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Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
Are You Ready For the Next Hacker Wave? It's Going to Be Brutal!

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 42:26


Are You Ready For the Next Hacker Wave? It's Going to Be Brutal! Right now, we're going to talk about this vulnerability, this huge vulnerability in almost the entire internet that will affect your life over the following number of years. And if you're a business, you better pay close attention. [Following is an automated transcript] [00:00:16] Well, we are looking at what is being called the single most significant, most critical vulnerability ever. [00:00:24] And if you want more information on this, have a look at last week's show, you'll find it up on my website. I talked quite a bit about it. You can email me M e@craigpeterson.com. I've put together a little cheat sheet that you can use to find out. What should I do? If you're an IT professional, this isn't something that you can do if you're a regular home user because you probably don't have any software your maintaining that has this log for J vulnerability. [00:00:59] But I do have to warn you that you probably do have a little bit of hardware that might have it in there. Many of these firewalls used in homes have it, not all of them, uh, I'm, a minority of them, but here's why this is the single most significant and most critical vulnerability ever. There is a programming lab library that is used in the job. [00:01:26] Programming language that logs events, if you're writing software and let's say their software is running a website, it could be almost anything. And do you notice a condition that's not quite right? What should you do while you should log it? And then, hopefully, the people that are running your software are monitoring the logs. [00:01:49] See the logs? No. Oh my gosh. Uh, there is something wrong here. One of the logs that I keep an eye on that just absolutely amazes me, frankly, is the SSH Daemon logs. Now SSH is a protocol. It uses encryption to get onto other machines using the command line. Now I've used a lot of protocols over the years to do this. [00:02:17] Telnet was the first, and SSH is something that I've been using for a very long time. You might remember the Heartbleed bug from a few years back. That nailed a lot of people, but I keep an eye on that SSH log because. If someone's trying to log into my system from the internet, that log will show it. [00:02:39] It's going to say that someone to try to use this username; they were coming from this IP address, and they failed to get in. And I have software that automatically monitors that log and says, well, if someone's coming from the same. Address multiple times. And they are unsuccessful at logging in add their internet address to my firewall blocking rules. [00:03:09] So what ends up happening is. Well, they just can't even get to my machine anymore. They're trying to hack me. same thing's true with the web blogs. If we have people who are trying to, for instance, kind of put us out of business doing what's called a denial of service attack, where they are sending us a lot of data. [00:03:31] Well, we can at our site or upstream from us have that IP address. Block. And that stops the attack, distributed denial of service attacks, or are a little bit more complicated. So all of this gets logged. It all gets written to a file, or it gets pushed off to a server that keeps track of the logs. And, and then there's analysis software, the looks at logs for. [00:03:57] Anomalies, all of that sort of stuff. It makes a lot of sense. Right. But this particular library that's used by Java programmers has a bug in it that allows a remote user to send just a small string, nothing fancy at all that can command. The web server that is using the logging function to go ahead and download malware. [00:04:28] Well, the easiest low-hanging fruit, when it comes to what kind of malware can we put onto a computer is quite simply crypto mining. So the bad guys they'll go ahead and they'll just send a small string, very simple. They don't have to compile a program. They don't have to do much of anything. They just send this little small. [00:04:50] And if that string gets logged, for instance, by my SSH, my remote access demon, or gets logged by the web server or something else, all of a sudden that wonderful little feature that allowed you to easily log things. Is your enemy because that feature is going to interpret that particular string that was sent to the log and try and be helpful. [00:05:18] But in fact, it could be given a command to download this remote file. Ran, then run that remote file. And that remote file initially here has primarily been crypto mining soft. So now your computer's being used by someone else. Your electricity's being used to mine. Things like Bitcoins or some of these other cryptocurrencies that are out. [00:05:45] Now the real reason, this is a huge, huge problem. Again, let me quote here. This is from Ahmad, a mate. I should say you're an over a tenable. It is by far the single biggest, most critical vulnerability ever. Why is that true? There's a couple of reasons. Ease of use is the obvious reason. It is so easy to use, not just for crypto mining, but for hacking any machine you would care to hack. [00:06:19] And then the second reason is it is in bedded everywhere. There are millions of computers that are vulnerable. We're seeing a hundred. Computers per minute, being hacked using this vulnerable. And if you are running, let's say a firewall that has this vulnerability. We have some clients that had this vulnerability and it is obviously a bit of a problem, right? [00:06:51] Well, that vulnerability now allows bad guys to get onto that firewall. And perhaps beyond that firewall, in order to do pretty much whatever they want. To do. This is huge, huge, huge, lots of software has flaws, and you need to be able to recover from the flaws. I've talked many times about how there are only two types of software. [00:07:23] There are software that has been hacked and there are software that will be hacked. So you need to make sure you know, that if someone gets into your network or gets into your computer, that you can restrict the damages, you can keep it under control. But with this log for J vulnerability, B. Everywhere in, not just that one library, but remember that one library is used all over the place. [00:07:52] It's in hundreds of thousands of pieces of software. Now, every one of these vendors has to grab the most recent version, recompile their software and send and re link it in deep pans. Right. I understand this is Java and then send it out to all of their customers to install the software. This is the second reason. [00:08:15] It is such a big. There will be sites. There will be pieces of software that have this vulnerability for years to come. And one of the biggest examples of this vulnerability is almost every Android device out there. Think of all of the phones. People have Androids being used for tablets it's in televisions, it's everywhere. [00:08:40] And with this particular vulnerability. Being everywhere. Every vendor that uses Android is going to have to release patches that you're going to have to install. Now it's one thing to have a brand new TV, and we've got a brand new Samsung TV and it's hooked up to the internet. It streams, Disney and discovery. [00:09:05] And it's just a wonderful thing. I love my TV, right then of course you probably realize I don't use smart TV features because of this particular type of person. What ends up happening? Well, how long is Samsung actually going to support updates for your television or Vizio who, by the way, one of the worst companies, when it comes to your privacy of your information on your television, how long, uh, how about your Android phones? [00:09:39] More than half of all Android smartphones out there, we'll never get another software. If you are still using Android smartphones now is the time to switch to an iPhone. I have been talking about this for years. I am not like the world's biggest apple fan. I'm not trying to make everybody an apple fan. I really don't care. [00:10:06] What I do care about is the ability of the software designers, those software implementers and the hardware manufacturers, the people that are in the supply chain on that Android device. I care that they do. Provide updates when it comes to security problems. And if you're using an iPhone, yeah. Again, two types of software right now, like phones have had vulnerabilities that can be vulnerable, but apple is supporting right now, still the iPhone six S which came out what five or six years. [00:10:46] With full security updates. They've even gone back further. Sometimes the Nat. So make the switch right now. If you are an it professional, I've got this whole list of resources that I vetted, I know are good that you can use to scan for this vulnerability in your network or on your. To where just email me M e@craigpeterson.com. [00:11:12] And if you have any questions about this or cybersecurity in general, just reach out again. me@craigpeterson.com. [00:11:21] Did you know that cyber flashing is a thing. We talked about it a couple of years ago, but it's back in the news this week and also apple air tags. They just released a new feature for our friends with Android. We'll tell you why. [00:11:38] Have you seen these air tags? Have you used them? They came from an idea that was really pioneered by company. Tile. And I guess they, I don't know what happened with the patent. I guess it didn't have one or apple wouldn't have been able to do this, but then again, you know, you've got a really big company you're up against a, it doesn't matter whether you're in the right. [00:12:02] Sometimes I'm not sure what happened there, but they have. These trackers called air tags. And I mentioned before on the show that my daughters have a total of five cats, well, actually six cats. Now I think of it. And what they've done is bought air tags and put them on. All of the cats callers. So they took them, they they've got them fastened on with this little holder. [00:12:31] You can get all kinds of holders. The air tags themselves are just little round buttons, really, and you can stick them into your wallet. For instance, in case you keep forgetting or losing your wallet, you can also put them into a holder. So they go on a key chain. I have a couple of flashlights at the house. [00:12:50] And if you're like me and you have other people around and it's dark and they know where your flashlight is, they'll take and borrow it right now. You don't get your flashlight back. It kind of bothers me. I probably shouldn't bother me as much as it does, but then when I need the flashlight, I just can't find this. [00:13:12] So, what did we put on the flashlight? We put an air tag on there. So the airtight ties into your iPhone. And if you have a newer iPhone, it's just absolutely amazing because the, the airtight will tell you where it is, but the newer iPhone, you can use it and it will walk you through. Up to the air tag, like, okay, it's a foot in front of you on the left-hand side or whatever, it'll take you there. [00:13:42] It's very cool. It's like these futuristic scifi movies. The problem with air tags that we discussed on the air here is that they have been used for evil. And what the bad guys have been doing is they'll take an air tag. They might drop it in your purse in order to follow you. Isn't that scary. They also have been taking the air tags and putting them on expensive cars so that they can follow you home. [00:14:16] Now, obviously nowadays it's extremely hard to steal one of the more expensive cars cause they've got all of this automation in them. The fancy systems do stop you from stealing it. Even my old F150 had a little chip built into the key so that it wouldn't start and less, that key that was starting. It actually had that RFID chip in it so that this technology. [00:14:45] Isn't being used so much to steal the car, but to know where you live and when you are home and when you're not home, you know, I've been warning everybody for many years, not to post on social media about vacation saying, oh, we're leaving. We're going to be gone in the Caribbean for two weeks. We're going for new year's party here, Christmas there, Hanukkah celebration, whatever it is you're doing, because the bad guys use that information to. [00:15:19] I'm break into your home and to steal things from your business. And I'm, I'm going to get into all of the details right now of how they do that. I've talked about it on the show before, and I'm sure I will talk about it again. And you'll even see some of the references on my website@craigpeterson.com. [00:15:36] If you're interested, there's some real interesting stories up there. What's happened to people. That particular problem of having an air tag and then having it put on to you to track you, or do you track your car or other devices is a huge potential problem. Now, apple built into the iPhone, a special little feature some time ago that when they, in fact, when they came out with the air. [00:16:11] So that when an airtight is following you, in other words, someone dropped it into your purse or your pocket or on your car. And that air tag is moving with you. It says, Hey guy, uh, there is an air tag following you. And at that point you can say, wait a minute, uh, what's going on here now? It's not going to warn you about your own air tags. [00:16:35] You know, the ones that you own. It's going to warn you about an, a foreign air tag one. That's not yours. In other words, someone's trying to track you so brilliant. Move on. Apple's part to get that out right away before there were any really scary, bad news stories about the same thing happened. How about Android users? [00:16:57] That's where the problem really is starting to come up. If you're an Android user, you don't have the ability to detect an air tag. Well until now. So if an air tag was following you, it wouldn't. Let you know, it couldn't let you know it didn't know. So apple is now offering what's called tracker detect. [00:17:21] It's an app on the Google play store, a free app that you can download if you using Android. And, you know, there are many, many, many, many reasons not to use Android and there's. Are almost as many to use iPhones. Okay. So if you use an Android switched to an iPhone, but if you're stuck on Android, because that's what your business gave you until you have to use it, have a look for tracker detect to end the apps description on the play store says tracker detect looks for item trackers that are separated from their owner, and that are compatible with Apple's find mine network. [00:18:02] These items, trackers include air tags and compatible devices from other companies. If you think someone is using air tag or another device to track your location, you can scan, scan to try and. So, I'm not sure that it's as good as the apple implementation, where the apple will pop up and say, even though you're not scanning for an air tag, say, Hey, somebody's tracking you. [00:18:31] It sounds like you have to actually use. Just scan for it. But Android users, according to Mac trust can scan the area to find nearby error tag trackers. If they think that there's an air tiger or other device that's being used to track their location, uh, an apple support document that you'll find online on support that apple.com. [00:18:57] Says, if you think someone is using an air tiger, other item tracking to track your location, you can scan to try and find it. If the app detects an air tag near you for at least 10 minutes, you can play a sound to help locate it. So that's the part that makes me think that it's always active. Okay. On your, on your Android device, it's free and you can get it right there in the Google play. [00:19:23] This next item is really, it applies to all of us here in the us, and it applies also to people over in the UK. And the UK is really getting kind of upset about this because apparently there are no laws against. Flashing now there are in the U S and it kind of depends on where you live, but cyber crap flashing is really a crime or should be a crime what's been happening. [00:19:58] Is people again who have iPhones have this ability to share files or websites, et cetera, with another person. It's fantastic. It's called airdrop. I just love this. And I use it all the time even to share files between my own devices. And what happens with air drop is you, you take the file and the use open up airdrop and you see, oh, okay. [00:20:26] There's my wife right there. So I click on the file. I drag it on top of it, a little Karen icon in airdrop, and now she gets a notice. Hey, there's a file from. Coming on in, and it does well, I always in my family and my business people, I always said to them, Error drop, uh, settings to only allow an airdrop from people that are in my contact list. [00:20:57] And that reason for that is this particular problem. People have been cited. Flashing. So what they do is they send obscene pictures to strangers through airdrop. And this term can also of course, apply to Bluetooth devices because you can also send these things via Bluetooth. I don't want to really talk a lot about what's really happening here. [00:21:28] Hopefully, you know what flashing is, or flasher is sending these obscene pictures, but the tone, the term was coined in August 25th. This female commuter was airdropped two pictures, obscene pictures, and they reported it to the British transport police. But we've seen, I have seen, and I've talked about cases where people are driving down the highway and all of a sudden on their phone come these obscene pictures because someone was driving past and they air dropped, or they use Bluetooth to send obscene. [00:22:09] There is an easy way to not allow that to happen. And that is the settings that I use, which is only allow airdrop from people in your contact list. You know, these are absolutely amazing features that they have, but there are some really weird people out there that think that this is the, this is a fun way, uh, to really mess with other people. [00:22:36] It's. It's just crazy. Okay. By the way, you can also turn air drop off. If you never use it, don't worry about it or a turn it on when you need it. And when someone's going to send something to you, Hey, I want you guys to take a couple of minutes here. If you go to Craig peterson.com/subscribe. You're going to find out about the bootcamps we have. [00:23:01] You're going to get my weekly trainings that I have. These are just an email. They just last a few minutes. You are going to love them. I get all kinds of compliments and this is in my free newsletter. Okay. It's not going to cost you anything. I'm not going to be hammering you on buying stuff. I want this information out. [00:23:24] That's why I am here today on. Everybody needs to understand this stuff. Craig peterson.com/subscribe, and I will be seeing you in the email world. [00:23:39] One of the things we wonder the most about is what's the future. What's the future of laptops and future of computers. We talked about some of these new chips that are out there, but this is an interesting story about what Dell is doing. Yeah. Dell. [00:23:55] I want to follow up a little bit about the 3g shutdown. We didn't quite get through the list. [00:24:02] All almost all of the Volvos from 2015 on to 2018, have this problem. There's only two automakers that told the drive.com that U S vehicles are unaffected by the end of 3g. So if you own a Ferrari or a McLaren, You're okay. Okay. Also what's interesting is what the different guys are doing. Subaru has an interesting little plan here going forward. [00:24:35] If you have what they call a connected vehicle plan. And this is according to a service bulletin filed with the national highway traffic safety administration. And then they will do a retrofit at no cost. How's that for nice. A lot of these manufacturers are upgrading to 4g. Yeah, the, uh, you know, LTE, the stuff that was really fast, you remember that I was remembering getting 50 megabits and that it was just incredible. [00:25:05] But at any rate, they're offering that and the option to purchase a subscription. To 4g. So you'll be able to get two gig of data per month at $10 a month. Now that's for some manufacturers, not all of them, have it $30 a month if you want unlimited data. So depending on how much you're driving GM started pushing a free over the air update in October to keep OnStar running. [00:25:32] After the 3g shut down though, some 2015 model year cars will need a ma a hardware worse. Tesla says it plans to charge $200 to upgrade older model S vehicles, but no additional fees are noted for it. Toyota, Toyota and Lexus are not planning to retrofit. Affected vehicles in its public FAQ Toyota sites, a clause and its disclosures that said certain connected services may change at any time without notice. [00:26:08] And when the drive ass Toyota, if it plans to offer an upgrade paid or otherwise for consumers who own effective vehicles, the answer was assumed. No. And Toyota, by the way, is one of the companies that has decided, Hey, um, we're just going to go ahead. And, uh, you, you, you know, that remote start that you got for those cold winters. [00:26:31] Yeah. W we've decided that, uh, even though you paid for, you know, what, three, four years ago, we're going to start charging you monthly to use your remote start. Uh, come on guys. So have a little. Um, try and find out, talk to your, uh, your automotive dealer or go to duck, duck, go and look up your car and type in three G uh, end of life at the same time and see what it comes up with at your model in there. [00:27:05] But I am very disappointed with Toyota. I have some friends that just loved Toyota. I bought a brand new one. Way back when, when would have been like 82, 3, something like that, a great little car Cresseta with a supra engine in it. And I drove that for quite a few years. The good, tough little car I had to keep replacing the water pump, but that was the only problem we ever had with it. [00:27:31] But I haven't owned a Toyota since then, but this is, and I've actually been thinking about it lately, but this is something that really turns me off. I don't know about. Let's get into our next, a little problem area. And that is fleet managers. If you are relying on electronic logging devices and other internet of things, devices to track your trucking fleet. [00:27:57] There's some problems. Uh, let's see here, here's a quote. This is from Czech Republic. Uh, John Nichols, executive vice president of sales for north America and mixed telematics estimated that about 80% of his customers are still using 3g devices. Now this was about a year ago. This is from a November, 2020 article. [00:28:22] So this is going to be a very. Problem for you as well. Uh, for any people who have fleet vehicles that they're trying to maintain, hopefully you know about this. Hopefully your vendors are going to take care of it for you. I'm impressed. The GM set their cars up with the hardware that can handle 3g and 4g. [00:28:44] And all you need is a software upgrade to have it switch. I think that was very smart of them. So. Kudos to GM for that particular thing. Dell led let's get into the future of computers and laptop design. Dell has been doing some interesting things. Now you probably heard me a couple of weeks ago be moan Dell because they have businesses. [00:29:06] Specialists and experts that you can call that really know almost nothing about what you really need. And it just drives me crazy because Dell has been selling my customers, hardware that doesn't meet the customer's needs because frankly, the customers don't really know what their needs are. And so that's something that I've helped them with. [00:29:28] And I, if you email me@craigpeterson.com, I written up. On what the best computers to buy are based on what it is you need, you know, what, what are the tricks that you need to follow? But what Dell is doing right now is something they're calling concept Luna, and I've seen things like this before. There was a, a cell phone that was being manufactured that allowed you to change modules. [00:29:58] They were literally just click and go and kind of like Lego. Almost and the phones weren't that popular. I don't even think they're in business anymore. I can't remember their name, but those particular clicking NGOs were clicked and gone is kind of the bottom line on it because they were kind of big. [00:30:19] They were kind of clumsy. They weren't released something people wanted to use. You know, Android comes from Google. And Google has their basic tests and says, this is what Android should look like, but every manufacturer puts their own look and feel on top of that Android operating system. And what that ends up doing for you is, you know, makes it a little more pleasant and also. [00:30:49] So that you don't really, really want to go and change your phones. Cause you're used to the way this particular phone works, but Dell is looking at doing kind of the same thing. They're looking at this electronic waste problem where you have a laptop, it gets old, you throw it away. And, but now it looks like there's more sustainability. [00:31:14] Built into things like this Luna design, they're trying to make the company's laptops more environmentally friendly and in the process are going to make them more repairable, which is kind of cool. If you look at what Apple's done in their laptops, there's basically nothing inside there. That's user replaced. [00:31:36] Okay, you can probably replace a battery. I use a company I've had their president on my show a few times. Uh, Larry, um, Connor, I think it is his last name, but OWC other world computing and they've got. Little upgrades and replacement parts and videos on how to do it and all the tools you need to, to upgrade your Mac. [00:32:00] But nowadays apple is soldering the memory on the motherboard, or even more recently using the apple chips. And by the way, this is part of the reason they're so fast. They are putting the memory right on the same silicone and. The CPU itself. So they're moving towards a one chip with everything on it. So if you buy an apple computer nowadays, I love them. [00:32:29] They are great. They've got great security built in, et cetera, et cetera, but you better buy a computer that has enough memory and enough storage on it to last you for some years. Because a lot of these computers I'm picking on apple right now, but there's a lot of other vendors the same way. They are not upgradeable, but concept Luna should work pretty well boring. [00:32:56] This idea from that's right. It was framework. That was the name of it. Anyways, stick around and visit me online. Craig peterson.com. [00:33:05] If you own a car and that car has been made, uh, all the way up to 2021 and your car is using. The internet by a 3g, which is most cars. I got a little news for you. [00:33:22] We are looking at a real big problem here that most people haven't heard of. [00:33:29] I was talking in fact, this week on the air with someone who has a car to Volvo and they have a remote little starter, which has been great for. And they were informed that they needed to do an upgrade. And that upgrade turned out to be very costly. I had another listener who has a solar panel on the roof of their house and their solar panel on that roof is designed to. [00:34:03] Be able to get updates, software updates, let you know, what's the charge like how much sun is there today? Maybe you should brush off some of the snow. All of that is communicated by the. But how, how was that working? The problem that most vendors have is, uh, how do they get the data to, and from their devices? [00:34:30] If you think about, for instance, Elon Musk, with the wonderful little Tesla cars, they want to push an update and we're seeing this more and more by. The older cars, most cars, non Tesla, as you take them into the dealer for service. And while it's there they go ahead and plug it in. They download new software firmware from the internet and install it on your car. [00:34:56] And you are often driving. Maybe you're none the wiser. Maybe you got some new features. So it's one thing for them. To have control over a basic network, uh, network that our car dealer might have where they say, okay, here's the specs you need this much. Download speed. You need that. You need the other thing simple enough. [00:35:20] But how about you and your home or you and your business? How does that time system keep track of the employees when they sign in and out? Does it upload it to the internet? Did you have to plug it into your network? Did you have to hook it up to your wifi? I can tell you from personal experience, anytime we touch your network and there is. [00:35:45] Problem later on, we own the problem, even if we had nothing to do with it. It's again, it's another Craig ism, whoever touched the computer last owns the next problem. So these vendors have decided, well, we can solve that problem. All we need to do is use cellular phone data. So they put effectively a little cell phone onto their devices. [00:36:13] Just like that Volvo we were talking about or other high-end luxury cars. So there's solar panel has a 3g modem in it. The cars have 3g modems in them to unlock the doors, to start the. In many cases, right? They also have updates that come down from the cloud, quote, unquote, over three G for your navigation system to let you know, Hey, there's heavy traffic. [00:36:45] I'm going to reroute you. We're rerouting all of that data coming from the 3g network, coming through it, or being pushed up via the 3g network. All of that data is in trouble and it's in trouble because. Every major carrier is eliminating three G next year. Yeah, it is really that bad. A T and T is shutting down 3g services in February. [00:37:16] Sprint's following in March and T-Mobile in July and Verizon. On December 31st, all of them, 2022, that is a very big deal and a very big problem. So what can you do about it? No, it depends. The roof, solar panels, we were just talking about their vendor, told them they could do the upgrade for them, and it would be $800. [00:37:47] Very very big deal. We also had other people who were talking about their cars and what had to happen with them. And the cars are look like they're tending to be more expensive. You can expect to pay between 520 $500 for an upgrade because many of them are saying, Hey, w you know, we're not going to just fix this one problem. [00:38:10] We have to replace the whole module. And that means. To replace your infotainment system in your car. Infotainment of course, being basically everything that has to do with your GPS navigation, your satellite radio, your, uh, your car play from apple or Android car or whatever it is you might be using. [00:38:33] That's why it gets so expensive. So. Keep an eye out. This is going to be a very, very big deal. We're looking at everything from owner applications, like going ahead and starting that engine to warm it up to emergency calls services to in navigation, functionality, reporting telematics, which is the data about your car back to the dealer. [00:39:02] Ultimately, so, you know, your car says, oh, uh, you need to go in and get your oil changed. And it's going to be a, you know, we can set up alarm and you want it. And you know, some of them are very, very fancy and all of that is going to go away and includes a lot of luxury cars all the way through. Some 2021 models, but many, many of them, if not most of them through 2019. [00:39:29] Okay. Is that a very, very big deal or what these 3g towers are going away? The companies, the cell phone companies are planning on reusing that bandwidth and they're going to put it into where yeah. 5g, exactly 5g. So here's a few. The cars that you might want to be concerned about Acura. They have something called link, uh, and they have, let's see the MDX ILX, RDX, uh, RLX TLX NSX, like kind of sounds like almost all of them. [00:40:06] So Acura is going to have a problem with almost all of their cars that were made between 2014 and 2017. Audi. They're going to have problems with, again, all their cars, a three, four or 5, 6, 7, 8, the RS Q3 five and seven. Yeah, pretty much all of their cars from 2012 through 2018. So I already saw this coming and decided to fix it early, so good for them. [00:40:39] So basically if your car is older than 2018 model year, you're going to have some problems, Bentley. A number of models produced prior to 2020. And if you're driving a Bentley and do you want to give it to some guy, you know, really great looking guy, you can just let me know Craig. Yeah. Yeah. [00:40:57] me@craigpeterson.com BMW number models produced before 2019 general motors. Models may between 2015 and 2021 across its fleet will be affected, but it's not breaking down with specific vehicles across it's brands of Buick Cadillac, Chevy, GMC, but they did in this case, it's the drive.com track down a technical service bulletin that indicates almost every post 2015 model is affected. [00:41:32] Okay. Yeah. Bu-bye a Honda again, pretty much everything. From 2018 to 2021 Lexus all models 2010 to 2017 Mazda. Pretty much everything. 2016 to 2019 Mitsubishi, every eclipse cross and Outlander Porsche 9 11, 18, 7 eighteens, et cetera, et cetera. All of them, 20 14, 20 19 Subaru. Pretty much everything. 2016 and on Tesla model as built before 2015 Toyota. [00:42:14] Ooh, they got some interesting problems, 2010 and on Volkswagen, much the same stick around. Visit me online. Craig peterson.com.

