, so you know it's gonna be a goodie. We got MindSeize impressions and some more Diablo 2 talk. Then it's Perry's favorite time of the year, Smash Direct time. Hosted by Perry Burkum (@PBurkum), Casey Gibson (@Case_Jets), and Alex Culafi (@culafia) Intro 00:00 Travels 1:30 Food Talk 4:15 MindSeize 15:15 "Quick Bite" Diablo 2 41:16 Poll Time 48:56 News Block 54:26 Outro 1:04:00 Thank you for listening! We can tell that you are a good-looking person. Peep the discord: https://discord.gg/XPByvgvByQ Please write in to the show at TNP@NintendoWorldReport.com Tweet us @TalkNintendoPod and Instagram us at talknintendopodcast Please consider supporting us on Patreon! For just $1 you can get access to tons of exclusive content! Check us out at www.patreon.com/nwr

The Game Informer Show
Saints Row Cover, Metroid Dread, and Far Cry 6 Reviews | GI Show

The Game Informer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021


Welcome back to a massive episode of The Game Informer Show! This week, we have so much to discuss, including Sora coming to Smash Bros. Ultimate, our latest cover story featuring Saints Row, and our reviews of Metroid Dread and Far Cry 6. On top of that, we're discussing our review of the Nintendo Switch OLED and have some fun with community emails, all while joined by special guest Kate Sánchez from the pop culture website But Why Tho to break it all down. Follow the crew on Twitter: Alex Stadnik (@Studnik76), Alex Van Aken (@itsVanAken), John Carson (@John_Carson), Brian Shea (@BrianPShea), Ben Reeves (@BenjaminReeves), and Kate Sánchez (@OhMyMithrandir) The Game Informer Show is a weekly gaming podcast covering the latest video game news, industry topics, exclusive reveals, and reviews. Join hosts Alex Stadnik and Alex Van Aken every Thursday to chat about your favorite games – past and present – with Game Informer staff, developers, and special guests from all around the industry. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app. Check out the timestamps below to jump to a particular point in the discussion: 00:00:00 – Introduction 00:02:16 – Kate Sánchez Intro 00:09:46 – Sora In Super Smash Bros. Ultimate 00:24:33 – Saints Row Cover Impressions 00:39:14 – Metroid Dread Review 01:01:57 – Far Cry 6 Review 01:32:31 – Nintendo Switch OLED Review 01:47:38 – Housekeeping 01:51:22 – New Podcast Announcement 01:53:36 – Community Emails

SportsRage Late Night
10/7 Hour 1: Dodgers walk-off, NLDS, and more...

SportsRage Late Night

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 45:56


Gabe Morency recaps the Dodgers walk-off win over the Cardinals in the NL Wild Card. Gabe explains why Dodgers-Giants could be one of the most epic DS series in decades.

The All Things Nintendo Podcast
Introducing All Things Nintendo – A New Podcast From Game Informer!

The All Things Nintendo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021


Nintendo has a special place in the games industry. For many of us, a Nintendo controller was the first we ever held and remains one of our favorites to pick up today. This is not because of the form factor or the visual aesthetics of the controller itself, but rather because of the magic that plays out on-screen when we hold it. For nearly the last 40 years, Nintendo has played a crucial role in our gaming lives and the industry at large, and now we're creating a special place to celebrate that. The All Things Nintendo podcast is a place where we can celebrate, discuss, and break down all the latest games, news, and announcements from the industry's most recognizable name. Each week, I'll be joined by different guests to talk about what's going on in the world of Nintendo. Along the way, we'll share personal stories, uncover hidden gems in the eShop, and even look back on the classics we grew up with. I've been covering Nintendo for more than a decade now, and I can't wait to bring that experience into this exciting new venture. The All Things Nintendo podcast will be available on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Spotify, and wherever else you get your podcasts. Join me every Friday and get your weekend started right with a nice dose of Nintendo.

Nerds Without Pants
Episode 209: Nerd Saturday Morning

Nerds Without Pants

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 233:33


Put on your footie pajamas and pour a bowl of your favorite sugary cereal, because this week the Nerds Without Pants are turning their favorite games into imaginary Saturday morning cartoons! Don’t worry, we’ll explain what that is if you’re a young’un. Angelo joins us for this super fun show, so let’s get to it! 00:00 – 00:10:41 Introduction 00:10:51 – 02:10:08 STAGE SELECT: What games would you want to see turned into Saturday morning cartoons? 02:10:19 - 03:28:48 CONSUMPTION JUNCTION: Halo Master Chief Collection, toxic multiplayer people, Minecraft, game music playlists, artbooks, Lost Judgment, Lost Words, The Avengers 03:29:25 – 03:47:58 VIDEO GAME CAGE MATCH: Primal Rage vs Bloody Roar 03:48:07 – 03:53:33 Outro NEXT EPISODE: STAGE SELECT: What video game characters or creatures scare you the most? NOTE: They don’t have to come from horror games! VIDEO GAME CAGE MATCH: Resident Evil 4 vs Dead Space 2 SUBMIT YOUR COMMENTS BY 8:30 CENTRAL ON 10/22 TO BE ON THE SHOW! Twitter: @NWPcast Email: NWPcast@gmail.com Our theme song “Relax” and interstitial tracks “To the Maxx” and “Moody Grooves” are written and performed by Megan McDuffee.  

WOE.BEGONE
41: That's not who I am.

WOE.BEGONE

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 23:04


WOE.BEGONE: Music From The Podcast Season 2 is now available for $5+ patrons and on bandcamp at http://woebegonepod.bandcamp.com . Listen to 20 songs from the season 2 soundtrack remixed, remastered, and fleshed out. I'm taking questions for a monthly Q&A for $2+ patrons! Get access to early episodes, instrumentals, extra art, The Diary of Aliza Schultz spinoff podcast, exclusive Discord channels, clips of my cat meowing during recording, and full-length director's commentary on episodes on Patreon. http://patreon.com/woe_begone PATREON: http://patreon.com/woe_begone ALIZA SCHULTZ: http://anchor.fm/alizaschultz TRANSCRIPTS: http://WOEBEGONEPOD.com TWITTER: @WOEBEGONEPOD REDDIT: /r/DOGCATCHER and /r/WOEBEGONE MUSIC: http://woebegonepod.bandcamp.com DISCORD: https://discord.gg/pn9kjTBYPD LOUD NOISES AT: 16:23 - 17:00 19:17 - 19:41 Thanks to all of my patrons: Aaron Richardson, Alex LeMire, Allison Bourgeois, Anthony Ess, Ashley Moo, Austin Sleeper, Ben Rowe, BertBert, Brendon Liner, Brynne C, C(l)ow(n)girl, Catherine Draper, CeCe Byrnes, Charlie Kininmonth, Chris McDaniel, Christopher Fox, clydmica haley, cookiedoughgelato, Cooper Dukes, D S, Dairy the A.I. Union Representative, Daniel Jenkins, David Ault, EleanorInTheWoods, Elizabeth Kirkman, Elliott K, Erin G, Erinna, fbt, Giles Barton-Owen, goodoledev, Grey, harrison minnix, HarveyJane, Jason Li, Jay, Jaz Vallin, jean, Jesse Grace, Jessica Longaker, JMaths, johnny bazookatone, Julia B, KateSherrod, Kevin Berrey, Kiesha Hill, Lekha Shupeck, Lucia Dubra, Maple Autumn, marie koo, Marn S., Matthew Robertson, Melvis Grey Mystery, Mitch Gerads, Monica Quirk, Morgan Jackson, n13e86, Nora V., Paul Ainsworth, Paul Harvey, Paul S, Pineapple, Plumule, Rick Platinum, Risky Coffee, Rowan, Ryan is bitter about Mike's Scruff messages, S. R. Jenkins, Samantha Töpfer, Seanability, Shannon M, Shy Ruff, Si !!, Sophie, SRaye96, Sydney D'Agostino, Tarabyte3, Toasty warm hamster, Tom P, and weiing.

