Podcasts about Sculpture

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Artworks that are three dimensional objects

  • 1,409PODCASTS
  • 3,233EPISODES
  • 37mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Dec 5, 2021LATEST
Sculpture

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Best podcasts about Sculpture

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Latest podcast episodes about Sculpture

CavernCast
Episode 14 - Flow Hen Stamp Microphone Sculpture

CavernCast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 32:36


In this episode I think I've discovered where many of the world's wonders came from. So y'know, chill stuff. Also a Scottish pigeon has a disagreement with a Scottish hen.

The Reality Revolution Podcast
The Man Who Tapped The Secrets Of The Universe By Glen Clark (unabridged audiobook)

The Reality Revolution Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 101:10


All my life I have been looking for a man who has discovered the universal law that lies at the back of the Sermon on the Mount and who consciously uses that law with full awareness of its meaning and full obedience to its principles. Tens of thousands preach it or write about it yet have little understanding of its meaning. I doubt if there are many men in the whole world who actually know that cosmic basis sufficiently to live it knowingly. If I could find such a man, I thought to myself, he would be so cosmically aware of the Light of God that he would know the spiritual cause of all effect. Such a one would be a supergenius, for the hidden secrets of the universe would be his. He would see the universe as a whole and know his relationship to it and to God. All knowledge of cause would be his and the power to use it. Alternate Universe Reality Activation  get full access to new meditations, new lectures, recordings from the reality con and the 90 day AURA meditation schedulehttps://realityrevolutionlive.com/aura45338118 BUY MY BOOK! https://www.amazon.com/Reality-Revolution-Mind-Blowing-Movement-Hack/dp/154450618X/ Listen my book on audible https://www.audible.com/pd/The-Reality-Revolution-Audiobook/B087LV1R5V This information is mindblowing. Music by Mettaverseinner worldstravel lightlight catchersfield of onenessthe great shiftsolsticelight quotient639hz heart chakradeep relaxationgolden lotusnocturnewhen all else fades ➤ Listen to them on Soundcloud: http://bit.ly/2KjGlLI➤ Follow them on Instagram: http://bit.ly/2JW8BU2➤ Join them on Facebook: http://bit.ly/2G1j7G6➤ Support their Work at Patreon: http://bit.ly/2TXQhu3➤ Subscribe to their channel here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyvjffON2NoUvX5q_TgvVkw The Home Study Course playlist https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKv1KCSKwOo9SxrM97CZ40xTvWXh1zGPj All my Walter Russell videos - https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKv1KCSKwOo-9Oguc4o0PlZVfpKD-H2Kz All My Lao Russell Videos - https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKv1KCSKwOo9kB-BKSGP3KLc8p5dlfUwY The law of One Playlist - https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKv1KCSKwOo9YW0EjSjbVh94EFlOU_Czw How To Meditate - https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKv1KCSKwOo_W8G0bCs1qSdQni9oOvX2N Join the prosperity revolution, all of my financial abundance videos https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKv1KCSKwOo8M7wX4D348BfA2Auj_h0MP All My Robert B Stone Videos In One Playlist - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKv1KCSKwOo_4YbfCN1F3HvE6Tk61Z5wk All my Audiobooks - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKv1KCSKwOo-ArT_9WQ-SrKaEP7VgIPb5 All My Neville Goddard Videos In One Playlist - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKv1KCSKwOo8kBZsJpp3xvkRwhbXuhg0M All my videos about Dr. Joseph Murphy - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKv1KCSKwOo_OtBhXg2s85UuZBT-OihF_ Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/The-Reality-Revolution-Podcast-Hosted-By-Brian-Scott-102555575116999 Join our facebook group The Reality Revolution https://www.facebook.com/groups/523814491927119 Subscribe to my Youtube channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOgXHr5S3oF0qetPfqxJfSw  For all episodes of the Reality Revolution – https://www.therealityrevolution.com Contact us at media@advancedsuccessinstitute.com #walterrussell #laorussell #light #meditation #greatawakening Intro : 00:00Chapter 1 We Go Seeking 02:26Chapter 2 We Meet The Man 06'19Chapter 3 We Meet the Artis 18:09Chapter 4 We Meet The Man In Action 38:22Chapter 5 Five Laws Of Success 59:21Chapter 6 The Vision From The Studio 1:27:46Chapter 7 The Deferred Preface 1:33:47

LadyKflo
Supermarket Shopper

LadyKflo

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 10:38


What makes Duane Hanson's sculpture Supermarket Shopper a masterpiece? Desolation of spirit and a TV dinner to match A typical American moment stands apart Destroying a controversial past   Read LadyKflo's collected works and learn about more masterpieces with a click through to LadyKflo's site.   https://www.ladykflo.com/category/masterpieces/   Checkout her socials too:   https://www.instagram.com/ladykflo/ https://www.pinterest.com/Ladykflo https://twitter.com/ladykflo

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 139: Part 1 - The “Ambassador of Wearable Art” Shares Her Insights from Two Decades in the Business with Lisa M. Berman, Owner of Sculpture to Wear Gallery.

