Podcasts about XYZ

  • 1,200PODCASTS
  • 2,067EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 31, 2023LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about XYZ

Show all podcasts related to xyz

Latest podcast episodes about XYZ

I Have ADHD Podcast
Understanding Executive Functions - Working Memory

I Have ADHD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2023 16:45


In Episode 196, I am kicking off the anticipated Executive Function series! I'll be breaking down the six key executive functions that are impacted by ADHD. Today's focus is all about Working Memory. Working memory is a temporary storage system that allows you to hold information in your mind long enough to do something with it. I like to think of working memory as an internal bulletin board where sticky notes get posted temporarily. Did you know there are two types: verbal and non-verbal? Join me as I dive into understanding the mind's voice and the mind's eye that are both necessary to picture the steps involved in a task and get it done.This is an easy one to give ourselves a hard time about. We think we SHOULD be able to do XYZ from start to finish, and we shame ourselves when we don't. As you'll find out in the podcast, my biggest lesson here is to embrace acceptance of our impairment and learn how to externalize these plans of action to help us accomplish them. Ready to make a game plan for yourself to improve life with ADHD? I invite you to join my group coaching program FOCUSED, where adults like you receive regular coaching calls and learn how to hold themselves accountable in a loving but firm way.Hang out with me on Instagram HERE. 

The Option Genius Podcast: Options Trading For Income and Growth

Allen Welcome passive traders to another episode. Today, I have a big announcement. And I have a first for the podcast, which is really interesting. I'm going to tell you the first before we get into the announcement. The first is that for the first time we are having a husband and wife, team, actually, we're going to find out if they're a team or not. But they're both traders. And they're both doing well. And they've been doing it for a while. So I wanted to get their opinion on how trading works in a family how trading works in a relationship, how to not get on each other's toes. So I have today, Mr. And Mrs. Matt and Margaret Ambrosi. Welcome, guys, thank you for doing this. Matt Thanks. Thanks. Thanks for having us. Allen Now, the big announcement, we probably should have done it better and differently. But Matt is now full time as an option genius coach. So we are very happy to have Matt on board. And he's already made a big difference in several people's lives. He's getting more, more happy comments, or, you know, people coming together to have a wonderful he's doing he's getting more than I am. So I think I got the right person for the job. And if you if you see Matt, or you hear the voice, and it's kind of familiar, we did do an interview with Matt back in episode 110. So 110, and that he actually gave us a story of how he got started what he was doing. And at that point, his job, his role, or his, his goal of trading was mainly to replace his current income through trading options. So I think he's, he's come a long way since then, as a trader, and just emotionally and as a person. So, guys, welcome. And Matt, thank you again, for coming on board the team, it's been really awesome to work with you and to see you take the reins, and you know, it's only made the company stronger and better, and our customers are loving it. So they're really excited. Matt I really appreciate that Alan, you know, I couldn't be more excited. I mean, I have a real passion for this. And it's a real dream to, to do a job and and really fulfill that passion. So thank you. Allen Yep, yeah, I mean, you know, one of my mentors had told me he's like, you know, in your programs, you should have a lot more interaction with the, with the students. And I'm like, I don't have time for that. He goes, well, then you need to get a coach, we need to get some other coaches on board. And I'm like, Okay, where do I find these people? They're like, don't you have students? I'm like, yeah. You know, but they're all trying to retire. Like, they'll try to quit their jobs. He goes, No, I bet you there's some that are really good at teaching. They're really love people. And they would be happy to do this on a full time basis, or even like a part time basis, and just help other people. And I was like, huh, and I thought about that about and Matt was like almost one of the first people I thought of and I'm like, Hey, let me give him a call. And I'm sure he came out of the blue for you. And you were shocked. Matt So I mean, I really enjoy, I really enjoy helping people at the core of my being. And, you know, I just love seeing the light go off in people's minds when they see a trade and they see it work out and they see that everything's a possibility, just like it was for me. So I'm really excited to be part of it. Cool. And then Margaret a this question is for you. So he comes, he comes to you and says, Hey, you know, I've been working at Costco for I don't know, what, 1415 years or something. Yeah. And he's like, he's like, I just got this other job offer. I'm gonna What do you think? Yeah. Margaret There's a whole story. There's a whole nother story. When he got that call, because I mean, we were definitely both shocked. But I think what you just said reminded me of what a good coach Matt was before he even worked at Option Genius. Because when we we started at let's say, when we got married seven years ago, we we were both on the same page about being financially free. And what what does that look like? Matt was definitely more of a researcher in terms of he would read a book, he would, he would give it to me. And so I think we were on, we've been on board on the same page, what to do. And then when we found you, and started learning your methods, we both latched on to it. So when you caught him, I think I was just excited because I knew it was something he really wanted to do. I had already seen him in a coaching role with me and his mom and his sister of trying to like the backend stuff, right? The things that are the charts, the systems, getting your platform set up. Those are things that are challenging and takes a lot of time. And so I was like, I think I was super excited. I knew he could do it. I knew it'd be great at it. And so I just thank you for giving him the opportunity because it's really been wonderful for him to do this thing that he loves anyway. I mean, he was already before he worked for you, in the mornings before he would go to work. Its full time job was studying and learning. And so, yeah, it just was really exciting. Thank you for that. I guess we had the trust, right. The trust was already there. So. Allen Okay. Yeah, now he's doing wonderful. And, you know, he's gonna be trading at the hedge fund as well when that happened. So that's going to be exciting. So a whole new level. So awesome. Cool. All right. So let's get into you guys. All right, so the trading couple and it's not just I know for Matt, you know, he's not just a trading couple. He's got the whole trading family going on there. He told me that he and his wife and his mom and his sister all get together and have trade night. What is that? Matt So it just kind of started, you know, my, my parents live in South Carolina, we're in Georgia, and my sister is up in Massachusetts. And it was a good way. They were always interested in what I was doing. And they always wanted to learn what I was doing. So it just became natural that I would say, hey, let's just have a call. And we'll talk about it. And then I showed them how to, you know, do the platform, and you know, they had all their feelings about whether they're going to do it correctly. And all the all the fears, just like I had when I started, and I was like, Okay, well, we just started going through it. And we started meeting kind of regularly on Fridays. And it was usually Friday, like, nine 930 in the morning. And we'd meet for about an hour and we talk about it. And then it just kind of progressed and was like okay, let's do this next Friday, okay, let's do the next Friday, let's do the next Friday, next Friday, and then just became we'd call it trade top Fridays. And you know, and then started being like, if we miss one, you know, let's say my sister couldn't make it. She'd be upset, like, Oh, I gotta I gotta make it or my mother missed it, she would be upset. So we, we were there every day, you know, and then Margaret would come in here and there and it just kind of evolved. So it was really a really great experience. And then it kept us really connected. I mean, in ways that I wouldn't think you know.. Margaret And you get to learn other parts of your family members and their personalities that you didn't know before. Allen Mm hmm. I can imagine. Yeah. I mean, people's personality comes out when they're like, frustrated, or when they're Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. You were saying that a little bit earlier that your mom kind of surprised you, you know, going all aggressive on you. Matt She still does. I mean, there's like, I'm just like, you know, she'll tell us like, Oh, she did something. And then she'll like, say to my sister, oh, I got out of this trade. She's like you did? What? How do you get out of that trade? You didn't tell me about it? And it's like, yeah, they're like, they go back and forth. But it's all in solid, good. You know? Margaret Yeah, once she has the parameters, then she, she'll get a little bit more risky that she said, a differentiated, she told us it's like she's at a different age where she feels like she can take a little different risk than we can. Yeah. So it makes it makes a difference. Matt That's interesting. It also goes back and forth. I mean, my sister, she put on a trade, she was getting into a new trade that we're doing. And then my mother was like, kind of hesitant about getting into it. And my sister just went ahead and did it. And then my mother's like, Oh, I'm gonna, I'm gonna, like hours later, she she's like, I'm like, what happened? She's like, Oh, I put a trade on. Like, because my sister went ahead and did it. So they kind of play off each other. So Allen that's cool. Because normally, it's the opposite. You know, it's like, the older you get, the more conservative is like, oh, no, I don't want to lose that or lose. The younger people take more risk, but over here are flipped. That's pretty cool. Yeah. Yeah. But that I love it, how you're using something to bond, you know. And it's so rare nowadays, especially everybody's spread out across the country. It's like, oh, yeah, we get together on Thanksgiving. Yeah. Okay. Great. You guys get together every week. That's I love it. That's, that's wonderful. Yeah. I think more families need to find something in common like that. And like trading? Yeah. I mean, because the way we do it, everybody can find their own little niche, you know, yeah. Everybody can be conservative or aggressive or whatever. And yeah, I love it. Cool. So, um, how did you guys get into trading? Matt Oh, well, I mean, it was always long term for me. So I was learning about long term investing through reading and then while we actually, Margaret yeah, since you were 29, he started investing. And then we went to one seminar together. And there was a man who was sitting next to us, and he said, uh, you could self manage your portfolio. And we looked at each other and we're like, never worry, That's too scary. It's too risky. We gotta leave that to the professionals. There's reason that people get paid money to do that. And he made it seem like it was no big deal at all. And I think he was he, yeah, that was a pivotal point. And then after that, We went to a couple other seminars together. And then I think the the really the one that we learned about options was three years ago. And at that one, we I had never even heard the term option. I didn't know what an option was. We went to go find out about long term investing and how to value stocks in order to know if it's a good purchase or not. And then at that seminar, we just sat back and because they showed us how to do an option, and and then after that we met found you and he because he was looking for people who did a similar strategy. And then it after we Yeah, so that's how we got into it. Matt Right. And they, they basically started this seminar off with an option. And we're like, Oh, I thought we were coming here to long term invest. And I didn't, you know, we didn't know anything, how options work. We're trying to figure out how it did right there. And then this guy's like, Oh, I just made $7,000. And you're like, show me how you're just like, whatever you just did, like you have my attention. How did you do that? And I was like, on a, I was possessed to figure it out. I mean, Margaret, she's smarter than I am. In some ways, yes, definitely. She was like, this is a funnel, like, marketing, marketing funnel and Margaret figure it all out. And thanks for just calm down. Matt It's just she sat back, I'll relax. And I was like, I'm trying to figure it out. And but we progressed. And, you know, it really opened the whole a whole new world, really. And then, you know, we met you. Margaret And it's just a progression to back up to because that's where we started trading with our family with his mom and sister. So after we learned that strategy, and we were all trading together, that's where the, the trade top Fridays came from. So that was kind of a cool thing that came from that. Allen Okay, so from the beginning, you guys were like, Okay, we're doing this together. It's not like, you know, because Margaret, you have your own company. And if anybody wants to know, she does great videography, and photos for real estate agents, and you guys are located where? Margaret Just north of Atlanta. Allen Just north of Atlanta. So if any realtors are out there. Margaret And I'm glad you mentioned that, because honestly, the reason I want to trade is because I am getting older. I've been a creative for 20 years, and the old body isn't getting any younger. So at some point, I will not be able to schlep video gear and photography gear around, and I want to have some home, what gives me the security and knowing that I can bring in my paycheck that I'm accustomed to it on my own. But we definitely talk about our strategies together. Allen Right, exactly. So, okay, so But you said like, okay, so he's working full time you have your business, but you guys still decided, hey, we're gonna go this road together, we're gonna learn together, we're gonna go the seminars together, we're gonna talk about it. And then do you guys trade in the same account together? Or is it separate? How does that work? Matt We kind of did in the beginning. And then we realized that it was best to have separate accounts, we do everything we talk about everything together. It's just I think that's really smart. Everyone's different. But I think for us, it works that we have separate accounts, because it kind of gives you the flexibility for the trading the fit your personality, and everyone's personalitie's different, you know, even though we're married, we're different personalities. So that reflects in that account, I think. Margaret And the cool part is, we both fund each other's accounts. So when there's money that we have to put into the account to get it started, we weren't going at an equal pace, if that makes sense. Matt Right. So like, for example, I would get a bonus from Costco, I'd split that bonus, put it into our account separately, she would get a bonus, she would put that money into our accounts, and then we're trading the strategies under those two accounts. Allen Okay, so do you have any joint money like a joint account? Margaret Not for not in a brokerage account? No. I mean, we're, we're each other's beneficiaries. But yeah, right. And I think part of that, too, Alan comes from me at I was not married for 36 years, and I am very customed to taking care of myself and producing my own income, and having my own money, you know, just to be quite frank about it. I want to make sure that I can take care of myself if anything ever happened to Matt, but we definitely we know what each other's logins are. We know what the money's in there. So that part's very open. It's not like they don't share the information. But I think that's a good point about having a different trading style because I am a little more aggressive than Matt is, and we learned that we didn't know that going in, but I will jump into things a little quicker than he does and he wants to be Yeah, wants to have all the information. Matt Those are things we learned about it To think that I was not as conservative as I am. But I realized that I'm a very conservative trader. I like to know everything about everything before I jump in, and sometimes that can hinder you, Margaret, she's like, let's get to it. Let's figure it out. And she jumps in. And I'm really admire that part of her. I really do. Margaret And as long as it works out, Matt she's I say she's measured, you know, she doesn't just jump into things. She's measured about it. Allen Yeah. But like, Margaret, what you said about the, you know, having, I guess, I don't know, for for a lot of women, it's a it's a fear. But it's also about a sense of security. And a lot of our customers are, you know, are the customers that come to us, and they come in, they're like, you know, my spouse doesn't want me trading, or when my spouse would rather have me working, because that paycheck comes in regular. I remember when I first started, even, even though I was, in the beginning, I was horrible. I lost a lot of my wife's money. But after I got good at it, she still was not comfortable with the trading, because she would be like, Okay, I don't know, if you're going to make money every month, you know? Because that's just the way it is. And so she's like, Can you do something pleased to have something regular come in? And that's probably the biggest motivation behind the company option genius. Was that, hey, even if I have a little bit, you know, obviously, I'm supposed to be a small little one person company. And is like, even if I have a little bit like, like a, you know, like, five $6,000 coming in a month. Okay, cool. She'll know that, you know, because she still wanted to work. So she knows something's coming in. But that's, that's just, I think it's ingrained in a lot of spouses that are not generating an income on their own that, hey, I need some consistency. So that's been a big for a lot of people. That's a big, you know, switch. Like to go from Yeah, my wife my husband makes or my wife makes x dollars per month to Yeah, I don't know, if he's gonna make any money. Margaret Yeah, I can see how that would be difficult. Because I mean, we're still both bringing in incomes and trading at the same time. Yeah. Matt Yeah, it's a big shift, a mindset shift. But I think the thing about trading is that, you know, when you're working a static job, you have that income, like you said, it's coming in monthly, you can rely on it. But the real benefit of trading, I think, is that you don't see used to see money as you exchange your paycheck for time. And in trading. You can just, you can just make money, and you don't have to sit there for that time. No, it's, you look as money is finite, in your mind, okay? When you look at trading, you work with trading, it's like, it just opens up to you. Margaret It's more of an energy like it goes out comes and goes out. Exactly. Yeah. Matt So I'm trying to say, Allen interesting. That's a good way to look at it. Yeah. So then have this written down? Okay, I'm gonna ask it or I don't know if which one of you is a better trader? Margaret So how do you define better? Allen I guess, who makes the most money? Matt I will say that I wrote this in a lot of books. And I believe that to be true as a women's are much better emotionally, as traders, I believe that I really do because guys are gonna over are like our macho, we just gotta just get in there and do it. And, you know, but in general, I think women are much, much better emotional trading style. Margaret I will just say last year, Matt made more money than I did. But this year, I've made more money than Matt did. So there you go.. Matt But I'm built for the long. Nothing short term with me. We actually nickname each other Margaret's short term, and I'm on long term, Margaret Yeah, I like short term, you know, I'm an entrepreneur. So I like to see things happen in a timely fashion. I live and breathe it, you know. And so I had do struggle with the long term stuff. One day, I would be curious to see what it would like be like to do long term put that. We'll see about that, you know, I like I like the shorter term gains. Matt But yeah, I mean, that's all part of your personality. So we I think we play off each other very well, you know? Yeah. Allen Yeah. It seems like you guys have a good balance. So then, like, if there's a disagreement, then how do you guys handle that? Or is it just, you know, you do whatever you want your account? I'll do whatever I want to my account. Margaret Yeah, well, we talk about what strike prices we're going to be at, and where, you know, kind of idea of what we both want to do. And then we may be a couple points different from each other. Matt Yeah, but we stay within the rules. And I think you know, the great thing about the strategies that you teach and that we've learned is that there's some flexibility in that, okay, as you get better as a trader, it's just not the rules, right? You know, it's just not like, Oh, get out here. And that's it, there's a little bit of flexibility, I think as you get better as a trader, you get more experienced behind you, you're able to kind of fudge the lines a little bit, if you will, not in a bad way, but be like, okay, you know, I know this, I have a little more experience, I can become a better trader. So it's like, that's the whole flexibility part. Margaret Right. And I think, too, just just thinking about how sometimes Matt will stay in a trade longer than me, and I'll get out quicker. Here's a good example. So this month, in our oil trading, I have tripled up, I've gotten in and gotten out three times, and he stayed in the whole time. You know, and I know, during the classes, there's a couple of other people in our class, when we're on the queue that do the same thing. And then some people will sit and so I think it just depends, and I don't know that it would work as well. For us, if we had one account, I just love having our separate accounts, where we get to talk about what we're gonna do and then have the freedom to.. Matt I think the key is that we talk about it. Yeah, I mean, if you don't talk about things between each other, it's just not gonna work. Yeah. So you're like, Okay, you're gonna go that at least I know about it, right. And then you can see how it works out, right. And then at least you know, what, what's going on, you know, it's different, if you just have a count, and you're just doing your own thing, and you're not talking about it. Margaret The, the emotions part is very real. And I don't think you can really understand that until you start to become a trader, and you see where the trade is. And you get to know yourself better, where in the beginning, we were a lot quicker to get out of a trade if it went a certain way. And now we've learned a little bit more of the rhythms, we know each other's rhythms. And so we don't we don't freak out either way, quite as much. Matt: But you got to look at it. Like in totality. I mean, nothing's the end of the world. Right? And with trading, you may lose money, and you probably will, okay, everybody's lost money. And experience is not cheap. Right? With that happening. It's, it's okay, you know, if nothing is, you treat money as, okay, you can be lost, and it can be one. And the whole idea of trading is getting consistent as a whole thing. And it's like, as you get better and better as a trader, I really believe in my core, you try everyone's trying to build that consistency. Okay, and you have to match your personality to that consistency Margaret: Do you also mean make money? Because that's my goal. Matt: Yes, consistently, or us to make money. But you need to be consistent to do that. Allen: So yeah. Well, like I say, In the beginning, it's not about making money. In the beginning, it's just about not losing money. So knowing what you do properly. And like, even if you don't make any money, that's okay. But you don't lose it month after month after month. Okay, I know, it's annoying, but that's a good thing. And then, you know, we could just do a little tweak here and there, and then then the the profits start taking off. So I totally agree with that. And see, because a lot of people that sell options, they'll tell you, Oh, yeah, you know, I have great months, and then I have a big loss. And then I have good months and have nobody wants to be on that roller coaster. Because eventually you're like, man, what am I doing? Matt: I mean, do you want to go make money in the beginning of the year, at the end of the year, you've lost money or just break even? It's, that's frustrating, you know? So the whole goal is to, you know, especially what you said in the beginning, it's very true. Yeah. Allen: So now you guys said that communication was key. So do you have any rules around that? Do you have like, do you like get together and say, okay, besides the trade trade talk, you know, when you have that, do you actually sit down and be like, alright, half an hour debrief, what do we do this week? How are we going to improve? Or is it just, Matt: I think I know what you're gonna go to. I think, I think, for us, and this is just for us, but a big part. And a lot of people think it's a dirty word. But a budget, we always had a budget always kept us in line, you know, and it's like, whenever we've kind of rapidly spending, you know, and aren't talking about trading, we're just talking about life and your budget, it always get us back on the road, so to speak. So that was a big piece of our communication. So it's just knowing that we're kind of on the road. So I think that flows into your trading and it flows into your communication. So I think that's a really big piece. Margaret: Yeah. And I would say like specific rules about communicating around trading, we've never said anything. It's just kind of happened organically. And we will, you know, there's there certain parameters that you teach in your class and we get in at a certain time and when we do that, we will talk to each other that day, and then we check it both together, generally in the morning, and we'll just kind of go Oh, or Yeah, and commit Write together or celebrate together. And then that I think, I guess that's the organic piece. We just check in with each other in the morning. Matt: Be like, Fine, quick text during the day, you know? Yeah. Margaret: Yeah. Because Matt is watching it for his day job. And he'll text me if something, you know, hey, keep your as open. This is happening or, but yeah, so I guess that's it like we wake up in the morning. We look at it, we chat about it, and then throughout the day, he'll text me. Or maybe if I'm doing something, I'll text him and say, Hey, have you seen? And he always says yes. But yeah, that's it. Okay, Allen: Cool. So what happens when one of you wins and the other loses? Matt: That's a good question. Well, yeah, I've lost before I've lost my I lost. I lost before. And oh, yeah. Oh. Yeah Margaret: Jog my memory. Okay. So I'm going to just tell myself here in the beginning, before we found your class, and I'm not just saying this, because this is true. So it's just true. We cannot say how much of course we lost $5,000. So $5,000 is, is a lot of work for me. And I, I am the one who had funded it that month, to the account, and Matt lost it. And we we realized then, that that was really tough. That was tough on me, it was tougher on me than it was him. And actually, our trade talk Fridays, were really good, because they had also lost the money. And I had lost a little bit, but not as much. We were all just really disheartened and frustrated. And I think I think I was a little mean was a little mean, Matt: Slightly slightly. Are you sure you can do this? Well, yeah, feel the weight of that. Right. Yeah. I mean, if you're not, your wife's out there, she's, she's busting her butt to bring in money, and then you just lose it. It's a lot of you feel the way that, you know, you gotta really dig deep and be like, okay, emotionally and you know, everything about to have the confidence to keep going, right? And you got to search and really believe in yourself that you can, you know, like I said, it's not the end of the world, but you have to get through there gonna be times like that. That happened. Margaret: It made me quit trading for a couple months. Yeah, I got really nervous. And then I said, okay, and then actually, that's is that that's about the time we found oil, wasn't it? Like we found oil sometime after that? It seemed to be a little exactly what you're talking about earlier, it wasn't as much of a roller coaster. And that has changed it for me. Allen: Okay, so was there anything else besides finding that strategy that was able to get you through it? Because like, I mean, emotionally, that's a it's a big hit. Right? And did anything change between the way you guys communicated the way you guys traded? Matt: No, I think Margaret took a little hiatus. I'm the type that I never, I never give up on thanks, I will just take it to the death, you know. I'm like, I just keep going no matter what, just get out of my way. No matter how many hits I take, I just keep going. And I leave it all on the table. So I just I knew I was going to keep going. But again, the key and I don't be, Margaret: but you. You did try it a little more conservatively? Didn't you? Matt: Sure. Yeah. I mean, you learn your lessons, you get burned out a little bit, you start to kind of, you know, you remember and you're like, Okay, I don't want to have those same feelings. But let me cautiously kind of figure it, learn from your mistakes, if you will, you know, and treat a little bit more conservative pay a little more attention. What can I learn from that experience? And I think that changes everything. Of course, you know, the strategies that we do, are a lot better, like I'm able to manage our trades so much better. I think that's important. Margaret: I think that's key. And I think that's key for me, knowing interesting that we have better management strategy now makes me feel a lot more secure, and a lot less emotional, and more. What's the word? I'm looking for sure. That Matt and I can both do the trades and not lose that $1,000 chunks anymore. Matt: More confident? Yeah. And I think I've read this before, and I really believe it is that you are your first really job is to become your risk assessor. And then you're a trader. Yeah. So it's like it's really important that you this all we do is assess risk all the time. So I think it's really important to, to focus on that. And once you get better at assessing risk and managing, just become a better trader, but you just kind of have to go through those things. I mean, when I first started trading, they're like, Okay, your first loss is your best loss. And I was like, what does that mean? They don't want to lose you. And like, they said it all the time, like, Oh, your first last year about like, Who is this person? Like, why did he say that to me? I don't want to lose. But it is true. Like, it teaches you things that you just, you think, you know, you like, oh, yeah, I'm gonna get out of that trade, I know what I'm doing. And then you get burned. Everyone's got to touch the stove, apparently, at some point, you know, it's like, Oh, don't touch the stove. It's hot. But of course, we gotta go touch it. But that's just life. I mean, and it's how you react to those situations, I think. And you don't you don't tell yourself that you're not? How are you going to respond to that? Is very important. You know, in all aspects of life as a trader anything. Allen: I mean, a lot of people, you could say that, but it's not as easy when you're going through it. You know, the first time Oh, first time you do it, it's like, ah, people behave in all crazy different ways. Matt: Yeah. Yeah, it's just, you're gonna have to, I guess this, the best way is to do the best you can to bring people through that experience. All right, you can tell them that it's it probably will happen. But how you react to that situation? It's good to kind of tell your future. Margaret: We're model citizens is that? Allen: Well, I mean, they say that, you know, most divorces are caused because of money issues and problems. Yeah. You know, and a lot of people do not see eye to eye on money. And they don't talk about it before they get married. They don't talk about their goals, visions, whatever, or even how to balance it, you know, like, oh, yeah, one is a budget person. One is a non budget, I'm going to spend whatever I can, but it's like, a lot of people have these issues. And it's, it's great to see that you guys are same page, you know, same goal, same like, okay, hey, you guys talked about it ahead of time. Yeah, like, this is our vision. This is the goal. How do we get there, we'll change you know, like, we'll go on a different path. And we'll try and we'll try this. And like, you guys first started with the passive trading course. Right? It puts in the calls and, and then you say, Okay, let's graduate to something else. So then you guys added the oil program. And then you guys have been doing that. So you just added to something. Now you guys have even you know, got you got your own Airbnb now. So congratulations on that. Margaret: Thank you. Allen: So you're diversifying? So yeah, you're trying different things. And nobody says that you can't right. So you should you should work and in us every strategy available to get to whatever your your dream is. So in that sense, you guys have done a bunch of different things. How do you handle it when you disagree? Margaret: Like disagree on? Allen: On the path, disagree on maybe a tray disagree on let's say, you guys did the Airbnb? Maybe Matt would be like, yeah, no, I don't want to do that. And I want to put more money into trading account. Because we already know we're doing well here. Matt: I hate to disappoint. But I don't think we disagree on too much. If we do, it's like, you know, we do. I'm not saying it's easy enough. I mean, marriage is not easy. But we have their situations, I think it's important to you just you take a pause. You kind of realize how you're dealing with it personally, how you're, what you're thinking, what you're you're feeling, and then you come back to that person and you talk about it. Margaret: I think to just thinking about our investments so far, we do things that we are confident in our knowledge base around so I've had a real estate license for five years. And I shoot real estate and I understand real estate. So when I said Hey, Matt, let's buy this, Airbnb. He was like, Okay, sounds like a good investment. You've done the numbers. I trust you. Matt: Yeah, I do. I trust that she's, I've seen it, she's she's in that field, she does the work. She's always trying to figure it out. And I, their word really is trust. I trust her that she's going to do the best she can with it. Margaret: And I think it's about Yeah, I think it's likewise to you, because I trust that he's, he's read. If you could say our library of books, it's literally every book I've ever heard of on finance and investing. And multiple copies probably down. And so I think, I think it all comes back down to we, we because we both feel like we have studied different things. You know, and now Matt learns more about real estate and I, I give him all the credit because I always was interested in retirement and investing but I didn't know where to get started. And so because he had a knowledge base, he kind of brought me up a little bit faster than if I had then what I was able to do on my own right. So that's powerful. And then because I already trusted him so much and then we got to go to all the seminars together. It just build that built that foundation and so now we really don't disagree on Matt: I think part of also is like, I never wanted to push that on Margaret. Yeah, like my interest, right? I have interest in finance. I never wanted to push that it's an interest of mine. Real estates and interests of her. She doesn't push that on me. I don't push that on her. So it was, it becomes organic when you are you, you're interested in yourself, right? You're like, okay, you know, Matt's doing something. I'm interested in that I want to see a little bit more, but it comes from her. It doesn't come from me telling her Oh, you got to check this out. You should check this out. Yeah, that's important. But ultimately, it's gonna be her decision. Right? Yeah, Margaret: You start to for me, I started doing the numbers. Whoa, you can make this on a trade in two minutes. And I make this on how many? How many hours? Does it take me? Yeah, that's a no brainer. Allen: Cool. Okay, so now, so a lot of our customers they've been through. And unfortunately, like, they've gone on a path similar to yours. But I would say that you guys, you know, if you've, if you only started trading, like three years ago, you guys have taken a shorter route than a lot of our customers. Really? Yeah. So they've been trading for multiple years, still trying to figure out like, Hey, how can I make this work? How can I become consistent, profitable, I've tried, you know, XYZ strategy, and this and this, and this, and they've bought cores, and they've been videos and seminars, and, and they still are looking for that something, to get them over the hump, to get them to be like, Oh, finally, I'm actually making some money. Finally, like you said, they're confident that they can, you know, the month is going to start, I have a strategy that works. I'm confident I'll probably make money this month. But they're still not there yet. And because of that, because of them, you know, trying and investing in course, investing in Seminar investing in another doohickey. You know, they have all the things you can buy, like, Oh, hey, you know, that you can buy this indicator, and the indicator will tell you exactly when to buy and when to sell is only $3,000. You know, they're like, Okay, I'm gonna get that, you know, they get it and then they don't doesn't work. And then the wife or the other or the husband, either way, the spouse is like, I can't believe you're wasting all this time, all this energy, all this money on this trading stuff when he doesn't frickin work. You know, you've been trying for years, and it's just not working. It's all a big scam. Right? And that's the big girl. Yeah, it's a big scam that nobody can do this. So what advice or tips or anything? Would you suggest for a trader in that position where their spouse is maybe not very receptive to them continuing to trade? Where the spouse is like, you know, can you just give this up? You know, just spend time with me? Just, you know, Matt: Yeah. I'm gonna let you go first. And I'll go after. Margaret: Okay? Because we, we were not in that specific scenario, I just keep going back to it has to be the trust. So how are you going to build trust with your partner, not when they don't know what you're going through? And then I would say you would have to have some sort of mentor, and to be honest, that is you that that is you for us. Right? So we I remember, when I got the calculator that you sent out of this is where if you this is what you need in order to make the monthly income that you want on the percentage of money, and this is how much money you need in your account. And you've done it, like you've gone before us, we know it can be possible. So we're trusting that what you say is true. And we've seen it and especially now that that works for you. So I think finding somebody that you can put that trust into and having if your partner is not going to be in that with you, at least show them who that is that you're learning from or what they've done. And if if it's if it's not Alan Sama, then make sure that they've got a good record of what they've done. So that, that your partner can have trust in that you're learning from somebody that is credible. You know, the first thing we learned from had learned down the road from somebody who had learned from Warren Buffett, and so, you know, I don't really care about names of people, that doesn't impress me, but when you actually know something that impresses me, and that gives me the assurance to bet on myself. And that's what I would say, would be my advice. Matt: Yeah, I mean, I always went into investing, especially as I, you know, started to learn about options. I was like, I don't want to hear about oh, you can make all this money. You can do all this and everything's going great. I wanted to go and be like, show me how to do it. Right. And then once you show me how to do it, I believe you. And that's just who I am. And I think most people maybe are like that they want proof and they but more importantly they want to be be able to do it themselves, some people don't. But if you're into this and you want to learn, and you have to go into mindset be like, show me how to do it. And then you get the confidence that you can do it yourself, and then you can be able to teach other people. Allen: Okay, nice. Next question I have here is that you guys have been doing this for a little bit together? Are there anything thinking back that you would do differently? So basically, the question is, like, you know, are there any tips that you would give to a couple starting out? Or lesson or something that you felt? You know what, we didn't do that? Right? Maybe we should have done it differently? Margaret: I would. I know that $10,000 was a lot for us, when we bought into your class. It was 100% worth it. And I wish that we would have done that first. Matt: Yes, I think in this world, you know, you don't want to believe it, but you really pay for what you get. You know, it's a hard truth. Lots of people want to be like, oh, I want this for, you know, low money, or I want this, but you got to really look at is it? What's the worth of it? Right? Is it going to be? Margaret: And are you willing to do the work? Matt: Are you willing to do the work? That's a lot of people like, I think the advice I give people is like the least tell yourself before you think something is not worthy, or it doesn't go up to your expectations, at least go through and do the work of what has been laid before you. Okay, so you have all these lessons, and you have all everything, but you have to can you really tell yourself that you put on all the work, when you haven't gone through the class, when you haven't gone through all the, you know, really dug deep to get everything out of it, then you can say whether you want to continue or not, whether it was a failure, whether it was not at least do that. And I think it's important for people that start out, set aside a small amount of money, right? And maybe agree that, okay, if you lose this small amount of money, it's a good idea. Fine, it didn't work out. But at least you agreed on that. And then give it a shot. Yeah. Right. And then maybe if it didn't work out, and you want to go further, we examined it at that point. That way, you know, it's not like a, I lost everything. And it's the end of the world type scenario. At least I gave it a try. You know, I followed my dreams to figure out this on my own. And if you at least put in the effort, you can tell yourself, Margaret: I would like to give your wife major kudos. Since you said you lost a lot of money in the beginning. That's a good woman to keep if she kept supporting you to go forward. Allen: Yeah, yeah, I'm, I'm very blessed. I am amazingly blessed. So I just give you a short version of the story. I had just been laid off. And so the question was, and we had just been married recently. And so the idea was, Okay, do I go and get another job? Or do I try something else? And, you know, I had been dabbling with trading. But I was like, maybe I could do this full time. So she's like, Okay, if you think you can do it, go for it. And, of course, I did not have any money. She had money from that she had saved up from working for several years before we got married. So she's like, you know, I have all this in savings. You know, try it. And so then she got a second job to support us. So because I wasn't making anything, so she got the second job. And she's working. She was a nurse. So she was working like three days a week at the at the hospitals, 12 hour shifts. And then on the other day, she would be, they have this thing called home health, where the nurse actually shows up to your house. So she would be driving around town, going from place to place to place, you know, giving injections and IVs and medicines and all that stuff. So very draining, especially with all the traffic and everything. And yeah, and I proceeded to try everything like day trading and futures and forex and commodity options and everything is like nothing was working. And I was down over 40 grand. When I finally actually, I think what turned it around was that she found out because I was hiding it from her. Like I wasn't telling ya that she came on to check the mail. She checked the statement. She's like, where's all the money? Oh, like, oh, yeah, about that. So it was either Yeah, you know, it's like, okay, either go to go get a job right away. Turn this around. Or, you know, if you don't do one of those things, we're probably getting split, right. So I was planning like, I was getting my resume ordered together. And then I found selling options. Like I discovered that Hey, there, there was a trade I did that was actually it worked. And I'm like, Well, what is this? Let me follow up more and then I got into it and I showed her how to do it. She was like, Okay, you have something here. So you'd like you said I did Didn't I put like all the money aside? You know, I stopped playing with all the money. And I took a small amount. And I'm like, Okay, let me see if I could just do something with this, instead of the big amount. And that gave her pause, like, okay, fine, you know, he's not gonna lose all the money. And if I lost that money, then yeah, go get another job. And that's it, end of story. But luckily, I showed her she understood it, it started working. And then you know, then the rest is history from there. Margaret: I can imagine there's some pretty real feelings going on around that. That's Allen: Very stressful. Yeah, very, very stressful. Because she wanted to know what I was doing. But she didn't have any background in finance. You know, her family never talked about investing or anything. So she didn't really know anything about it. Slowly, slowly, I started telling her. And then the funny part is, she would come home, like, and she'd be like, Oh, hey, she got interested, right? And she would come home and she goes, Hey, I checked the news and the markets up today. And I'm like, Yeah, but I'm, you know, I'm in. I'm in calls today. Oh, there she goes, Oh, no, oh, that's too bad. You know? And then two days later, she'd be like, Oh, look, I checked in the markets down today. I'm like, No. I mean, Puts today. She would like she did, she wouldn't know if I'm gonna be happy or sad. But she was nuts. But yeah, so and then after a while, then it got good. And like I said, you know, she wanted that stability. She didn't want that up and down. She's like, I need something stable income, so I can quit the second job, take okay. And then she was able to quit the first job. And then so it worked out. But yeah, it was a long, hard road. And I did not have the mentor that you mentioned, you know, so that was one of the probably the biggest things that if I could have found somebody that could have just pulled my hand be like, here, this works, just follow this plan. Margaret: You know, that's why we got to shortcut it. Yeah. Allen: But.. Matt: I think that is a hard thing. Because you're always trying to search for, you know, they're always there numerous or many mentors out in the world, it's like, is trying to find who's true, right? That's it's very difficult. And you you have a guard up, everyone's got their guard up. And they're always kind of like, is this person trying to take me or, you know, I don't feel right about this person, I maybe feel right about this person. I mean, just look at FTX. I mean, that guy that was like darling, and crypto. And then they find out he's, he's, you know, a Bernie Madoff. So it's like, it happens over and over again. So that's kind of how I got into trading. I was like, show me how to do it, and see if it worked, right. And you're not only a mentor, but you show people how to do it. And then you can build trust in yourself, rather than, you know, of course, a mentor is wonderful. And it will shortcut that process. But you can learn about this stuff. And then you, you make yourself your own mentor in a way, you know, it's like you just kind of be like, Okay, I have the confidence now. And then you can go on. Allen: Yeah, I think it all comes down to confidence too. Because like, if I look at it, you know, we have several students that in any strategy that you pick one strategy, and then there's somebody there that's been like, Oh, hey, I did you know this much percent? And I'm like, wow, that's better than me. And there's another strategy. Oh, I did this much. And I'm like that better than me. And I know that, like, what everybody's doing better than me what's going on? You know, but I think that's part of it is the confidence. There's like, and this will tell you something about me, like, you know, I came up with the rules, right? So I came up with the test and testing it and failing, and I forgot what they call it. But it's like, you know, you, you try something and then you fail, and you try and you're failing, you chaired it. So in my mind, you know, all these rules are made by me. Right? So I was like, I don't know how much I can, you know, like, really? I'm gonna trust myself. I don't know. It's scary. But then somebody else comes and goes, Oh, Allen, you know, he's the man. He knows what he's doing. I'm just gonna go 100%. And they do. They do better than me. And I'm like, I don't get it. Matt: redo my rules. Allen: I just need to, I just, like, forget it. I just give you guys my money's like here. Matt: But I mean, in all seriousness, as well, I mean, people, they come in these programs, and everyone has so much to add. I mean, that's how you get better. I mean, there's people that are just like, oh, yeah, I did this way. And you're like, Oh, I didn't think about that. And it's like, if you're open to that, and you receive that, then it makes everything better for everybody. And I've seen that over and over again, where somebody will just say, Oh, I found this way to do this easier. It's like it's constant learning. All of us are constantly learning constantly getting better constantly trying to achieve and go go better. And that's a wonderful thing. Allen: Yep. Yeah, we had an hour. Just recently, we in our passive trading group, somebody had put like, Hey, I don't know how to do this. And I'm pretty sure it's in it's in the core somewhere. But then another student was like, oh, here, let me make you a video. And he just made a video. Yeah, this is how I did it. It's like, Oh, wow. And they asked another Oh, how about this, he made another video. It's just, you know, everybody's helping each other because we all have the same goal. And it's like, Let's just all work together. And, you know, we're all on the same path. Matt: Yeah, it's like, it's always true, you surround yourself with the right people, and good things will happen. I mean, it's just just got to be able to do that, Allen: you know, it's like, amazing, we had some really cool students, helpful, you know, just to go out of the way for each other. It's really, really nice. So then, okay, so my last question for you guys. And I don't know, maybe you guys like, maybe this is a problem that we've seen people have, but I don't know if you guys are gonna be able to answer it. But how can a trader have their spouse support them in their trading? So like, you know, if, you know, one of you is the trader, or you want to do something, how can you get your spouse to have that confidence in you? That you can do it? Does that make sense? Yeah. Because like, I know, with my wife, in the beginning, she didn't have any confidence. And then later on, you know, the numbers kind of spoke for themselves. But one of the things I did was when the back testing software came out that we that we use a lot, I showed it to her. And she was like, Oh, cool. I want to learn this, too. So we would sit there, and I gave her the rules. I think we were talking about credit spreads at the time. It's like, okay, so this is kind of how we find a trade. And I didn't have like, first set out rules yet. It was just, you know, ideas. I try, sometimes they do this way, that way. And so then I had her and I told her what it was. And we would look at a chart and be like, okay, hey, what do you what's the trade? And so she would pick her trade? And then, you know, we would we would go through it. And then I had already done it my way, you know, and it would always come out where she was actually more profitable than me. Same trade, same stock, same timeframe, if we had done it her way, we would have made more money. That's the thing about the confidence. He knows, like, when you see your wife who doesn't know anything, she just numbers, you know, she doesn't matter. It's like, I don't know, maybe I'm not cut out for this. But then, but then later on, there was a time where I got into like, a, like a rut, you know, so I wasn't I wasn't following the rules, the discipline became a problem. Because our trading doesn't take a lot of time. And so when you're just, you know, stuck, you don't have anything else to do, you kind of start over trading, and you're messing around with stuff. And so I had her, and she came, she's the one that came up with this. She's like, you know what, every single trade, you're going to write it down. And you're going to tell me, and I'm going to come upstairs at one o'clock every day, I'm going to ask you questions about every single trade, you know, and I forget exactly what they were. But it's in one of our products. It's like, you know, what's the goal? What's the plan? You're going to adjust it or you're going to get out when you're going to do it? Where's it now? And why haven't you done what you're supposed to do? You know, and so because of that, because I knew she was going to come? Right? I would have everything ready before she came in. So if I had to get out of a trade because it was down or I needed to do an adjustment, it will already be done by the time she got in. And so that degree of holding me accountable. It really I mean the results just went skyrocketing higher. That's really smart. So that was.. Margaret: something that you said yesterday on our call on our oil call really has stuck with me about every day that you wake up you have a decision to stay in that trade or get out so that's the day that you're making a decision. And it's not Yeah, so that it just hit me this morning because we had the the market was down a little bit this morning. And we talked about it like what what are we going to do so I like that idea of having an accountable Matt: Well, it's important because you're you yourself are going to be emotionally different each day for whatever reason, just as you as an individual that but now you have your wife or someone who was account recording accountable is going to come in and keep you straight. I think what every what everybody needs Allen: Yep. Either either spouse or buddy or accountability partner or something like that, that you can trade with. Trading buddy, I like that. Cool. Okay. Is there anything else that you guys wanted to share with our audience? Margaret: Hmm, you can do it. You can absolutely do it. I think if I could have told myself which I had zero knowledge background in how what what was a brokerage? Let's just start with the simple step. I did not even know the difference between brokerages I did not understand what a brokerage account was. So if I could Tell Margaret, even just five years ago, what I will be doing today, I would not have believed it. And that once you start looking at your money, you know, everybody always says nobody cares about your money more than you do. I think our age group needs this knowledge. Because with the advent of you having to figure out your own retirement and not having pensions, it is extremely important for us to know that and we didn't have any knowledge that is out there. You know, we didn't we weren't 20 and Tiktok. And Instagram rails were out there where you could learn some of this stuff. You know, we're where we're younger people already know so much more than I knew when I'm in my 20s. I think there's a group of us that needs the hope that comes from knowing that you can manage your own money, and you can make money and you can help your retirement, it doesn't matter if you're in your 40s. Matt: No matter really what age you are, I mean, my mother's 80, right. And if she was, you know, I used to stay at Costco all the time. And I said this many times where they're, they're older people that give out samples or they're in the job. And there, you can see that they're in pain. They're standing all day long, and they're like 70, and 80 years old. And if they just knew if they knew how to do a simple strategy, or trade or just learn it, in which they totally can, yeah, or be shown that and, you know, they can believe in it, that would change their life. And they change their comfort, not later on and be right now. Yeah. Which is so powerful. So it's really it goes to, that's what I love about trading, it can help all age groups. Yeah. Right. And you're right. No one cares about your money more than you do. And I look at like, life's risky. Everything's at risk. So you owe it to yourself. You think trading is risky. Give it a shot. Everything's risky. Yeah. Right. So you got to overcome your fears. See how things work? Believe in yourself. And just go for it. Yeah, because we're only on here one turn, you know, Margaret: Why not? Give it a shot? Allen: Well said Well said, you guys, I really thank you for this. This has been a pleasure. And I really appreciate your time and spending some time and sharing intimate details about your lives and your relationship with us. It's it's been a blessing. Thank you so much. Margaret: Thank you for asking us. Yeah.

