Podcast appearances and mentions of Jackson Hole

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Valley in Wyoming, USA

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Best podcasts about Jackson Hole

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Latest podcast episodes about Jackson Hole

The Story Box
Colin O'Brady Unboxing | Invest One Day, Conquer Your Mind & Live Your Best Life

The Story Box

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 61:03


Colin O'Brady is a ten-time world record breaking explorer, New York Times bestselling author of The Impossible First, speaker, entrepreneur, and expert on mindset. His mission: sharing his hard-earned wisdom to empower others to conquer their minds and unlock their best lives. Colin's highly publicized expeditions have been followed by millions and his work has been featured in The New York Times and Forbes and on The Tonight Show, the BBC, The Joe Rogan Experience, and NBC's Today. His feats include the world's first solo, unsupported, and fully human-powered crossing of Antarctica, speed records for the Explorers Grand Slam and the Seven Summits, and the first human-powered ocean row across Drake Passage. He regularly speaks on mindset and high performance at Fortune 100 companies such as Nike, Google, and Amazon and at top universities including Harvard, Yale, and UPenn. His TEDx talk has nearly 3 million views. He's also the cofounder of 29029 Everesting. Native to the Pacific Northwest, he now lives in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, with his wife, Jenna Besaw, and their dog, Jack. Engage with Colin and his work @ColinOBrady or at ColinOBrady.com. Visit 12HourWalk.com and IG @12HourWalk, and download the 12HourWalk app to join the movement!The 12-Hour Walk Book Here: Amazon US Pre-order my new book 'The Path of an Eagle: How To Overcome & Lead After Being Knocked Down'.► AMAZON US► AMAZON AUSSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/thestorybox. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Raptors Show with Will Lou
Banter Pod: Raptors Summer Scrimmages, Nick Nurse in Hungary, the Birth of Panda Pod

The Raptors Show with Will Lou

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 213:09


Welcome to another banter pod! Will Lou and Alex Wong chat about their first bank account, riding in Alex's 2001 Honda Civic, chicken balls, chicken feet, durian, and the idea of a “panda pod” before diving into this week's Raptors news (50:14) including the team's training camp and pre-season schedule, end of roster moves, the Rico Hines runs, Nick Nurse's expectations for this coming season, whether Toronto can finish as a top-two seed, Bruno to Boston, Raptors statues outside of Scotiabank Arena, and KD sitting down with Joe Tsai. Later, Will and Alex go through listener emails (1:54:11) from Jackson Hole, Wyoming to Bologna, Italy and discuss the origin story of “hello and welcome” and the Costco hot dog before they wrap up (2:49:25) by putting every Raptor player into their own fandom tier.The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the position of Rogers Sports & Media or any affiliates.

The Jackson Hole Connection
Episode 201 - Photographing our Community with Brad Boner of the Jackson Hole News & Guide

The Jackson Hole Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 39:54


Brad Boner is a father, photographer, author, and the Director of Visuals for the Jackson Hole News & Guide. Originally from the Black Hills area of South Dakota, Brad moved out to Wyoming back in 2004.   In this episode, Brad shares the path that led him to the Jackson Hole area. He talks about his family's western roots and the legacy of the 12 Mile Ranch. Brad then discusses his stunning 2017 photography project that takes a new look at some of William Henry Jackson's most famous photos of the Yellowstone area. Stephan and Brad also chat about the Jackson Hole News & Guide, what goes on behind the scenes, and some of Brad's more powerful stories.  Find a copy of Yellowstone National Park: Through the Lens of Time at the Teton County Library. To connect with Brad email Photo@JHNewsandGuide.com This week's episode is sponsored in part by Teton County Solid Waste and Recycling, announcing the new commercial Curb to Compost Program for restaurants and other commercial food waste generators. More athttps://tetoncountywy.gov/1459/Compost ( TetonCountyWY.gov) or athttps://www.instagram.com/roadtozerowaste.jh ( @RoadToZeroWaste.JH on Instagram) Support also comes from The Jackson Hole Wine Club. Curating quality wine selections delivered to you each month. Enjoy delicious wines at amazing prices. More athttp://jacksonholewineclub.com/ ( JacksonHoleWineClub.com) Want to be a guest on The Jackson Hole Connection? Email us at connect@thejacksonholeconnection.com. Marketing and editing support byhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelmoeri ( Michael Moeri) (http://michaelmoeri.com/ (michaelmoeri.com),https://www.instagram.com/thatsamoeri/ (@thatsamoeri))

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #95: Bogus Basin General Manager Brad Wilson

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 121:19


To support independent ski journalism, please consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. This podcast hit paid subscribers’ inboxes on July 27. Free subscribers got it on July 30. To receive future pods as soon as they’re live, please consider an upgrade to a paid subscription.WhoBrad Wilson, General Manager of Bogus Basin, IdahoRecorded onJuly 11, 2022About Bogus BasinClick here for a mountain stats overviewOwned by: The Bogus Basin Resort Association Inc., a group of approximately 100 people who own the ski areaPass affiliations: Powder Alliance, Freedom PassLocated in: Boise National Forest, IdahoClosest neighboring ski areas: Tamarack (2.5 hours), Soldier Mountain (2.5 hours)Base elevation: 5,790 feetSummit elevation: 7,852 feetVertical drop: 1,800 feetSkiable Acres: 2,600 Night-skiing acres: 175Average annual snowfall: 250 inchesTrail count: 88 (24% double-black, 49% black, 20% intermediate, 7% beginner)Lift count: 10 (4 high-speed quads, 3 doubles, 3 carpets, - view Lift Blog’s inventory of Bogus Basin’s lift fleet)Why I interviewed himFor many years, I lived in West Harlem. Specifically, a slice of bricks and concrete called Morningside Heights. It’s beautiful. The streets straightline up from the river with San Franciscan steepness. Walking and bike paths line the Hudson and above this looms Riverbank State Park, a neat grid of basketball courts and plazas and a full 400-meter track and west-facing benches where I would write and watch the sun set over New Jersey. I lived on the fourth floor of a rambling prewar building of four- and five-bedroom apartments, in a small corner room set with enormous river-facing windows, bracketing the Palisades and the George Washington Bridge twinkling over the swarm.Harlem is a big, busy neighborhood – a neighborhood of neighborhoods, as they say around here. It was a part of the city that still acted like the old city, vibrant with life beyond transit, kids running and inflatable pools dragged onto the sidewalk and on hot days the local fire brigade would pop open the hydrants and let the water gush. Men played Dominoes on folding tables. It was a primarily Dominican neighborhood, and the bodegas stocked heaping crates of wild exotic fruits.This was wonderful, but the place had shortcomings. It was hard to find basic items, such as a toothbrush. I once found myself in need of bug spray and had to take the 1 train down to the Upper West Side – 51 blocks – to find it. I was frequently offered drugs while walking down the street. There were no bars and few restaurants.Every New York-based newspaper and magazine would point to Harlem, with its lovely building stock and dense network of subway lines and irreplaceable Manhattan location, as the “next Brooklyn.” What that meant, of course, was gentrification. That’s a heavy subject, and one I’ll skim over here. What I wanted was to be able to restock my medicine cabinet without an excursion across the island, like some sort of uptown Laura Ingles Wilder. When a chain pharmacy finally moved into four combined storefronts in my third or fourth year in the neighborhood, I was relieved. I thought maybe a nice pub would follow.It never did. I moved back to the Upper East Side in 2014. For four years, I kept the apartment and rented out the rooms. A chichi wine bar popped up here and there, but Morningside Heights today looks much the same as it did in 2009, when I moved in: smoke shops and sex shops and bodegas and variety stores that look as though they are stocked by dumping out the contents of random shipping containers. It’s lively and raw and interesting, but Harlem was not, in fact, the next Brooklyn.And that’s kind of how I view Idaho. It’s skiing’s next big thing that never quite gets there. And why not? There is plenty of snow. Lookout Pass scores 400 inches per year. Pomerelle rocks 500. Brundage, Schweitzer, Silver, and Tamarack each claim 300. If you count Lost Trail, which straddles the Idaho-Montana border, the state has nine ski areas* with more than 1,000 acres of terrain and 12 with a vertical drop of more than 1,000 feet**. The southern part of the state is well-served by Boise airport, and the northern part by Spokane.So why, as Colorado and Utah overflow from Epkon skiers, do Idaho lifts continue to spin empty so much of the time? Most skiers not from Idaho can name one Idaho ski area: Sun Valley. And then they’re stumped. Or maybe they get Schweitzer, whose profile is rising thanks to Ikon Pass membership. Or they’ve heard about once-troubled Tamarack, launched with gusto in 2004 and soon shuttered by a rash court-appointed receiver (it’s back now, and I had a great, extended conversation with current resort president Scott Turlington about the resort’s past and future earlier this year). But, mostly, this is a prime ski state that is not at all perceived as one on the national scene.I’m not exactly sure why. Bogus Basin encapsulates this mystery better than any other Idaho ski area. The mountain is less than an hour (on good roads), from the Boise airport. It’s roughly the size of Copper Mountain and is larger than Beaver Creek, Telluride, Deer Valley, or Jackson Hole by inbounds skiable acreage. It is, in fact, larger than Sun Valley, which is far more remote (a fact somewhat obviated by a good airport). It has four high-speed quads. Coming expansions could further supersize the place.What gives? I put this question to Wilson in the podcast, and his answer is enlightening (and inspiring), for anyone wondering if all big mountains are destined to become Disney-at-Altitude.*Schweitzer (2,900 acres), Bogus Basin (2,600), Sun Valley (2,434), Brundage (1,920), Lost Trail (1,800), Silver (1,600), Soldier Mountain (1,142), Tamarack (1,100), and Pebble Creek (1,100).**Sun Valley (3,400 feet), Tamarack (2,800), Schweitzer (2,400), Silver (2,200), Pebble Creek (2,200), Brundage (1,921), Bogus Basin (1,800), Lost Trail (1,800), Soldier Mountain (1,425), Lookout Pass (1,150), Pomerelle (1,000), and Kelly Canyon (1,000).  What we talked aboutA record financial season at Bogus Basin; reopening in April after putting the mountain away for the year; learning to ski in the early ‘70s hotdog scene; Heavenly in the Killebrew days; Gunbarrel lunchbreaks; the legendary team in the Goldmine-transitioning-to-Big Bear days; what made that team disperse; stumbling upon Brian Head; Sugarbush in the American Skiing Company days; yet another testament to the virtues of Sugarbush; yeah I forgot the name of the Slide Brook Express shoot me; fixing up Mountain High; SoCal as snowboard mecca; from 180,000 skier visits to 577,000 in four years with very little capital investment, dethroning Snow Summit as king of SoCal; Alpine Meadows in the Powdr Corp days; why Wilson didn’t become the general manager at Alpine; the difference between the two sides of the resort now known as Palisades Tahoe and thoughts on the base-to-base gondola; how Wilson wound up living and working on Catalina Island, 24 miles off the California coast, for several years; becoming a ski consumer; the unique governance structure of Diamond Peak and how that makes it challenging to operate; finally a GM; how Diamond Peak is different from other Tahoe ski areas; that one season Diamond Peak had the best season of any ski area in Tahoe, and why; trying to market a ski area where the skiers don’t want any other skiers; master planning Diamond Peak; Bogus Basin’s complex ownership structure; Alf Engen’s role in founding Bogus Basin; the ski area’s evolution; the dire financial situation at Bogus Basin when Wilson arrived and how he turned it around; the legacy of Mike Shirley and the birth of the mega-bargain season pass; the incredible, exponential increase in pass sales when the first $199 sale hit; where the discount-pass strategy faltered; what happened when Wilson finally raised the price after more than two decades; Bogus Basin’s expansive reciprocal season pass lift ticket program and why the mountain began charging extra for an upgrade to that pass; what percentage of the ski area’s pass holders upgrade; why Bogus Basin hasn’t (and probably won’t) join the Indy Pass; Bogus Basin’s incredibly low walk-up lift ticket prices; the amazing number of night-skiing passes the mountain sells and the importance of night skiing to the mountain; the tremendous value of the twighlight family pass; the two trails that Bogus Basin is in the process of adding to its night-skiing footprint as soon as the 2022-23 ski season; puzzling through the elaborate equation of night skiing, grooming, avalanche mitigation, and everything else that goes along with big-mountain management; grooming in a low-snow year; coping with Boise’s explosive growth; where Bogus Basin could expand terrain next; when we could see an update of the ski area’s 2016 masterplan; where new trails could be cut within the mountain’s existing footprint; which chairlifts may get an upgrade next; where Bogus Basin may upgrade a high-speed quad to a six-pack; where the ski area may install a new lift within the existing trail footprint and what sort of lift we may see there; is Deer Point the most-used chairlift in the country?; ideas to reconfigure the Coach liftline and what sort of lift could replace the existing machine; the improved and widened beginner trail debuting off the top of Morningstar this coming winter; how Bogus Basin discovered it had water and built a snowmaking system from scratch; expanding the system in the future; and what’s keeping 2,600-acre Bogus Basin from becoming a national destination resort.Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewIt started with a comment on one of the most-popular Storm stories I’ve ever written: Rob Katz Changed Skiing. What Comes Next for Vail Resorts?, which I published last December:Let's set the record straight, Vail did not create the concept of cheap passes driving volume. That piece of history should go to Bogus Basin in Boise, Idaho. In 1998 the ski area lowered their anytime season pass rates from $450 to $199. They went from 5,500 passes sold in 1997 to 25,000 in 1998. The rest of the industry took notice and many, if not most ski areas jumped on board. Rob may have expanded on the concept, largely because he had a much larger audience, but he in no way came up with the concept. I'm sure SAM could pull up some old stories. Thanks and Happy New Year-Brad Wilson, GM Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area.Well that was a nice surprise. Perhaps Brad wanted to set the record straight on the podcast, rather than in the comments section alongside various Angry Ski Bros and one guy who said the article was too long for him to read “while riding in the car,” (which really should describe any bit of writing longer than the name of your radio station)?It took us a while, but we finally arranged the chat. Idaho has turned out to be fertile ground for The Storm – the Tamarack pod landed well, and the general managers of Brundage and Sun Valley are scheduled to join me in the fall. As I attempt to sort out both the mystery of Idaho’s secret radness and the market forces and historical events driving the modern U.S. American ski landscape, this sort of insight and historical perspective from the people who lived and are living these things is invaluable.But there was another interesting element to this that I didn’t realize until I began researching the resort for my interview: for a long time, Bogus Basin wasn’t a very good business. For several years, it lost money. And while it never seemed to be in danger of closing, it was in desperate need of new management. Enter Wilson, who, since 2015, has orchestrated one of the greatest big-mountain turnarounds in modern U.S. American skiing. In less than seven years, he has grown revenues from $8 million annually to $18 million. Operating surpluses have grown from negligible to $5 million per year. One hundred percent of that goes back into the mountain, which operates as a nonprofit.This is rare. Most nonprofit ski areas lose money (profitable Bridger Bowl is another exception). Many are taxpayer subsidized. Wilson, who carried four decades of ski industry experience into the corner office with him, has so far been able to navigate whatever bureaucratic and organizational hurdles hobble these other organizations and transform the mountain into an understated gem of the Upper Rockies, a place no one has heard of that everyone could try if they spent about two minutes on logistics. It’s a good mountain that is getting better, and it was a good time to talk about what that better could look like.Questions I wish I’d askedBogus Basin has now explained to me a couple of times why they aren’t interested in joining the Indy Pass, and it has come down to some version of “we don’t want our passholders to have to pay extra for the partner resort lift tickets.” Indeed, Bogus Basin has one of the most phenomenal reciprocal programs (see chart below) in the country – but they charge extra for it. A Bogus Basin-only pass is $549, while the “True Bogus” pass, which includes the reciprocal days, is $80 extra. Granted, that is far less than the $199 Indy AddOn Pass would cost passholders, but it also weakens the rationale that the reciprocal days ought to be embedded in the pass as a native benefit. Wilson explained that the True Bogus pass is a year-round pass and also includes access to all the summer stuff, including scenic lift rides and the MTB trails. He also said there’s a lot of crossover between Bogus Basin’s reciprocals and the Indy Pass - 23 Indy Pass partners are also Bogus Basin reciprocal partners. I’m still not sure that I really understand the fundamental equation here, and I would have liked to have asked a follow-up question or two. But it wouldn’t have really mattered – whatever they’re reason, the mountain is not interested in joining the Indy Pass.What I got wrongI stated in the intro and a couple times throughout the podcast that Bogus Basin was “publicly owned.” That is untrue. While the mountain is registered as a nonprofit organization, it is in fact privately owned by the Bogus Basin Resort Association Inc., which, according to Wilson, is a group of “about 100 volunteers” who own the ski area. If they were ever to sell it, Wilson said, the operation would go to the state.My understanding was that Bogus Basin was running a $1.2 million surplus prior to Wilson’s arrival, but this was, according to Wilson, an isolated figure from one standout year. Most years, the ski area lost money – enough that it totaled “millions of dollars” over the decades, according to Wilson.I stated a couple times in the interview that Bogus Basin was “almost as big as Sun Valley.” It is, in fact, larger by 166 acres. Who knew?In the middle of our conversation, I attempted to call out the name of “the long lift between the two peaks” at Sugarbush, and I blanked. Like a dumbass. Slide. Brook. Express. Maybe if I have a ski publication I ought to be able to remember the name of the longest chairlift on the planet?Why you should ski Bogus BasinBogus Basin seems to have everything a ski resort needs to transform itself into a major name in the U.S. American ski scene: good terrain, plenty of snow, fast lifts, proximity to a major(-ish) airport. It’s larger than the state’s one true legendary destination, Sun Valley, and a bit easier to get to (access road excepted). So why, I asked Wilson, isn’t Bogus Basin lobbying for Ikon membership and tying all these attributes together into a come-ski-me package?Because, he said, the mountain cares about locals and locals alone. That’s its mission: make sure the people of Treasure Valley, Idaho have access to outdoor recreation. So that’s where the mountain focuses its marketing, and that’s what guides its pricing decisions. Peak-day walk-up lift tickets were $73 last year. That’s insane. Who cares if the mountain isn’t on your ULTIMATE FLIPKICK PASS!!! – you can just walk up and ski like it’s Keystone in 2003.There’s another something cool about this local’s focus. When I swing through a locals’ bump in New England, the pace and sense of comfort and urgency is completely different than if I’m at Stratton or Okemo. There’s a sense of, “hey, no need to hurry here. We’re home.” Typically, that sort of place-building self-confidence only exists at places stripped of high-speed lifts and triple-digit trail counts. The big joints – outside of northern Vermont – can rarely retain it. But here is one of the 20 largest ski areas in America, and you’ll find almost no tourists. It’s a place by and for locals, a big ski area that acts like a little one while still skiing like a monster. And that’s pretty cool.Podcast notesWilson came up with Tim Cohee, who is now CEO and part-owner of China Peak, at Heavenly and Big Bear. Cohee joined me on the podcast last year, and there is a ton of crossover between their stories:It’s worth noting that we recorded this podcast on July 11, a week and a half before Gunstock’s senior management team resigned en masse to protest the micromanaging blockheads on the Gunstock Area Commission (GAC), which oversees the county-owned mountain. The parallels between the intransigent GAC and the way that Wilson describes the five-person board of stay-off-my-lawn locals at Diamond Peak are eerie. Certainly we would have made an explicit comparison had it been available to make. Timing.The Storm publishes year-round, and guarantees 100 articles per year. This is article 78/100 in 2022, and number 324 since launching on Oct. 13, 2019. Want to send feedback? Reply to this email and I will answer (unless you sound insane). You can also email skiing@substack.com. Get full access to The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast at www.stormskiing.com/subscribe