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 22:50


What you'll learn in this episode: The history of Sculpture to Wear and how Lisa maintains its legacy Why editorial and media coverage is crucial for getting art jewelry recognized as a fine art What the role of a jewelry gallery is Why Lisa always advises artists to keep good records of their work How the bold brooches of the 80s paved the way for today's art jewelry About Lisa M. Berman Lisa M. Berman is an internationally recognized “Ambassador of Wearable Art.” Based in Southern California, her expertise extends to major manufacturing and retail markets, museums and corporations in the United States, Canada, Mexico, Asia and Europe. Lisa is the owner of the iconic gallery Sculpture to Wear, which was instrumental in launching the studio jewelry movement in the United States. The gallery offers an eclectic array of art, jewelry and unique objects to discerning collectors, media producers and institutions, which have been featured in film, television and publications. Her recently launched Berman Arts Agency offers artist representation, career management, corporate acquisition, sponsorship advisement, museum placement, exhibition curation and education services on the disciplines of fine art, jewelry, design and fashion. Lisa holds degrees in Plastics Manufacturing Technology from California State University Long Beach, Product & Jewelry Design from Otis College of Art & Design and Merchandising/Marketing from Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising (FIDM). She has served on the Board of Governors for OTIS College of Art & Design; as Public Relations Chair for the Textile and Costume Council at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA); and on the Museum Collection Board at FIDM. She volunteers for Free Arts for Abused Children, STEAM projects and Art & Fashion Councils. Additional Resources: Sculpture To Wear Website Sculpture To Wear Instagram Sculpture To Wear Facebook Lisa Berman Instagram Photos: Lisa M. Berman wearing Archival 18k gold plate PEBBLES Necklace by Robert Lee Morris, her own sterling silver pendant by K. Lamberti, Issey Miyake coat and holding a signed ARTWEAR Catalog (RLM). Photo by Daniel Oropeza NUE Magazine Holiday 2020  Model Neva Cole, Photo by Daniel Oropeza  ICE Collar by Greg Orloff, 2018, $15,000 Creative Director / styled by: Lisa M. Berman  NUE Magazine Holiday 2020  Feature article "Powerful Woman of Dissent" from the "Feel the Frill" Exhibition honoring RBG curated by L.M. Berman.  Sculpture: LUX MAXIMUS, Winner of ARTPRIZE 2017 by Daniel Oropeza $350,000.  Model Neva Cole wears Emancipation Collar by 2Roses, 2020, $1,500.  Photo by Daniel Oropeza  Creative Director / styled by: Lisa M. Berman  Cover of IONA Magazine  Model wears Beaded Galaxy by 3 Tribes, from our Timeless Measures Exhibition 2006, curated by Lisa M. Berman & Pamela McNeil  1 year collaboration with women from 3 tribes in Africa - elders teaching the younger generation how to bead.  Cuffs (sterling Silver & Copper) by Tana Action  IONA Magazine  Models wears pieces by Jan Mandel: “REVEALED” Collar $50,000 (worn to the EMMY Television Academy's Governors Ball) and “POIGNET” (French meaning Wrist) $25,000 - both with created from Stainless steel mesh, outlined with 18k gold wire, Citrine, 2001. IONA Magazine  Models wears pieces by Jan Mandel: Earrings - 18k gold & aqamarine (NFS), “TRANSITION” Collar, 18k gold, Onyx, Aquamarine $20,000  and “GOLDEN” Cuff, 18k gold, $10,000, made in 2001. Niche Magazine - TOP RETAILER SPIKED, red collar (Collection of Myra Gassman) & Cuffs on left side by Michelle Ritter  “POIGNET” (French meaning Wrist) $25,000 -  both with created from Stainless steel mesh, outlined with 18k gold wire, Citrine. Bouquet Ring, Stainless steel & garnet by Wendy Gwen Hacker $800 Collaboration with Sculpture To  Wear Designer Gina Pankowski & MOEN Facet manufacturer. Utlilitary into Wearable Art Cover of W Magazine  - January Jones wears LATTICE necklace (oxidized Sterling Silver) by Gina Pankowski, $4,000 And Bridge Bracelet sterling silver by Sergey Jivetin, SOLD in Private Collection    The images below are from a PHOTO shoot based in the music video Rico Mejia Photography Fashion Beauty Celebrity Lifestyle Mobile number: 323-370-0555 https://www.behance.net/ricomejia https://twitter.com/RicoMejiaFoto https://www.instagram.com/ricomejiaphoto/ Perpetual Light in Motion - editorial photography by Rico Meija for Costumes bResin and Diamond Bangle by Cara Croninger from 24K Show, 1979, $4,000 Citrus Collar of acrylic, stainless steel & magnetic closure $650, and Bracelet $300 by Adriana Del Duca of Genos Jewelry  Vintage Earrings- acrylic, one of a kind by Frank & Anne Vigneri, 1984, $350 Perpetual Light in Motion - editorial photography by Rico Meija for Costumes by Swinda Reichelt  Resin DROP earrings by Cara Croninger $200 REGINA Collar of acrylic, stainless steel & magnetic closure $800 by Adriana Del Duca of Genos Jewelry for "Feel the Frill" exhibition honoring RBG, curated by L.M. Berman. Bracelet by Genos, NFS in collection of Julie Laughton Perpetual Light in Motion - editorial photography by Rico Meija for Costumes by Swinda Reichelt  BLUE DROP earrings Teri Brudnak $98 HEDGEHOG Collar of acrylic, stainless steel & magnetic closure $850 by Adriana Del Duca of Genos Jewelry for "Feel the Frill" exhibition honoring RBG, curated by L.M. Berman. Clear CUFF by Cara Croninger, NFS collection of L.M. Berman        Cover of Vogue with Cherize Theron     Transcript: Lisa Berman, owner of art jewelry gallery Sculpture to Wear, has been a figure in the art jewelry world for over 20 years, and she has a wealth of insight to share with fellow jewelry lovers. For her second appearance on the Jewelry Journey Podcast, she talked about how she's maintained relationships with hundreds of designers and collectors over the years, what advice she offers the designers she works with, and why art jewelry is coming into its own as a fine art collected by museums. Read the episode transcript here. Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guest is Lisa Berman. Although we share the same last name, I'm not related to Lisa; however, over the years she has become a friend and a trusted dealer. Lisa has been a guest on the show before. Today, we'll have a wide-ranging discussion with less of a focus on a particular piece, more talking about her experience in the jewelry and fashion world. Per our practice, the podcast is audio only. We will be posting photos of many of the pieces Lisa mentions today on our website, which is JewelryJourney.com. This is also a two-part podcast, so please keep your eyes open for our second episode which will air later this week. Please make sure you're a member of our jewelry community by subscribing to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. That way you can listen to both episodes hot of the presses, so to speak. With that, I'd like to welcome Lisa to the program. Lisa: Thank you, Sharon. I'm so delighted to be back here again. Sharon: It's great to have you. For those who don't know your background, can you give us a brief overview of your background? Lisa: Of course. I grew up in the fashion industry and had a career in fashion design. I had an accessory business for many, many years, and then I acquired the name of Sculpture to Wear Gallery in 1998. Of course, that was originally launched in 1973 in New York City in the Park Plaza Hotel. I launched my first exhibition at Bergamot Station Art Center, which I'll tell you about in a second, on January 16, 1999. I'm proud to be the second owner of Sculpture to Wear Gallery. Now, location is important. Location, location, location, you've heard a million times in real estate. Bergamot Station Art Center is in Santa Monica, California, Southern California, and it was formerly the home to 25 thriving contemporary galleries and the Santa Monica Museum of Art. It was, I believe, a five-acre complex. Now the Red Line runs through it. Sharon: The Red Line being the Metro. Lisa: Yes, the metro. Anyway, that's where I started my journey. I actually met my former husband, Robert Berman, there as well. It was the heyday. It was like Soho. It was the happening place on the West Side; it was a lot of fun. Every Thursday, Friday and Saturday night for 10 years, there were gallery openings. There was constant influx of artists and jewelers and collectors and educators and writers, so it was definitely the place to be. Sharon: What was groundbreaking about—first, it was groundbreaking that Sculpture to Wear was on the West Coast, but what was groundbreaking about the original Sculpture to Wear? Lisa: The owner, Joan Sonnabend, was basically located in Boston, but she had a tiny, little, postage-stamp gallery. Robert Lee Morris told me it was only about 400 square feet. The delineation was that she only showed work by signed artists. For example, you had Alexander Calder making jewelry, and he actually made his jewelry. There were pieces by Picasso; those were in addition to the series and those were made by other craftsmen. Of course, you have people like Robert Lee Morris, whose entire career was launched at the original Sculpture to Wear. The idea was that she was selling one-of-a-kind, sculptural jewelry made by fine artists, not by jewelry artists. That was the idea. Sharon: From what I've heard, nobody else was doing that then. This was unusual. Lisa: It was extremely unusual. The only person that was doing something similar was in Philadelphia. That's our beloved Helen Drutt, who is about to turn 91. She was also very monumental and important in bringing studio jewelry and wearable art to the United States, but she worked with jewelers and makers, mostly in Europe. Sharon: How did you know the Sculpture to Wear license was available? How did you find out about that? Lisa: I was introduced to the idea through Cindy Forbes, who's now Cindy Brown. She ultimately ended up being my gallery manager. We had a conversation, one thing led to another, and that was kind of it. It was available, so I capitalized on that and the domain and the name. When I acquired the name, I felt it was very important that every decision I made was legacy-driven, because it was a very important part of history. This is not something I just launched; they had an important history and legacy on the East Coast. That's why for my business card, I purposely selected the title of “visionary proprietor,” because it kept me on point and on target. At first, I got a little flak from it, but as I explained, that kept me on point to do my best. That was it. Sharon: Flak because people said, “Oh my gosh—”  Lisa: A lot of gumption that I would profess to be this visionary proprietor. Now, everyone on social media is a visionary and all the museum collectors' groups are visionaries. I don't know; I guess I was ahead of the curve. Sharon: You are a visionary. Lisa: This was 23 years ago. There you go.  Sharon: So, you opened at Bergamot Station and then you moved the gallery to Montana Avenue in Santa Monica? Well, they're both in Santa Monica. Lisa: I was in Bergamot Station from 1999 until 2003. In Bergamot Station, I had two separate little locations. In 2003, I moved to a much larger location. That was on Montana Avenue at the cross street of 11th Street. I moved there knowing I was a destination, that I had built a brand with Sculpture to Wear and with the artists through a number of different ideologies and media and exposure. We'll get into that in a second, but I knew I was a destination. I was not going to rely on walk-in traffic on Montana Avenue, like so many of the other stores did. That was really important, that I had built up that mailing list, the collector base. People would be traveling, or friends would be coming in from out of town and our collectors would pick them up at the airport and say, “We have to take you to Sculpture to Wear first.” It was those kinds of relationships we had built there. Sharon: Did people stumble on your gallery in Bergamot Station? How did they find you? Lisa: Bergamot had 25 galleries, so at any given day at any given moment, you had tons of people walking around. It's completely different than it is today; of course during the pandemic, but completely different. There was no problem reaching collectors, and I was the complete anomaly. You have this sculptural jewelry, and it was an education to a new audience. A lot of these people weren't necessarily open to the idea of jewelry not having diamonds or gold. People that had an educated eye in regard to design, like architects, were some of our first clients because they understood the design. It literally was a small-scale sculpture.  I think my passion for that and some of the artists were also incorporated into that conversation. I made a request of any artists that were local to the gallery that they do three things: they had to work in the gallery, they had to come and help set up an exhibition that wasn't theirs, and they had to attend an opening that wasn't theirs. I wanted them to understand the role of a gallery and what we did. At first it was, “Well, why I would give you 50 percent of the retail price?” This was a demonstration for them to learn why. There wasn't any artist who partook in those three requests that came to me and said, “No, this isn't right.” They all were shocked at what we did on a daily basis. Robert Lee Morris, I told him about that, and he was shocked. He said, “You did that?”  Sharon: You mentioned Robert Lee Morris. A lot of people will know who he is, especially New Yorkers or fashionistas, but tell us who he is and why he's important. Lisa: Robert Lee Morris is an icon. He's been designing jewelry for over 50 years. He's the only designer to earn the Coty Award for his jewelry design an unprecedented three times. He was the designer who made the big, bold, gold jewelry in conjunction with Donna Karan's black cashmere new work uniform in the late 80s, early 90s. Digressing to understand why he's important in my world, our world of art jewelry, is that he was one of the most important and prolific designers at the original Sculpture to Wear in New York.  He was self-taught. He was literally found at a tiny, little show in an offbeat path. He was immersed in this incredible work from Alexander Calder, Salvador Dalí, Louise Nevelson—amazing artists who already had these incredible careers, and as it turns out, people loved Robert's work. He outsold all the other artists combined at Sculpture to Wear. Then he launched his own gallery. After Sculpture to Wear closed, he launched Artwear. That launched a number of careers from a lot of famous artists, jewelers, studio jewelers, some of whom are still with us and some are not. That's his legacy; first at Sculpture to Wear, then Artwear. He has these amazing archives, and we'll talk about how editorial and prior images play a role in the secondary market. That might be a good place to talk about that. Sharon: O.K., please. Lisa: What's a phenomenon for me is that when I started and someone would ask if I sold jewelry, I knew the context. They would immediately think of CZ or— Sharon: Engagement rings. Lisa: Engagement rings. I said, “No, that's not at all what I do,” and I would always be wearing a piece. I was always wearing largescale pieces of jewelry. At that time when I first opened my gallery, I had very short hair; I think it was two inches long. People may not have remembered my name, but they would point at me from across the room and say, “Oh, that's the jewelry lady. That's the Sculpture to Wear lady,” and that was just fine.  This type of work, like photography 80 or 60 years ago, was not accepted in the realm of a fine art museum. Now you see photography auctioned at over $1 million, and some of the most incredible collections in the world are simply photography. Art jewelry is now collected in some specific fine art institutions, and that is for a number of reasons. First of all, it's because of exposure from editorial and media, and also because of the stewardship of specific collectors and designers like Helen Drutt, who bequeathed her collection to the Houston Fine Art Museum. I think it was almost a decade ago, and there's an incredible book. It's on my bookshelf. I can see it from here; it's very orange and large. She wanted her collection to be viewed at a fine arts museum versus a craft museum, and that started that conversation.  Lois Boardman on the West Coast donated her collection to LACMA, LA County Museum of Art, I believe five years ago. Also, for example, the Renwick Gallery at the Smithsonian has been collecting this work for a lot longer. For example, Jen Mandel and I were there for her induction into the Smithsonian. That was incredible. We were standing right next to a piece made by Alexander Calder, and that's where her vitrine was placed. It's really about this conversation, and I think it's a conversation of education.  As for the secondary market, we were just attending the Bonhams preview for the Crawford Collection. That's an unprecedented phenomenon, to have a collection of that level, of that stature, being auctioned by Bonhams without diamonds, without gold. There are a few elements and pieces to that, but you're looking at Art Smith pieces, modernists, studio jewelers. This is a very exciting and fertile time to be involved in studio and art jewelry. This is what I've been doing for the last 22, 25 years. We're at a very exciting place and there are a number of forums, especially with Covid and Zoom, with Art Jewelry Forum having open conversations about this, introducing collectors to artists and, of course, your podcast. There are a lot of variations and factors for the secondary market. Sharon: Lisa, because your jewelry and art jewelry in general is still avant garde—although it's coming into its own—do you think collectors or people like you are going to say, “O.K., what's next? What's on the horizon now? That's become old hat.” It hasn't, but do you think people are going to move on? Lisa: Sharon, I hope not. Within the genre of studio jewelry and wearable art, it has progressed and become so sophisticated. There are so many different makers out there, especially with the internet connecting us. When I first started in 1999, we didn't really have the internet; we barely had email, and now that's how everyone communicates. I think that people's creativity, the way people wear pieces and where they wear them—the reality is that we're not going anyplace right now during the pandemic, and I'm looking at different generations and how to include that next generation in collecting. For example, some of my first clients were in their 60s and 70s when they started collecting, and some are no longer with us. So, how do we engage their family members? You're our most recent convert to art jewelry. My gallery was so close to your house, yet you would have had no interest in what we did. I think it's a journey. Can you say someone's going to have a different trend? No.  I also think technology has played an important role not only in studio jewelry and the exposure, but also the techniques. People are using laser cutting, 3D printing. Technology has also been accepted into fine arts institutions and it has blurred the lines of the conversation of craft and fine art. Even five years ago, there was a delineation that was very distinct. There are still institutions that are not interested in immersion, but I think technology has been a friend, not a foe, to studio jewelers and the paths they can cross. Sharon: I do have to tell a story. Lisa and I were laughing because I lived close to where her gallery used to be. I lived not so far in the Valley, 10 miles away. I was never in your gallery, but I remember seeing an ad one day and thinking, “Who is going to wear this stuff?”  Lisa: And now the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Sharon: It was way out. When you say that people who were older started collecting it, that's the sort of people who don't automatically say, “Wow, that's so new and so cool.” Lisa: My collectors—and I'm sure a number of the gallerists across the United States who have been around for decades would say the same—our clientele, they're not interested in trends. If they open a Vogue, they might see a dress they like, but they're not going to buy it because it's on trend or in fashion. All my clientele, they're well-traveled; they're well-heeled; they're generally educated. They're willing to be avant garde. They don't want to wear the same thing everyone else is wearing, so it's a little bit different. The whole conversation now is that there are younger generations. I just met an incredible student at USC at the Bonhams preview. She's running this entire magazine department in her off time while she's full-time at USC. That's to reach a new collector base and new makers, but that's exciting. That's what makes it viable. Sharon: Yes, it keeps on going. Lisa: Right. That was one of the things I wanted to talk about in regards to when I first started in 1999: it was not only the relationships we built with the artists and the collectors, but we also had our version of social media, which was just printed publications. We didn't have social media, so building relationships with well-known stylists, who were either Emmy award winners or high-profile people that worked with celebrities, that was really important. We got to the point where they would literally call me up with the theme, tell me what it was, and I would already pull the pieces and have a box ready for them. We had a shorthand. That was, again, a relationship that would have to be cultivated. It was very exciting, and that's part of building the legacy of why this work is important. For example, Robert Lee Morris is pulling out his archives. Part of the excitement of these presentations is showing some of the editorial, these great magazine covers and shows that these pieces were included in. I have two decades of binders of images. So, that's very exciting, to show the relevance 20 years ago to now.