Kove Kast
2021 Kove Kast Tech Roundup

Kove Kast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 22:14


Join Yessie and Daniel for a roundup of all the accessible tech we purchased this year! Links are provided below for your convenience. Thank you so much for listening to, and supporting, the Kove Kast throughout 2021. We look forward to bringing you more exciting content in 2022! Check out the Kove Kast Linktree for all of our links. Like the way this episode sounds? Check out Izzie G's Linktree, and feel free to get in touch for help with your next audio project. Links Logitech Circle View Doorbell HomePod mini PlayStation 5 Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra SteelSeries Arctis 5 Sonos Roam Apple AirTags Apple iPad Air Apple Magic Keyboard for iPad Pro and iPad Air 4 Vizio 32-inch HomeKit-enabled TV 2nd Generation Siri Remote for Apple TV Belkin Boost↑Charge Pro 3-in-1 Wireless Charger with MagSafe DualSense Charging Station Apple AirPods 3rd Generation Apple 14-Inch MacBook Pro Roborock S7 --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/KoveKast/support

Even the Podcast is Afraid
Side Crime: Dancing Polish Cactus

Even the Podcast is Afraid

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 49:32


In this episode of Side Crime, the hosts of Even the Podcast is Afraid discuss several weird stories that have recently been in the news, including: Rentahitman.com - woman hires hitman to kill her husband, Man who put razor blades in pizza dough, Cash & checks found inside wall at Joel Osteen mega church, Walmart pulls children toys that swears & sings in Polish, and an accidental shooting leads police to home with over 70 casts.[FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA]TWITTER: www.twitter.com/PodcastAfraidINSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/PodcastAfraidYOUTUBE: https://tinyurl.com/3mwr54tbTIKTOK: https://www.tiktok.com/@podcastafraid[PATREON & KO-FI]Do you need more Even the Podcast is Afraid content, and would like to help support the show in the process? You can join our 'Elbow Deep Club' for just $5 per month and get exclusive content like ad-free & early access episodes, access to the after show, and more.PATREON: www.patreon.com/ordisstudiosYou can also leave us a small donation on KO-FI to help support the show & get your name in the credits of our TV Show + Access to out private Ordis Studios Discord Server for just $3!KO-FI: https://ko-fi.com/podcastafraid[WATCH OUR TV SHOW ON THE CRIME & CONSPIRACY NETWORK]TV NETWORK WEBSITE: https://www.podtv.live/DOWNLOAD APP: https://solo.to/etpiaDownload the PodTV app on your iOS, Android, Google Play, Amazon Appstore, ROKU, VIZIO, and more to watch our video podcast, EXCLUSIVE to the Crime & Conspiracy Network. Just search Crime & Conspiracy in your app store.[MUSIC USED IN THIS EPISODE]Music from https://filmmusic.io"In Your Arms" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)[THANKS & MENTIONS FOR THIS EPISODE]Created, produced, & hosted by Jared OrdisCo-hosted by Nick Porchetta & Samantha VazquezEven the Podcast is Afraid is part of the Ordis Studios Podcast Network & an original Ordis Studios ProductionCopyright © 2021 by Ordis Studioswww.ordisstudios.com

FLOSS Weekly (MP3)
FLOSS Weekly 661: Open Source for Observability - Computer Security, VIZIO Lawsuit

FLOSS Weekly (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 73:30


Is it a coincidence that observability is both an essential feature of open source and also a scourge of our wantonly spied lives online? Can we use the former to solve the latter? That and many other questions are discussed during FLOSS Weekly. Join Doc Searls as he is joined by co-hosts Jonathan Bennett and Simon Phipps for a year-end look at the crazy state of our connected world and discussing other topics such as the VIZIO class-action lawsuit & the Linux Tech Tips Linux challenge. Hosts: Doc Searls, Jonathan Bennett, and Simon Phipps Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/floss-weekly Think your open source project should be on FLOSS Weekly? Email floss@twit.tv. Thanks to Lullabot's Jeff Robbins, web designer and musician, for our theme music. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit

FLOSS Weekly (Video HD)
FLOSS Weekly 661: Open Source for Observability - Computer Security, VIZIO Lawsuit

FLOSS Weekly (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 73:50


Is it a coincidence that observability is both an essential feature of open source and also a scourge of our wantonly spied lives online? Can we use the former to solve the latter? That and many other questions are discussed during FLOSS Weekly. Join Doc Searls as he is joined by co-hosts Jonathan Bennett and Simon Phipps for a year-end look at the crazy state of our connected world and discussing other topics such as the VIZIO class-action lawsuit & the Linux Tech Tips Linux challenge. Hosts: Doc Searls, Jonathan Bennett, and Simon Phipps Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/floss-weekly Think your open source project should be on FLOSS Weekly? Email floss@twit.tv. Thanks to Lullabot's Jeff Robbins, web designer and musician, for our theme music. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
FLOSS Weekly 661: Open Source for Observability

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 73:30


Is it a coincidence that observability is both an essential feature of open source and also a scourge of our wantonly spied lives online? Can we use the former to solve the latter? That and many other questions are discussed during FLOSS Weekly. Join Doc Searls as he is joined by co-hosts Jonathan Bennett and Simon Phipps for a year-end look at the crazy state of our connected world and discussing other topics such as the VIZIO class-action lawsuit & the Linux Tech Tips Linux challenge. Hosts: Doc Searls, Jonathan Bennett, and Simon Phipps Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/floss-weekly Think your open source project should be on FLOSS Weekly? Email floss@twit.tv. Thanks to Lullabot's Jeff Robbins, web designer and musician, for our theme music. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
FLOSS Weekly 661: Open Source for Observability

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 73:50


Is it a coincidence that observability is both an essential feature of open source and also a scourge of our wantonly spied lives online? Can we use the former to solve the latter? That and many other questions are discussed during FLOSS Weekly. Join Doc Searls as he is joined by co-hosts Jonathan Bennett and Simon Phipps for a year-end look at the crazy state of our connected world and discussing other topics such as the VIZIO class-action lawsuit & the Linux Tech Tips Linux challenge. Hosts: Doc Searls, Jonathan Bennett, and Simon Phipps Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/floss-weekly Think your open source project should be on FLOSS Weekly? Email floss@twit.tv. Thanks to Lullabot's Jeff Robbins, web designer and musician, for our theme music. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit

Tomorrow Will Be Televised
Tomorrow Will Be Televised What's Ahead For TV 2022?/Polaris Rises Episode

Tomorrow Will Be Televised

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 59:00


First Christmas Week 2021 episode of the program all about TV. Coming up: 2022 TV developments and trends suggested by Hub Entertainment Research principal Jon Geigengack, and Rahman J. Dukes, founder-principal chairperson of Polaris, the new hip-hop culture channel launching last week on Vizio's smart TV sets.

Even the Podcast is Afraid
CIA's Strange Animal Projects - Part II

Even the Podcast is Afraid

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 49:46


Project MK-Ultra, the CIA's infamous human mind control project, wasn't the only thing that was going on in the ‘60s. In that decade, the U.S. government deployed nonhuman operatives–ravens, pigeons, even cats–to spy on Cold War adversaries. In our final part of this series we discuss a real project that can still be used by anyone today, real insects turned into insect cyborgs. Look out for RoboRoach![FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA]TWITTER: www.twitter.com/PodcastAfraidINSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/PodcastAfraidYOUTUBE: https://tinyurl.com/3mwr54tbTIKTOK: https://www.tiktok.com/@podcastafraid[PATREON & KO-FI]Do you need more Even the Podcast is Afraid content, and would like to help support the show in the process? You can join our 'Elbow Deep Club' for just $5 per month and get exclusive content like ad-free & early access episodes, access to the after show, and more.PATREON: www.patreon.com/ordisstudiosYou can also leave us a small donation on KO-FI to help support the show & get your name in the credits of our TV Show + Access to out private Ordis Studios Discord Server for just $3!KO-FI: https://ko-fi.com/podcastafraid[WATCH OUR TV SHOW ON THE CRIME & CONSPIRACY NETWORK]TV NETWORK WEBSITE: https://www.podtv.live/DOWNLOAD APP: https://solo.to/etpiaDownload the PodTV app on your iOS, Android, Google Play, Amazon Appstore, ROKU, VIZIO, and more to watch our video podcast, EXCLUSIVE to the Crime & Conspiracy Network. Just search Crime & Conspiracy in your app store.[MUSIC USED IN THIS EPISODE]Music from https://filmmusic.io"In Your Arms" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)[THANKS & MENTIONS FOR THIS EPISODE]Stephanie Kemmerer, researcher & writer for Even the Podcast is Afraid, conducted all the writing and research for this episode on the CIA's strange animal projects.Created, produced, & hosted by Jared OrdisCo-hosted by Nick Porchetta & Samantha VazquezEven the Podcast is Afraid is part of the Ordis Studios Podcast Network & an original Ordis Studios ProductionCopyright © 2021 by Ordis Studioswww.ordisstudios.com

iNEWS每日快訊
1209iNEWS每日快訊 | 主播 莫祥珍| 三立新聞| 三立iNEWS

iNEWS每日快訊

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 2:22


Linux Weekly Daily Wednesday
LWDW 304: Linux Font Tips

Linux Weekly Daily Wednesday

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 65:14


Linus attempts to install a font, Blender 3.0 removes OpenCL rendering, Vizio responds to copyleft violations, and portable apps with Exodus.