Friends of Build Magazine
Jackson Hole Art Auction with Kevin Doyle

Friends of Build Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 39:49


Listen in as Kevin talks about working with Sotheby's Auction House for over 20 years in New York, the dramatic rise of online bidding in recent years, and the differences between his native Manhattan's art scene and that of Jackson Hole.He speaks on his typical day in the life as an auctioneer and how he has seen tastes evolve over the past two decades. He speaks in particular of the NFT (non-fungible token) phenomenon and how different generations view the idea of owning a publicly viewable piece of digital media.Topics Discussed: From Manhattan to Jackson Hole and how iconic auctions are put togetherHow the industry is adjusting to the rising trend of online biddingA day in the life of an auctioneerArtwork featured at auctions in Manhattan versus Jackson HoleThe tastes of today's younger collectors compared to older collectorsThe NFT phenomenon and other current trendsAbout the next art auctionConnect with Jackson Hole Art Auction:Website - https://jacksonholeartauction.com/ Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/jacksonholeartauction/?ref=badge Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/JacksonHoleArtAuction Pinterest - https://www.pinterest.com/jhaamedia/ Connect with Build Magazine:Website - https://rebrand.ly/bmwebInstagram - https://rebrand.ly/bmigwebFacebook - https://rebrand.ly/bmfbwebKey Quotes by Kevin:The pandemic probably pushed online bidding forward by ten years.As an auctioneer, you're essentially like a referee: You want to be respectful and give everybody a fair shot.

Catch Me in the Kitchen Audio Snacks: an English-French stories podcast for kids

Imagine: If you got to bake your favourite cake, what kind would you make? What ingredients would you need? How would you decorate it? Would you share it with someone special? About today's Storyteller: Chloe Place is a first-time author, publishing Let's Bake a Cake in 2022. Born in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, she is a lover of nature, coffee, and good conversation. You can catch her in the kitchen getting a spoon full of peanut butter with dark chocolate chips on top.  Draw and share... If you'd like to share a drawing you've made inspired by 'Let's Bake a Cake' you can do that at catchmeinthekitchen.com/fan-art and we will post it on our story fridge! Catch the latest! Subscribe to our newsletter at catchmeinthekitchen.com to get the latest stories, songs, and activities. If you have a minute, drop us a note - we would love to hear from you! Our first audiobook, ‘Pigs, Princesses, and One Tough Turtle', along with a paperback copy, is available through our website. Les mots sont délicieux! Words are delicious. French/English from today's snack: Le gâteau au citron: lemon cake Du beurre non salé: some unsalted butter Parfait: perfect Un lion: a lion Un gâteau: a cake La farine: flour Chaud: hot Mélanger: to stir Les guimauves: marshmallows A bientôt! See you soon! Merci beaucoup! Merci à Chloe Place for sharing her story ‘Let's Bake a Cake.' This Audio Snack was performed by Chloe Place, Professor Pineapple, and Bearkin. Our 'Catch Me in the Kitchen' theme song was performed by The Pickle Peppers. Episode mixed by Tim Freeman. Creative and production support by Ginette Mohr. Episode music composed and performed by Tim Freeman and Red Velvet Revolution. 'Village' composed and performed by Sergei Chetvertnykh. A bientôt! See you soon! Support Catch Me in the Kitchen Audio Snacks: an English-French stories podcast for kids by contributing to their tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/catch-me-in-the-kitchen-audio-

The Jackson Hole Connection
Episode 198 - Cohabitating With The Wild featuring Kyle Kissock of The Jackson Hole Wildlife Foundation

The Jackson Hole Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 40:39


Kyle Kissock is the Communications Manager for the Jackson Hole Wildlife Foundation.  Originally from Ohio, Kyle moved out west to work for the Teton Science school before finding his home at the Wildlife Foundation.  In this chat, Kyle and Stephan talk about all things wildlife.  Not just the big ones like moose, bears, and elk, but the little creatures that make up our ecosystem.  Kyle dives into some of the big projects that the Foundation is working on, such as modifying fences to make them friendlier to wildlife movement and some initiatives that help reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions. Stephan and Kyle also talk about some of the elusive wildlife in the Tetons such as the mountain lions and wolverines.  If you have an interest in learning more about the wildlife that makes up the heart of our valley, this is a must-listen.  Learn more about the Jackson Hole Wildlife Foundation athttps://jhwildlife.org/ ( JHWildlife.org) Photo by: Christine Paige Follow Stephan and his family on Instagramhttps://instagram.com/buildingintheholein22?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y= ( @buildinginthehole22) to see their experience of living in a camper for the summer as they give their home away to build a new home.  This week's episode is sponsored in part by Teton County Solid Waste and Recycling, announcing the new commercial Curb to Compost Program for restaurants and other commercial food waste generators. More athttps://tetoncountywy.gov/1459/Compost ( TetonCountyWY.gov) or athttps://www.instagram.com/roadtozerowaste.jh ( @RoadToZeroWaste.JH on Instagram) Support also comes from The Jackson Hole Wine Club. Curating quality wine selections delivered to you each month. Enjoy delicious wines at amazing prices. More athttp://jacksonholewineclub.com/ ( JacksonHoleWineClub.com) Want to be a guest on The Jackson Hole Connection? Email us at connect@thejacksonholeconnection.com. Marketing and editing support byhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelmoeri ( Michael Moeri) (http://michaelmoeri.com/ (michaelmoeri.com),https://www.instagram.com/thatsamoeri/ (@thatsamoeri)).

Pivot Podcast with Jenny Blake
284: The Art of Horse Whispering and Trust-Building with Grant Golliher

Pivot Podcast with Jenny Blake

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 49:03


“Trust is not just a feeling. It's also an action, and it's a process that happens over time. Be slow to take, and quick to give.” These are just some of the gems that Grant Golliher has picked up in three decades of horse whispering, training, and teaching the art of trust-building. Today we're talking about what horses can teach us about reading people and intuition. More About Grant: Grant Golliher is a horseman and the proprietor of the historic Diamond Cross Ranch in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, where he teaches corporate executives, coaches, celebrities, and families from all around the world the skills necessary to tame troubled horses and become leaders and better people. Today we're talking about his new book, Think Like a Horse: Lessons in Life, Leadership, and Empathy from an Unconventional Cowboy.

The Jackson Hole Connection
Episode 197 - Living a Happy Life in Jackson Hole with Hal Johnson

The Jackson Hole Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 49:36


Hal Johnson is a father, long-time local, entrepreneur, horseshoer, ranch hand, and one of the first tram operators. Hal has called this valley his home for over 65 years. Born in Firth, ID, and raised in the Blackfoot area, he made his way to Wyoming as a teenager and landed in Jackson back in 1957.   In this episode, Hal shares with Stephan many stories of what it was like to live in work in Jackson over the years. He talks about owning a feedlot that was run out of business by Purina. Hal goes into detail about all the longtime locals he has worked for, how he became a part-owner of the rodeo and why he left Jackson for a brief period of time. He also talks about being a member of the Order of Odd Fellows and what they do for the community. Stephan and Hal then discuss the importance of finding your happiness and surrounding yourself with people who also share a passion for life.  Hal is enjoying his “retirement” at the age of 85. He still keeps active by working for his son Hap Johnson at Jackson Hole Security.  Follow Stephan and his family on Instagramhttps://instagram.com/buildingintheholein22?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y= ( @buildinginthehole22) to see their experience of living in a camper for the summer as they give their home away to build a new home.  This week's episode is sponsored in part by Teton County Solid Waste and Recycling, announcing the new commercial Curb to Compost Program for restaurants and other commercial food waste generators. More athttps://tetoncountywy.gov/1459/Compost ( TetonCountyWY.gov) or athttps://www.instagram.com/roadtozerowaste.jh ( @RoadToZeroWaste.JH on Instagram) Support also comes from The Jackson Hole Wine Club. Curating quality wine selections delivered to you each month. Enjoy delicious wines at amazing prices. More athttp://jacksonholewineclub.com/ ( JacksonHoleWineClub.com) Want to be a guest on The Jackson Hole Connection? Email us at connect@thejacksonholeconnection.com. Marketing and editing support byhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelmoeri ( Michael Moeri) (http://michaelmoeri.com/ (michaelmoeri.com),https://www.instagram.com/thatsamoeri/ (@thatsamoeri)).

Freestyle Travel Show
#79 - Hitchhiking Near Mountains is Easy

Freestyle Travel Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 29:46


Typical Vegas nonsense is followed by a fishing trip in Idaho and hitchhiking around Jackson Hole, Wyoming. ==== Support the show and Kenny's other projects while getting some bonuses here: https://www.patreon.com/kennyflannery Kenny's book "A Six-Pack of Hitchhiking Stories" is available on Amazon in paperback, eBook and audiobook formats: https://amzn.to/2IynlFm Kenny designed the transforming BivyPack and recommends third-party travel gear at http://www.FreestyleTravelGear.com Hopping YouTube Channel (Kenny's travel/beer series): https://www.youtube.com/Hopping == FOLLOW KENNY FLANNERY == @HoboLifestyle on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, YouTube and http://www.hobolifestyle.com == KENNY'S TRAVEL PROMO CODES == -Get a $20 credit on Airbnb: http://www.airbnb.com/c/kflannery16?s=8 -Free ride on uber: uberhobolifestyle You can freely download or subscribe to this show in many ways and everywhere podcasts can be found, check out http://www.freestyletravelshow.com. https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/freestyle-travel-show/id1229479428 http://www.soundcloud.com/freestyletravel http://www.twitter.com/freetravelshow http://www.facebook.com/freestyletravelshow RSS Feed: http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:295572863/sounds.rss Want to support the show? You can cashapp $kenflannery or venmo @kenflannery Thanks! Music in this episode is "Cali" performed by Cyderobin, written by Mark Tubridy.