Norton Simon Museum Podcasts
Multisensory Tour: Jusepe de Ribera's “The Sense of Touch” and “Venus with a Dolphin”

Norton Simon Museum Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 6:16


06:16 https://www.nortonsimon.org/learn/watch-and-listen/videos-podcasts-and-lectures/multisensory-tour-ribera-venus/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 12:00:00 -0800 nortonsimon4002 ldenk@nortonsimon.org (Norton Sim

Norton Simon Museum Podcasts
Multisensory Tour: Isenbrandt's "Young Man with a Rosary"

Norton Simon Museum Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 4:12


04:12 https://www.nortonsimon.org/learn/watch-and-listen/videos-podcasts-and-lectures/multisensory-tour-isenbrandt/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 12:00:00 -0800 nortonsimon4001 ldenk@nortonsimon.org (Norton Simon Museum)

Norton Simon Museum Podcasts
Multisensory Tour: Fragonard's "Happy Lovers"

Norton Simon Museum Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 4:23


04:23 https://www.nortonsimon.org/learn/watch-and-listen/videos-podcasts-and-lectures/multisensory-tour-fragonard/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 12:00:00 -0800 nortonsimon4000 ldenk@nortonsimon.org (Norton Simon Museum)

Congratulations Pine Tree
278 - Turkey Revenge

Congratulations Pine Tree

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021


This is a wild ride. Kate is cooking breakfast throughout this entire episode. We learn that there is a new director at the Kadist. Maysoun is rededicating herself to not being part of art scene pretension. We find out about an extinct prehistoric turkey.the music in this episode is by FAVORS

Battles With Bits of Rubber
Amelia Rowcroft: Strong Foundations

Battles With Bits of Rubber

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 65:07


Figurative sculptor Amelia Rowcroft lives in the lovely Sussex town of Lewes on the South East Coast of England, which dates back to 961AD. She was kind enough to invite us into her studio in a building that once housed a brewery in the 1600s, and that's where we recorded this episode of BWBoR. Amelia has been sculpting practically, working in clay for over 20 years, creating primarily fine art portraits and figurative sculptures, though she has also worked within the film industry, and for the world's leading wax figure museums including Madame Tussaud's, and we talked about it all. She studied at Central St Martins, and the Florence Academy in Florence, Italy, and interestingly enough, was also a student at Wimbledon School of Art where Stuart attended, though a few years behind him. As fate would have it, another of our upcoming podcast guest artists, ZBrush Master Madeleine Scott Spencer, also studied at the Florence Academy and remembers Amelia, but we'll save that for later. We chatted for a good hour and a half and covered a variety of sculpture-related topics, such as why isn't there a Museum of Crap Renaissance Sculpture so we can see the failures of the Masters – because there had to be some - and creating a likeness sculpture vs. creating a caricature of a subject. We also chatted about sculpting digitally vs. pushing actual clay around. Amelia was kind enough – incredibly generous is more like it – to allow us to explore her online sculpture course, and it is jaw-dropping in content and ‘lightbulb' moments. We urge you to at least look at the sample video lessons on Amelia's website www.sculptingmasterclass.com/collections. We suspect you'll want to enrol to take advantage of the instruction offered by this incredible sculptor. Whether you sculpt practically or digitally, this information is invaluable and transferable between mediums. -------------------------------------- Many thanks as always for your time checking the stuff out. You can email us direct at stuartandtodd@gmail.com or leave us a voice message directly on our site. If you enjoy this podcast and got something out of it, would you do us a solid and tell just one more person about us? Send them a link and help us grow! -Stuart & Todd