Even the Podcast is Afraid
CIA's Strange Animal Projects - Part I

Even the Podcast is Afraid

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 42:36


Project MK-Ultra, the CIA's infamous human mind control project, wasn't the only thing that was going on in the ‘60s. In that decade, the U.S. government deployed nonhuman operatives–ravens, pigeons, even cats–to spy on Cold War adversaries. In part one of this two part series, we look at the Acoustic Kitty Project and the Pigeon Project.[FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA]TWITTER: www.twitter.com/PodcastAfraidINSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/PodcastAfraidYOUTUBE: https://tinyurl.com/3mwr54tbTIKTOK: https://www.tiktok.com/@podcastafraid[PATREON & KO-FI]Do you need more Even the Podcast is Afraid content, and would like to help support the show in the process? You can join our 'Elbow Deep Club' for just $5 per month and get exclusive content like ad-free & early access episodes, access to the after show, and more.PATREON: www.patreon.com/ordisstudiosYou can also leave us a small donation on KO-FI to help support the show & get your name in the credits of our TV Show + Access to out private Ordis Studios Discord Server for just $3!KO-FI: https://ko-fi.com/podcastafraid[WATCH OUR TV SHOW ON THE CRIME & CONSPIRACY NETWORK]TV NETWORK WEBSITE: https://www.podtv.live/DOWNLOAD APP: https://solo.to/etpiaDownload the PodTV app on your iOS, Android, Google Play, Amazon Appstore, ROKU, VIZIO, and more to watch our video podcast, EXCLUSIVE to the Crime & Conspiracy Network. Just search Crime & Conspiracy in your app store.[MUSIC USED IN THIS EPISODE]Music from https://filmmusic.io"In Your Arms" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)[THANKS & MENTIONS FOR THIS EPISODE]Stephanie Kemmerer, researcher & writer for Even the Podcast is Afraid, conducted all the writing and research for this episode on the CIA's strange animal projects.Created, produced, & hosted by Jared OrdisCo-hosted by Nick Porchetta & Samantha VazquezEven the Podcast is Afraid is part of the Ordis Studios Podcast Network & an original Ordis Studios ProductionCopyright © 2021 by Ordis Studioswww.ordisstudios.com

Firewalls Don't Stop Dragons Podcast
My Debit Card Was Hacked

Firewalls Don't Stop Dragons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 68:11


Credit cards are more secure than debit cards. I've said this in my book, my podcast, my blog and my seminars. Credit card transactions are loans - you're not out any money if a fraudulent charge comes through (assuming you or the credit card company catches it first). With debit cards, any fraud activity will actually take your money from your account - it's gone and you have to convince your bank to give it back. And so, I almost never use my debit card. And yet, I was still hacked. My card wasn't stolen or cloned with a skimmer. The number wasn't leaked in a hack. The bad guys somehow managed to guess my card number. And then they got clever and drained my bank account. I'll give you the details today and give you some pointers for avoiding being bitten the same way I was. In other news: bad guys have come up with some very clever ways to drain your bank accounts using Zelle and text messages; they've also used similar techniques to disable the Find My feature on stolen iPhones; Apple is suing Israeli hacking company NSO Group over their Pegasus spyware; attackers apparently don't try guessing passwords longer than about 10 characters; GoDaddy admits to a major breach, but in a dumb way; there's a nasty new Windows bug that was give up by an upset security researcher; there's a powerful IoT malware that appears to be lurking on the internet; Microsoft Windows is doing some shady stuff to force you to use Edge browser and give up your data; and Vizio makes more money off your TV data than off the TV itself. Article Links The ‘Zelle Fraud' Scam: How it Works, How to Fight Back https://krebsonsecurity.com/2021/11/the-zelle-fraud-scam-how-it-works-how-to-fight-back/ iPhone thieves are using this trick to disable Find My on stolen devices https://www.imore.com/iphone-thieves-are-using-trick-disable-find-my-stolen-devices Apple sues NSO Group for attacking iPhones with Pegasus spyware https://www.theverge.com/2021/11/23/22798917/apple-nso-group-spyware-pegasus-cybersecurity-research Apple will alert users exposed to state-sponsored spyware attacks https://appleinsider.com/articles/21/11/25/apple-will-alert-users-exposed-to-state-sponsored-spyware-attacks Attackers don't bother brute-forcing long passwords https://therecord.media/attackers-dont-bother-brute-forcing-long-passwords-microsoft-engineer-says/ GoDaddy admits to password breach: check your Managed WordPress site! https://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2021/11/23/godaddy-admits-to-password-breach-check-your-managed-wordpress-site/ New Windows zero-day with public exploit lets you become an admin https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/microsoft/new-windows-zero-day-with-public-exploit-lets-you-become-an-admin/ This mysterious malware could threaten millions of routers and IoT devices https://www.zdnet.com/article/this-mysterious-malware-could-threaten-millions-of-routers-and-iot-devices/ Microsoft Enables Edge Sync By Default, Hoovering Up Your Data in the Process https://www.extremetech.com/computing/329162-microsoft-enables-edge-sync-by-default-hoovering-up-your-data-in-the-process?source=Computing Vizio is making more money selling your data than it is selling TVs https://knowtechie.com/vizio-is-making-more-money-selling-your-data-than-it-is-selling-tvs/ My Debit Card Was Hacked: https://firewallsdontstopdragons.com/my-debit-card-was-hacked/ Further Info HUGE sale on my book! 9.99/6.99: https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-1-4842-6189-7Give Thanks and Donate https://firewallsdontstopdragons.com/give-thanks-donate/ Best & WorstBecome a Patron! https://www.patreon.com/FirewallsDontStopDragons Would you like me to speak to your group about security and/privacy? http://bit.ly/Firewalls-SpeakerGenerate secure passphrases! https://d20key.com/#/ 

Even the Podcast is Afraid
Tsavo's Serial Killer Lions

Even the Podcast is Afraid

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 70:24


The horrifying true story of Lions Gone Wild takes place in Tsavo, a region of Kenya, located at the crossing of the Uganda Railway over the Tsavo River. Where in 1898, for nine months, two mane less male Tsavo lions stalked the campsites, dragging workers from their tents at night, devouring them, becoming serial killer lions with the taste for human flesh.[FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA]TWITTER: www.twitter.com/PodcastAfraidINSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/PodcastAfraidYOUTUBE: https://tinyurl.com/3mwr54tbTIKTOK: https://www.tiktok.com/@podcastafraid[PATREON & KO-FI]Do you need more Even the Podcast is Afraid content, and would like to help support the show in the process? You can join our 'Elbow Deep Club' for just $5 per month and get exclusive content like ad-free & early access episodes, access to the after show, and more.PATREON: www.patreon.com/ordisstudiosYou can also leave us a small donation on KO-FI to help support the show & get your name in the credits of our TV Show + Access to out private Ordis Studios Discord Server for just $3!KO-FI: https://ko-fi.com/podcastafraid[WATCH OUR TV SHOW ON THE CRIME & CONSPIRACY NETWORK]TV NETWORK WEBSITE: https://www.podtv.live/DOWNLOAD APP: https://solo.to/etpiaDownload the C&C app on your iOS, Android, Google Play, Amazon Appstore, ROKU, VIZIO, and more to watch our video podcast, EXCLUSIVE to the Crime & Conspiracy Network. Just search Crime & Conspiracy in your app store.[ORDIS STUDIOS PODCAST NETWORK]WEBSITE: www.ordisstudios.comORDIS STUDIOS TWITTER: www.twitter.com/ordisstudiosORDIS STUDIOS INSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/ordis.studios[MUSIC USED IN THIS EPISODE]Music from https://filmmusic.io"In Your Arms" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)[THANKS & MENTIONS FOR THIS EPISODE]Stephanie Kemmerer, researcher & writer for Even the Podcast is Afraid, conducted all the writing and research for this episode on the Tsavo Killer Lions."Even the Podcast is Afraid" (ETPIA) is created & produced by Jared Ordis, an original Ordis Studios Production.Even the Podcast is Afraid is part of the Ordis Studios Podcast Network.Copyright © 2021 by Ordis Studioswww.ordisstudios.com

Bercoff dans tous ses états
Éric Dupond-Moretti attaque les non-vaccinés, Fabrice Di Vizio contre-attaque en justice / "Le Péril Vert" de Pascal Perri (Éditions de l'Archipel) - "Anti-chasse, anti-corrida, antispécistes, anti-nucléaires, anti-sapins, anti-Tour de France, a

Bercoff dans tous ses états

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021


Éric Dupond-Moretti attaque les non-vaccinés, Fabrice Di Vizio contre-attaque en justice / "Le Péril Vert" de Pascal Perri (Éditions de l'Archipel) - "Anti-chasse, anti-corrida, antispécistes, anti-nucléaires, anti-sapins, anti-Tour de France, anti-mâles blancs, antiavion, antivaccins" / Jean Castex en cas contact, un ministre efface la photo / En Australie, les convois se préparent pour enfermer les kangourous réfractaires

Tomorrow Will Be Televised
Tomorrow Will Be Televised Smart Outlook/Yellowjackets/Freak/ABFF Pilots Episode

Tomorrow Will Be Televised

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 119:00


Two-hour episode of the program all about TV. Our lead half-hour: a new Vizio/Magid consumer studiy on smart TV current and future usage. Detailing the findings: Vizio director of media insights and analytics Devin Fallon and Magid executive vice president of global media and entertainment Mike Bloxham. Also on this episode: Drew Comins, executive producer of Showtime's new acclaimed drama series Yellowjackets; Courtney Solomon and Mark Canton, executive producers of new Tubi amination series The Freak Brothers, and a pair of TV series pilot makers featured at the American Black Film Festival in Miami--Owners executive producer DeAngelo Moore and Talia Versus executive producer Saraphina Mattis.

Software Defined Talk
Episode 330: The marketing became the technology

Software Defined Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 79:21


This week we discuss Splunk's CEO Transition, Crypto.com renames the Staples Center and Netlify's attempt to realize Git Push Nirvana. Plus, when do house shoes become just shoes. Rundown Splunk stock plunges as CEO Doug Merritt steps down (https://www.cnbc.com/2021/11/15/splunk-stock-plunges-as-ceo-doug-merritt-steps-down.html?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter_axioslogin&stream=top) Git Push Nirvana Heroku itself isn't what people want. What we actually want is (https://twitter.com/bryanl/status/1460286401199718401?s=21) git push heroku main (https://twitter.com/bryanl/status/1460286401199718401?s=21) Netlify Raises $105 Million to Transform Development for the Modern Web (https://www.netlify.com/press/netlify-raises-usd105-million-to-transform-development-for-the-modern-web) Goodbye, Staples Center. Hello, Crypto.com Arena (https://www.latimes.com/business/story/2021-11-16/crypto-staples) Relevant to your interests ManualsLib - Makes it easy to find manuals online! (https://www.manualslib.com/) Spotify expands into audiobooks with acquisition of Findaway (https://techcrunch.com/2021/11/11/spotify-expands-into-audiobooks-with-acquisition-of-findaway/) Apple's unexciting 2021 Mac and iPhone software prove it should take a break from annual OS updates (https://www.theverge.com/22771079/apple-macos-monteray-ios-15-mac-iphone-software-operating-system-updates-space-out-features) Red Hat 8.5 released with SQL Server and .NET 6 (https://www.theregister.com/2021/11/11/red_hat_8_5/) Business Essentials (https://www.apple.com/business/essentials/) FBI system hacked to email 'urgent' warning about fake cyberattacks (https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/fbi-system-hacked-to-email-urgent-warning-about-fake-cyberattacks/) Citrix Systems Inc. Layoffs - TheLayoff.com (https://www.thelayoff.com/citrix-systems) if you use the "Cost Explorer" to check the details of your bill, they will charge you $0.01 (yes, 1 cent) per each request? 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Start your 7-day Free Trial today at cbtnuggets.com/sdt (https://cbtnuggets.com/sdt) Conferences THAT Conference comes to Texas January 17-20, 2022 (https://that.us/events/tx/2022/) — Now with the right link Listener Feedback Tim wants you to work as a Principal Architect, Commercial and Medical IT (https://jobs.smartrecruiters.com/Biogen/743999777039406-principal-architect-commercial-and-medical-it) in Warsaw, Boston or RTP Jeffrey wants to work at Blizzard as Reliability Engineer (https://careers.blizzard.com/global/en/job/R010526/Software-Engineer-Reliability) SDT news & hype Join us in Slack (http://www.softwaredefinedtalk.com/slack). Send your postal address to stickers@softwaredefinedtalk.com (mailto:stickers@softwaredefinedtalk.com) and we will send you free laptop stickers! Follow us on Twitch (https://www.twitch.tv/sdtpodcast), Twitter (https://twitter.com/softwaredeftalk), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/softwaredefinedtalk/), LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/software-defined-talk/) and YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCi3OJPV6h9tp-hbsGBLGsDQ/featured). Brandon built the Quick Concall iPhone App (https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/quick-concall/id1399948033?mt=823) and he wants you to buy it for $0.99. Use the code SDT to get $20 off Coté's book, (https://leanpub.com/digitalwtf/c/sdt) Digital WTF (https://leanpub.com/digitalwtf/c/sdt), so $5 total. Become a sponsor of Software Defined Talk (https://www.softwaredefinedtalk.com/ads)! Recommendations Brandon: InterStellar BBQ (https://www.theinterstellarbbq.com) Coté: Travels with My Aunt (https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48858.Travels_with_My_Aunt). Photo Credits Banner Art (https://unsplash.com/photos/OT1D53cUbnI) Cover Art (https://unsplash.com/photos/UT8LMo-wlyk)

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

Apple te permitirá reparar tu propio iPhone / Mangueras para incendios en coches eléctricos / Podcasts de pago en Spotify / Pelea por las NFT de Pulp Fiction / Disney la lía otra vez / NASA parchea el Hubble Patrocinador: La gala de premios Huawei Next Image son el mayor concurso de fotografía móvil https://consumer.huawei.com/es/community/next-image/ del mundo. Más de dos millones de personas de todo el mundo han participado, y este año viene con más premios que nunca. — Las inscripciones están abiertas https://consumer.huawei.com/es/community/next-image/ hasta el 30 de noviembre, y puedes participar en múltiples categorías. Si algún lector gana que lo comparta conmigo, ¿eh? Apple te permitirá reparar tu propio iPhone / Mangueras para incendios en coches eléctricos / Podcasts de pago en Spotify / Pelea por las NFT de Pulp Fiction / Disney la lía otra vez / NASA parchea el Hubble

Freelance to Founder
When You're Too Busy to Scale

Freelance to Founder

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 56:24


On today's episode, we have a great conversation with Will Gibbons—a product rendering guru who works with huge brands like Pelaton, 3M, Vizio and more. After a year of working for himself, Will is facing perhaps one of the best problems you can ask for as a freelancer: He's got too many client requests coming in and too much work that needs done. So in this episode, Clay and I walk him through a few hiring, scaling, and management tips to help him go from freelancer to agency without losing control of his business. We talk about pricing, sales, hiring, and lots more in a conversation you won't want to miss. ATTENTION: We Need YOU! We're currently casting new guests for our upcoming season and we want to feature your business. Come on the show and we'll offer some free pro-level advice for scaling your service business. To join us on the air, click here. Leave us a review on Apple Podcasts: If you enjoy the show, can you do us a favor and leave us an honest rating and review on Apple Podcasts? We'll love you forever. Click here to leave a review. Support our sponsors so we can keep airing new episodes: Vidyard - Leverage the power of video to scale your business. Milk&Bull - save 20% off your first design contract when you mention this podcast. Creative Elements - tells the stories of how your favorite creators broke through. Indeed - If you're hiring, you need Indeed. Blinkist - Acquire knowledge from top non-fiction and podcasts, so you can learn anytime, anywhere. Talkspace: Feeling better starts with a single message Canva: Templates for absolutely anything ButcherBox: Get our meat delivered, for free, right to your door. Justworks - Manage your remote team and run your business with confidence. Dripify - Premium learning platform for entrepreneurs. SolidGigs - Get more freelance jobs. More Recommended Listening: This show is a part of the Podglomerate, a company that produces, distributes, and monetizes podcasts. We encourage you to visit the website and sign up for our newsletter. We suggest you also try other Podglomerate shows about entrepreneurship, business, and creativity such as Rocketship.fm and Creative Elements. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy
#SGGQA 229: Apple Digital ID Costs Taxpayers, Pixel 6 Pro Teardown, Vizio Ad Sales, Steam Deck Delayed

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


Apple is walking back their terrible decision to harm 3rd party iPhone repair, and we get an even better look at the Pixel 6 Pro in an iFixit teardown! Vizio announced recent profits, and ads ON their TV make them more money than selling TVs. Steam Deck has been delayed, and it’s breaking my heart. … Continue reading "#SGGQA 229: Apple Digital ID Costs Taxpayers, Pixel 6 Pro Teardown, Vizio Ad Sales, Steam Deck Delayed"

Computer Talk with TAB
2nd PC Thoughts

Computer Talk with TAB

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 37:07


Musk talk, Where do you get a MAC fixed? What should I get as a 2nd PC for financial use? Apple updated my phone and now I can't share pictures, Vizio makes more money selling data on what you watch on their TVs then in selling TVs! COX is blocking e-mail via VPN, Comcast Outage, VHS to DVD, E-bay hack. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Into Tomorrow With Dave Graveline
Weekend of November 12, 2021 – Hour 1

Into Tomorrow With Dave Graveline

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021


Tech News and Commentary Dave and the team discuss crypto coins and billionaires, the Twitter Blue subscription service, new Moon landing delays, cars as digital devices, Vizio getting more money from user data than from TVs, Facebook’s toxicity, Musk harming Tesla’s stock price, and more. Andy in Atlanta, Georgia listens on AM920 The Answer and […]

Crayton Bible talk and tech podcast
How I access things on my Vizio smartest tv

Crayton Bible talk and tech podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 24:30


In this episode, I go over how I access certain things on my Vizio smart cast TV. It's a nice podcast, and I hope that you guys enjoy it.