Live Like the World is Dying
S1E57 - Nadia on Harm Reduction

Live Like the World is Dying

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 65:20


Episode Summary Margaret and Nadia talk about harm reduction, what it is, how it relates to community preparedness, strategies for including harm reduction in your preparedness routines, and a little bit of history and legality as relates to different kinds of drug use. Guest Info Nadia works with Next Distro and can be found at https://nextdistro.org/ Host Info Margaret can be found on twitter @magpiekilljoy or instagram at @margaretkilljoy. Publisher Info This show is published by Strangers in A Tangled Wilderness. We can be found at www.tangledwilderness.org, or on Twitter @TangledWild and Instagram @Tangled_Wilderness. You can support the show on Patreon at www.patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness. Transcript LLWD: Nadia on Harm Reduction Margaret 00:15 Hello, and welcome to Live Like the World is Dying, your podcast for what feels like the end times. I'm your host today, Margaret killjoy. And today, I am really excited about this episode, I think you'll all get a lot out of it. I guess I say that every time but I wouldn't record these episodes, if I didn't think you would get a lot out of them. Today, we are talking about harm reduction. And we were talking about preparedness that includes drug users. Because, if you think you don't know any drug users, you just don't know anyone who is willing to tell you that they're a drug user. And we will talk about that and a lot more. But first, this podcast is a proud member of the Channel Zero network of anarchists podcasts. And here's a jingle from another show on the network. Margaret 01:01 Okay, we're back. And if you could introduce yourself with your name, your pronouns. And then kind of a little bit about your background about the kind of stuff that we're gonna be talking about today. Nadia 01:52 Yeah, sure, hey, Margaret. My name is Nadia, I use they or she pronouns. And I am a harm reductionist, a drug user. And I have both worked at in-person syringe service programs, and currently work for an online meal based program, where we ship safer drinking supplies to folks all over the country. Margaret 02:16 That's cool. So we talked about having you on, because we wanted to talk about preparedness that includes the drug users in your community, whether the person listening to this as drug user, or whether they care about drug users in their community. And I know it's a big open question, but I kind of wanted to ask you that. How prepare that? Nadia 02:45 Well, you know, I think that when we talk about prepping, disaster prepping and harm reduction, they're really similar, because it's really boils down to a risk assessment and thinking critically, right? The world isn't black and white, it's not really an easy question to answer, for example, should I evacuate or not in a disaster? Similarly, how do I protect myself as a drug user, in a world that isn't concerned about my health or safety? And you know, for people who historically lack access to resources, and healthcare, I think talking about how to prepare or what readiness looks like, is especially important. Margaret 03:28 So, I guess I kind of want to start with some of the practical questions. It's like, what are the things that one should do that are different from what one would otherwise do? Like I'm like thinking about like, even for my own sake, right. Like, I'm like, like people say, like, carry Narcan, for example, like, how does one access that? What is the shelf life on that? Is that a thing that if community like mutual aid groups or individuals who have like large stashes of things or whatever? Is it like worth having a bunch of. Is it depend on community access? Is it better to just like, specifically coordinate with existing harm reduction and like needle exchange groups in your area? Like, it seems to me that like, like, one of the prepper mindset things is like, "Oh, there's a thing I need, I should go out and get a bunch of it". Right? And my instinct here is that maybe that rather than run out and get a bunch of say, Narcan, it would be more about like, be aware of how people can access that and which groups do distribute that and then maybe have like enough for me to carry around? I don't know. Yeah, like, I guess let's start with Narcan. What's What's the Narcan? Nadia 04:40 Sure. Um, so for folks that are listening that don't know, Narcan or naloxone is a medication that will reverse an opioid overdose. And you know, it, it should be kept in a relatively temperature stable area, but there's there's been a lot of studies on it. And they have shown that it maintains its efficacy, much past expiration dates and the kind of temperature parameters. So you don't want to keep it somewhere freezing or super hot, but it is more resilient than you think. And having some naloxone is better than having none. And you mentioned, you know, going out and sort of stocking up. And I think that this is a broader conversation about prepping too, the difference between being ready and hoarding, right, yeah, and sometimes that line definitely gets blurry. Do you really need 100 pounds of rice? Are you going to go through it before it gets bad? Do you have a proper place to store it? I mean, you can talk about naloxone in the same way. And you know, just like you can keep Narcan in your bag. If you're going to a show going to a bar, you can also keep some in your gobag, if you have one, to evacuate, for example. Margaret 06:06 What's the....you know, I usually present myself as sort of the the person who pretends like she doesn't know what she's asking in these episodes, but I actually don't know as much about this as I would like. Alot of my friends are way more knowledgeable about this stuff. Like what is the difference between Narcan and naloxone? And how would I go about getting some to carry around with me? Nadia 06:29 Sure. So Narcan is really just a brand name, that's the the nasal spray. Naloxone is the actual medication. You can pick it up from certain service programs in your area. If you don't have a needle exchange in your area, you can go just Google Next Distro. We mail Naloxone to folks, so just check the website, see if you live in a state or an area where we do that. But we do try to encourage people to sort of seek out resources where they live. But yeah, there's there's a lot of different organizations, everything from sort of anarchist collectives, running needle exchanges to health departments that are, you know, offering trainings and providing Narcan. Margaret 07:19 What's the legality of it? Nadia 07:21 So, as far as you know, carrying it with you, there is what is called a standing order. It's basically a sort of blanket prescription. You can go to the pharmacy, purchase Naloxone, it can be prohibitively expensive, especially if you don't have insurance, which is why I kind of mentioned, you know, needle exchanges and health departments first. But I think, you know, as far as having it on your person, it's not going to be a situation where it's illegal. However, we know that cops like to fuck with people. So if you do happen to have Naloxone, and you have syringes on you, I'm not going to say you'll be fine. However, the law is on your side in that regard. And another piece of that, too, is different states have different Good Samaritan laws. So if you are with someone that is experiencing an overdose, in many states, not all, you can call 911, without the fear or threat of potentially being arrested for small possession, or things like that. They are very narrow in a lot of places. But that's something that you're going to want to look into for your state. Margaret 08:37 So it's like, this makes sense, like so probably, if I have some drugs on me and my friend has some drugs on me and my friend overdoses. There's a fear of involving the medical establishment because there's a fear of me or the person who's overdosing getting arrested for what we have on them. Is that what you're saying that this law protects? Like, yeah, in some states protects people about? Nadia 09:00 So you know, there's, there's a lot of stigma, right? And you know, just the the illegality piece. And at the end of the day there, there is an overdose crisis in the United States, in many places. And so these laws are designed to sort of take some of that fear away. And if you are responding to someone who's experiencing an overdose, you don't have to tell 911 when you call that this person is on drugs or that they are overdosing. You can just merely describe the symptoms and what is happening to them. For example, this person is not breathing, they're turning blue. I can't hear a heartbeat, whatever it might be. And you know, if you do have to leave and you have given them Naloxone, you can just leave the vials or or the package next to the person that way when EMS does arrive, they do know "Okay, this person has been given Narcan, "and they can kind of go from there, Margaret 09:59 Right. Okay, so like if you have reasons that you don't want to interact with emergency personnel and need to leave the scene, okay. Nadia 10:07 Yeah, and you have options. And that's kind of the whole thing about harm reduction, right? It's a pragmatic approach to drug use and a realistic one. And so, you know, that's why there, there are no hard and fast rules of do this, or don't do this, but, you know, sort of a continuum of human behavior. And, you know, acknowledging the risks at any point of it. Margaret 10:30 I want to come back to that in a little bit, because I want to have this whole conversation about what harm reduction...like why the work that y'all do is so like, philosophically important, to like disaster preparedness, and probably life in general. But first, I want to, I want to keep talking about some of this stuff, like with, like, you're talking about the, you know, there's an overdose crisis in the United States, I feel like everyone, on some level knows that. And one of the things that's so interesting to me, I would think I was thinking about before we did this episode is that it's like, you know, this is all about like, disaster preparedness, right? The whole show. And it feels like a lot of communities and certainly including drug communities. I don't know the way phrase that..... Nadia 11:18 You can say, "people who use drugs." Margaret 11:20 Okay. But so there is a disaster happening right now. Like, there is a crisis. Like there's a reason we call it crisis, you know, it's like a really fucking bad thing. And I'm wondering if, without necessarily going into it, like, too great, but I'm curious, like, what is happening? Like, what is what's happening right now? Why is everyone OD'ing? , Nadia 11:44 Well, you know, there's a lot of different facets to the overdose crisis and a lot of different solutions. Some of them sort of more triage, you know, we were just talking about Naloxone, and, and it's a great medication, it saves lives. But ultimately, what we really need is a safe supply of drugs. If people are aware and knowledgeable of what they're taking, how potent it is, if there are any adulterants in it, you know, that's where we would like to go. Obviously, drugs are illegal. Most drugs are illegal in most places in the United States. And, you know, there there has been pushes for access to safe supply in places like Canada in, you know, I believe Oregon has, has I think, legalized some drugs, right? You can purchase I think mushrooms now. Don't quote me on that. I'm not actually familiar with Oregon law. Margaret 12:46 Anyone listening this, you can go out and buy mushrooms legally. And if the police stop you, you can say "it''s okay. It's not a crime." Don't do that. Okay. Anyway. Yeah. Nadia 12:57 I mean, you know, philosophically, it's not a crime. It's not a crime to do drugs. And, you know, the, the idea that some of these drugs are illegal, and some of them aren't, really, is sort of goes back to like this puritanical history of our country. You know, why is alcohol legal when we know that drunk driving rates are through the roof, and you know, it can cause incredible damage to your body over time. But then, you know, smoking marijuana is, is still illegal in a lot of places. where I live, for sure, especially in the south. So, you know, I think that there's there's that moral component Margaret 13:38 So we should bring back prohibition? Nadia 13:40 Yeah, exactly. And so I think, you know, as far as having access to drugs that are safe, drugs, that that you know, what you're getting, you know, I think that we don't want to short....when I say 'we,' I mean people who use drugs, I mean, people in the harm reduction community. We don't want to shortchange ourselves. I don't want to say, "Oh, well, the overdose crisis would be so much better if everyone had not Narcan." Yes, that's true. But that's a temporary fix, Margaret 14:11 Right. It's...no, that's such a good point. Because I feel like that's like the...I know I owe came out the gate with like that as the first thing that was on my mind. And I, and I'm, like, kind of embarrassed about that because it's such the like, it's the band aid we always keep getting presented. And it's like a real good band aid. It's more like the tourniquet we keep getting presented. But, it does seem like yeah, what you're talking about decriminalization, it's almost like when you make things illegal, it doesn't make the problem go away. Nadia 14:40 Yeah, and you know, I think about it in terms of living under capitalism for so long our entire lives, right. And you get to a point where it's hard to think about solutions outside of the current system. We're so focused on kind of again, that that triage, right, how do we make things better within this oppressive state that we live in? But really, ultimately, the goal should be moving past that and moving beyond it, right? Margaret 15:11 Yeah. Yeah. So to go back with preparedness, I know that you do a little bit of preparedness yourself. We talked before we started recording about, you know, canned vegetables and things like that. How does it impact your preparedness, both that you are a drug user, and also that you, like, care about and take drug users into consideration in your preparedness? Nadia 15:40 Yeah, I mean, I think a lot of it is planning, right? I'm gonna use the example of of evacuating, I lived in the Gulf South for a very long time. Hurricanes were a yearly occurrence. And so I had to think about it a lot. But, you know, just in terms of what your risk is, and making a decision based on that, for example, if you are evacuating, do you bring drugs with you and sort of chance getting pulled over? Or do you try and score in a new place? And you have to decide what the bigger risk is for you. For example, if I'm driving with five of my friends in an unregistered van with acab stickers all over it, I might not want to be riding dirty, I might not want to have drugs on me. Versus, you know, if I am going somewhere completely unfamiliar to me, I'm not sure if I'm going to be able to score when I get there. It might be worth the risk, right? And so thinking of those things in advance is really important. And the longer you wait in an emergency situation, the longer it's going to take you to get out of that cone of impact, right? If you wait to the last minute, there's going to be you know, traffic on the road, it's harder to to get out, it's harder to find a hotel room, for example. So really, that thinking of it in advance, you know, I think can save you a lot of critical time when you need to act. Margaret 17:10 Yeah. Yeah, like, I don't envy a lot of my friends who live in the Gulf South, are like, "What do I need?" And I'm like, I don't know, a house in the mountains somewhere. And then I'm like, No, that doesn't. That doesn't help. You know, I can't just tell people that. Nadia 17:26 Well, and I mean, you know, we're talking about preparedness, we're talking about disaster prep. And, you know, a lot of places that haven't had to deal with disasters, like hurricanes or flooding, or wildfires are seeing more and more of that now. And there's a greater impact on bipoc, queer and trans folks, disabled people, you know, marginalized groups whose access to resources is already more limited. And, you know, I think we really need to look towards communities that have been repeatedly harmed, especially by structural and environmental racism, I think they're best informed as to how to survive and how to support each other. And I don't want to say just in the Gulf south, but I'm talking about Flint, Michigan, I'm talking about, you know, Jackson, Mississippi, there's a lot of places where, you know, people are painfully aware that no one is coming to save you. It could be weeks or months for FEMA to arrive. In many places, local governments rely on mutual aid networks and charity groups to provide support. And so that kind of vacuum speaks to the importance of building dual power. Because it leaves the field open, I think for kind of any group that wants to become entrenched or inevitability, to sort of step up, right, whether that's a homophobic church group, right wing militias, especially in rural or remote areas, because, people remember who took care of them. You know, that's one of the reasons why the Black Panthers were such a threat with free breakfast programs and community care, is why Food Not Bombs is illegal in some places. There's just there's a lot of power in community sufficiency. Margaret 19:23 Yeah. I mean, and so you, you mentioned that there's like lessons that you draw from these specific places, especially bipoc. communities that are under like constant threat. What are some of the lessons that you feel like you draw from that? I mean, besides the one that you just pointed out, maybe that's the answer to the question, what you point out that like, building mutual aid networks and stuff like that, but.... Nadia 19:45 Yeah, absolutely, figuring out who is in your support network. Also in a disaster or crisis situation, how will you communicate with that network is really important. You know, do folks know where you're staying and vice versa? Yeah. Also, you know, we're talking right now and 2022, almost 2023, the COVID pandemic isn't over. So figuring out how you can shelter places safely, you know, do you have masks on hand? That sort of thing. And then going back to prepping for people who use drugs, stocking up on drugs, you know, you might be thinking, "Oh, well, after the fact, I can just XYZ," whatever your plan is, but what if your dealer evacuated? You know? And, you know, the, as far as staying with other people, how do they feel about drug use? Does everyone know where the naloxone is and how to use it, you know, disasters are stressful, you might be dealing with extreme temperatures, hunkering down with people and their different temperaments, and, you know, for most of us to, stress impacts drug use, and it's important to keep that in mind. If you're, you know, for example, trying to cut back or regulate your use. I think all of these things, you know, are useful for people who use drugs, but ultimately, I think they're all skills or at least, you know, aspects of preparing that are beneficial for anyone. Margaret 21:14 Yeah. Well, so interesting, because it you know, normally we think of like, okay, if you can get more of a medication that you need ahead of time, right? That's great. And, you know, there's this limitation, it's actually very similar limitation, the limitation is legality. In this case of like, you know, it's, it's sometimes very hard for people who even have a prescription to get more than, you know, a month's worth of supply or whatever, at a time of any given prescription. And it's, it's something that people run up against a lot. And then obviously, with, I don't know, whether the way to phrase it as street drugs or not, or like drugs that are not being bought through the pharmaceutical networks or whatever, you know, there's an accessibility that is hit and miss. And then there's also an increased danger of stockpiling, because it seems like the the level of risk that you're carrying for getting busted changes a lot based on how much of any given drug you have on you. Nadia 22:11 Yeah, definitely. And I do want to kind of speak to one of the pieces you talked about, as far as having medications, you know, if you're on prescription medications, you know, you can check in with your provider, see, if you can get a larger refill than normal say, you know, instead of 30 days, can you get a 60 day supply, especially for people who use drugs, who might be on, you know, medication assisted treatment, they might be taking methadone, naltrexone, and, you know, these are highly effective in terms of either regulating your use, or perhaps, you know, not using it all. But they can be difficult to access. And in some places, it's harder to pick up the prescription for Vivitrol or suboxone because of stigma, because pharmacists, you know, have this idea of, of drug users, or they just might not know the the regulations and laws in their area. And you might not know them either, because you're new. So, I think that checking in, like I said, with providers ahead of time, if that's possible, and you know, doing what you can in terms of stocking up, but this, that whole plan needs the assistance of people in the medical field. And even they have, you know, that kind of stigma, unfortunately, Margaret 23:33 Yeah, yeah. To self insert this, I got refused a COVID shot because I was wearing a harm reduction shirt once. Nadia 23:41 Wait, why what was the excuse that they gave you? Margaret 23:45 I went in, I was like this dirty punk wearing a Steady Collective shirt, which is the harm reduction group in Asheville, North Carolina. And I, it's funny, I feel like it's like Stolen Valor that I wear this shirt. Because people like when I wore in Asheville people were like, I love what you do. And "I'm like, thanks. What I do is I designed the logo." And the reason I wear the shirt is because I designed the logo for it. So I'm very proud of...and it's just crossed hypodermic needles. And Nadia 24:13 It's a cool logo. Margaret 24:14 Thanks. Thanks. And I was in like, rural fucking right wing California. And I wanted a COVID booster. And so I went into the pharmacy. I found out ahead of time that this particular pharmacy did walk ins. And I walked in, and the the pharmacist at the counter was talking to a doctor who was in line in front of me. And they were both just complaining about drug users. And they were just both sitting there being like, "Oh, these damned, you know, junkies," or whatever. I don't remember how they phrased it, but it wasn't polite. And then like the person finally leaves and I walk up and I'm like, Yall take walk ins? and she's like, "No." And I'm like, "Can I make an appointment? And she's like, "Not for today." Nadia 24:59 That is wild. I mean, also you have a lot of people in the medical community that don't really believe that COVID is a thing or that vaccines are effective. I mean, you can have an anti Vaxxer pharmacist, which is, yeah, I mean, Margaret 25:16 And, like, this is such a, like, I face stigma once....I so it's like, it's really easy for me to imagine after that, that like, of course, people face stigma coming in and picking up their fucking medications, if they're like, the kinds of medications that are, like methadone and stuff like that. That's fucked up. I don't know, that sucks. Nadia 25:40 Yeah, and I mean, you know, we're talking about COVID. And I think harm reduction is a huge piece of you know, how we can kind of move through the world right now. People are continuing to die and be disabled by COVID. And, you know, we were talking a little bit before, before we started about, you know, kind of the beginning of COVID. And I was really optimistic at first kind of seeing mutual aid networks spring up and more people coming to the realization that the government will kill us for the sake of the economy. But you know, now I think even in radical spaces, that sort of care and community level protection has given way to the more mainstream sentiment or desire to return to normalcy. And that's just something that isn't possible. And it's not desirable to many, many people for whom normalcy was oppressive and a danger. Yeah, you know, I think that, especially as anarchists or folks that consider themselves radical, preppers, as well, we know that we keep us safe, right? That's kind of the tagline. But, that should also apply to immunocompromised people as well, and disabled folks. And, you know, now, I think it's a really great time to take stock of your existing protocols, and safety measures and sort of ask if those things that you're doing or not doing are still in line with what our current risk is. And right now, going into winter, you know, nationally, over 10% of tests are coming back positive. And we know that we're severely under testing, and we know that COVID reinfections, wear down your immunity. That increases your risk for long COVID or kind of lingering COVID symptoms, and, you know, makes people more susceptible to things like the flu, RSV, or Strep A, all three of which we're seeing a surge of in this winter. Margaret 27:43 Yay. Yeah. I think about it, like the fact that...I don't know how to put this. Like, I wear a mask for the same reason I carry a gun. And it...and not that I want everyone to carry guns, that is a very personal decision based on the legality and the threat models that you're facing. Bu,t I carry a gun, so that it is harder for someone to murder me and it is harder for someone to murder the people I care about who are near me, right? I wear a mask, so that I am less likely to die, and other people around me are less likely to die. This seems like such a, like the idea that there's people who are like preppers or prepper adjacent, who are anti mask, and then anti vaccine is just so nonsensical to me. And I mean, I do think that like protocols do like, they do need to shift, we do need to realize it as we realize that this is endemic, and you know, we can't...like we probably can't just say no more live music in the course of human history. Right? Nadia 28:58 I would hope not. Margaret 29:00 But I especially like, when I walk into the grocery store, there is literally no cost to me to wear a mask. There is just, there's only positive effects of me wearing a mask minus social stigma. Nadia 29:17 You know, I think that we need, if we're going to survive, care, kindness, and a lot of grace. Which requires us to acknowledge that there's a huge cognitive dissonance people are dealing with right now. We're three years into a global pandemic that's killed six and a half million people around the world, the rise of fascism, I mean, there's a lot and people's responses are going to vary wildly. Kind of the metaphor I like to use is, it sort of feels like a house fire. And we've all just gone through this traumatic experience, and we've run out of the house in the middle of the night, and everyone is sort of behaving in a trauma informed way, some people are trying to run back into the house, some people are claiming that there was never a fire. And, you know, it's, it's trying to take care of each other, and hold ourselves accountable to being, you know, I think responsible for our communities, but while also acknowledging, you know, this is a weird fucking time. You know, I think too, this kind of goes back a little bit to our Naloxone conversation. You know, when we talk about masks, when we talk about boosters, these are sort of individual steps we can take, right? But ultimately, that's, that's only a piece of it, right? We need a societal shift. We need proper air filtration in schools, we need access to rapid testing, we need the working class to have the money and ability to take time off of work when they're sick. I mean, all of these things are sort of interconnected to this larger struggle. And one way that capitalism and our sort of overlords here and Imperial core, are able to shift blame is by you know, kind of making everything this individual choice and individual responsibility when it's not at all. Margaret 31:33 No, that's such a good point. And there's it, it shows that there's even like, some of those things are small scale community, things can be done as well, like, it would be a shame for a small scale community to have to suddenly like come up with the resources to provide rapid testing to everyone constantly or whatever, right. But like, I don't know, like, helping your local venues get real good air filtration systems, you know, or like, expanding outside infrastructure in climates that allow it, and like, there are the steps that we can take that are sort of medium. They're not....And I think that's actually where anarchists and radicals actually do best is not at the individual level. And frankly, if I if I'm being honest, not necessarily at the systemic level, but like this sort of in between level, this community based this community size level of like, how do we? Yeah, I mean, we can't....the punks or the anarchists, or whatever is can't pass a mask mandate, but like, we can create, like, cultures where, when there's no reason not to, we wear masks, and we work on our air filtration. And this is really just me thinking about COVID instead of the whole point of this conversation was drug use stuff, but... Nadia 32:54 Well I mean, they're, I think they're interrelated. You know, if you are putting on a punk show, is it accessible, right? Does that mean, you know, for folks in wheelchairs, folks with, you know, mobility aids, as well as immunocompromised people, and ensuring that you know, this is a place that they have access to? Or if it's not, saying that. I at least want you to say, "Hey, this is a dangerous place for you. And, making it accessible is not our priority or isn't possible in this situation. Therefore, you can make your own decision about whether or not you want to attend." Margaret 33:36 I've been in like, an now I can't remember if it was France or Montreal, somewhere where people spoke French. I've been in places where like any anarchist event will put on the fliers the accessibility or lack of accessibility for wheelchair access. And that's such an interesting, good point, right? Because if you have to flag on it, "This is not wheelchair accessible." It means you have to think about it when you do it, right. And like, Which isn't to say you shouldn't...I don't know one way or the other about what I'm about to say, which doesn't mean like you can't put on an event if you can't find it, accessible space, but you should have to own it, and you should have to be working on making the space more accessible. Is that, uh??? I'm really talking about my ass here. I haven't I haven't been part of these conversations. But. Nadia 34:21 I mean, as someone who is struggling with long COVID still a year in, you know, I am also new to the disability conversation. And I definitely feel grateful for the folks who have been activists and have been organizing around these issues for you know, forever, honestly. And it really was shocking to me, even though I'm fairly realistic about how our society treats folks they deem unworthy or undesirable, but it was really shocking the level to which you become invisible. All. And you know, I think, to sort of shoehorn a little segue back to our orginal conversation, people who use drugs also live in that sort of liminal space, right? There's so much that is invisible about drug use. But also, this kind of caricature of drug users is sort of trotted out anytime people want to talk about society's ills, right? When people are talking about folks without homes, inevitably drug use comes up as if people aren't sitting in their houses doing drugs. They just have walls and you can't see them. Margaret 35:38 Yeah, well, and then one of the things that I really appreciate about this conversation with you is that you're talking about the implication, or the the inference that I'm picking up on, is that basically saying, It's okay, if people use drugs, that is their choice, it seems to be like, like a lot of the conversation that I've feel like I'm exposed to is this, like, we should have pity for these poor drug users, and everyone is trying to stop using drugs. Whereas, it seems like you're trying to present an alternate case where people can choose whether or not they want to engage with drugs in different ways? Nadia 36:17 Yeah, I mean, you know, harm reduction is the sort of set of principles or tenants that allows for autonomy and allows for people to make informed decisions about what they do. You know, abstinence doesn't necessarily work or isn't feasible for everyone. And so, you know, giving people the space and acknowledging that there's always going to be some risk in the things that we do, you know, helps us kind of approach it with clear eyes. But the I think the moral question around using drugs really does us a disservice. Doing drugs is fun, and cool. And that is, I think, an important message to have out there because, you know, so often, we're just inundated with all of the terrible things that can happen to you. And again, this is normal human behavior. This is normal behavior in other other species, you've got monkeys eating, you know, fruit that's gone, gone bad and getting drunk, you've got bears eating psychedelic honey. We do this because it's enjoyable. And to deny it that, I think, sort of leaves us on our back foot in terms of "Okay, well, how do we do this safely?" Margaret 37:41 Yeah, presenting as this is a bad thing that someone shouldn't have done and now we have to deal with the bad parts, as compared to being like, every animal on the planet wants to do this, we should figure out ways that people can have freedom to do it as safely as they want or to not do it, if they don't want. Nadia 38:07 Right, and you know, both are fine. It's also cool to not do drugs. I do want to put that out there. But as a drug user, you know, this touches on our conversation about safe supply, right? When you're buying and you don't know the quality or if there's cross contamination, obviously, a lot of folks are very concerned about things like fentanyl right now. There's also you know, other sort of fillers or things people can use. Xylazine is something that is sort of making the rounds right now that can have potential, like negative health impacts. So yeah, I think this, this goes back to sort of those bigger picture solutions as opposed to the band aids. Margaret 38:55 Okay. And then, how useful is it? You know, like, as you pointed out earlier, right....Again, before, we had a long pre conversation. We knew each other back in the day for, now, people can know that about us, I guess. You know, pointing out because like, I mostly don't do drugs, but I do drink sometimes, right, and that is a drug and alcohol is absolutely a drug. It's a very dangerous drug. And it's one that I engage with very rarely, but I do engage with, and it does seem like a fairly useful comparison for talking about other drugs. Like cause there's this drug that is socially acceptable while also being massively destructive, right? And it seems like that actually maps fairly well to most of the other drugs that are like, problems for people. I don't know is that too simplistic? Nadia 39:51 No, I don't think so. You know, and that's also not to say that people don't struggle with their drug use that people you You know, might be really unhappy with their relationship to drugs. And, you know, the more openly we can talk about it and the more access to different options people have, that sort of allows them to, you know, find the most comfortable place for them. Right, there is this, you know, kind of individual piece to it, even though we're talking a lot about sort of community care, Margaret 40:24 Right. No, that's what I mean, that, in some ways, is part of why alcohol feels like such a good comparison. It's not even a comparison, it's literally a drug. It's a drug that is somehow held into a different class than the others, is that I think we all know people who....for whom alcohol is a problem. And we all know people for whom alcohol is not a problem. And then we all know, people who completely abstain from alcohol, who are in one of those two camps, if they weren't abstaining, you know? Hmm. I don't know, I'm having this like, epiphany, that should have been obvious a long time ago, I think about this. Nadia 41:02 Well, and, you know, thinking in terms of alcohol, and using that as an example of how constrained we are in terms of our choices, you know, if if you are someone that struggles with drinking, really the the options that are given to you are abstinence, right? 12 steps, complete sobriety, and the message that that is the only way that you will be able to, you know, become a functioning member of society. And the fact is that that's simply not true.You know, abstinence really doesn't work for many, many people. You know, I think most of us can remember the "Just Say No," campaigns of the 90s, or maybe the 80s, depending on how old you are. And we know those didn't work. It don't work for children, it doesn't work for adults. And, you know, I think I don't want to get too far down the rabbit hole. But I think it would be important for folks to sort of think about, "Well, why is alcohol illegal? And all these other drugs aren't?"And I think it all goes back to capitalism. It goes back to money. It goes back to social control. Margaret 42:22 Yeah. Well, ironically, one of the reasons that alcohol is legal, is that a bunch of people fought the KKK to the death to make alcohol legal. I only learned as kind of more recently when I did a bunch of....one of my other podcasts is a history podcast. And I didn't realize that the second incarnation of the KKK was like, one of their main things is that they were the foot soldiers of prohibition. They were like the Proud Boys of the prohibition era. And it was this whole thing where it was like Protestants versus everyone else, including reasonable Protestants. It was white Protestants against Irish Catholics, Italians, all of the people who were, you know, bootlegging, and all of that other stuff. And there were these like massive violent street fights. And I mean, mostly, it was massive violence, street fights about fuck you, you're the KKK, we want to...you can't run our town. But, what they wanted to do was run the town on a prohibition model. And there's this like, really interesting tie between white supremacy and prohibition. And it? I don't know, I mean, like, I know, I know how to immediately draw the same thing between the outline of weed and anti blackness. And I'm suspecting that if I dug very hard, I would find similar things with like, drugs, period. I don't know. I just got really excited about people beating up the KKK and that's why we're allowed to drink. Nadia 43:59 Yeah, that's always a win, both of those things. Margaret 44:06 But, what anyway, sorry, I got lost in rabbit hole thinking about that. Okay, so you've brought up this topic a couple times: harm reduction. And I suspect most people have at least an idea of what harm reduction is, but I'm wondering if you could kind of introduce it because, one, it feels very relevant to this specific conversation. But it also feels very relevant to conversations around disaster preparedness in general, because it seems to be implying that there is no perfect and that in some ways perfect is the enemy of good. And that we should just like, figure out what can go wrong and do the best we can rather than expect to succeed in everything. Maybe that's a misunderstanding. Nadia 44:51 That's, that is I think, a really core piece of it, you know, and I don't want to belie the the history behind harm reduction too, you know, this was a movement that was created in platformed by people who use drugs, by sex workers, especially during the HIV AIDS crisis. And again, you know, from groups of marginalized people that realize that they are the only ones looking out for each other. And you know, that many behaviors carry some form of risk. And so talking about that honestly, and figuring out how to mitigate that risk is far more helpful than shaming people and that is connected, you know, directly to the criminalization of HIV and AIDS too, you know, there's the sort of moralizing, right, when folks become sick. There's this idea, I think, that is rooted in very, like old school, Brimstone Christianity, that, you know, it's some form of punishment. And I think that the way our society looks at people who use drugs, and the potential risks are viewed as appropriate punishment for the behavior, which is wrong and fucked up. Margaret 46:06 Yeah. Okay, so. So what is harm reduction? Nadia 46:12 So, you know, I think that if we're specifically talking about drug use, that can be, you know, practical tips, anything from making sure that you're using sterile supplies, making sure that you have syringes, and you don't have to share them, to prevent the transmission of diseases, you know, that can be, you know, figuring out different routes of administration. So for example, if you're someone that likes to snort a lot of drugs, maybe you want to give your nostrils a break, and, you know, smoke or boof. There are a lot of things that you can kind of adjust, right? You don't even have to necessarily be adhering to this strict set of rules as far as your drug use, but really being sort of flexible based on your own needs. Margaret 47:09 Okay. And then, what are some of the ways that harm reduction either applies to other things besides drug use, or like has been successfully applied, or like some of the ways that like harm reduction, as jargon, has been, like, kind of co-opted by other things? Nadia 47:32 Yeah, I mean, I feel like especially after 2016, the the idea that voting is harm reduction really picked up speed. And I personally disagree. Margaret 47:47 Okay. Nadia 47:48 For the most part, because harm reduction is something that you know, you can use for yourself, for your drug use, and so when we say voting is harm reduction, my question is, "Whose harm is being lessened?" You know, we currently have a Democratic president, and there's still concentration camps on our southern border, you still have Democratic mayors and city council's introducing regressive anti homelessness laws, throwing more money at more cops. And so I just think the notion that we can affect the kind of change necessary to liberate us by voting is....it's short sighted. And I think it can be an excuse for people to not have to invest so much in their allyship. Yeah, I think at its very base, most like literal definition, voting potentially reduces harm, but most of that is going to be in the immediate or short term. Margaret 48:50 Well, so that's really interesting to me, right? Because I think that I had a kind of misunderstanding of harm reduction in some ways, because from my point of view, I mean...voting as harm reduction just seemed to be the rephrasing of vote for the lesser evil. Because in my mind, voting for the lesser evil is acknowledging an evil, right, it is acknowledging like Like, like, Biden is an evil, the Democratic Party is an evil, that does evil things in the world. And so for me, there's a there's a sensibility to the argument of thinking that voting is how we make systemic change is terrible. And I actually thought that the kind of concept of, but they always lose their meaning, right, in the 80s. and 90s It was vote for the lesser evil and people were like, yeah, that's how we make things better. It's like, no, it's clearly not how to make things better. It's how you make things evil. You're just controlling the amount of evil. And then with harm reduction argument, the reason I bought it at first was because it was like, "Oh, yes, because it's, it's saying there is going to be harm, but we want to do less of it." But, with what you're talking about, about how drug use or sex as two of the spaces that we talk about harm reduction a lot, right? Like those things can rule, right? Like sex and drugs, there's a reason that people talk about them positively. They're very dangerous activities sometimes, right. And people should go into them as clear headed as...well, maybe not clear headed depending on their preferences, but you know, people should should be aware of the risks, but then go and have all the sex and drugs and rock and roll or whatever that they want, as compared to... and so this is where the metaphor to the political system seems to fall apart to me is because like, well, the existing political system that we have is just doing bad. And it's really about what tiny little bits of mitigation or picking, something's going to kill. It's the trolley problem, right? You're still killing people. And that's not fun and cool. That's not sex, drugs and rock and roll. I don't know. That's what I got. Nadia 51:01 Yeah. And, you know, I think that you really laid it out very well there. You know, yes, I can reduce the harm to myself if I am using drugs or having sex, but I can't get these politicians that I voted in to reduce the harm that they are causing. Because, you know, if you're voting for one of the two dominant political parties in the United States, I think you're just asking yourself, if you want to get to fascism, the short way or the long way, because I think, you know, voting in Democrats does make a material difference when it comes to some social services, and some environmental protections. But ultimately, both of these parties work at the behest of the ruling class. And capitalism requires ceaseless consumption and growth. And neither of those are sustainable. And they require the subjugation of working class people. So I think, you know, if, you know, it's, it's a question of capacity, if you and the people in your community that you organize with have the time and resources to engage in electoral politics, while simultaneously building dual power, and fighting encroaching fascism, like, go with God. There's space for a lot of tactics, and you gotta find where your skill set is and where your comfort lies. And I do just want to say this one last piece, too, when we talk about voting as harm reduction in the United States, that often I think tends to overlook the international implications of maintaining the current political system here, Margaret 52:36 Right, which is, that's where it becomes even more of the same as like, yeah, it's never...the solutions don't lie in the ballot box, and like, Oh, whatever. I'm just like, speaking cliches or whatever. But it's like, even if we can make things like slightly better, like, because like, literally, if someone was like, "Well, do you want fascism tomorrow? Do you want fascism in five years," I'd be like, "Five years, please, that gives me a little bit more time to try to fight it." But of course, the problem, obviously, we're way off topic, but the problem is, of course, then people think that like, oh, that's the solution. The solution is engaging with this political system that has no fucking reason for existing besides driving us closer to Ecocide and fascism. Nadia 53:21 Right. That's, that's the band aid. That's the triage. You know, there are so many different things that I think harm reduction principles can be applied to whether that's sex work, you know, mental health issues, eating disorders, tobacco use, I think there's a really natural evolution of the harm reduction philosophy to extend it to other health risk behaviors and to a broader audience in that way. I just, I think that, again, using harm reduction to sort of Pantious Pilate wash your hands of a lot of things and just say,"I voted and that's enough," is it's not going to work. It's not. Margaret 54:00 Okay. No, and now I'm thinking, I'm like, Oh, shit, is my like, I just carry around naloxone. Is that my, like, wash my hands of addressing the larger systemic things and like, well, it doesn't affect me, it clearly affects me because it affects people I care about and it like, I don't know, is the takeaways. Okay, wait, I'm gonna try and some of the takeaways I've gotten from you, is that carry Naloxone, but it's a band aid. And it is a useful one, but the larger systemic problems have to do with criminalization and they have to do with access to safe supply. And so working on the kind of pressure involved to fight for that is good having mutual aid networks....Oh, okay. One of the questions that kind of had actually is, in your experience existing mutual aid networks, how well do they get along with existing harm reduction networks? Does it tend to be the same players and everyone's excited, or do you run across some mutual aid networks do they kind of like to step up their game about actually care about, you know, drug users? Or like, How's that look right now, Nadia 55:09 In my personal experience, and I can't really speak to, you know, places I haven't lived or, you know, different communities that I'm not a part of. But there is a great deal of overlap. You know, a lot of folks that are working in harm reduction, people who use drugs and sex workers are sort of use to you know, fending for ourselves, we're used to creating these these networks of care that exist outside of the current system. And, you know, that's not to say that, when disaster strikes, it can sort of hit some folks harder than others. If the needle exchange in your town closes down, because there was a disaster. You know, there, there might be some time before they opened back up. And that's not going to stop people from using drugs. It will just create a situation where people have to use drugs more dangerously. And so, you know, yes, I think that there's a lot of overlap. But also, it shouldn't be this sort of jerry rigged, you know, last line of defense, the folks that have just experienced a disaster now having to turn around and all care for each other. Because again, no one is coming to save you. Margaret 56:28 Yeah. Yay. That's Nadia 56:32 that's the real point of it. Yes. Margaret 56:35 But I mean it's really liberating. I think that like, I'm not super into political nihilism, personally, a lot of my friends are and I don't mean to slight it. But, the thing that reminds me of what like my like nihilist friends get out of like hopelessness, not hopeless, whatever, out of nihilism is comparable to the like, I find something joyous and liberating about the realization that no one's coming to save us. Because it's this like concept, one of my favorite cliches from like, when I was a baby anarchist was just like, "We are the ones we've been waiting for." Because it's less about, no one is coming to save us, we're doomed. And it's more about like, it is up to us to build the power and capacity necessary to bring about the changes that we need to see in this world. And there's a lot of us, and there's a lot more of us all the time, and the problems we're facing, seem to be getting bigger and bigger, depending on the position you're coming from, right, the problems facing me have gotten bigger and bigger as all the anti trans stuff comes through, or whatever, you know, but there's also more of us. Even to just continue the trans thing as a metaphor. It's like, the reason there's all this anti trans shit is that we all came out of the fucking closet. Like, there's a ton of us. And like, there always were a ton of us, but we were all fucking scared. And like, and what they want to do is make us afraid and get back in the closet. And so I get a lot out of, 'no one is coming to save us.' Because of the flip side being. We're going to save us. Nadia 58:16 Yeah, I mean, I think it's really liberatory. That's something that I love about anarchism, too, you know, yes, that means that, you know, the system isn't here for us, because it's never been here for us. But ultimately, we have to take responsibility for our lives, for our communities, and for the future that we want, as opposed to sort of being handed these these goals and expectations, the rules that were supposed to have, the lives were supposed to lead. And you know, it can be scary to not have that safety net, but I think through, you know, both political discourse, but also just, you know, having lived a life, you quickly become aware that that safety net never actually existed in the first place. Margaret 59:05 Yeah. Well, are there any last words on preparedness that you want to, you want to shout out? Everyone should fill their basement with needles? I don't know. Nadia 59:22 Well, I mean, don't do that. Or if you do that, make sure that they are, you know, safely kept somwhere that only you have access to, or the folks that need them. You know, I know I've kind of hammered this home a lot. But, it really, when I say 'it,' I mean harm reduction. And I think what we're trying to do for ourselves really comes down to community and it comes down to having these bigger goals and not taking, 'no,' for an answer or taking, you know, half measures for an answer. The overdose crisis is very real. And there are pharmaceutical companies and families that have directly caused a lot of pain and death, and they should be held accountable. And that is slowly happening over time. But, I just want to keep clear, you know, who are the folks in our community who are doing the work? And who are maybe the people that are sort of preventing us from living our best lives? Margaret 1:00:34 Yeah. All right. Well, is there anything you want to shout out here at the end of like, what people...I don't know it was anything you want to draw attention to any projects? Any of your work? 1:00:47 You know, support your local needle exchange, support your local sex workers. You know, if there is a call to fight back against fascists, or show up at your local library, because people are doing some fuck shit against trans people, you should be there. That's my shout out. Yeah. Margaret 1:01:05 That's a good shout out. Well, thanks for being on...it's funny as like, every now and then I do these episodes where I'm like, it like challenges my own like weird....I don't want to say puritanical upbringing, I didn't have a puritanical upbringing. I was around a lot of people, you know, all my friends did a lot of drugs when I was in....whatever. And it's just like, interesting to every now and I'd have these episodes like, it's like the first couple times I did firearms episodes. I was like, It's not that I was like, Oh, I'm being so edgy. It was just being like, Oh, right. Information is dangerous because I and then I'm like, that's true about everything. I don't know where I'm going with this. Basically, thanks for coming on to talk about something that I feel like doesn't get talked about because people are afraid to acknowledge it, because we all walk around with this, like, 'drugs are bad,' and then we just secretly all do drugs. And so it's just better to just actually be like, drugs are complicated. Nadia 1:02:03 Yeah, and people are complicated. Margaret 1:02:05 What? Not me. I'm a paladin. I adhere to my moral code. That doesn't sound great. Okay. Yep. All right. Well, thank you for coming on this episode. Nadia 1:02:15 Thanks for having me. Margaret 1:02:17 All right. Bye. Margaret 1:02:25 Thank you so much for listening. If you enjoyed this podcast, please tell people about it by whatever means that you prefer to tell people about things, like skywriting, please sky write Live Like the World is Dying above a beach. Ooh, get one of those banners that goes behind the like little plane that flies by the beach and usually advertises auto insurance. And instead it should just say, "Live Like the World is Dying." Don't tell people it's a podcast. Just tell people to live like the world is dying and become a cool, no future punk or a only a future if we imagine it....Okay, I'm off track. So, yeah, you can tell people about it. You can also support us. This podcast is published by pa...not by Patreon, it's supported by Patreon. It's published by Strangers in a Tangled Wilderness, which is a publishing collective that I'm part of along with a bunch of other people. We put out books we recently put out Cindy, Barukh's Milstein's "Try Anarchism for Life" and soon possibly, actually, I don't know when this episode is gonna be released. February 1st, 2023, we are releasing my book, "Escape from Incel Island." If you're listening to this before February 1st, 2023, you can pre order it at tangledwilderness.org. If you're listening to it after February 1st, 2023, you can buy it wherever books are sold, or go to the library, or steal a copy from Barnes and Noble. I don't care. And but, don't steal it from an info shop. That's just, it's just mean. Why would you do that? Get a library to carry it and then get it, or steal it from a big corporate place. Whatever. You can support us on patreon at patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness and your donations, go to pay the transcriptionist and pay the audio editor to keep all of this stuff happening. And in particular, I want to thank Aly, and Paparouna, and Milica, and Boise Mutual Aid, Theo, Hunter, Shawn, SJ, Paige, Mikki, Nicole, David, Dana Chelsea, Kat J, Staro, Jenipher, Eleanor, Kirk, Sam, Michaiah, Chris, and Hoss the dog. I really appreciate all of you and I really appreciate that there's enough of you that I read your names fast and maybe that's like really rude. But, I just like I don't know, I'm kind of like humbled by the support that Strangers gets and I hope that you who are listening well I only hope you support us if you can afford it. If you can't afford it, just continue to get our shit for free. And that's the whole point of supporting, is it helps other people get our shit for free. Anyway I'll talk to you all soon be as well as you can Find out more at https://live-like-the-world-is-dying.pinecast.co

Create Community
Recruiting Others to Help You Fulfill Your Dream

Create Community

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 9:26


If you are a mover and shaker with a big dream, it is likely that you get a lot of unsolicited advice about how you should do ‘XYZ'. Usually, that advice comes from people who aren't doing much themselves– right? In today's Fidget Friday episode, I share with you an idea on how you can respond to these people AND actually recruit people to help you fulfill your dream.ACCESS FULL SHOW NOTES HERE: https://www.heatherparady.com/episodes/86TOPICS FROM THIS EPISODE:Dealing with criticism or unsolicited adviceLetting go of control and letting people help youMoving past the need to make everyone happyCONNECT WITH US!Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/heatherparadyFollow Heather on IG:https://www.instagram.com/heatherparady/Follow Heather on Twitter: https://twitter.com/heatherparadyFollow Heather on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@heatherparady?

The Product Biz Podcast
How to stay positive no matter what life, or business, throws at you

The Product Biz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 14:07 Transcription Available


We've all said the phrase "I'll be happy when...." and most of us are living in the state of "I'll be happy when I leave my full-time job" or "I'll be happy when my business makes X amount of dollars" or "I'll be happy when XYZ happens"... but how do we find a way to continue to show up while working towards these goals?How do we find a way to stay positive during challenges, hardships, and roadblocks, when we feel like nothing is going right and just want to throw in the towel?In today's Quick Tip Wednesday, we'll be talking about how to stay positive no matter what life, or business, throws at you.LEARN MORE FROM MONICA LITTLEWebsite: www.monicalittlecoaching.comInstagram: @monicalittlecoachingMy small business: www.shopplantbasedbeauty.com

Simplify and Enjoy
How to Be Happy with Money and Have a Happy Life

Simplify and Enjoy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 30:52


Do you have a huge financial goal you're chasing, but you're not sure how to fit it in with everything you have going on right now? Learn how you can be happy with your money and your life! Finding a Healthy Balance with Your Money and Your Life I find one of the biggest challenges when you're working on family and financial goals is finding that balance. It can be easy to go from one extreme to the other without even realizing it. Before we started knocking out our debts, I wouldn't say I gave much attention to finances. However there's this other extreme where you're completely focused on your financial goals. It can get to the point where you say, ‘We're going to do this when we pay this debt off, or have this much invested, or XYZ‘, you get the idea. This approach can rob you of joy of the journey and can add undue stress to your family. Taking care of your family and financial goals can be enjoyable and fun. It can also be more holistic, where you also improving different areas of your life including being more social, mental health, and more. That's why I'm thrilled Jason Vitug is on the show today. He's the author of You Only Live Once, and his new one one, Happy Money Happy Life. In this episode we'll: look at finances through a holistic lens share how you can make sure that you're enjoying the journey how to take care of yourself and your family We have a lot of cover, so let's get started! Resources to Find More Balance with Your Health and Wealth If you're ready to jump into the year and knock out some of your health and wealth goals, here are a few of my favorite. Best Budget and Money Apps: Personal Capital, Tiller, Mint Grab Your Copy: Jumpstart Your Marriage and Your Money Jason's Books: Happy Money Happy Life and You Only Live Once Connect with Jason: Twitter and Instagram Start with Your Why Noom Weight: Unlike other programs, Zoom's psychological focus uses small goals to help users create lasting habits and lose weight for good. You'll get fitness tips, recipes, a coach, and more to stay motivated. What's the #1 habit Peter would suggest every person add to their daily regimen? If you'd like to chat more your money system, please join us in our private and free Facebook group – Thriving Families. We're families looking to support and help one another out. Hope to see you there! Thank You to Our Sponsor Coastal! Support for this podcast comes from Coastal Credit Union! Come check out Coastal today if you're living in the Raleigh Durham area and looking to bank better. As a credit union, Coastal serves its members first and foremost including an annual loyalty bonus. We've been members for years and love their service and competitive rates on checking and savings accounts! Support the Podcast! Thank you so much for listening to the podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and found it helpful, here are some ways to support it. Spread the word! If you enjoyed this episode and think it can help a buddy get on the path to dumping debt and become financially free, please share. Join our coffee group ☕: Get access to exclusive behind the scenes videos, chats, and more! Leave a review. Honest feedback and reviews make a big difference and gets the word out about the podcast. Leave your review on Apple or Stitcher. Grab a copy of Jumpstart Your Marriage and Your Money. My book is designed for a busy couple to set up their finances in four weeks. Get tips and tools that have worked for other couples on their journey of building their marriage and wealth together! Photos by Daniel Torobekov and Tatiana Syrikova:

Soft Skills Engineering
Episode 340: Productivity lulls and code review showdown

Soft Skills Engineering

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 33:03


In this episode, Dave and Jamison answer these questions: A listener Daniel asks, How do I handle periods of time where I am just not productive as I used to be? I'm talking about periods of several weeks. For example, when your kids are ill all the time (daycare fun) or you are down because of XYZ. How do you turn not really constructive feedback into useful feedback? I have a difficult time dealing with PR reviews from a specific colleague. They have a way to push my buttons somehow, it's like even when they are actually right, the way they approach the subject or how nit picky their comments are just make it hard to take the feedback or start a healthy discussion. It prompts me to become confrontational. I know it's not good to react like this, but I don't feel comfortable talking directly to them about it to try to smooth things out. I don't think its personal as I've seen this kind of comments on other people's PRs too. I am aware this might be me being overly sensitive, but its like every time he is the one reviewing my PR I get the feeling of “oh, not this guy again” and need to mentally prepare for his comments. I'd like to find a way to take the core of the feedback that might be useful and kind of ignore the rest that might feel dismissive or opinionated, and I thought you might have some tools for this. The main reason I care about it is that this reflected badly on my latest performance review, as I had stellar feedback in general and the only improvement areas were that I should learn how to deal with mistakes or negative feedback better. I am aware it can be a weak point on me , but I know that a big part of that comment from my manager comes from my interactions with this specific colleague.

In Before The Lock

Erica and Brian run down the most common interview questions and how to answer them. Community Industry News: Quinn McCully joined Vesta as Community Management and Engagement Specialist Maren Hamilton was promoted to Director of Social & Community at The North Face Ami Defesche joined The Wildcard Alliance as Director of Community Corey Strausman joined Weights & Biases as Community Manager, Growth Dominique Farrar joined Quantive as Director of Community Nick Emmett joined Alvaria as Senior Community & Knowledge Manager Marjorie Anderson joined Exos as Director of Community Paul Bradley joined Kaplan as Vice President, Kaplan Community Farhan Chowdry joined Deen Developers as Community Lead for Forge Jeremiah Haze joined Intuit as Community Moderator Mattie Fairchild joined OP Lab as Head of Developer Relations Top 10 interview questions and how to answer them: Role Specific: What has been the biggest thing you've learned at your current role that you think would be relevant to this role? How would it inform you in this role? What was the most recent community program you built and how did you build it? Tell me about what you saw when you looked at our community? Strategy: Provide an example where you encountered someone or a part of the organization that was not bought into Community. How did you overcome it? How do you balance the needs of the community and the needs of the business? What would you say is the most important element to building a vibrant community? What level of resources do you expect to need to be successful with the community here Metrics/Measurement/ROI: How did you measure success, what were your key metrics, and what insights did you draw from them? Collaboration: How have you brought community input/feedback to XYZ teams in your past experience? Content Strategy: What was your content strategy when building community?

The Product Biz Podcast
How to stop procrastinating with Dr. Christine Li

The Product Biz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 32:49 Transcription Available


We all can relate to the feeling when we KNOW that we HAVE to do something, but we just keep pushing it off. We wait and wait and wait... finding any excuse not to do it. Or, maybe it's not so blatantly obvious, but there's SOMEthing we've been avoiding... saying we are too busy, we don't have enough time, we don't have enough XYZ... when it really might just be another form of procrastination that's sneaking up on us.If you can relate to either of these feelings, then this episode will debunk what procrastination REALLY is.. and show you how to OVERcome it to keep making progress towards your dreams, with special guest Dr. Christine Li.Dr. Christine Li is a New York-based clinical psychologist, known as the "Procrastination Coach," who specializes in helping her clients identify and understand the stories behind their procrastination so that they can reconnect with their natural motivation, talent, and productivity. She uses a unique coaching process that is a blend of mindset strategy, time and emotion management tips, and a deep belief in the power we each have. Dr. Li is the host of the podcast Make Time for Success, which features relatable stories of people who have overcome self-doubt and resistance to find personal and professional success.BY THE TIME YOU FINISH LISTENING, YOU'LL​ LEARN:The two types of procrastination that exist and how you can spot them in your day-to-day lifeHow you can start to overcome procrastination and build belief in yourselfThe #1 strategy to get OUT of a procrastination funk and back into ACTION towards your big dreams and goalsLINKS MENTIONED IN TODAY'S EPISODEFollow Christine on Instagram and TikTok @procrastinationcoachDownload Christine's 12 simple ways to get over procrastinationListen to Christine's Make Time for Success podcastLEARN MORE FROM MONICA LITTLEWebsite: www.monicalittlecoaching.comInstagram: @monicalittlecoachingMy small business: www.shopplantbasedbeauty.com

Slate Star Codex Podcast
Conspiracies of Cognition, Conspiracies Of Emotion

Slate Star Codex Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 13:06


https://astralcodexten.substack.com/p/conspiracies-of-cognition-conspiracies I. Some conspiracy theories center on finding anomalies in a narrative. For example, Oswald couldn't have shot Kennedy, because the bullet came from the wrong direction. Or: the Egyptians couldn't have built the Pyramids, because they required XYZ advanced technology. I like these because they feel straightforwardly about styles of processing evidence (Remember, I use the word “evidence” in a broad sense that includes bad evidence. By saying that some conspiracy theory has “evidence”, I'm not suggesting it's justifiable, just that someone somewhere has asserted that they believe it for some particular reason. For example, someone might say they believe in alien abductions because of eyewitnesses who claim to have been abducted; I'll be calling the eyewitnesses “evidence” without meaning to assert it is any good.)

The Ambitious Introvert Podcast
How I Think About… Investing

The Ambitious Introvert Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 25:43 Transcription Available


Welcome to the third episode in the How I Think About….. Series. This week I'm sharing my thoughts on investing, specifically related to investments in our businesses.There's a LOT of educational content online showing us how to do XYZ, but we don't often see the thought process behind the actions online business owners take. But it's actually the thought process that gives us the changes and breakthroughs we need, because it's a reflection of our mindset (and we know how important that is).My hope in the ‘How I Think About…..' series of episodes is that you can decide how YOU think and feel about a certain topic, whether you resonate with something I've said or firmly disagree!In this week's episode I'll be sharing:How I approached investing in myself and my business when I first started (and how I'd feel if an investment didn't work out the way I thought it would)When my view of investing began to change and the impact that had on the next business investment I madeHow I think about investing in my business now, and how I categorise each type of investmentWhy a ROI isn't always immediate but doesn't necessarily mean it is less valuable (and in fact may be even more so)The energetics behind investing and why they matter so muchRESOURCES EMMA-LOUISE MENTIONEDThe Advance NetworkMy ‘As If' trip podcast episodeThe Pathway membership by To be MagneticCONNECT WITH EMMA-LOUISE:Website: http://www.emmalouiseparkes.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/ambitiousintrovert/Facebook Group: The Ambitious Introvert® NetworkFREE RESOURCES:Enjoyed this episode? Hit ‘subscribe' and share it with other Ambitious Introverts who'll appreciate it. Plus, leave a review for the podcast and you can win a FREE 45 minute coaching session as a thank you!Grab every book recommendation from all of my amazing guests! These reads are guaranteed to provide heaps of value and help you grow your business. Sign up for the free list here http://theambitiousintrovert.com/readinglistPREMIUM SUPPORTInterested in working with me 1:1? Fill out this form to start the conversation! https://bit.ly/2QQAwcxConnect with Emma-Louise: Website: http://www.emmalouiseparkes.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/emmalouparkes Facebook Group: The Ambitious Introvert® Network

The Nonlinear Library
AF - Non-directed conceptual founding by Tsvi Benson-Tilsen

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 14:30


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Non-directed conceptual founding, published by Tsvi Benson-Tilsen on January 15, 2023 on The AI Alignment Forum. [Metadata: crossposted from. Written 13 June 2022. I'm fairly likely to not respond to comments promptly. If you're especially interested in chatting, my gmail address is: tsvibtcontact ] In trying to understand minds-in-general, we sometimes ask questions that talk about "big" things (taking "big" to ambiguously mean any of large, complex, abstract, vague, important, touches many things, applies to many contexts, "high-level"). E.g.: What is it for a mind to have thoughts or to care about stuff? How does care and thought relate? What is it to believe a proposition? Why do agents use abstractions? These "big" things such as thought, caring, propositions, beliefs, agents, abstractions, and so on, have to be analyzed and re-understood in clearer terms in order to get anywhere useful. When others make statements about these things, I'm pulled to pause their flow of thoughts and instead try to get clear on meanings. In part, that pull is because the more your thoughts use descriptions that aren't founded on words with clear meaning, the more leeway is given to your words to point at different things in different instances.[1] Main claim From talking with Sam, I've come to think that there's an important thing I hadn't seen sufficiently clearly: A description of Y that uses terms that are only as "foundational" as Y or even "less foundational" than Y, can still be useful and doesn't have to be harmful. For analyzing "big" things, such descriptions are necessary. Circular founding A description is a proposition of the form "Y is a ...". A description is founded on X if it assumes that X exists, e.g. by mentioning X, or by mentioning Z which mentions X, or by relying on X to be in the background.[2] Some descriptions of Y might be founded on Y, or on X where X is itself founded on Y. A description like that could be called circular, or in general non-directed. The circularity could be harmful. E.g., you could trick yourself into thinking you're talking about anything coherently, when really you're not: whenever you ask "Wait, what's Y?" you respond "Oh it's XZ", and you say "Z is YX", and you say "X is YZ", and you never do the work of connecting XYZ to stuff that matters, so it's all hot air. Or, you might have "Y" more densely connected to its neighbors, but not beholden to anything outside of its neighbors, so "Y" and its neighbors might drift under their own collaborative inertia and drag other ideas with them away from reality. There are probably other problems with circular founding, so, there's reason to be suspicious. But: (A) Non-directed founding can elucidate relevant structure; (B) For "big" things, it's more likely to be feasible to found somewhat-non-directedly, and especially somewhat-circularly, and less likely to be feasible to found strictly in a certain direction; and therefore (C) For analyzing and understanding "big" things, non-directed and circular founding are likely to be best-in-class among the available tools. (A): "Thing = Nexus" as a circular, non-directed, useful founding As an example, take the description of a thing as an inductive nexus of reference (more specifically, the claim that nexusness points essentially [see below] at the nexus of thingness). This description makes use of a pre-theoretic notion of the "stuff" between which there may be relations of reference, and defines "reference" in terms of what minds in general do. So the definition of nexus is founded on "stuff", which is pre-theoretically on a similar footing to "thing", making the definition of nexus somewhat circularly founded. And, the definition of nexus is founded on "mind", which is a "bigger" concept than "thing", making the definition of nexus founded on so...

Sons of UCF
SOUL: January 12, 2023

Sons of UCF

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 64:31


Proudly presented by the law firm of Gordon and Partners. Contact UCF Alum Michael Hoffman via text at (407) 913-5350 or visit the website www.fortheinjured.com. Don't trust just anybody, trust the best, and trust a Knight. Gordon and Partners, for the injured.This week, the Sons of UCF welcome in Adam Breneman, fresh from his tour of the UCF Football facilities with QB John Rhys Plumlee. Breneman is the Vice President of Media & NIL for Mercury which is behind ChargeOn.XYZ for UCF. Plus, we're talking about UCF Basketball's 2 OT win over Memphis!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Screaming in the Cloud
Exposing Vulnerabilities in the World of Cloud Security with Tim Gonda

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 33:23


About TimTim Gonda is a Cloud Security professional who has spent the last eight years securing and building Cloud workloads for commercial, non-profit, government, and national defense organizations. Tim currently serves as the Technical Director of Cloud at Praetorian, influencing the direction of its offensive-security-focused Cloud Security practice and the Cloud features of Praetorian's flagship product, Chariot. He considers himself lucky to have the privilege of working with the talented cyber operators at Praetorian and considers it the highlight of his career.Tim is highly passionate about helping organizations fix Cloud Security problems, as they are found, the first time, and most importantly, the People/Process/Technology challenges that cause them in the first place. In his spare time, he embarks on adventures with his wife and ensures that their two feline bundles of joy have the best playtime and dining experiences possible.Links Referenced: Praetorian: https://www.praetorian.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/timgondajr/ Praetorian Blog: https://www.praetorian.com/blog/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Thinkst Canary. Most Companies find out way too late that they've been breached. Thinkst Canary changes this. Deploy Canaries and Canarytokens in minutes and then forget about them. Attackers tip their hand by touching 'em giving you the one alert, when it matters. With 0 admin overhead and almost no false-positives, Canaries are deployed (and loved) on all 7 continents. Check out what people are saying at canary.love today!Corey: Kentik provides Cloud and NetOps teams with complete visibility into hybrid and multi-cloud networks. Ensure an amazing customer experience, reduce cloud and network costs, and optimize performance at scale — from internet to data center to container to cloud. Learn how you can get control of complex cloud networks at www.kentik.com, and see why companies like Zoom, Twitch, New Relic, Box, Ebay, Viasat, GoDaddy, booking.com, and many, many more choose Kentik as their network observability platform. Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Every once in a while, I like to branch out into new and exciting territory that I've never visited before. But today, no, I'd much rather go back to complaining about cloud security, something that I tend to do an awful lot about. Here to do it with me is Tim Gonda, Technical Director of Cloud at Praetorian. Tim, thank you for joining me on this sojourn down what feels like an increasingly well-worn path.Tim: Thank you, Corey, for having me today.Corey: So, you are the Technical Director of Cloud, which I'm sort of short-handing to okay, everything that happens on the computer is henceforth going to be your fault. How accurate is that in the grand scheme of things?Tim: It's not too far off. But we like to call it Praetorian for nebula. The nebula meaning that it's Schrödinger's problem: it both is and is not the problem. Here's why. We have a couple key focuses at Praetorian, some of them focusing on more traditional pen testing, where we're looking at hardware, hit System A, hit System B, branch out, get to goal.On the other side, we have hitting web applications and [unintelligible 00:01:40]. This insecure app leads to this XYZ vulnerability, or this medical appliance is insecure and therefore we're able to do XYZ item. One of the things that frequently comes up is that more and more organizations are no longer putting their applications or infrastructure on-prem anymore, so therefore, some part of the assessment ends up being in the cloud. And that is the unique rub that I'm in. And that I'm responsible for leading the direction of the cloud security focus group, who may not dive into a specific specialty that some of these other teams might dig into, but may have similar responsibilities or similar engagement style.And in this case, if we discover something in the cloud as an issue, or even in your own organization where you have a cloud security team, you'll have a web application security team, you'll have your core information security team that defends your environment in many different methods, many different means, you'll frequently find that the cloud security team is the hot button for hey, the server was misconfigured at one certain level, however the cloud security team didn't quite know that this web application was vulnerable. We did know that it was exposed to the internet but we can't necessarily turn off all web applications from the internet because that would no longer serve the purpose of a web application. And we also may not know that a particular underlying host's patch is out of date. Because technically, that would be siloed off into another problem.So, what ends up happening is that on almost every single incident that involves a cloud infrastructure item, you might find that cloud security will be right there alongside the incident responders. And yep, this [unintelligible 00:03:20] is here, it's exposed to the internet via here, and it might have the following application on it. And they get cross-exposure with other teams that say, “Hey, your web application is vulnerable. We didn't quite inform the cloud security team about it, otherwise this wouldn't be allowed to go to the public internet,” or on the infrastructure side, “Yeah, we didn't know that there was a patch underneath it, we figured that we would let the team handle it at a later date, and therefore this is also vulnerable.” And what ends up happening sometimes, is that the cloud security team might be the onus or might be the hot button in the room of saying, “Hey, it's broken. This is now your problem. Please fix it with changing cloud configurations or directing a team to make this change on our behalf.”So, in essence, sometimes cloud becomes—it both is and is not your problem when a system is either vulnerable or exposed or at some point, worst case scenario, ends up being breached and you're performing incident response. That's one of the cases why it's important to know—or important to involve others in the cloud security problem, or to be very specific about what the role of a cloud security team is, or where cloud security has to have certain boundaries or has to involve certain extra parties have to be involved in the process. Or when it does its own threat modeling process, say that, okay, we have to take a look at certain cloud findings or findings that's within our security realm and say that these misconfigurations or these items, we have to treat the underlying components as if they are vulnerable, whether or not they are and we have to report on them as if they are vulnerable, even if it means that a certain component of the infrastructure has to already be assumed to either have a vulnerability, have some sort of misconfiguration that allows an outside attacker to execute attacks against whatever the [unintelligible 00:05:06] is. And we have to treat and respond our security posture accordingly.Corey: One of the problems that I keep running into, and I swear it's not intentional, but people would be forgiven for understanding or believing otherwise, is that I will periodically inadvertently point out security problems via Twitter. And that was never my intention because, “Huh, that's funny, this thing isn't working the way that I would expect that it would,” or, “I'm seeing something weird in the logs in my test account. What is that?” And, “Oh, you found a security vulnerability or something akin to one in our environment. Oops. Next time, just reach out to us directly at the security contact form.” That's great. If I'd known I was stumbling blindly into a security approach, but it feels like the discovery of these things is not heralded by an, “Aha, I found it.” But, “Huh, that's funny.”Tim: Of course. Absolutely. And that's where some of the best vulnerabilities come where you accidentally stumble on something that says, “Wait, does this work how—what I think it is?” Click click. Like, “Oh, boy, it does.”Now, I will admit that certain cloud providers are really great about with proactive security reach outs. If you either just file a ticket or file some other form of notification, just even flag your account rep and say, “Hey, when I was working on this particular cloud environment, the following occurred. Does this work the way I think it is? Is this is a problem?” And they usually get back to you with reporting it to their internal team, so on and so forth. But let's say applications are open-source frameworks or even just organizations at large where you might have stumbled upon something, the best thing to do was either look up, do they have a public bug bounty program, do they have a security contact or form reach out that you can email them, or do you know, someone that the organization that you just send a quick email saying, “Hey, I found this.”And through some combination of those is usually the best way to go. And to be able to provide context of the organization being, “Hey, the following exists.” And the most important things to consider when you're sending this sort of information is that they get these sorts of emails almost daily.Corey: One of my favorite genre of tweet is when Tavis Ormandy and Google's Project Zero winds up doing a tweet like, “Hey, do I know anyone over at the security apparatus at insert company here?” It's like, “All right. I'm sure people are shorting stocks now [laugh], based upon whatever he winds up doing that.”Tim: Of course.Corey: It's kind of fun to watch. But there's no cohesive way of getting in touch with companies on these things because as soon as you'd have something like that, it feels like it's subject to abuse, where Comcast hasn't fixed my internet for three days, now I'm going to email their security contact, instead of going through the normal preferred process of wait in the customer queue so they can ignore you.Tim: Of course. And that's something else you want to consider. If you broadcast that a security vulnerability exists without letting the entity or company know, you're also almost causing a green light, where other security researchers are going to go dive in on this and see, like, one, does this work how you described. But that actually is a positive thing at some point, where either you're unable to get the company's attention, or maybe it's an open-source organization, or maybe you're not being fully sure that something is the case. However, when you do submit something to the customer and you want it to take it seriously, here's a couple of key things that you should consider.One, provide evidence that whatever you're talking about has actually occurred, two, provide repeatable steps that the layman's term, even IT support person can attempt to follow in your process, that they can repeat the same vulnerability or repeat the same security condition, and three, most importantly, detail why this matters. Is this something where I can adjust a user's password? Is this something where I can extract data? Is this something where I'm able to extract content from your website I otherwise shouldn't be able to? And that's important for the following reason.You need to inform the business what is the financial value of why leaving this unpatched becomes an issue for them. And if you do that, that's how those security vulnerabilities get prioritized. It's not necessarily because the coolest vulnerability exists, it's because it costs the company money, and therefore the security team is going to immediately jump on it and try to contain it before it costs them any more.Corey: One of my least favorite genres of security report are the ones that I get where I found a vulnerability. It's like, that's interesting. I wasn't aware that I read any public-facing services, but all right, I'm game; what have you got? And it's usually something along the lines of, “You haven't enabled SPF to hard fail an email that doesn't wind up originating explicitly from this list of IP addresses. Bug bounty, please.” And it's, “No genius. That is very much an intentional choice. Thank you for playing.”It comes down to also an idea of whenever I have reported security vulnerabilities in the past, the pattern I always take is, “I'm seeing something that I don't fully understand. I suspect this might have security implications, but I'm also more than willing to be proven wrong.” Because showing up with, “You folks are idiots and have a security problem,” is a terrific invitation to be proven wrong and look like an idiot. Because the first time you get that wrong, no one will take you seriously again.Tim: Of course. And as you'll find that most bug bounty programs are, if you participate in those, the first couple that you might have submitted, the customer might even tell you, “Yeah, we're aware that that vulnerability exists, however, we don't view it as a core issue and it cannot affect the functionality of our site in any meaningful way, therefore we're electing to ignore it.” Fair.Corey: Very fair. But then when people write up about those things, well, they've they decided this is not an issue, so I'm going to do a write-up on it. Like, “You can't do that. The NDA doesn't let you expose that.” “Really? Because you just said it's a non-issue. Which is it?”Tim: And the key to that, I guess, would also be that is there an underlying technology that doesn't necessarily have to be attributed to said organization? Can you also say that, if I provide a write-up or if I put up my own personal blog post—let's say, we go back to some of the OpenSSL vulnerabilities including OpenSSL 3.0, that came out not too long ago, but since that's an open-source project, it's fair game—let's just say that if there was a technology such as that, or maybe there's a wrapper around it that another organization could be using or could be implementing a certain way, you don't necessarily have to call the company up by name, or rather just say, here's the core technology reason, and here's the core technology risk, and here's the way I've demoed exploiting this. And if you publish an open-source blog like that and then you tweet about that, you can actually gain security support around such issue and then fight for the research.An example would be that I know a couple of pen testers who have reported things in the past, and while the first time they reported it, the company was like, “Yeah, we'll fix it eventually.” But later, when another researcher report this exact same finding, the company is like, “We should probably take this seriously and jump on it.” It sometimes it's just getting in front of that and providing frequency or providing enough people around to say that, “Hey, this really is an issue in the security community and we should probably fix this item,” and keep pushing others organizations on it. A lot of times, they just need additional feedback. Because as you said, somebody runs an automated scanner against your email and says that, “Oh, you're not checking SPF as strictly as the scanner would have liked because it's a benchmarking tool.” It's not necessarily a security vulnerability rather than it's just how you've chosen to configure something and if it works for you, it works for you.Corey: How does cloud change this? Because a lot of what we talked about so far could apply to anything. Go back in time to 1995 and a lot of what we're talking about mostly holds true. It feels like cloud acts as a significant level of complexity on top of all of this. How do you view the differentiation there?Tim: So, I think it differentiated two things. One, certain services or certain vulnerability classes that are handled by the shared service model—for the most part—are probably secure better than you might be able to do yourself. Just because there's a lot of research, the team is [experimented 00:13:03] a lot of time on this. An example of if there's a particular, like, spoofing or network interception vulnerability that you might see on a local LAN network, you probably are not going to have the same level access to be able to execute that on a virtual private cloud or VNet, or some other virtual network within cloud environment. Now, something that does change with the paradigm of cloud is the fact that if you accidentally publicly expose something or something that you've created expo—or don't set a setting to be private or only specific to your resources, there is a couple of things that could happen. The vulnerabilities exploitability based on where increases to something that used to be just, “Hey, I left a port open on my own network. Somebody from HR or somebody from it could possibly interact with it.”However, in the cloud, you've now set this up to the entire world with people that might have resources or motivations to go after this product, and using services like Shodan—which are continually mapping the internet for open resources—and they can quickly grab that, say, “Okay, I'm going to attack these targets today,” might continue to poke a little bit further, maybe an internal person that might be bored at work or a pen tester just on one specific engagement. Especially in the case of let's say, what you're working on has sparked the interest of a nation-state and they want to dig into a little bit further, they have the resources to be able to dedicate time, people, and maybe tools and tactics against whatever this vulnerability that you've given previously the example of—maybe there's a specific ID and a URL that just needs to be guessed right to give them access to something—they might spend the time trying to brute force that URL, brute force that value, and eventually try to go after what you have.The main paradigm shift here is that there are certain things that we might consider less of a priority because the cloud has already taken care of them with the shared service model, and rightfully so, and there's other times that we have to take heightened awareness on is, one, we either dispose something to the entire internet or all cloud accounts within creations. And that's actually something that we see commonly. In fact, one thing I would like to say we see very common is, all AWS users, regardless if it's in your account or somewhere else, might have access to your SNS topic or SQS Queue. Which doesn't seem like that big of vulnerability, but I changed the messages, I delete messages, I viewed your messages, but rather what's connected to those? Let's talk database Lambda functions where I've got source code that a developer has written to handle that source code and may not have built in logic to handle—maybe there was a piece of code that could be abused as part of this message that might allow an attacker to send something to your Lambda function and then execute something on that attacker's behalf.You weren't aware of it, you weren't thinking about it, and now you've exposed it to almost the entire internet. And since anyone can go sign up for an AWS account—or Azure or GCP account—and then they're able to start poking at that same piece of code that you might have developed thinking, “Well, this is just for internal use. It's not a big deal. That one static code analysis tool isn't probably too relevant.” Now, it becomes hyper-relevant and something you have to consider with a little more attention and dedicated time to making sure that these things that you've written or deploying, are in fact, safe because misconfigured or mis-exposed, and suddenly the entire world is starts knocking at it, and increases the risk of, it may really well be a problem. The severity of that issue could increase dramatically.Corey: As you take a look across, let's call it the hyperscale clouds, the big three—which presumably I don't need to define out—how do you wind up ranking them in terms of security from top to bottom? I have my own rankings that I like to dole out and basically, this is the, let's offend someone at every one of these companies, no matter how we wind up playing it. Because I will argue with you just on principle on them. How do you view them stacking up against each other?Tim: So, an interesting view on that is based on who's been around longest and who is encountered of the most technical debt. A lot of these security vulnerabilities or security concerns may have had to deal with a decision made long ago that might have made sense at the time and now the company has kind of stuck with that particular technology or decision or framework, and are now having to build or apply security Band-Aids to that process until it gets resolved. I would say, ironically, AWS is actually at the top of having that technical debt, and actually has so many different types of access policies that are very complex to configure and not very user intuitive unless you speak intuitively JSON or YAML or some other markdown language, to be able to tell you whether or not something was actually set up correctly. Now, there are a lot of security experts who make their money based on knowing how to configure or be able to assess whether or not these are actually the issue. I would actually bring them as, by default, by design, between the big three, they're actually on the lower end of certain—based on complexity and easy-to-configure-wise.The next one that would also go into that pile, I would say is probably Microsoft Azure, who [sigh] admittedly, decided to say that, “Okay, let's take something that was very complicated and everyone really loved to use as an identity provider, Active Directory, and try to use that as a model for.” Even though they made it extensively different. It is not the same as on-prem directory, but use that as the framework for how people wanted to configure their identity provider for a new cloud provider. The one that actually I would say, comes out on top, just based on use and based on complexity might be Google Cloud. They came to a lot of these security features first.They're acquiring new companies on a regular basis with the acquisition of Mandiant, the creation of their own security tooling, their own unique security approaches. In fact, they probably wrote the book on Kubernetes Security. Would be on top, I guess, from usability, such as saying that I don't want to have to manage all these different types of policies. Here are some buttons I would like to flip and I'd like my resources, for the most part by default, to be configured correctly. And Google does a pretty good job of that.Also, one of the things they do really well is entity-based role assumption, which inside of AWS, you can provide access keys by default or I have to provide a role ID after—or in Azure, I'm going to say, “Here's a [unintelligible 00:19:34] policy for something specific that I want to grant access to a specific resource.” Google does a pretty good job of saying that okay, everything is treated as an email address. This email address can be associated in a couple of different ways. It can be given the following permissions, it can have access to the following things, but for example, if I want to remove access to something, I just take that email address off of whatever access policy I had somewhere, and then it's taken care of. But they do have some other items such as their design of least privilege is something to be expected when you consider their hierarchy.I'm not going to say that they're not without fault in that area—in case—until they had something more recently, as far as finding certain key pieces of, like say, tags or something within a specific sub-project or in our hierarchy, there were cases where you might have granted access at a higher level and that same level of access came all the way down. And where at least privilege is required to be enforced, otherwise, you break their security model. So, I like them for how simple it is to set up security at times, however, they've also made it unnecessarily complex at other times so they don't have the flexibility that the other cloud service providers have. On the flip side of that, the level of flexibility also leads to complexity at times, which I also view as a problem where customers think they've done something correctly based on their best knowledge, the best of documentation, the best and Medium articles they've been researching, and what they have done is they've inadvertently made assumptions that led to core anti-patterns, like, [unintelligible 00:21:06] what they've deployed.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Uptycs, because they believe that many of you are looking to bolster your security posture with CNAPP and XDR solutions. They offer both cloud and endpoint security in a single UI and data model. Listeners can get Uptycs for up to 1,000 assets through the end of 2023 (that is next year) for $1. But this offer is only available for a limited time on UptycsSecretMenu.com. That's U-P-T-Y-C-S Secret Menu dot com.Corey: I think you're onto something here, specifically in—well, when I've been asked historically and personally to rank security, I have viewed Google Cloud as number one, and AWS is number two. And my reasoning behind that has been from an absolute security of their platform and a pure, let's call it math perspective, it really comes down to which of the two of them had what for breakfast on any given day there, they're so close on there. But in a project that I spin up in Google Cloud, everything inside of it can talk to each other by default and I can scope that down relatively easily, whereas over an AWS land, by default, nothing can talk to anything. And that means that every permission needs to be explicitly granted, which in an absolutist sense and in a vacuum, yeah, that makes sense, but here in reality, people don't do that. We've seen a number of AWS blog posts over the last 15 years—they don't do this anymore—but it started off with, “Oh, yeah, we're just going to grant [* on * 00:22:04] for the purposes of this demo.”“Well, that's horrible. Why would you do that?” “Well, if we wanted to specify the IAM policy, it would take up the first third of the blog post.” How about that? Because customers go through that exact same thing. I'm trying to build something and ship.I mean, the biggest lie in any environment or any codebase ever, is the comment that starts with, “To do.” Yeah, that is load-bearing. You will retire with that to do still exactly where it is. You have to make doing things the right way at least the least frictionful path because no one is ever going to come back and fix this after the fact. It's never going to happen, as much as we wish that it did.Tim: At least until after the week of the breach when it was highlighted by the security team to say that, “Hey, this was the core issue.” Then it will be fixed in short order. Usually. Or a Band-Aid is applied to say that this can no longer be exploited in this specific way again.Corey: My personal favorite thing that, like, I wouldn't say it's a lie. But the favorite thing that I see in all of these announcements right after the, “Your security is very important to us,” right after it very clearly has not been sufficiently important to them, and they say, “We show no signs of this data being accessed.” Well, that can mean a couple different things. It can mean, “We have looked through the audit logs for a service going back to its launch and have verified that nothing has ever done this except the security researcher who found it.” Great. Or it can mean, “What even are logs, exactly? We're just going to close our eyes and assume things are great.” No, no.Tim: So, one thing to consider there is in that communication, that entire communication has probably been vetted by the legal department to make sure that the company is not opening itself up for liability. I can say from personal experience, when that usually has occurred, unless it can be proven that breach was attributable to your user specifically, the default response is, “We have determined that the security response of XYZ item or XYZ organization has determined that your data was not at risk at any point during this incident.” Which might be true—and we're quoting Star Wars on this one—from a certain point of view. And unfortunately, in the case of a post-breach, their security, at least from a regulation standpoint where they might be facing a really large fine, is absolutely probably their top priority at this very moment, but has not come to surface because, for most organizations, until this becomes something that is a financial reason to where they have to act, where their reputation is on the line, they're not necessarily incentivized to fix it. They're incentivized to push more products, push more features, keep the clients happy.And a lot of the time going back and saying, “Hey, we have this piece of technical debt,” it doesn't really excite our user base or doesn't really help us gain a competitive edge in the market is considered an afterthought until the crisis occurs and the information security team rejoices because this is the time they actually get to see their stuff fixed, even though it might be a super painful time for them in the short run because they get to see these things fixed, they get to see it put to bed. And if there's ever a happy medium, where, hey, maybe there was a legacy feature that wasn't being very well taken care of, or maybe this feature was also causing the security team a lot of pain, we get to see both that feature, that item, that service, get better, as well as security teams not have to be woken up on a regular basis because XYZ incident happened, XYZ item keeps coming up in a vulnerability scan. If it finally is put to bed, we consider that a win for all. And one thing to consider in security as well as kind of, like, we talk about the relationship between the developers and security and/or product managers and security is if we can make it a win, win, win situation for all, that's the happy path that we really want to be getting to. If there's a way that we can make sure that experience is better for customers, the security team doesn't have to be broken up on a regular basis because an incident happened, and the developers receive less friction when they want to go implement something, you find that that secure feature, function, whatever tends to be the happy path forward and the path of least resistance for everyone around it. And those are sometimes the happiest stories that can come out of some of these incidents.Corey: It's weird to think of there being any happy stories coming out of these things, but it's definitely one of those areas that there are learnings there to be had if we're willing to examine them. The biggest problem I see so often is that so many companies just try and hide these things. They give the minimum possible amount of information so the rest of us can't learn by it. Honestly, some of the moments where I've gained the most respect for the technical prowess of some of these cloud providers has been after there's been a security issue and they have disclosed either their response or why it was a non-issue because they took a defense-in-depth approach. It's really one of those transformative moments that I think is an opportunity if companies are bold enough to chase them down.Tim: Absolutely. And in a similar vein, when we think of certain cloud providers outages and we're exposed, like, the major core flaw of their design, and if it kept happening—and again, these outages could be similar and analogous to an incident or a security flaw, meaning that it affected us. It was something that actually happened. In the case of let's say, the S3 outage of, I don't know, it was like 2017, 2018, where it turns out that there was a core DNS system that inside of us-east-1, which is actually very close to where I live, apparently was the core crux of, for whatever reason, the system malfunctioned and caused a major outage. Outside of that, in this specific example, they had to look at ways of how do we not have a single point of failure, even if it is a very robust system, to make sure this doesn't happen again.And there was a lot of learnings to be had, a lot of in-depth investigation that happened, probably a lot of development, a lot of research, and sometimes on the outside of an incident, you really get to understand why a system was built a certain way or why a condition exists in the first place. And it sometimes can be fascinating to kind of dig into that very deeper and really understand what the core problem is. And now that we know what's an issue, we can actually really work to address it. And sometimes that's actually one of the best parts about working at Praetorian in some cases is that a lot of the items we find, we get to find them early before it becomes one of these issues, but the most important thing is we get to learn so much about, like, why a particular issue is such a big problem. And you have to really solve the core business problem, or maybe even help inform, “Hey, this is an issue for it like this.”However, this isn't necessarily all bad in that if you make these adjustments of these items, you get to retain this really cool feature, this really cool thing that you built, but also, you have to say like, here's some extra, added benefits to the customers that you weren't really there. And—such as the old adage of, “It's not a bug, it's a feature,” sometimes it's exactly what you pointed out. It's not necessarily all bad in an incident. It's also a learning experience.Corey: Ideally, we can all learn from these things. I want to thank you for being so generous with your time and talking about how you view this increasingly complicated emerging space. If people want to learn more, where's the best place to find you?Tim: You can find me on LinkedIn which will be included in this podcast description. You can also go look at articles that the team is putting together at praetorian.com. Unfortunately, I'm not very big on Twitter.Corey: Oh, well, you must be so happy. My God, what a better decision you're making than the rest of us.Tim: Well, I like to, like, run a little bit under the radar, except on opportunities like this where I can talk about something I'm truly passionate about. But I try not to pollute the airwaves too much, but LinkedIn is a great place to find me. Praetorian blog for stuff the team is building. And if anyone wants to reach out, feel free to hit the contact page up in praetorian.com. That's one of the best places to get my attention.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:30:19]. Thank you so much for your time. I appreciate it. Tim Gonda, Technical Director of Cloud at Praetorian. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry comment talking about how no one disagrees with you based upon a careful examination of your logs.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

@BEERISAC: CPS/ICS Security Podcast Playlist
SBA 394: How to Get IT AND OT to work together with Bayron Lopez

@BEERISAC: CPS/ICS Security Podcast Playlist

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 73:03


Podcast: The Smart Buildings Academy Podcast | Teaching You Building Automation, Systems Integration, and Information Technology (LS 42 · TOP 1.5% what is this?)Episode: SBA 394: How to Get IT AND OT to work together with Bayron LopezPub date: 2023-01-06In this episode of the Smart Buildings Academy Podcast Bayron Lopez helps us to unpack the world of IT from a customer's point of view. So often we are busy thinking "How can I respond to this spec?"  Or  "How can I be compliant with XYZ requirement?" But how often do we stop to think about the operational side of the systems we install? In this episode Bayron helps us to understand the customer's point of view. Join us as Bayron gives us a behind the scenes look at how IT decisions are made and how we can avoid that dreaded not-qualified decision from IT. The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Phil Zito Building Automation and Systems Integration Expert, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Arroe Collins
Play It Forward Episode 535 With Terry Ilous All Or Nothing

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 17:41


This is Play It Forward. Real people. Real stories. The struggle to Play It Forward Episode 535 With Rocker Terry Ilous Terry Ilous, lead singer for the band Great White, and founder of 80's metal band XYZ is premiering his third solo venture, Gypsy Dreams. A video trailer for the album can be viewed via the following link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K900FNP5rrQ Terry Ilous relocated to Hollywood, California from Lyon, France in 1986 forming the metal band XYZ along with friend and bassist Pat Fontaine. Ilous quickly became a favorite on Sunset Strip scene in the late 80's before getting signed to Enigma / Capitol Records. After selling over 1.5 million records worldwide and touring with artists such as Foreigner and Alice Cooper; Ilous has continued to release albums well into the 2000's along with film, song-writing, and television work.

Arroe Collins
Play It Forward Episode 535 With Terry Ilous All Or Nothing

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 17:41


This is Play It Forward. Real people. Real stories. The struggle to Play It Forward Episode 535 With Rocker Terry Ilous Terry Ilous, lead singer for the band Great White, and founder of 80's metal band XYZ is premiering his third solo venture, Gypsy Dreams. A video trailer for the album can be viewed via the following link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K900FNP5rrQ Terry Ilous relocated to Hollywood, California from Lyon, France in 1986 forming the metal band XYZ along with friend and bassist Pat Fontaine. Ilous quickly became a favorite on Sunset Strip scene in the late 80's before getting signed to Enigma / Capitol Records. After selling over 1.5 million records worldwide and touring with artists such as Foreigner and Alice Cooper; Ilous has continued to release albums well into the 2000's along with film, song-writing, and television work.

The Smart Buildings Academy Podcast | Teaching You Building Automation, Systems Integration, and Information Technology

In this episode of the Smart Buildings Academy Podcast Bayron Lopez helps us to unpack the world of IT from a customer's point of view. So often we are busy thinking "How can I respond to this spec?"  Or  "How can I be compliant with XYZ requirement?" But how often do we stop to think about the operational side of the systems we install? In this episode Bayron helps us to understand the customer's point of view. Join us as Bayron gives us a behind the scenes look at how IT decisions are made and how we can avoid that dreaded not-qualified decision from IT. 

Arroe Collins
Play It Forward Episode 535 With Terry Ilous All Or Nothing

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 17:41


This is Play It Forward. Real people. Real stories. The struggle to Play It Forward Episode 535 With Rocker Terry Ilous Terry Ilous, lead singer for the band Great White, and founder of 80's metal band XYZ is premiering his third solo venture, Gypsy Dreams. A video trailer for the album can be viewed via the following link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K900FNP5rrQ Terry Ilous relocated to Hollywood, California from Lyon, France in 1986 forming the metal band XYZ along with friend and bassist Pat Fontaine. Ilous quickly became a favorite on Sunset Strip scene in the late 80's before getting signed to Enigma / Capitol Records. After selling over 1.5 million records worldwide and touring with artists such as Foreigner and Alice Cooper; Ilous has continued to release albums well into the 2000's along with film, song-writing, and television work.

Arroe Collins
Play It Forward Episode 535 With Terry Ilous All Or Nothing

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 17:41


This is Play It Forward. Real people. Real stories. The struggle to Play It Forward Episode 535 With Rocker Terry Ilous Terry Ilous, lead singer for the band Great White, and founder of 80's metal band XYZ is premiering his third solo venture, Gypsy Dreams. A video trailer for the album can be viewed via the following link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K900FNP5rrQ Terry Ilous relocated to Hollywood, California from Lyon, France in 1986 forming the metal band XYZ along with friend and bassist Pat Fontaine. Ilous quickly became a favorite on Sunset Strip scene in the late 80's before getting signed to Enigma / Capitol Records. After selling over 1.5 million records worldwide and touring with artists such as Foreigner and Alice Cooper; Ilous has continued to release albums well into the 2000's along with film, song-writing, and television work.

Jake Ducey's 2nd Mind Podcast
3 Dangerous Words BLOCKING You from Attracting Money

Jake Ducey's 2nd Mind Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 14:31


✅  FREE SUCCESS HYPNOSIS - click here to download my free success hypnosis to reprogram your subconscious mind ➡ https://www.jakeducey.com/hypnosis In this video we talk about 3 dangerous words blocking you from attracting money. I AM NOT - 3 DANGEROUS WORDS BLOCKING MONEY & WEALTH  I AM NOT  I am not is an admission that I am not good enough to earn more money.  I am not is an admission that I cannot create more financial abundance.  I am not is an admission that I am not enough.  I am not is an admission that I am not smart enough, qualified enough, capable enough. I am not is an admission that you're not worthy of living a life of freedom and options.  First, here's a list of 5 high achievers with major reasons to doubt their own potential:  1.  Richard Branson, dyslexia and ADD.  2. Henry Ford, illiterate, elementary education.  3.  Thomas Edison was kicked out of the school when he was only 12 years old and that was because people believed that he was too dumb. He faced difficulties in learning mathematics when he was still in school and it became hard for him to speak and pronounce words. All of these things happened because he suffered from dyslexia. 4. Ludwig van Beethoven - best composer in history. He gave his first public performance as a pianist at the age of 8 years. At the age of twenty, he gained fame all over the world as a great pianist. In 1796, began losing his hearing. Despite of this problem, he immersed himself in his work and he created some of the music history. He achieved different milestones despite being completely deaf for the last 25 years of his life. 5. Vincent Van Gogh suffered from depression and was admitted to psychiatric hospital. His problem continued to worsen over tine and on July 27, 1890, at the age of 37 he shot himself in the chest. - Additionally, I am not is blasphemy to everything we know about psychology, neuroscience, and religion, especially in relation to MONEY. So we'll start with psychology, hit neuroscience, then end with Religion and Spirituality… 1.) Psychology - this is what is called “assuming an identity.” Psychologists have relayed to us for years that our own self-image determines much of the quality of our life, and the results we create for ourselves. Your self-image is a collection of the ideas you hold about yourself that you believe to be true. For example, “I AM NOT.” Not good enough, not young enough, not smart enough for XYZ…  2.) Neuroscience - 50 years ago we didn't know that your brain actually responds to emotions and life circumstances. Your emotions literally get wired into your brain via “Hebb's Law.”  3.) Religion -   - “Those who have more will be given, to those that do not have even that which they have will be taken away.”  ✅  FREE SUCCESS HYPNOSIS - click here to download my free success hypnosis to reprogram your subconscious mind ➡ https://www.jakeducey.com/hypnosis

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots
456: Jeli.io with Laura Maguire

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 46:37


Laura Maguire is a Researcher at Jeli.io, the first dedicated instant analysis platform that combines more comprehensive data to deliver more proactive solutions and identify problems. Victoria talks to Laura about incident management, giving companies a powerful tool to learn from their incidents, and what types of customers are ideal for taking on a platform like Jeli.io. Jeli.io (https://www.jeli.io/) Follow Jeli.io on Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/jeli_io/), Twitter (https://twitter.com/jeli_io) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/jeli-inc/). Follow Laura Maguire on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LauraMDMaguire) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/lauramaguire/). Follow thoughtbot on Twitter (https://twitter.com/thoughtbot) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/150727/). Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of Giant Robots! Transcript: VICTORIA: This is the Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots Podcast, where we explore the design, development, and business of great products. I'm your host, Victoria Guido. And with me today is Laura Maguire, Researcher at Jeli, the first dedicated instant analysis platform that combines more comprehensive data to deliver more proactive solutions and identify problems. Laura, thank you for joining me. LAURA: Thanks for having me, Victoria. VICTORIA: This might be a very introductory level question but just right off the bat, what is an incident? LAURA: What we find is a lot of companies define this very differently across the space, but typically, it's where they are seeing an impact, either a customer impact or a degradation of their service. This can be either formally, it kind of impacts their SLOs or their SLAs, or informally it's something that someone on the team notices or someone, you know, one of their users notice as being degraded performance or something not working as intended. VICTORIA: Gotcha. From my background being in IT operations, I'm familiar with incidents, and it's been a practice in IT for a long time. But what brought you to be a part of building this platform and creating a product around incidents? LAURA: I am a, let's say, recovering safety professional. VICTORIA: [chuckles] LAURA: I started my career in the safety and risk management realm within natural resource industries in the physical world. And so I worked with people who were at the sharp end in high-risk, high-consequence type work. And they were really navigating risk and navigating safety in the real world. And as I was working in this domain, I noticed that there was a delta between what was being said, created safety, and helped risk management and what I was actually seeing with the people that I was working with on the front lines. And so I started to pull the thread on this, and I thought, is work as done really the same as work as written or work as prescribed? And what I found was a whole field of research, a whole field of practice around thinking about safety and risk management in the world of cognitive work. And so this is how people think about risk, how they manage risk, and how do they interpret change and events in the world around them. And so as I started to do my master's degree in human factors and system safety and then later my Ph.D. in cognitive systems engineering, I realized that whether you are on the frontlines of a wildland fire or you're on the frontlines of responding to an incident in the software realm, the ways in which people detect, diagnose, and repair the issues that they're facing are quite similar in terms of the cognitive work. And so when I was starting my Ph.D. work, I was working with Dr. David Woods at the Cognitive Systems Engineering Lab at The Ohio State University. And I came into it, and I was thinking I'm going to work with astronauts, or with fighter pilots, or emergency room doctors, these really exciting domains. And he was like, "We're going to have you work with software engineers." And at first, I really failed to see the connection there, but as I started to learn more about site reliability engineering, about DevOps, about the continuous deployment, continuous integration world, I realized software engineers are really at the forefront of managing critical digital infrastructure. They're keeping up the systems that run society, both for recreation and pleasure in the sense of Netflix, for example, as well as the critical functions within society like our 911 call routing systems, our financial markets. And so the ability to study how software engineers detect outages, manage outages, and work together collaboratively across the team was really giving us a way to study this kind of work that could actually feed back into other types of domains like emergency response, like emergency rooms, and even back to the fighter pilots and astronauts. VICTORIA: Wow, that's so interesting. And so is your research that went into your Ph.D. did that help you help define the product strategy and kind of market fit for what you've been building at Jeli? LAURA: Yeah, absolutely. So Nora Jones, who is the founder and CEO of Jeli, reached out to me at a conference and told me a little bit about what she was thinking about, about how she wanted to support software engineers using a lot of this literature and a lot of the learnings from these other domains to build this product to help support incident management in software engineering. So we base a lot of our thinking around how to help support this cognitive work and how to help resilient performance in these very dynamic, these very changing large scale, you know, distributed software systems on this research, as well as the research that we do with our own users and with our own members from learning from incidents in software engineering Slack community that Nora and several other fairly prominent names within the software community started, Lorin Hochstein, John Allspaw Dr. Richard Cook, Jessica DeVita, Ryan Kitchens, and I may be missing someone else but...and myself, oh, Will Galego as well. Yeah, we based a lot of our understandings, really deep qualitative understandings of what is work like for software engineers when they're, you know, in continuous deployment type environments. And we've translated this into building a product that we think helps but not hinders by getting in the way of engineers while they're under time pressure and there's a lot of uncertainty. And there's often quite a bit of stress involved with responding to incidents. VICTORIA: Right. And you mentioned resilience engineering. And for those who don't know, David Woods, who you worked on with your Ph.D., wrote "Resilience Engineering: Concepts and Precepts." So maybe you could talk a little bit about resilience engineering and what that really means, not just in technology but in the people who were running the tools, right? LAURA: Yeah. So resilience engineering is different from how we think about protecting and defending our software systems. And it's different in the sense that we aren't just thinking about how do we prevent incidents from happening again, like, how do we fix things that have happened to us in the past? But how do we better understand the ways in which our systems operate under a wide variety of conditions? So that includes normal operating conditions as well as abnormal or anomalous operating conditions, such as an incident response. And so resilience engineering was kind of this way of thinking differently about predicting failure, about managing failure, and navigating these kinds of worlds. And one of the fundamental differences about it is it sees people as being the most adaptive component within the system of work. So we can have really good processes and practices around deploying code; we can institute things like cross-checking and peer review of code; we can have really good robust backup and failover systems, but ultimately, it's very likely that in these kinds of complex and adaptive always-changing systems that you're going to encounter problems that you weren't able to anticipate. And so this is where the resilience part comes in because if you're faced with a novel problem, if you're faced with an issue you've never seen before, or a hidden dependency within your system, or an unanticipated failure mode, you have to adapt. You have to be able to take all of the information that's available to you in the moment. You have to interpret that in real-time. You have to think of who else might have skills, knowledge, expertise, access to information, or access to certain kinds of systems or software components. And you have to bring all of those people together in real-time to be able to manage the problem at hand. And so this is really quite a different way of thinking about supporting this work than just let's keep the runbooks updated, and let's make sure that we can write prescriptive processes for everything that we're going to encounter. Because this really is the difference that I saw when I was talking about earlier about that work is done versus work is prescribed. The rules don't cover all of the situations. And so you have to think of how do you help people adapt? How do you help people access information in real-time to be able to handle unforeseen failures? VICTORIA: Right. That makes a lot of sense. It's an interesting evolution of site reliability engineering where you're thinking about the users' experience of your site. It's also thinking about the people who are running your site and what their experience is, and what freedom they have to be able to solve the problems that you wouldn't be able to predict, right? LAURA: Yeah, it's a really good point, actually, because there is sort of this double layer in the product that we are building. So, as you mentioned earlier, we are an incident analysis platform, and so what does that mean? Well, it means that we pull in data whenever there's been an incident, and we help you to look at it a little bit more deeply than you may if you're just following a template and sort of reconstructing a timeline. And so we pull in the actual Slack data that, you know, say, an ops channel or an incident channel that's been spun up following a report of a degraded performance or of an outage. And we look very closely at how did people talk to one another? Who did they bring into the incident? What kinds of things did they think were relevant and important at different points in time? And in doing this, it helps us to understand what information was available to people at different points in time. Because after the incident and after it's been resolved, people often look back and say, "Oh, there's nothing we can learn from that. We figured out what it was." But if we go back and we start looking at how people detected it, how they diagnosed it, who they brought into the event, we can start to unpack these patterns and these ways of understanding how do people work together? What information is useful at different points in time? Which helps us get a deeper understanding of how our systems actually work and how they actually fail. VICTORIA: Right. And I see there are a few different ways the platform does that: there's a narrative builder, a people view, and also a visual timeline. So, do you find that combining all those things together really gives companies a powerful tool to learn from their incidents? LAURA: Yeah. So let me talk a little bit about each of those different components. Our MVP of the product we started out with this understanding of the incident analyst and the incident investigator who, you know, was ready to dive in and ready to understand their incident and apply some qualitative analysis techniques to thinking about their incidents. And what we found was there are a number of these people who are really interested in this deep dive within the software industry. But there's a broader subset of folks that they work with who maybe only do these kinds of incident analysis every once in a while, and they're not as interested in going quite as deep. And so the narrative builder is really this kind of bridge between those two types of users. And what it does is helps construct a timeline which is typically what most companies do to help drive the discussion that they might have in a post-mortem or to drive their kind of findings in their summary report. And it helps them take this closer look at the interactions that happened in that slack transcript and raise questions about what kinds of uncertainties there were, point out who was involved, or interesting aspects of the event at that point in time. And it helps them to summarize what was happening. What did people think was happening at this point in time to create this story about the incident? And the story element is really important because we all learn from stories. It helps bring to life some of the details about what was hard, who was involved, how did they get brought in, what the sources of technical failure were, and whether those were easy or difficult to understand and to repair once the source of the failure was actually understood. And so that narrative builder helps reconstruct this timeline in a much richer way but also do it very efficiently. And as you mentioned, the visual timeline is something that we've created to help that lightweight user or that every once in a while user to go a little bit deeper on their analysis. And how we do that is because it lays out the progression of the event in a way that helps you see, oh, this maybe wasn't straightforward. We didn't detect it in the beginning, and then diagnose it, and then repair it at the end. What happened actually was the detection was intermittent. The signals about what was going wrong was intermittent, and so that was going on in parallel with the diagnosis. The diagnosis took a really long time, and that may have been because we can also see the repair was happening concurrently. And so it starts to show these kinds of characteristics about whether the incident was difficult, whether it was challenging and hard, or whether it was simple and straightforward. This helps lend a bit more depth to metrics like MTTR and TTD by saying, oh, there was a lot more going on in this incident than we initially thought. The last thing that you mentioned was the people view, and so that really sets our product apart from other products in that we look at the sociotechnical system. So it's not just about the software that broke; it is about who was involved in managing that system, in repairing that system, and in communicating about that system outwardly. And so the people view this kind of pulls in some HR data. It helps us to understand who was involved. How long have they been in their role? Were they on-call? Were they not on-call? And other kinds of irrelevant details that show us what was their engagement or their interaction with this event. And so when we start to bring in the socio part of the sociotechnical system, we can identify things like what knowledge do we have within the organization? Is that knowledge well-distributed, or is it just isolated in one or two people? And so those people are constantly getting pulled into incidents when they may be not on-call, which can start to show us whether or not these folks are in danger of burning out or whether their knowledge might need to be transferred more broadly throughout the organization. So this is kind of where the resilience piece comes in because it helps us to distribute knowledge. It helps us to identify who is relevant and useful and how do they partner and collaborate with other people, and their knowledge and skill sets to be able to manage some of the outages that they face? VICTORIA: That's wonderful because one of my follow-up questions would be, as a CEO, as a founder, what kind of insights or choices do you get to make now that you have this insight to help make your team more resilient? [laughs] LAURA: So if this is a manager, or a founder, or a CEO that is looking at their data in Jeli, they can start to understand how to resource their teams more appropriately, as I mentioned, how to spread that knowledge around. They can start to see what parts of their system are creating the most problems or what parts of their system do they have maybe less insight into how it works, how it interacts with other parts of the system, and what this actually means for their ability to meet their SLOs or their SLAs. So it gives you a more in-depth understanding of how your business is actually operating on both the technical side of things, as well as on the people side of things. VICTORIA: That makes a lot of sense. Thank you for that overview of the platform. There's the incident analysis platform, and you also have the bot, the response chatbot. Can you tell me a little bit more about that? LAURA: Yeah, absolutely. We think that incident management should be conducted wherever your work actually takes place, and so for most of our customers and a lot of folks that we know about in the industry, that's Slack. And so, if you are communicating in real-time with your team in Slack, we think that you should stay there. And so, we built this incident management bot that is free and will be free for the lifetime of the product. Because we think that this is really the fundamental basis for helping you manage your incidents more efficiently and more effectively. So it's a pretty lightweight bot. It gives kind of some guardrails or some guidance around collaboration by spinning up a new incident channel, helping you to bring the right kinds of responders into that, helping you to communicate to interested stakeholders by broadcasting to channels they might be in. It kind of nudges you to think about how to communicate about what's happening during different stages of the event progression. And so it's prompting you in a very lightweight way; hey, do you have a status update? Do you have a summary of what the current thinking is? What are the hypotheses about what's going on? Who's conducting what kinds of activities right now? So that if I'm a responder that's coming into the event after 20-30 minutes after it started, I can very quickly come up to speed, understand what's going on, who's doing what, and figure out what's useful for me to do to help step in and not disrupt the incident management that's underway right now. Our users can choose to use the bot independently of the incident analysis platform. But of course, being able to ingest that incident into Jeli it helps you understand who's been involved in the incident, if they've been involved in similar incidents in the past, and helps them start to see some patterns and some themes that emerge over time when you start to look at incidents across the organization. VICTORIA: That makes sense. And I love that it's free and that there's something for every type of organization to take advantage of there. And I wonder if at Jeli you have data about what type of customer is it who'd be targeted or really ideal to take on this kind of platform. LAURA: So most organizations...I was actually recently at SREcon EMEA, and there was a really interesting series of talks; one was SRE for Enterprise, and the next talk was SRE for Startups. And so it was a very thought-provoking discussion around is SRE for everyone, so site reliability engineering? Even smaller teams are starting to have to be responsible for reliability and responsible for running their service. And so we kind of have built our platform thinking about how do we help not just big enterprises or organizations that may have dedicated teams for this but also small startups to learn from their incidents. So internally, we actually call incidents opportunities as in they are learning opportunities for checking out how does your system actually work? How do your people work together? What things were difficult and challenging about the incident? And how do you talk about those things as a team to help create more resilient performance in future? So in terms of an ideal customer, it's really folks that are interested in conducting these sort of lightweight but in-depth looks at how their system actually works on both the people side of things and the technical side of things. Those who we found are most successful with our product are interested in not so much figuring out who did the thing and who can they blame for the incident itself but rather how do they learn from what happened? And would another engineer, or another product owner, another customer service representative, whoever the incident may be sort of focused around, would another person in their shoes have taken the same actions that they took or made the same decisions that they made? Which helps us understand from a systems level how do we repair or how do we adjust the system of work surrounding folks so that they are better supported when they're faced with uncertainty, or with that kind of time pressure, or that ambiguity about what's actually going on? VICTORIA: And I love that you said that because part of the reason [laughs] I invited you on to the podcast is that a lot of companies I have experience with don't think about incidents until it happens to them, and then it can be a scramble. It can impact their customer base. It can stress their team out. But if you go about creating...the term obviously you all use is psychological safety on your team, and maybe you use some of the free tools from Jeli like the Post-Incident Guide and the Incident Analysis 101 blog to set your team up for success from the beginning, then you can increase your customer loyalty and your team loyalty as well to the company. Is that your experience? LAURA: Yeah, absolutely. So one thing that I have learned throughout my career, you know, starting way back in forestry and looking at safety and risk in that domain, was as soon as there is an accident or even a serious near miss, right away, everybody gets sweaty palms. Everybody is concerned about, uh-oh, am I going to get blamed for this? Am I going to get fired? Am I going to get publicly shamed for the decisions that I made when I was in this situation? And what that response, that reaction does is it drives a lot of the communication and a lot of the understanding of the conditions that that person was in. It drives that underground. And it's important to allow people to talk about here's what I was seeing, here's what I was experiencing because, in these kinds of complex systems, information is not readily available to people. The signals are not always coming through loud and clear about what's going on or about what the appropriate actions to take are. Instead, it's messy; it's loud, it's noisy. There are usually multiple different demands on that person's attention and on their time, and they're often managing trade-offs: do I keep the system down so that I can gather more information about what's actually going on, or do I just try and bring it up as quickly as I can so that there's less impact to users? Those kinds of decisions are having to be made under pressure. So when we create these conditions of psychological safety, when we say you know what? This happened. We want to learn from it. We've already made this investment. Richard Cook mentioned in the very first SNAFU Catchers Report, which was a report that came out of Ohio State, that incidents are unplanned investments into understanding how your system works. And so you've already had the incident. You've already paid the price of that downtime or of that outage. So you might as well extract some learning from it so that you can help create a safer and more resilient system in the future. So by helping people to reconstruct what was actually happening in real-time, not what they were retrospectively saying, "Oh, I should have done this," well, you didn't do that. So let's understand why you thought at that moment in time that was the right way to respond because, more than likely, other people in that same position would have made that same choice. And so it helps us to think more broadly about ways that we can support decision-making and sense-making under conditions of stress and uncertainty. And ultimately, that helps your system be more resilient and be more reliable for your customers. VICTORIA: What a great reframing: unplanned investment. [laughs] And if you don't learn from it, then you're going to lose out on what you've already invested that time in resolving it, right? LAURA: Absolutely. MID-ROLL AD: Are you an entrepreneur or start-up founder looking to gain confidence in the way forward for your idea? At thoughtbot, we know you're tight on time and investment, which is why we've created targeted 1-hour remote workshops to help you develop a concrete plan for your product's next steps. Over four interactive sessions, we work with you on research, product design sprint, critical path, and presentation prep so that you and your team are better equipped with the skills and knowledge for success. Find out how we can help you move the needle at: tbot.io/entrepreneurs. VICTORIA: Getting more into that psychological safety and how to create that culture where people feel safe telling about what really happened, but how does that relate to...Jeli says that they are a people software. [laughs] Talk to me more about that. Like, what advice do you give founders and CEOs on how to create that psychological safety which makes them be more resilient in these types of incidents? LAURA: So you mentioned the Howie Guide that we published last year, and this is our guidance around how to do incident analysis, how to help your team start to learn from their incidents, and Howie stands for how we got here. And that's really important, that language because what it says is there's a history that led up to this incident. And most teams, when they've had an outage, they'll kind of look backwards from that outage, maybe an hour, maybe a day, maybe to the last deploy. But they don't think about how the decisions got made to use that piece of software in the first place. They don't think about how did engineers actually get on-boarded to being on-call. They don't necessarily think about what kinds of skills, and knowledge, and expertise when we're hiring a DevOps engineer, and I'm using air quotes here or an SRE. What kinds of skills and knowledge do they actually have? Those are very broad terms. And what it means to be a DevOps engineer or an SRE is quite underspecified. And so the knowledge behind the folks that you might hire into the company is going to necessarily be very diverse. It's going to be partial and incomplete in many ways because not everyone can know everything about the system. And so, we need to have multiple diverse perspectives about how the system works, how our customers use that system, what kinds of pressures and constraints exist within our company that allow us some possibilities over others. We need to bring all of those perspectives together to get a more reflective picture of what was actually happening before this incident took place and how we actually got here. This reframing helps a lot of people disarm that initial defensiveness response or that initial, oh, shoot; I'm going to get in trouble for this kind of response. And it says to them, "Hey, you're a part of this bigger system of work. You are only one piece of this puzzle. And what we want to try and do is understand what was happening within the company, not just what you did, what you said, and what you decided." So once people realize that you're not just trying to find fault or place blame, but you're really trying to understand their work, and you're trying to understand their work with other teams and other vendors, and trying to understand their work relative to the competing demands that were going on, so those are some of the things that help create psychological safety. About ten years ago, John Allspaw and the team at Etsy put out The Etsy Debriefing Facilitation Guide, which also poses a number of questions and helps to frame the post-incident learnings in a way that moves it from the individual and looks more collectively at the company as a whole. And so these things are helpful for founders or for CEOs to help bring forward more information about what's really going on, more information about what are the real risks and threats and opportunities within the company, and gives you an opportunity to step back and do what we call microlearning, which is sharing knowledge about how the system works, sharing understandings of what people think is going on, and what people know about the system. We don't typically talk about those things unless there's a reason to, and incidents kind of give us that reason because they're uncomfortable and they can be painful. They can be very public. They can be very disruptive to what we think about how resilient and reliable we actually are. And so if you can kind of step away from this defensiveness and step away from this need to place blame and instead try and understand the conditions, you will get a lot more learning and a lot more resilience and reliability out of your teams and out of your systems. VICTORIA: That makes sense to me. And I'd like to draw a connection between that and some other things you mentioned with The 2022 Accelerate State of DevOps Report that highlights that the people who are often responding to those incidents or in that high-stress situation tend to be historically underrepresented or historically excluded groups. And so do you see that having this insight into both who is actually taking on a lot of the work when these incidents happen and creating that psychological safety can make a better environment for diversity, equity, inclusion at a company as well? LAURA: Well, I think anytime you work to establish trust and transparency, and you focus on recognizing the skills that people do have, the knowledge that they do have, and not over assuming that someone knows something or that they have been involved in the discussions that may have been relevant to an incident, anytime you focus on that trust and transparency you are really signaling to people within your organization that you value their contributions and that you recognize that they've come to work and trying to do a good job. But they have multiple competing demands on their attention and on their time. And so we're not making assumptions about people being complacent, or people being reckless or being sloppy in their work. So that creates an environment where people feel more willing to speak up and to talk about some of the challenges that they might face, to talk about the ways in which it's not clear to them how certain parts of the system work or how certain teams actually operate. So you're just opening the channels for communication, which helps to share more knowledge. It helps to share more information about what teams are doing at different points in time. And this helps people to preemptively anticipate how a change that they might be making in their part of the system could be influencing up or downstream teams. And so this helps create more resilience because now you're thinking laterally about your system and about your involvement across teams and across boundary lines. And an example of this is if a marketing team...this is a story that Nora tells quite a bit; if a marketing team is, say, launching a Super Bowl commercial for their company but they don't actually tell the engineers on-call that that is about to happen, you can create all sorts of breakdowns when all of a sudden you have this surge of traffic to your website because people see the Super Bowl commercial and they want to go to the site. And then you have a single person who's trying to respond to that in real-time. So, instead, when you do start thinking about that trust and transparency, you're helping teams to help each other and to think more broadly about how their work is actually impacting other parts of the system. So from a diversity and inclusion and underrepresented groups perspective, this is creating the conditions for more people to be involved, more people to feel like their voice is going to be heard, and that their perspective actually matters. VICTORIA: That sounds really powerful, and I'm glad we were able to touch on that. Shifting gears a little bit, I wanted to talk about two different questions; so one is if you could travel back in time to when Jeli first started, what advice would you give yourself, your past self? LAURA: I would encourage myself to recognize that our ability to experiment is fundamental to our ability to learn. And learning is what helps us to iterate faster. Learning is what helps us to reflect on the tool that we're building or the feature that we're building and what this actually means to our users. I actually copped that advice to myself from CEO Zoran Perkov of the Long-Term Stock Exchange. They launched a whole new stock market during the pandemic with a fully remote team. And I had interviewed him for an article that I wrote about resilient leadership. And he said to me, like, "My job as a CEO is 100% about protecting our ability to experiment as a company because if we stop learning, we're not going to be able to iterate. We're not going to be able to adapt to the changes that we see in the market and in our users." So I think I would tell myself to continually experiment. One of the things that I talk to our customers about a lot because many of them are implementing new incident management programs or they're trying to level up their engineering teams around incident analysis, and I would say, "This doesn't have to be a fully-fleshed out program where you know all of the ways in which this is going to unfold." It's really about trying experiments, conduct some training, start small. Do one incident analysis on a really particularly spicy incident that you may have had or a really challenging incident where a lot of people were surprised by what happened. Bring together that group and say, "Hey, we're going to try something a little bit different here. We'll use some questions from the Howie Guide. We'll use the format and the structure from the Etsy Debriefing Guide. And we're just going to try and learn what we can about this event. We're not going to try and place blame. We're not going to try and generate corrective actions. We just want to see what we can learn from this." Then ask people that were involved, "How did this go? What did we learn from it? What should we do differently next time?" And continually iterate on those small, little experiments so that you can grow your product and grow your team's capacity. I think it took us a little bit of time to figure that out within the organization, but once we did, we were just able to collaborate more effectively work more effectively by integrating some of the feedback that we were getting from our users. And then the last piece of advice that I would give myself is to really invest in cross-discipline coordination and collaboration. Engineers, designers, researchers, CEOs they all have a different view of the product. They all have a different understanding of what the goals and priorities are. And those mental models of the product and of what the right thing to do is are constantly changing. And they all have different language that they use to talk about the product and to talk about their processes for integrating this understanding of the changing conditions and the changing user into the product. And so I would say invest in establishing common ground across the different disciplines within your team to be able to talk about what people are seeing, to be able to stop and identify when we're making assumptions about what other people know or what other people's orientation towards the problem or towards the product are. And spend a little bit of time saying, "When I say this is important, I'm saying it's important because of XYZ, not just this is important." So spending a little bit of time elaborating on what your mental model is and where you're drawing from can help the teams work more effectively together across those disciplines. VICTORIA: That's pretty powerful advice. You're iterating and experimenting at Jeli. What's on the horizon that you are...what new experiments are you excited about? LAURA: One of the things that has been front and center for us since we started is this idea of cross-incident analysis. And so we've kind of built out a number of different features within the product, being able to help tag the incident with the relevant services and technologies that were involved, being able to identify which teams were involved, and also being able to identify different kinds of themes or patterns that emerge from individual incidents. So all of this data that we can get from mostly just from the ingested incident itself or from the incident that you bring into Jeli but also from the analysis that you do on it this helps us start to be able to see across incidents what's happening not just with the technical side of things. So is it always Travis that is causing a problem? Are there components that work together that kind of have these really hidden and strange interdependencies that are really hard for the team to actually cope with? What kinds of themes are emerging across your suite of opportunities, your suite of incidents that you've ingested? Some of the things that we're starting to see from those experiments is an ability to look at where are your knowledge islands within your organization? Do you have an engineer who, if they were to leave, would take the majority of your systems knowledge about your database, or about your users, or about some critical aspect of your system that would disappear with all of that tacit knowledge? Or are there engineers that work really effectively together during really difficult incidents? And so you can start to unpack what are these characteristics of these people, and of these teams, and of these technologies that offer both opportunities or threats to your organization? So basically, what we're doing is we're helping you to see how your system performs under different kinds of conditions, which I think as a safety and risk professional working in a variety of different domains for the last 15 years, I think this is really where the rubber hits the road in helping teams be more reliable, and be more resilient, and more proactive about where investments in maintenance, or training, or headcount are going to have the biggest bang for your buck. VICTORIA: That makes a lot of sense. In my experience, sometimes those decisions are made more on intuition or on limited data so having a more full picture to rely on probably produces better results. [laughs] LAURA: Yeah, and I think that we all want to be data-driven, thinking about not only the quantitative data is how many incidents do we have around certain parts of the system, or certain teams, or certain services? But also, the qualitative side of things is what does this actually mean? And what does this mean to our ability to grow and change over time and to scale? The partnership of that quantitative data and qualitative data means we're being data-driven on a whole other level. VICTORIA: Wonderful. And it seems like we're getting close to the end of our time here. Is there anything else you want to give as a final takeaway to our listeners? LAURA: Yeah. So I think that we are, you know, as a domain, as a field, software engineering is increasingly becoming responsible for not only critical infrastructure within society, but we have a responsibility to our users and to each other within our companies to help make work better, help make our services more reliable and more resilient over time. And there's a variety of lessons that we can learn from other domains. As I mentioned before, aviation, healthcare, nuclear power all of those kinds of domains have been thinking about supporting cognitive work and supporting frontline operators. And we can learn from this history and this literature that exists out there. There is a GitHub repo that Lorin Hochstein has curated with a number of other folks with the industry that points to some of these resources. And as well, we'll be hosting the first Learning From Incidents in Software Engineering Conference in Denver in February, February 15 and 16th. And one feature of this conference that I'm super excited about is affectionately called CasesConf. And it is going to be an opportunity for software engineers from a variety of organizations to tell real stories about incidents that they had, how they handled them, what was challenging, what went surprisingly well, and just what is actually going on within their organizations. And this is kind of a new thing for the software industry to be talking very publicly about failures and sharing the messy details of our incidents. This won't be a recorded part of the conference. It is going to be conducted under the Chatham House Rule, which is participants who are in the room while these stories are being told can share some of the stories but not any identifying details about the company or the engineers that were involved. And so this kind of real-world situations helps us to, as I talked about before, with that psychological safety, helps us to say this is the reality of operating complex systems. They're going to fail. We're going to have to learn from them. And the more that we can talk at an industry level about what's going on and about what kinds of things are creating problems or opportunities for each other, the more we're going to be able to lift the bar for the industry as a whole. So you can check out register.learningfromincidents.io for more information about the conference. And we can link Lorin's resilience engineering GitHub repo in the notes as well. VICTORIA: Wonderful. Well, I was looking for an excuse to come to Denver in February anyways. LAURA: We would love to have ya. VICTORIA: Thank you. And thank you so much for taking time to share with us today, Laura. You can subscribe to the show and find notes along with a complete transcript for this episode at giantrobots.fm. If you have questions or comments, email us at hosts@giantrobots.fm. And you can find me on Twitter @victori_ousg. This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot and produced and edited by Mandy Moore. Thanks for listening. See you next time. ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success. Special Guest: Laura Maguire.

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast
Strategies to Communicate Pay: The Good, Bad and Ugly [THA 309]

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 35:05


Join 3 shop owners as they share some great stories and wisdom about what works and what doesn't when talking about pay. Can you show how to earn the pay they want? How can you bring the team together when there are earning discrepancies? Watch Episode HERE Chris Lawson, TechnicianFind.Com. Chris' previous episodes HERE Mehrdad Avar, Haven Auto Repair, Rancho Cucamonga, CA Shawn Gilfillan, Automotive Magic, Kenvil and Lake Hopatcong, NJ. Shawn's previous episodes HERE Show Notes: When in doubt about what to list as pay in an ad, look at your top compensated tech and use that as a benchmark.  Commitment to training- investment, not a liability, not a cost. It's always best to put your best foot forward with respect to salary in an ad. “What's the highest pay level you feel comfortable having a conversation about?” In other words, “If you were sitting across your desk from a tech and they asked for that salary/compensation, do you feel comfortable having a conversation where you show them how they can earn that level of income?” (production and efficiency levels needed + salary, bonuses, profit sharing, etc.) Changing the perception of your technicians not wanting to hire another. Asked, “Did your income get better or worse?” Sharing profit and loss, where and how the shop will continue to grow. Make sure your salaries and job titles match up and are in alignment with market rates.(you can verify this on Indeed Hiring Insights) As the owner- look at yourself from the inside out. Make yourself worthy of the top employees. What is the perception of your business from the outside? Your business is a reflection of yourself. Interviewing technicians- you will spend more time at work than at home. Is 1-hour interview worthy of a ‘marriage?' Listen closely to the interviewee's questions. Get your team involved in the process, and consider a trial period. Comebacks- learning experiences with the whole team, quality control employee Zero sum decision making- knowing what you know now, would you make the investment in XYZ, if you wouldn't make that decision again, move on. Connect with the Podcast Aftermarket Radio Network Subscribe on YouTube Visit us on the Web

Your Intended Message
Convey Your Message with a Short Book: Mike Capuzzi

Your Intended Message

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 35:17


If you have experience and expertise you can publish a book Let's explore the magic of short books to boost your intended message Episode 128 (Mike is based in eastern Pennsylvania) In this conversation with Mike Capuzzi, we explore: Why a short book can help your business differentiate from the competition Why a short can boost your career and help build your team Where do you start when planning a book Why a short book is better than a long book How do approach your book project The magic of short books and free books About Mike Capuzzi: Mike has written and published 19 books, including two Amazon @1 Best Sellers. He has helped over 225 business owners, entrepreneurs and corporate leaders publish their own short books. He started his career in engineering and shifted to marketing in 1994. Grab the offer of three free ebooks about the magic of publishing short books here https://mikecapuzzi.com/magic/   ----- Excerpts from this conversation with Mike Capuzzi ----- The thought is always about serving the reader first ----- I think most of us are short on time, or at least we appear to be, therefore lets appreciate it - this idea of a short book that can be read in an hour or so. ----- About two thirds of our clients are local business owners, the local retailer, the local physician, the local chiropractor, the local insurance agent. And that person that woman, or man who writes that book, they typically want to be what I call five mile famous, they want to be the number one chiropractor, the most sought after Dentist, the you know, insurance agent who's known for XYZ, whatever it might be. So they're not looking to be a worldwide phenomena, they are looking to be an established authority in their community. So for them, it's really about being different than their competition. Each one of those types of business owners has a ton of competition, most of their competition, if not all have never written a book. So right there differentiates them. So being five mile famous for the local business owner is definitely one of the biggest benefits. For the corporate leader, the entrepreneur, the business owner, like myself, who has a worldwide audience, we have clients all over the world, it's a bit different, it is more about establishing your authority, your expertise on a worldwide level doesn't necessarily mean speaking, though. I have spoken on stage several times over the years. But it's really about being a credible source of podcast guest, you know, immediate interview potential prospect for media. And it's really about using your book to establish that expertise, that authority, that credibility. ----- ----more---- Your Intended Message is the podcast about how you can boost your career and business success by improving your communication skills. We'll examine the aspects of how we communicate one-to-one, one to few and one to many – plus that important conversation, one to self. In these interviews we will explore presentation skills, public speaking, conversation, persuasion, negotiation, sales conversations, marketing, team meetings, social media, branding, self talk and more.   Your host is George Torok George is a specialist in executive communication skills. That includes conversation and presentation. He's fascinated by way we communicate and influence behaviors. He delivers training and coaching programs to help leaders and promising professionals deliver the intended message for greater success.   Connect with George www.SpeechCoachforExecutives.com https://www.linkedin.com/in/georgetorokpresentations/ https://www.youtube.com/user/presentationskills https://www.instagram.com/georgetorok/   For weekly tips to improve your presentations visit https://toroktips.com/  

The Last 10 Pounds Podcast
EP. 311- New Year Goal Setting for Success (my personal 3-step process)

The Last 10 Pounds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 55:57


In this workshop-style NEW YEAR GOAL SETTING WORKSHOP I quite LITERALLY walk you through every single step in order to set yourself up for mind-blowing success with your goals this year. The only thing you'll need is to be willing to gift yourself some time to DREAM UP YOUR LIFE, so that then you can go and claim it! That's right. DREAM IT UP. Make it Juicy. (the more details the better) And then get out there and CLAIM IT. I believe, that the moment you dream up a goal: It's already yours.  *IF * you are willing to STAY WITH YOURSELF through the learning moments and the actual CREATION OF IT. It's SO fun to see the incredible 'measurable results' I've created in the 10+ years having used this 3-step process... But that pales in comparison to the unquantifiable value of me LIVING MY LIFE FEELING LIMITLESS, believing in my total capacity, and KNOWING that I can do anything I damn decide. If you're feeling skeptical that you can actually lose x amount of pounds (and keep it off) or change XYZ habit around food (such as sabotaging or emotional eating)... Borrow the belief I HAVE that has allowed me to create ANYTHING I decide: Of course it's possible. Of course I'm capable. I pair these beliefs with UNCONDITIONAL LOVE for myself + INFINITE PATIENCE as I go ahead and make my goals, my reality. Happy New Year, my sister! CHEERS TO YOU. CHEERS TO YOUR BIGGEST GOALS AND DREAMS. Cheers to the vision YOU have for your life- xo Brenda Learn more about The Last 10 Program here: www.brendalomeli.com/thelast10

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 88 – Unstoppable Neurodiversity Specialist with Khushboo Chabria

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022


Khushboo Chabria describes herself as a “Neurodiversity Specialist and a Transformational Leader”. She comes by this description honestly. However, while she has her own neurodivergent characteristic, (she has been diagnosed as ADHD), she did not discover about her diagnosis until she was 30 years of age. Those of you who have listened to many of our episodes have heard me talk with others who have different characteristics such as ADHD, Autism and even blindness and low vision that were not discovered or properly diagnosed until they became adults. I would suspect in part this is due to our own growing knowledge base about such things. As you will hear from Khushboo, however, increased knowledge does not mean more positive attitudes. As she will explain, while in some quarters we are learning more, we do not spread this education and improved attitudinal advance throughout our culture.   Today, Khushboo works for a not-for-profit agency called Neurodiversity Pathways, (NDP) in the Silicon Valley She will tell us how NDP has created an in-depth program to help Neurodivergent individuals grow to gain and keep employment as well as simply learning how to live meaningful and productive lives.   I believe you will be inspired by Khushboo Chabria. She has lessons all of us can use about how to move forward in life.     About the Guest: Deeply passionate about diversity and inclusion, Khushboo is a Neurodiversity Specialist and a Transformational Leader, on a mission to advocate for and help provide access to high-quality services for neurodivergent individuals. Khushboo aims to make a meaningful impact in the world through education, empowerment, authentic engagement and unbridled compassion. With varied experiences in supporting neurodivergent individuals of all ages and their family members, working as a therapist and clinician, studying Organizational Leadership and discovering her own ADHD, Khushboo brings an interesting mix of skills and experiences to this field of work. Khushboo is currently a Program Manager, Career Coach and Program Facilitator at Neurodiversity Pathways (NDP) - a social impact program under the Goodwill of Silicon Valley focused on educating and supporting neurodivergent individuals to help launch their career and supporting organizations to integrate ND employees into the workplace through belonging and intentional empowerment. The tagline is “Inclusion for Abilities and Acceptance of Differences” and NDP is on a mission to inspire and improve the intentional inclusion of neurodistinct individuals in the workplace. Khushboo also sits on the board of Peaces of Me Foundation and is involved in consulting and speaking on the topics of Neurodiversity, DEIB, Transformational Leadership, Psychological Safety, Cultural Competency, Mental Health + Employee Wellbeing as well as Coaching. I believe in diversity in who we are, but also in how we see the world.   Social Media Links/Websites: Personal Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/khushboochabria/ Connect with Neurodiversity Pathways: https://ndpathways.org/ https://www.facebook.com/NDpathways https://www.linkedin.com/company/ndpathways https://www.instagram.com/ndpathways/ https://twitter.com/pathways Neurodiversity is Normal website:  https://sites.google.com/goodwillsv.org/neurodiversity/home   About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Hi there and welcome to unstoppable mindset. It is late in August when we're recording this getting near the end of what they call the dog days. Speaking of dogs Alamo is over here asleep on the floor and quite bored. However, here we are. And our guest today is Khushboo Chabria. And Khushboo is a person who is very much involved in the world of neurodiversity, and providing services for people who are neurodivergent. She has her own things that she has dealt with along the way. And I'm sure that we'll get into all of that. And she had an adventure last week, which we might get into. If she wants to talk about it and set you went a little so we'll get there anyway. Welcome to unstoppable mindset. Glad you're with us.   Khushboo Chabria  02:07 Thank you. Thank you so much for having me.   Michael Hingson  02:09 And you are up in Northern California, right? That's correct. In the Silicon Valley. What's the weather up there?   Khushboo Chabria  02:17 It's really warm right now. It's hot.   Michael Hingson  02:21 We're about 96 degrees today. It was 104 yesterday, so   Khushboo Chabria  02:26 yeah, maybe not that hot. Yeah, I   Michael Hingson  02:29 know. But at least neither of us are in Palm Springs or Sacramento.   Khushboo Chabria  02:33 That's true. That's true, that would definitely be harder.   Michael Hingson  02:37 Well, let's start Would you just begin by telling us a little bit about you growing up and all that kind of stuff? And give us a little background like that?   Khushboo Chabria  02:46 Yeah, sure. Um, so I was actually born in India. My mom's sister had moved to the US in the late 80s. And we had applied for green card when we were little kids. And it wasn't until I was 10 years old that we got our green card, and I moved here with my family. So my parents and my brother and I, we all moved here in 1999.   Michael Hingson  03:15 Okay, and what was it like moving to obviously, a whole new country and all that what? What motivated your parents to come over here? And what was it like for you growing up in a new country? Yeah,   Khushboo Chabria  03:29 it was honestly very challenging. I was very young. And I was the I was at the kind of time in my life where I was very impressionable. So when we moved to America, my parents, they had to reestablish their careers here. And for the time being, we had stayed with different aunts and uncles, along the way, until my parents could afford their own place. And both my parents worked multiple jobs, in order to make sure that we had everything we needed. They wanted to move to America so that my brother and I would have additional opportunities, and a chance to really succeed at life. So that was, it was a whole American Dream story.   Michael Hingson  04:21 You when you moved here did or did not speak much English.   Khushboo Chabria  04:26 I actually spoke a lot of English because I went to an English school in India. So a lot of people don't know this, but the British when they had occupied India, took over the school system. So if you went to an English school in India, that means you got a really good education. And I went to a school called St. Mary's School in Pune, Maharashtra. And I had a little bit of a British accent, actually, when I moved here,   Michael Hingson  04:58 you've lost that   Khushboo Chabria  05:01 Yes, it's gone. It's been too long.   Michael Hingson  05:04 But what you don't have is, I guess more of a traditional Indian accent having been born and lived there for 10 years.   Khushboo Chabria  05:13 Yeah, I mean, I do speak in Hindi with my mom every day. But when anyone else hears me speaking Hindi, they think I have an American accent. So I feel like I've definitely lost the Indian accent. But it comes out every now and then when I'm speaking with my family.   Michael Hingson  05:34 It just always fascinates me to talk with people who have come from another country who have spent a lot of time here, but maybe grew up elsewhere. Some end up retaining an accent, and some don't. And I've always been fascinated by that and never understood how it works out that some do. And some don't, it must just plain be the listening or just the amount of work they put into what they choose their accent to be.   Khushboo Chabria  06:04 I think it also depends on age. So my brother still has a very much an Indian accent. Because when he moved here, he was 15. And because I was 10, I was still kind of at that age where it was easier for me to assimilate than it was for him.   Michael Hingson  06:23 So you, you, you get right in as it were,   Khushboo Chabria  06:26 yeah, definitely. Oops. So   Michael Hingson  06:29 you came here, you obviously were able to settle in from a language standpoint, and so on. But you say it was a little bit hard when you came, how come?   Khushboo Chabria  06:39 Um, it was challenging, because as I mentioned before, our family was staying with our extended family members. So we would stay at this aunt's house for six months, and then this uncle's house for three months. And then this uncle's house. So I ended up going to several different schools for sixth grade. And after that, my parents had enough, just enough to put a downpayment on a one bedroom apartment. And so when we moved into the apartment, those my parents were working all the time. And so often, I grew up in the apartment with my brother. And it was many times it was we were on our own. And it was a long time before my parents had established themselves enough in their careers that we had a more comfortable lifestyle.   Michael Hingson  07:37 What kind of career should they have? What did they do?   Khushboo Chabria  07:39 So my dad, he actually ended up going and getting a real estate license and is a broker. And full time for his job. He works at FedEx. And my mother, she took night classes at a school and got a certification and accounting. And then she basically became an accountant. And she worked for companies before. But now she manages the accounts for several different businesses from home.   Michael Hingson  08:15 Wow. That's still that's pretty cool. And then it shows the typical work ethic. I see, oftentimes, from people who move here from elsewhere, they're going to work hard, they're going to do whatever they need to do, to be able to establish themselves and care for families and so on. And I think that's personally so cool. My parents grew up here. And were born here. But still, they very much had that kind of an attitude. And they worked very hard to make sure that my brother and I also kept that same kind of attitude. And I, I don't think that that's a bad thing at all. And I think that we all can work pretty hard at trying to succeed, and we can do it in a good way.   Khushboo Chabria  09:03 Definitely. It was really important to learn that too.   Michael Hingson  09:07 Yeah, I agree. How long after you moved here? Did you guys finally get your own apartment?   Khushboo Chabria  09:13 Um, it must have been about what to say nine months or nine to 12 months before we did. Wow. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  09:25 For a 10 year old kid. That is a long time not to be able to put down roots somewhere and call someplace home.   Khushboo Chabria  09:34 Yeah. And you know, when I started in the public school system, I started first and a middle school. And then I ended up in an elementary school and then I ended up in a junior high. So it was a lot of switching around as well in between different school systems and trying to kind of figure out what where I fit into this whole education piece too?   Michael Hingson  10:03 Well, what was it like growing up just physically and so on? I know you have said that you, you have ADHD is something that you live with, when did you discover that?   Khushboo Chabria  10:16 I didn't discover that until I was 30 years old. So, you know, growing up, I was always a busy child, my mom had enrolled me and lots and lots of different classes when I was in India. So I was learning dance, I was learning singing, I was learning art, I was learning ceramics, I had a lot of different things that I was involved in, and my parents had a lot of structure in our lives. So I didn't for a long time even know that I had this different brain and that I actually struggled with ADHD. Even after I graduated college and started working in the field of behavior analysis, I didn't know that I had ADHD. And then at some point, when I became a board certified behavior analyst, and I actually move forward in my career, I went from being a therapist that spent 100% of my time with clients, to now becoming a clinician that spent 90% of my time with spreadsheets and 10% of my time fighting with insurance companies. And with all of that, I got further and further away from the clients, and further and further away from solving problems in real time, to just being behind the screen. And that's when my ADHD really started to show up.   Michael Hingson  11:54 So what made you finally realize that ADHD was part of your life.   Khushboo Chabria  11:59 Um, you know, to be honest, at first, I was just burned out, I was a burnt out clinician with a huge caseload, I was driving all over the Bay Area all day long. And I ended up in a clinic, and I got, I got diagnosed with depression. And I first got misdiagnosed with bipolar disorder, because that's something that a lot of people confuse, especially in regards to ADHD. And then I got a therapist who started to recognize that all the things that I was discussing in our sessions, all the areas of my life that I felt anxious and depressed about, were areas that are related to executive functioning, and ADHD. So she was, she was bright enough and keen enough to notice that, and to suggest that I be tested for ADHD, which is when they started the actual diagnosis process.   Michael Hingson  13:14 How do they test for ADHD?   Khushboo Chabria  13:17 Well, first, they took all of my notes that they had from the therapist, and they also interviewed my mother to find out what I was like as a child. And then lastly, they had me go through a bunch of different assessments where they were tracking my ability to focus. And these were usually tests on a computer where they showed different images. And I had to press specific keys when certain images popped up. And I did that for hours and hours and hours. And based on what they found, I definitely had ADHD. So I got the official diagnosis. Then I was connected with a cycle analyst who was able to then prescribe medication for me, which I didn't end up staying on. But that was the beginning.   Michael Hingson  14:13 A lot of it, though, is ultimately recognition. And then once you know it and believe it, then you can really work to understand it and not medications can't help but a lot of times it's more what you do internally that makes a difference.   Khushboo Chabria  14:32 Exactly. That's true.   Michael Hingson  14:35 So for you, you, you finally got diagnosed with that. But by that time you had been very much involved in a lot of psychology oriented kinds of things, which do you like better being a clinician or actually practicing and being in front of clients?   Khushboo Chabria  14:55 You know, to be honest, I think the field had completely changed. inch by the time I graduated with my master's, because at that point, the Affordable Care Act had passed. And what that what happened with that is all the insurance companies were now in the system. And while that made the services more available to lots and lots of people, it also meant that there was now this huge demand for the services. So I think my experience was the way it was because of the timing of that bill passing, as well as at that point, the need that was there for more service providers in this field. But that being said, I think that it was, it's much more reinforcing for me to engage with people, rather than engaging with spreadsheets. And as someone who has ADHD, since the time I was diagnosed, and all the years that I continued to struggle with ADHD, I have learned that I work best in an environment where I'm constantly solving novel problems, that are allowing me to research different kinds of things. And also to use everything in my toolbox to solve problems. And any problem that has a fast response in terms of solving it is one, that's the most reinforcing to me.   Michael Hingson  16:36 So does that translate today into you, looking at cases from kind of the outside or working more with people and being in front of them,   Khushboo Chabria  16:46 I think it's a little bit of both. Now, I would say that the most amazing part of my career is the coaching. And what the coaching allows me to do is to work with neurodivergent people with all kinds of different backgrounds. Because that makes it so that one day, I might be researching how to get a marketing internship. And the next day, I might be understanding how I should help my coachee brand themselves as a musician. And then maybe the third day, I'm working with someone who has a computer science background. And so I'm working with a lot of different skill sets and a lot of different abilities. And the great thing about what I get to do now is that it is fully aligned with how I work best. And that I get to continue solving novel problems. I get to continue teaching, I get to continue engaging with organizations on increasing the awareness of neurodiversity. So I get to solve these issues, and improve that awareness for neurodiversity in a lot of different ways that are very much in line with how I work best.   Michael Hingson  18:05 So what are the star diversity take in obviously ADHD would be a factor. What other kinds of things fall under that category?   Khushboo Chabria  18:15 Yeah, definitely. So ADHD is a big one. Autism is a big one. Dyslexia, dyscalculia. dyspraxia, bipolar disorder, as well as Tourette's   Michael Hingson  18:30 are all considered part of neurodiversity, or neuro divergent world.   Khushboo Chabria  18:36 Yeah, and neurodiversity as an umbrella term, just to explain what it is. You know, just like when, you know, you see any people we see, we say that, you know, people have different height, people have different hair color, people have different eye color. And just like how there's so much variability in humans, in terms how we present physically, the same way, our brains have just as much variability. So the term neuro diversity is to describe the natural variability in people's brains and behavior functioning.   Michael Hingson  19:15 When you talk about neurodiversity. Do people try to create some sort of box and fit everyone into it? Or do people generally recognize that it is a really broad category that takes in a lot of stuff?   Khushboo Chabria  19:29 I think different people have different ways of looking at it. You know, there are companies that instead of having specific groups for neurodiversity, we'll put everything in an ability group, which is about including anyone with any kind of disability, whether it's invisible or visible. In terms of neurodiversity. A lot of people know the main ones to be autism, dyslexia and ADHD. But we're still learning so much about bipolar does over and about to rats. And so there's a lot of understanding that still needs to happen around neurodiversity. There's still a lot of stigma there, there's still a lot of people who aren't really aware of what this term means. So I would say that people have different levels of understanding about this. But I think it's all kind of related, right? I mean, if we have different ways of processing information from the world, then we all kind of have a different way of going about it. And when we say neuro divergent, we're talking about one person who may or may not have one of those labels. When we say neuro diverse, we're talking about everyone, because everybody's in that umbrella of having a brain that's unique and processing information in a unique way, and making sense of the world in a unique way. So it depends, I guess that's the answer to the question.   Michael Hingson  21:06 No, it does. And I could make the case that we're all part of a neuro divergent world in a way, and I think that's what you're saying. But there, there are specific kinds of categories that mostly we deal with when we talk about neurodiversity. I'm a little bit familiar with Tourette's, but can you define that a little bit? Yeah,   Khushboo Chabria  21:27 definitely. Um, Tourette's has to do with basically, it has to do with just kind of its has to do with tics and involuntary repetitive movements. So in terms of how that relates to neurodiversity, we're just talking about individuals who have different behaviors, whether that sounds, whether that's saying the same words in the same way, or having physical behavioral differences that are stereotypical, well,   Michael Hingson  22:02 how was it for you grew up? Well, not growing up so much, but being in the workplace and not being diagnosed with ADHD and so on? That had to be quite a challenge?   Khushboo Chabria  22:13 Yeah, definitely. Um, you know, to be honest, one of the biggest things that I found out right off the bat was that when I had a lot of different cases, and different deadlines, and different things that I needed to accomplish in my job, I really struggled with keeping control over everything that was going on. And as a clinician, you know, there was a lot of things that I was responsible for I was responsible for training all the staff that was on my cases, I was responsible for keeping track of all the materials that were needed. On every case, I was responsible for parent training, I was responsible for scheduling meetings, I was responsible for completing reports, I was responsible for staying connected to insurance companies. And with all of those different things, I had a really hard time with managing all my responsibilities. And in the beginning, you know, it was just a write up about being more punctual and being more timely to meetings. Then it became about making sure that all my reports are complete, then it was about making sure that my reports had all the feedback taken into consideration. And throughout every single step of it, I was feeling more and more disheartened about where I was and how I was working. And it really made me question, you know, is something wrong with me? Why is it that everyone else is able to do all this without any issues, but when it comes to me, here, I am struggling so much. And I was really depressed. I, I thought I was depressed, and I thought I was burnt out. And in trying to get treatment for that I ended up finding out I had ADHD.   Michael Hingson  24:22 Did other supervisors or colleagues see kind of all the stress and the things that were going on? Or were you able to kind of hide it?   Khushboo Chabria  24:30 A lot of people were able to see the stress and to be honest, for the longest time, despite being in a field that was there to support children with neurodiverse conditions. I found myself in a workplace that was very toxic. And I was basically just told, Well, you need to meet your billable hours and maybe you need to do this or maybe you need to do Under planning, but nobody was sitting down and telling me how to go about doing that, or what steps I needed to take to get the support I needed. And not a single person in that office had identified what I was dealing with as something that could be related to ADHD. Instead, I was just being told that I wasn't working hard enough, or I wasn't working fast enough, or I wasn't being organized enough. And I took all of that to heart. For a long time, it took me a long time to unlearn those messages. Because I kept beating myself up over the simple things. And I felt like I wasn't a good employee. And I felt at times that I was being discriminated against. But I realized now looking back at it all, that I made a lot of mistakes as well. And I should have known how to ask for that support early on. But I didn't know what I didn't know. So there's a lot of thinking that's gone behind everything that happened then. But looking back at it, now I'm able to see all the different sides of that equation.   Michael Hingson  26:15 When did you start in the workforce?   Khushboo Chabria  26:17 I started in the workforce in 20. I would say 2007.   Michael Hingson  26:26 Okay, so you Where were you in school at that time?   Khushboo Chabria  26:33 At that time, I was in community college, okay. And I was working at a daycare center with a whole bunch of children. And I was also working as a campus activities coordinator at our school.   Michael Hingson  26:50 So that was 15 years ago. Do you see that there has been a lot of change in dealing with ADHD and and neuro diversity. And I don't mean, just talking about a real substantive change, that would nowadays make a difference. If you were starting out today, as opposed to what happened to you 15 years ago? Um, is it different? Yeah,   Khushboo Chabria  27:23 I think the way that we do work with children who are neurodiverse has changed a lot. Like the way that things are done. Now the way that treatment is carried out, is very neurodiversity affirming, which means that it's not really about fixing anything, it's about really understanding what are the challenges that this individual is facing? And how can we support them such that they can live fulfilling independent lives without having to depend on other people. And so a lot of what I did before, was in regards to teaching skills. So I might be teaching a two year old how to make eye contact, I might be teaching a five year old how to tie their shoelaces. I taught everything from toilet training, to how to make a purchase at the store, how to start a conversation with someone how to speak, a lot of my clients were nonverbal when I was in the field. So that whole space has changed a lot. In regards to working and working conditions. I don't know if there have been a lot of changes in how we provide care, and how we provide support to people who are providing that care. And I think that as a society, we need to do a better job of supporting the people who are providing health care to the disability population. Yeah, and we could do a lot better with that. Right?   Michael Hingson  29:08 Oh, no doubt about it. I was thinking, though, of how you described your work situation is you needed to work harder, you needed to work better, and so on. Do you think those attitudes in the workforce toward people who may be experiencing the same thing that you experience? Do you think that those kinds of conditions have changed much?   Khushboo Chabria  29:35 I think they have to some degree, but I wouldn't say all across the board. And what I've mean when I say that is because even now, when people have disclosed their neurodiversity to their employer, there are times where people are just saying, Well, you know, I understand that you're struggling with a XYZ, but this work needs to be completed. So this idea of kind of painting this color on somebody who's a little bit differently, who works differently, who thinks differently, who processes information differently, I think we still have these assumptions that we make about people and those assumptions of, oh, this person's just lazy, or this person's just not doing it, or this person's just not the right fit. And as soon as we start using that terminology, we've now made assumptions before trying to understand what it is that that person might be struggling with. Right? Oh,   Michael Hingson  30:46 I agree. And it sounds like that, even with the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act. And now 32 years ago, and 31 years ago, actually being enacted and going into law, it hasn't made a lot of difference in these kinds of things, because we just haven't really dealt with the educational aspect of it yet.   Khushboo Chabria  31:11 Right? Yeah. I think you know, the problem is really with the stigma we have in society about people who are different, anyone who's another, right? It's very easy to say, Oh, this is just not working out, instead of approaching that person and saying, Hey, I noticed that in our last interaction, this is what happened. Is there something that I'm seeing that's confusing you? Or can you talk to me about what's going on, so I can help, right? And that moment, where you have the chance to question somebody, to understand that better before you judge them. That is something that we as a society just need to be better at, we need to be better managers, we need to be better educators, we need to be better leaders. And that comes with not trying to just rush things along and thinking that someone is going to be exactly the perfect candidate. But instead saying, You know what this is a human being. And the way that they might think, or work might be different than the way I think and work. So before I put them in a box, it's important to show that curiosity and that compassion to learn more about that person.   Michael Hingson  32:41 And I think you hit it on the head when you talk about curiosity very much. How do we get people to be more curious to be more open to ask why and why not? As opposed to just assuming? Yeah, definitely. That's a real general question. I really,   Khushboo Chabria  33:05 ya know, you know, and our presentations at neurodiversity pathways, we have this terminology called compassionate curiosity. And what that is, is that when you have a moment where something doesn't make sense, or someone's behavior is just not adding up to what you know about them. Or if some interaction happened, that leaves you feeling confused. Before you jump to, I can't believe this person hasn't gotten this to me. If we could all take a moment to say, Hey, I haven't heard from you. I just wanted to follow up is everything. Okay? Right. That's a really great way that we can sort of foster that kind of a culture, which capitalizes on empathy and understanding versus judgment and expectations. But that being said, to change that, I think that begins with increasing awareness. Right. So in the work that we do with neurodiversity pathways, the first thing we do when any company engages with us, and they say, We want to hire people with autism, or we want to hire neurodivergent people. The first thing we say to them is, there's no point in bringing anyone into your organization, unless and until you're able to foster a culture of inclusion, and a culture of understanding and awareness that's built around neurodiversity because as someone who is responsible for placing neurodivergent people into organizations, I know that if I place somebody in an organization that is not supportive neurodivergent talent, then that person is, forget, thrive or succeed, that person is not even going to be able to retain that position.   Michael Hingson  35:10 Do you hear people often say, Oh, we don't need to do that, because I'm certainly open. I'm glad to bring somebody in. Who is who has autism? Or who is neuro divergent in some way? Do you? Do you see that a lot? Or do people get it and then tend to be open to say, how do we really make that happen?   Khushboo Chabria  35:31 I would say probably a few years ago, there was a lot less awareness about neurodiversity. And I know that probably with every client that we engage with, they're at different levels of understanding about it. And maybe some of them have received trainings from other sources. But that being said, I think that there are definitely some companies who do try to rush these things. None of those are companies that we've engaged with. But the ones who try to rush into these diversity and inclusion efforts are usually the ones that fail. Because without that understanding, and that real culture of inclusion, and that culture of psychological safety, it's just kind of a recipe for disaster, when you have people who don't understand how to work with that population,   Michael Hingson  36:28 and don't really want to take the time to do it. Right.   Khushboo Chabria  36:32 Exactly. Exactly.   Michael Hingson  36:34 Well, how did you get involved in being interested in disabilities, and well, neurodiversity, and so on, because that clearly had to happen a long time before you were diagnosed with ADHD. So how did all that happen?   Khushboo Chabria  36:47 Yeah, definitely. Um, you know, so when I was in college, at UC San Diego, I had a major human development. And I was actually pre med at the time, because I thought that I wanted to go into medicine. And after I graduated from college, it was actually right when we had had our first sort of economic collapse as a country. And so there were still not a lot of jobs, I thought I wanted to do PhD programs in social psychology. And I had started applying to graduate programs all over the country in that degree. And it wasn't until I started working in the field of behavior analysis, that I felt I had kind of found a home. So growing up, I had a cousin, who had Global Developmental Delay, previously known as Mr. And I grew up with him. And I had always had a really special bond with them, I was very close to him. And I also had another cousin who grew up with schizophrenia. So I grew up kind of seeing how that had affected him. And when I graduated college, I needed a job, I applied to a part time job as a behavior therapist. And I worked for a very small company in Oakland, California. And my first client was an eight year old, nonverbal, autistic boy from Ethiopia. And he was the most beautiful child I had ever seen in my entire life. And I just fell in love with him. And within a few months of working with them, he started speaking his first words. And the first sentence he ever spoke was, I want more cookies. And that was it. I think that as soon as he started speaking, I knew that whatever I did, I wanted to be helping this population. And I wanted to work with neurodivergent people. And it started out with working with children. But when that client spoke his first words, I felt like the trajectory of my life had changed. And I decided to rescind all my applications for social psych. I reset for my GRE exams, and I reapplied to grad schools in behavior analysis. That's kind of what started the journey in that direction. And then obviously, as we spoke about before, when I was finally a clinician, I found out I had ADHD. i At that point, had worked for a school district. I had worked as an assessor. I had started a social skills group, I had tried to start a parent training program. I had done a lot of other things before I found neurodiversity pathways. Well,   Michael Hingson  39:59 the big Question, of course is did you give him more cookies?   Khushboo Chabria  40:03 Of course we did. Definitely   Michael Hingson  40:07 reward good behavior.   Khushboo Chabria  40:09 Yeah, he just it was amazing because as soon as he started speaking, just like babies do, he started babbling as well. And he would wake his mom up early in the morning and Babble Babble Babble for hours to her trying to communicate and everything that we pointed to and labeled for him was a word he picked up immediately. So it was a transformative case.   Michael Hingson  40:38 That is so cool. And do you? Do you hear anything about him nowadays?   Khushboo Chabria  40:46 Yeah, actually, I'm still in touch with his mom. And he just graduated high school a year ago. So he's starting in community college.   Michael Hingson  40:56 How old is he?   Khushboo Chabria  40:57 He is now 19 years old.   Michael Hingson  41:00 Wow. That's so cool.   Khushboo Chabria  41:04 Isn't that amazing?   Michael Hingson  41:05 It is. It's wonderful. Well, that's what doing good work like that. And being thorough is all   Khushboo Chabria  41:11 about. Exactly, exactly.   Michael Hingson  41:14 So for you, having eventually been diagnosed with ADHD that that certainly had to give you a great amount of well, relief on one hand, but then also, it gave you the ability to really sit back and look at your options and decide how you go forward. What kind of tools did you end up then starting to use that maybe you didn't use so much before tools that help you be more productive and deal with what you had to deal with?   Khushboo Chabria  41:46 Yeah. So at first, I had therapy, which is what I had started out with, and I had continued. At some point, I had also tried meds, but I found out that the meds were just too difficult on my body, and I couldn't handle staying on those. So I had to find other strategies. And some of those strategies were things like using a Google calendar using more reminders, planning ahead, having more of a morning routine, really building healthy habits around eating, sleeping hygiene and meditation so that I had a better handle on things, and also had to learn coping and resilience strategies for when things did not go my way. A lot of these tools and strategies got solidified when I joined neurodiversity pathways. And we actually used all this information to create the curriculum for our students who were going into the workplace. But for the time being, when I first gotten diagnosed, I started reading about things online. And I found people who were sharing strategies, on websites and on LinkedIn and on social media. And I slowly started piecing together the things that worked best for me, the things that were the most instrumental. In the beginning, were buying a habit calendar. And having a morning routine. With those two things, I was really able to get started. Then with the executive functioning, I started planning out reminders for things that I had do weeks in advance so that I was more on top of getting my tasks completed. And as I learned more and more about ADHD, I recognize that most of the things that I struggled with in regards to executive functioning, they weren't necessarily related specifically to cognitive differences, but they were more related to the emotional and behavioral aspects of executive functioning. So the anxiety of having to start a task that I've never done before, or just the fear of not getting it correct, that would just paralyze me from even beginning on the task. Those were the things that I needed tools around the most and that's where therapy came into play.   Michael Hingson  44:26 Do you still deal with therapy today?   Khushboo Chabria  44:29 I, I have been on and off therapy. I'm currently on a lookout for therapists. So if anyone's listening, I'm looking for one and I'm on many waitlist. The therapists in my area are all booked up because of COVID. And so there's been a little bit of challenge with that. But since the diagnosis, I have tried individual therapy. I've worked with different kinds of therapists so it was really important to me to try to find someone who was a South Asian therapist, because I felt like there were a lot of things that someone with a South Asian background would understand that someone who doesn't have that background would have a lot of difficulty in regard to cultural competency. In addition, I've also tried group therapy. And I've also done a workshop on ADHD that helped with learning how to be more organized. And with better planning.   Michael Hingson  45:34 You mentioned meditation, how does that play into what you do? And in your own progress in psyche? Yeah,   Khushboo Chabria  45:43 definitely, I think, you know, meditation is one of those things that a lot of people throw around. And it's kind of like, you know, the pop psychology thing to talk about, right? Like, let's all do mindfulness and meditation. And for me, because my mind is constantly racing at 100 miles per hour, what meditation and mindfulness practices allow me to do is to steal my mind, and to really focus on my breathing, and to really sort of observe the things that are making me anxious, without starting to act upon them right away. And so when I meditate, it's, that's my time to steal my mind of all the racing thoughts, to take account of the things that I'm anxious about. And instead of jumping on them, just observing them, reflecting on them, and noticing them before I can actually start to begin what it is that I want to do. And that single moment of clarity is enough for me to kind of be in a better headspace, so that I can tackle all the tasks on my to do list,   Michael Hingson  47:06 show what happens when you do that.   Khushboo Chabria  47:10 I think that it helps me relax, it helps me focus. It helps me prioritize on the things that I need to get done. And it allows me to have some breathing room to really plan things out in a way that doesn't take over my entire life. But instead, it helps me remember what things I have to do, what things I need to do, and what things I want to do. And as soon as I have that division and that clarity, in my mind, I'm better able to tackle the things I need to get done.   Michael Hingson  47:51 Cool. Well, you've mentioned neurodiversity pathways many times. And so we should get to that. Tell me about that. What led you to finding it, what it is, and so on?   Khushboo Chabria  48:04 Sure. So actually, when I decided to pivot to neurodiversity, in 2020, it was because at that point, I had tried to work in the field of behavior analysis for years, and continued to struggle and fail at that endeavor. And the reason being that I just didn't feel like the field was aligned with what I wanted to do. And I needed to figure out a different thing that I could take or a different path that I could take going forward with my career. So in the beginning of 2020, shortly before COVID, I had just left a position as a behavior specialist at a school district, where I was helping to support a class of students that were under the IDI category or emotionally disturbed. And at that point, I had decided that I wanted to shift away from all of the behavioral stuff and focus more on neurodiversity, because I wanted to be neurodiversity affirming in my career, and I wanted to be working with adults and I wanted to expand my skill set. And I didn't feel like my previous work was aligned with me anymore. So I ended up hiring a career coach. And this was in January of 2020. And he was someone who had a completely different background than me, but he was very good at learning what was awesome about me and what my strengths were, and how I could best showcase those strengths to the world. So together you him and I started our research into neurodiversity. And we learned a lot about how the field works. And then I started networking. And it's kind of ironic that I started with a career coach, because now I am a career coach to neurodivergent people. But in my networking, I ended up meeting someone named Jessica Lee, who has a neurodiversity program in Southern California. And she told me that I should speak to Ranga Rahman, who is the program director of neurodiversity pathways, and we set up a networking call, I opened up to him and honestly shared with him about everything that I had faced and where I was with my career, and what it is that I wanted to do. And to be honest with you, Michael, I cried to him. And 20 minutes later, he sent me a job description and said, I can only hire you as a volunteer for now. But you will get the work experience that you need in this space. And if at any point, you get another job, you're welcome to leave. But this would be a great starting place for you. And we will be happy to have you on the team. So that's how I came on to neurodiversity pathways. And when I joined the team, we have lost all our funding due to COVID. And we had to basically build our program from the ground up. So at the time, me Ranga, and a small group of volunteers work together to build our first online course. And that was growth mindset. And we went from building one course to three courses, to five courses, to 10 courses to 14 courses. And what our career launch program is now is a 14 course program training program called Career Readiness Training, followed by six months of one on one coaching. The entire program is called Career launch programs. And it is aimed at neurodivergent individuals who have a two or four year college degree and those who are unemployed or underemployed, in relation to their strengths, their qualifications and their interest. And it's focused on those who are really motivated to get a job and be good at it. And those who need the motivation and drive to get to their goals.   Michael Hingson  52:41 Well, overall, what is neuro diversity pathways as an organization, what what does it do? How do you start? Tell us a little more about that, if you would?   Khushboo Chabria  52:52 Yeah, definitely. So Rhonda J. Rahman, who's our program director, was actually responsible for starting a lot of coalition building around neurodiversity at Stanford University. And when he left Stanford, he joined goodwill, and started neurodiversity pathways, which used to be known as expandability. Colon autism advantage. And then after about two years, they rebranded themselves to not just focus on autism, but to be focused on the full neurodiversity umbrella, which is when they became neurodiversity pathways. We've been around since 2017. And we are a social impact program under the mission services umbrella at the goodwill of Silicon Valley. So we Oh, go ahead. Go ahead. I was gonna say we work on two sides. On one side, we work with individuals, which is the career launch program, which I was just telling you about. And on the organization side, we have workplace inclusion services, where we train companies on neuro Diversity Awareness, and we provide business process consultation. And we provide coaching and we provide half day and full day workshops to train companies on how to work with neurodivergent people. So those are the two ways in which we support   Michael Hingson  54:26 do you work on both sides of the company or mainly in the work?   Khushboo Chabria  54:31 I work on both sides. So on the individual side, I teach all the job development courses. And I do a lot of the coaching that we do with our students to get them placed into jobs. And on the organizational side and part of all the presentations and the consulting that we do with companies that want to hire neurodivergent people.   Michael Hingson  54:56 Are there other kinds of career launch programs around the country? Similar to what neurodiversity pathways does, or yeah,   Khushboo Chabria  55:05 there are, but there are many different kinds. And they're offering many different kinds of services. But I would like to say that there isn't a single program in the country that as in depth as ours, that has a 10 month commitment to neurodivergent individuals, where we teach everything from personal effectiveness to workplace competency skills, and job development. And a two week workplace experience, followed by six months of coaching,   Michael Hingson  55:38 is the program free to people who need it.   Khushboo Chabria  55:41 The program is free to anyone who is connected to any DLR office in California. However, if you live in a different state, if you live in a different country, we're willing and able to work with any local service providers or government agencies in order to get you the funding that you need to cover the costs of the program.   Michael Hingson  56:08 So you get funding from the Department of Rehabilitation now, for example. So there is funding, unlike there was at the beginning of the COVID time.   Khushboo Chabria  56:19 Yeah, so actually, I was only I was a volunteer for a part of the time. And then I was my manager pushed for me to become a contractor. And then I became a full time employee. So I have been a full time employee for a little bit. And we have gotten the program off the ground. So when we were building the courses, we did several test runs. We had our official first cohort launched in spring of this year, which went from March 1 to July 1. And we are now recruiting for our fall program, which begins on September 13.   Michael Hingson  57:00 How can organizations and people support or help what you're doing and neurodiversity pathways in the Korean lunch program.   Khushboo Chabria  57:09 There are so many different ways. So if you actually go to our website, you can make a donation to our mission. You can also sponsor the education of a student if you're interested in that you can hire us to come speak to your work groups, to your community groups, to your team, to your organization, about neurodiversity, you can also sign up to be a volunteer coach to help support one of our students while they're working, or look looking for jobs. So there are lots of different ways we host two neurodiversity awareness sessions that are free to anyone in the world online. And those are offered two times a month, you can sign up on our website when you click on awareness sessions, and go to individual and click on the Google Form there. Additionally, if you want to hire us for Neuro Diversity Awareness, or to help hire neurodiverse people into your company, we're happy to speak to you about that as well.   Michael Hingson  58:19 In it all operates under the umbrella of goodwill of Silicon Valley's 501 C three tax status, or do you have your own?   Khushboo Chabria  58:28 We're all under the goodwill and   Michael Hingson  58:32 it makes sense. Well, so what do you do when you're not working?   Khushboo Chabria  58:37 Um, to be honest, lately, I've been mostly just working. But I'm also working on my dissertation, which is kind of related to work.   Michael Hingson  58:49 Congratulations. So you're working toward a PhD?   Khushboo Chabria  58:52 Yeah, it's actually an EDD in organizational leadership.   Michael Hingson  58:57 Okay. Where, what what?   Khushboo Chabria  59:01 So I'm going to UMass global, which used to formally be known as Brandman University, under the Chapman umbrella. And I am getting my degree in organizational leadership. So I'm going to abd right now, which is all but dissertation, which means I have completed my coursework, but I haven't completed my dissertation yet. And so I am completing that now. My dissertation is going to be looking at the lived experience of colleagues of neurodivergent employees.   Michael Hingson  59:40 When do you think you'll get to defend it and become a doctor?   Khushboo Chabria  59:46 Well, to be honest with you, Michael, with my ADHD, I only have until August of next year to defend so I have to get it done by August of next year. Or school. Yeah, I do much better. They have deadlines. So when they told me I had a year left, I wish they had emailed me that, that actual email a few years prior, so I could have been scared enough to just get it done. But here we are towards the end of it outside of my dissertation. I am learning Tarot. So I'm moonlighting as a tarot reader. And I do a lot of different networking things. And I'm part of social groups, and I do speaking engagements. And I spend a lot of time with friends and family and I travel as well. Where have you traveled? I've traveled to a lot of places in Asia. So I've traveled to the Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Macau. I've also traveled a little bit in Europe. So I've traveled to Spain and to France. But I'm hoping to increase that once things settle down with COVID.   Michael Hingson  1:01:11 Yeah. Hopefully that will happen sometime in the near future, or at least in the future, but it's so unpredictable still.   Khushboo Chabria  1:01:20 Exactly, definitely.   Michael Hingson  1:01:23 Well, this has been a heck of a lot of fun. And I've learned a lot I appreciate all that you have had to say. So you haven't written any books or anything yet, your thesis is probably going to be your first major project.   Khushboo Chabria  1:01:37 Yes, definitely. I have been published as a poet and a couple of books, but that's not related to this.   Michael Hingson  1:01:45 Okay. Well, it's, it's great that you're doing some writing. And that is always exciting to do. Well, if people want to learn more about you, or reach out, if they want to explore neurodiversity pathways, and so on, if you would tell us all about how to contact you and how to learn about the program and so on.   Khushboo Chabria  1:02:05 Yeah, definitely. So when this podcast is published, I know you're going to be posting some links on our website, and all of those other things. But if you go to ndpathways.org. That is our website, all our information is there, our contact information is there as well. You can reach out to me directly, you can connect with me on LinkedIn, I'm happy to answer any questions that you have. And to be able to help you in any way that I   Michael Hingson  1:02:36 can. How do people connect with you on LinkedIn,   Khushboo Chabria  1:02:40 my LinkedIn profile will also be linked to this podcast, but it is actually just linked in.com and my U R L, let me just pull it up is linkedin.com backslash Khushboo Chabria, which is K h u s h B for boy, o o C a b r i a. And that's my full name after the LinkedIn and the backslash.   Michael Hingson  1:03:18 Khushboo. Thank you very much for being here. And I think it's always fun when we get to learn more and new and different things. And we get to explore new ideas, at least to some of us. They're new, but explore ideas and even picking up new things. Even though we may have heard some of it before. There's always new stuff. So thank you for bringing that to all of us.   Khushboo Chabria  1:03:46 Thank you so much for having me, Michael, I appreciate you.   Michael Hingson  1:03:49 Well, I appreciate you being here. And I hope you enjoyed this out there, please reach out to Khushboo. And also, I'd love to hear from you. Let me know what you thought about this. You can reach me at Michaelhi at accessibe.com or go to www dot Michael hingson.com/podcast. We also really would appreciate a five star review from you wherever you're listening to this podcast. Please do that. Your support is what makes this worthwhile and possible and we love to hear the things you have to say. So we appreciate you doing that. And we hope that you'll be here again next weekend Khushboo you thank you for once more for being here with us today.   Khushboo Chabria  1:04:35 Thank you so much for having   Michael Hingson  1:04:41 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

My Business On Purpose
12 Week Plan LIVE Event: Workshop 2- Stirring In The Substance: Backing Up The Spectacle With Your Process

My Business On Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 8:18


Thomas just talked about some amazing recruiting practices and you had time to put ideas on paper of how to recruit great talent. Now What?  You have some resumes that look promising and you're excited that all your prayers might be answered with one of these resumes.  Now it's time to start interviewing. This is the recruit's first impression of you and your organization. This sets the tone for everything from this point forward. Are you professional? Are you organized? Are you intentional? Are you mission-driven or chaos-driven? If you are professional, well organized, and intentional, then the recruit knows you mean business. They will either get scared and run or they will show up and show off for you because they want the job. Wouldn't you want to scare them off now, instead of 3 months from now when they have cost you over $10,000 to $25,000 in your time and resources, and then you have to do this recruiting, hiring and onboarding all over again? So, How are you giving the first impression to recruits of your business? You should be doing this with your 6-Step Hiring Process. Step 1 Phone Interview Do you have this mapped out with the specific questions you ask at your phone interview? Is this replicable so anyone in your organization can get on the phone and do a phone interview? Step 2 1st Live Sit Down Interview This is the time where you share vision/mission/values/culture to allow the candidate to determine if this is even the type of business they want to be a part of? Do you have this spelled out so you don't have to think when the candidate comes in for the interview.  Step 3 Due Diligence  (My favorite)  This is where we are calling the candidate to tell them we want to move forward and we want to do personality profiling, call their references, and assign homework. Have you decided on a Personality profiling tool to use? How about calling on references? Do you have your questions written down on what questions you will ask when calling references? What homework do you have for the candidate? For a bookkeeper maybe reconcile a mock bank account, for an estimator, estimate an old job, for a marketing specialist design a logo.   Step 4 2nd Live Interview preferable with other team members  Here you are deep diving into the role and seeing how they act with the other team members.  Again, do you have this written out and documented so you cover everything from their ideal weekly schedule to going over your MPR? Step 5 Spousal/Friend Dinner/Lunch, social  In his 2011 book “EntreLeadership,” Dave Ramsey recommends that companies vet spouses to make sure their hire is not “married to crazy.” Dave says, “When hiring someone, you are employing more than just the person. You're taking on the whole family. And when they are married to someone who is domineering, unstable or simply full of drama, you'll end up with a team member who can't be creative, productive or excellent.” Go to lunch or dinner with your candidate and their spouse to find out if crazy lives at home.  Step 6 Phone call and email with Offer. Some of you are saying “Patrice we got this, we have been interviewing & hiring for years” Great then how can you systemize it and  make it better so anyone can take your hiring process and run with it. Alright, your Hiring process is complete and the candidate accepted your offer Yeah!! They start on Monday and all your problems are going to be solved. Let me tell you a story, Becky. Becky sent her resume to XYZ realty as a marketing specialist. She had all the qualifications for the role and was hired. Her first day she was shown her desk, given her laptop, set up on email, and then voila! She started marketing and it was the best marketing ever done for XYZ realty. I wish!! Becky isn't her real name because honestly, I don't remember it. XYC Realtry was the Miles and Smith Real Estate Group which I owned. Becky was my new recruit. She was going to change everything for our real estate group. We would start getting more leads now then ever with a part-time marketing specialist, right! Within two weeks I was wondering what in the world she was doing. I saw a post or two on social media, but besides that….I had no clue what she was doing. I sat down with her to ask and she showed me a couple of things but nothing substantial. I asked where her marketing calendar was, where her content creator checklist was, how was she keeping track of analytics so we knew what was working and what wasn't, what about a newsletter or updating the website, I mean she is a marketing specialist she should know all these things.  How many times as business owners have we said “They should know this, they did bookkeeping before, they did project management before….They should know what to do, why do I have to tell them everything? Because what is common to you is not common to them. What is common to you is not common to me. What is common to you is not ever common to your spouse or your best friend who knows you inside and out. You have to train, set expectations and hold people accountable so what is common to you can become common to them.  To do this you need an Onboarding Process, Checklist and Training Schedule Your Onboarding Process will set the tone for the future accountability and performance of your new employee.  Is your Onboarding Process clearly defined?  Your onboarding checklist allows you to list everything you want to go over during the training and who in your organization is going to do the training. Do you have an onboarding checklist with all the Admin/Tech/Projects/Software/Processes and General Company policy and procedures that you want to go over with your new employee during their training time.   Your onboarding weekly training schedule will map out in timeblocks what they are going to be trained on from your checklist. Do you have a weekly training schedule spelled out for at least the 1st week. So what part of Onboarding do you need to create or perfect? Breakout. First 10 minutes spend on your Hiring Process. Every step of the hiring process is crucial. If you don't have a hiring process, then start creating one. If you already have a hiring process….What are you short cutting on in your hiring process?       2. Second 10 minutes spend on your Onboarding. What do you need to create or perfect? Your Onboarding Process, Checklist, and or Training Schedule.       3. Talk to your team and collaborate on best practices and be prepared to share a few ideas to the group when we come back. 

Tank Talks
How to Turn a Passion for Real Estate and Travel into an Investment Platform for Millennials with Getaway CEO Ali Nichols

Tank Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 41:03


Real Estate is one of the best ways to build wealth, and travelling is a great way to spend it! What if there was a way to combine both of those ideas into a single platform? Our guest today is Ali Nichols, Co-Founder of Getaway, who thinks she has figured out a way to combine both of those passions for millennials. On today's show, we cover how Getaway is combining the demands of younger generations to not only invest in real estate but also enjoy the perks of that investment along the way. About Ali Nichols:Ali Nichols is the Co-founder and Co-CEO of Getaway. Prior to founding Getaway, Ali spent over 4 years as an executive at Bungalow, a technology-enabled residential real estate company, where she ran Operations, Growth, Marketing, Sales, and Real Estate. She spearheaded raising and operating a $700M real estate fund focused on acquiring single-family rentals. Before that Ali was a Strategy & Planning Sr. Manager at Uber and a Consultant at IBM. She holds a Bachelor of Science from Carnegie Mellon University.A word from our sponsor:At Ripple, we manage all of our fund expenses and employee credit cards using Jeeves. The team at Jeeves helped get me and my team setup with physical and virtual credit cards in days. I allowed my teammates to expense items in multiple currencies allowing them to pay for anything, anywhere at any time. We weren't asked for any personal guarantees or to pay any setup or monthly SaaS fees.Not only does Jeeves save us time, but they also give us cash back on our purchases including expenses like Google, Facebook, or AWS every month. New users can earn up to 3% cashback for their first 90 days.The best part is Jeeves puts up the cash, and you settle up once every 30 days in any currency you want, unlike some other corporate card companies that make you pre-pay every month. Jeeves also recently launched its Jeeves Growth and Working Capital initiative for startups and fast-growing companies to enable more financial freedom for companies. The best thing is that Jeeves is live in  24 countries including Canada, the US and many other countries around the world.Jeeves truly offers the best all-in-one expense management corporate card program for all startups especially the ones at Ripple and we at Tank Talks could not be more excited to officially partner with them. Listeners of Tank Talks can get set up with a demo of Jeeves today and take advantage of our Tank Talks special with a‍ $250 statement credit after the first $2,500 in spend or a $500 statement credit after the first $5000 in spend. Lastly, all Jeeves cardholders receive access to their Lounge Pass program and access to over 1300 airports globally.Visit tryjeeves.com/tanktalks to learn more.In this episode we discuss:(02:33)  Ali's journey into tech(04:56)  Ali's experience at Uber(05:46)  Where Ali's passion for Real Estate developed(07:35)  Uber's real estate division(10:03)  The biggest takeaway from Uber(11:12)  Ali's time at Bungalow and helping it grow(13:52)  Bungalow's model for sourcing(15:18)  Why she started Getaway(19:11)  Finding her co-founder and why their partnership works(23:03)  Why vacation rentals is an exciting asset class(26:11)  Who Getaway is targeted at(28:09)  How this is different from a traditional timeshare(29:56)  How Getaway actually works(32:21)  Target annual returns to users on Getaway(35:03)  Plans to build out their portfolio of Real Estate holdings(36:53)  What Getaway is doing with their recent $5.9M raise led by Cowboy Ventures, XYZ, and Night Ventures(37:59)  Benefits from having a strong network of angel investorsFast Favorites:*

Dear Analyst
Dear Analyst #113: Top 5 data analytics predictions for 2023

Dear Analyst

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 31:12


It’s that time of the year again where data professionals look at their data predictions from 2022 and decide what they were wrong about and think: “this must be the year for XYZ.” Aside from the fact that these type of predictions are 100% subjective and nearly impossible to verify, it’s always fun to play […] The post Dear Analyst #113: Top 5 data analytics predictions for 2023 appeared first on .

Dating, Relationships, and Disability
63 - When You Get NO Response

Dating, Relationships, and Disability

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 19:56


There are a lot of hard parts of dating - having the courage to put yourself out there, facing the possibility of rejection, getting hurt, having difficult conversations, and the list can go on and on. Sometimes it certainly may not feel worth it, but it is, especially if you want to share your life with someone. Today I want to talk about a dating difficulty that wasn't on that brief list - putting yourself out there and receiving no response at all. It's a rejection but not a direct one. It can sometimes feel worse than a direct one because you think, What, I'm not even worthy of a response?This is a very common problem for all people dating. Many people don't have the skills to communicate hard things like “Thank you so much for the offer, but I have other plans or I'm not interested.” We think we don't want to hurt people's feelings, but downright ignoring someone's interest in you is not exactly kind eitherHow To Handle No ResponseAs I see it, there are basically two ways to respond to no response. You can obviously do nothing about it. Let it go. Write it off. Move on. The key in all this is to not internalize it as rejection. You have no concrete reason why they didn't respond so don't make it something negative about you. If they don't have effective communication skills, that's on them, not you. Don't use no response against yourself.Remind yourself it's their loss. Congratulate yourself that it was terrific that you put yourself out there and took a risk. Also remember as with most things in life, the more you get a no, the closer you get to a yes.The alternative to not saying anything to someone not responding to you at all is, of course, to say something. Circle back. Say, “Hey, I mentioned us doing XYZ and never heard from you. Could you tell me what's going on?”Yes, this is a more bold option. But if it's calling to you to not ignore a no response, then go for it. I would just recommend doing it in a more matter of fact way and not an emotional way. If you do react emotionally rather than try to have a conversation, you may prove to the person why they didn't respond to your invite. Also with this option, don't internalize what the other person says. Remember, there's another way of looking at rejection. Rejection is simply someone else's preference. It's not about you, who you are, or what you're about.Where Do We Go From Here? It's not fun to work up the courage to reach out to someone and express interest, only to receive no response or follow up. But what else are you going to do? You have to put yourself out there if you have that dream in your heart about finding your person. Putting yourself out there is how you do that.Keep doing it. Keep showing up for yourself, not them. If you don't get a response to asking someone out, decide if you're going to let it go or say. Either way, though, don't use it against yourself or to hold you back from your dreams. No one is ever worth that.Resources Free download - Whenever we talk about a topic that is harder when it comes to dating and relationships, I like to remind you of the Dating Affirmations to help you maintain confidence as you put yourself out there.Go to it, my friend, keep pursuing that dream no matter what responses (or lack of) you get. Your desire for love is so worth it.Music by Successful Motivation | Artwork photo by Elevate

Finanse Bardzo Osobiste: oszczędzanie | inwestowanie | pieniądze | dobre życie
FBO: Czy warto kupić akcje tej firmy? Finansowa Forteca Audio cz.17

Finanse Bardzo Osobiste: oszczędzanie | inwestowanie | pieniądze | dobre życie

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 16:55


Często otrzymuję pytania w rodzaju:

Crypto Sapiens
Mini Series : Dejourno 2 by EurekaJohn| Platform or Protocol: Web3 Tooling for Journalists Keith Axline, Crystal Street, Eric Mack and Spencer

Crypto Sapiens

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 53:38


  Dejourno hosted by EurekaJohn: Platform or Protocol: Web3 Tooling for Journalists with Keith Axline, Crystal Street, Eric Mack and Spencer   We dive into web3 tooling for journalists - platform vs. protocol, and how to understand the differences between them. We also look at what tools web3 currently offers for journalists (i.e.: Mirror, Unlock, Orange Protocol, Publish0x, Photure, etc). We finally conclude on Web3 investigation platforms with the assistance of JournoDAO and other top architects in the web3 journalism area.   JournoDAO is an incubator for projects that transform and rethink the journalism ecosystem in the web3 space.       Listen to what our speakers have to say on the state of journalism today, its development, and how decentralization and web3 have affected it.   We intend to expose many of the cutting-edge apps currently being created to you, dear listeners. I sincerely hope you appreciate it and find it helpful in your cryptocurrency adventure.   To learn more, follow them on Twitter, and also don't forget to visit their website, JournoDAO.xyz.   SPEAKERS Keith Axline - @kaxline Crystal Street - @crystaldstreet Eric Mack - @ericcmack Spencer - @clinamenic       Wherever you listen to this podcast, please remember to like and subscribe.   We appreciate you checking out Crypto Sapiens. It is completely free, means the world to us, and aids in spreading the word about excellent stuff. Please rate this episode 5 stars wherever you listen to podcasts if you liked it.   Visit our website at cryptosapiens.XYZ to discover more discussions similar to this one.   TIMESTAMPS: 0:00 - 0:52 - DeJourno miniseries Introduction 0:52 - 3:14 - Host & Speakers Introduction and their journey in the crypto space/DeJourno   3:17 - 8:18 - Defining the categories of tools for web3 journalism (storage, censorship, resistance, transparency, community building and business, investigation tools)   8:20 - 17:58 - How is a platform different from a protocol in web3   18:00 - 29:57 - Easy to use web3 application and integration (unlock protocol as a case study)   30:00 - 34:07 - About Mirror.xyz as a platform      34:10 - 36:26 -  Contributing to IPFS   36:28 - 42:52 - Degree of centralization to decentralization   42:54 - 44:16 - Censorship in Journalism   44:17 - 50:29 - How peer graph works and web2 server integration into web3   50:30 - 51:20 - Doing research about publishing platforms before using them    51:21 - 52:37 - Decentralize Journalism   52:38 - 53:28 - DeJourno dao NFT   52:29 - Outro   Crypto Sapiens is produced in partnership with Bankless DAO.   https://bankless.community    ---   Crypto Sapiens hosts lively discussions with innovative Web3 builders to help everyone learn about decentralized money systems, including Ethereum, Bitcoin and DeFi.     Website- https://www.cryptosapiens.xyz/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/CryptoSapiens  Youtube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC26aOc_4vSGiQATW1V4e9Tw Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/cryptosapiensofficial/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/CryptoSapiens-Podcast-107678875061018    Connect with Humpty Calderon - https://twitter.com/humptycalderon   SUMMARY KEYWORDS centralization, decentralization, journalism, protocol, platform, people, journalists, publishing platform, investigation platform, web server, blogging, on-chain, blockchain, IPFS, news, local, algorithms, web3, NFT,       ---   Not financial or tax advice. This channel is strictly educational and is not investment advice or a solicitation to buy or sell assets or make financial decisions.   Do your own research.  

The FitBUX Podcast
Amy FOCUSED and potentially has an additional $600K

The FitBUX Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 20:05


This is a story about how Amy learned to FOCUS on what mattered to her financially.  Amy was always a good student, with a 4.0 GPA and an AP scholar.  She did great in undergrad and pursued a doctorate in the medical field.  Besides her career, she really loved DIY home projects, and was super excited to finally graduate and start working so she could buy a house.  However, she was terrified because she had absolutely no clue what to do with money.  She had over $250K in student loan debt, a car loan of $500/month, and only making a $78K salary.  She was advised by well meaning people to do XYZ and ABC.  But she couldn't qualify for a mortgage. Finally a colleague told her about FitBUX.  Amy built a profile and developed her plan.  But the plan wasn't want she wanted.  She was conflicted, and finally decided to schedule a call with her FitBUX Coach.  She finally learned... FOCUS is the key. Listen in to see what it means to FOCUS.

The Nonlinear Library
LW - The Story Of VaccinateCA by hath

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 15:52


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: The Story Of VaccinateCA, published by hath on December 9, 2022 on LessWrong. Linked is Patrick MacKenzie's writeup of VaccinateCA, the nonprofit that succeeded at creating the best source of vaccine availability data when the government completely dropped the ball. It's long, but one of the best things I've read in a while. Some highlights: We found it surprising that The System did not know where the vaccine was and that this fact persisted. The System allocates and ships the vaccine, after all. Devolution to various layers of government, community groups, and healthcare providers; pervasive inability to connect IT systems; and unwillingness to correct this problem meant that people in positions of authority considered the ground truth beyond the abilities of their institutions to discern. It is not harder to track a shipment of vaccine than it is to track a package from Amazon. Full stop. We are a nation that is extremely skilled at logistics, including healthcare logistics. A pharmacy chain can calculate, within a matter of minutes, the number of bottles of aspirin it owns, broken down by address. That count will be shockingly close to physical reality. Capitalism, ho! We chose, as a nation, that knowing the location of the vaccine was . . . just not a top priority. As an example of places where the data chain of custody broke down, consider the (true) case where a government actor directs some vials that it controls into the University of California at XYZ hospital system. (I will elide naming the specific hospital system, but for people not familiar with California, note that there are many different academic institutions called the University of California and their names are distinguished by the city they are primarily located in.) That hospital system has one address, according to a shipping spreadsheet. That hospital system routinely centrally receives, records, allocates, and reships all the medical supplies needed to keep a hospital system running, from saline to radiomedicine to scalpels. Then it parcels them out to the locations it provides healthcare at. Which it has more than one of and which are not a short walk from one another. I invite you to take a look at the locations list for the University of California at San Diego hospital system. We surprised the government by telling them that the vaccine was present where they believed it was absent. After delivery was taken at the central receiving facility, the vaccine was moved to individual locations where healthcare was conducted within the area of interest. What if the State of California had an alternative to engaging consultancies to deliver information systems months late and half functional? What if it, for example, had the world's leading tech industry, which is abundantly capable of shipping and operating websites? What if that industry was also extremely experienced at solving scaled logistical challenges, including ‘atoms, not bits' logistical challenges, including via the employment of tens of thousands of call center workers? Throughout the pandemic, as part of the ongoing estrangement between the tech industry and other corridors of power, there was unwillingness in the political class to work directly with the tech industry. You can write the tweet yourself, right? ‘Government tells Big Tech to ask millions of vulnerable Americans about their medical conditions. So they can do what, sell their data to advertisers?' It certainly did not help matters that various people in positions of power assumed tech was complicit in serial prevarication being heard from elsewhere in the public sector, including about, e.g., Covid testing. This rift deepened sharply in the immediate wake of 6th January, which many important people laid at the door of tech. Damn techies trying to Ctrl-Alt-Delete consti...