The Inspiring Conversations Podcast
A Deep Conversation With Artist Eleanor Kipping

The Inspiring Conversations Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 39:57


Eleanor(she/her) is a New York-based artist, educator, and arts administrator. Her interdisciplinary practice explores the experience of the Black Diasporic female body in the united states of amerikkka through the examination and deconstruction of historical and contemporary narratives. She is interested in the public, private, and civic negotiations of race, gender, and class in addition to the effect and practice of violence, and surveillance on the body. This hybrid work exists as performance, video, and photography, poetry/spoken word, collaborative education, educational collaboration, installation, & writing but often draws on other methods such as social practice, and design. Eleanor is originally from Maine and has a BS in Video Production from the New England School of  Communications (2007), an MFA from the University of Maine (2018), and attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 2018. Current exhibitions include Are You Happy at the Portland Museum of Art as part of Untitled, 2020: Art From Maine in a ______ Time.  She is also a Guest Curator with this year's Yellow Fish Durational Performance Festival.  If you're lucky, you'll spot her at Camp El during your visit! eleanorkipping.com   /  @elfelicia 

Me Reading Stuff
Episode 347: Charles Simic - Dime-Store Alchemy

Me Reading Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 24:59


“He who cannot howl will not find his pack.” - Charles Simic "...unusual feeling of satisfaction and accomplishment, unexpected and more abiding than usual." - Joseph Cornell LINKS:Buy Charles Simic's Dime-Store Alchemy here: https://www.nyrb.com/products/dime-store-alchemy-1?variant=1094929469Order my 2021 Headstone Greeting Cards here: https://www.robynoneil.com/cardsandstickersMe on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/robyn_oneil/?hl=enHandwritten Notes: https://www.instagram.com/handwrittennotesontv/Me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Robyn_ONeil

Congratulations Pine Tree
277 - Become Gnomes

Congratulations Pine Tree

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021


 We have an absolute deluge of listener emails this week! What do you do about cat fur in your paint? How do you get rid of art you bought but don't want anymore? Get the wise answers only the Pine Tree can provide!The music in this episode is by Vector HoldSend your questions to congratulationspinetree@gmail.com

Seraphiend
Dane Fabrication | Seraphiend Podcast Season 2

Seraphiend

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 21:18


In today's episode, I had Jason Wilson, founder of Dane Fabrication. Jason specializes in custom furniture design, which is honestly a work of art. We dive deep into his career, and how he went from creating furniture by the age of 12 to now creating and selling pieces all over the U.S. Follow Jason at: https://www.instagram.com/danefabrication/  https://www.instagram.com/lineacrossroads/  To keep up with Seraphine, follow her at: Website: https://seraphiend.com/  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/seraphiend_podcast/  Instagram (Personal): https://www.instagram.com/therealseraphine/  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/seraphiendpodcast 

Tenet
Ep. 105 Autumn T. Thomas – Interdisciplinary Artist, Wood Sculpture

Tenet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 162:13


This week, Wes and Todd talk with Autumn T. Thomas. Autumn talks about becoming a full-time Artist, the non-verbal language of art, Ashe, her M.F.A experience, being self-reliant, the catalyst that led her to explore wood sculpture, process, engaging people with art, her piece “Lift Every Voice”, residencies, and finding balance.Join us for a wonderful and insightful conversation with Autumn T. Thomas.Check out Autumn's work at her website www.atthomas.comFollow Autumn on social media:On Instagram - www.instagram.com/seasonsofautumn/@seasonsofautumnOn YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwvXZkCsz6NgCO7tBQ0Kp-gSee Autumn's work in person: Bitfactory Gallery, "Rise" - All female group exhibition focused on gender equality in the Arts, December 17, 2021 – January 13, 2022 – www.bitfactory.netThe Arvada Center – Art of the State, January – March 2022 – www.arvadacenter.org

Crazy and The King Podcast
The CATK Interview: Baltimore Artist Kim Rice

Crazy and The King Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 42:41


Join Torin and Julie in welcoming creator of Being White, Redlining, and The Inheritance on a must listen interview. Kim Rice creates large-scale works using common materials. Her installations are a meditation on institutional racism and the policies that continue to affect American society today. Kim earned her BFA in Sculpture and MFA in Printmaking from the University of Oklahoma. Her work has been shown throughout the country including the Alexandria Museum of Art, the Fred Jones Museum of Art, the Northern Illinois Art Museum, the Delaware Museum of Art, the Peale Museum, and Prospect.4 Satellite. She has received multiple awards, including the McNeese Grant for Socially Engaged Practice. Born in Kentucky, raised in California, educated in Oklahoma, loved in New Orleans and now home in Baltimore, Kim's work is influenced by her two children and the pile of books by her bed.

Welcome To The Neighborhood: A Mister Rogers Tribute Podcast
Paul Day Sculpture - Welcome To The Neighborhood: A Mister Rogers Tribute Podcast

Welcome To The Neighborhood: A Mister Rogers Tribute Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 35:01


Welcome To The Neighborhood: A Mister Rogers Tribute Podcast A BEAUTIFUL DAY FOR A NEIGHBOR - Sculptor: Paul Day   Paul Day has spent over twenty years developing a highly personal approach to figurative sculpture with a particular interest in representing the figure in architectural space using high-relief, an art form that combines drawn composition and fully rounded sculpture.   In 2019, Rollins College in Winter Park, Florida, commissioned Paul Day to create a commemorative sculpture of Fred Rogers for the Campus. Mister Rogers was their most famous Alumnus and very well known in the United States for having created and animated the famous “Mister Rogers'...   On October 28th, 2021 The 360-degree sculpture titled A BEAUTIFUL DAY FOR A NEIGHBOR was unveiled. The bronze cast piece stands over 7 feet (2 meters) tall and weighs more than 3,000 pounds (1,360 kilograms). It depicts Rogers surrounded by children, hand puppets from his show, lyrics from the series' theme song and the show's Neighborhood Trolley.   Paul Day has stopped by our podcast neighborhood for a visit to talk about his latest masterpiece. Paul Day, welcome to the Neighborhood. Web Site: https://pauldaysculpture.com/project/a-beautiful-day-in-the-neighborhood/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/pauldaysculpture/   Thank you for joining us here this week in the neighborhood. Music featured on podcast was Stay by Rick Lee James Special Thanks to my guest Paul Day And The @MisterRogersSay Community on Twitter. Our Substack page is https://rickleejames.substack.com/s/welcome-to-the-neighborhood-a-mister. Our Instagram page is https://www.instagram.com/misterrogerssay/ I'm your host Rick Lee James.   My Twitter account is @RickLeeJames, my web site is RickLeeJames.com, My other Podcast is Voices In My Head (The Rick Lee James Podcast), and I look forward being with you again next time. Until Then: You make each day a special day. You know how, by just your being you. There's only one person in this whole world like you. And people can like you exactly as you are.  

The Dark Web Vlogs
What Is the Mystery Of The Shigir Idol And Why Is It Important?

The Dark Web Vlogs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 9:27


What Is the Mystery Of The Shigir Idol And Why Is It Important?Discovered in 1894 by miners in a swamp in Russia, a sculpture known as Shigir Idol may have been created more than 12,000 years ago making it older than the pyramids of Giza. It may have the oldest text known today.

The Atlas Obscura Podcast
The Forgotten Songs Sound Sculpture

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 11:33


This unique installation in Sydney, Australia combines art and ornithology, commemorating the calls of the city's lost birds. Plus, bin chickens!READ MORE IN THE ATLAS: https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/forgotten-songs-sound-sculpture

3 minute lesson
The Terracotta Army | Archaeology

3 minute lesson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 3:16


Episode 388. Topic: The Terracotta Army. Theme: Archaeology. How did some farmers uncover an untouched collection of funeral art in China? What is The Terracotta Army and why was it made? How did they go for millennia without discovery or looting? Can you visit them today?Twitter: @3minutelessonEmail: 3minutelesson@gmail.comInstagram: 3minutelessonFacebook: 3minutelessonNew episode every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday! Find us everywhere podcasts are found.

Congratulations Pine Tree
276 - Shannon's Soul Report

Congratulations Pine Tree

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021


 Maysoun goes totally Sarah Palin on her former roommate, Shannon over her work at a giant tech company. We also talk about a couple shows and the western grebe! The dancer of water birds!The music in this episode is by GiraffageThis is Shannon now.