Linux Action News
Linux Action News 212

Linux Action News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 13:32


Major performance milestones are being hit with new code inbound for Linux, Plasma and GNOME desktops are set to run Wayland on NVIDIA's binary driver, and why the SFC's new GPL fight could have implications for you.

Linux Action News
Linux Action News 212

Linux Action News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 13:32


Major performance milestones are being hit with new code inbound for Linux, Plasma and GNOME desktops are set to run Wayland on NVIDIA's binary driver, and why the SFC's new GPL fight could have implications for you.

This Week in Linux
173: Steam Deck Verified, SFC Sues Vizio, Raspberry Pi, PS3 Emulator | This Week in Linux

This Week in Linux

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 43:13


On this episode of This Week in Linux, Valve Launches “Steam Deck Verified” Program, SFC Sues Vizio For GPL Violations, Raspberry Pi Price Increase, RPCS3 Can Now Boot All PS3 Games, Ubuntu 21.10 Flavours Released, AlmaLinux ELevate, MX Linux 21, Redcore Linux 2102, GIMP 2.99.8 Released Closer To 3.0, Humble Bundles. All that and much […]

Podcast – AV Rant
AV Rant #777: Don’t Show All the Crazy

Podcast – AV Rant

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 123:37


Back to normal! And Tom got his happy birthday wishes…belatedly. We have some interesting discussions about Vizio’s 2022 TV lineup, attaching fabric to walls & ceilings, and figuring out if you need diffusion, plus so much more. Pictures shown in this episode:https://flic.kr/s/aHsmWXV8Hd 00:00:00 – Intro, DC & MCU– All the news from DC FanDome ’21: https://tinyurl.com/madj7h5h– […] The post AV Rant #777: Don’t Show All the Crazy appeared first on AV Rant .

il posto delle parole
Gabriella Airaldi "Essere avari"

il posto delle parole

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 23:17


Gabriella Airaldi "Essere avari"Storia della febbre del possessoMarietti Editorehttps://www.mariettieditore.it/L'avaro è un individuo meschino, capace di ogni bassezza, insopportabile alla società in cui vive. La sua figura è avvolta in ogni tempo da biasimo e condanna, ironia e disprezzo. Una fisionomia che ha le sue radici nel mito e nelle sue più recenti riscritture: Creso, Euclione, Shylock, Arpagone, Ebenezer Scrooge, Paperon de' Paperoni, Gordon Gekko. Nomi che si rincorrono nei secoli per disegnare un identikit spregevole.L'opinione comune di una vita che oscilla perennemente tra il vizio e la virtù, in una lotta costante, pone l'avidità, il febbrile desiderio di possedere, alla base del comportamento dell'avaro. Eppure, la vita non è un gioco di estremi e le sfumature sono molte.Avarizia è termine proteiforme, che può indicare diverse cose, in relazione ai tempi e ai luoghi. Quante sono le sembianze dell'avaro? In quanti modi si possono descrivere? E quanti significati racchiude il vocabolo “avarizia”? La questione resta aperta, come accade ai grandi temi di lunga durata.Gabriella Airaldi, specialista di Storia mediterranea e di Storia delle relazioni internazionali, ha insegnato Storia medievale all'Università di Genova. Con Marietti 1820 ha pubblicato Storia della Liguria (2008-2012), Gli orizzonti aperti del medioevo. Jacopo da Varagine tra santi e mercanti (2017) e Il ponte di Istanbul. Un progetto incompiuto di Leonardo da Vinci (2019).IL POSTO DELLE PAROLEascoltare fa pensarehttps://ilpostodelleparole.it/

Tomorrow Will Be Televised
Tomorrow Will Be Televised 9 Years To Neptune/Polaris Episode

Tomorrow Will Be Televised

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 77:00


First of three episodes this week for the program all about TV. Our guests: Tyler and Peter McKellar, creators and showrunners of 9 Years To Neptune, the new workplace somedy series launching tonight on BYU TV, and Rahman J. Dukes, founder and principal chairman of Polaris, a new multicultural channel launching next month through Vizio smart TV sets.

Barron's Streetwise
The Dongle Is Dead

Barron's Streetwise

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 18:40


Power is shifting to TV makers. Vizio's plan to take on Roku and Amazon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

All CNET Video Podcasts (HD)
Vizio M512a-H6: This is the Dolby Atmos soundbar you should buy

All CNET Video Podcasts (HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021


The Vizio M512a-H6 offers a lot of bang for your buck including true Dolby Atmos playback.

CNET News (HD)
Vizio M512a-H6: This is the Dolby Atmos soundbar you should buy

CNET News (HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021


The Vizio M512a-H6 offers a lot of bang for your buck including true Dolby Atmos playback.