The Lucky Few
135. Let's Talk Potty Training and Down Syndrome! (ft. Dr. Lina Patel, PsyD)

The Lucky Few

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 52:56


Alright friends, you asked for it.. and now it's time to talk about potty training! And who better to learn from than Dr. Lina Patel? (Psychologist, DS expert, and author of Potty Time for Kids with Down Syndrome: Lose the Diapers, Not Your Patience). She's breaking it all down for us today.. because there's more to potty training than we even realize (hint: medical challenges, cognition, language, and motivation)! We're talking about when to NOT start potty training, why traditional techniques might not work for our kiddos, and of course- all the strategies to use when it's time! Our #1 tip? Dr. Patel's book! Oh and if you've ever felt yourself stuck in some weird unspoken competition on who's kid is potty trained first, so have we. So we're chatting about that too! __ SHOW NOTES Learn more about Dr. Lina Patel here. Buy Potty Time for Kids with Down Syndrome: Lose the Diapers, Not Your Patience on Amazon.com or woodbinehouse.com Check out this wooden stool and training toilet Micha is using for potty training her son, Ace. LET'S CHAT Email hello@theluckyfewpodcast.com with your questions and Good News for future episodes. HELP US SHIFT THE NARRATIVE Interested in partnering with The Lucky Few Podcast as a sponsor? Email hello@theluckyfewpodcast.com for more information! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/theluckyfewpod/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theluckyfewpod/support

Tooth or Dare Podcast
#91- Carrie Wucinich: Writing Dental Books for Kids

Tooth or Dare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 53:08


Irene and Katrina chat about Katrina's upcoming event sponsored by our friends at Dentsply Sirona in this episode. DS has their annual event called DS world, and tickets for their live event and online event can still be purchased. Katrina will be chatting about polishing during her presentation, so register to see the event even after it's all over! Don't miss out on John Mullaney, Gwen Stefani, and The Chainsmokers. It's happening on Sept. 23 - 25 online or in-person so that you can get your education on!  Grab tickets from their website

Radio Free Nintendo
Episode 741: Mario's Poop Joke Sommelier

Radio Free Nintendo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 124:51


FEATURING: (00:05:01) New Business - Actraiser Renaissance. (00:35:50) WarioWare: Get It Together!. (00:43:22) Bonfire Peaks. (00:50:57) Psychonauts 2. (00:58:56) Super Mario-kun. (01:08:25) Diablo 2: Resurrected. (01:29:36) Listener Mail - Which Nintendo character deserves to go to space? (01:49:44) A final bit of Super Smash Bros Ultimate character speculation.

Mouthin Off Sports
Fixin' To Talk Sports Episode 46: “What ifs” pt 2

Mouthin Off Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 63:31


Ryan and DS continue to contemplate some of the greatest "What If's" in the sports world in Part 2 of this special two-part series! Make sure you follow us @FixinTalkSports as well as the rest of the podcasts under the Mouthin Off Sports umbrella: Foxborough Files @FilesFoxborough The Cool Zone @TheCoolZonePod Mouthin Off Sports Show @MouthinOffRadio

Mouthin Off Sports
Fixin' To Talk Sports Episode 45: “What Ifs”

Mouthin Off Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 93:54


Ryan starts the show with a big announcement before he and DS contemplate some of the greatest "What If's" in the sports world in this special two-part series! Make sure you follow us @FixinTalkSports as well as the rest of the podcasts under the Mouthin Off Sports umbrella: Foxborough Files @FilesFoxborough The Cool Zone @TheCoolZonePod Mouthin Off Sports Show @MouthinOffRadio

UNITEDcast
UNITEDcast #536 - JOGOS que viraram ANIME parte 2

UNITEDcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 64:11


Olá pessoas do UNITEDcast, no episódio dessa semana nossos podcasters jogaram uma lista foderosa de alguns jogos que acabaram virando anime. Venha conhecer estes também!   Participantes: Ds, André, Ana, Vitor   Edição: Ana Paula - Compre na nossa LOJA: Use o Cupom: unitedcast https://unitedstore.com.br – Mande seu Email: Mande um audio: Whatsapp Email: podcast@animeunited.com.br – Apoie o UNITEDcast: Compre na AMAZON pelo Nosso Link: https://amzn.to/2WjH5kMSeja um FODEROSO do nosso Apoia-se: https://apoia.se/unitedcast Assista ao vivo no nosso Canal do Youtube! – Assine o UNITEDcast: Spotify: Segue a gente por lá! iTunes: Adiciona a gente lá! Google Podcasts: Assine Agora! – Links do Episódio: Twitch do DS: https://twitch.tv/dsunited – Nos Siga: Twitter do DS: https://twitter.com/odaltonsilveira Instagram do DS: https://www.instagram.com/odaltonsilveira/ Fabebook da United: https://www.facebook.com/animeunitedoficial Twitter da United: https://twitter.com/animeunitedBR Instagram da United: https://www.instagram.com/animeunitedbr/

Giant Bomb Presents
GrubbSnax EP. 14: Sony and Bluepoint, Switch 4K

Giant Bomb Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021


Grubb is here to chat about the Bluepoint acquisition, the constant 4K Nintendo Switch rumors, and your BURNING questions!

The Game Informer Show
New World Launch Impressions And Netflix Getting Into Games | GI Show

The Game Informer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021


We're back with another scorching episode of The Game Informer Show! This week, we're breaking down our launch impressions of Amazon's exciting new MMORPG New World and discussing what we think of Netflix purchasing Night School Studio, the developers behind Oxenfree and Afterparty. That's not all though, as our amazing crew of Dan Tack, Kimberley Wallace, and Jill Grodt are here to chat about Sable, NBA 2K22, and get a little wild during another fun round of community emails! Follow the crew on Twitter: Alex Stadnik (@Studnik76), Alex Van Aken (@itsVanAken), Dan Tack (@DanTack), Kimberley Wallace (@kstar1785), Jill Grodt (@Finruin) The Game Informer Show is a weekly gaming podcast covering the latest video game news, industry topics, exclusive reveals, and reviews. Join hosts Alex Stadnik and Alex Van Aken every Thursday to chat about your favorite games – past and present – with Game Informer staff, developers, and special guests from all around the industry. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app. Check out the timestamps below to jump to a particular point in the discussion: 00:00:00 – Introduction 00:04:12 – Netflix Purchases Night School Studio 00:17:10 – New World Launch Impressions 00:35:08 – Sable 00:48:29 – NBA 2K22 01:04:55 – TOEM 01:10:11 – Housekeeping 01:14:58 – Listener Emails

Bit Socket Podcast
Episode 95: League of Shadogs

Bit Socket Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021


Chalk on your DS? That dug is getting snatched.

Giant Bomb Presents
ALBUMMER! 09: Bruce Willis' The Return of Bruno

Giant Bomb Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021


Before he was dying hard, Bruce Willis had a little more hair and an album!

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Constraining Putin's Russia

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021


Thomas Graham, distinguished fellow at CFR, leads a conversation on constraining Putin's Russia. FASKIANOS: Welcome to today's session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. Today's meeting is on the record, and the video and transcript will be available on our website CFR.org/academic if you would like to share it with your colleagues or classmates. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We are delighted to have Thomas Graham with us to talk about Putin's Russia. Mr. Graham is a distinguished fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and a senior advisor at Kissinger Associates, where he focuses on Russian and Eurasian affairs. He is cofounder of the Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies program at Yale University, and is also a research fellow at the MacMillan Center at Yale. He previously served as special assistant to President George W. Bush and senior director for Russia on the National Security Council staff from 2004 to 2007, and director for Russian affairs from 2002 to 2004. His résumé is very distinguished. I will just also say that he is a U.S. diplomat who served two tours of duty in Moscow, where he worked on political affairs. So, Mr. Graham, thanks very much for being with us today. I thought you could get us started by talking about the primary interests at stake in U.S.-Russia relations. GRAHAM: Great. Thank you very much, Irina, for that introduction, and it's a real pleasure to be with all of you here today. I want to start with three broad points that will frame the rest of our discussion. The first is that the problem that the United States faces is not simply with Putin; it is with Russia more generally speaking. The last seven years of very difficult, challenging adversarial relationship is really not an aberration in the history of the relationship between our two countries. In fact, from the moment the United States emerged as a major power on the global stage at the very end of the nineteenth century, we have had a rivalry with Russia. And the issues that divide us today are the ones that divided us 125, 150 years ago: We have opposing worldviews. We have different geopolitical interests. And clearly, we have different systems of values that inform our domestic political systems. This rivalry has intensified, ebbed and flowed during the twentieth century. But the effort we made at partnership after the breakup of the Soviet Union up until 2014, marked by the eruption of the crisis in Ukraine, is really the aberration in the history of relations between our two countries and one that was founded very much on the fact that Russia endured a period of strategic weakness. So the issue we have to deal with Russia and how we're going to deal with Russia well into the future, even after Putin departs—which he will, obviously, at some point, if only for biological reasons. The second point that I would make is that Russia is not going to go away. We hear a lot in the public debate in the United States about Russian decline, about the population/demographic problems it has, about its stagnating economy, and so forth. None of this is necessarily untrue, but I think it tends to exaggerate the problems that Russia faces. It ignores the problems that all other major countries face—including China, the United States, and many major European countries—but it also overlooks the very great strengths that Russia has had for decades that are going to make it a player and an important player on the global stage, nuclear weapons to begin with. We should never forget that Russia remains the only country that can destroy the United States as a functioning society in thirty minutes. Russia has the largest natural endowment of any country in the world, a country that can pretend to self-sufficiency and, in fact, is better placed than most other countries to deal with a breakdown in globalization in the decades to come if that, indeed, happens. It has a veto on the U.N. Security Council, which makes it an important player on issues of importance to the United States, and it has a talented population that has fostered a scientific community that, for example, is capable of taking advances in technology and developing the military applications from them. Just look at the strength that Russia exhibits in cyberspace, for example—again, a major challenge for the United States. So Russia is going to continue to be a challenge. One other thing that I should have mentioned here is that the Russian state throughout history and Putin's Russia today has demonstrated a keen ability to mobilize the resources of their own society for state purposes. So even if in relative terms they may be weaker and weakening vis-à-vis China and the United States, in some ways that political will, that ability to mobilize, allows Russia to play a much larger role than mere indicators of its economic size and population size would suggest. Now, Russia clashes with the United States across a whole range of issues, and as I said that is going to continue for some time. And this brings me to my third point: How we should think about American foreign policy, what our guidelines should be in dealing with Russia. And here there are three, I think, key elements to this. First, the United States needs to preserve strategic stability. We need to have that nuclear balance between us (sic) and the United States. This is an existential question. And as I already mentioned, Russia does have a tremendous nuclear capability. Second, the United States should seek to manage its competition with Russia responsibly. We want to avoid or reduce the risk of a direct military conflict that could escalate to the nuclear level. This is—also, I think, recognizes that the United States is not going to be able to compel Russia to capitulate on issues that are of interest to us, nor are we going to be able to radically change the way they think about their own national interests. So it's a competitive relationship and we need to manage that responsibly. And finally, given the complex world that we live in today—the very real transnational challenges we face: climate change, pandemic diseases, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction—the United States should seek, to the extent possible, ways to cooperate with Russia in dealing with these issues. We should recognize that Russia is not necessarily the only player nor necessarily the most important player in dealing with these challenges, but it does have a role to play along with other major powers in handling these transnational issues. So those, I think, are three sort of broad points that help set the stage for our discussion. Now let me turn sort of very briefly to the questions about U.S. policy. How do we deal with this Russia? What are sort of—the way we should think about American foreign policy? And here the point I would make is that we should think of the policy in terms of what I would call the three Ds: defense, deterrence, and dialogue. Now, defense and deterrence in many ways go together. If you have a very good defense, if you demonstrate an ability and willingness to defend your interests effectively and deliberately, then you tend to deter another power. They have less reason to want to attack you. But if deterrence fails, you very much need to be able to defend yourself—to disrupt Russian operations in cyberspace, for example, or disrupt military operations by the Russians that you find problematic in some way. So defense and deterrence go together, and we need to think about that. Now, you build these elements on a number of other things that we're all familiar with. A strong military—strong, capable military—is, obviously, an element of both defense and deterrence, and something that we have managed quite well in the past and I imagine will manage quite well going into the future. Cyber defenses are also an important element of constraining Russia on the global stage. Now, here the United States really has much room for improvement. We built our internet, our cyberspace largely for the accessibility, the ability to pass information from one entity to another, and we spent much less attention to the security of that system. As cyberspace has become more important to our socioeconomic and political lives, we really need to devote much more attention to cybersecurity, hardening our commuter—computer networks, for example, making sure we have strong passwords and so forth, something that I think we now recognize but we need to put a much greater effort into doing that. Third area of defense and deterrence is strong alliances. When we're thinking about Russia, this is clearly the transatlantic community, NATO, our relations with our other European partners. And here, we need to develop the types of military/defense cooperation that we need to demonstrate quite clearly that the United States, along with the rest of the NATO allies, is ready and prepared to meet its Article 5 guarantees to collective security should the Russians do something that is untoward in our neighborhood. And then, finally, and I think of increasing importance, is the question of national unity. National unity, national resilience, has really become a key element in defense and deterrence at this point. We need to demonstrate to the Russians that we have sufficient national unity to clearly identify what our interests are and pursue them on the international stage. One of Putin's close colleagues several years ago said that what Putin is doing is messing with the Americans' minds, and certainly we've seen that over the past several years. Putin hasn't sowed the discord in the United States, but he certainly has tried to exploit it for Russian purposes. And this is something that he's going to concentrate on in the future, in part because he recognizes the dangers of military confrontation with the United States. So great-power competition, from the Kremlin's standpoint, is going to move very, very quickly from the kinetic realm to the cyber realm, and we need to be able to deal with that. So building national unity at home, overcoming our polarization, is really perhaps one of the key steps in constraining Russia on the global stage. And then, finally, some very brief words about dialogue. We tend to downplay this in our national discussion. Many believe that diplomatic relations are—should not be branded as a reward for bad behavior. But I think if you look at this objectively, you'll see that diplomatic relations are very important as a way of defending and advancing our national concerns. It's a way that we can convey clearly to the Russians what our expectations are, what our goals are, what our redlines are, and the responses that we're capable of taking if Russia crosses them. At the same time, we can learn from the Russians what their goals are, what their motivations are, what their redlines are, and we can factor that into our own policy. This is a major element of managing the competition between our two countries responsibly. You'll see that we have begun to engage in negotiations and diplomacy with the Russians much more under President Biden than we did under President Trump. We've already launched strategic stability talks with the aim of coming up with a new concept of strategic stability that's adequate to the strategic environment of the present day and the near future. We've engaged in cybersecurity talks, which my understanding is have, in fact, had