Maker Mom Podcast
Episode 210 - Andrea de Leon

Maker Mom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 61:44


Andrea is a Mexican-American artist based in Texas. She obtained her BFA in Studio Arts from the University of Texas and has received multiple awards, including residencies at Ox Bow School of Art and Penland School of Crafts. She has worked and exhibited internationally and currently teaches metalsmithing in several institutions in Texas. With metalsmithing she creates sculptural pieces as well as knives. She is also pursuing a passion in scientific glass blowing. You can follow along with Andrea on Instagram and her Website.

Ben Fordham: Highlights
M12 giant emu sculpture a waste of taxpayer dollars: NSW One Nation leader Mark Latham

Ben Fordham: Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 7:17


A $7 million 'giant emu' sculpture is set to adorn the M12 dual carriage motorway approaching the new Western Sydney airport. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

SBS Russian - SBS на русском языке
Arty. Nina Sanadze with installation Apotheosis - laureate of the churchie emerging art prize - Arty. Нина Санадзе с инсталляцией Apotheosis - лауреат the churchie emerging art prize

SBS Russian - SBS на русском языке

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 23:35


Melbourne-based artist Nina Sanadze was announced as the winner of the churchie emerging art prize 2021 at the IMA. This interview is available in Russian only. - Премия churchie для новых художников в этом году досталась Нине Санадзе из Мельбурна. В основу ее инсталляции Apotheosis лег архив советского скульптора-монументала Валентина Топуридзе, который она перевезла в Австралию из Грузии.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
NZ Sculpture on Shore

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 14:41


In amongst the many events dealt the Delta blow this summer is NZ Sculpture OnShore - a major art exhibition held in Takapuna, Auckland. The exhibition is not only the country's largest sculpture event, it's also the biggest fundraiser for Women's Refuge.

Congratulations Pine Tree
275 - Return of the Snork Mask

Congratulations Pine Tree

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021


 This week we are naysayers about a crystal fair. Also Kate tries to get Maysoun into a snork mask and out the door. Everyone email Maysoun if you're bothered by any of the mouse clicking in this episode. Love you! Bye!The music in this episode is by New Scans Save these guys by making a wetlands in your apartment!

The Daily Gardener
November 3, 2021 Mercy Park Sculptures, William Young, William Cullen Bryant, Sarah Addison Allen, Genealogy for Gardeners by Simon Maughan and Ross Bayton, and Kansas Gardens

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 39:36


Today in botanical history, we celebrate a German-American botanist who reached out to Queen Charlotte, an American poet who found inspiration in nature and the father of ecology. We'll hear an excerpt from The Sugar Queen - a great fiction book. We Grow That Garden Library™ with a book that's part of a wonderfully informative series from the RHS. And then we'll wrap things up with a little story about the glory of Kansas gardens in November.   Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart To listen to the show while you're at home, just ask Alexa or Google to “Play the latest episode of The Daily Gardener Podcast.” And she will. It's just that easy.   The Daily Gardener Friday Newsletter Sign up for the FREE Friday Newsletter featuring: A personal update from me Garden-related items for your calendar The Grow That Garden Library™ featured books for the week Gardener gift ideas Garden-inspired recipes Exclusive updates regarding the show Plus, each week, one lucky subscriber wins a book from the Grow That Garden Library™ bookshelf.   Gardener Greetings Send your garden pics, stories, birthday wishes, and so forth to Jennifer@theDailyGardener.org   Facebook Group If you'd like to check out my curated news articles and original blog posts for yourself, you're in luck. I share all of it with the Listener Community in the Free Facebook Group - The Daily Gardener Community. So, there's no need to take notes or search for links. The next time you're on Facebook, search for Daily Gardener Community, where you'd search for a friend... and request to join. I'd love to meet you in the group.   Curated News The Almanac A Seasonal Guide to 2021by Lia Leendertz  Mercy Park garden adds 3 new sculptures | The Joplin Globe | Emily Younker   Important Events November 3, 1766 On this day, a young botanist named  William Young returned to America after receiving the title of the Queen's botanist. William Young was born in Germany, and he immigrated to the United States when he was just a little boy at the age of two. His family settled in Philadelphia and eventually became neighbors to one of America's first botanists, John Bartram. Growing up, William spent a great deal of his childhood exploring Bartram's gardens. Bertram even encouraged him to pursue botany, and he took him along on some collecting trips. By all accounts, William was a smart and self-directed young man. When he was in his early twenties, he decided that he wanted to get the attention of the brand new Queen of England, Queen Charlotte. Charlotte was the bride of George III, and William put together a little parcel for her - a little gift of seeds - along with a letter (no doubt congratulating her on her wedding and introducing himself as an American botanist.) Charmed by William's thoughtful gift, Charlotte decided to summon William to England. She wanted him to come to England to study botany for a year and then return to America to collect plants on behalf of the royal family. And so that's exactly what William Young ended up doing. When he left America, he had no formal training in botany. He was, however, full of potential and eager to learn. This opportunity in England was an extraordinary chance for William to learn the science of botany from the worldwide center for botanical research: England. At the same time, this series of events caused a bit of jealousy and a shock in the American botanical community. John Bartram himself was an old man by the time this happened for William, and he made comments along the lines of, "Hey, I've been in America, collecting and cultivating for decades, and I've never received an offer like this." And so many of the American botanists really couldn't believe William's good fortune. His trip was essentially like winning a botanist lottery with the promise not only of training but steady work and support from a generous, well-funded patron. Despite Charlotte's hopes for William, his peers were dubious of William's ability to measure up to the task. While William was passionate about botany, he hadn't demonstrated any particular acumen or success that should have garnered the kind of opportunity that had come his way. The bottom line was, they didn't think William had it in him. Yet, William's critics were not entirely fair. After all, William had been bold enough to send that package of seeds to the new Queen. And he was smart enough to leverage his German heritage when he wrote to her. Charlotte had German heritage as well, and when she first came to England, she surrounded herself with other Germans who spoke her language and shared her history, customs, and culture. Summoning William to England was just another example of Queen Charlotte making herself feel more at home away from home. When William arrived in England, he was in his early twenties. He had a huge learning curve to conquer when it came to his new station in life. He had no idea what it was like to be in front of royalty or how to behave in Royal circles. Of course, William didn't have a ton of life experience as a young person in his twenties. So, he performed exactly as one might imagine he would: dazzled by the luxury and lifestyle, he quickly began racking up bills. With each passing month, he found himself deeper in debt until he ended up arrested and in jail for the large debts that he owed. Incredibly, it was the Queen who bailed him out - but not before sending him home to Philadelphia with the hopes that he could still perform as a plant collector in America. And so it was on this day. November 3 in 1766, that William returned to America with his new title as botanist to the King and Queen. Instead of being humbled by his financial misdeeds, William returned proud and haughty. He strutted about under the auspices of his Royal appointment, but his behavior didn't endear him to his American peers. They heard the rumors about how William had acted when he was in England and they were turned off by his peacocking and attire. In a letter to the botanist Peter Collinson, John Bartram wrote, “I am surprised that Young is come back so soon. He cuts the greatest figure in town and struts along the streets whistling, with his sword and gold lace.” And then Bartram confided that William had visited his garden three times, feigning respect and bragging about his yearly pay from the Royal family, which amounted to 300 pounds sterling. Now William was no fool, and it's clear that he craved acceptance from his peers. At the same time, he was probably aware of how some of his peers truly felt about him. But he did not dwell on this conundrum and focused on his work. He still had collecting to do for the King and Queen, and he needed to mend fences on that front if he ever hoped to make it as a botanist. And so, he set off for the Carolinas, where he spent an entire year collecting plants. Then, he carefully and quite expertly packaged up all of the plants that he had found and traveled back to London - personally bringing all of these plants to the King and Queen and hoping to get back in their good graces. Although William arrived in England only to be refused to be seen by the King and Queen, he still managed to make his trip a resounding success. By shepherding rare, live plants in wonderful condition from the Carolinas to England, he impressed English collectors. And there was one plant in particular that really helped to repair and save William's reputation, and that was the Venus Fly Trap. William brought many live specimens of the Venus flytrap to England, and as one might imagine, the plant caused a sensation. Without the flytrap, there was probably little that William could say to restore his reputation. So in this sense, his plants, especially the Venus flytrap, did the mending and the PR work for him. What William did was essentially no different than an apologetic spouse who brings their partner flowers after a fight. That's exactly what William did on this trip when he returned and presented the Venus flytrap to England. One other fact about this trip is that William proved himself to be an expert plant packer. Clearly, one of the biggest challenges for early botanists was keeping specimens alive - that was really hard to do. Dead specimens didn't garner anywhere near the attention or pay of living plants. William's skill in this area underscores just how intelligent and thoughtful William could be. A 1771 letter to Humphrey Marshall detailed William's packing technic: William Young sends his plants very safely by wrapping them in moss and packing them pretty close [together] in a box. He ties the moss in a ball around the roots with a piece of packthread...It's very surprising how well they keep in this manner.  William's method differs little from the way plants are packaged and sent by mail today. William ends up devoting his life to botany. He returned to American and collected plants in the Carolinas, returning to England when he had a full shipment. William mastered his collecting strategy over his lifetime - returning again and again to the Carolinas, scouring the wilderness for rare plants like the Venus flytrap that had brought him so much success. Along the way, William continued to struggle financially as he paid his debts. But by the end of his life, William was able to get his affairs in order, and he actually died a fairly wealthy man. Tragically, he died young at the age of 43. In December of 1784, William decided to set out once again for the Carolinas. Unbeknownst to him, he was going on what would become his final collecting trip. He never did reach the Carolinas. He only made it as far as Maryland, where he collected along a waterway known as Gunpowder Falls, where he fell into the river and died after being swept away by the current. His body was found about seven weeks later.   November 3, 1794 Birth of William Cullen Bryant, American poet.   William drew inspiration from the natural world. He once wrote a lovely verse about roses: Loveliest of lovely things are they, On earth, that soonest pass away. The rose that lives its little hour Is prized beyond the sculptured flower. William also wrote about the month of November in a little poem called A Winter Piece.  ...When shriek'd The bleak November winds, and smote the woods, And the brown fields were herbless, and the shades, That met above the merry rivulet, Were spoil'd, I sought, I loved them still,—they seem'd Like old companions in adversity.   November 3, 1841 Birth of Eugenius Warming, Danish botanist. Eugenius was one of the founders of modern plant ecology. He's credited with writing the first ecology textbook with his book, Oecology of Plants: An Introduction to the Study of Plant Communities (1895).   Unearthed Words She went to the window. A fine sheen of sugary frost covered everything in sight, and white smoke rose from chimneys in the valley below the resort town. The window opened to a rush of sharp early November air that would have the town in a flurry of activity, anticipating the tourists the colder weather always brought to the high mountains of North Carolina. She stuck her head out and took a deep breath. If she could eat the cold air, she would. She thought cold snaps were like cookies, like gingersnaps. In her mind, they were made with white chocolate chunks and had a cool, brittle vanilla frosting. They melted like snow in her mouth, turning creamy and warm. ― Sarah Addison Allen, The Sugar Queen   Grow That Garden Library Genealogy for Gardeners by Simon Maughan  and Dr Ross Bayton This book came out in 2017, and the subtitle is Plant Families Explored & Explained. Anything that has genealogy and gardening in the title is a book that I'm interested in. Before I get into this particular review, I should mention that this book is part of one of my favorite garden series by the RHS. So in this series is the book Latin for gardeners as well as botany for gardeners. And now this book Genealogy for Gardeners is designed to help you explore and understand plant families - and plant family trees, which to me is even more exciting. Now you may be wondering why. Well, I think the authors do a great job of explaining that in the preface to their book. They write, While most of us think of plants, that's belonging to one big happy family. The fact is they don't. There are hundreds of different plant families, which botanists have cleverly grouped together using what they know of family histories and genealogy and now, of course, DNA to bring some sense and order to more than a quarter of a million different plant species.  But why should this matter to you as a gardener, aside from just wanting to become more knowledgeable about plant families? Well, here's the explanation from the authors: Plant families are all around us. Whatever the time of year, go for a walk and look for wild or garden plants. You'll be surprised at how many plant families are represented within a small radius of your home. Even in your own garden, there will be a fantastic genealogy of plants.  Thanks largely to the efforts of plant collectors and horticulturists who brought the plants into cultivation from the four corners of the world.  When it comes to being a good gardener making connections is what it's all about. And if you are faced with a strongly acidic soil, and know that rhododendrons will grow, then you can broaden your planting ideas to include other plants in the same family, such as Heather. Mountain Laurel, leather leaf, blueberries, and others. If you are designing with plants, you may know that all plants and a particular family, and share certain features, which enables you to mix displays effectively and extend your range.  Now that is a very compelling reason to get to know your plant families. One of the things that I love about this particular series of books is that the illustrations are incredible. The editors have pulled images of botanical art that truly are the best example of some of these plants. The beauty of these books, including the cover, just is not rivaled. In fact, the minute I spot these books, they just have a look and a feel to them - I know immediately that it's part of this series from the RHS. These books are in my office on a special little bookshelf of books that I reference all the time, and this little series from the RHS is such a gem. This particular book about plant family, garden, genealogy - Basically the genealogy of plants-  is one that I go back to again and again, and again. So this is a fantastic book. As I mentioned, the illustrations are great. It is very clearly laid out. They've really done the heavy lifting when it comes to simplifying this material, making it very understandable and accessible. And yet, they do not dumb it down. That's not what this book is about. If you want a book on this topic that is exceptionally clear And is a delight to read, then this is the book that you've been waiting for. So, whether you're a landscape designer, a horticulture student, or just an amateur gardener, Genealogy for Gardeners will help you better understand and utilize plant families in your garden. This book is 224 pages of plant families and plant family trees - and it's part of one of the top garden book series on the market today. You can get a copy of Genealogy for Gardeners by Simon Maughan and Ross Bayton and support the show using the Amazon Link in today's Show Notes for around $20.   Today's Botanic Spark Reviving the little botanic spark in your heart November 3, 1903 On this day, The Cherokee Sentinel (Cherokee, Kansas) published this heartwarming blurb about the gardens in the Heartland of America. Here's what they wrote: It's November, and gardens and flowers are as green and beautiful as in summer. Verily, Kansas is an American Italy and the garden spot of the world.  Well, I don't know how true that was, and I question whether that was written for the benefit of enticing immigrants to come to Kansas. Nevertheless, I found it very sweet, and I thought it was a great way to end the show today.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener. And remember: "For a happy, healthy life, garden every day."