Raw Data By P3
Alex Dupler and Alex Powers

Raw Data By P3

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 104:22


We welcome Power Platform expertise in the form of Two Alex! Alex Dupler and Alex Powers both work at Microsoft. The organization they work for and their first names aren't the only thing that these two share! They also both have a lot of experience with and passion for the Power Platform. Alex Powers is a member of the Power BI Customer Advisory Team (PBICAT), and Alex Dupler is a Program Manager focused on BI & Data Infrastructure. These guys know data! Follow Two Alex: Alex Dupler Twitter Alex Powers Twitter Two Alex Youtube Channel References in this Episode: Raw Data with Brad and Kai from Agree Media Episode Timeline: 7:00 - The woes of Stack Ranking, Data storage options, more fun with names! 22:00 - What draws you to data?, The value (and drawbacks) of Excel, and the path to Power BI 36:40 - Two Alex-similarities and differences, Rob tells a story of someone crossing him, and one of Rob's favorites-the art of using BI to drive action 59:00 - When BI and IT collide, the 2 Alex's non-traditional BI path, the value of being an expert even if you aren't THE expert 1:16:00 - Two Alex LOVE helping people, is there value to documentation?, knowing the Business portion of Business Intelligence 1:37:00 - Advertising performance discussion Episode Transcript: Rob Collie (00:00:00): Hello friends. Today's guests are Alex Powers and Alex Dupler, collectively known as Two Alex. They're both Microsoft employees in very different roles, but both have their feet rooted firmly in the power platform. You might be familiar with their YouTube show. I interact with them primarily on Twitter and a little bit on Reddit. And this is the first time I've had really any conversation of length with Alex Powers. And it's the first time I've had any conversation at all with Alex Dupler. And no surprise here, really, really cool people. We had a lot of fun, really dynamic and inspiring, interesting conversation that wound through a number of topics, including some show favorites, like non-traditional backgrounds, and closing the action loop, and imposter syndrome. We talk about how years ago Alex Powers wrote a review of my book that called out the intermission in the book and how, what a delight that was at the time to read. Rob Collie (00:00:57): And that leads to a conversation about how we're always essentially at our own little intermission in our expertise curve. You're always in the middle somewhere. And if we started doing metrics on this podcast, you'd probably find that this one ranked very highly in opinions expressed per minute. Ooh. What could he mean? Let's get into it. Announcer (00:01:21): Ladies and gentlemen, may I have your attention please? Announcer (00:01:25): This is the Raw Data By P3 Adaptive podcast. With your host, Rob Collie, and your cohost Thomas LaRock. Find out what the experts at P3 Adaptive can do for your business. Just go to p3adaptive.com. Raw Data by P3 Adaptive is data with the human element. Rob Collie (00:01:49): Welcome to the show. Alex Powers and Alex Dupler. How are you today, gentlemen? Alex Dupler (00:01:54): I'm doing great. It's great to chat with you. Alex Powers (00:01:56): Rob, back-to-back meetings. I'm glad that Luke found us some time here. I was so hesitant about this podcast, just cause I love listening to it. I was like, "I don't know, should I do it? Should I do it? Should I do it?" Rob Collie (00:02:08): The answer is yes, you should do it. Alex Powers (00:02:10): I appreciate Alex D and Rob just pulling us all together. Yeah. Rob Collie (00:02:13): We've already backstage a little bit been laughing about this. So let's bring it out to the front stage. The two of you combined, what do we refer to you as? Are you the Two Alex's? Or something different? Alex Dupler (00:02:23): So we learned separately from our wives that the correct pluralization is two Alex. Rob Collie (00:02:30): See, I just don't buy this. I still think Alex's. I mean, we could get really funky and say, Alexi. Tom LaRock (00:02:36): I was going to say, that's what I think. Yeah, Alexa, Rob Collie (00:02:39): But I mean, think of it this way. There's fish, and that's plural. But even there, there's still fishes, which refers to different species of fish. Yes. I think. Is that what it is? Alex Powers (00:02:51): Yeah, that's right. Fishy. Yes. Rob Collie (00:02:53): I don't know. So the two Alex, are you guys seriously going to go by that now? Is that going to be the new thing, or? Alex Dupler (00:02:58): Well, the YouTube channel is called Two Alex. Rob Collie (00:03:01): How'd the two of you come to know one another? Is it just like, oh, we're both working in data and we're both named Alex. So you're like, you see each other from across the room and your eyes meet across the internet? Alex Powers (00:03:10): I would say across the internet, for sure there. Just because he's up in Redmond, I'm kind of located in St. Louis, Missouri. From there it was kind of this, I think natural, just both being active in the community. Alex D you can keep me honest there, I'm sure we were connecting on Twitter a little bit there before, definitely in the subreddits. One of my earliest memories of was, Hey, this thing isn't folding. And I was like, oh my gosh, it's Power Query. I've got to tackle this. I've got to answer this question. Reddit is where I hang out at. I would say from there that's when we really started coming chat more and more, but Alex D I'll let you kind of tell your side of the story. Alex Dupler (00:03:43): Yeah. Yeah. My recollection is that the first time we interacted with each other, where it wasn't just some random poster on Reddit, was side conversations on Microsoft teams within Microsoft. There's some internal discussions where salespeople can get their question answered and sometimes the questions are interesting. And so, yeah we had some side conversations. Plus back then, when Alex wasn't on the product team, he didn't always have full visibility into the roadmap. And so we would chat on the side about what we would do with the roadmap. Not that we would do a better job, just a different job. Rob Collie (00:04:19): Yeah, I get you. Yeah, I understand. I understand. What are the two of your roles at Microsoft today? Alex Dupler (00:04:25): I work for Microsoft advertising. We're the organization that sells the ads that go on Bing, as well as some partner websites like Yahoo search and AOL search and stuff like that. And I work in the business function of the sales org. So I do BI for a sales team. And it just happens to be at Microsoft, and that influences the technologies that we use. IPM are like data warehouse and big cube stuff. Rob Collie (00:04:50): Cool. We're going to have to circle back to that for sure. And Alex P what are you up to these days? Alex Powers (00:04:56): Yep. So senior program manager on the Power BI customer advisory team, so PBI CAT for maybe those out in the community. I'm called as kind of that last bastion of hope sometimes, where I'm not very close to the solution, not close to the architecture, just come in and fix it. Where Alex D, he owns the solution, he owns the finished product. That's a line of visibility that I completely lose in my day to day. But you get variety, you get to do different things. Some days it's maybe a DAX challenge, next day I'm writing C#. The next day, I'm writing kind of new report, kind of clicky, clicky, draggy droppy experiences. So a vast rich tapestry of Power BI. Rob Collie (00:05:32): So you're on the CAT team with a number of people that have already been on the show, right? Adam Saxton, Casper, Chris Webb. You're part of that crew? Alex Powers (00:05:41): Yep. Rob Collie (00:05:41): I hear that that crew continues to expand, it's like this great gravitational attractor. It's like just hoovering all of these people. Let's just have it on the record. Does the Power BI CAT team have ambitions of world takeover? Alex Powers (00:05:53): Every day. And I think what you're seeing right now is a lot of formality. Community contributors, experts, decades of experience. They're now turning into bosses, they're now turning into managers. So they're getting further away from the technology and kind of now being people managers. I'm enjoying our livestream here because Rob is laughing. He's like, oh, I know that exact feeling. Rob Collie (00:06:14): I do. I do, right. I got a request today from some media outlet to interview me for Power BI tips. And I'm like, gosh folks, I'm probably not that person. You want to talk about strategy, okay, that's different. But I have gotten further and further. I still build some Power BI stuff for sure, for my own purposes. But I don't have that day to day, like, this is my life. That's not how my day goes anymore. I'm back to the management game after years of being out of it. Yeah. Growing a company tends to keep you out of the actual hands-dirty data trenches that started the whole thing. Alex Dupler (00:06:52): Well, if you ever start stack ranking, that's when it's going to be time to sell it. Rob Collie (00:06:56): True story, stack ranking was the reason why I actually stopped being a manager at Microsoft. At one point, I just said, I'm done applying the system for you. I was sick of it. And I understand it's gone now. I found out the hard way that stepping back from a management position didn't just relieve me of that stack ranking thing that I found immoral and uncool. It also took me out of a lot of the important conversations. I just didn't have nearly the input or influence that I had before. And that was hard. If I was still at Microsoft today, my career at Microsoft would still have suffered like a multi-year setback because of this era where I just said, I'm done. I know that at this point, the whole stack rank thing has been gone for a long time, but it was still a number of years later after I left that it still persisted. No, we're never going to do that. We're never going to play lifeboat with human beings. I mean, it really sucked, right? Basically, if you built a really good team, either by recruiting or by development or both, you were punished for it. Alex Dupler (00:08:04): Yeah. Apply this to Alex's team. You want to stack rank Chris Webb and Casper and Adam? Tom LaRock (00:08:09): I will. I'll do it. Rob Collie (00:08:11): Which one of them gets told that they had a terrible year? Right? Tom LaRock (00:08:16): I'd be happy to do it. Rob Collie (00:08:20): Hey, listen. As long as we put that kind of phenomenal power in the hands of a benevolent tyrant, like Tom, it's perfectly safe. What could go wrong? Alex Dupler (00:08:29): That is what they said about solar winds. Tom LaRock (00:08:34): My first criteria, having known them for many years, is Jaeger consumption. So we'll just start with that and work our way down the stack. Rob Collie (00:08:44): Which way are we going to sort that list though? We sort it largest to smallest, or smallest to largest? I mean, I could see that list being sorted either way. Tom LaRock (00:08:50): We'll try it both ways and see how it shakes out. Rob Collie (00:08:53): Yeah. I mean, it could be like a honeypot, right? Put some Jaeger out there, see who goes for it? You're getting the 3.0. We won't be doing any of that, thankfully. Now, Alex P, you were previously in a different role, right? Alex Powers (00:09:10): Yes. So, here at Microsoft less than two years, came in through the premier field engineer side to support, really had a blast there kind of proactive engagements training, probably train like 4,000 Tableau users on the Power BI. So just like the grind of doing it day in, day out, talking about the product, I just absolutely loved that. Transitioned to kind of field sales roles. There it's competitor competes, a lot of disinformation where they're saying, well, Power BI can never do this. What do you mean it can't do that? Here's an article. Here's me, kind of the whizzbang demo. That's probably where I got my hyperlink chops for those that kind of know me on the community. Alex Powers (00:09:44): This is the good and bad of the pandemic is like, Hey, we're making some career advancements, we're working long hours, whatever else it may be. A lot of my goal whiteboard over here was, Hey, I want to be on the Power BI CAT team. Had that visibility, just kind of did those grinding over the fall and winter months when we're all stuck inside. But I'm sorry, Thomas. I don't know how good I would be at the Jaeger thing, just because I don't have that peer connection. I haven't met my coworkers. So that's tough for a lot of people that I think are just making career jumps during the pandemic right now. Rob Collie (00:10:16): Yeah. I mean, it's weird. I live in a completely altered reality where we've been a hundred percent remote, I've been a hundred percent remote for 11 years. Probably more closer to 12, actually. Our company was a hundred percent remote from the beginning, basically out of necessity. To me, it's shocking how many people who've been at this company for a long time have never met each other face to face. We did a gathering, a team gathering in 2019. We didn't do one in 2020. I don't remember why we didn't do that. We haven't done one this year, either. We're hoping to maybe do one in 2022. We've hired so many people in the last year that there's like half the company that I haven't ever been in person with. Alex Powers (00:11:02): It's tough. Rob Collie (00:11:03): It's different, isn't it? Alex Powers (00:11:04): Yeah. I think it was like the good meme the other day where it's like, Hey, here's your company culture, it's just like an empty cubicle. And it's like, well, people don't even have that anymore. It's just, here's your new job, here's your new email. Log in, welcome to the company. Great friend of mine, Mark Beedle, I know kind of joined T3 adaptive. I love that he's like, this is where I want to be. I think of the P3 of the past, where you take the group, I think, up to Seattle or some of the different areas. And then it was like, oh wow, they're all getting together and having fun. You know, I tried applying for the job, but unfortunately your Excel file was corrupt and I couldn't pass the test. Rob Collie (00:11:36): Oh, I see. I see how this [crosstalk 00:11:38]. Alex Powers (00:11:38): Yeah, what happened with that, Rob? Rob Collie (00:11:39): I don't know, man. Alex Powers (00:11:40): That's really what I wanted to corner you on today. Rob Collie (00:11:43): That might've been part of the test, Alex. Alex Powers (00:11:45): I literally thought it was, that responded that way. I was like, I don't know if they're testing me with a corrupted file. Alex Dupler (00:11:50): Yeah. You need to have mastered the Open XML format of the Excel file, and be able to track down the corruption in the Power Query. Rob Collie (00:12:00): I saw a joke or a meme on some social media a couple of years ago about cast iron, the hipsters with their cast iron and how you have to take care of it and everything like that. And then after you're done with that, you have to dry it in the sun for 24 hours. And someone goes, 24 hours? And they go, yeah, if you're not willing to go to the Arctic, you don't deserve cast iron. So it's like that kind of test. Yeah. Alex Dupler (00:12:23): We beat the crap out of our cast iron, it's just fine. Rob Collie (00:12:26): Okay. And now Alex Dupler. You're working in BI in the advertising wing, within Bing but also the affiliated networks like Yahoo and things like that. And so you mentioned that you're in charge of the data warehouse and you're in charge of, you said big cube. Alex Dupler (00:12:42): Yeah. Rob Collie (00:12:43): For a year I worked on Bing, and maybe this is a completely different dataset than what you actually end up caring about, but the state of the world back then was there was this giant distributed commodity hardware database system, data storage system called Cosmos. Alex Dupler (00:12:58): Yep. Rob Collie (00:12:58): One of the world's foremost write-only data stores. It was amazing at storing data. You could never get anything useful out of it. There was only one person in the entire organization, named Jamie Buckley, who was capable of actually running queries against this thing. And so if you wanted any information whatsoever about what searches were being run and things like that, yeah sure, you could try to write a query against this thing. And what would happen is you'd get syntax error after syntax error after syntax error, and then eventually you kick off a query and it wouldn't give you any errors. And you're like sweet. And it would run and run and run and you go away and you'd come back like a day and a half later and then you'd get a runtime error. Alex Dupler (00:13:38): Yeah. And when it works, you get a CSV. And so we still have that. I think when I was getting trained on it, which they said it had something like 5% of the world's data in it. Cause it's not just Bing, it's X-Box and a whole bunch of stuff. It's this really cool exabyte scale thing. But nobody knows how to use it, partially because it uses scope scripts, which the only commercial product they've ever been used in is the ATLS gen one analytics feature, which was not a successful product and is being deprecated. And so you can't hire people that know how to use it, there's just like a bunch of vendors that have learned it. And I can't write it either. Also, I don't know if this was your experience, but the engineers are allergic to writing documentation. It's got these petabyte sized tables with 400 columns and there'll be a data dictionary and it doesn't have any descriptions of any of the columns. Rob Collie (00:14:33): This does match my experience, yes. Alex Dupler (00:14:35): So we use that some, we also have other partners. I mean, it's a huge organization. We just missed getting touted in the quarterly earnings as having crossed $10 billion for the last fiscal year. I think the public number is like 9.95 or 9.5 billion. Yeah so it's a real business, even though the market share is pretty small. It turns out advertising is just a really, really good business. So we take a bunch of data out of there, and then also from partners that take data in there, and put it all in Databricks and make it available to folks that way. And we love Databricks because our analysts, they can come with whatever skills they have, and they can be successful on day one. Because they don't have to learn SCOPE or KQL or whatever. Alex Dupler (00:15:22): They can write Python, they can write R, they can write SQL, there's a cube so they can do Power BI, they can do Excel. They can do whatever they want, all in the same data. Now, if they want to do things that are super fancy, they may have a hard time using the cube. So they got to write something. Rob Collie (00:15:41): Yeah. Alex Dupler (00:15:42): But if you're a PM owning a project, you can drag and drop in that cube all day long and have a good time. And then the other thing that we like about the setup we have is, with the data in Data Lake, our partners that have their own generous Azure budgets, they're not running queries against our server. Whereas if we put it in Synapse or SQL, when they want to query our data, we're paying for this compute. But here they just mount it onto their own compute system, and they pay for it. And that's great. We like when other people pay to use our data. Rob Collie (00:16:15): So it's funny, I actually expected that the answer to the question was going to be, oh no, no, we fixed all that. That original system is completely straightened out, it's got a much more human friendly interface. But it turns out that you just have other systems that are human friendly. And those things have to... on the order of one-time investments to figure out how to populate those things from the great Oracle that is Cosmos. Alex Dupler (00:16:41): Yeah that's largely true. I mean, in Cosmos, they've implemented the ATLS APIs. So you can mount data in Cosmos directly to a Spark engine and do stuff that way, if you want. Yeah. Basically that's how they've done things. You will not be surprised to learn that Microsoft likes to reuse names. Maybe you've seen this phenomenon before in the word power, but yeah. Cosmos, the internal exabyte scale data platform is not the same as Cosmos DB, the Azure product, which is for, I couldn't even describe it. It's for, like, everything. Rob Collie (00:17:19): Yeah. I mean, there's only so many cool nouns. And furthermore, the set of cool nouns in the world is further refined by the ones that computer scientists gravitate to. So you end up with a really small population of words. And the chances... It's like the pigeonhole principle from math, right? You need 450 names, you only have 300 words. So you're screwed. And so you end up with things like the word dashboard being repurposed to mean something kind of niche in Power BI. That's one that I wish we could get a do-over on. And you know, I'm a sinner. I named some things poorly in my day. I'll give you an example. When PowerPivot V1, and actually several versions of PowerPivot, at least in 2010, there were those two drop zones, extra drop zones in the pivot table field list, for slicers. Rob Collie (00:18:11): Cause Amir insisted that we make slicer layout really easy as opposed to tedious. So we had these extra drop zones, and one drop zone put the slicers down the left-hand side of the pivot table and one put them across the top of the pivot table. What did I name those two zones? Horizontal and vertical slicers. For years after that, when I taught that product to classes, they go, oh, what does a horizontal slicer do that's different than a vertical slicer? And I just sit there with my head in my hands like, it should have been left and top, Rob. Why did you... Previous Rob, why were you so nerdy and stupid at the same time? Left and top. Alex Dupler (00:18:48): Well you see, in an indimensional cube, there are some things that are horizontal and some things that are vertical. Once you understand what the tubal is, it'll all make sense. Rob Collie (00:18:59): Yes. So let's go back to basics and... Yeah, no. It's just left and top. Yep. These are what you call own goals. Can't make these things up. It's even funnier, by that point in my career when I made that mistake, I was already kind of like this rabid high priest of naming. Like, we should be better. And here I was in the course of delivering those sermons, just committing tremendous sins out the back of the church. It's just like. Alex Dupler (00:19:31): Yeah, it turns out we should be better in, oh crap, I got an hour before this presentation, what am I going to call this thing? Those are two overlapping states of being. Rob Collie (00:19:41): You know, people's hearts are in the right place. So I still think that the two of you probably might've gravitated toward each other just a little bit, maybe like 1% more, because of the shared first name. Can I be allowed like an extra 1% gravity on this? Alex Powers (00:19:54): 99. I mean, a lot of Alex's within Microsoft that are doing Power BI, we've all kind of banded together. Rob Collie (00:19:59): There's like an Alex crew? Alex Powers (00:20:01): Hell yeah. Big time. There's multiple Two Alex's, too. Rob Collie (00:20:04): As we've established, once you get above like three or four Alex, it's suddenly Alex's. That's when it becomes plural. Alex Dupler (00:20:10): There are at least two Alex's working at Microsoft in the Power BI ecosystem that are smarter than either of us. Rob Collie (00:20:17): Well I mean, going back to something we were talking about earlier, every single person, every single consultant at P3 is a hell of a lot better at Power BI than I ever was. I can't even argue that it's like, oh, I'm off my peak. It's not that at all. They were always going to be much, much better. It's very humbling. Like in the real sense of the word, when you sort of get put in your place. Alex Powers (00:20:40): Is this like a time thing, Rob? Cause I feel it too. It's like the early days, Power Pivot and Power Query were something like, I'm digging, I'm learning all of these things. And then like everything else is kind of passing me by and it's like, yeah I'll catch up to that at some point. And I see the wild stuff that people are doing nowadays, like, I don't know what nights and weekends they're spending learning this product, but I'm working twice as hard and I'm still not catching up. Alex Dupler (00:21:00): Yeah. I was watching the other demo the other day. And he was talking about how you should have your report and your data model in two separate PBIX's. This was Mike Carlo. It was a great demo. But then he was like, and to make this really easy, what we're going to do is we're going to edit the PBIX. And I was like, hold on a second. You can't do that. That's not allowed. Rob Collie (00:21:22): [crosstalk 00:21:22] Like actually hacking the file? Like he got into the file structure? Alex Dupler (00:21:25): Yeah. Rob Collie (00:21:26): I do love me some file hacking. For me, I think it's not necessarily a question of time. It's actually that the universe has returned to its default state with respect to me. Which is, the whole time I worked at Microsoft, in all the years I was on the engineering teams, I worked with plenty of people who were super technical, but also enthusiastically technical. When VB.Net came out, and ASP.NET, I had some colleagues that just dove into that. They loved it, it was the most amazing thing. And I just could never... I was still at that point going like, okay, well I learned how to write my VBA, and I'm sticking with it. That's where the frontier of my coding, actual procedural coding, is still VBA six. Rob Collie (00:22:09): For some reason, DAX and data modeling, as technical tools go, DAX and data modeling really, really spoke to me. Like I freaking loved it and still do, still do to this day. And Excel formulas are kind of the same thing, right? This is the handful of exceptional technologies that really seem to appeal to my nervous system, and none of the others do. And by the way, M is another example that does not appeal to me at all. Alex Powers (00:22:38): I am the opposite. I love M. Rob Collie (00:22:39): Really? You love M? Alex Powers (00:22:40): I love, love, love. Hell yeah. Rob Collie (00:22:42): You're not my species then, you're something completely different. Alex Dupler (00:22:47): So I think one of the big things that drew me to data modeling, so there's a lot of constraints. And with programming, it's like, there's such an open world. Like the only programming I could ever really get my head around was VBA. That's where I started. You didn't have to have a big, complicated object model. There was just Excel. That was your object model. And it made everything so much easier. And you're like, okay, well, what I'm trying to do is move these cells to those cells. And with data modeling, especially in Power BI, it's like, well, I need one column for these relationships. And I need these relationships to flow in one direction. The constraints make it a much more manageable problem, but also opens up room for more creativity. Rob Collie (00:23:30): I agree. And also VBA comes with a macro recorder, the world's greatest set of training wheels. It's like, if I want to build an app from scratch, I can't like act out like pantomime what the app will do, and have something spit out code for it. Alex Dupler (00:23:48): Draw some stick fingers in Figma and just drag them around, and get some code from that. Rob Collie (00:23:51): Yeah. It's like, mock up the UI in Balsamiq or something, or Vizio, and then start mashing on the screen with your finger and say, okay. And then speaking out loud, what should happen at that... there's no macro recording for actual software developers. Alex Dupler (00:24:04): I think we got to tell Charles that, that's what he's got to do with his AI driven power apps development. Rob Collie (00:24:09): Yeah. It's we need to turn this into a LARPing thing, right? You just act out the application in the real world with these cameras... Holo lens. There it is. We've solved the world's problems. Take that for low code development. Alex Powers (00:24:26): Well, I like how Power Automate's now watching your points and clicks, and generating flows for you. Rob Collie (00:24:32): See, I didn't know that it did that. Alex Powers (00:24:33): Oh yeah. You're training the machine. You don't even have to write the code anymore. It's like, oh, automation is here. It's really here now. Rob Collie (00:24:41): It's always a feel good moment to meet a fellow VBA 6-er. The world used to be lousy with us. We were just everywhere. It's kind of a dying art. Office has got this new JavaScript API, Office Scripts. That's incredible. Again, in theory. I haven't touched it, because it's not reaching out and grabbing me by the eyeballs. I'm tempted though. It's sort of like, oh, a new VBA six and they have a macro recorder and I'm like, okay, maybe, maybe. This might be the way I learn JavaScript someday, is Office Scripts. Alex Dupler (00:25:09): Yeah, that sounds like how I'd learn it, except Excel is dead to me. I mean, I use Excel for note taking and PM stuff, but data work, I don't use it. Because first of all, Power Query is the way to go. And in Excel, when you have Power Query over, you can't save the Excel file. Rob Collie (00:25:28): Really? Alex Dupler (00:25:29): Yeah, Power Query takes a lock, like a lot of the old school windows. And you can't get back to the main- Rob Collie (00:25:34): Modal window. Alex Dupler (00:25:35): Yeah. So you can't save, you can't refer back to the data. You can't open stuff. And it's not like Excel ever crashes when you're working with lots of data. So saving, it's not that important. And if you want to say, first you have to evaluate your queries or set them to disable load. But if you've already loaded some, if you do something to disable load, it destroys the cells. I just said, I'll do it all in Power BI. No more Excel. Not because there's anything wrong with Excel. It's just that that user experience was just so unacceptable to me. I lost so many hours of work. Tom LaRock (00:26:10): Wait, what do you mean, not that there's something wrong... Clearly there's something wrong with Excel. Alex Dupler (00:26:14): Yeah. Rob Collie (00:26:15): Alex, you're cut from a cloth that I understand very well. Your sarcastic cynicism is, ooh, it speaks to me. Yeah, we've come to the right place. Even I, team Excel guy, I am really on team Excel. I haven't written any DAX in the Excel environment in several years. It's all Power BI, all the time now. Alex Dupler (00:26:38): The other big thing is why would you want to write DAX in an environment that you can't schedule to refresh? Unless you don't have pro licenses, like... Alex Powers (00:26:47): Hold on, let me challenge you now. Here we go, this is a little taste of Two Alex. So I love Ken Puls, where he's saying, Hey, I don't want the heavy weight of Power BI. If I can do as much as possible within Excel, be it Power Query or even Power Pivot. I would agree that. Alex Powers (00:27:03): Be it kind of power query or even power pivot. I would agree that the development experience is severely lacking. That's not to say that the power BI side is the best in the world, obviously Dax studio, et cetera. But I would much rather take a lightweight application over a heavy one every day and then just import that data model into power BI when I'm ready. Rob Collie (00:27:19): To me, the primary value of these technologies in Excel is as an on-ramp to the power BI universe for the authors. Tomorrow's power BI authors are today living in Excel. And the reason, I've said this multiple times on this podcast of multiple different people at Microsoft, but the reason why I'm, I don't want to use like the passive aggressive version of the word disappointed. Let's use the completely neutral version of the word disappointed. The reason why I'm disappointed that there isn't more investment there is because that is the gateway drug, and as a universe, as a community, like we really need to care about bringing those new people on. And that's where they're going to come to. To tell those same people, "No, put Excel down and start learning this in a completely new environment," their immune systems reject that because they've been sold a million times on the idea that something's going to replace Excel. They know better by