some success over the past several weeks. Where we, I think, have lagged is in the discussion of regional issues—Europe, Ukraine, the Middle East, for example. These are areas where there is still potential for conflict, and the United States and Russia ought to be sitting down and talking about these issues on a regular basis. So three Ds—defense, deterrence, and diplomacy or dialogue—are the ways that we should be thinking about our relationship with Russia. And obviously, we'll need to adjust each of these three elements to the specific issue at hand, whether it be in Europe, whether it be in the nuclear realm, cyberspace, and so forth. Now, with that as a way—by way of introduction, I am very pleased to entertain your questions. FASKIANOS: Tom, thanks very much for that terrific overview and analysis. We're going to go to all of you now for your questions. You can either raise your hand by clicking on the icon, and I will call on you, and you can tell us what institution you are with; or you can type your question in the Q&A box, although if you want to ask it you can raise your hand. We encourage that. And if you're typing your question, please let us know what college or university you're with. So I'm going to take the first raised-hand question from Babak Salimitari. And unmute yourself. Q: Can you guys hear me? GRAHAM: Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Hello. I'm a third-year UCI student, economics. I have a question. I'm going to sound a bit like Sean Hannity here, so please forgive me, but I have a question about that Nord Stream 2 pipeline that you constantly hear on the news, and it just doesn't make that much sense for me of why this pipeline was allowed to be completed into the heart of Europe considering Russia's strength with natural gases and the leverage that they have over Europe with that pipeline. Why was that allowed to be completed? GRAHAM: Well, I think from the standpoint of the Biden administration this was a matter of what we call alliance management. Germany is clearly a key ally for the United States in Europe, and the Germans were very committed to the completion of that pipeline, starting with Chancellor Angela Merkel down through I think both the leading political parties and the German business community. So I think they made the decision for that. But let me step back because I'd like to challenge a lot of the assumptions about the Nord Stream 2 project here in the United States, which I think misconceive it, misframe the question, and tend to exaggerate the dangers that is poses. The first point that I would make is that Europe now and in the future will have and need Russian gas. It's taken a substantial amount in the past—in the past decades, and even as it moves forward towards a green revolution it will continue to take considerable amounts of Russian gas. It can't do without that gas. So the Nord Stream 2 pipeline, contrary to what you hear in the United States or at the U.S. Congress, I don't think poses an additional threat to Europe's energy security, no larger than the threat that was posed before that pipeline was completed. The Europeans, I think are aware of the problems that that poses, and they've taken steps over the past several years to integrate the gas—the gas distribution network in Europe, to build facilities to import liquified natural gas, all as a way of eroding the leverage that Gazprom might have had over energy markets in Europe. And that has been quite successful over the past—over the past several years. Now, I think, you know, the other issue that comes up in the discussion in the United States is Ukraine, because Nord Stream 2 clearly provides Russia with a way to import the gas into Europe and bypass Ukraine at the—at the same time. And Ukraine is going to suffer a significant loss in budgetary revenue because of the decline in transit fees that it gets from the transportation of Russian gas across its territory. You know, that is a problem, but there are ways of dealing with that: by helping Ukraine fill the budgetary gap, by helping Ukraine transition away from a reliance on gas to other forms of energy, of helping Ukraine develop the green-energy resources that will make it a much more important partner in the European energy equation than it is now. And then finally, you know, it strikes me as somewhat wrongheaded for Ukraine to put itself in a position where it is reliant on a country that is clearly a belligerent for a significant part of its federal revenue. So we need to think hard with the Ukrainians about how they deal with this issue, how they wean themselves off Russian transit fees, and then I think we have a situation where we can help Ukraine, we can manage the energy-security situation in Europe, we can reduce any leverage that Russia might have, and that Nord Stream 2 really doesn't pose a significant risk to the United States or our European allies over the long run. FASKIANOS: Thank you. We're going to take the next question from the written queue from Kenneth Mayers, who's at St Francis—sorry, that just popped away; oh, sorry—St. Francis College. Thinking beyond this triangular framework, what pathways and possibilities can be envisioned for a more positive dimension of working together in mutually, even globally, beneficial ways? GRAHAM: What triangular relationship are we talking about? FASKIANOS: His—thinking beyond this triangular framework and— GRAHAM: Oh, OK. So I think it's defense, deterrence, and diplomacy is the— FASKIANOS: Correct. GRAHAM: OK. Can you repeat the final part of the question, then? FASKIANOS: What pathways and possibilities can be envisioned for a more positive dimension of working together in mutually beneficial ways? GRAHAM: Well, there are a number of areas in which we can work together beneficially. If you think about proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, for example, the United States and Russia over the past two decades have played a major role in both securing weapons that were located in Russia, but also in securing highly-enriched uranium that was in Soviet-designed reactors throughout the former Soviet space. We have taken a lead together in setting down rules and procedures that reduce the risk of nuclear material—fissile material getting into the hands of terrorist organizations. And we have played a role together in trying to constrain the Iranian nuclear program. Russia played an instrumental role in the conclusion of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action that we signed in 2015 that the Trump administration walked away with, but they will continue to play a role in constraining Iranians' nuclear ambitions going forward. And we've also worked in a cooperative fashion in dealing with the North Korean nuclear program. So there are areas in nonproliferation where the two countries can work together. On climate change, I mean, I think the big challenge for the United States is actually persuading Russia that climate change is a significant threat to their own security. They're slowly beginning to change that view, but as they come around to recognizing that they have to deal with climate change there are a number of areas where the two countries can cooperate. One of the things that climate is doing is melting the permafrost. That is destabilizing the foundation of much of Russia's energy infrastructure in areas where gas and oil are extracted for export abroad. The United States has dome technologies that the Russians might find of interest in stabilizing that infrastructure. They suffer from problems of Siberian fires—peat-bog fires, forest fires—an area that, obviously, is of concern to the United States as well. And there may be room for cooperation there, two. And then, finally, you know, the United States and Russia have two of the leading scientific communities in the entire world. We ought to be working together on ways that we can help mitigate the consequences of climate change going forward. So I see an array of areas where the two countries could cooperate, but that will depend on good diplomacy in Washington and a receptivity on the part of the Russians which we haven't seen quite yet. FASKIANOS: Thank you. Let's go next to Jeffrey Ko. You can unmute yourself. Thank you. Q: Hi. So I'm Jeffrey Ko. I'm an international relations master's student at Carnegie Mellon. And my question has to deal with these private military forces, and especially the Wagner Group. And so I would like to know, you know, how does this play into our security strategy regarding Russia in countries that have seen proxy warfare? And how does this—how difficult will it be to engage with Russia either diplomatically or militarily on the use of these gray-zone tactics, and specifically utilizing the Wagner Group as an informal branch of Russia's military? GRAHAM: Well, look, I mean, I do think that we need, one, to sit down and have a discussion with Russia about the use of these private military forces, particularly the Wagner firm, which has played a significant role in a number of conflicts across the globe in the Middle East, Africa, and in Latin America. But we also ought to help the countries that are of interest to us deal with the problems that the Wagner Group causes. You know, the United States had to deal with the Wagner Group in Syria during the Syrian civil war. You know, despite the fact that we had a deconfliction exercise with the Russians at that point, tried to prevent military conflicts between our two militaries operating in close proximity, when the Wagner forces violated those strictures and actually began to attack a U.S. facility, we had no hesitation about using the force that we had to basically obliterate that enemy. And the Wagner Group suffered casualties numbering in the hundreds, one to two hundred. I think the Russians got the message about that, that you don't—you don't mess with the United States military, certainly not while using a private military company like Wagner. You know, in places like Libya, where Wagner is quite active, I think the United States needs a major diplomatic effort to try to defuse the Libyan crisis. And part of the solution to that would be negotiating an agreement that calls for the withdrawal of all foreign military forces and certainly private military groups from Libyan territory, and lean on the Russians to carry that through. In any event, you know, this is not going to be an easy issue to resolve. I think we deal with this by—country by country, and we focus our attention on those countries where our national interests are greatest. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Jill Dougherty, who's at Georgetown University. The Putin administration appears to be hardening its control of Russia's society with the purpose of keeping Putin in power at least until 2036. Most recent example is the Duma elections that just took place. Will this crackdown domestically affect or damage U.S.-Russia relations? GRAHAM: Thank you, Jill. Always a good question and always a difficult question to answer. You know, I think the issue here is the extent to which the Biden administration wants to make the domestic political situation in Russia a key item on its agenda with Russia over the next—over the next few years. You know, my impression from the conversations I've had with people in the administration—in and around the administration is that President Biden is not going to focus on this. You know, his focus really is going to be China, and what he wants to do is maintain something of a status quo in the relationship with Russia. You will notice that the second round of sanctions that the United States levied with regard to the poisoning of Alexei Navalny, something that was mandated by U.S. law, were actually quite mild—much less extreme, much less punitive than the legislation allowed—I think a signal that the Biden administration was not going to let domestic political issues in Russia overwhelm the agenda that the United States has, which is going to be focused on strategic stability, cyber issues, and so forth. So my immediate reaction is that the Duma election is really not going to have a dramatic impact on the state of the relationship between our two countries. We accept the fact that Russia is an authoritarian system. It is becoming more authoritarian. We will continue to try to find ways to support those elements of civil society we can, but always being careful not to do it in ways that causes the Russian government to crack down even harder on those individuals. This is a very sort of difficult needle to thread for the United States, but I think that's the way we'll go and you won't see this as a major impediment to the improvement of relations—which, as we all know, are at a very low level at this point in any event. FASKIANOS: Great. Thank you. Let's go next to Sujay Utkarsh. Q: Hi, yeah. Can you hear me? GRAHAM: Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Awesome. So, regarding the issue about cyber warfare, I was wondering if you can go into more detail about what advantages the Russians have in cyberspace and what the United States can do to compete with those advantages. GRAHAM: A good question and a difficult question for people outside the government to answer, since we're not privy to all the information about Russian cyber capabilities nor are we privy to the information about American cyber capabilities. Both countries cloak those programs in a great deal of secrecy. You know, it seemed to me that one of the advantages that perhaps Russia has is that it's a much more closed society than the United States. Now, I'm thinking simply in terms of the way societies can be disrupted through cyberspace. We're a much more open society. It's easier to access our internet. We are—just as I mentioned before, we are a polarized society right now. That allows Russia many avenues into our domestic political system in order to exacerbate the tensions between various elements in our society. The United States can't reply in the same way in dealing with Russia. You know, second, Russia, in building its own internet, its own cyberspace, has paid much more attention to security than the United States has. So, you know, I would presume that its computer systems are somewhat harder to penetrate than American systems are at this point, although another factor to take into account here is that much of the initial effort in building up cyberspace—the Web, the computer networks—in Russia was built with American technology. You know, the Googles, the Intels, and others played an instrumental role in providing those types of—that type of equipment to the Russians. So I wouldn't exaggerate how much stronger they are there. And then, finally, I think what is probably one of the strengths, if you want to call it that, is that Russia is probably a little more risk-prone in using its cyber tools than the United States is at this point, in part because we think as a society we're more vulnerable. And that does give Russia a slight advantage. That said, this shouldn't be a problem that's beyond the capability of the United States to manage if we put our minds to it. We have done a lot more over the past several years. We are getting better at this. And I think we'll continue to improve in time and with the appropriate programs, the appropriate education of American society. FASKIANOS: Thank you. The next question is a written one from Kim-Leigh Tursi, a third-year undergraduate at Temple University. Where do you see Russia in relation to the rise of China, and how does that affect how the U.S. might approach foreign policy toward Russia? GRAHAM: Well, you know, that's an important question, obviously one that a lot of people have focused on recently. You know, Russia and China have developed a very close working strategic relationship over the—over the past several years, but I think we should note that the Russian effort to rebuild its relations with China go back to the late Soviet period to overcome the disadvantages that then the Soviet Union felt they had because of the poor relationship with China and the ability of the United States to exploit that relationship to Moscow's detriment. So relations have been improving for the past twenty-five, thirty years; obviously, a dramatic acceleration in that improvement after 2014 and the breakdown in relations between Russia and the West. Now, there are a number of reasons for this alignment at this point. One, the two countries do share at a very general level a basic view of for—a basic dislike of what they see as American ambitions to dominate the global—the global security and economic environment. They don't like what they consider to be American hegemonic goals. Second, the economies seem to be complementary at this point. Russia does have a wealth of natural resources that the Chinese need to fuel their robust economic growth. You have similar domestic political systems. And all of this, I think, is reinforced by what appears to be a very good personal relationship between President Putin and President Xi Jinping. These two leaders have met dozens of times over the past five to seven years and have maintained, I think, very robust contact even during the—during the pandemic. So there are very good strategic reasons why these two countries enjoy good relations. They are going to step those up in the near term. The Russians are continuing to provide the Chinese with significant sophisticated military equipment. They've also undertaken to help the Chinese build an early warning system for ballistic missiles, and when that's completed it will make China only the third country in the world to have such a system along with Russia and the United States. Now, I would argue that this strategic alignment does pose something of a challenge to the United States. If you look at American foreign policy or American foreign policy tradition, one of the principles that has guided the United States since the end of the nineteenth century, certainly throughout the twentieth century, was that we needed to prevent the—any hostile country or coalition of hostile countries from dominating areas of great strategic importance, principally Europe, East Asia, and more recently the Middle East. A Russian-Chinese strategic alignment certainly increases the chances of China dominating East Asia. Depending on how close that relationship grows, it also could have significant impact on Europe and the way Europe relates to this Russian-Chinese bloc, and therefore to the United States as a whole. So we should have an interest in trying to sort of attenuate the relationship between the two countries. At a minimum, we shouldn't be pursuing a set of policies that would push Russia closer to China. Second, I think we ought to try to normalize our diplomatic relationship with the Russians. Not that we're necessarily going to agree on a—on a range of issues at this point, but we need to give the Russians a sense that they have other strategic options than China going forward—something that would, I think, enhance their bargaining position with the Chinese going forward and would complicate China's own strategic calculus, which would be to our advantage. I think we also should play on Russia's concerns about strategic autonomy, this idea that Russia needs to be an independent great power on the global stage, that it doesn't want to be the junior partner or overly dependent on any one country as a way, again, of attenuating the tie with China. The one thing that I don't think we can do is drive a wedge between those two countries, in part because of the strategic reasons that I've mentioned already that bring these two countries together. And any very crude, I think, effort to do that will actually be counterproductive. Both Beijing and Moscow will see through that, quite clearly, and that will only lead to a closing of the ranks between those two countries, which as I said is a strategic challenge for the United States going forward. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Holli Semetko, who's at Emory University. Polarization is something we must overcome, as you said, but those of us working on social media have some evidence to suggest that social media has fostered political polarization in the U.S. Yuri Milner, a Russian Israeli entrepreneur, invested in an early round of Facebook funding with help from VTB, a Russian state-controlled bank, as well as his investment in Jared Kushner's real estate firm. What is the level of FDI from Russia in the U.S. and do you see it as a threat to national security? GRAHAM: Well, look, I mean, the actual level of Russian FDI in the United States is quite small. You know, you have some few, I think, good examples of it—the one that you've mentioned with Yuri Milner, for example. There was some investment in a steel factory some years ago. But by and large, there hasn't been a significant amount of Russian foreign direct investment in the United States. I think our growing concerns about Russia have made us even more leery of allowing Russian investment, particularly in sectors that we consider critical to American national security. So I'm not deeply concerned about that going forward. I think we probably face a much greater challenge from the Chinese in that regard. Of course, you've seen efforts by the United States to deal more harshly or look more closely at Chinese investment in the United States over the past several years. Let me just make one sort of final point on social media since it's come up. You know, Russia is a problem. We need to pay attention to Russia in that space. But again, I don't think that we should exaggerate Russia's influence, nor should we focus simply on Russia as the problem in this area. There is a major problem with disinformation in social media in the United States, much of that propagated by sources within the United States, but there are a host of other countries that also will try to affect U.S. public opinion through their intrusions into American social media. You know, given our concerns about First Amendment rights, freedom of speech and so forth, you know, I think we have problems in sort of really clamping down on this. But what we need to do, certainly, is better educate the American public about how to deal with the information that crosses their electronic devices day in and day out. Americans need to be aware of how they can be manipulated, and they need to understand and know where they can go to find reliable information. Again, given the political polarization in our country today, this is a very real challenge and difficult one. But I think if we think long term about this problem, the key really is educating the American public. An educated American public is going to be the best defense against foreign countries, other hostile forces trying to use social media to undermine our national unity and exacerbate the politics of our country. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Eoin Wilson-Manion, who's raised his hand. Q: Hello. Can you hear me now? GRAHAM: Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Awesome. Well, thank you. I just wanted to ask if you could touch a little bit more on Russia's presence in Syria and what that means for U.S. interests in Syria and I guess the larger Middle East. I'm Eoin from Carnegie Mellon University. Thanks very much. GRAHAM: Well, you know, the Russians entered Syria in 2015 militarily largely to save Assad from what they thought was imminent overthrow by what they considered a radical Islamic force, a group of terrorists that they thought would challenge Russian interests not only in Syria but would fuel extremist forces inside Russia itself, particularly in the North Caucasus but farther afield than that—even into Moscow, into areas that were Muslim-dominated inside Russia itself. So they had very good national security reasons for going in. Those ran—I mean, the Russian presence in Syria clearly has run counter to what the United States was trying to do at that point since we clearly aligned against Assad in favor of what we considered moderate reformist forces that were seeking a more sort of democratic future for Syria as part of this broader Arab Spring at that time. So there was a clear conflict at that point. You know, subsequently and in parallel with its continued presence in Syria, the Russians have extended their diplomatic—their diplomatic effort to other countries in the region. Russia enjoys a fairly robust diplomatic relationship with Israel, for example, that has been grounded in counterterrorism cooperation, for example. They have a sort of strange relationship, largely positive, with Turkey that they have pursued over the past several years. We know of the ties that they've had in Tehran, in Iran for some time. They have reached out to the Saudis and the Saudis have bought some military equipment from them. We see them in Egypt and Libya, for example. So they're a growing presence, a growing diplomatic presence in the Middle East, and this does pose some problems for the United States. From the middle of the 1970s onward, one of the basic thrusts of American foreign policy was to limit the role the Russians played in the Middle East. We sidelined them in the negotiations between the Arabs and the Israelis in the 1970s and in the 1980s. We limited their diplomatic contacts to countries that we considered critical partners and allies in that part of the world. Now I think the geopolitical situation has changed. Our own interest in the Middle East has diminished over time, in part because of the fracking revolution here in the United States. Gas and oil, we've got close to being independent in that area. We're not as dependent on the Middle East as we once were for energy sources. And also, as, you know, the Biden administration has been clear, we do want to pivot away from the Middle East and Europe to focus more of our energies on what we see as the rising and continuing strategic challenge posed by China. So I think that means that going forward the United States is going to have to deal with Russia in a different fashion in the Middle East than in the past. We're going to have to recognize them as a continuing presence. We're not going to be able to push them out, in part because we're not prepared to devote the resources to it. We have countries that are still important to us—Saudi Arabia, Israel for example—that do want a Russian presence in the Middle East. And so what we ought to do, it seems to me, is to begin that discussion about how we're going to manage the rivalry in the Middle East. Now, it's not all simply competition. There are areas for cooperation. We can cooperate in dealing with Iran, for example, the Iran nuclear dossier, as we have had in the past. Neither country has an interest in Iran developing nuclear weapons. Second, I think the two countries also would like to see a Middle East that's not dominated by a single regional power. So despite the fact that the Russians have worked together quite closely with the Iranians in Syria, they don't share Iranian ambitions elsewhere in the Middle East. And if you look at the diplomatic ties that the Russians have nurtured over the past with Turkey, with Israel, Saudi Arabia for example, none of these are friends of Iran, to put it mildly. So we can talk, I think, to the Russians of how our—you know, we can conduct ourselves so as to foster the development of a regional equilibrium in the Middle East that tends to stabilize that region, makes it less of a threat to either country, less of a threat to America's European allies, and use this as a basis for, again, sort of not escalating the tension in the region but moderating it in some ways that works to the long-term advantage of the United States. FASKIANOS: Next question from Michael Strmiska, who's a professor at Orange County Community College in New York state. Do you see any hope of persuading Russia to abandon its occupation of Crimea in the near term? Or do you think this is like the occupation of the Baltic states of Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia after World War II, where a very long timespan was needed before any liberation was realistically possible? GRAHAM: Well, I guess my answer to those two questions would be yes and no, or no and yes. On Crimea, you know, I see no sort of near-term scenario that would lead to the Russians agreeing to the return of Crimea to Ukraine. Quite the contrary, Russia has taken steps since 2014 they continue at this point to further integrate Crimea into the Russian Federation politically, economically, socially, and so forth. The Russians have also built up their military presence in Crimea as a way of enhancing their domination or their influence in the greater Black Sea region. So I see no set of circumstances that would change that, certainly not in the—in the near term. And I think, you know, the Ukrainian effort to focus attention on Crimea is not going to, in fact, gain a great deal of traction with Europe nor with the United States going forward, though we will maintain the principled position of not recognizing Russia's incorporation or annexation of Crimea. You know, I don't think that the Crimean and Baltic situations are necessarily analogous. You know, in the Baltic states there was a significant indigenous element, governments in exile, that supported the independence of those countries. There was a fulcrum that the United States or a lever that the United States could use over time to continue pressure on the Soviets that eventually led to the independence of those countries as the Soviet Union broke down and ultimately collapsed at the end of the 1980s into 1991. I don't see any significant indigenous element in Crimea nor a movement of inhabitants of Crimea outside Crimea that wants Crimea to be returned to Ukraine. I think we need to remember that a significant part of the population in Ukraine is Russian military, retired Russian military, that feels quite comfortable in—within the Russian Federation at this point. So if I were being quite frank about this, although I think the United States should maintain its principled position and not recognize annexation of Crimea, I don't see anything over the long term, barring the collapse of Russia itself, that will change that situation and see Ukraine (sic; Crimea) reincorporated into the Ukrainian state. FASKIANOS: So there are a couple questions in the chat about Russia's economy: What is their economy like today? And what are the effects of the sanctions? And from Steve Shinkel at the Naval War College: How do you assess the tie between Russia's economy and being able to continue to modernize its military and ensure a stable economy? And will economic factors and Russia's demographic challenges be a future constraining factor? So if you could— GRAHAM: Yeah. No, no, just take the economy. Obviously, a big issue, and it will be a constraining factor. I mean, the Russian economy is stagnating and it has for some—for some time. They enjoyed—the Russian economy enjoyed a very rapid period of growth during President Putin's first presidential—two presidential terms in the 2000s, but since the financial crisis of 2008 and 2009 Russia has run into very difficult economic times. In fact, it's never really recovered from that crisis. If you look at the past ten years, barely any growth in the Russian economy at all. If you look at the impact that that has had on Russians themselves, there's basically been no growth in real disposable income; rather, a decline over the past six or seven years. I think the Russians recognize that. The question is whether they can come up with a set of policies that actually will reverse that and that lead to a more robustly growing economy. Now, what the Kremlin has tried to do is not so much reform the economy—which I think is necessary if they're going to enjoy robust economic growth—as much as professionalize the economy; that is—that is, bring in a younger sort of cadre who are well educated, many of them educated in the West, who understand how modern economies function and can keep the economy stable at least at the macro level. And this is one of the reasons that Western sanctions have not had nearly the impact on Russian behavior that many had hoped for or anticipated back in 2014 when we began to turn repeatedly to this tool in response to Russian activities and operations against Ukraine. You know, it has had some impact. I think the IMF would say that it's probably taken a percentage point off—or, not a percentage point, but a tenth of a percentage point off of Russia's GDP growth over the past several years. That certainly hasn't been enough to change Russian behavior. But it hasn't been more, in fact, because the governors of the—of the central bank have dealt quite adeptly with that, and maintain said Russian macroeconomic stability and some sort of foundation for the economy to grow going forward. I imagine that's going to continue into the—into the future as well. So it is a constraining factor. Then I would end with what I—with a point that I made in my introduction. Russia does have a tremendous ability to mobilize its resources for state purposes, to extract what it needs from society at large to modernize the military, to maintain certainly Russia's defenses and also some capability to project power abroad. So I wouldn't write them off because of that. I think it's going—still going to be a serious power, but not nearly as great a challenge to the United States as if it, in fact, solved its demographic problems, its economic problems, and had a robustly growing economy, greater resources that it could devote to a whole range of things that would improve its standing on the global stage vis-à-vis the United States and vis-à-vis China. FASKIANOS: Well, with that we are at the end of our time. And I apologize to everybody. We had over twenty written questions still pending and raised hands. I'm sorry we couldn't get to all of you, but we do try to end on time. So, Thomas Graham, thank you very much for sharing your insights and analysis with us today. We appreciate it. And to all of you for your terrific questions and comments, we appreciate it. Our next Academic Webinar will be on Wednesday, October 6, at 1:00 p.m. Eastern Time. And we will focus on the Indo-Pacific with Dhruva Jaishankar, who is the executive director of the Observer Research Foundation America and nonresident fellow at the Lowy Institute. And in the meantime, I encourage you to follow CFR at @CFR_Academic and visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for new research and analysis on global issues. So, Tom, thank you very much. GRAHAM: Thank you. Good luck to all of you. (END)

Talk Nintendo Podcast
Episode 264: Buffin' the Bald Buster

Talk Nintendo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 110:09


The boys are all back together and diving into everything from the latest Nintendo Direct as well as a look at Diablo 2, Beast Breaker, and more! Hosted by Perry Burkum (@PBurkum), Casey Gibson (@Case_Jets), and Alex Culafi (@culafia) Intro 00:00 The Docket 4:00 Dark Arts 6:00 Diablo 2 Resurrected 14:40 Quick Bite 30:25 Beast Breaker 39:30 Nintendo Direct 46:00 Outro 1:40:00 Thank you for listening! We can tell that you are a good-looking person. Peep the discord: https://discord.gg/XPByvgvByQ Please write in to the show at TNP@NintendoWorldReport.com Tweet us @TalkNintendoPod and Instagram us at talknintendopodcast Please consider supporting us on Patreon! For just $1 you can get access to tons of exclusive content! Check us out at www.patreon.com/nwr

WOE.BEGONE
40: I am terrified that I am going to live forever.

WOE.BEGONE

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 27:31


Mike finally gets to kick back and sleep off some of his stress. He really takes a huge weight off of his shoulder. WOE.BEGONE: Music From The Podcast Season 2 is now available for $5+ patrons and on bandcamp at http://woebegonepod.bandcamp.com . Listen to 20 songs from the season 2 soundtrack remixed, remastered, and fleshed out. I'm taking questions for a monthly Q&A for $2+ patrons! Get access to early episodes, instrumentals, extra art, The Diary of Aliza Schultz spinoff podcast, exclusive Discord channels, clips of my cat meowing during recording, and full-length director's commentary on episodes on Patreon. http://patreon.com/woe_begone PATREON: http://patreon.com/woe_begone ALIZA SCHULTZ: http://anchor.fm/alizaschultz TRANSCRIPTS: http://WOEBEGONEPOD.com TWITTER: @WOEBEGONEPOD REDDIT: /r/DOGCATCHER and /r/WOEBEGONE MUSIC: http://woebegonepod.bandcamp.com DISCORD: https://discord.gg/pn9kjTBYPD Thanks to all of my patrons: Aaron Richardson, Alex LeMire, Allison Bourgeois, Anthony Ess, Ashley Moo, Austin Sleeper, Ben Rowe, BertBert, Brendon Liner, Brynne C, C(l)ow(n)girl, Catherine Draper, CeCe Byrnes, Charlie Kininmonth, Chris McDaniel, Christopher Fox, clydmica haley, cookiedoughgelato, Cooper Dukes, D S, Dairy the A.I. Union Representative, Daniel Jenkins, David Ault, EleanorInTheWoods, Elizabeth Kirkman, Elliott K, Erinna, fbt, Giles Barton-Owen, goodoledev, Grey, harrison minnix, HarveyJane, Jason Li, Jay, Jaz Vallin, jean, Jesse Grace, Jessica Longaker, JMaths, johnny bazookatone, Julia B, KateSherrod, Kevin Berrey, Kiesha Hill, Lekha Shupeck, Lucia Dubra, Maple Autumn, marie koo, Marn S., Matthew Robertson, Melvis Grey Mystery, Mitch Gerads, Monica Quirk, Morgan Jackson, n13e86, Nora V., Paul Ainsworth, Paul Harvey, Paul S, Pineapple, Plumule, Rick Platinum, Risky Coffee, Rowan, Ryan is bitter about Mike's Scruff messages, S. R. Jenkins, Samantha Töpfer, Seanability, Shannon M, Shy Ruff, Si !!, Sophie, SRaye96, Sydney D'Agostino, Tarabyte3, Toasty warm hamster, and weiing.

Two Button Crew Podcast
TBC 030: Metroid: Zero Mission

Two Button Crew Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 55:30


Metroid: Dread is almost upon us, and that sentence alone still sounds like a miracle to Metroid fans who have been waiting for a new 2D entry in the series for nearly two decades. Scott & Glen are swept up… Read more TBC 030: Metroid: Zero Mission › The post TBC 030: Metroid: Zero Mission appeared first on Two Button Crew.

The Lucky Few
134. Social Stories for Kiddos with Down Syndrome (ft. Dr. Lina Patel, PsyD)

The Lucky Few

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 39:37


Alright friends, it's time to talk SOCIAL STORIES, those magical little books that help our kiddos with Down syndrome understand what's expected of them in a new environment. Social stories are game changers when it comes to managing behaviors and transitions.. but don't just take it from us. We have a social story expert on the show today! Dr. Lina Patel is a speaker, consultant, researcher, professor, and psychologist with almost 10 years of experience in the DS world. She's breaking down the basics including the key elements (visuals, first person language, problem solving, and simplicity!) + she's sharing some of her favorite resources for creating social stories. And maybe most importantly, we're chatting about WHY certain behaviors occur and what we can do to support our kiddos in moments of stress. If you've ever thought about creating a social story, this is a good place to start! __ SHOW NOTES Learn more about Dr. Lina Patel here. For more information on social stories, head to carolgraysocialstories.com Check out some sample social stories on teacherspayteachers.com For social stories on the go, check out the special stories app LET'S CHAT Email hello@theluckyfewpodcast.com with your questions and Good News for future episodes. HELP US SHIFT THE NARRATIVE Interested in partnering with The Lucky Few Podcast as a sponsor? Email hello@theluckyfewpodcast.com for more information! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/theluckyfewpod/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theluckyfewpod/support

LAisOurHouse
Greg Vanney & Jona Dos Santos Postgame Comments. LA Galaxy fall 2-0 on the road to Austin FC

LAisOurHouse

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 17:50


LOS ANGELES (Sunday, Sept. 26, 2021) – Playing the first of two road games in the span of four days, the LA Galaxy fell 2-0 on the road to Austin FC at Q2 Stadium on Sunday night. Goal-Scoring Plays ATX – Moussa Djitté, 64th minute: After Jonathan Bond parried away Moussa Djitté's shot, the rebound fell inside the box back to Djitté, who fired his shot into the top right corner of the goal. ATX – McKinze Gaines (Nick Lima), 79th minute: Receiving the ball inside the right side of the penalty box, McKinze Gaines' half-volleyed shot was rifled into the top right corner of the net. LA Galaxy (11-10-5, 38pts) at Austin FC (6-16-4, 22 pts) Sept. 26, 2021 – Q2 Stadium (Austin, Texas) Goals by Half 1 2 F LA Galaxy 0 0 0 Austin FC 0 2 2 Scoring Summary: ATX: Djitté, 64 ATX: Gaines (Lima), 79 Misconduct Summary: ATX: Domínguez (caution), 48 ATX: Driussi (caution), 84 Lineups: LA: GK Jonathan Bond; D Julian Araujo, D Séga Coulibaly, D Daniel Steres, D Jorge Villafaña (Niko Hämäläinen, 45) ; M Sebastian Lletget, M Jonathan dos Santos ©, M Rayan Raveloson (Efrain Álvarez, 72), M Kévin Cabral (Samuel Grandsir, 67); F Javier “Chicharito” Hernandez, F Víctor Vázquez (Dejan Joveljić, 80) Substitutes Not Used: GK Jonathan Klinsmann; D Nick DePuy, D Oniel Fisher, M Sacha Kljestan, M Adam Saldaña TOTAL SHOTS: 14 (Chicharito, 3); SHOTS ON GOAL: 7 (Chicharito, 3); FOULS: 11 (Chicharito, 4) OFFSIDES: 1; CORNER KICKS: 10; SAVES: 3 ATX: GK Brad Stuver; D Jhohan Romana, D Julio Cascante, D Zan Kolmanic, D Nick Lima; M Tomas Pochettino, M Dani Pereira, M Sebastián Driussi ©, F Cecilio Dominguez (McKinze Gaines, 72), F Diego Fagundez, F Moussa Djitté (Jon Gallagher, 72) Substitutes Not Used: GK Andrew Tarbell; D Hector Jimenez, D Freddy Kleeman; M Sebastian Berhalter, M Manny Perez, M Jared Stroud; F Rodney Redes TOTAL SHOTS: 12 (Moussa Djitté, 3); SHOTS ON GOAL: 5 (Moussa Djitté, 2); FOULS: 9 (Sebastián Driussi, Daniel Pereira, 2) OFFSIDES: 1; CORNER KICKS: 4; SAVES: 7 Referee: Guido Gonzalez Jr. Assistant Referees: Peter Manikowski, Jeffrey Swartzel Fourth Official: Marcos DeOliveira VAR: Ismail Elfath Weather: Clear, 81 degrees Attendance: N/A

NWR Connectivity
Episode 292: Metroid Dread Preview Spectacular

NWR Connectivity

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 69:52


Matt and Jared join John to talk about their recent experience playing Metroid Dread and the Switch OLED Model at a recent Nintendo press event. Fair warning, if you're worried about spoilers from the first hour or so of Metroid Dread, this may not be for you. Connectivity has joined Twitter, so be sure to follow @ConnectivityNWR to be up to date on any announcements. We are wanting more listener participation, so feel free to ask questions, they may show up in the show! Please send in some hard-hitting questions for the Connectivity gang to ponder over: the address is connectivity@nintendoworldreport.com

Radio Free Nintendo
Episode 740: Mario Creator Jim Davis

Radio Free Nintendo

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 124:51


FEATURING: (00:00:00) September 2021 Nintendo Direct - Right away with the Mario movie casting. (00:25:26) We move on from the Mario movie talk. (00:44:19) Voice of Cards: The Isle Dragon Roars. (00:52:42) Castlevania Advance Collection. More general Direct talk.

Kuldrin's Krypt A BDSM 101 Podcast
Abuse of Power and Authority in BDSM-S03E32

Kuldrin's Krypt A BDSM 101 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 92:18


Recorded: 2/14/2021 / Published: 09/26/2021- Call in at 865-268-4005 to leave your question or visit the Krypt at https://kuldrinskrypt.com. - In this episode of The Krypt Mayfair, the chatroom, and I, discuss a problem that is so common in the scene most people don't even realize they do it; abuse of power and authority.- Rules to Love By: ( https://inclusionwoodworks.com )1: Safe, sane, consensual, and informed2: KNKI: Knowledge, No Intolerance, Kindness, Integrity3: “Submission is not about authority and it's not about obedience; it is all about relationships of love and respect.” -Wm. Paul Young- “Abuse of Power and AuthorityBDSM-S03E32”- Abuse of Power, also known as Abuse of Authority, is defined as the use of one's position to gain an unfair advantage over another outside of that position's scope.To be clear, although writing about this can come across as more clinical and less dramatic, purposeful misuse of power is indeed a form of actual abuse, and its use should not be tolerated.Abuse of Power can be done in many ways, consciously or unconsciously, and can come from a variety of sources. Some examples of this include, but is not limited to:Using the Household name as a means of elevating one's self in order to gain an unfair advantage over anotherTrying to exert power over something that was not negotiated or agreed upon.Using one's title to inappropriately exert power over someone not in your sphere of influence.Pushing a scene further than you are capable of to “show off”Bullying or shamingInterjecting unwanted advice into another party's conversationShifting responsibility for a scene onto the other party if things don't go wellBeing a “Protector” to someone and also being involved with them romantically or dynamicallyUsing the dynamic as leverage against the relationshipChanging rules or protocol to suit you without notifying, considering, or negotiating with the other partyPurposely finding or creating loopholes in rules or protocol to suit youPurposely defying boundaries, triggers, or limitsPushing another to “pay” beyond their means (via time, money, energy, or other forms of “payments”) to be with youWithholding communication, sex, or dynamic (outside of negotiated terms) to get your wayUsing your position or title to justify doing something you shouldn't have doneThings to remember:Abuse of Power does not necessarily mean it is always directly related to a dynamic. Being a part of a Household or simply having many active years in the scene can very well make someone else feel like you hold more power and sway than they do, which makes it possible that this power can be abused.It does not always come from the top. Since what we engage in is a Power Exchange, bottoms hold a degree of power as well. Abuses of Power can come from a top, bottom, dominant, submissive, master, or slave. It can come from a well-seasoned kinkster who's been in the scene for decades or the newbie just getting their feet wet. It can be wielded by anyone.When power is abused in the scene it can cause a multitude of problems, foremost of which is the victim who can suffer physically, mentally, psychologically, or even spiritually. As an abuse, the responsibility falls solely to the abuser, but the victim often carries the inner scars from it in the forms of distrust, depression, anxiety, and loss of self-worth amongst others.It is important to note that the primary concept here is that power has been used inappropriately. We must all be aware that each of us is capable of Abusing Power and should strive to use it appropriately.As a Mentor, you should be looking for an understanding of what Abuse of Power is fundamentally, who perpetrates it, and what issues can arise from it.https://www.familylifecanada.com/blog/the-misuse-of-power-in-relationships/ Important Links:Full show notes: https://kuldrinskrypt.com/332National Suicide Hotline: 1-800-273-8255https://KuldrinsKrypt.com/Patreon https://kuldrinskrypt.com/silentcommunication https://KuldrinsKrypt.com/survey https://kuldrinskrypt.com/TeePublichttps://kuldrinskrypt.com/PayPalhttps://www.paypal.com/paypalme/masterkuldrinShow Producers:- Benefactor ($2,000/month): - Pro Producer ($100/month): Buffalo_Max92- Master Producer ($50/month): - Executive Producer ($25/month) ShadowyFox, JunicornsAngel, Johnny Ferrell, Haru Webb, Rei Webb, slave Brendan, and Just_Call_Me_Ash- Sr. Producers ($10/month): xEmeraldxWolfx, ThatPlace: Oklahoma City, RoxieBear, Trouble113, Alexandria, babylove&Sir, SortOutTheKinks, Master Gabriel, Daddy Steve, Sir Pent, KJ, TwistedTink&JustTommy, ArtKitten, AuthorMistressBlackrose, UpstateScCouple, Crystal Force, CJ, Cali, PerfectlyThick, Thorn, Toredon, Cap'n J, and BxB- Producers ($5/month): Kainsin, CIVLdisobedience, Hadea, Sir&Kitten, Raven, Raider69time, Atsila, MBRpoodle, LylacWine, Baddogbad, CozyCow, Arctic Foxglove, Anomalous Mats, MsRedSin & AJRJ, Katnipmeow, WyldThyme&Deacon Sean, CheeryQuery, Ropestuff2, Rabbit, BurningRedHot, Sir Wolf ArchAngel, Subx13, CourtsDom, Anthony, Gator, and Gizmo- Jr. Producers ($1/month): K-2SO, Jeremiah, Morgana13, Lilly, Brodie, The Gabbing Girl Time Podcast, MilkiyMilf, and LexaBecome a show producer: https://KuldrinsKrypt.com/PatreonVendors I know, like, trust, and use: (None of these are paid sponsors of the podcast.)- http://bdsmcontracts.org Coupon code: kuldrin20 for a 20% discount on all purchases.- http://whippingstripes.com - My personal maker of most things leather and paracord impact toys.- https://www.etsy.com/shop/TorridTimber - Fine fetish furniture and accessories- https://www.etsy.com/shop/TheCraftyHedonist - Tink's Toys Fb Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2350280868612699 Fetlife Profile: https://fetlife.com/users/9885653?sp=3 *coupon for listeners (first purchase only) TinksToys13- Dark Delights Shops: https://darkdelightsshop.com/ (Watch my product review of them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zbTsAuBKTy4 )Contact info:Email: MasterKuldrin@gmail.comFetlife Group: https://fetlife.com/groups/159275Fb: Kuldrin Fire https://www.facebook.com/kuldrin.fireTwitter: @MasterKuldrin https://twitter.com/MasterKuldrinInstagram: masterkuldrin https://www.instagram.com/masterkuldrin/Patreon: kuldrinskrypt https://www.patreon.com/KuldrinsKrypthttp://kuldrinskrypt.com/contactresourceSupport the podcast

The Game Informer Show
Kena: Bridge of Spirits Review & Guardians of the Galaxy Impressions | GI Show

The Game Informer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021


We're back with another exciting episode of The Game Informer Show! This week, we're discussing our hands-on time with Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy and the official review for Kena: Bridge of Spirits! Today's episode is also a special one as we bring on the one and only Liana Ruppert for her last episode before she sails off to work at a little studio called Bungie. Thought we were done? We also bring on the illustrious Ben Hanson to talk MinnMax, Age of Empires IV, and so much more! Follow the crew on Twitter: Alex Stadnik (@Studnik76), Alex Van Aken (@itsVanAken), Brian Shea (@BrianPShea), Liana Ruppert (@DirtyEffinHippy), and Ben Hanson (@yozetty). The Game Informer Show is a weekly gaming podcast covering the latest video game news, industry topics, exclusive reveals, and reviews. Join hosts Alex Stadnik and Alex Van Aken every Thursday to chat about your favorite games – past and present – with Game Informer staff, developers, and special guests from all around the industry. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app. Check out the timestamps below to jump to a particular point in the discussion: 00:00:00 – Introduction 00:02:00 – Liana Is Going to Bungie 00:07:55 – Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy 00:36:21 – Kena: Bridge of Spirits 00:52:22 – Life is Strange: True Colors 01:01:20 – Age of Empires IV 00:08:58 – Deathloop 01:18:13 – Housekeeping 01:23:09 – Heat Map 01:48:40 – Community Emails