Art History for All
Episode 28: No Foolin'

Art History for All

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 35:59


In this episode we delve into the portrait of Don Juan de Calabazas in the Cleveland Museum of Art! Allyson talks jesters, fools, disability history,…

Stitchery Stories
Jennie-maree Tempest : Beautiful Botanical Sculptures

Stitchery Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 39:41


Jennie-maree Tempest is a textile artist living on the Bass Coast of Australia. After many years creating art quilts and portraits, she has decided to challenge her textile art skills and creativity by creating textile art botanical sculptures. Jennie-maree focuses her creativity inspired by the native Australian species that grow around her coastal home. The latest is a flowering yucca that is around 6ft / nearly 2m tall! It has been a massive undertaking, and has taken over four months of hard work to create. It's not only a challenge of textile art but also of construction. How did she make such a large item out of fabric & threads? Today on the Stitchery Stories textile art podcast, Jennie-maree Tempest chats with Susan Weeks about her inspirations and challenges and her creative life by the coast. For this episode... View Show Notes, Links & Examples of Jennie-maree's work at http://www.stitcherystories.com/JenniemareeTempest Visit: https://jemartem.com/ Like : https://www.facebook.com/JemARTem/ Look : https://www.instagram.com/jemartem.textiles/ Buy : https://www.etsy.com/au/shop/JemartemTextiles Pin : https://www.pinterest.co.uk/jemartem/  

Talking Out Your Glass podcast
Peter Bremers: Transformation and Transcendence

Talking Out Your Glass podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 107:01