KHOL Jackson Hole Community Radio 89.1 FM
'We can't wait for it to break.' Jackson Hole Fire/EMS seeks funding to replace satellite stations

KHOL Jackson Hole Community Radio 89.1 FM

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 5:14


'We can't wait for it to break.' Jackson Hole Fire/EMS seeks funding to replace satellite stations by KHOL

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #93: Perfect North Slopes, Indiana General Manager Jonathan M. Davis (with a Timberline, WV Bonus)

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 110:32


 To support independent ski journalism, please consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. This podcast hit paid subscribers’ inboxes on June 28. Free subscribers got it on July 1. To receive future pods as soon as they’re live, please consider an upgrade to a paid subscription.WhoJonathan M. Davis, General Manager of Perfect North, IndianaRecorded onJune 20, 2022About Perfect NorthClick here for a mountain stats overviewOwned by: The Perfect FamilyPass affiliations: NoneLocated in: Lawrenceburg, IndianaClosest neighboring ski areas: Mad River, Ohio (2 hours, 18 minutes); Paoli Peaks, Indiana (2 hours, 39 minutes); Snow Trails (3 hours)Base elevation: 400 feetSummit elevation: 800 feetVertical drop: 400 feetSkiable Acres: 100Average annual snowfall: 24 inchesTrail count: 22 (1 double-black, 3 black, 3 blue-black, 10 intermediate, 5 beginner)Lift count: 12 (2 quads, 3 triples, 5 carpets, 2 ropetows - view Lift Blog’s inventory of Perfect North’s lift fleet)About Timberline, West VirginiaWhile this podcast is not explicitly about Timberline, Jonathan had an important role in the ski area’s acquisition in 2019. His enthusiasm for Timberline is clear, the opportunity and the investment are enormous, and this conversation acts as a primer for what I hope will be a full Timberline podcast at some future point.Click here for a mountain stats overviewOwned by: The Perfect FamilyPass affiliations: NoneLocated in: Davis, West VirginiaClosest neighboring ski areas: Canaan Valley (8 minutes); White Grass XC touring/backcountry center (11 minutes); Wisp, Maryland (1 hour, 15 minutes); Snowshoe, West Virginia (1 hour, 50 minutes); Bryce, Virginia (2 hours); Homestead, Virginia (2 hours); Massanutten, Virginia (2 hours, 21 minutes)Base elevation: 3,268 feetSummit elevation: 4,268 feetVertical drop: 1,000 feetSkiable Acres: 100Average annual snowfall: 150 inchesTrail count: 20 (2 double-black, 3 black, 5 intermediate, 10 beginner)Lift count: 3 (1 high-speed six-pack, 1 fixed-grip quad, 1 carpet - view Lift Blog’s inventory of Timberline’s lift fleet)Why I interviewed himThere are two kinds of ski areas in the Midwest. The first are the big ones, out there somewhere in the woods. Where 10,000 years ago a glacier got ornery. Or, farther back in time, little mountains hove up out of the earth. They’re at least 400 feet tall and top out near 1,000. They’re not near anything and they don’t need to be. People will drive to get there. Often they sit in a snowbelt, with glades and bumps and hidden parts. Multiple peaks. A big lodge at the bottom. There are perhaps two dozen of these in the entire region, all of them in Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. Boyne, Nub’s Nob, Crystal, Caberfae, Bohemia, Powderhorn, Whitecap, Granite Peak, Spirit, Lutsen. This is not a complete list. I’m making a point here.The second kind of Midwest ski area is usually smaller. It claims 200 vertical feet and actually has 27. It has four chairlifts for every run. It has a parking lot that could swallow Lake George. It’s affordable. And it’s close. To something. Metro Detroit has four ski areas. Milwaukee has eight. Minneapolis has six. But pretty much any Lower Midwestern city of any size has at least one ski area in its orbit: Cleveland (Alpine Valley, Boston Mills, Brandywine), Columbus (Snow Trails, Mad River), St. Louis (Hidden Valley), Kansas City (Snow Creek), Des Moines (Seven Oaks), Chicago (Four Lakes, Villa Olivia), Omaha (Mt. Crescent).For Cincinnati, that ski area is Perfect North. It’s actually one of the larger city-adjacent ski areas in the region: 400 vertical feet on 100 acres (accurate numbers, as far as I can tell). Twelve lifts. Twenty-two trails. Indiana has 6.7 million residents and two ski areas. Some winter days, approximately half of them are skiing at Perfect North.I’m just kidding around about the numbers. What I’m trying to say is that urban Midwestern ski areas are terrific businesses. They’re small but handle unimaginable volume in short, intense seasons of 12-hour-plus days. Davis tells me in the podcast that the ski area hires 1,200 seasonal employees for winter. That is an almost incomprehensible number. Killington, the largest ski area in the east, 20 times the size of Perfect North, has around 1,600 wintertime employees.But that’s what it takes to keep the up-and-down moving. Perfect North was a sort of accidental ski area, born when a college student knocked on farmer Clyde Perfect’s door and said, “hey did you know your land is perfect for a ski area?” In almost snowless Indiana, this was quite a wild notion. Not that no one had tried. The state has nine lost ski areas. But Perfect North is one of only two that survived (the other is Vail-owned Paoli Peaks, which survives no thanks to the mothership). I don’t know enough about the ski areas that failed to say why they’re gone, but it’s obvious why Perfect North has succeeded: relentless investment by committed operators. Here’s an excerpt from a case study by SMI snowmakers:[Perfect North] employs 245 snowmaking machines and an infrastructure that pumps about 120 million gallons of water annually, giving the resort a 3-4 foot snowpack throughout the season. The system is so efficient that operators can start as many as 200 snowmakers in about an hour.At its modest start-up in 1980, Perfect North had only rope tows, T-bars and about a dozen snowmakers covering roughly seven acres. But the family-owned operation has expanded each year and now features five chair lifts and six surface lifts serving more than ten times the skiable terrain, as well as one of the largest tubing operations in the entire U.S. …“We knew early on that snowmaking was critical to a great experience on the hills. The snow is the reason people come; everything else is secondary. So we really focused on it right from the beginning, and we’ve enhanced our snowmaking capability every year,” said [Perfect North President Chip] Perfect.All of the snow guns now in use at Perfect North are manufactured by SMI, and every one is permanently mounted on a SnowTower™ (or pole-top unit). Most are the company’s signature PoleCat™ or Super PoleCat™ designs, with either hill air feed or onboard compressors. Unlike some resorts that boast 100% snowmaking on their trails, Perfect North runs enough machines to be able to make snow on virtually the entire skiing and tubing area at the same time.This is not one model of how to make a ski area work in the Lower Midwest – this is the only way to make a ski area work in the Lower Midwest. The region was a bit late to skiing. Perfect North didn’t open until 1980. Snowmaking had to really advance before such a thing as consistent skiing in Indiana was even conceivable. But being possible is not the same thing as being easy. There are only two ski areas in Indiana for a reason: it’s hard. Perfect North has mastered it anyway. And you’ll understand about two minutes into this conversation why this place is special.What we talked aboutA couple kids watching for the lights to flip on across the valley, announcing the opening of the ski season; Perfect North in the ‘80s; a place where jeans and “layered hunting gear” are common; ski area as machine; from bumping chairs to general manager; the pioneer days of 90s tech; moving into the online future without going bust; RFID; the surprising reason why Perfect North switched from metal wicket tickets to the plastic ziptie version; taking over a ski area in the unique historical moment that was spring 2020; staff PTSD from the Covid season; the power of resolving disputes through one-on-one talks; “we lost something in those two years with how we interact with people”; 1,200 people to run a 400-vertical-foot ski area; how Perfect North fully staffed up and offered an 89-hour-per-week schedule as Vail retreated and severely cut hours at its Indiana and Ohio ski areas; Perfect North would have faced “an absolute mutiny” had they pulled the Vail bait-and-switch of cutting operating hours after pass sales ended; how aggressive you have to be with snowmaking in the Lower Midwest; “the people of the Midwest are fiercely loyal”; reaction to Vail buying Peak Resorts; “I want Midwest skiing to succeed broadly”; Cincinnati as a ski town; skiing’s identity crisis; the amazing story behind Perfect North’s founding; the Perfect family’s commitment to annual reinvestment; remembering ski area founder Clyde Perfect, who passed away in 2020; you best keep those web cams active Son; snowmaking and Indiana; the importance of valleys; the importance of a committed owner; potential expansion; where the ski area could add trails within the existing footprint; terrain park culture in the Lower Midwest; the management and evolution of parks at Perfect North; potential chairlift upgrades and a theoretical priority order; where the ski area could use an additional chairlift; the potential for terrain park ropetows; coming updates to Jam Session’s ropetows; Perfect North’s amazing network of carpet lifts; the ski area’s massive tubing operation; why Perfect North purchased Timberline and how the purchase came together; why creditors rejected the first winner’s bid; West Virginia as a ski state; the reception to Timberline’s comeback; “it didn’t take us long to realize that the three lifts on site were unworkable”; how well Perfect North and Timberline work as a ski area network; “Timberline Mountain has got to stand on its own financially”; whether Perfect North could ever purchase more ski areas; “I hate to see ski areas wither up and die”; Perfect North’s diverse season pass suite; “what drives our guest’s visits is their availability”; and whether Timberline or Perfect North could join the Indy Pass.            Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewYou want to hear something funny? I often put out queries on Twitter or via email, asking people to tell me who they would most like to hear from on the podcast. Or sometimes people just write and say something like, “hey love the pod you should interview…” And the interview they’ve most often requested has been some combination of Timberline and Perfect North. I don’t really understand why. I mean, I think it’s an awesome story. I’ve yet to meet a ski area I wasn’t fascinated by, and this Midwest-buys-Mid-Atlantic storyline is especially compelling to me. But this one has, for whatever reason, resonated broadly. I’ve never once had someone ask me to track down the head of Telluride or Mammoth or Heavenly (I’d gladly talk to the leaders of any of the three), but the Perfect North/Timberline request has been hitting my inbox consistently for years.Well, it’s done. I’d still like to do a Timberline-first pod, but the basic story of the acquisition is there, and we spend about 15 minutes on the West Virginia ski area. Still, I was not just listening to the request line. I tracked down Davis for the same reason that I tracked down Snow Trails, Ohio’s Scott Crislip last month: these are the only two ski areas in Indiana or Ohio that functioned normally last season. And they are the only two ski areas in those states that are not owned by Vail.Paoli Peaks was open 28 hours per week, from Thursday through Sunday, with no night skiing on weekends. Perfect North was open 89 hours per week, with night skiing seven days per week. I found this fairly offensive, and WTIU Public TV in Indiana invited me on-air back in March to talk about it:How, exactly, did Vail get owned by two independent operators with a fraction of the institutional resources? That is the question that these two podcasts attempt to answer. Vail clearly misread the market in Ohio and Indiana. They did not make enough snow or hire enough people. They cut night skiing. In the Midwest. That’s like opening a steakhouse and cutting steak off the menu. Sorry, Guys, budget cuts. You can’t find steak at this steakhouse, but we have beef broth soup and canned greenbeans. And by the way, we’re only open for lunch. Like, how did they not know that? It may be the worst series of ski area operating decisions I’ve ever seen.I should probably just let this go. Now that I’ve said my piece via these two interviews, I probably will. I’ve made my point. But seriously Vail needs to look at what Perfect North and Snow Trails did this past season and do exactly that. And if they can’t, then, as Davis says in this interview, “if they don’t want Paoli and Mad River, we’ll take them.”Questions I wish I’d askedPerfect North has a really interesting pass perk for its highest-tiered pass: Perfect Season Pass holders can go direct to lift. That pass is $356. Gold passholders, who can ski up to eight hours per day, must pick up a lift ticket at the window each time they ski. That pass is $291. While the gold pass is not technically unlimited, eight hours per day seems more than sufficient. I’m ready to wrap it up after seven hours at Alta. I can’t imagine that eight hours wouldn’t be enough Indiana skiing. But I don’t think the ski area would bother with the two different passes if the market hadn’t told them there was a need, and I would have liked to have discussed the rationale behind this pass suite a bit more.What I got wrongI said on the podcast that Snow Trails was open “80-some hours per week.” The number was actually 79 hours. I also stated in the introduction that Perfect North was founded by “the Perfect family and a group of investors,” but it was the Perfect family alone.  Why you should ski Perfect NorthWe’ve been through this before, with Snow Trails, Mountain Creek, Paul Bunyan, Wachusett, and many more. If you live in Cincinnati and you are a skier, you have a choice to make: you can be the kind of skier who skis all the time, or you can be the kind of skier who skis five days per year at Whistler. I know dozens of people in New York like this. They ski at Breckenridge, they ski at Park City, they ski at Jackson Hole. But they don’t – they just couldn’t – ski Mountain Creek or Hunter or even Stowe. East Coast skiing is just so icy, they tell me. Well, sometimes. But it’s skiing. And whether you ski six days per year or 50 largely depends upon your approach to your local.If I lived in Cincinnati, I’d have a pass to Perfect North and I’d go there all the time. I would not be there for eight hours at a time. Ten runs is a perfectly good day of skiing at a small ski area. More if conditions are good or I’m having fun. Anything to get outside and make a few turns. Go, ride the lifts, get out. No need to overthink this. Any skiing is better than none at all.Most of Perfect North’s skiers, of course, are teenagers and families. And it’s perfect for both of these groups. But it doesn’t have to be for them alone. Ski areas are for everyone. Go visit.As far as Timberline goes, well, that’s a whole different thing. A thousand feet of vert and 150 inches of average annual snowfall shouldn’t take a lot of convincing for anyone anywhere within striking distance.Podcast NotesPerfect North founder Clyde Perfect passed away in 2020. Here is his obituary.I mentioned that Indiana had several lost ski areas. Here’s an inventory. My 1980 copy of The White Book of Ski Areas lists nine hills in Indiana. Perfect North isn’t one of them (Paoli Peaks, the state’s other extant ski area, is). Here’s a closer look at two of the more interesting ones (you can view more trailmaps on skimap.org):Nashville AlpsHere’s the 2001 trailmap for Nashville Alps, which had a 240-foot vertical drop. The ski area closed around 2002, and the lifts appear to be gone.If anyone knows why Nashville Alps failed, please let me know.Ski StarlightThe White Book pegs this one with an amazing 554 vertical feet, which would make it taller than any ski area in Michigan’s Lower Peninsula. The map shows trails running along little ridgelines separated by valleys, which would have made this a really interesting spot on the rare occasions it snowed enough to ski the trees.Google maps suggests that this trailmap more or less reflects geologic reality. Here’s a YouTube video from a few years back, when the ski area was apparently for sale. The lifts were still intact (though likely unusable):The White Book says that this place had a double-double and two J-bars in 1980. Just 20 minutes from Louisville, this seems like the kind of little Midwestern spot that could boom with the right operators. The cost to bring it online would likely be prohibitive, however. As with most things in U.S. America, it would be the permitting that would likely kill it in the crib.The Storm publishes year-round, and guarantees 100 articles per year. This is article 70/100 in 2022, and number 316 since launching on Oct. 13, 2019. Want to send feedback? Reply to this email and I will answer (unless you sound insane). You can also email skiing@substack.com. Get full access to The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast at www.stormskiing.com/subscribe

Lessons from a Quitter
The Process of Going After Your Dream Life

Lessons from a Quitter

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 31:20


This week I want to talk to you about how to go after your dream life. If you follow me on Instagram, you know I've been in Jackson Hole, Wyoming for the past month. Taking this trip with my family is one way I'm going after my dream life. And the process is actually really simple, it's just two steps. I want to show you that the things you want are possible because whether you think you can or you can't you're right. So this week I'm sharing the two-step process for going after your dream life and how I'm applying that in my own life.