now. Rob Collie (00:28:23): But no one in that category, like the V lookup and pivot route, none of them resist the idea of there being crazy, powerful new versions and features of the things that they're already doing. You get them 48 hours into that new world, and they're more than happy to switch to the power BI environment. They're excited about it. Those same people who would have rejected it 48 hours before. You got to take them on that path and this thing not getting the love that I think it deserves, I understand it's from the perspective of our real production environment is the power BI environment. I get that. But the on-ramp, they are doing some things about that, even things that I didn't know, because they're targeted at people who don't know about this stuff and I already do. Brian, when he was on the podcast, was talking about how they're using machine learning, advanced clippy generation seven, to detect the people who should be interested in this stuff and sort of pointing them to power BI. And there actually was really good uptake of that. That feature didn't fire for me because I don't use V Lookup or regular pivot tables anymore. Alex Dupler (00:29:23): That's almost exactly the journey that I went on. Like many of your guests, I did not go to school for power BI. I actually, I went to school for chemistry and I worked as a chemist for a couple of years. I was doing lab work and I was very bad at lab work. I mean, I understood the chemistry, but I would break glassware that was expensive and stuff like that. Which when you make $15 an hour, breaking expensive glassware is a good way to get in trouble. So I was like "Okay, well I grew up in a very computer centric family. Maybe I can do some of this Excel stuff." And so I was doing visual basic, and we were doing some dashboards, like operational reporting. And I had Excel in this company. I loved the people there, but it was not a successful business. We had maybe a hundred thousand dollars in revenue per employee with high CapEx, because we had these big, expensive instruments that we had to buy and chemicals and all sorts of stuff, lots of HVAC. So there was not enough money to pay people to live in Seattle, so every office license was a battle. Alex Powers (00:30:31): Wow. Alex Dupler (00:30:31): I was looking at, okay, what can I do with Excel 2007, because we had some of that I think we had enough licenses, but it didn't really check. So we didn't really pay too much attention. But then I was like wanting to use power query because I had sort of discovered it was easier, but I couldn't. So I was like, "Okay, how do I get this macro to run as a service so that I can refresh these dashboards on these dowels that we bought second hand?" Rob Collie (00:31:01): You know, if it weren't for the a hundred thousand dollars of revenue per employee, at a certain point, that story sounded like season two of Breaking Bad. The HVAC, the cap ex, oh you mean a hundred thousand dollars per employee per week? Okay. Alex Dupler (00:31:18): No, no, no, per year. Rob Collie (00:31:19): Then it's meth. Alex Dupler (00:31:20): Yeah, no. So this is the environmental testing industry. And the way it works is your tests have to be defensible to the EPA. So the EPA puts up a spec and says the test needs to be done this way. And when it's done, it has these parameters in terms of statistical reusability. And that means that one lab's product is a commodity compared to the other lab's product. And so you can't get outside profits. All you can do is compete on service and price. And if you take a high CapEx business and bolted to professional services, you're not going to get good margins. Rob Collie (00:31:59): Unintended consequences of everything, right? Alex Dupler (00:32:01): Yeah. I mean, Rob, can you imagine your business, if you are charging professional services business model, but you bolted on a whole, huge amount of consumable costs to every delivery? Rob Collie (00:32:14): Yeah. It sounds like we can safely not choose the wine in front of me. Alex Dupler (00:32:19): That's how I first encountered the 2017 standalone web, maybe it was 2016. The first time power BI was split out. I was doing office 365 admins and I got like a push notification. I was like, "This is cool." And I built some stuff and I showed it to my manager and he was like, "That's cool. How much is it?" "$10 a month." "Nope, can't afford it." And that's when I started looking for jobs anywhere where they had good Excel people. Rob Collie (00:32:46): Yeah, and to put that in perspective, this is the punchline to many jokes when people ask us how much it is. We go, "It's $10 a month per user." We all just start laughing. Like, "Oh my God, it's like stealing. It's so cheap." Alex Dupler (00:32:58): I didn't even have that many users. Rob Collie (00:33:02): I mean, this might be $30 a month. You know, like, nope. Alex Dupler (00:33:06): No. Rob Collie (00:33:07): It's like when we first moved to Cleveland back in the day, it was right in the middle of the financial crisis. We were looking at real estate and everything. And there were houses for sale in Cleveland for $10,000, like $10,000. And I started laughing. I'm like, imagine the deal going down. This house has been on the market for 180 days at $10,000. And you come in and say, "Look, I've got a cash offer. I'm willing to pay asking price. But the grill out back? You need to leave it." And the owner's like, "Mmmmm." Alex Dupler (00:33:43): My wife's best friend lives in Cleveland and they recently bought a house. And so we looked at a bunch of Zillow listings. I'm like, "Oh man, we could pay cash. Move next door." And they're sort of north of the Cleveland Clinic, that super nice neighborhood up in there. I was like, "Oh yeah, we could buy a very nice house, but our family is not there." Also, have you looked at the weather? It's not Seattle. Rob Collie (00:34:05): No, it's not Seattle, but I'll tell you what, here's an interesting description of statistics. When we moved to Cleveland, it wasn't because we wanted to, it was because basically my kids had been taken to Cleveland and so we're trying to console ourselves. We're like, "Okay, well, okay. It's going to be colder. There's going to be snow. Okay, okay. But at least it isn't going to be as overcast." And then we looked it up and Cleveland has more overcast days per year than Seattle. So we were like, "Damn, that sucks." However, it turns out that the definition of overcast days is very, very, very important. Because like an overcast day in Cleveland is like 75% of the sky is covered by clouds. That's an overcast day. At no point in time ever is Cleveland under a one mile thick, oppressive blanket that starves you, where you don't even have any idea where the sun is in the sky. So number of days is one of those misleading statistics. Total amount of oppressive cloud cover needs to be a different statistic. Trust me, there's more sun in Cleveland on an ongoing basis than there is in Seattle. Those winter and fall months, man, those are rough. Alex Dupler (00:35:16): That's not the part that bothers me. I was born and raised in Seattle. It's the shoveling your driveway in March, that part of it. Rob Collie (00:35:24): You could just be the delinquents that we were and just get a four wheel drive vehicle and say, "Screw it." Alex Powers (00:35:31): You don't shovel in March. After February, you don't shovel. It's in my contract. I don't shovel after March 1st. That's it. Because it's going to melt. Alex Dupler (00:35:40): Eventually. Alex Powers (00:35:40): It'll melt by the end of the month. Rob Collie (00:35:43): By the end of the month. Alex Powers (00:35:44): By the end of the month, it'll be gone. The rainstorm's coming. Sunshine's going to happen. I ain't shoveling. No, I put that in my contract years ago. Rob Collie (00:35:53): Cleveland's where I learned the rule, we do not adopt dogs that require walking. Alex Powers (00:35:58): Yes. Rob Collie (00:35:58): They need to be able to go out in the backyard and come back in. I fell so many times on ice. I eventually got, they're like crampons essentially. Alex Dupler (00:36:06): Yak tracks? Rob Collie (00:36:08): Yak tracks, that's what they are. Yak tracks or something else. You can't intentionally slip on yak tracks. It's crazy. But without them, just any day now broken hip. Alex Dupler (00:36:19): Our friends that lived there, they just got a golden retriever. We met the puppy when we were visiting with them this summer. Very cute, but I think they have some of those walks in their future. Rob Collie (00:36:29): So you start looking for a job, that's what led you into Mount Redmond? Alex Dupler (00:36:34): Yeah, I literally went looking for jobs good with Excel in Seattle. I found a contract position into Microsoft, making sure that the salespeople were assigned to the right customers and got paid on the right quota because advertising the agency model, it makes that much more complicated. Because we were in this model where we'd try and keep all the customers of an agency with the same salesperson which makes a lot of sense, especially when you're the underdog and you have relatively few sales resources, you get more leverage. But customer's change agencies all the time, have no respect for our compensation cycles, and so it was quite the nightmare. Rob Collie (00:37:15): Yeah, I love that. Like, so here's how we'll define the world for our benefit, "Oh world, you did not get the message. World, please don't change. Don't have your own things going on." Yep, that sounds like a software engineering problem from the nineties back before the industry kind of got wiser. So you start talking about the show. It seems like with a format like that, it's got to wander, which is what our show does too, by the way. So what are some of the most entertaining or valuable corners that you found yourself wandering into over time? Alex Powers (00:37:48): I'm still excited with our first episode where we talked about kind of beyond the desktop where it's no longer just development in [inaudible 00:37:56] desktop. It now almost takes like five different applications to build something at scale, which is like a good and bad thing. Well, you're getting more tools, seeing new things faster, more performing, et cetera, but why do I need 10 tools? Can we solve that within the desktop application? And we just had a really good conversation, a lot of attendees there, providing their own thoughts. And it kind of comes back to like this overwhelming feeling of learning power BI it's. Like I have to learn 20 new things all the time, learning, learning, learning. It's just never ending. That was my key episode. Alex Dupler (00:38:26): I agree. I mean, I think that's been the central theme of the whole show. I mean, we did that first episode and then we've talked, we've had the same conversation about these tools in so many different contexts. What are the different ways to do dev ops in power BI? What are different ways to measure how you're doing in terms of the effectiveness of your models? And so all of that is sort of external to the desktop application. Alex Powers (00:38:52): I think the best part, too, is that we're not from these traditional backgrounds of 20 years of BI or 20 years of kind of dev ops. We're learning this real time, sharing our experiences of, Rob, I think you call us power users or business users that find these tools, that get empowered by this technology. That is the seat in which we sit in. Hey, I found Excel 2010 power query add in 2013, 2016. I'm fighting with my IT admins. Can you please just upgrade to the next monthly release that will solve all my problems? Where Alex D is on the other series fighting tooth and nail for a 2007 license. It's kind of funny to hear that conversation. Rob Collie (00:39:32): $10 a month. We need those charity commercials like Sally Struthers used to do. This is Alex Dupler. For $10 a month, less than the price of a cup of coffee, you could get him an O 365 license. Alex Dupler (00:39:50): Yeah. So we ended up getting some E3 licenses and some E1 licenses, which meant I could work in power query, not using my personal license, but using the company's license. And then when I tried to share it with my coworkers, they only had E1. They couldn't use desktop. They had to use power query online or Excel online. And there was no power query online. And so even once we sort of modernized, we installed like a windows server 2012 and it was already 2015 and I was okay, this is our modernization. Alex Powers (00:40:26): So Rob, I'm going to steal one of your quotes here if you don't mind. Rob Collie (00:40:30): No, please do. We have an open source quote license at P3. Alex Powers (00:40:35): Well, I'll buy you a 2007 Excel license too, if I have to. Rob Collie (00:40:39): Fantastic. Alex Powers (00:40:39): But one of the items you had said a long time ago, I believe it was either in your book or maybe some of the video recordings you used to do in the studio with a nice button up shirt. You said, "There are two types of people when it comes to technology, those who can see the possibilities and bring about change and those who are about to be affected by it." And I always look at this and I look at things like had kind of talked about with the Excel users who haven't even gotten to this experience yet. There is still somebody out there today that is using Excel 2007 and their employer or their this, their that, or whatever their situation they're red is like, "I just see this little rectangle. It hasn't changed. Why do you want me to go invest in any of this stuff?" Like how often are you still seeing this? Rob Collie (00:41:17): Anecdotally in our public classes, which I haven't taught in a while, I've taught one as recently as let's say two years ago. And when I taught public classes for P3, I still stubbornly insisted on using the Excel version of this stuff to teach. Again, because of that onboarding effect. Alex Powers (00:41:34): Yep. Rob Collie (00:41:34): I think I was the only one left at our company that was still stubbornly doing that and I wasn't bothering to argue with others and whatever. So I did this for years, probably the first one of those classes I taught would have been like in 2011. So fighting with different versions of Excel, all the different students showed up with, for a long time, that was like a quarter of the class. The instructions for the class were very clear, show up with this version or don't bother. And they'd show up and no, they had a version, didn't even have power pivot and couldn't get power pivot. And so it was so bad for a while, we would bring spare laptops. If we traveled to another city, we'd be lugging spare laptops with us and they'd just be there ready to go like the hot swap with a student. That problem really went away though. I reached the point where I'd survey everybody at the beginning of class, "What version of Excel are you on," or whatever. And everyone, every single person in the class would be on the basically some version of recent 365. Rob Collie (00:42:32): I really do think that the person who's trapped on 2007 or hell even 2010 or 2013, they're out there, but they are really a tiny, tiny fraction of the world now. Whereas that used to be an overwhelming problem. So it's really testament to how successful O 365. Alex Powers (00:42:52): I would agree. Rob Collie (00:42:53): It's like, I was kind of like cynically betting against it forever, like the tortoise and the hare. Like I woke up one day and that's the world. The world is O 365. I think everyone's on the modern, not everyone, but it rounds to everyone, is on the modern wave of the tools. But they're still shocked when I show them, when we show them, "Did you know that this is in here?" And they're just like, "What?" Alex Powers (00:43:19): How is that in here? Rob Collie (00:43:20): They get angry because they start to realize how much of their life they have lost by not being told. Alex Powers (00:43:27): What I was always seeing was people had to live in two worlds. Like I went to some of the Excel boot camps, Michael Alexander, absolutely transformed on my personal laptop. I'm having the best time of my life in these three-day boot camps. I'm loving, loving, loving. At the very end though, I have to go back to work on Monday. I saw what could be, and I'm now back to what is. And it's just very difficult to kind of live in that middle space. For those that are still out there and listening to this, Hey, look at your surroundings. Hopefully Office 365 is coming within your organization. But if not, kind of like Alex D's story, I just went looked somewhere else. I saw the future that was coming, and I bet it all myself and I went for it. And I think that me and him both kind of share those stories, too. Alex Dupler (00:44:08): Inside of Microsoft, in my little corner of the Microsoft that most people in Microsoft don't even know about, I put together a class that I've given a couple of times, Modern Excel for Managers. And basically I would just show them power query and X Lookup. We didn't even talk about Dax. But just to like get them thinking like, "Hey, if you're doing some annoying thing in Excel, maybe there's a couple ways to make it a little bit better. Maybe you've never even seen the formula bar before." I had one person that I worked with who I was like, I didn't handle it very well at first. But she was like, "Can you add these numbers together for me?" And I was like, "Yeah." Alex Powers (00:44:52): Just a standard Excel formula bar? Is that what you're talking about? Alex Dupler (00:44:55): She was like, "Can you show me the difference between these two numbers?" "I can do that for you, but here, let me come over here and show you something." Rob Collie (00:45:04): So there was another program manager on being, because I was such an Excel, I'd come from the Excel team, I'm such an Excel zealot, that all someone had to do was say that they needed Excel help and I was there. Alex Powers (00:45:17): Oh yeah. Rob Collie (00:45:18): This person, they developed a habit of having me do all of their Excel work for them. This is one of my peers. And then of course passing off the work as their own. Fine, I wasn't that career minded, really. Six months after this is when I volunteered to no longer be a manager. So climbing the corporate ladder wasn't some voracious appetite of mine. So, okay, fine, fine. I knew what was happening, but I was still okay because the Excel problems were so fun. Keep them coming. Then one day this person asked me for Excel help. And there were these two columns of numbers. And this person had subtracted column two from column one to create column three and then added up column three to get the difference. Alex Powers (00:46:04): I'm waiting for the reveal, because there's a big story here and I'm loving it right. Rob Collie (00:46:09): I said, "Well, you know, you could have just summed column one and column two, and then taken the difference between the two sums." And they said, "But wouldn't the answer be different?" There was this moment of silence. I'm looking. I'm looking at them. They're looking at me. I'm looking at them. They're looking at me. At that moment, they realized that they couldn't use me anymore because I was now dangerous. I now knew that they didn't know math. They didn't just not know spreadsheets, they didn't know math. They were exposed. This person is now an executive at Google. Tom LaRock (00:46:48): This person being the executive at Google. I have no doubt probably doesn't know math. However, as somebody who uses technology and knows that data can be dirty and whatnot, I would actually, if it was me Rob, I would say do it both ways and make sure the answers match. Because you know what? We both seen it where it didn't work out. Rob Collie (00:47:10): That's true. But like when you see all the numbers in front of you, you physically see them all. You've got access. There's nothing hidden going on here. Oh, by the way, Tom, what's your degree in again? Tom LaRock (00:47:21): I have a master's in mathematics from Washington State University. Rob Collie (00:47:23): Masters, yep. Yeah, the masters in math is what allows Tom to say, "I'm not sure." Tom LaRock (00:47:29): Now hold on. Hold on. We've seen it. We've seen it. Rob Collie (00:47:35): There's a name for this. It's like the distributive property or associative property or something. There's some property that we learned in middle school. Tom LaRock (00:47:41): See, that's math with paper and pencil. Now we're talking about using Excel for math. So the tool, there could be something like, "Hey wait," and that's why we tell you, "well, just do it both ways." Even Wayne Winston would probably say, "Yeah, well have two columns. They should match. If they don't match..." Rob Collie (00:47:58): No, no he would not, not in this particular case. Tom LaRock (00:48:01): You're right. He wouldn't. Rob Collie (00:48:02): Every time I tell this story, someone always sort of like takes a sympathetic stance towards the antagonist and I end up feeling like a heel. Tom LaRock (00:48:09): You shouldn't. You shouldn't. Rob Collie (00:48:12): But come on. Tom LaRock (00:48:15): I'm with you. I have no doubt that they don't know math because I come across the same people. I do. Rob Collie (00:48:22): It's think it's the intersection of all of those things, That I was being used the whole time. Tom LaRock (00:48:27): Yes. Rob Collie (00:48:29): Which I had kind of made my peace with. But then on top of that, this incredibly aggressive ladder climber, the kind of person who really was kind of like willing to climb over the bodies of their colleagues. There's something delicious about, even though I was the rube in the whole story up until a certain point. I was being taken advantage of and I knew it. But even me in that situation, there was that moment of just like jaw dropping dumbstruck, like just looking at this person going, "Oh my God, you did not do that." Alex Powers (00:49:09): I'm going to lift us up from the depths here of career and everything else. I thought you were going to take us into that they didn't use cell references, which I've seen people type in column A plus column B's value in an equals. And it's like, "Well, why didn't you just do A1 plus B1?" Mind was blown. So I love that those moments still exist and you find them out in the wild every once in a while. And it's not massive warehouse MPP processing, et cetera, et cetera, that everyone's like, "Oh, this is the," I call it the BI bubble. Everyone's out here living in the BI bubble, writing C sharp, doing tabular and coding, blah, blah, blah. People are still excited about the very simple things that technology can achieve for them. Alex Dupler (00:49:56): My in-laws, they own a brewery in Rinton and they make great beer. I offered to help my mother-in-law with some of her bookkeeping that she does on inventory. And she was showing me how she was doing it. And she was like, "Okay, I get these numbers in Excel. And then I get out my calculator." And I was like, "Okay, let me show you how you can do this differently." And I showed her. She was like, "No, no, that's going to be too hard. I'm going to stick with the calculator." And I was like, "Okay, that's fine." Alex Powers (00:50:20): I still get the, "I don't trust Excel, so I double check with the calculator." Rob Collie (00:50:25): My first exposure to that, I was in college. I was working for a construction management firm that was building the new chemistry building on Vanderbilt campus and I was working in the management trailer. I was sort of all purpose ... we called me the lackey. I would just do whatever anybody needed. Sometimes I'd go out in the building and take measurements for things or whatever. But most of the time, I was just doing paperwork and stuff. They turned over the spreadsheet for this latest change order to the project to Vanderbilt management. And the price tag, it was an Excel spreadsheet and it had a column of values that were summed and there was a number at the bottom of it. And I remember the guy Tony who worked for Vanderbilt going, "Well, someone's going to have to double check these numbers. We can't just pay this contract." And my boss was just looking at him going, "Come on. That's what the spreadsheet is for is for doing that." And Tony's like, "Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, I know. But still, I mean, we can't just pay this number." I can understand that stance a little better, anyway, I just looked like a giant meany. But remember. This was someone who was taking advantage of me. Alex Powers (00:51:36): I agree. I agree. Alex Dupler (00:51:38): One of the things that I wanted to touch on in this conversation, something you've brought up a lot, which is going from BI to taking action within the report. And I got to tell you, this concept terrifies me. As a BIPM, I'm terrified of it. And I totally agree that the value is there, but in the BI space, we are really bad at testing. And if I think about how going from, Hey, I've got a report and these are the numbers to someone's going to click a button and it's going to change something in a system of record, the level of quality and testing goes up and I think really threatens the quick solution thing that you've also talked about is your bread and butter of like, Hey, we're going to do this really fast and it's going to blow your mind. But if I got to throw all that testing in there to make sure I don't blow up your source system instead, I don't know how those two things coexist. Rob Collie (00:52:39): Yeah. that's a fair point. I mean, for a moment there, when you were saying the taking action part and this terrifies you, before I understood the subtleties of your point, I was going to make the joke like, "Oh, you want this to be like the psychic hotline. It's for entertainment purposes only. Please don't use this report to take any action." Alex Dupler (00:52:57): It does make my job easier, I will admit, but it is a little bit more nuanced than that. Rob Collie (00:53:02): Okay, okay, fine. So anyway, I still managed to sneak the joke in there without ... it's not a joke at your expense because your point is different. Okay, there's escalating versions of this with escalating versions of responsibility and test implications and things like that. So you can just start with report design and working backwards from the types of action, your constituents, the users of your report. In classes what I would teach this concept on the end of the last day, as sort of like a religious sermon. I would encourage people to think of the users of their reports as each one of them sitting in front of like some gigantic cartoonish bat computer looking thing with these giant oversized 1960s, pop art colored buttons and they're labeled things like "open more stores" or "adjust hours of locations" or "increase head count, reduce head count" or "change product mix" or whatever. It's actually kind of interesting, when you imagine e ... Rob Collie (00:54:03): ... mixed or whatever, right? It's actually interesting when you imagine it that way to give it that physical manifestation, it actually becomes a little bit easier, for me anyway, to imagine what these people can do, because every role in a company really has a finite number of actions that they can take. Now, finite in terms of their categories of actions. It's certainly infinite when you get into the details of what are you going to do. And if you start to think of them from that perspective and you think, okay, what I should do is build reports that advise them or at least are helping inform them as to which control they should touch on their dashboard and directionally which way they should move it. Rob Collie (00:54:45): And it sounds like not that important of a trick, not that powerful of a trick, but if you actually apply that methodology faithfully, you end up with a vastly different portfolio of reports that you have built. Even I, very often, don't live up to my own principle in this regard. Because it's so easy. It's so seductively easy. It's the path of least resistance to grab all the data, load it up, make the model, that's fun, and then it's like flowing downhill. It's just like, oh, this is the easy and fun part, right? And then inevitably, you just start slapping together some reports. And those reports, in some ways, are just exposing the coolness of what you've built. Rob Collie (00:55:29): Now, that still leads to some very, very useful things. That's mind-blowingly better than what you ended up with in the old dark ages of Excel or even traditional BI. But I mean, oh my God, we were just talking about it on the last podcast. Some of the things that I have seen in the world that were supposed to be helping people make decisions were better described as their opponents in the process. This report was something that you had to fight to figure out what you should do at your dashboard. Rob Collie (00:55:59): So even before we start with any sort of actual software integration and taking action and things like that, that's a really, I think, important religion to develop. And again, when you're at your best, your absolute gold medal in the Olympics celebrated by the world best, maybe 30% of your output will live up to this. You just can't, you can't execute that way all the time. It's really, really hard. But it's software development. You are building software when you're building reports. You should have the same sort of mindset, if you can, as the Power BI team has when they sit down to design a new feature in their software. Alex Dupler (00:56:38): I totally agree. One of the questions I've been asking a lot, because I've been working on reports for the salespeople to take to the customers is, what is the conversation you're going to have with the customer? Not, what is the metric, but how does this fit into the conversation? And part of this is because my superpower and my career is going and building tools for the thing I used to do. And I think a lot of BI people come from that, where they were in the business and they were doing a thing, they just started making the reports for that thing. And somewhere along the line, they either work away from it for too long or they solve those problems. They had to learn how to make reports for something they haven't done for years. And I think that's a difficult transition and one I've been going through. Alex Dupler (00:57:26): But yeah, learning how to ask questions of the user, because they're not just going to tell you... what they tell you isn't what they need. You have to learn how to learn from what they say, what they actually want. Rob Collie (00:57:42): Yeah, it's a fine art. And by the way, when you've been in "BI", building the same reports for a long time, generally speaking, looking backwards anyway, those reports also sucked because they were constrained by what was possible at the time. And so they were never very ambitious. And most of those reports amounted to... A lot of times they just amounted to the data dump import that's used for something else. It's just, again, it's the opponent. It's better than nothing, but it's meager, meager help. And suddenly you're given this brand new tool set that's capable of so much more. Rob Collie (00:58:22): And unfortunately what I see a lot of times, when you give Power BI to an IT department, they go, "Oh hot damn, the new SSRS." This is the new reporting services. We're going to use it like reporting services. Load that big one flat wide table and pigeonhole it as visualization. It's just like, "Come on." Alex Powers (00:58:45): I'm telling you my favorite DAX is always written from the IT department. It's just written like a massive sequel statement, 400 lines. None of it makes any sense. It's like, "Can we just calculate, maybe another table here or there." Alex Dupler (00:58:59): The folks coming from the IT department, the one thing they do have going for them is that they did learn to format their code. Sometimes people coming from the Excel world, they learned that they can't format their code. And so I'm not sure that I would agree that the worst DAX comes from the IT department. Because you take a DAX statement and you take all the formatting out, and you've just made it 10 times worse. Alex Powers (00:59:21): From readability, yeah, I would agree. Rob Collie (00:59:24): I gave a talk one time where I asked the trick question of, what's the number one programming language in the world? And

Freelance to Founder
Does Getting Clients Keep You from Scaling?

Freelance to Founder

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 56:02


New clients are often the lifeblood of a freelance business, but what if taking on new work is holding you back from growing your business? On today's show, we give some coaching to Will Gibbons—a product rendering expert who works with huge brands like Pelaton, 3M, Vizio and more. After a year of freelancing, Will is facing perhaps one of the best problems you can ask for: He's got too many client requests coming in and too much work that needs done. So in this episode, Clay and I walk him through a few hiring, scaling, and management tips to help him scale up his freelancing without losing control of his business. Get your own on-air coaching call We'd love to feature your business and offer some free on-air advice for growing your business. To see if you're a good fit, click here. Leave us a review on Apple Podcasts: If you enjoy the show, can you do us a favor and leave us an honest rating and review on Apple Podcasts? We'll love you forever. Click here to leave a review. Support our sponsors so we can keep airing new episodes: GoodLife Clothing — Essentials for Modern Living. Offering ultra-premium essentials to ensure you always look your best even when you're at your most comfortable.  Blinkist — Acquire knowledge from top non-fiction and podcasts, so you can learn anytime, anywhere. Dripify — Premium learning platform for entrepreneurs. SolidGigs — Get more freelance jobs. Mentioned in this episode: Clay's original "therapy" episode: Revenue on Autopilot—Is It Really Possible? Our episode with Adii Pienar about work/life balance More Recommended Listening: This show is a part of the Podglomerate, a company that produces, distributes, and monetizes podcasts. We encourage you to visit the website and sign up for our newsletter. We suggest you also try other Podglomerate shows about entrepreneurship, business, and creativity such as Rocketship.fm and Creative Elements. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
Our loss of privacy is bigger than you think - and what to start doing about it

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 11:58


[As heard on WTAG, WHYN, WHJJ on 2021-06] You might have an idea of how much privacy has been lost. I went through a lot of the details today. The idea is to help you understand what you're doing to yourself by using all of these different new technologies and what can you do right now to start getting your privacy under control? So here we go with Mr. Polito. [00:00:29] Jim Polito: Our good friend tech talk guru Craig Peterson has talked about this before. When you click that, "I accept" in the terms and conditions for something online, he is always explained what's going on there. And how, in many instances, as you are the product for that app, the app is in the product. [00:00:48]Now there are more concerns about just clicking "I accept." Joining us now. We accept our good friend here every week at this time, Craig Peterson the tech talk guru. Good morning, sir. [00:01:02] Craig Peterson: [00:01:02] Hey, good morning. Click away. It's quite a thing. Isn't it. Where does this article come from? We're talking about, did you notice this? [00:01:10] The daily mail came out of the UK, not in America. [00:01:15] Jim Polito: [00:01:15] Yeah, I know. Very interesting. And I just happened to have the daily mail app on my phone because it's one of the stops I make in show prep. So there's a warning. And of course, Greg, this doesn't come as any surprise probably to regular listeners because you've been talking about all the things that are included in there. [00:01:36] And but what's the latest concern. [00:01:38]Craig Peterson: [00:01:38] What they did is they put it all together and it's rare that you see this. So they started Dawn. What's the first thing you do while you check at your phone, I would actually put it back even a few hours. What do you do at night with your smartphone? You plug it in and it's sitting right there next to you. [00:01:57]So now you've got all of these busy bodies that the tech companies cause remember. Apps, many of these are tracking use. They're not free. They're gathering information about you. So they know every night Jim puts his phone here and oh, buys the ways. So does this woman and this guy. Oh, okay. That's where Jim Pollito lives, right? [00:02:21] So it's your smartphone manufacturer, particularly if it's Google, but it's true for apple app developers or mobile phone company, intelligence agencies. If they're watching you, which happens all the time. But all they're doing is collecting metadata. [00:02:43] Yeah. That's exactly what it's used for, what time you're waking up where, who you're sharing your Baird bed with? Where are you going when you go to work? If you're speeding, when you're going to work, right? It's anybody's guess where all of this stuff is ending up at now. We're adding ring doorbells that we have on the front of our home. [00:03:04] Please more than I think it's 1500 right now. Police departments are taking these feeds from ring. So now they have cameras in all of the neighborhoods. We have facial recognition from those ring cameras and from all the other cameras are putting around our home. So they know where we are, who we are. [00:03:23] Vizio. A TV manufacturer has been caught. Watching us through a camera, hidden camera and the TV, listening to what we're saying. And even if the company isn't doing now, like your Samsung TV, they are tracking exactly what you're watching, where it's going. Facebook has been accused with. They're a wonderful little portal device, which is a, something that allows you to talk to someone. [00:03:50] Face time. They've been accused of listening in on everything you're saying, because people including my son last week, he was at his girlfriend's house. She has the two of these Facebook portals. They started talking about maybe getting a hammock. Talking about it, not on a conversation on the portal at all. [00:04:09] And all of a sudden what starts happening, their feeds are showing ads for hammocks, even though they hadn't looked for them before. So our cars are logging the places we're going. They're tracking how fast we're going. We have legislators right here in mass who are looking at it saying these electric cars, oh my gosh, we're not getting our gas taxes, which we don't bother using to fix the roads. [00:04:34] That would be a terrible. It was electric cars. Aren't paying gas taxes. We want the cars to report on you and tell them how many miles you drove in math. And from that, they will send you a bill every year. If you want to, re-register your electric car. We were doing DNA testing kits for health reasons. [00:04:55] Maybe we were trying to find out if we truly are Italian or. That genetic information is up for grabs anybody who's willing to pay for it. This is a surveillance state at something even the Staci weren't able to do. They only had files on about a third of the population of east Germany intelligence agencies today here in the us. [00:05:17] Remember. Our information that was being kept by the federal government, including all the background check information for people that have secret top secret and other clearances, all of that information was stolen by China. We're giving this away. We are not keeping it safe. We're on top of all of this, Jim, we're telling people we're going on social media. [00:05:40] Oh yeah. I'm going away for a week. We're going to a w wherever on vacation, it's going to be a great time. So now even the bad guys know this is amazing. We have right now started to enter the days of artificial intelligence. Yeah. And it's not like you and I, the way we think it's putting pieces of a puzzle together, that's what computer artificial intelligence is all about. [00:06:06] And all of this stuff that we're allowing to be tracked from the national health service all the way on down in the UK and in the UK. This is really something we've got to start pulling our wings. And we're talking [00:06:20] Jim Polito: [00:06:20] with our good friend tech talk guru, Craig Peterson, Craig here's the thing. [00:06:25] So the reason that Facebook and these other places can offer all these services for free is because we are the customer and then they sell that information. You've just laid out the scenario about how those things get stolen, but they sell that information. Is this something where the government steps in with better regulation? [00:06:47] Or is this something where the marketplace says, Hey, do you want something like Facebook? Okay. Pay me $5 a month and you can have it, and then we won't try to do all this stuff, you've got to pay you to have this service. [00:07:01]Craig Peterson: [00:07:01] Facebook did try that at one point they were floating the idea. [00:07:05] But I want you to consider one other thing here, Jim, when you're talking about this, when has government ever decided they needed less information about the people? [00:07:21] Jim Polito: [00:07:21] Yeah. Yeah. You're rife. They don't, they want to know everything. Cause then they want to tax it. They want to regulate it. They want to, whatever. And here I am just bringing up regulation, but yeah. [00:07:33] Craig Peterson: [00:07:33] That's exactly what they're going to do. That's what they do. The job of a bureaucrat data. [00:07:38] I have Ribeiro grad in this country, whether they're working for the town of pod talk at Rhode Island, or they're working for the federal government, every bureaucrat in the country has one job don't get fired. And then the second job is grow my faith. Yeah. And that means that even if they were to pass laws, you remember, we already had laws about the federal government not watching us. [00:08:04] And then we found out, oh, wait a minute, eight T and T had been feeding the federal government, all of the information about all of the phone calls in the country since 1950. Yeah, there were laws against it. Okay. It, even if they say, okay, you can't use this information, you're gathering from marketing is what I'm more at about, frankly, because if I'm looking to buy an F-150 truck, I'd love to see offers on F150 trucks. [00:08:32] Okay. So being able to track me in my searches make sense. I'm extremely worried about. Everything else. And I'm very worried about this artificial intelligence being used, frankly, for evil. And it already is with some of these phishing attacks. It's this is just something it's something Facebook, by the way, even teams shadow profiles on people who don't even have accounts, because when you join Facebook, Facebook says, Hey, you want me to find your friends so you can link into them? [00:09:05] Yeah. Just upload your contacts to. Who did [00:09:11] Jim Polito: [00:09:11] so Craig, in the short time we have left what do you do? What do you do. [00:09:16] Craig Peterson: [00:09:16] I'm having a meeting about that today. In fact, there's some friends, I have a couple of attorney friends, and some other friends who are looking at this and saying, this is nuts. [00:09:25] What do we do? Apple is the only one. So you've found manufacturers out there that really does have your privacy in mind to a large degree. They have mostly been keeping us safe. That is generally speaking the best thing that you can do, but don't volunteer information, post himself up on Facebook. [00:09:47] You're posting pictures that have the GPS coordinates of where it was taken. Facebook has based. So recognition don't do that. Get away from doing that sort of thing. Also be careful with the information that you're sharing with any other company out there, Google some of these free photo services, et cetera, et cetera, that pulling it all together. [00:10:10] Facebook's given Microsoft search engine, the ability to see Facebook friends without their consent. It gave Netflix and Spotify the ability to read and even delete Facebook users. Private messages. Don't use these companies, mark Zuckerberg, the allegations are all out there that Facebook was started using illegal methods. [00:10:32]Crazy illegal methods scraping the the horrible. Book, if you will, of students and having people rate how good looking that woman is. Okay. All well and good, I guess if you were a teenager, but come on, this is not an ethical company. Google is not, they've even removed this slope. [00:10:52] Don't be evil from their website, stop using them things like duck, go for your searches posted up there. Don't make sure you turn off GPS tracking on everything you can paying attention. Apple now has this new feature that will tell you every app. Exactly what that app is supposedly doing in collecting data and doing with your data and make intelligent choices. [00:11:19] Jim Polito: [00:11:19] I got it. Craig, how do folks get more information? [00:11:23]Craig Peterson: [00:11:23] The easiest way is just go to Craig peterson.com. That's Frank Peterson with an o.com and you can subscribe to my newsletter. You'll get all of this stuff. You'll get also links to all of them like podcasts and nerves about I do about a dozen a week. [00:11:39] Believe it or not. Wow. And you'll be able to listen to those and you can listen to them on the iHeart radio app. Just go to Craig peterson.com/iheart or click on the iHeart logo. On my homepage, [00:11:51] Jim Polito: [00:11:51] Craig Peterson, everybody. He's the man, Craig. Thanks so much. We'll talk with you next week.

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
You're not going to want to click "I Agree" anymore

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 8:55


[ As heard on WGIR, WQSO, and WKXL on 2021-06-28] Privacy is gone. We started talking this morning with Mr. Christopher Ryan, and we got into our privacy. There's a great article that I'll have this weekend in my newsletter from the Daily Mail about about this whole thing. And it's titled "Read This and You Won't Click 'I Agree' Ever Again". So we got into that and also into this new bill here, it's called the ending platform monopoly, please act, can we split up these huge companies, these social media companies, et cetera, that are providing various platforms. Should we split them up? [00:00:37] This is a real interesting topic and one that's going to affect every last one of us. And of course, Chris and I both had opinions. [00:00:46] Chris Ryan: [00:00:46] I am Chris Ryan. Craig Peterson is the host tech talk on news radio six, 10 and 96. 7 Saturdays and Sundays at 11:30 AM. [00:00:54] One of the more fascinating things about the tech environment is how. Either we don't care or it's unbeknownst to us that we allow for tech companies to spy on us and to have an inner track basically to our minds and to our souls were for many years, we always wondered why other people were thinking, right? [00:01:19] Like what does that person thinking? And there was no way to ever really. But now there are ways to know, because we look into things on Google. We look into things via searches and we like certain things. We agree on certain things. And as a result of that we at some points in time are just giving the money, the giving information to tech companies, but at other points in time, We're actually showing via social media, who we are in ways that we never would have done in the past and employers, friends, everybody get a completely different view of a person's true inner feelings and how their mind works via social media that we never had before. [00:02:02] Craig Peterson: [00:02:02] It is potentially a huge problem. We've got these busy bodies, if you will, that are listening to basically all of the signals we're sending out. We tell them where we live. You may not have given them your address, but if you have apps on your phone that you guaranteed that smartphone now who stays in the same house every night, they know where you. [00:02:26] They know what you're like because of what you're searching for online, the website you're going to, they know what you say with some of these devices. My son I had was over his girlfriend's house and had a conversation with her about getting a hammock in front of one of these little portals from our friends at Facebook. [00:02:46]Immediately ad started showing up for all of us. So we're telling these tech companies, everything that we're doing, we have microphones in our rooms, our television visions, Vizio, which is one of the major manufacturers was caught watching us. Who is looking at the TV when they're looking at it so they can get better ratings. [00:03:09] Microphones are being used. The spy agencies worldwide now have direct access to us. It's a real problem. And it's a problem for you and me, not just for someone that's a high tech. High value target. It's a problem for you and me because now all of this information is also available to the regular bad guys. [00:03:30] That's what they're using for fishing. They're getting you to do things on marketers are getting you to do things. Obviously the PI getting all this information and showing you the right information at the right time, the bad guys are getting you to do things by clicking on it. So links going to websites that are actually going to cause you harm. [00:03:51] And we're seeing huge increases in all of this, Chris. Right? [00:03:56] Chris Ryan: [00:03:56] And it's the, those types of things are happening behind the scenes, but it's also a lot of the outward things. What do you post about, what do you say? How do you interact with other people? All of these types of things are accessible to the public at times, and also accessible, behind the scenes as well. [00:04:13] And it allows for a catalog to be built on you as an individual. And we are. Insight into our inner thinkings and our process that we would never have thought about that our parents would have never thought about doing before. And as a result of that there is a lot of things that take place out in society that, may we may not understand, or we may not completely comprehend, but a lot of it has to do with. [00:04:46] Behavior on social media and our inability to know when to say things and when not to say things, and that is a huge problem. [00:04:56] Craig Peterson: [00:04:56] It is knowing when to shut up. It's right there in politics as well. The Obama campaign was the first to mine. Incredible amounts of data from Facebook. Incredible. [00:05:09] Far more access than anyone had ever had before Facebook just literally gave it to them. And then you had the Trump campaign come along and the higher, the Cambridge Analytica guys who had access to much less data than the Obama campaign had. But in both cases you were saying. Ads that were so tightly targeted at people and individuals that you really were being manipulated because they know what you're saying. [00:05:37] They know what you're doing, they know who your friends are, and they put it all together now to lead you down that Primrose path, whatever. See, that's where I really get concerned. We are absolutely being manipulated. And as you pointed out, Chris we're being manipulated voluntarily. We're telling them everything we possibly can about us when we're posting on these various sites. [00:06:04] Chris Ryan: [00:06:04] That's a really good point. How's judiciary committee approved antitrust legislation that could prohibit platform operators like Amazon, apple, Google, and Facebook from favoring, their own products and services. And the legislation could even break up industry giants by forcing them to eliminate or sell certain divisions. [00:06:21] I don't see any way shape or form that this becomes law. That being said there is a public desire. For law to come to fruition that creates a more even playing field breaks up big tech breaks up these corporate giants and creates an environment where there is more shared prosperity. And. I'm curious as to what your thoughts are on this and what direction this goes and does do these companies need to be broken up in your view, a and B given how tightly they're able to control political figures via donations and power and things of that nature. [00:07:06] Is there any way that these big tech companies get back? [00:07:10]Craig Peterson: [00:07:10] It's a great question. And I would love to say that let the marketplace take care of it, but these companies are so incredibly profitable. The odds of them going under are very slim. Look at how long now we've had Facebook and Google out there. [00:07:27] I'm sure their predecessors died. Their predecessors, trying to have went that way. My space out, et cetera. But these people have had so much control, so much money, so much profit that the opposite they are going to be corrected by the marketplace are slim. Because part of the problem, Chris, with these huge guys is they keep everybody else out of the market. [00:07:52] Get Instagram, a company that was worth maybe $50 million. Facebook has been out there paying a billion dollars to buy their perspective competition. And they've done it multiple times. Google has done it multiple times. We're talking about a hundred times what the company is worth, just so they don't have to face competition. [00:08:16] So now that brings in this ending platform monopolies, right? That you just mentioned will that help? Yeah, but yeah, I don't know. How do you break them up? There's obvious ways you can slice them up, but is there the stomach for the federal government to get involved in this? And we're just giving it all to these companies with margins, proper margins that are insane. [00:08:41]Chris Ryan: [00:08:41] As always. [00:08:41] Craig, thank you so much. Appreciate your time. Hey, take care. Craig Peterson, joining us here on Hampshire day. Host of tech talk on news radio 610 and 96.7 Saturdays and Sundays at 11:30.

The Tech Guy (MP3)
Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1804

The Tech Guy (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2021 138:31


Setting up a new Mac Mini, talking about Apple's Spatial Audio with Scott Wilkinson, troubleshooting when your TV's remote controls the wrong device, the future of virtual reality, syncing calendars across devices, mobile data options for an RV, getting data off an old laptop, backing up an iPhone that won't turn on, Google is deleting my homework, tiny but powerful chargers from Anker with the GizWiz and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Scott Wilkinson and Dick DeBartolo Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsor: mintmobile.com/techguy

The Tech Guy (Video LO)
Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1804

The Tech Guy (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2021 139:11


Setting up a new Mac Mini, talking about Apple's Spatial Audio with Scott Wilkinson, troubleshooting when your TV's remote controls the wrong device, the future of virtual reality, syncing calendars across devices, mobile data options for an RV, getting data off an old laptop, backing up an iPhone that won't turn on, Google is deleting my homework, tiny but powerful chargers from Anker with the GizWiz and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Scott Wilkinson and Dick DeBartolo Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsor: mintmobile.com/techguy

The Tech Guy (Video HI)
Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1804

The Tech Guy (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2021 139:11


Setting up a new Mac Mini, talking about Apple's Spatial Audio with Scott Wilkinson, troubleshooting when your TV's remote controls the wrong device, the future of virtual reality, syncing calendars across devices, mobile data options for an RV, getting data off an old laptop, backing up an iPhone that won't turn on, Google is deleting my homework, tiny but powerful chargers from Anker with the GizWiz and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Scott Wilkinson and Dick DeBartolo Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsor: mintmobile.com/techguy

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
The Tech Guy 1804

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2021 139:11


Setting up a new Mac Mini, talking about Apple's Spatial Audio with Scott Wilkinson, troubleshooting when your TV's remote controls the wrong device, the future of virtual reality, syncing calendars across devices, mobile data options for an RV, getting data off an old laptop, backing up an iPhone that won't turn on, Google is deleting my homework, tiny but powerful chargers from Anker with the GizWiz and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Scott Wilkinson and Dick DeBartolo Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsor: mintmobile.com/techguy

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
The Tech Guy 1804

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2021 138:31


Setting up a new Mac Mini, talking about Apple's Spatial Audio with Scott Wilkinson, troubleshooting when your TV's remote controls the wrong device, the future of virtual reality, syncing calendars across devices, mobile data options for an RV, getting data off an old laptop, backing up an iPhone that won't turn on, Google is deleting my homework, tiny but powerful chargers from Anker with the GizWiz and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Scott Wilkinson and Dick DeBartolo Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsor: mintmobile.com/techguy

Radio Leo (Audio)
The Tech Guy 1804

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2021 138:31


Setting up a new Mac Mini, talking about Apple's Spatial Audio with Scott Wilkinson, troubleshooting when your TV's remote controls the wrong device, the future of virtual reality, syncing calendars across devices, mobile data options for an RV, getting data off an old laptop, backing up an iPhone that won't turn on, Google is deleting my homework, tiny but powerful chargers from Anker with the GizWiz and more of your calls! Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Scott Wilkinson and Dick DeBartolo Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsor: mintmobile.com/techguy

The Tech Guy (Video HI)
Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1802

The Tech Guy (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2021 149:02


Microsoft rumored to launch Windows 11 soon, personal cloud storage with a network-attached storage (NAS), Home Theater Geek' Scott Wilkinson on Vizio's 2022 TV line-up, Johnny Jett on Boom Supersonic, the best way to backup terabytes of data, using Gmail with a custom domain, and more of your calls. Host: Leo Laporte Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: itpro.tv/twit promo code TWIT30 simplisafe.com/twit

The Tech Guy (Video LO)
Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1802

The Tech Guy (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2021 149:02


Microsoft rumored to launch Windows 11 soon, personal cloud storage with a network-attached storage (NAS), Home Theater Geek' Scott Wilkinson on Vizio's 2022 TV line-up, Johnny Jett on Boom Supersonic, the best way to backup terabytes of data, using Gmail with a custom domain, and more of your calls. Host: Leo Laporte Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: itpro.tv/twit promo code TWIT30 simplisafe.com/twit

The Tech Guy (MP3)
Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1802

The Tech Guy (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2021 148:21


Microsoft rumored to launch Windows 11 soon, personal cloud storage with a network-attached storage (NAS), Home Theater Geek' Scott Wilkinson on Vizio's 2022 TV line-up, Johnny Jett on Boom Supersonic, the best way to backup terabytes of data, using Gmail with a custom domain, and more of your calls. Host: Leo Laporte Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: itpro.tv/twit promo code TWIT30 simplisafe.com/twit

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
The Tech Guy 1802

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2021 148:21


Microsoft rumored to launch Windows 11 soon, personal cloud storage with a network-attached storage (NAS), Home Theater Geek' Scott Wilkinson on Vizio's 2022 TV line-up, Johnny Jett on Boom Supersonic, the best way to backup terabytes of data, using Gmail with a custom domain, and more of your calls. Host: Leo Laporte Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: itpro.tv/twit promo code TWIT30 simplisafe.com/twit

Radio Leo (Audio)
The Tech Guy 1802

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2021 148:21


Microsoft rumored to launch Windows 11 soon, personal cloud storage with a network-attached storage (NAS), Home Theater Geek' Scott Wilkinson on Vizio's 2022 TV line-up, Johnny Jett on Boom Supersonic, the best way to backup terabytes of data, using Gmail with a custom domain, and more of your calls. Host: Leo Laporte Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit For detailed show notes, visit techguylabs.com. Sponsors: itpro.tv/twit promo code TWIT30 simplisafe.com/twit

Daily Tech Headlines
Huawei Releases HarmonyOS for Smartphones – DTH

Daily Tech Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021


Huawei releases HarmonyOS for smartphones, Vizio eyes gamers with its 2022 TV lineup, and Etsy intends to acquire the fashion resale platform Depop. MP3 Please SUBSCRIBE HERE. You can get an ad-free feed of Daily Tech Headlines for $3 a month here. A special thanks to all our supporters–without you, none of this would beContinue reading "Huawei Releases HarmonyOS for Smartphones – DTH"

Notnerd Podcast: Tech Better
Episode 286: Broberry Shortcake

Notnerd Podcast: Tech Better

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 37:10


This episode has more than its usual share of security and privacy stories, but we break it up the best we can with some Tiger King crypto news, some great pro tips, and so much more.  Followup:   Have I been Pwned goes open source (01:15) Interesting new voice control in iOS 14.6 (04:20) WWDC is next week (06:20) Cryptowatch: Joe Exotic launches Tiger King cryptocurrency (08:30) Dave’s Pro Tip of the Week: Safari for iOS: website errors by blocking cookies - Stash (10:30) Takes:  Vizio makes nearly as much money from ads and data as it does from selling TVs (14:55) Facebook no longer treating ‘man-made’ Covid as a crackpot idea (17:50) Amazon to buy MGM Studios for $8.45 billion (19:45) Twitter confirms plans for Twitter blue subscription (21:35) Bonus Odd Take: A map of the internet 2021 - Full-size image (23:35) Picks of the Week:  Dave: OpenEmu (26:50) Nate: My Little Pony Pocket Ponies (29:55) Ramazon™ purchase (31:50) Subscribe and Review Contact Info: www.Notnerd.com Support Notnerd on Patreon and get cool stuff Twitter - @N0tnerd, Nate - @NetBack, Dave - @DavyB Instagram - @n0tnerd Notnerd Youtube Channel Notnerd Facebook Email - info@Notnerd.com Call or text 608.618.NERD(6373) If you would like to help support Notnerd financially, mentally, or physically, please contact us via any of the methods above. Consider any product/app links to be affiliate links.

Three Percent Podcast
Three Percent #186: Italian Science Fiction

Three Percent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2021 53:20


In this special episode, Chad talks with Rachel Cordasco about a new Three Percent project focusing on translators as curators. Over the course of the next month, we'll be posting a number of different types of posts—excerpts, profiles, readings, shorter podcasts, movie clips—using the five works of Italian science fiction Rachel selected as the starting point.  In case it gets lost in the podcast, here are the five books in Rachel Cordasco's "Italian Science-Fiction Collection": Cancerqueen by Tommaso Landolfi (tr Raymond Rosenthal)(1971) Storie naturali (1966, as by Damiano Malabaila) and Vizio di forma  (1971) selections from both in The Sixth Day and Other Tales (tr Raymond Rosenthal, 1990) full translations of these & all Levi titles in Complete Works of Primo Levi (2015), w/ the two collections above tr Jenny McPhee Nexhuman by Francesco Verso (tr Sally McCorry) (2015) Creative Surgery by Clelia Farris (tr Rachel Cordasco and Jennifer Delare) (2020) Bug by Giacomo Sartori (tr Frederika Randall) (2021) Stay tuned for more information about these titles and other related books.  This episode's music is "Motherboard" by Daft Punk. If you don’t already subscribe to the Three Percent Podcast you can find us on iTunes, Stitcher, and other places. Or you can always subscribe by adding our feed directly into your favorite podcast app: http://threepercent.libsyn.com/rss