Creator. Healer. Traveler. Dutch-born artist, Peter Bremers, is renowned for his glass sculptures inspired by nature's most extreme landscapes and the transformational journeys he has taken around the world. Deeply touched by the majesty of nature, Bremers conveys his awe and gratitude through his sculpture while using his travels as an inexhaustible source of inspiration.  Having begun his career working with a wide range of materials including glass, plastic, steel and stone, over time Bremers found glass to be the best way of realizing his artistic visions. Understanding the captivating power of transparency and light, he has successfully broken boundaries with scale and form throughout his 40-year career leading to his international reputation. The artist's use of reductive forms awakens his viewers' sensitivity to space and perception in graceful, nonverbal poems about light, color, and form.  Bremers states: “I have a deep love for glass as it is the only material that allows you to experience four dimensions. You can see the front and the back of a sculpture at the same time, as well as the matter and space in-between.” Born in 1957 in Maastricht, Netherlands, Bremers attended the University of Fine Arts (Sculpture Department) in his hometown. His introduction to glass came by serendipity after he was well-established as a light-sculptor, when he wandered into a glassblowing workshop and was enthralled by the molten, luminous material. He then studied glass at the Jan van Eyck Akademie, Post Academic Institute for Art & Design, also in Maastricht. He attended workshops at The Oude Horn in Leerdam and became an assistant to Bernard Heesen. In 1989, he participated in a workshop with Lino Tagliapietra, who executed two of Bremers' designs that were subsequently purchased by the Municipal Museum of The City of The Hague. That same year, he went to work with Neil Wilkin in England, where he produced objects using the graal technique. Bremers has taught and exhibited around the world, from Europe to Australia, Africa, China, and North America. His art is included in numerous collections including the National Glass Museum (Leerdam, Netherlands); the Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Indiana, the Kunstgewerbe Museum (Berlin, Germany); the Palm Springs Art Museum (California); and the Ringling School of Art and Design, Basch Gallery, (Sarasota, Florida). He has had solo and group exhibitions in the Netherlands, France, Germany, Switzerland, the United States, Australia, Israel, Italy, Canada, Dubai, the Czech Republic, China, and Taiwan. Among other public commissions, he has done installations on the Queen Mary II and at the “Murano” Glass Hotel in Tacoma, Washington.   Through January 16, 2022, Imagine Museum, St. Petersburg, Florida, presents Transformation and Transcendence, a solo exhibition including two distinct bodies of Bremers' sculpture – Perception and 7 Bodies. The Perception series of nine sculptures, identical in form, have been created using different colors and materials. Their level of reflectiveness, from transparent to mirroring, change the periphery of our vision and thus the perception of how we are interpreting each form and its impact. The 7 Bodies series represents seven fundamental elements that embody our human existence through repetitive, sculptural forms. The pieces in the series are entitled: Physical, Mental, Emotional, Vibrational, Spiritual, Creative and Ethereal. Bremers approaches each of these bodies with the intention of exemplifying through the exterior and interior forms, the human potential that exists within us all. “Capturing the beauty of life, Bremers' work transports the viewer into the worlds he has created. From the spiritual to the transcendent, his creations leave you with a sense of positivity and hope as we all search for meaning and appreciation of our planet.” – Imagine Museum In this special AMA (Ask Me Anything) episode and Patreon reward, long-time ToYG supporter Anthony Cowan interviews Bremers. Cowan, who lives in Florida, is immersed in energy healing, glass art and poetry. He has written a feature article on Bremers that will publish in Glass magazine on December 1, 2021. If you're interested in becoming a Patreon sponsor and co-producer of ToYG podcast, please visit www.patreon.com/TalkingOutYourGlass  

Congratulations Pine Tree
274 - Stated Positions

Congratulations Pine Tree

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021


 This week we decide who is the king of Bay Area museums. We also announce the winner of our first annual pumpkin carving contest!!! Maysoun accidentally thinks it's January for a second! Unbelievable! The music in this episode it by bastiengoatGo see the shows at MoADFairfield BeaversSuzanne's beaver podcast!INGRID FOREVER!!!

Géopolitique
Le retour des sculptures pillées au Bénin : tourner la page du traumatisme colonial

Géopolitique

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 3:04


durée : 00:03:04 - Géopolitique - par : Pierre Haski - Lors d'une cérémonie au musée du Quai Branly, la France a officiellement restitué au Bénin 26 sculptures royales pillées au 19ème siècle. Un processus universel de justice et de dignité impossible à stopper.

Greene & Lewis
119: Part-Time Bed

Greene & Lewis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 71:06


Camper's Amazon 'haul," putting the fun in funeral, revisiting stonks, and Brad Troemel's CIA psy-op report reviewed

VernissageTV Art TV
Meret Oppenheim: Mon Exposition / Retrospective at Kunstmuseum Bern

VernissageTV Art TV

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021


Materially Speaking
Filippo dalle Luche: Key to the future

Materially Speaking

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 15:57


See pictures and read more on materiallyspeaking.comFilippo is a vivacious 24-year-old student at Accademia di Belle Arti di Carrara which was founded in 1769 by Maria Teresa Cybo, princess of Carrara, to support the marble industry. The Academy was founded with two schools: sculpture and architecture, but over the centuries painting, scenography, decoration and graphics were added. However, Filippo has chosen to specialise in the most recent addition: new art technologies, founded in 1999, which trains artists in digital media skills.Filippo has lived his whole life in Monteggiori, a small fortified medieval village dating back to 1224, perched above Pietrasanta with a strategic view over the Versilia plains and the sea. As cars are forbidden, everyone has to walk up the steep cobbled path carrying their provisions, and if anyone urgently needs the hospital you'll see men bobbing down over the cobbles bearing them on a stretcher. There's a brown dog on duty in the car park and many feisty cats which wander from house to house demanding food and attention. It's a close-knit and colourful community.Filippo's parents run La Bottega dell'Arte, and being experts in the traditional arts of gilding and silvering, restore furniture, picture frames and antiques. Using these skills they have done restoration projects for the church of San Stefano in Monteggiori. Meanwhile, Filippo straddles both the old world and the new. This is reflected in the two projects he's chosen for his course theses, both of which he hopes will give something back to his village.His first thesis will explore how the digital revolution could help modernise the exhibition space of Monteggiori Arte, a cultural association and gallery space located in an historic home. The gallery can be found as you walk up into the village next to the frescoed arch, with a dragon by artist Tano Pisano, weaving in and out of its walls.For the second thesis, Filippo uses 3D technology to create a spare key for San Stefano church. He presents the key to the priest during a special Sunday service and in a slideshow on his iPad (set within a gilded picture frame devised in his parents' workshop) shows the congregation how the various stages of reverse engineering created the key.LinkedIn: /filippodallelucheAccademia di Belle Arti di Carrara

Jason's Failed Podcast
s. 3 ep. 34 - Mary Carley's Pecan Casa

Jason's Failed Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 52:19


This week, Jason has a candid conversation with Mary Carley about the use of sculpture, pencil drawing, and painting to help heal from years of abuse and overcome her dissociative disorder. You can find her art online at her Etsy shop MarysHeartShop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/MarysheartShop?ref=search_shop_redirect

Ecotone
Architectural Dreaming and Digital Memory with Refik Anadol

Ecotone

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 68:46


In this episode hosted by computational designer Shankar Saanthakumar (ximulacra.com), we speak with Refik Anadol, an artist who transforms vast data sets from a variety of sources into immersive, hallucinatory video installations. In this way, he does alchemy with vital but sometimes-dry information sources such as climate projections or medical data, transmuting them into overwhelming and evocative aesthetic experiences. These works the suggest intelligent and malleable architectures that resonate with the liquid structure of dreams, memories, and imagination.

The Roundtable
2021 North Bennington Outdoor Sculpture Show

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 22:28


The North Bennington Outdoor Sculpture Show - or NBOSS - is one of the region's premiere arts events of the summer/fall season, featuring work by some of the best artists from southern Vermont and throughout the northeast for the last 23 years.

An Even Bigger Fly On The Wall
1323. "The Golden Age of Chinese Art: T'ang Dynasty." Play Books. (10/21/21)

An Even Bigger Fly On The Wall

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 73:13


"For almost three hundred years the noble T'ang Dynasty fostered a period of artistic and intellectual endeavor which has never been equaled in the history of China. Sculpture, ceramics, glass, and textiles were some of the major artifacts that emerged from this glorious renaissance of Chinese taste and skill. This book is the story of the T'ang told through objects in the author's collection, one of the most representative in private hands. It includes a marvelous array of gold and silver mirrors, jade, jewelry and gilt bronzes. The 124 illustrations, 24 in full color are accompanied by a history of the T'ang era, and a chapter on each of the categories in the collection gives a comprehensive background to the illustrations. The knowledgeable comments of a well-known collector are authoritative, and will be invaluable to other collectors, was well as to all connosseurs of Chinese art." (For Educational and inspirational materials. The Creators own their content and music/songs).

Congratulations Pine Tree
273 - Maysoun Gives the Finger

Congratulations Pine Tree

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


 This week we got into some traffic drama! We also saw a plethora of art shows. Come on this winding journey with us!All the music in this show is by FAVORSGo see all the shows at Cushion Works, Telematic, Slash, Wattis, and Microsoft Paint! And beyond!Do not flip people off from your bike!

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano
Il museo di Vienna censura i capolavori online

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 3:04


Il museo di Vienna ha deciso di censurare le grandi opere d'arte esposte online per protestare contro le piattaforme social, che non permettono l'esposizione di nudi anche se artistici.