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #92: Alterra Mountain Company CEO Rusty Gregory

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 91:45


To support independent ski journalism, please consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. This podcast hit paid subscribers’ inboxes on June 25. Free subscribers got it on June 28. To receive future pods as soon as they’re live, please consider an upgrade to a paid subscription.WhoRusty Gregory, CEO of Alterra Mountain Company, owner of the Ikon PassRecorded onJune 23, 2022About Alterra Mountain CompanyOwned by: KSL Capital and Henry Crown and CompanyAbout the Ikon PassHere’s a breakdown of all the ski areas that are party to Alterra’s Ikon Pass:Why I interviewed himIn its first five years, Alterra has gotten just about everything right – or about as right as any ski company can as it Starfoxes its way through an asteroid belt filled with Covid and empowered workers and shattered supply chains and The Day After Tomorrow weather patterns and an evolving social fabric and the sudden realization by U.S. Americans that there’s such a thing as outside. The company changed the name of one of America’s iconic resorts, managed a near meltdown of its Pacific Northwest anchor, met Covid as well as it could, and continually tweaked Ikon Pass access tiers to avoid overwhelming partner mountains while still offering skiers good value. Oh, and adding Sun Valley, Snowbasin, Chamonix, Dolomiti Superski, Kitzbühel, Schweitzer, Red Mountain, Mt. Bachelor, and Windham to the pass – all since Covid hit.If it’s all seemed a little improvisational and surprising, that’s because it has been. “I have a great propensity for enjoying chaos and anarchy,” Gregory tells me in the podcast. That explains a lot. In the frantic weeks after Covid zipped North American skiing shut in March 2020, angry skiers demanded concessions for lost spring skiing. Vail released, all at once, an encyclopedic Epic Pass credit plan, which metered discounts based upon number of days skied and introduced an “Epic Coverage” program that secured your investment in the event of everything from a Covid resurgence to the death of a beloved houseplant. Alterra, meanwhile, spun its plan together in four dispatches weeks apart – a renewal discount here, a deferral policy there, an extension six weeks later. “We’re continuing to strengthen our offerings,” Gregory told me on the podcast mid-way through this staggered rollout.In other words, Dude, just chill. We’ll get it right. Whether they ultimately did or not – with their Covid response or anything else – is a bit subjective. But I think they’ve gotten more right than wrong. There was nothing inevitable about Alterra or the Ikon Pass. Vail launched the Epic Pass in 2008. It took a decade for the industry to come up with an effective response. The Mountain Collective managed to gather all the best indies into a crew, but its reach was limited, with just two days at each partner. M.A.X. Pass, with five days per partner, got closer, but it was short on alpha mountains such as Jackson Hole or Snowbird (it did feature Big Sky, Copper, Steamboat, and Winter Park) and wasn’t a season pass to any ski area. The Ikon Pass knitted together an almost impossible coalition of competitors into a coherent product that was an actual Epic Pass equal. Boyne, Powdr, and the ghosts of Intrawest joining forces was a bit like the Mets and the Red Sox uniting to take on the Yankees. It was – and is – an unlikely coalition of competitors fused around a common cause.The Ikon Pass was a great idea. But so was AOL-Time Warner – or so it seemed at the time. But great things, combined, do not always work. They can turn toxic, backfire, fail. Five years in, Alterra and Ikon have, as Gregory tells me, “dramatically exceeded our expectations in every metric for the fifth year in a row.” While Rusty is allergic to credit, he deserves a lot. He understands how complex and unruly and unpredictable skiing and the ski industry is. He came up under the tutelage of the great and feisty Dave McCoy, founder of the incomparable and isolated Mammoth Mountain, that snowy California kingdom that didn’t give a damn what anyone else was doing. He understood how to bring people together while allowing them to exist apart. That’s not easy. I can’t get 10 people to agree to a set of rules at a tailgate cornhole tournament (the beer probably doesn’t help). Everyone who loves the current version of lift-served skiing – which can deliver a skier to just about any chairlift in the United States on a handful of passes (and that’s definitely not all of you), and has inspired an unprecedented wave of ski area re-investment – owes Gregory at least a bit of gratitude.What we talked aboutThe accidental CEO; Alterra’s “first order of business was to do no harm”; Rusty’s mindset when the Ikon Pass launched; the moment when everyone began believing that the Ikon Pass would work; reflections on the first five years of Alterra and Ikon; the challenges of uniting far-flung independent ski areas under one coalition; “every year we have to make the effort to stay together”; the radically idiosyncratic individualism of Dave McCoy; what it means that Ikon has never lost a partner – “there’s no points in life for losing friends”; Alterra doesn’t like the Ikon Base Plus Pass either; Covid shutdown PTSD; the long-term impact of Covid on skiing and the world; the risks of complacency around the Covid-driven outdoor boom; why Alterra’s next CEO, Jared Smith, comes from outside the ski industry; how the Ikon Pass and Alterra  needs to evolve; preserving the cultural quirks of individual mountains as Alterra grows and evolves under new leadership; “we dramatically exceeded our expectations in every metric for the fifth year in a row”; the importance of ceding local decisions to local resorts; “I have a great propensity for enjoying chaos and anarchy”; the current state of the labor market; Ikon Pass sales trends; “having too many people on the mountain at one time is not a great experience”; staying “maniacally guest-experience focused”; Crystal Mountain’s enormous pass price increase for next season; why Deer Valley and Alta moved off the Base Pass for next season; Mayflower, the resort coming online next to Deer Valley; the Ikon Session Pass as a gateway product; why Alterra pulled Mammoth, Palisades Tahoe, and Sugarbush off the Mountain Collective Pass; Sun Valley and Snowbasin joining Ikon; Ikon’s growing European network; whether Alterra would ever look to buy in Europe; “we’re making constant efforts” to sign new Ikon Pass partners; “we’re very interested in Pennsylvania”; I just won’t let the fact that KSL owns Blue and Camelback go; “Alterra needs to move at the right pace”; whether we will ever see more Ikon partners in the Midwest; why Alterra hasn’t bought a ski area since 2019; whether Alterra is bidding on Jay Peak; and thoughts on Rob Katz’s “growth NIMBYism” speech.Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewGregory has been Alterra’s CEO for about four and a half years. That seems to be about four and a half years longer than he wanted the job. In 2017, he was enjoying retirement after four decades at Mammoth. As an investor in the nascent Alterra Mountain Company – a Frankenski made up of Mammoth, Palisades Tahoe, and the remains of Intrawest – he helped conduct a wide-reaching search for the company’s first CEO. He ended up with the job not through some deft power play but because the committee simply couldn’t find anyone else qualified to take it.His only plan, he said, was to do no harm. There are, as we have seen, plenty of ways to make multi-mountain ski conglomerates fail. Boyne alone has managed the trick over the extra long term (a fact that the company does not get nearly enough credit for). The years after Gregory took the job in February 2018 certainly tested whether Alterra and Ikon, as constructs, were durable beyond the stoke of first concept.They are. And he’s done. At 68, confined for the past half decade to a Denver office building, I get the sense that Gregory is ready to get away from his desk and back in the liftline (or maybe not – “I will be so pissed if I have to wait in a line,” he tells me on the podcast). He’s earned the break and the freedom. It’s someone else’s turn.That someone else, as we learned last month, will be Jared Smith, Alterra’s current president. Gregory will move into a vice chairman of the board role, a position that I suspect requires extensive on-the-ground snow reporting. Smith, who joined Alterra last year after nearly two decades with Live Nation/Ticketmaster, has plenty to prove. As I wrote in May:Gregory was the ultimate industry insider, a college football player-turned-liftie who worked at Mammoth for 40 years before taking the top job at Alterra in 2018. He’d been through the battles, understood the fickle nature of the ski biz, saved Mammoth from bankruptcy several times. Universally liked and respected, he was the ideal leader for Alterra’s remarkable launch, an aggressive and unprecedented union of the industry’s top non-Vail operators, wielding skiing’s Excalibur: a wintry Voltron called the Ikon Pass. That such disparate players – themselves competitors – not only came together but continued to join the Ikon Pass has no doubt been at least partly due to Gregory’s confidence and charisma.Smith came to Alterra last June after 18 years at Live Nation and Ticketmaster. I don’t know if he even skis. He is, by all accounts, a master of building products that knit consumers to experiences through technology. That’s a crucial skillset for Alterra, which must meet skiers on the devices that have eaten their lives. But technology won’t matter at all if the skiing itself suffers. Alterra has thrived as the anti-Vail, a conglomerate with an indie sheen. Will the Ikon Pass continue to tweak access levels to mitigate crowding? Will Alterra continue its mega-investments to modernize and gigantify its resorts? Can the company keep the restless coterie of Boyne, Powdr, Jackson Hole, Alta, Taos, A-Basin, Revelstoke, Red, and Schweitzer satisfied enough to stay united on a single pass? For Alterra, and for the Ikon Pass, these are the existential questions.I have been assured, by multiple sources, that Smith does, in fact, ski. And has an intuitive understanding of where consumers need to be, helping to transform Ticketmaster from a paper-based anachronism into a digital-first experience company. Covid helped accelerate skiing’s embrace of e-commerce. That, according to Gregory, is just the beginning. “Different times require different leadership, and Jared Smith is the right leader going forward,” Gregory tells me in the podcast.Alterra’s first five years were a proof of concept: can the Ikon Pass work? Yes. It works quite well. Now what? They’ve already thought of all the obvious things: buy more mountains, add more partners, play with discounts to make the thing attractive to loyalists and families. But how does Alterra sew the analogue joy that is skiing’s greatest pull into the digital scaffolding that’s hammering the disparate parts of our modern existence together? And how does it do that without compromising the skiing that must not suffer? Is that more difficult than getting Revelstoke and Killington and Taos to all suit up in the same jersey? It might be. But it was a good time to get Gregory on the line and see how he viewed the whole thing before he bounced.Questions I wish I’d askedEven though this went long, there were a bunch of questions I didn’t get to. I really wanted to ask how Alterra was approaching the need for more employee housing. I also wanted to push a little more on the $269 Steamboat lift tickets – like seriously there must be a better way. I also think blackout dates need to evolve as a crowding counter-measure, and Vail and Alterra both need to start thinking past holiday blackouts (as Indy has already done quite well). I’ve also been preoccupied lately with Alterra’s successive rolling out of megaprojects at Palisades Tahoe and Steamboat and Winter Park, and what that says about the company’s priorities. This also would have been a good time to check in on Alterra’s previously articulated commitments to diversity and the environment. These are all good topics, but Alterra has thus far been generous with access, and I anticipate ample opportunities to raise these questions with their leadership in the future.What I got wrongWell despite immense concentration and effort on my part, I finally reverted to my backwater roots and pronounced “gondola” as “gon-dole-ah,” a fact that is mostly amusing to my wife. Rusty and I vacillated between 61 million and 61.5 million reported U.S. skier visits last year. The correct number was 61 million. I also flip-flopped Vail’s Epic Pass sales number and stated at one point that the company had sold 1.2 million Epic Passes for the 2021-22 ski season. The correct number is 2.1 million – I did issue a midstream correction, but really you can’t clarify these things enough.Why you should consider an Ikon PassI feel a bit uncomfortable with the wording of this section header, but the “why you should ski X” section is a standard part of The Storm Skiing Podcast. I don’t endorse any one pass over any other – my job is simply to consider the merits and drawbacks of each. As regular readers know, pass analysis is a Storm pillar. But the Ikon Pass is uniquely great for a handful of reasons:An affordable kids’ pass. The Ikon Pass offers one of the best kids’ pass deals in skiing. Early-birds could have picked up a full Ikon Pass (with purchase of an adult pass) for children age 12 or under for $239. A Base Pass was $199. That’s insane. Many large ski areas – Waterville Valley, Mad River Glen – include a free kids pass with the purchase of an adult pass. But those are single-mountain passes. The Ikon lets you lap Stratton from your weekend condo, spend Christmas break at Snowbird, and do a Colorado tour over spring break. The bargain child’s pass is not as much of a differentiator as it once was – once Vail dropped Epic Pass prices last season, making the adult Epic Pass hundreds of dollars cheaper than an Ikon Pass, the adult-plus-kids pass equation worked out about the same for both major passes. Still, the price structures communicate plenty about Alterra’s priorities, and it’s an extremely strong message.A commitment to the long season. On April 23 this year, 21 Ikon partners still had lifts spinning. Epic passholders could access just nine resorts. That was a big improvement from the previous season, when the scorecard read 20-2 in favor of Ikon. Part of this is a coincidence – many of Alterra’s partners have decades-long histories of letting skiers ride out the snow: Killington, Snowbird, Arapahoe Basin, Sugarloaf. Others. But part of it is Alterra’s letting of big operational decisions to its individual resorts. If Crystal Mountain wants to stay open into June, Crystal Mountain stays open into June. If Stevens Pass has a 133-inch base on April 18… too bad. Closing day (in 2021) is April 18. The long season doesn’t matter to a lot of skiers. But to the ones it does matter to, it matters a lot. Alterra gets that.That lineup though… The Ikon Pass roster has been lights out from day one. But as the coalition has added partners, and as key mountains have migrated from Epic to Ikon, it has grown into the greatest collection of ski areas ever assembled. As I wrote in March:Whatever the reason is that Snowbasin and Sun Valley fled Epic, the ramifications for the North American multipass landscape are huge. So is Alterra’s decision to yank its two California flagships and its top-five New England resort off of the Mountain Collective. Those two moves gave the Ikon Pass the best top-to-bottom destination ski roster of any multi-mountain ski pass on the continent.Good arguments can still be made for the supremacy of the Epic Pass, which delivers seven days at Telluride and unlimited access to 10 North American megaresorts: Whistler, Northstar, Heavenly, Kirkwood, Park City, Crested Butte, Vail, Beaver Creek, Keystone, and Breckenridge, plus Stowe, one of the top two or three ski areas in the Northeast.But many of Vail’s ski areas are small and regionally focused. I like Hunter and Jack Frost and Roundtop and Mount Brighton, Michigan, and their value as businesses is unquestioned, both because they are busy and because they draw skiers from rich coastal and Midwestern cities to the Mountain West. But the Epic Pass’ 40-some U.S. and Canadian mountains are, as a group, objectively less compelling than Ikon’s.The Ikon Pass now delivers exclusive big-pass access to Steamboat, Winter Park, Copper Mountain, Palisades Tahoe, Mammoth, Crystal Washington, Red Mountain, Deer Valley, Solitude, and Brighton, as well as a killer New England lineup of Killington, Stratton, Sugarbush, Sunday River, and Loon. The pass also shares big-mountain partners with Mountain Collective: Alta, Arapahoe Basin, Aspen Snowmass, Banff Sunshine, Big Sky, Jackson Hole, Lake Louise, Revelstoke, Snowbasin, Snowbird, Sugarloaf, Sun Valley, and Taos. For pure fall-line thrills and rowdy, get-after-it terrain, there is just no comparison on any other pass.In large parts of America, it’s become impossible to imagine not buying an Ikon Pass. The lineup is just too good. Epic still makes more sense in many circumstances. But for the neutral party, aimed primarily for big-mountain destinations in a city not defined by access to a local, the Ikon is telling a damn good story.Podcast NotesRusty and I talked a bit about the huge jump in Crystal’s pass price for next season. Here’s a more comprehensive look that I wrote in March, based on conversations with Crystal CEO Frank DeBerry and a number of local skiers.We also discuss Mayflower Mountain Resort, which is to be built adjacent to Deer Valley. Here’s a bit more about that project, which could offer 4,300 acres on 3,000 vertical feet. The developers will have to overcome the ski area’s relatively low elevation, which will be compounded by Utah’s larger water issues.Rusty explained why Alterra pulled Palisades Tahoe, Mammoth, and Sugarbush off the Mountain Collective pass ahead of next ski season. Here were my initial thoughts on that move. A tribute to Mammoth Mountain founder Dave McCoy, who died in 2020 at age 104:Previous Storm Skiing Podcasts with Rusty or Ikon Pass mountain leadersThe Summit at Snoqualmie President & GM Guy Lawrence – April 20, 2022Arapahoe Basin COO Alan Henceroth – April 14, 2022Big Sky President & COO Taylor Middleton – April 6, 2022Solitude President & COO Amber Broadaway – March 5, 2022The Highlands at Harbor Springs President & GM Mike Chumbler – Feb. 18, 2022Steamboat President & COO & Alterra Central Region COO Rob Perlman – Dec. 9, 2021Jackson Hole President Mary Kate Buckley – Nov. 17, 2021Crystal Mountain, Washington President & CEO Frank DeBerry – Oct. 22, 2021Boyne Mountain GM Ed Grice – Oct. 19, 2021Mt. Buller, Australia GM Laurie Blampied – Oct. 12, 2021Aspen Skiing Company CEO Mike Kaplan – Oct. 1, 2021Taos Ski Valley CEO David Norden – Sept. 16, 2021Alterra CEO Rusty Gregory – March 25, 2021Sunday River GM Brian Heon – Feb. 10, 2021Windham President Chip Seamans – Jan. 31, 2021Sugarbush President & GM John Hammond – Nov. 2, 2020Sugarloaf GM Karl Strand – Part 2 – Sept. 30, 2020Sugarloaf GM Karl Strand – Part 1 – Sept. 25, 2020Palisades Tahoe President & COO Ron Cohen – Sept. 4, 2020Alterra CEO Rusty Gregory – May 5, 2020Boyne Resorts CEO Stephen Kircher – April 1, 2020Sunday River President & GM Dana Bullen – Feb. 14, 2020Loon Mountain President & GM Jay Scambio – Feb. 7, 2020Sugarbush President & COO Win Smith – Jan. 30, 2020Boyne Resorts CEO Stephen Kircher – Nov. 21, 2019Killington & Pico President & GM Mike Solimano – Oct. 13, 2019Future Storm Skiing Podcasts scheduled with Ikon Pass mountainsBoyne Resorts CEO Stephen Kircher – September 2022Sun Valley VP & GM Pete Sonntag – September 2022The Storm publishes year-round, and guarantees 100 articles per year. This is article 69/100 in 2022, and number 315 since launching on Oct. 13, 2019. Want to send feedback? Reply to this email and I will answer (unless you sound insane). You can also email skiing@substack.com. Please be patient - my response may take a while. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.stormskiing.com/subscribe

The Photographer Mindset
Exploding into the Wildlife Photography Scene with @tiffanytaxis

The Photographer Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 50:40


In this episode, Aaron and I are joined by Tiffany Taxis  (@tiffanytaxis) , a wildlife photographer and another Olympus shooter living in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Tiffany describes how her first art fair went and the criteria that went into selecting which pieces of artwork to exhibit. We also talk about putting yourself out there and establishing connections within the local photography community when you find yourself in a new part of the country. Aaron and I both agree that Tiffany's wildlife photography is one of the most explosive in quality that we've ever seen. If you scroll back on her instagram grid, one minute she has a typical looking grid, the next polar bears, bobcats, and coyotes are staring you in the face with a tremendous and thoughtful burst of artistic flare.  We both admire her work ethic and talent. Make a donation via PayPal for any amount you feel is equal to the value you receive from our podcast episodes! Donations help with the fees related to hosting the show: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=Z36E4SCB6D3LWThanks for listening!Go get shooting, go get editing, and stay focused.@sethmacey@mantis_photographyDIY WealthIlluminating a different spectrum of thinking regarding your freedom, time, and money.Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

Hot Drinks - Stories From The Field
Mike Clelland: NOLS - One Epic Alaska Mountaineering Course!

Hot Drinks - Stories From The Field

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 88:05


As a young adult, Mike lived in New York City from 1981 to 1991, working as a freelance illustrator. During that time, he spent one winter season as a ski bum in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, in 1986 and couldn't get it out of his system. So Mike moved west permanently in 1991, eventually settling in Driggs, Idaho, where he spent a quarter of a century. He worked for NOLS in the Rockies, The Pacific Northwest, Canada and Alaska for 17 years. Mike taught backpacking, mountaineering, backcountry skiing, and rock climbing courses for NOLS. He also spearheaded the lightweight courses at NOLS. In those years, he divided his time between outdoor work and illustration. Mike is now living on Puget Sound near Seattle, focusing on his writing.Mike has illustrated or written at least nine books. All of Mike's Book https://www.goodreads.com/author/list/570863.Mike_Clelland Mike's current website  https://mikeclelland.com/

The PR Maven Podcast
Episode 190: How to Personal Brand, with Kit Huffman, Personal Branding Strategist at SENECA

The PR Maven Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 41:34


How do you personal brand? Find out in this episode as Kit Huffman explains how to start a personal brand, sharing her tips and steps she uses with her clients. Kit shares what personal branding is, how to identify a goal for building a personal brand and talks about how networking will boost it, sharing tips on how to network. In addition, Kit shares how she built her own personal brand, and how that fits into an overall marketing strategy. 2:59 - Kit explains that she had so many interests, so she decided to go to business school.   6:17 – Kit shares how her father and grandfather were also entrepreneurs.   9:00 – Kit defines what personal branding is to her.   11:24 – Kit explains how to identify what your goal is for building a personal brand.   17:18 – Kit stresses the importance of your LinkedIn "about" section.   19:33 – Kit explains networking and personal branding.   26:09 – Kit shares personal branding steps.   30:25 – Kit shares how she built her own brand.   32:28 – Kit talks about how personal branding fits into an overall marketing strategy.   35:02 – Kit shares how to build personal and company brands.   36:38 – Kit lists some resources that have been helpful to her.   Quote “My strategy for networking on LinkedIn is I will send a genuine note to someone if I engage with their content that I really do enjoy, or if I read an article that they like, and say ‘I liked this and I would love to be a part of your network and grow together.' A take away I've learned is to take something they've read, but make it personal to them.” – Kit Huffman, Personal Branding Strategist at SENECA                              Links: Indiana University Nancy's Forbes Agency Council articles - https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbesagencycouncil/people/nancymarshall1/?sh=2638ac614485 Disney Simon Sinek - Start with Why (Book) Jackson Hole Sugarloaf Tim Ferriss - Tools of Titans (book and podcast)     Listen to Karl Strand's podcast episode to learn more about Sugarloaf.     Activate the PR Maven® Flash Briefing on your Alexa Device.  Join the PR Maven® Facebook group.          About the guest:     Kit is the lead strategist and founder of Seneca. With a marketing degree from a top-10 business school and experience as a social media consultant for one of Europe's largest marketing agencies, her pivot to specialize in personal branding has allowed her to work with global Fortune 500 clients and executives. When she is not building strategies to skyrocket her clients' personal brands, catch her skiing the slopes of Jackson Hole, trying a new coffee shop, or planning her next international getaway.   Looking to connect:           LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/kit-huffman/ Twitter: @kit_huffman Website: https://www.senecaagency.co

The Best Thing I Ever Ate
Chilled Perfection ft. Giada De Laurentiis, Duff Goldman and Cat Cora

The Best Thing I Ever Ate

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 15:40


What do Maui, HI and the snowy mountains of Jackson Hole, WY have in common? They're two of the eight places where Food Network stars including Giada, Cat Cora and Duff find their favorite foods ... served cold.Giada De Laurentiis takes us to Jackson Hole, WY for eskimo barsMarc Summers heads to Hawaii! Cat Cora delights in the lemon ice box pie from Crystal GrillCurtis Stone is all about the ceviche in Miami, FLDonatella Arpaia can't resist the ice cream sandwich from Piattini Ristorante in Brooklyn, NYAdam Gertler goes for the egg salad sandwich from Euro PaneDuff Goldman keeps it classic with a lobster roll from PJ's Family Restaurant in Wellfleet, MA Hungry for more Food Network? Go to discoveryplus.com/bestthing to start your free trial today. Terms apply.

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #91: Snow Partners (Big Snow, Mountain Creek) CEO Joe Hession

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022


To support independent ski journalism, please consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. Paid subscribers receive thousands of extra words of content each month, plus all podcasts three days before free subscribers.WhoJoe Hession, CEO of Snow Partners, owners of Mountain Creek, Big Snow American Dream, Snowcloud, and Terrain Based LearningRecorded onJune 15, 2022About Mountain CreekLocated in: Vernon Township, New JerseyClosest neighboring ski areas: National Winter Activity Center, New Jersey (6 minutes); Mount Peter, New York (24 minutes); Campgaw, New Jersey (51 minutes); Big Snow American Dream (50 minutes)Pass affiliations: NoneBase elevation: 440 feetSummit elevation: 1,480 feetVertical drop: 1,040 feetSkiable Acres: 167Average annual snowfall: 65 inchesTrail count: 46Lift count: 9 (1 Cabriolet, 2 high-speed quads, 2 fixed-grip quads, 1 triple, 1 double, 2 carpets – view Lift Blog’s inventory of Mountain Creek’s lift fleet)About Big Snow American DreamLocated in: East Rutherford, New JerseyClosest neighboring ski areas: Campgaw, New Jersey (35 minutes); National Winter Activity Center, New Jersey (45 minutes); Mountain Creek, New Jersey (50 minutes); Mount Peter, New York (50 minutes)Pass affiliations: NoneVertical drop: 118 feetSkiable Acres: 4Average annual snowfall: 0 inchesTrail count: 4 (2 green, 1 blue, 1 black)Lift count: 4 (1 quad, 1 poma, 2 carpets - view Lift Blog’s of inventory of Big Snow American Dream’s lift fleet)Why I interviewed himTwenty-five years ago, Vail Resorts was known as “Vail Associates.” The company owned just two mountains: Vail and Beaver Creek, which are essentially right next door to each other in Eagle County, Colorado. The resorts were, as they are today, big, snowy, and fun. But they were not great businesses. Bankruptcy threatened. And the ski media – Skiing, Powder – was mostly dismissive. This was the dawn of the freeskiing era, and the cool kids were running the Circuit of Radness: Snowbird, Squaw, Mammoth, Jackson Hole, Whistler, the Powder Highway. Vail was for suburban dads from Michigan. Beaver Creek was for suburban dads from New York. If you wanted the good stuff, keep moving until you got to Crested Butte or Telluride. Vail was just another big Colorado ski resort, that happened to own another big Colorado ski resort, and that was it.Today, Vail is the largest ski company in history, with (soon to be) 41 resorts scattered across three continents. Its Epic Pass transformed and stabilized the industry. It is impossible to talk about modern lift-served North American skiing without talking about Vail Resorts.There was nothing inevitable about this. Pete Seibert, Vail’s founder, did not enter skiing with some snowy notion of Manifest Destiny. He just wanted to open a great ski resort. It was 18 years from Vail Mountain’s 1962 opening to the opening of Beaver Creek in 1980. It was nearly two more decades until Vail bought Keystone and Breck in 1997. It was 11 more years until the Epic Pass debuted, and a few more before anyone started to pay attention to it.What Snow Partners, led by Joe Hession, is doing right now has echoes of Vail 15 years ago. They are building something. Quietly. Steadily. Like trees growing in a forest. They rise slowly but suddenly they tower over everything.I’m not suggesting that Snow Partners will be the next Vail. That they will buy Revelstoke and Jackson Hole and Alta and launch the Ultimo Pass to compete with Epic and Ikon. What Snow Partners is building is different. Additive. It will likely be the best thing to ever happen to Vail or Alterra. Snow Partners is not digital cameras, here to crush Kodak. They are, rather, skiing’s Ben Franklin, who believed every community in America should have access to books via a lending library. In Snow Partners’ version of the future, every large city in America has access to skiing via an indoor snowdome.This will change everything. Everything. In profound ways that we can only now imagine. The engine of that change will be the tens of millions of potential new skiers that can wander into a Big Snow ski area, learn how to ski, and suddenly train their radar on the mountains. Texas has a population of around 29.5 million people. Florida has about 22 million. Georgia has around 11 million. Those 61.5 million people have zero in-state ski areas between them. They could soon have many. There are countless skiers living in these states now, of course, refugees from the North or people who grew up in ski families. But there are millions more who have never skied or even thought about it, but who would, given the option, at least try it as a novelty. And that novelty may become a hobby, and that hobby may become a lifestyle, and that lifestyle may become an obsession.As anyone reading this knows, there’s a pretty direct line between those first turns and the neverending lines rolling on repeat in your snow-obsessed brain. But you have to link those first couple turns. That’s hard. Most people never get there. And that’s where Big Snow, with its beginner zone loaded with instructors and sculpted terrain features – a system known as Terrain Based Learning – is so interesting. It not only gives people access to snow. It gives people a way to learn to love it, absent the broiling frustration of ropetows and ice and $500 private instructors. It’s a place that creates skiers.This – Big Snow, along with an industry-wide reorientation toward technology – is Hession’s vision. And it is impossible not to believe in his vision. Hession announces in this podcast that the company has secured funding to build multiple Big Snow ski areas within the foreseeable future. The combination of beginner-oriented slopes and simple, affordable packages has proven attractive even in New Jersey, where skiers have access to dozens of outdoor ski areas within a few hours’ drive. It makes money, and the business model is easily repeatable.Mountain Creek, where Hession began working as a parking lot attendant in his teens, is, he says, a passion project. The company is not buying anymore outdoor ski areas. But when Big Snows start minting new skiers by the thousands, and perhaps the millions, they may end up driving the most profound change to outdoor ski areas in decades.What we talked aboutThe nascent uphill scene at Mountain Creek; “most people don’t realize that this is what New Jersey looks like”; celebrating Big Snow’s re-opening; the three things everyone gets wrong about Big Snow; the night of the fire that closed the facility for seven months; how the fire started and what it damaged; three insurance companies walk into a bar…; why six weeks of work closed the facility for more than half a year; staying positive and mission-focused through multiple shutdowns at a historically troubled facility; New Jersey’s enormous diversity; skiing in Central Park?; “we’re creating a ski town culture in the Meadowlands in New Jersey”; everyone loves Big Snow; the story behind creating Big Snow’s beginner-focused business model; why most people don’t have fun skiing and snowboarding; the four kinds of fun; what makes skiing and snowboarding a lifestyle; what Hession got really wrong about lessons; the “haphazard” development of most ski areas; more Big Snows incoming; why Big Snow is a great business from a financial and expense point of view; looking to Top Golf for inspiration on scale and replicability; where we could see the next Big Snow; how many indoor ski domes could the United States handle?; what differentiates Big Snow from Alpine-X; whether future Big Snows will be standalone facilities or attached to larger malls; is American Dream Mall too big to fail?; finding salvation from school struggles as a parking lot attendant at Vernon Valley Great Gorge; Action Park; two future ski industry leaders working the rental shop; Intrawest kicks down the door and rearranges the world overnight; a “complicated” relationship with Mountain Creek; Intrawest’s rapid decline and the fate of Mountain Creek; leaving your dream job; ownership under Crystal Springs; how a three-week vacation will change your life; transforming Terrain Based Learning from a novelty to an empire; “I’ve been fascinated with how you go from working for a company to owning a company”; the far-flung but tightly bound ski industry and how Hession ended up running Big Snow; how much the Big Snow lease costs in a month; an Austin Powers moment; this is a technology company; an anti-kiosk position; the daily capacity of Mountain Creek; buying Mountain Creek; the art of operating a ski area; the biggest mistake most Mountain Creek operators have made; the bargain season pass as business cornerstone; “we were days away from Vail Resorts owning Mountain Creek today”; bankruptcy, Covid, and taking control of Mountain Creek and Big Snow in spite of it all; how much money Mountain Creek brings in in a year; “a lot of people don’t understand how hard it is to run a ski resort”; a monster chairlift project on the Vernon side of Mountain Creek; “a complicated relationship” with the oddest lift in the East ( the cabriolet) and what to do about it; “no one wants to take their skis on and off for a 1,000 feet of vertical”; which lift from Mountain Creek’s ancient past could make a comeback; bringing back the old Granite View and Route 80 trails; why expansion beyond the historic trail network is unlikely anytime soon; Creek’s huge natural snowmaking advantage; why no one at Mountain Creek “gives high-fives before the close of the season”; Hession is “absolutely” committed to stretching Creek’s season as long as possible; the biggest job of a ski resort in the summertime; the man who has blown snow at Mountain Creek for 52 years; whether Snow Operating would ever buy more outdoor ski resorts; “variation is evil”; the large ski resort that Hession tried to buy; “I don’t think anyone can run a massive network of resorts well”; an Applebee’s comparison; whether Mountain Creek or Big Snow could ever join a multi-mountain ski pass; why the M.A.X. Pass was a disaster for Mountain Creek; why Creek promotes the Epic and Ikon Passes on its social channels; changing your narrative; not a b******t mission statement; why the next decade in the ski industry may be the wildest yet; and the Joe P. Hession Foundation.Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewI’ll admit that it can be awfully hard to appreciate the potential of Big Snow from the point of view of the casual observer. For anyone living in the New York metro area, the place spent a decade and a half as a vacant laughingstock, a symbol of excess and arrogance, an absurdly expensive novelty that was built, it seemed, just to be torn down. As I wrote last year:On Sept. 29, 2004, a coalition of developers broke ground on a project then known as Meadowlands Xanadu. Built atop a New Jersey swamp and hard by Interstate 95, the garish collection of boxes and ramps with their Romper Room palette could be seen from the upper floors of Manhattan skyscrapers, marooned in their vast asphalt parking lot, an entertainment complex with no one to entertain.It sat empty for years. Crushed, in turn, by incompetence, cost overruns, the Great Recession, lawsuits, and funding issues, the building that would host America’s first indoor ski slope melted into an eternal limbo of ridicule and scorn.I didn’t think it would ever open, and I didn’t understand the point if it did. This is the Northeast – we have no shortage of skiing. At four acres on 160-foot vertical drop, this would instantly become the smallest ski area in nine states. Wow. What’s the next item in your master development plan: an indoor beach in Hawaii?But eventually Big Snow did open: 5,545 days after the center’s groundbreaking. And it was not what I thought it would be. As I wrote the month after it opened:For its potential to pull huge numbers of never-evers into the addictive and thrilling gravitational pull of Planet Ski, Big Snow may end up being the most important ski area on the continent. It is cheap. It is always open. It sits hard against the fourth busiest interstate in the country and is embedded into a metro population of 20 million that has outsized influence on national and global trends. Over the coming decades, this ugly oversized refrigerator may introduce millions of people to the sport.I wrote that on Jan. 13, 2020, two months before Covid would shutter the facility for 177 days. It had only been open 94 days when that happened. Then, 388 days after re-opening on Sept. 1, 2020, fire struck. It caused millions in damage and another 244-day closure. After endless negotiations with insurance companies, Big Snow American Dream finally re-opened last month.So now what? Will this place finally stabilize? What about the disastrous financial state of the mall around it, which has, according to The Wall Street Journal, missed payments on its municipal bonds? Will we see more Big Snows? Will Snow Operating bid on Jay Peak? Will we ever get a real chairlift on Vernon at Mountain Creek? With Big Snow rebooted and live (take three), it was time to focus on the future of Snow Operating. And oh man, buckle up.Questions I wish I’d askedI could have stopped Joe at any time and asked a hundred follow-up questions on any of the dozens of points he made. But there would have been no point in that. He knew what I wanted to discuss, and the narrative is compelling enough on its own, without my input.Why you should ski Mountain Creek and Big SnowBig SnowIf you’re approaching Big Snow from the point of view of a seasoned skier, I want to stop you right there: this is not indoor Aspen. And it’s not pretending to be. Big Snow is skiing’s version of Six Flags. It’s an amusement park. All are welcome, all can participate. It’s affordable. It’s orderly. It’s easy. And it has the potential to become the greatest generator of new skiers since the invention of snow.And that will especially be true if this thing scales in the way that Hession believes it will. Imagine this: you live in Houston. No one in your family skis and so you’ve never thought about skiing. You’ve never even seen snow. You can’t imagine why anyone would ever want to. It looks cold, uncomfortable, exotic as moonrocks, and about as accessible. You’re not a skier and you probably never will be.But, what if Big Snow sprouts out of the ground like a snowy rollercoaster? It’s close. It’s cheap. It could be fun. You and your buddies decide to check it out. Or you take someone there on a date. Or you take your kids there as a distraction. Your lift ticket is well under $100 and includes skis and boots and poles and bindings and a jacket and snowpants (but not, for some reason, gloves), and access to instructors in the Terrain Based Learning area, a series of humps and squiggly snow features that move rookies with the ground beneath them. You enter as a novice and you leave as a skier. You go back. Five or six more times. Then you’re Googling “best skiing USA” and buying an Epic Pass and booking flights for Denver.And if that’s not you, how about this scenario that I face all the time: nonskiers tell me they want to try skiing. Can I take them? Given my background, this would not seem like an irrational request. But I’m not sure where to start. With lift tickets, rentals, and lessons, they’re looking at $150 to $200, plus a long car ride in either direction, just to try something that is cold and frustrating and unpredictable. I’m sure as hell not teaching them. My imagination proves unequal to the request. We don’t go skiing.Big Snow changes that calculus. Solves it. Instantly. Even, as Joe suggests in our interview, in places where you wouldn’t expect it. Denver or Salt Lake City or Minneapolis or Boston. Places that already have plenty of skiing nearby. Why? Well, if you’re in Denver, a snowdome means you don’t have to deal with I-70 or $199 lift tickets or figuring out which of the 100 chairlifts in Summit County would best suite your first ski adventure. You just go to the snowdome.The potential multiplying effect on new skiers is even more substantial when you consider the fact that these things never close. Hession points out that, after decades of refinement and tweaking, Mountain Creek is now finally able to consistently offer 100-day seasons. And given the local weather patterns, that’s actually amazing. But Big Snow – in New Jersey or elsewhere – will be open 365 days per year. That’s three and a half seasons of Mountain Creek, every single year. Multiply that by 10 or 20 or 30 Big Snows, and suddenly the U.S. has far more skiers than anyone ever could have imagined.Mountain CreekThere exists in the Northeast a coterie of unimaginative blockheads who seem to measure their self-worth mostly by the mountains that they dislike. Hunter is a big target. So is Mount Snow. But perhaps no one takes more ridicule, however, than Mountain Creek, that swarming Jersey bump with the shaky financial history and almost total lack of natural snow. Everyone remembers Vernon Valley Great Gorge (as Mountain Creek was once known), and its adjacent summertime operation, the raucous and profoundly dysfunctional Action Park. Or they remember Intrawest leaving Creek at the altar. Or that one time they arrived at Creek at noon on Dec. 29 and couldn’t find a place to park and spent half the afternoon waiting in line to buy a bowl of tomato soup. Or whatever. Now, based on those long-ago notions, they toss insults about Creek in between their Facebook posts from the Jackson Hole tram line or downing vodka shots with their crew, who are called the Drinksmore Boyz or Powder Dogzz or the Legalizerz or some orther poorly spelled compound absurdity anchored in a profound misunderstanding of how impressed society is in general with the antics of men in their 20s.  Whatever. I am an unapologetic Mountain Creek fan. I’ve written why many times, but here’s a summary:First, it is close. From my Brooklyn apartment, I can be booting up in an hour and 15 minutes on a weekend morning. It is a bargain. My no-blackout pass for the 2019-20 season was $230. It is deceptively large, stretching two miles from Vernon to Bear Peaks along New Jersey state highway 94. Its just over thousand-foot vertical drop means the runs feel substantial. It has night skiing, making it possible to start my day at my Midtown Manhattan desk job and finish it hooking forty-mile-an-hour turns down a frozen mountainside. The place is quite beautiful. Really. A panorama of rolling hills and farmland stretches northwest off the summit. The snowmaking system is excellent. They opened on November 16 this year and closed on April 7 last season, a by-any-measure horrible winter with too many thaws and wave after wave of base-destroying rain. And, if you know the time and place to go, Mountain Creek can be a hell of a lot of fun, thanks to the grown-up chutes-and-ladders terrain of South Peak, an endless tiered sequence of launchpads, rollers and rails (OK, I don’t ski rails), that will send you caroming down the mountain like an amped-up teenager (I am more than twice as old as any teenager).I don’t have a whole lot to add to that. It’s my home mountain. After spending my first seven ski seasons tooling around Midwest bumps, the glory of having a thousand-footer that near to me will never fade. The place isn’t perfect, of course, and no one is trying to tell that story, including me, as you can see in the full write-up below, but when I only have two or three hours to ski, Creek is an amazing gift that I will never take for granted:Podcast notesHere are a few articles laying out bits of Hession’s history with Mountain Creek:New VP has worked at Creek since his teens – Advertiser-News South, Feb. 22, 2012Mountain Creek Enters Ski Season With New Majority Owner Snow Operating – Northjersey.com, Nov. 23, 2018I’ve written quite a bit about Big Snow and Mountain Creek over the years. Here are a couple of the feature stories:The Curse of Big Snow – Sept. 30, 2021The Most Important Ski Area in America – Jan. 13, 2020This is the fourth podcast I’ve hosted that was at least in part focused on Mountain Creek:Big Snow and Mountain Creek Vice President of Marketing & Sales Hugh Reynolds – March 3, 2020Hermitage Club General Manager Bill Benneyan, who was also a former president, COO, and general manager of Mountain Creek – Dec. 4, 2020Crystal Mountain, Washington President and CEO Frank DeBerry, who was also a former president, COO, and general manager of Mountain Creek – Oct. 22, 2021Here are podcasts I’ve recorded with other industry folks that Hession mentions during our interview:Vail Resorts Rocky Mountain Region Chief Operating Officer and Mountain Division Executive Vice President Bill Rock – June 14, 2022Mountain High and Dodge Ridge President and CEO Karl Kapuscinski - June 10, 2022Alpine-X CEO John Emery – Aug. 4, 2021Fairbank Group Chairman Brian Fairbank – Oct. 16, 2020Killington and Pico President and General Manager Mike Solimano – Oct. 13, 2019Here’s the trailer for HBO’s Class Action Park, the 2020 documentary profiling the old water park on the Mountain Creek (then Vernon Valley-Great Gorge) grounds:Hession mentioned a retired chairlift and retired trails that he’d like to bring back to Mountain Creek:What Hession referred to as “the Galactic Chair” is Lift 9 on the trailmap below, which is from 1989. This would load at the junction of present-day Upper Horizon and Red Fox, and terminate on the landing where the Sojourn Double and Granite Peak Quad currently come together (see current trailmap above). This would give novice skiers a route to lap gentle Osprey and Red Fox, rather than forcing them all onto Lower Horizon all the way back to the Cabriolet. I don’t need to tell any regular Creek skiers how significant this could be in taking pressure off the lower mountain at Vernon/North. Lower Horizon is fairly steep and narrow for a green run, and this could be a compelling alternative, especially if these skiers then had the option of downloading the Cabriolet.Hession also talked about bringing back a pair of intermediate runs. One is Granite View, which is trails 34 (Cop Out), 35 (Fritz’s Folly) and 33 (Rim Run) on Granite Peak below. The trail closed around 2005 or ’06, and bringing it back would restore a welcome alternative for lapping Granite Peak.The second trail that Hession referenced was Route 80 (trail 24 on the Vernon side, running beneath lift 8), which cuts through what is now condos and has been closed for decades. I didn’t even realize it was still there. Talks with the condo association have yielded progress, Hession tells me, and we could see the trail return, providing another connection between Granite and Vernon.Creek skiers are also still obsessed with Pipeline, the double-black visible looker’s right of the Granite lift on this 2015 trailmap:I did not ask Hession about this run because I’d asked Hugh Reynolds about it on the podcast two years ago, and he made it clear that Pipeline was retired and would be as long as he and Hession ran the place.Here are links to a few more items we mentioned in the podcast:The 2019 Vermont Digger article that lists Snow Operating as an interested party in the Jay Peak sale.We talked a bit about the M.A.X. Pass, a short-lived multi-mountain pass that immediately preceded (and was dissolved by), the Ikon Pass. Here’s a list of partner resorts on that pass. Skiers received five days at each, and could add the pass onto a season pass at any partner ski area. This was missing heavies like Jackson Hole, Aspen, and Taos, but it did include some ballers like Big Sky and Killington. Resorts of the Canadian Rockies, which includes Fernie and Kicking Horse and is now aligned with the Epic Pass, was a member, as were a few ski areas that have since eschewed any megapass membership: Whiteface, Gore, Belleayre, Wachusett, Alyeska, Mountain High, Lee Canyon, and Whitewater. Odd as that seems, I’m sure we’ll look back at some of today’s megapass coalitions with shock and longing.This podcast hit paid subscribers’ inboxes on June 19. Free subscribers got it on June 22. To receive future pods as soon as they’re live, please consider an upgrade to a paid subscription.The Storm publishes year-round, and guarantees 100 articles per year. This is article 67/100 in 2022, and number 313 since launching on Oct. 13, 2019. Want to send feedback? Reply to this email and I will answer (unless you sound insane). You can also email skiing@substack.com. Get full access to The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast at www.stormskiing.com/subscribe

Watching America
Grant Golliher: Think Like a Horse

Watching America

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022


Horseman and horse whisperer Grant Golliher's experience training animals began in childhood, but he rejected the aggressive tactics used in mule and horse training he witnessed. Instead, Golliher employs a philosophy centered on empathy, trust, and discipline. In this episode of Watching America, Golliher talks to Dr. Alan Campbell about the psychology behind connecting with animals—including humans. Golliher's book about his methods is called “Think Like a Horse: Lessons in Life, Leadership, and Empathy from an Unconventional Cowboy.” Golliher is the proprietor of the historic Diamond Cross Ranch in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. diamondcrossranch.com

Wet Fly Swing Fly Fishing Podcast
WFS 331 - Jackson Hole Fly Company with Greg Epstein

Wet Fly Swing Fly Fishing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 60:17 Very Popular


Show Notes: https://wetflyswing.com/331 Presented By: Jackson Hole Fly Company Sponsors: https://wetflyswing.com/sponsors Greg Epstein, owner of Jackson Hole Fly Company, tells the story of how he acquired a 40-year-old fly shop in Jackson, Wyoming. We find out what they have going at the shop – how they produce around 1000 types of flies, outsource materials, and create basic fly fishing packages that are easy on the pocket but great in quality. We hear some pretty crazy stories from Greg including one when he got buried in an avalanche while skiing, like one of those 'I Shouldn't Be Alive' stories. Greg also tells us about his involvement with Teton Gravity Research and his responsibilities being a County Commissioner at Teton. Jackson Hole Fly Co is one of our podcast sponsors and you always hear me talk about the good stuff they do. Well today, we hear from the headman himself, so hit that play button to get a better feel of their products and service. Show Notes with Greg Epstein and the Jackson Hole Fly Company 03:50 - In 2001, Greg moved up to Alaska - Girdwood, a little southeast of Anchorage 04:50 - Greg used to ski. Then he became a ski photographer. 05:30 - Greg's wife also loves fly fishing 06:20 - In 2014, Greg got caught in an avalanche while skiing and endured severe injuries. That's when he went all-in with fly fishing because all he could do was sit on a boat and cast. 07:30 - In 2018, Jackson Cardinal company was for sale - a fly manufacturing, fly distribution company, started by the guy named Kirk Stone in 1978. Greg and his wife didn't buy the business until 2019. 09:30 - Greg tells the story of how he survived that avalanche 13:00 - Greg teaches his 2-and-a-half-year-old daughter how to ski and fish 14:30 - Greg was head of the production and one of the people who helped create and write the risk management program for all the athletes for Teton Gravity 17:00 - Immediately after they purchased the company, they created Jackson Hole Fly Company. In 6 to 8 months they got everything completed from the website to branding, all the marketing, etc. 18:10 - Their customers are mostly novices and don't want to do extreme outdoor sports but they want to go out, they want to camp, and disconnect from their day-to-day life 19:45 - One of their focuses is the basics package called, the Crystal Creek - it comes with a rod and reel for only $152.98 (first-time purchase price) 21:00 - They also have another basic package called, the Flat Creek - click here to find out its inclusions 22:00 - They have a great lifetime warranty with a fast turnaround time. They'll fix it within 1 to 2 weeks. 22:50 - They have around a thousand patterns from fresh to saltwater in different sizes 25:45 - If you don't see a pattern you like from their fly selection, you can email them at support@jacksonholeflycompany.com 28:10 - Kirk Stone, the previous owner grew the Jackson Cardinal fly company from the ground up. It reminds me of the story of the Umpqua Feather Merchants. We had Russ Miller on the podcast at WFS 303 29:20 - Greg gives a bit shoutout to his employees for doing an amazing job, loving what they do, and really passionate about fly fishing. They got 3 dogs in the shop as well - 1 black Labrador and 2 Corgis. 33:35 - They get their flies tied in Kenya. They ship the materials to Kenya. They source all of the materials out of the country. 35:30 - Greg explains the logistic issues they encounter when shipping the materials 39:00 - The Green River is about 45-50 mins away from their shop. That's Greg's favorite river to fish and camp. 40:10 - They use a 16-foot Hyde drift boat 41:20 - Greg's favorite fly is a Peanut Envy streamer. He also likes a Duracell nymph 46:30 - Greg shares some photography tips Don't be afraid to turn the camera horizontal or vertical to get a better photo If you're using an SLR camera, have it accessible. The last thing you want is to have some fish struggling while you're setting up your camera. 50:00 - JH Fly Co has a 50% off Spring sale. They always have a sale going so check in with them often. 50:45 - Greg is a County Commissioner at Teton and conservation is a big part of his responsibility 56:15 - Alaska wild-caught salmon are healthier to eat Conclusion with Greg Epstein and the Jackson Hole Fly Company So there you go.. Now you know what JH Fly Co is all about. Greg, his wife, and their team are doing an amazing job getting more people engaged in fly fishing. And that's always the goal.. is to get people on the water, release stress, connect with other folks and create great memories, but also.. have good gear without spending too much. Thank you, Greg and the JH Fly Co team for partnering with us. We are truly grateful to have you as our sponsor. We're excited to watch you grow and do more good things for the fly fishing community. If any of you have more questions for Greg, you can send him a message at support@jacksonholeflycompany.com or send them a DM on Instagram @jhflyco. Show Notes: https://wetflyswing.com/331

When Women Fly
070 On Taking Risks and Personal Transformation with Backcountry Skier and Paraglider Caite Zeliff (2021)

When Women Fly

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 69:05


As part of our Season III relaunch this week, we are revisiting a few of our favorite episodes that grapple with big life themes, break down the components of change, and dive into strategies that are relevant and applicable to you today.This is the story of an athletic prodigy. It's also the story of how setbacks become catalysts for change, how determination fuels a dream, and how a drive for adventure can evolve. And it is a story of risk-taking, mountain life,  and personal reflection that characterize what it takes to ski and fly in the backcountry. For pro-skier Caite Zeliff, the derailing of her career as a ski racer was an opportunity to reconnect with herself and become the athlete she was always meant to be.  At 12, Caite Zeliff started a ski racing career that brought her all over the world. She ascended, she earned a scholarship to a boarding school, she won titles, she received an invitation to the US Ski Team – and she also was rejected, blew out her knee, and burned out – all by age 20. When the U.S. Ski Team invitation didn't come, and she blew out her knee while racing for the University of New Hampshire, she left college and headed westward in search of big mountains and powder. It was in Jackson Hole, WY, where Caite found her true calling – freeskiing.This risk-taking mentality has built her a career as a professional freeskier. Beyond winning Jackson Hole's Kings and Queens of Corbet's twice, Caite has starred in films like Warren Miller's Timeless (2019) and Teton Gravity Research's Make Believe (2020), and Stoke the Fire (2021).  Topics Include:- Caite's journey from ski racer to professional freeskier- Viewing “failure” as an opportunity- Wrestling with an inner obsession for achievement- Shifting focus from the outcome to the process- Processing childhood- Taking risks and stepping out of comfort zones- Finding your voice as a female in a male-dominated industry- The transformational power of women supporting women- Learning to fly and a shifted mindset- And other topics...Resources Mentioned:Caite's Website: https://www.caitezeliff.comCaite's IG: @caitezeliffTimeless, Warren Miller (2019): https://warrenmiller.com/film-archive/timeless-2019Make Believe, Teton Gravity Research (2020): https://www.tetongravity.com/films/make-believeStoke the Fire, Teton Gravity Research (2021): https://www.tetongravity.com/films/stoke-the-fire Powder Magazine: https://www.powder.com/stories/pro-deal-caite-zeliff/Freeskier Magazine: https://freeskier.com/stories/jackson-royaltyStay Connected:Signup for AIR BORN, our monthly newsletter! A letter from Sylvia will show up in your inbox, with links to her latest conversations and insights.Website: https://www.whenwomenfly.com/Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Pinterest: @whenwomenflyWrite to us at: hello@whenwomenfly.com

NBC Meet the Press
MTP NOW June 13 — Sen. Martin Heinrich on guns, Jan. 6th Committee latest, Stephanie Ruhle on market turmoil

NBC Meet the Press

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 50:50 Very Popular


Sen. Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.) shares the latest on gun regulation negotiations. Guad Venegas speaks with Nevada GOP Senate candidate Sam Brown. Stephanie Ruhle says interest rate hikes will come more quickly as recession fears grow. Jonathan Allen reports from Jackson Hole, Wyoming, as Republican voters sour on Liz Cheney. 

The Fisheries Podcast
178 - Talking Trout Unlimited Stream Restoration in NW Wyoming with Leslie Bahn Steen

The Fisheries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 41:59


This week Kadie chats with Leslie Bahn Steen, the Northwest Wyoming Program Director for Trout Unlimited. Listen in to hear about how a sea kayaking expedition spurred Leslie's interest in fisheries, Leslie's current stream restoration work in the Snake River headwaters for Trout Unlimited, and how she manifested her dream job in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.    If you would like to get in touch with Leslie, you can email her at Leslie.Steen@tu.org. Check out the Spread Creek project and more of Leslie's work in the Snake River Headwaters with this ArcMap (the Spread Creek project is on tab 8). You can also watch the film Leslie mentioned on the Tribasin Divide on Youtube.   If you want to get ahold of Kadie, you can reach her @kbheinle on Twitter.   Get in touch with us! The Fisheries Podcast is on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram: @FisheriesPod  Become a Patron of the show: https://www.patreon.com/FisheriesPodcast Buy podcast shirts, hoodies, stickers, and more: https://teespring.com/stores/the-fisheries-podcast-fan-shop Thanks as always to Andrew Gialanella for the fantastic intro/outro music. The Fisheries Podcast is a completely independent podcast, not affiliated with a larger organization or entity. Reference to any specific product or entity does not constitute an endorsement or recommendation by the podcast. The views expressed by guests are their own and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. Views and opinions expressed by the hosts are those of that individual and do not necessarily reflect the view of any entity with those individuals are affiliated in other capacities (such as employers).  

Carole Baskins Diary
2017-10-05 Carole Baskin's Diary

Carole Baskins Diary

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 7:40


I was gasping for every breath; hanging onto the railing so that I wouldn't pass out from the lack of oxygen, but I kept climbing because I knew that just a few steps away there was a mecca of like minded people (800+) who are changing the world.  That was the scene about a dozen times a day during my week in Jackson Hole at the Cat Summit because I live at 7 feet above sea level and Jackson Lake Lodge is close to 7,000 feet above sea level.  Between my room and both levels of the conference, it meant taking the stairs up and down three levels in between each hour long session.   The rock stars of the Cat Summit were Dereck and Beverly Joubert.  They have worked primarily in Africa on big cats for over 30 years.  They are the cofounders of the Big Cats Initiative with National Geographic and were recipients of eight Emmys, a Peabody, Panda awards, the World Ecology Award and the Presidential Order of Meritorious Service by the President of Botswana.  The Jouberts are also involved with the Great Plains Conservation Foundation which was established to protect wild land, and is presently managing over one and a half million acres in Africa.   George Schaller is a field biologist with the Wildlife Conservation Society and Panthera.  He has studied and helped protect such species as the mountain gorilla, tiger, giant panda, and snow leopard.  These have been the basis for his books, among them The Year of the Gorilla, The Serengeti Lion, The Last Panda, and Tibet Wild.  He continues his field work particularly in China, India, and Brazil.   Our good friend and ally at CITES, Debbie Banks from the Environmental Investigation Agency was there.  She's the Campaign Leader for Tigers & Wildlife Crime and has over 20 years of experience investigating environmental crime with the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA), including illegal wildlife trade, illegal mining and illegal trade in ozone depleting substances. She has developed, deployed and participated in overt and covert investigative teams to obtain incontrovertible evidence in the form of video and audio recordings, and ensured that EIA investigation findings are backed up with robust desk-based research and analysis. She has been with EIA since 1996, investigating, exposing and campaigning against the illegal and unsustainable destruction of tiger habitat, illegal trade in tigers and other Asian big cats, and tiger “farming".   We met Carlton Ward and hope to get to know him a lot better.  Carlton is a National Geographic Explorer focused on the story of the Florida panther as a call to action for protecting the Florida Wildlife Corridor – a campaign he helped establish through two 1000-mile expeditions that mapped and connected conservation priorities from the Everglades to Georgia and Alabama.   I was invited to speak by Jeff Flocken who is the North American Regional Director for the International Fund for Animal Welfare where he leads the organization's team of legislative professionals in the US and Canada advocating for global, national, and local policy initiatives on behalf of animals.  Jeff serves on the Board of Directors of the Jaguar Conservation Fund, the Steering Committee for the IUCN Tapir Specialist Group, and is an Advisor to the Grace Gorilla Sanctuary.  He is also the founder and board co-chair of the Emerging Wildlife Conservation Leaders initiative which mentors and provides campaign training for up-and-coming leaders in the wildlife field.  He is the coauthor of the book Wildlife Heroes.   On my panel, which covered the impact media can have saving animals, using examples of Cecil Lion and the Zanesville massacre, was Ian Michler who has spent the last 27 years working as a safari operator, specialist guide, consultant and photo-journalist across Africa. Currently, he is the Consultant and Lead Character for the campaign documentary Blood Lions (www.bloodlions.org). Ian lives in South Africa where he is co-owner of Invent Africa Safaris www.inventafrica.com, a specialist safari company running trips across Africa.   Also on my panel was Brent Stapelkamp is a Zimbabwean born conservationist and wildlife photographer who has spent the last decade studying lions and specializing in mitigating the conflict between them and livestock owners in Zimbabwe. Guided by Permaculture ethics he is working with his community towards a sustained regeneration of the landscape for the betterment of both the people and its wildlife. The community trust is called "The Soft Foot Alliance".  He was the person who discovered Cecil's murder because he'd been following Cecil for years.   There were far too many celebrities in the world of big cat conservation to mention here, but not only was it global collective of those heroes, the conference was primarily held for filmmakers and those working in exciting new areas of virtual reality to meet up with the film buyers from National Geographic, Discovery, Animal Planet, and other well known and private funders.  Hundreds of films had been submitted and judged for a night of awards in the little town of Jackson.  As a panelist I was given access to all of the films and am still working my way through them.  There is so much talent out there and I'm really looking forward to Big Cat Week in December when many of these will debut.   I met a lot of very interesting people that I have scheduled for future Cat Chat shows and was able to meet people working in VR that will be able to help us move the experience of being close to wild animals out of the barbaric practice of breeding them for life as captives, to walking amongst them in a virtual world.  So many people try to tell me that their kids have to see animals in cages to appreciate them and I don't buy it.  The poor cats who are destined to live in cages are mere shadows of who they would be in the wild, so it gives the viewer no real sense of who they are, what they need, or why they are important to our own survival.  I think Virtual Reality will be able to bridge that gap.   We've started conversations, or extended friendships we already had, in order to save wild cats, in the wild, before it's too late.  Many of the people we met have risked their lives to capture the evidence of the illicit trade in big cats that is being enabled by the legal trade here and abroad.  We are committed to making the most of their sacrifices to saving wild cats and their habitats because without healthy forests we will all be gasping for air like I was on those stairs.   Hi, I'm Carole Baskin and I've been writing my story since I was able to write, but when the media goes to share it, they only choose the parts that fit their idea of what will generate views.  These are my views and opinions. If I'm going to share my story, it should be the whole story.  The titles are the dates things happened. If you have any interest in who I really am please start at the beginning of this playlist: http://savethecats.org/   I know there will be people who take things out of context and try to use them to validate their own misconception, but you have access to the whole story.  My hope is that others will recognize themselves in my words and have the strength to do what is right for themselves and our shared planet.     You can help feed the cats at no cost to you using Amazon Smile! Visit BigCatRescue.org/Amazon-smile   You can see photos, videos and more, updated daily at BigCatRescue.org   Check out our main channel at YouTube.com/BigCatRescue   Music (if any) from Epidemic Sound (http://www.epidemicsound.com) This video is for entertainment purposes only and is my opinion.  Closing graphic with permission from https://youtu.be/F_AtgWMfwrk

Female Founder World
Why Starting an Ecomm Biz in Wyoming Was Marea Founder Monica Grohne's Smartest Move

Female Founder World

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 31:53


This episode is brought to you by Gorgias, the ecommerce helpdesk that turns your customer service into a profit center. We can't hype up our new sponsor enough—learn more about how Gorgias can help you build your personalized experience, and nab a free two month trial here: https://gorgias.grsm.io/fgtl7d2cuz4j Welcome back to the Female Founder World pod! I'm so happy to be back on the tools and chatting with Monica Grohne, who launched a PMS-based wellness brand with a $50k grant in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. To get a free copy of the media database that helped Jasmine land her beauty brand in Vogue, Well and Good, Refinery29, Elle, and more mastheads within months of launching, follow these two steps: 1. Leave a review on the podcast, where ever you listen.  2. Screenshot your review. 3. DM me at @femalefounderworld on Instagram with the screenshot, and I'll send you back a link to the database!   Links: Say hi to Jasmine on IG: www.instagram.com/jasminegarnsworthy Get the free 10-minute newsletter keeping 5k+ consumer brand builders in the know: www.femalefounderworld.beehiiv.com Learn more about Marea: https://mareawellness.com/  Resource roundup:   octane.ai  https://dtcpod.simplecast.com/ https://www.facebook.com/groups/wearecommerceclub/about/ 'Supermaker' by Jaime Schmidt OkaySis podcast   Shownotes: 2:10 Should you work for someone else before starting a business?  6:00 How to meet industry regulations (and not break the law :)) 7:15 Claims testing in the wellness industry 8:40 What makes a good early stage fulfillment and manufacturing partner? 10:30 Traction tips for early stage consumer businesses  14:00 Transitioning from DTC only to omnichannel distribution  15:00 How to use a quiz to customize your product and marketing messaging 17:10 Wellness business ideas 18:50 Launching with a $50,000 grant 20:00 Normalising working on the side while growing your biz 24:00 Where should you live when you launch a business? 25:00 The best Slack channels and groups for founders  26:00 Resource recommendations

Warden's Watch
TGL029 Tom Rowland

Warden's Watch

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 71:42


Capt Tom Rowland is a fishing guide in both fresh and saltwater turned entrepreneur.  Becoming a flyfishing guide in Jackson Hole, WY was a dream come true but finding great success in Key West, FL was even more of an unlikely success story. No one could have predicted what came next as Tom and his partner started a production company, created, starred in, sold and distributed a television show on ESPN and OLN Networks  Most recently, he has become a podcaster and creates inspiring and educational content for his loyal audience that includes interviews with entrepreneurs from all industries, fishing and hunting icons as well as, "how-to" advice.  Tom credits much of his success to his dedication to his physical condition and keeps physical education as a foundational part of his message.  Tom believes that one way to accomplish your goals is to help other people reach theirs. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Built HOW
Brett McPeak - Thriving In A Hyper-Competitive Market

Built HOW

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 28:33


Join your host Trish Reinert as she talks with team leader Brett McPeak. Team longevity has propelled the McPeak group to stay together through adversity and thrive in a hyper-competitive market. One that combines super LOW inventory AND the nation's highest per capita income; Teton County, Wyoming - home to Jackson Hole. ---------- Visit www.builthow.com to sign up for our next live or virtual event.   Part of the Win Make Give Podcast Network

Ron Spomer Outdoors
242: Jackson Hole Elk Devastated by Hunting?

Ron Spomer Outdoors

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 18:26


Subscribe to my YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/RonSpomerOutdoorsSubscribe Welcome to the Ron Spomer Outdoors Podcast! Jackson Hole in Wyoming has elk. Perhaps too many elk. Roughly 11,000 elk crowd into the National Elk Refuge each winter for their daily handout of hay. This overcrowding creates potential disease problems. Yet, according to a recent report in the Washington Post, elk herds were once “devastated” by hunting and settlement that cut off migration routes. Links: Website: https://ronspomeroutdoors.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ronspomeroutdoors Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ronspomer/ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/RonSpomerOutdoors Who is Ron Spomer For 44 years I've had the good fortune to photograph and write about my passion – the outdoor life. Wild creatures and wild places have always stirred me – from the first flushing pheasant that frightened me out of my socks in grandpa's cornfield to the last whitetail that dismissed me with a wag of its tail. In my attempts to connect with this natural wonder, to become an integral part of our ecosystem and capture a bit of its mystery, I've photographed, hiked, hunted, birded, and fished across much of this planet. I've seen the beauty that everyone should see, survived adventures that everyone should experience. I may not have climbed the highest mountains, canoed the wildest rivers, caught the largest fish or shot the biggest bucks, but I've tried. Perhaps you have, too. And that's the essential thing. Being out there, an active participant in our outdoor world. Produced by: Red 11 Media Disclaimer All loading, handloading, gunsmithing, shooting and associated activities and demonstrations depicted in our videos are conducted by trained, certified, professional gun handlers, instructors, and shooters for instructional and entertainment purposes only with emphasis on safety and responsible gun handling. Always check at least 3 industry handloading manuals for handloading data, 2 or 3 online ballistic calculators for ballistic data. Do not modify any cartridge or firearm beyond what the manufacturer recommends. Do not attempt to duplicate, mimic, or replicate anything you see in our videos. Firearms, ammunition, and constituent parts can be extremely dangerous if not used safely. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ron-spomer-outdoors/support

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #88: Snow Trails, Ohio General Manager Scott Crislip

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 89:00


To support independent ski journalism, please consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. Paid subscribers receive thousands of extra words of content each month, plus all podcasts three days before free subscribers.WhoScott Crislip, General Manager of Snow Trails, OhioRecorded onMay 31, 2022About Snow TrailsClick here for a mountain stats overviewOwned by: The Carto familyLocated in: Mansfield, OhioClosest neighboring ski areas: Mad River Mountain (1.5 hours), Boston Mills-Brandywine (1 hour)Base elevation: 1,174 feetSummit elevation: 1,475 feetVertical drop: 301 feetSkiable Acres: 200Night skiing: Yes, 100% of terrainAverage annual snowfall: 30 to 50 inchesTrail count: 17 (20% black, 60% intermediate, 20% beginner)Lift count: 7 (4 triples, 2 doubles, 1 carpet - view Lift Blog’s inventory of Snow Trail’s lift fleet)Why I interviewed himStare at it for a while, and the American ski map teases some captivating storylines. How is it that there are so many ski areas in Southern California? Or New Mexico? Or how about that map dot above Tucson, or, for God’s sake, Ala-freaking-bama? Are those real? Why are there so many ski areas in practically snowless eastern Pennsylvania, and so few (relatively speaking) in snow-choked and mountainous Washington and Oregon?But one of the most curious sectors of U.S. skiing is the lower Midwest. Ohio hosts five public ski areas; Indiana has two; Illinois, four; Iowa, three; Missouri, two. That’s just 16 ski areas across five states. The upper Midwest, by contrast, hosts 90 ski areas across three states: 40 in Michigan, 31 in Wisconsin, 19 in Minnesota. So that 16 may seem low, but the lower Midwest’s ski area count is actually quite impressive if we look at the macro conditions. Take Ohio: why – how – does this windblown flatland host five public ski areas (a sixth, Big Creek, operates as a private club near Cleveland). Eastern Ohio – the western borderlands of Appalachia – is actually quite hilly. But there aren’t any ski areas there. Instead, Ohio ski life is clustered around or between the state’s many large cities – Dayton, Columbus, Cleveland.Most of America’s ski areas, if you pick them apart, exist because of a favorable combination of at least a couple of the following factors: elevation, population, aspect, accessibility, snowfall – often lake effect. North-facing Snow Trails, seated high (for Ohio) in the Possum Run Valley, right off Interstate 71 between Columbus (population 889,000) and Cleveland (population 383,000), combines four of the five. The ski area only averages 30 to 50 inches of snowfall per year, depending upon the source, but there’s plenty of juice (snowmaking) to keep the lifts spinning.The place, in fact, has more skiers than it knows what to do with. Last year, Snow Trails began limiting season pass sales for the first time in its 60 seasons. The outdoor boom hit Ohio as much as it hit New England or Colorado. People wanted to ski. If they live in the north-central part of the state, they’ve got a fine little hill to do it on.What we talked aboutSummertime at Snow Trails; the passing of Snow Trails long-time founder and operator David Carto; the ski area’s founding in the ‘60s; the unique climate of Ohio’s Possum Run Valley; Snow Trails’ novel water source; introducing a “Western” feel to an Ohio ski area; how climate, technology, commitment, and culture work together to make a ski area succeed; the incredible longevity of Snow Trail’s management team; 60 years working at one ski area; Snow Trails’ future as a family-run ski area; don’t let your significant other teach you how to ski; learning to ski on ropetows; the insane grind of a lower Midwest ski season; the Cal Ripken of skiing: 22 years as GM and he’s never missed a day; reflecting on last ski season; “whenever the opportunity comes to make snow, come November, we’re going to do it”; managing volume at a small, insanely busy ski area during the Covid boom; limiting season pass sales; when Snow Trails’ season passes may go on sale; whether Snow Trails has considered joining the Indy Pass; watching Ohio’s collection of independent ski areas slowly consolidate under a single owner throughout the early 2000s; the moment Vail bought four of the five public ski areas in Ohio; Vail’s abysmal performance in Ohio this past season and how Snow Trails rose above skiing’s larger labor and weather struggles to offer 79 hours of operations per week; how Snow Trails will respond to Vail’s $20-an-hour minimum wage; the “gut punch” of Vail’s decision to slash operating hours and days of operation after Epic Pass sales ended; whether the ski area will bring back midnight Fridays; oh man you do NOT take night skiing away from Midwesterners; thoughts on how Vail can turn around the disappointing state of their operations in Ohio; how the installation of carpet lifts transformed the beginner experience at Snow Trails; which chairlift the ski area would like to upgrade next; where the resort is thinking about installing a ropetow; the best location on the mountain to potentially add an additional chairlift; where Snow Trails could potentially expand; the story behind Snow Trails’ glades, an anomaly in the lower Midwest; advancing snowmaking technology and how it increases resilience to climate change; what’s new at Snow Trails for the 2022-23 ski season; and RFID.  Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewVail stole the show in Ohio this past winter, mostly through a stunning display of callous ineptitude. Their four ski areas, which for decades have spun the lifts seven days per week, 10 or 12 or more hours per day, slashed hours and days of operation. Here’s what you were faced with, this past winter, if you were an Epic Pass holder in Ohio:Alpine Valley: closed Monday-Thursday, 3:30-9 Friday, 9-4 weekends (19.5 hours per week)Boston Mills: closed Monday & Tuesday, 10-3 Wednesday and Thursday, 4-10 Friday, 9-5 weekends (32 hours per week)Brandywine: 4-10 Monday-Friday, 9-5 Saturday and Sunday (46 hours per week)Mad River: 3-9 Monday-Friday, 10-5 Saturday and Sunday (44 hours per week)There were several elements of this modified schedule that were stunning in their complete misapprehension of the local market. First: night skiing, in the Midwest, is everything. Everything. Eliminating it – on Saturdays especially – is baffling beyond belief. Second: curtailing hours after season pass sales are complete is an offensive bait-and-switch, particularly for Midwesterners, who already weather the disrespect of the “flyover country” label. “How dumb does this Colorado, big-mountain company think we are?” was, by all accounts, the sort-of meta-narrative defining local sentiment this past season. Yes, the Epic Ohio Pass – good for unlimited access to all four of the state’s Vail-owned ski areas – started at just $279 for the 2021-22 ski season (it’s $305 right now), but it came with an implied promise that the ski areas would function as the ski areas always had. Crowded? Yes. Frantic? Yes. Existing on the margins of where people can hack a ski experience out of nature’s ferocious whims? Always. But it would be skiing, pretty much whenever you wanted it, for 12 weeks from mid-December to mid-March.Vail did not deliver on that expectation. The company responded to a mild early season and tight labor market not by dumping resources into operations and hiring but by retreating. Not just in Ohio, but in Indiana and Missouri as well. Paoli Peaks operated four days per week. The Missouri ski areas did better, with seven-day schedules and a decent amount of night skiing. But overall, Vail Resorts did not look like Vail Resorts in the lower Midwest during the 2021-22 ski season. The largest ski company in the world – proud, bold, insatiable, domineering Vail – looked bumbling, scared, confused, lost.And they would have gotten away with it, too, were it not for those meddling independent ski areas that carried on as though it were a completely normal Midwest ski season. Vail owns seven of the nine public ski areas in Ohio, Indiana, and Missouri. The other two – Perfect North, Indiana and Snow Trails – absolutely embarrassed Vail, exposing every flimsy excuse the company made for curtailing operations. Perfect North spun the lifts 89 hours per week. Snow Trails went 79, offering night skiing until 9 p.m. seven days per week. How did they do this? “We did what we always did,” Crislip told me in the interview. But what was that, exactly? And what could Vail learn from a little reflection after the humbling that was this past Ohio ski season?Why you should ski Snow TrailsCrislip mused, during our conversation, on the long-term advantages of severely discounting lift tickets for school groups. Those discounted tickets, he said, pay big dividends down the line.No kidding. I only ever tried skiing because 200-vertical-foot Mott Mountain, Michigan offered $6 lift tickets to my high school in the winter of 1992. I think rentals were an extra $5. A bus ride to the hill and back – about half an hour each way – was free.Mott Mountain is long gone, but I think we can conclude that the ski industry’s return-on-investment was sufficient. The amount of money that I’ve spent on the sport in the decades since that first bus ride is all of it. There were winters during which I did little else but ski and purchased almost nothing that was not directly ski related, other than gasoline and Taco Bell.Which is great for kids, right? But why would an accomplished skier ever want to ski a bump like Snow Trails, let alone travel there to do it on purpose? It’s a rhetorical question, asked because the world is still filled with studly chest-beaters, who answer questions like this:With machofest responses like this:Twenty years ago, we’d say that if you wanted someone to expose their true selves, get them drunk or angry. Now, you can just open their social media accounts. I don’t know where this dude lives, but if it’s anywhere near Snow Trails, I’d give him this bit of unsolicited advice: put your ego down (it may require the assistance of a forklift), store it somewhere safe, buy a season pass, and go enjoy yourself. If you can’t have fun skiing a bump like this, then I’m not sure you understand how to have fun skiing at all. Get to know the hill, get creative, nod to the lifties – treat it like your local bar or gym or coffee shop. Somewhere to be in the wintertime that isn’t your couch.  Or wait until your trip to Whistler and be happy skiing six days per year. I can’t tell you how to live. I’m just here to make suggestions. Here in New York, I know plenty of people like this. They wouldn’t dare ski Mountain Creek, New Jersey’s beehive-busy analogue to Snow Trails. “You probably ski Mountain Creek” they’ll type on social media, as though there’s something wrong with a thousand-footer with high-speed lifts and a happy hour-priced season pass. But once you adopt this mentality, it’s malignant. Soon, you’re also too good for Hunter, then Gore, then Killington, then, like the Twitter turkey above, the venerable Jay Peak, the NEK powder palace that averages more inches of average annual snowfall than Steamboat or Winter Park. Before you know it, your ski-day choices are down to Snowbird, Jackson Hole, Palisades Tahoe, and Revelstoke. Anything else “isn’t real skiing.”Or something like that. It’s all a little tedious and stupid. We’re fortunate, in this country, to have hundreds of viable ski areas, pretty much anyplace that hills and cold collide. If you live anywhere near one, there are a lot more reasons to frequent it than to snub it. There are plenty of skiers who live in Florida or Texas or Georgia, places where the outdoor lift-served bump is an impossibility. Not to sound like your mom when you were five years old, but there are plenty of kids in the world that don’t have any toys to play with, so try to be happy with the ones you’ve got. Go skiing.More Snow TrailsA Mansfield News Journal obituary for longtime Snow Trails owner David CartoNear the end of the interview, Crislip says refers to the work that “you and Matt” are doing to promote Midwest skiing. Matt is Matt Zebransky, founder of midwestskiers.com and all-around good dude. The site is comprehensive and terrific, and Zebransky is a really talented video producer and editor, who puts together some knockout reels laser-focused on Midwest skiing. Zebransky introduced me to Crislip after he hosted me for a podcast interview recently (I’ll let you know whenever that’s live). The Midwest Skiers Instagram account is a terrific follow.The Storm publishes year-round, and guarantees 100 articles per year. This is article 60/100 in 2022, and number 306 since launching on Oct. 13, 2019. Want to send feedback? Reply to this email and I will answer (unless you sound insane). You can also email skiing@substack.com.This podcast hit paid subscribers’ inboxes on June 2. Free subs got it on June 5. To make sure you get future pods as soon as they’re live, please consider an upgrade. Get full access to The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast at www.stormskiing.com/subscribe

Grand Teton Music Festival
Live from the GTMF - S5, Episode 13: Enigma

Grand Teton Music Festival

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 59:00


Live from the Grand Teton Music Festival is a series of one-hour podcasts hosted by Music Director Sir Donald Runnicles and GTMF General Manager Jeff Counts. Season Five's episodes celebrate the Festival's 2021 return to live performances at Walk Festival Hall in Jackson Hole.Grand Teton Music Festival OrchestraSir Donald Runnicles, conductorRichard StraussDon Juan, Op. 20Edward ElgarEnigma Variations, Op. 36

I Like Beer The Podcast
North County San Diego is Happening - Road House Brewery and Colab Public House

I Like Beer The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 45:08


It's a great time to be in North County San Diego.  First the ILB team is joined remotely and via field trip by the team from Roadhouse Brewery in Jackson Hole, Wyoming - Max Shafer, Shane Sprig, and Lori Losardo - who share their stories and great tasting beers.  Then ILB team visits with Joe Deutch at the new Colab Public House in Vista, CA as they prepare for their Grand Opening.

Facets: Voices of the Mountain Life
Making Jackson Home

Facets: Voices of the Mountain Life

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 29:09


Four days a week, Roney de la Cruz drives a bus of mostly Latino students to a bilingual pre-school. His route represents how a wave of immigration, primarily from Mexico, has transformed the workforce, schools and broader community of Jackson Hole since the mid-1990s. In this episode, KHOL's Kyle Mackie digs into the local history of immigration and shares stories of how Latino immigrants and first-generation residents are putting down roots and making Jackson home.   This episode was made in collaboration with Stio, stewards of the mountain life. It was reported and produced by Kyle Mackie, with additional reporting by Natalie Schachar and Alicia Unger. KHOL's Will Walkey and Emily Cohen provided editorial and production support. The episode contained original music scoring by Sheena and Jacob Ferguson. Creative direction and executive production support provided by Stio's Liz Barrett and Jessie Van der Linden. Facets logo design by Kika MacFarlane.

The Zach Gelb Show
Jackson Hole (Hour 2)

The Zach Gelb Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 46:20


Is it a big deal that Lamar Jackson is skipping OTAs? l Craig Berube, St. Louis Blues head coach l Baker Mayfield to the Panthers inevitable?

Grand Teton Music Festival
Live from the GTMF - S5, Episode 12: Bronfman and Beethoven

Grand Teton Music Festival

Play Episode