Materially Speaking
Julia Vance: Letters and words

Materially Speaking

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 28:23


See pictures and read more on materiallyspeaking.comWith abstract calligraphic lines, Julia Vance creates sculptural forms in white Italian Statuario marble. She tells us how she created a modern altar, font and pulpit for a new church in Hønefoss, Norway, which replaced the previous church which had burnt down.In this episode, Julia describes a piece she was finishing called Passage to Knowledge. Carved in black granite, this monumental sculpture is like a huge letter Q, signifying a question. It comprises a circle with a tail, and is a portal you can pass through.Julia believes the value of questions is far more important than students being filled up with answers. Passage to Knowledge was unveiled in the schoolyard of the newly opened Flesberg school, Norway, in September 2019. Julia created the piece to honour curiosity and encourage children to engage and play with it.Another work which plays with calligraphic forms is HOLD #2. This sculpture is inspired by the sweeping lines and curves of the letters H, L and D. The piece invites you to curl up inside the cavity and become the missing letter O. Before going on display in Holland Park, London, HOLD #2 was shown in front of the Norwegian Parliament.The sculpture group WE-ME #5 was inspired by the idea that the word ‘me' can easily be turned upside-down to form a ‘we', much the same way an individual ‘me' can join a group and become part of a ‘we'. First displayed in 2014 in front of Oslo Central station, the piece has wheels fastened to the side allowing members of the public to rotate the words.Since 2005 Julia has divided her time between Norway and Italy, creating her letter- and word-inspired sculptures. Having spent most of the pandemic in Norway, she is looking forward to returning to her studio in Pietrasanta to work on new commissions.juliavance.noinstagram.com/juliavance1Royal Society of Sculptors

Shirtloads of Science
AI Myths #1-3 busted with professor Toby Walsh (259)

Shirtloads of Science

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 23:38


Artificial Intelligence is here and embedded in modern life. So how best to traverse those “uncanny valleys” between robots and humans? Can computer Art or Sculpture express human feeling? Could AI math (re-factorable numbers) keep us safer?  Professor Toby Walsh is an expert and has answers for Dr Karl. https:drkarl.com @TobyWalsh

I Like Your Work: Conversations with Artists, Curators & Collectors
Clintel Steed: Seeing Life Through Paint

I Like Your Work: Conversations with Artists, Curators & Collectors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 61:55


I had the pleasure of sitting down and interviewing the amazing painter Clintel Steed in person at his studio in New York City. Clintel Steed takes inspiration for his work from his surroundings, whether it's Utah or Harlem. His work is an exploration of moments, feelings, situations and experiences that he brings to life through art. His paintings often carry themes of the struggle of feeling divided, politics and current events.    Clintel Steed was born in 1977 in Salt Lake City, Utah. He received his BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and his MFA from Indiana University, and completed Advanced Studies at the New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting and Sculpture.    His work has been featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions, most recently Clintel Steed: Endymion at Steven Harvey Fine Art Projects, New York; Emoji Show at Klaus von Nichtsagend, New York, and So Much, So Little, All At Once at Regina Rex, New York,  and Mark Borghi in Sag Harbor, Solo Exhibition, "Behind the Hood" among others.    He is the recipient of the John Koch Award from the National Academy of Arts and Letters, and recent press includes Hyperallergic, Artcritical, and The New York Sun.   Clintel Steed lives and works in New York City and is an instructor at the New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting & Sculpture.    LINKS:  https://www.clintelsteed.com/   I Like Your Work Links: https://www.sunlighttax.com/ilikeyourwork Catalogs Subscriptions Exhibitions Studio Visit Artists I Like Your Work Podcast Instagram Submit Work Observations on Applying to Juried Shows Studio Planner

Maker Mom Podcast
Episode 205 - Delia Dante

Maker Mom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 56:45


Delia Dante is an award winning metal art and glass enamel artist currently living and working in Idaho. Her fine art gallery, Enamel and Welding studio is in the heart of downtown Boise. Delia discovered her artistic passion in the creation of metal and enamel sculptures, wall pieces and jewelry. She works with copper and steel. The popularity and demand for her fine art enameling and welding classes are a result of her outstanding reputation as an art teacher for 12 years and working as a professional enamel artist since 2004. You can follow along with Delia on Instagram and her Website.

Talk Art
Rosanne Robertson

Talk Art

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 58:07


Russell and Robert meet artist Rosanne Robertson on the eve of their new exhibition 'Subterrane' at Maximilian William gallery in London. The Cornwall based artist works in sculpture, photography, drawing and performance to explore the boundaries of the human body and its environment. Capturing moments, schisms and shifts, their work often explores negative natural spaces to create expanded representations of the figure. Their first solo exhibition has just opened coinciding with Frieze London art fair.We discuss Robertson's ongoing body of work titled Stone (Butch) which explores the terrain of the Queer body in the landscape. The term ‘stone butch' is taken from the lesbian and trans activist Leslie Feinberg's 1993 novel Stone Butch Blues in which the oppression of lesbian, trans, butch and femme identities is laid bare. Through an interest in terrain, Robertson elucidates upon Feinberg's metaphoric ‘raincoat layer,' the layer which protects the body from hostile external forces.The sculptural articulations of Stone (Butch) are created by plaster casting directly in crevices in natural rock formations at Godrevy Point, St Ives Bay, Cornwall and The Bridestones, West Yorkshire. The ‘sculptural void' makes physical a negative space created by the power of the sea and air. The sculptures embody a space that is shifting and fluid, reclaiming a natural space for Queer and Butch identity from a history of being deemed ‘against nature'. Robertson sees the natural stone formations as queer forms and changing bodies that are not set in stone, but revealed to us over a long period of time, as fluid structures shaped by water and erosion. Queer bodies which are as fluid as the water that shapes them and as plural as the grains of sand that erode them.Rosanne Robertson (they/them) (b. Sunderland 1984) is a contemporary artist based in West Cornwall. They obtained their BA in Fine Art from the Manchester School of Art in 2010. In June 2021, Robertson unveiled their first public sculpture, commissioned for the 10th edition of Sculpture in the City and installed at London's iconic Gherkin skyscraper until Spring 2022. To coincide with this unveiling, Robertson will perform Stone (Butch): Undercurrents in Nocturnal Creatures, a contemporary art festival programmed by the Whitechapel Gallery and Sculpture in the City. Their second public sculpture – commissioned by Sunderland Council as a legacy to the 700 women who worked in Sunderland's shipyards – will be unveiled later this year. Their work and writing are featured in Breaking the Mould: Sculpture by Women Since 1945, (London: Hayward Gallery Publishing, 2020) which was published on the occasion of the eponymous Arts Council Collection exhibition. Robertson will present their first solo exhibition at Maximillian William, London in October 2021, during the same month, they will exhibit in the group exhibition Seen at the Newlyn Art Gallery & The Exchange, Cornwall. While Associate Artist during the 2019 Yorkshire Sculpture International, Robertson presented a solo display, Stone (Butch), at The Hepworth Wakefield, Wakefield, 2019 and exhibited in the group exhibition Associated Matter at the Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Yorkshire, 2019. Works by Robertson... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Congratulations Pine Tree

 Kate and Maysoun do some corrections, redactions, RETRACTIONS, recantations, disavowals and so much more in this episode !The intro and outro music in this episode is by Tomu DJNFTs Are Hot. So Is Their Effect on the Earth's Climate8+ Interesting Palestinian Films Coming to Netflix, This Weekend & This MonthREDACTED AND RETRACTED

The Social Breakdown
SOC504 - Money and Morals: Judging Creativity in Art (Guest Edition)

The Social Breakdown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 37:49


Did you know that contemporary and modern art aren't the same thing? Come learn with us about the contemporary art world, how artists judge and value their own art and creative journey, and how artists represent or negotiate their creative vision. We invited Dr. Hannah Wohl, who recently published Bound by Creativity: How Contemporary Art is Created and Judged with University of Chicago Press to talk about her ethnographic work with contemporary artists. Dive with us into the art world and maybe spark that creativity to become an artist yourself!

The Inspiration Place
162: SOLD OUT Sculpture Collection with Simone Kestelman and Miriam Schulman

The Inspiration Place

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 36:46


Sculptor Simone Kestelman created a town-wide installation during the pandemic for her sculptures and as a result, sold out the art collection!! For full show notes, go to schulmanart.com/162 ++++++++++++++++++++

Art and Cocktails
Cupcakes, Candy, & Career Highlights with Olivia Bonilla

Art and Cocktails

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 20:45


Olivia Bonilla is a painter and sculptor born in Vermont. Bonilla received her BFA in painting, with a minor in sculpture from Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts. Bonilla continues to focus on unconventional materiality, an inventive approach to color theory within sculpture. Cement transforms into the soft and fluffy, resin to irresistible hard candy.  Bonilla expands her approach to sculpture through large installations, series of signature collections, and mixed media experimentation. Exhibiting venues include The Ely Center for Contemporary Art and Center for Creative workshops in New Haven CT, Vendue Art hotel, and 2019-2021 Affordable Art Fair in NYC. She has shown nationally from Fabrik Gallery, LA to dk Gallery, Atlanta as a guest artist. Bonilla has received a diverse credit in publications including Connecticut Magazine, House Beautiful, and Vogue Portugal for the May 2021 lifestyle issue, gourmet. Current gallery representation includes Miller Gallery in Charleston and Art and Light Gallery in Greenville, SC. She currently resides in Charleston, SC.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
The complicated life and legacy of Robert Indiana, artist behind iconic 'LOVE' sculpture

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 6:23


When most people think of the artist Robert Indiana, they think of the iconic "LOVE" sculpture with a tilted "O." While his art endures, a new book also paints a portrait of him as a troubled, isolated artist. Maine Public's Jennifer Rooks has a look for our arts and culture series, CANVAS. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders