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Latest podcast episodes about Salesforce

Moery Company
Let’s Start A Business. Building a Great Foundation (7m 20s) – Association Hustle Podcast Episode 303

Moery Company

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 7:19


    Let's start a business together! I want to talk about some of the things that I went through as I started to launch The Moery Company.       Hello and welcome to JP Moery's Association Hustle Podcast. Founder of The Moery Company, JP's mission is to arm today's associations with insight and strategy to thrive and a progressively complex and competitive business landscape. 21st century associations must move forward with a little bit of hustle and revenue development at their core. Here's JP. 1. Job Descriptions I wrote job descriptions for every single role in the company three years ahead. I projected three years down the road, what jobs were going to be needed in The Moery Company.  That was helpful because when I wrote out the jobs and the primary responsibilities, I signed my name to them.  I realized, in the very beginning, I was going to be responsible for all those functions, because it was just me. 2. Establish a strong sales operation Three steps that you should consider as you develop the sales operation. First, you have to have great data. I'm starting a new racing sponsorship effort right now, and it's still about who's the right person? What's the contact information? Is it an audience that makes sense for my business? If you don't have that critical information in place, you have nothing. Second, how are you going to track your sales and marketing information? I've used Salesforce in the past, and in fact I just bought a brand new Salesforce subscription today for myself.  I've got to keep track of who I'm talking to, and where is this deal in the sales process?  What stage might it be in? If I don't know those things, I'll lose track very quickly. Third, what is the script in the narrative? You built this infrastructure, so you have the right people to talk to. Now what if they decide to talk to you? How are you going to explain your value? I have talking points on the value proposition that I'm offering. It includes things like, why do other companies buy, or why do other companies join my association? What are specific examples that I have of their success when they did join? 3. Getting started and maximizing your value We're trying to eliminate fear and mistakes from the buyer. So many sales don't occur because we didn't eliminate enough risk.  We've got to do that in our pitch, then you're ready to go to market. 4. Hiring Process If you want to hire someone, here are some tips on hiring the first, second or third salesperson in your organization. I love to hire underdogs. Somebody that's got something to prove, a chip on their shoulder. Giving somebody a chance is a noble thing, and you start by giving them a substantial emotional deposit when you do hire them. If you're bootstrapping your business, it's going to be hard to compete or land the blue chippers. Sometimes you get value from folks that have been outcast by other organizations or just need a helping hand.   The people that have hit a rough spot is possibly because the average business didn't train, coach, or pay enough attention to them.  They didn't build a culture that you're going to build in your organization. So often, it's the company's fault, not the person. As you grow, you're going to learn that this hiring process is essential to your business. You're going to spend more time on personnel matters on HR. In fact, probably 75% of my time was spent on people matters. Making sure the culture was good, giving feedback, encouragement, etc.  You're going to be spending so much time with and on people, HR issues, why don't you get it right at the beginning. Thanks for listening. I get so much energy from your comments and feedback on the Association Hustle podcast. I can't wait to talk to you again next week. See you soon. Best wishes. I want to run up the score on downloads. So if you like this episode, would you share this on social media?

The Marketing Secrets Show
A Sneak Peek from Within the Category King's Mastermind

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 19:49


One of my biggest "ah-ha's" and "takeaways" from day 1 of our highest level mastermind. Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com ---Transcript--- What's up everybody, this is Russell Brunson. Welcome back to the Marketing Seekers podcast. I'm in a good mood today. I'm in a really good mood today. I hope you are as well. We relaunched my Inner Circle. We opened a new level called the Category Kings. We had a chance to meet with him yesterday, and actually I'm driving to downtown Boise, because I'm going to be hanging out with that group again for the next two days and then my Inner Circle for the next two days after that. And so this is like a week of hanging out with my favorite people in the world, and so I'm excited. I've got some long car rides back and forth this week, so you'll probably get some episodes of me talking about what we're talking about, what's happening. And I'm doing this for a couple reasons, number one is I want you to learn from some lessons and the key takeaways that I'm getting from these events. And number two, hopefully it will inspire you to want to set as a goal someday to be in my Inner Circle, and eventually to send up with the Category Kings and things like that. So there you go with that said I'm going to cue the theme song, when we come back I'm going to share with you guys some of the cool aha I had from our meeting yesterday. All right everybody. So yeah I'm driving downtown Boise here, about to go hang out with my Category Kings, which is a small group mastermind I have with some of the Category Kings here inside of the Click Funnels universe, which is fun. When I decided, as some of you guys know I've run my Inner Circle mastermind program for seven or eight years, and then two years ago, about six months before the COVID lockdowns I decided I needed a break. And so I paused Inner Circle. I shut it down, whatever you want to call it, and decided to take a two year hiatus, actually I didn't know how long it was going to be at the time. So decided to take a hiatus and maybe it was going to be forever. But over the last two years, I missed it. For me there're different ways to learn, like you can learn from a book, you can learn from a course, you can learn from a seminar, and for me I've done all those things. I'm a voracious reader. I go through everybody's courses. I love going to seminars, but eventually for me it gets harder and harder to like mine the gold out right? Because you just are more aware of things. And I've been doing this game now for almost 20 years. And so I've been to more seminars than most of you guys probably even knew existed in our industry. So for me it gets harder and harder to find like that gold nugget. And I was in, I remember my very first mastermind group I ever joined was Dan Kennedy and Bill Glazier's, which some you guys heard we recently acquired their company, which is such a cool thing. But in those groups it was interesting because it wasn't like I was learning, it wasn't like here's course curriculum. It was like the mastermind group, we get together, we all get share and talk, and ideas. And like that's where I started getting these nuggets of things that were just like, oh wow, I can apply that. Oh I can apply that. It was a different type of learning I never experienced before, but I fell in love with it. And I was in Bill's mastermind group for six years. And then when he retired and sold his company I wanted to go see if I could find another mastermind group to join. And I ended up joining all of them. Like all the ones I could find in my world in similar markets, I would join them all. And I never got the same experience. I didn't know why. And that was about the time I decided to launch my Inner Circle. And I think the reason why most of the masterminds I tried to join was like you join them, and there were a whole bunch of internet marketers in the group. And so everyone, I don't know, it was just, it never felt awesome. But what was cool about the Inner Circle I launched it, because we have ClickFunnels we didn't just have internet marketers who are using the platform, we had people in every market you can dream of. We have 100 and something 1000 active members now. And again, there's people that are chiropractors, dentists, doctors, people in curing cancer, wellness, health filled, people in marriage, family, counseling, relationships, dating, every market you can dream of are using ClickFunnels. And so when we opened the Inner Circle, it was crazy, because it wasn't just like, oh a whole bunch of internet marketers joined to talk about internet marketing stuff. It was like the best people in each industry joined it. And it was so cool, because now in this mastermind I was learning like what's working now in the relationship market? What's working over here in the supplement market? What's working here, because we had such a such wide variety of people. And man for me it lit up. And if you've read, specifically the Expert Secrets book, the Expert Secrets book was written in the middle of when the Inner Circle was at its peak. When people like Brandon and Calum Poland and Alex Hormozi and I could list all, the most of the names you guys know in the ClickFunnels community today were in the Inner Circle during that time. And it was fun, because I was writing that book, I would like test ideas and then I would test it on my business, have some success, I'd share it with the entire Inner Circle and within hours it was being tested in 40 different industries. And we got feedback and course correction, and tweaks back and forth and back and forth. And really the Expert Secrets book was born from that testing process inside the Inner Circle. It was so cool. Anyway, I digress. So for me after two years of having it closed down I reopened it, specifically because I missed learning. Like I've been in a weird spot where we've been growing, we've been acquiring companies, we're doing things, but I don't feel like I've been personally growing and you know growth is a big value for me. That's why I have so many books that I study so much, is I'm looking for ways to grow all the time. And so I reopened it with the excitement to start regrowing again with a small group of really cool people. So the Category Kings have 15 people in it. Each of them spend $150,000 a year to be part of it. And then the Inner Circle is $50,000 a year, and there's a 100 people in that one. And so those are the two groups, the Category Kings one was funny, I thought that was going to, I was like there's no way people are going to spend that much money. That one sold out in two days and Inner Circle, man we ended up from Funnel Hacking Live, we only presented it to people at Two Comma Club. We had a special luncheon. And from that I think we had 60 or 70 people join during the luncheon. And so anyway, so there's some context to what it is, why it is, why it's exciting, why I'm so passionate about it. So with the Category Kings, to kick off kind of this new group some of you guys have read the book Play Bigger, which teaches you how to become a category king. And I thought, how cool, and it's funny, because half of our, the Category King group are actually women. So as of yesterday I'm calling it the Category King and Queens, because there's as many Queens in the group as there are Kings. But anyway I digress, I thought it'd be really cool to have one of the authors of that book come and actually present. And so Dave Peterson came and he presented on how to like design your category. And it was interesting, because I've read the book multiple times, I've referred it to, I think he told me I was probably the top refer of his book, because I told everybody about it. And so it was interesting, because as we were preparing for this I had it in my head what he was going to do. He was going to use the principles in the book. We're going to map it out. We're going to category design. Like I thought, I really thought that was the direction we were going to go. It was interesting, because he told me, he's like, you know everything I've learned about category design for the most part happened after I wrote the book, we wrote the book based on these principles and he's like, we've been coaching for the last decade now. And he's actually now doing it in a company again. And he's like you know most of what I've learned about category design, I have learned since the book. And so there's a lot of things that are different. And so anyway, we had a four hour workshop with him and what was fascinating to me was we didn't cover most of the things in the book. In fact the first hour was all spent on something that seemed so simple. I'm almost nervous to tell you guys this, because you'd be like, oh that's so simple Russell. But me and 15 other people in this room of arguably Category Kings in their industries, none of us were able to really answer it. And that's what I want to share with you guys today. So the question and it's interesting, because like the way that I, the lens that I view the world at typically for me is like, okay I'm going to go find, who's my dream customer? And then I'm going to create an offer for them. That's like for me, like ground zero, that's where I begin this process. And then if you've read Extra Secrets, you know it's like, hey do we make an improvement offer? Or a new opportunity? Create a new opportunity. There's this whole thing around like down that rabbit hole. And that's where I begin. That's where I kind of start running with. And I always knew that when we're creating offers and creating products, and services and things like that, where like our goal to solve a problem. But what was interesting is that Dave asked us, he's like, what is the problem that you solve? And he showed a bunch of the big companies you're aware of. Like the billion dollar brands and most of them have like a really simple, less than 10 word statement on the problem that they solve for the market. Like for example the wetsuit guy, I don't know who it was, but like his problem he's trying to solve is I want to swim in cold water longer, but that was it. I want to swim in cold water longer, eight words right. And like, what is a wetsuit? Oh it helps people swim in cold water longer. What was the problem you try to solve? Boom this is a solution and billion dollar brand. And every company had something like that. And then he was interesting, he said that he would go to, or he was talking about some of his friends that have big companies. And he said that he started doing this exercise with them, when he'd get in the car with them, and he'd be like, Hey how's it going? How's business? Real quickly, what do you think the problem is you guys as a company solve? His friend would tell him the answer and he'd write it down, and next time they hung out three or four days later he'd be talking, he's like, wait real quick, what was the question? What is the main problem you solve again? And the guy would be like, oh, he'd tell him again, and then he'd do it again, he'd do it five or six times over the next month and a half or so. And eventually the guy came back and said, you know the seventh or eighth time he asked him, he's like, dude you got to quit asking me this. Like you keep asking and I keep telling you the problem we solve. And then Dave came back and said, actually what's interesting is I've been writing them down. He's like every single time I've asked you that question, you've given me a different answer. And the guy was like, oh my gosh. And he started looking at him and he was disagreeing with himself, not knowing it. But if you look at like, he's like I solve this problem, I solve this problem. And I solve this problem. And they kept changing around. And he said a lot of times he'll do consulting with people and they're in category design, and he'll ask everybody in the executive team, what is the problem you solve? And everybody's answers different. And then he'll ask the employees and everyone's answers different. And he's like, this is the foundation. Business is all about solving a core problem for an industry. Like what is the core problem? And what's interesting he said that if you figure out the problem correctly, he said, the category will take care of itself. Like you don't have to go and figure out the category and design, all kind of stuff. He's like it all relies on this one thing, is what is the problem you solve? And it was interesting, because as he said that, instant I'm like oh sweet I can answer this. And then I was like, wait a minute. I could answer this seven years ago when ClickFunnels first came out. That was the problem we were solving seven years ago? It was that entrepreneurs couldn't code. And so we had to make this easy drag and drop builder, oh sorry this is the solution. The problem is that entrepreneurs aren't coders, that's the problem right? And so we built ClickFunnels, because someone like me who's an entrepreneur who needs funnels, I can't code. And so it was like this simple thing. And so that was the problem we solved. Now fast forward seven years later, that's not the market problem anymore. There's a million ways that entrepreneurs can code something. There's a million Wix's and WYSIWYG editors, and WordPress and Shopify, and Etsy and Amazon, like there's a million ways to do it. So, that's no longer the core problem. Although, that's the problem that we solved initially. And so it got me thinking, what is the problem we solve today? Like the problems change in a market and an industry over time. In fact, I asked someone, I was like, does the core problem stay the same forever? And he's like, no, no. He's like there's a core problem, and you got to figure out and identify that, because that'll define the category and everything else. But he's like markets shift, markets change. And he showed this graph of the CRM industry over the last 50 years or 60 years, initially he was it was business cards. And then it was some dude figured out you could take a business card and type it into a data processor. Now you had a digital business card, and then the next wave was like... Sorry, we can come back to the problem. So the first problem is like I needed contacts. So business cards became the thing. That was the problem. And then next thing I have all these business cards, I don't know how to manage them or track them. And so someone made a program where you could type it in. It's like, oh I have a digital version, I can look at it. And if my book of business cards burns up I don't lose my business. So problem solution, and then a little while later it's like, okay this is tough I hate typing in these things. And so the next wave of that industry was card scanners, where you take a business card, you scan it and boom it's in your computer now, you've got it there. And that solved the next set of problems in the industry. And then later it was I don't just want a business card. I want a business card, but to be able to take notes. And if I talk to somebody and things like that, and it was like the first version of CRM, and he showed, was it Seabolt and showed how they became the Category Kings and they dominated. But then eventually it was like well, first Seabolt was really hard to install and all these kind of things. And that's when Mark Benioff came out with Salesforce, which was not software, it was hard and confusing and you had to have people come install it and set up. It was just web based software. And he was the very first to do SAS based software. And so like that became the next thing. And he kept showing them the industry shifting, because the problem shifts over time. And it was interesting, because in your market if you're not shifting your problem over time, someone else is going to solve the problem and that's when you lose the category. That's when the person passes you, which is so fascinating. And so the question came down to, what is the problem you solve? And so that's the thing I want to identify for you guys. And the problem that us entrepreneurs have is like, oh we solve a ton of problems. We do this and this and this, and this and this, and this and this, this and that is the wrong answer. You don't solve a whole bunch of problems. You've got to solve one problem for the category. And by doing that, by creating that, by understanding and identifying and framing that problem from there the category is built. And then we got deeper and talked about POV statements and things like that, it got deeper from there. But that was the core foundation, that again, if I was teaching, I'd be like step one find a problem, step two, what is the offer? And then like you know, and I'd go directly into that, but it's like, no, no, we got to step back to the foundation, which is really what is the problem that you're solving for the industry? When you figure that out the category will take care of itself, which was so fascinating. And again, he said, try to keep your problem statement to under 10 words. And that's hard to do. I spent 45 minutes talking about, 15 minutes work shopping it, and then I spent the next four hours like noodling on it, like try to figure this out, like what in the world, especially as I know some of you guys know we're launching ClickFunnels 2.0 soon, so like with this whole new launch, this new thing, what is the problem we're trying to solve? How do I identify? How do I structure? How do I make it so simple that it keeps us as the Category King? So anyway I hope that's helpful. Obviously there was a lot of stuff yesterday that was really, really cool, but that was the one that was like the biggest insight. It was funny, because we came back from the first workshop, I raised my hand initially, I was like, all right I don't know if it's just me, but that was really, really hard. And I looked around at everybody else, every other Category King and Queen in the room looked back and said, oh, then Kevin's like, we're so grateful it was hard for you Russ, that was really, really hard for us and we thought we were the only ones. I'm like, no, I'm going to be vulnerable here too. That was really hard. And then it was fun, because it opened the dialogue with us all trying to figure it out and work with each other. And Annie Grace, a lot of you guys know her, she spoke at Funnel Hacking Live two years ago, she actually wrote out mine and my POV statement and all these things for me, it was like I think this is what yours is. And like, anyway it was magical. So anyway that was the first half day of Category Kings and Queens. And so I'm heading into the event room now, I'm getting close actually. And I'm excited because I was up till two o'clock last night working on my presentation, because I'm going to, based off of what we learned yesterday with the problem I'm going to take that as the foundation point and then show everybody over the last seven years how ClickFunnels has built to the place it is. We've got over half a billion dollars in sales, well over that now, we built the category, we've done these things. So I'm going to kind of show the next phases for me to the group. I'll probably spend two or three hours going deep into that, which I'm so excited for. And this is like Russell raw, like if you guys see me live, I'm Russell polished where I'm, I've got slides, I've got things. Russell raw you get me and a black marker and that's about it. So I'm excited for these guys they're going to, for those who haven't been with Russell raw this will be my first hardcore doodle session with them going through the principles of how we build ClickFunnels into the category king it is. Things I've learned along the way, the pros, the cons, the ups the downs, and yeah stuff I don't get to talk about typically. So, that's the cool thing about these groups, if you look at our coaching programs we have all the base level stuff. And then if you come in one funnel way and courses and all that kind of stuff, but when you decide to ascend up and get into coaching with us, the first is our Two Comma Club X coaching program. The goal of that is to get somebody from where they are today to Two Comma Club. After you get done with Two Comma Club and you've made a million dollars inside of a funnel, that's when you get invited into the Inner Circle and then from there into category Kings. But it's interesting because the reason why we break it up like that, we used to always have it all together and everyone would be dumped in one coaching program. And it was tough because, or one mastermind group, but it was tough, because there're different conversations that happen at different levels. Like the conversations I'm having with people that spend $150,000 to be in a group, they have to make a minimum of five million a year, and have had to sold over 10 million. They had to have won at Two Comma Club X award. The conversations they have in that room are different than the conversation that happen in a room with people who just passed the million dollar mark. And they're different than the conversation I've going to have with somebody who is in a startup mode trying to get into Two Comma Club. So it's just fun, because again these are things I don't get to talk about, or share ever. And so the place it gets to happen is here inside Category King. So for you guys who are looking to say, okay this is the path, I'm going to hit Two Comma Club X. And then from there Inner Circle, then Category Kings, just know we do record these things and there's a private members there. So when you get to Category King some day, come in here and watch Dave Peterson's talk on Category Kings and watch my presentations from the next day. And you'll have a chance to kind of see where I went from there. So with that said, thanks for listening. This is a long episode because I got a long ride. Hopefully you guys enjoyed it. I miss doing stuff like this, I'm going to try to... We have some fun updates to the podcast coming that I'm doing a few things more long form, I'm going to have someone come and interview me on some topics, because I think those make fun episodes and yeah it's going to be anyway... I'm going to be spending more time with you guys here, is my plan and my goal. So with that said, thanks so much for everything and we'll talk to you guys all again soon.

Marketing Trends
Finding Alignment Between Vision, Perception and Business Needs Using Data with Kevin Tate, CMO of Clearbit

Marketing Trends

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 41:32


On the show we hear over and over again that marketing and sales need to find alignment and that data needs to be a big part of that. Kevin Tate is the CMO of Clearbit, a company that is taking an entirely different approach when it comes to data quality and coverage.  Clearbit is a tool for marketers to use to better understand customers, identify future prospects, and personalize marketing and sales interactions. And if there is one thing Kevin knows, it is the importance of quickly aligning the marketing team's vision with the customer perception and the needs of the business.  I was curious how tried-and-true marketing pillars have influenced the way Kevin runs his marketing department, so I asked him…“One of the things I've learned being on both sides of the sales and marketing equation is that there has to be a balance between marketing's vision for how we want to be viewed in the market and here's how we want people to think about and value what we do. Then there's the sales reality of [being] on the phone with this person, and they're asking for X, and there has to be a really close alignment between how do you help reframe or guide the conversation, but how do you also understand and listen to what that customer is asking for?”On this episode of Marketing Trends, Kevin and I go deep on why static or stale data is leading marketers down a precarious path when it comes to their data management. We also touch on how Clearbit is not just another data vendor, but a company that's doing radical things when it comes to empowering marketing. I hope you enjoy this episode. Main Takeaways:Combining Sales and Marketing Knowledge: There can be challenges related to aligning the marketing vision and sales objectives. Often there needs to be some time spent reframing with the client to guide them towards mutual interests. The marketing department has objectives for reach, the sales team has goals for moving the product, and the client on the phone has needs that you need to service. All three of these things need to work in concert. Content Marketing to Marketers: Content that is useful to your clients can be a great marketing tool. Blogs, eBooks, how-to guides, and reports are all good tools that can add value to your customer or prospective customer.   Funnels are Dependent on Good Data: To be able to hone in on what changes you need to make in your marketing mix requires that you have immediate and good data about your potential consumer. Especially with Product Led Growth companies the funnel that you build needs to have the most accurate information about what consumer are responding to and what they need. Connection Between Your Email Efforts and Ad Efforts: The most valuable thing you can have is a first party mechanism that will give you the most accurate data about the way that your email marketing campaign is supporting and working with your other marketing efforts. All of your marketing channels need to work together for a cohesive and effective marketing strategy. Key Quotes:“There's two parts to Clearbit, there's the data -- and we have data about every company with a website that we collect from hundreds of public sources. Then there's what you do with the data, which is the platform we have to put that data to work in your ad campaigns. Personalizing your website, shortening your forms, enriching all your other systems. We're trying to remove friction. Then on the operations side, having rich real-time data from the front to back of your revenue operations, that ends up mattering a lot. That's what people are doing with Clearbit.” “Clearbit is getting pulled into a company that is implementing an ABM strategy and needs the data and more importantly, the integrations to put that data to work at all the different points in that marketing and sales funnel.”“Product Led Growth companies [have] built funnels that depend on really good data to know of all the people trying [the] product and all the people giving intent signals, and all the people experiencing the product through its life cycle. ” “ The value that a company creates is linked to its product roadmap. You can extend the value beyond that roadmap. One is building things on top of it, and that's what we're doing in the growth engineering team.”“One of the things I've learned being on both sides of the sales and marketing equation is that there has to be a balance between marketing's vision for how we want to be viewed in the market. And here's how we want people to think about and value what we do. Then there's the sales reality of [being] on the phone with this person, and they're asking for X, and there has to be a really close alignment between how do you help reframe or guide where you can the conversation, but how do you also understand and listen to what that customer is asking for?”“We're using marketing technology to sell marketing technology technologists. First from a market perspective, I think we're fortunate to be in a really interesting and fast moving time where almost anyone would agree that the B2B funnel switching toward digital and online buying has really raised the importance of data and understanding. Now that much of the sales experience is mediated through these touch points/  Maybe it's chat, maybe it's email, maybe it's the website, all those need data to perform the best they can. A lot of times that comes down to how can I reduce friction or increased speed or increase the relevance of that, of that app based interaction.”“There's apps that are doing all those interactions, and then there's the data that's providing that foundation and making sure everything is as smart as it can be when it's doing that. That's the world we see on the horizon. Trying to be really thoughtful around growth, how do we make sure that we're creating and capturing value in the most important ways in that landscape? You can do a ton of things with Clearbit, but what are the things that are going to have the most and the most lasting impact on our customer's pipeline, on their ability to predictably create revenue.” “If you've got a first party mechanism to understand the connection between your email and ad efforts, and what's happening on your website, and then you can tie it back to a data platform with Clearbit, that makes a huge difference.”“Part of what Clearbit does is we have eBooks, we have a lot of blogs, recipes, and how-to guides. We have things like the Visitor Report that provides insight as a free to use tool.So we learn a lot by seeing who is engaging with those things, in what way, and where does that suggest they might be on their journey. I believe that one of the things that is invaluable about the shifts we've seen in B2B buying is that they are going to be in control of their own journey, right? They are going to learn how they want to learn, and they're going to raise their hand when they're ready. We try to be as attuned as we can to where they are in the process and where we can help.”Bio:Kevin Tate, the CMO of Clearbit has amassed 24 years of Sales, Marketing & Product leadership experience with firms serving G2000 brands and agencies. Kevin has led go-to-market for Software (SaaS), and Professional Services and Hardware-enabled SaaS companies. He is a sales and Strategic Marketing executive with deep domain expertise in Enterprise SaaS, eCommerce, Digital Marketing, Social Media and IoT. Kevin is a graduate of Stanford University. To learn more, click here: {{URL of detail page on found on www.mission.org}}---Marketing Trends podcast is brought to you by Salesforce. Discover marketing built on the world's number one CRM: Salesforce. Put your customer at the center of every interaction. Automate engagement with each customer. And build your marketing strategy around the entire customer journey. Salesforce. We bring marketing and engagement together. Learn more at salesforce.com/marketing.  

Unthinkable with Jay Acunzo
Maker Monsters 2

Unthinkable with Jay Acunzo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 34:20


In this episode, we follow multimedia journalist Natalia Aldana, organizer and artist Aisha White, podcaster and indie creator Jay Clouse, and we hear from marketing legend Joe Pulizzi as they (and me, Jay Acunzo) learn to navigate how these maker monsters attempt to take hostage their (and our) sense of self worth. So many of us conflate our professional success with personal worth, so what happens when we don't believe in ourselves or  we are paralyzed by potential rejection? And how can we all keep fighting back and overcome our own maker monsters? SHARE THE SHOW:Help others find Unthinkable in their favorite podcast player by sharing this link: https://pod.link/jaySUBSCRIBE TO THE NEWSLETTER:https://jayacunzo.com/newsletterWeekly stories and frameworks about how to create more resonant work. Join thousands of subscribers, from entrepreneurs, freelancers, and independent creators, to marketers and leaders at brands like Adobe, Red Bull, Shopify, Salesforce, the BBC, Wistia, HubSpot, Drift, ProfitWell, a16z, and the New York Times.VOICES IN THIS EPISODE:Natalia Aldana is a multimedia journalist and international news editor. She is an audio producer for Al Jazeera's podcast, The Take after working for The Ezra Klein Show and Recode Decade. She reports on stories around crime and justice, immigration, politics and music. Aisha White is a cultural organizer, artist, and researcher focused on community building and social impact. Her personal work is built around public health and fellowship.  Joe Pulizzi is an entrepreneur and marketing speaker and entrepreneur. Joe has founded multiple startups including The Tilt and is the author of several books including the best-selling Content Inc. Jay Clouse hosts the podcast Creative Elements and builds projects to serve fellow creators.  He's also the head of community at Smart Passive Income with Pat Flynn.SPONSOR: THE JUICEDiscover the world's best and brightest thinking and resources for sales and marketing pros on The Juice. They're like the Spotify of B2B, with content playlists and suggestions based on your job title and level. Avoid the endless lead-gen forms, skip all the system-gamers found via Google searches, and browse the most useful and transformative ideas affecting your work, for free.Learn more at https://thejuicehq.comCONNECT WITH US ELSEWHERE:- Twitter: https://twitter.com/jayacunzo and https://twitter.com/UnthinkableShow- Instagram: https://instagram.com/jacunzo- LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/in/jayacunzo- Email: jay@unthinkablemedia.comPRODUCTION:- Creator, host, writer, and editor: Jay Acunzo - https://jayacunzo.com- Producer and researcher: Ilana Nevins - https://www.ilananevins.comABOUT THE SHOW:Unthinkable is a storytelling podcast about creative people who break from conventional thinking to make what matters most. We're traveling the business world to learn how to create work that resonates — with powerful stories from makers, marketers, and leaders like the CEOs of Zoom and Patreon, execs from Adobe and Disney, and creators like writer Tim Urban, comedian Sarah Cooper, and photographer Chase Jarvis. From artisans to entrepreneurs, writers, designers, podcasters, video creators, and all the weird and wonderful nooks of the working world, we're meeting inspiring people to learn what we can do to resonate more deeply with the work we create.Listeners have called the show “This American Life for my work” with stories “as captivating as some of the best, like Malcolm Gladwell and Dan Carlin.”Thanks for listening and supporting Unthinkable!

Experience This!
EP142: Behaving, Marketing, and Innovating!

Experience This!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 39:07


Learn how restaurants and hotels are dealing with bad customer behavior, why marketers are finally paying attention to customer experience, and why innovation doesn't have to be complicated! Bite-Sized Delight From the Episode: • The Customer Isn't Always Right - If customers aren't behaving with civility, smart businesses will choose not to work with those customers, taking comfort in the fact that kind people want to go places that value kindness. • More CMOs are Focusing on Customer Experience - According to new research from Salesforce, nearly 78 percent of CMO's now own customer experience for their organization and are working to create a cohesive customer journey across channels and devices. • The Best Innovators Deliver Extraordinary Outcomes - In her new book RE:Think Innovation, Carla Johnson offers a framework for generating innovative ideas to push your organization forward. Are You Looking for Things We Referenced? • “Restaurants and Hotels Push Back Against the Uptick in Customer Tantrums” - by Clare Ansberry in The Wall Street Journal • State of Marketing in 2021 - by Salesforce • RE:Think Innovation: How the World's Most Prolific Innovators Come Up with Great Ideas that Deliver Extraordinary Outcomes - by Carla Johnson Learn more about the Experience This Show and the hosts: Joey Coleman Dan Gingiss

This Week in Startups - Audio
Growth & Retention: Why Subscription is the Holy Grail | Customer Basics with Salesforce's Tiffani Bova | E1311

This Week in Startups - Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 18:21


This Startup Basics is all about growth & retention. Tiffani Bova from Salesforce joins to talk about how startups should measure customer health, the pitfalls of high churn, the best kind of growth, how to earn trust by saying "no" & more.

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
1761: What the Vaccine Rollout Teaches About Big Data and B2B Marketing

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 26:47


Amnon Mishor is the CTO and founder of Leadspace, a leading B2B Customer Data Platform. He has designed and deployed innovative global data & AI solutions for some of the world's largest B2B tech organizations such as Zoom, Salesforce, SAP, Oracle, and more. After successfully designing and deploying world-class technology to aid the military in catching terrorists, Amnon saw an opportunity to apply data and AI in another industry where leaders cannot afford to "fail": B2B enterprise software. He shares his experiences from his time heading up the Intelligence Systems and Data Mining Department of the Israel Defense Force's Technological Intelligence Unit. In 2010, he founded Leadspace to help Silicon Valley's biggest enterprise companies take full advantage of customer and prospect data — their most valuable business asset. Have you ever wondered what the vaccine rollout teaches us about AI and big data? Amnon Mishor believes there are key takeaways for B2B marketers. In this podcast, Amnon shares expert opinion as a data technologist to expose what the vaccine rollout teaches B2B companies about big data, AI and more. We also discuss what's wrong with applying big data solutions to small data sets - and how to get it right.

Winners Wallets and Worldviews
Episode 144 - C-Suite Marketing with Drew Neisser

Winners Wallets and Worldviews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 49:22


AJ interviews Drew Neisser, Drew is often ranked among the top 25 CMO influencers and as a B2B influencer by Gartner, DemandBase, IBM, Salesforce, Pega, and Adobe/Marketo. He has been a featured marketing expert on ABC News, CBS Radio, iHeart Radio and Tony Robbins' podcast among many others. More on Drew: https://renegade.com/ More on A.J.: aaronjarmstrong.com  

Sales Game Changers | Tip-Filled  Conversations with Sales Leaders About Their Successful Careers
423: Former Top Salesforce Producer Ian Koniak on Building a World-Class Sales Coaching Culture

Sales Game Changers | Tip-Filled Conversations with Sales Leaders About Their Successful Careers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 32:07


Join the Institute for Excellence in Sales here. Read the complete transcription on the Sales Game Changers Podcast website. IAN'S TIP FOR EMERGING SALES LEADERS: “The framework I use to call is all based on RGAs, Revenue Generating Activities. Is what I'm doing an RGA or not? And there's two types of RGAs, one is advancement of pipeline – everything you need to do to move your deals forward in a sales cycle – and the second bucket is creation of pipeline – everything you need to do to add additional pipeline. Everything else is noise.”

Marketing Trends
Bulbul Hooda, Head of Brand and CMO, Vella Bioscience Brings Beauty Experience to a New Category

Marketing Trends

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 46:48


Here's an age-old marketing truth: sex sells. But marketing sex, or sexual wellness for that matter, can be a tough subject to bear. Within today's oversaturated marketplace, marketers are fighting not just for attention on shelves and landing pages, but also for customers' eyeballs. But when you're marketing a taboo product, such as a sexual wellness cream, those challenges are magnified and building product awareness becomes your number one goal.“This is a category that people don't even know is something that they're missing. There is no need-gap. You're filling as much as building an aspiration. There is a product here that's going to improve your sexual function. And this is something it's a first of its kind, it's a breakthrough. That's Bulbul Hooda, Head of Brand and CMO for Vella Bioscience, a CBD-infused pleasure serum designed to act as ‘Viagra' for women. On this episode of Marketing Trends, Hooda joined me for a candid conversation on the challenges she faces as a marketer marketing a product that consumers might want and need but could be nervous to approach. She discussed the need to normalize products such as pleasure serums, how Vella Bella manages goes about product awareness, and to succeed in a competitive eCommerce environment. Enjoy this episode.Main Takeaways:Marketing a category that people don't know exists: When you have an entirely new product category, you have to get the word out about what the product is before you can convince people that they need it. Doing unbranded campaigns in a market like this can go a long way to educating your prospective customers.  Marketing to Gen Z: As the next generation, Gen Z, has more spending power, their unique interests, and purchasing priorities are starting to affect markets and the products on offer. Gen Z is tending to use wellness categories, self-elevation, and self-improvement. Test a variety of channels before launch: Test your systems to ensure everything is correctly in place before launch. Run a silent campaign to see if things get rejected. Test whether email might be a stronger channel and shift resources away from social or put effort into retail play. This mixing and matching are better the more and you also need to be analyzing that. Power of Agency Partnerships: The debate about whether or not to use a marketing agency or to keep everything in-house has pros and cons any way you cut it. The benefits of hiring an agency include tapping into their resources both in terms of manpower, time, expertise in a specific field, and relationships they already have in the market.   Key Quotes:“This is a category that people don't even know is something that they're missing. There is no need-gap. You're filling as much as building an aspiration. There is a product here that's going to improve your sexual function. t's a breakthrough. To create that I needed to have those skillsets in my arsenal. Believing in my intuition, obsessively knowing my consumer. The third bit is building a brand together, piece by piece and that is something I truly learned at Unilever.” “Two things were happening because of the pandemic. Beauty was declining in color cosmetics. North America is a color cosmetics market. Second, what we are seeing is Gen Z becoming a critical purchasing group. Younger kids have more money, they're buying stuff, and they are leaning towards wellness categories, self-elevation improvement.” “[Social advertising issues] were definitely a small setback, learning every time we put an ad out, our website would get blocked. [Then] you [have to] wait out seven days. Thankfully we were testing this two months before launch. We use social both for organic community, but also for advertising. We collect email signups through our ads on social media. So we now know that we are only talking to people who are genuinely interested and therefore email marketing has, I can't say that it has completely replaced social media advertising, but it has arrested a lot of that loss for us. It's 30% of our revenue channel. Beyond that, we use paid search. Ads on Google, both display shopping and search words, and then what we use social media for is advertising through influencers. Influencer strategy combined with email strategy has helped us navigate the restrictions on Facebook ad blocks.”“I do come from and believe in agency partnerships. My entire marketing team is external. We've got somebody who looks after just PR and influencer strategy. There is another agency that does social media, community management, and yet another that'll do the website and all the updates. Digital marketing, that's a separate leg. The fourth one is a creative agency. While I truly believe in grooming and leading the team, and I've done that, there was just that need in the startup structure to get to market as quickly. Now we are starting to look through the structure and build the internal team. I deeply value all the four agency partnerships that I have.” “[Because certain] payment processors do not allow CBD products what you need is an additional app [for that] and we use Pinwheel to navigate that. The second [issue] is in paid search. If the product has CBD, the ads cannot be targeted to people under 18 years of age, which for us was not a problem, given the age of consent is 18. There is a third: shipping the product internationally. In a lot of countries, you cannot ship CBD products, Canada even. So we will need to set up a manufacturing plant in Canada.” “Everything is first set out as KPIs and then measured for paid advertising. For Google, we set out a return on advertising, spend ROS, KPIs at the beginning of every month. That takes into account competitors' performances, the landscape itself if there are any advertising regulations that have changed so on and so forth. And at the end of every month, we will evaluate where are we versus our goal? Exactly for that email marketing, we sent out, what are we hoping to achieve? It should give me a lift of 23%- 24%.” Bio:Bulbul Hooda is brand creator and chief marketing officer at Vella Bioscience. She has nearly 15 years of experience building & growing award-winning brands by devising their strategic positioning and creative vision along with commercial strategies for long-term revenue growth with a strong commitment to product innovation. Over the course of her global career at powerhouses like L'Oreal, Unilever, and Shiseido, Bulbul has proven success in assessing and meeting consumer needs, engaging target demographics, and directing powerful multi-channel campaigns.Hooda holds an undergraduate degree from Delhi University, along with an MBA from MICA, a top business school in India, and a master's degree in Cosmetics and Fragrance Marketing & Management from the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York.Hooda is a fierce advocate of diversity and inclusion. As a woman of color, raised in a military family that fostered in her a strong sense of self & individuality, she understands that the privilege of her upbringing requires her to support and uplift other women's voices and experiences, particularly in the beauty and wellness industry.To learn more, click here: {{URL of detail page on found on www.mission.org}}---Marketing Trends podcast is brought to you by Salesforce. Discover marketing built on the world's number one CRM: Salesforce. Put your customer at the center of every interaction. Automate engagement with each customer. And build your marketing strategy around the entire customer journey. Salesforce. We bring marketing and engagement together. Learn more at salesforce.com/marketing. 

The Cloud Pod
139: Back to the Future With Google Distributed Cloud

The Cloud Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 61:55


On The Cloud Pod this week, Jonathan reveals his love for “Twilight.” Plus GCP kicks off Google Cloud Next and announces Google Distributed Cloud, and Azure admits to a major DDoS attack.  A big thanks to this week's sponsors: Foghorn Consulting, which provides full-stack cloud solutions with a focus on strategy, planning and execution for enterprises seeking to take advantage of the transformative capabilities of AWS, Google Cloud and Azure. JumpCloud, which offers a complete platform for identity, access, and device management — no matter where your users and devices are located.  This week's highlights

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova
Mental Health is Not a Four-Letter Word with Stephanie Tilenius

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 31:05


Welcome to the What's Next! podcast with Tiffani Bova. This week I am thrilled to welcome Stephanie Tilenius to the What's Next! Podcast. Stephanie is a founder and the CEO of Vida Health, Inc., a mobile continuous care platform for preventing, managing, and overcoming chronic and mental health conditions deployed at Fortune 500 companies, large national payers, and healthcare providers since January 2014. She was an Executive in Residence at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, a venture capital firm, and Vice President of Global Commerce and Payments at Google, Inc., where she oversaw digital commerce, product search and payments. Prior to joining Google, she was at eBay Inc., ultimately as Senior Vice President of eBay.com and global products. I am beyond excited to bring you this episode of the What's Next! Podcast with Stephanie Tilenius!     THIS EPISODE IS PERFECT FOR… remote teams, those looking for tech-enabled mental health solutions, and entrepreneurs who want to know what it looks like to identify a true pain point and fill a need in a novel way.    TODAY'S MAIN MESSAGE… How intentional you need to be when building your company's culture, no matter how strong the mission is. Your organization's culture doesn't just happen, at least not in any extraordinary or conducive way, without a clear vision and intentionality.    WHAT  I  LOVE  MOST… How the Vida team is making the conversation about mental health one we all can feel safe discussing and doing something about in a constructive and supportive way.   Running time: 31:04     Subscribe on iTunes     Find Tiffani on social:  Facebook  Twitter  LinkedIn     Find Stephanie online:  LinkedIn  Twitter 

Banking Transformed with Jim Marous
Modernizing Complex Banking Customer Engagements

Banking Transformed with Jim Marous

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 27:24


An important component of digital banking transformation is to be able to improve efficiency and productivity in your organization while also helping employees to serve customers better. With complex customer engagements, you need to ensure that the right people are engaged at the right part of the customer journey, using a scheduling tool that reflects the customer need, expertise required, timing and locational constraints, and the ability for both your team and the customer to drive the process. We are joined on the Banking Transformed podcast today by Tom Chang, Distinguished Solutions Engineer at Salesforce. He discusses how a scheduling tool can create stronger relationships with precise, personalized appointments.

Stay Paid - A Sales and Marketing Podcast
292 - Is a Sales Career Right for You [and How to Get the Job if It Is]

Stay Paid - A Sales and Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 16:34


If you're wondering whether a career in sales is right for you, then this is a must-listen episode. Nearly 5% of the US population is in a sales-related career, and some are obviously better at their jobs than others. Listen to the Stay Paid pals as they share what traits and learned skills make the best sales professionals, how to determine if sales is the right career for you, and what you can do to prepare best for an interview.  And don't forget to check out the show notes for more in-depth information and added details not included in the episode. Visit www.staypaidpodcast.com.     Connect | Resources  The Predictive Index remindermedia.com/staypaidPI  If you're an introverted real estate agent who wants a coach that respects your preferences, check out Ashley Harwood at moveoverextroverts.com.  FREE printable: Cold and Flu Season Hand Sanitizer Tag. If door knocking isn't your thing, attached your business card and a small bottle of hand sanitizer to these tags, and then leave them in high-traffic areas or hang them on the doorknobs of your clients. 

Staffing & Recruiter Training Podcast
TRP 0072 Rehumanize the Sales Process with Shari Levitin

Staffing & Recruiter Training Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 26:13


As the founder of the Shari Levitin Group, Shari has helped create over 1 billion dollars in increased revenue for companies in over 40 countries teaching her authentic, heartfelt approach. Shari is the bestselling author of Heart and Sell: 10 Universal Truths Every Salesperson Needs to Know, a contributor to Forbes, CEO Magazine, and Huffington Post.   Additionally, Shari has been recognized as follows: ●     Top 100 Global Inspirational Leader for 2021 by PeopleHum ●     Top 50 Keynote Speakers for 2020 by Top Sales World ●     Top Ten Voices in Sales for 2018 for LinkedIn ●     20 sales experts who starred in the Salesforce documentary film "The Story of Sales.” ●     Top 35 Most Influential Women in Sales globally (Sales Hacker) ●     2020 Gold Medal Winner for Top Post by Top Sales World ●     Top 30 authors and books to read by Vengreso, the largest digital transformation company in the U.S ●     Guest lecturer at Harvard University where her book was chosen as the textbook for selling for the Strategic Selling Program Shari, her husband, and son live in Park City, Utah. When she is not creating killer content, and presenting at sales kick-offs, Shari enjoys skiing, rock climbing, reading, and standing on her head. Links www.sharilevitin.com https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6770133385466785792/

The Top Entrepreneurs in Money, Marketing, Business and Life
SalesChoice Bootstrapped to $1m in ARR on Salesforce, Now Raising $2-3m

The Top Entrepreneurs in Money, Marketing, Business and Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 16:13


End Revenue Uncertainty in B2B Sales

IT Visionaries
How to Overcome the Cyber Attack Tsunami, Strategize and Disrupt, with Attivo Network's Carolyn Crandall

IT Visionaries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 42:43


Threats are not new to business. Whenever there has been a plentiful economic prize, there have also been pirates. In the swashbuckling days, the captain and the crew were charged with protecting the merchandise on board. The difference today is the sheer volume of cyber attacks inbound to companies. Carolyn Crandall, the Chief Security Advocate and CMO at Attivo Networks, describes the attack as an enormous wave.Main TakeawaysA Security Threat Tsunami: Cyber attacks are like giant perpetual waves. Businesses are constantly inundated with these threats. The first steps toward fighting back are recognizing the power of one's adversaries, understanding how the company is being attacked, knowing where the company's vulnerabilities are, and then devising a plan to combat the attacks.Strategy over Monitoring: Businesses tend to want to monitor their systems and that's generally a good thing. Part of the method of attackers, however, is to overwhelm with data. Instead of only monitoring, companies have to decipher attacker techniques and then strategize on how to defend accordingly.Automate, Automate!: People can only do so much by themselves to defend against constant cyber attacks. Automation can be an answer to these attacks. Humans can't protect against the deluge of attacks by themselves and must lean on A.I. and machine learning to help combat these nefarious attacks. When companies begin to deploy an A.I. defense strategy, the designed algorithms can begin to decipher what is normal activity on network servers and what is not.Data Cloak and Disrupt: Misusing credentials is a great way for attackers to gain access to resources. It is possible to have an automated system, such as Attivo, that can bait rogue elements, gain their trust, and then deny their access while hiding vital data.IT Visionaries is brought to you by the Salesforce Platform - the #1 cloud platform for digital transformation of every experience. Build connected experiences, empower every employee, and deliver continuous innovation - with the customer at the center of everything you do. Learn more at salesforce.com/platform

Hey Salespeople
Why Your Tools Must Play Nicely Together With Clay Blanchard

Hey Salespeople

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 25:02


Clay Blanchard is the Vice President of Sales Operations at Collibra, where he landed after stints at LinkedIn and Salesforce. Jeremey considers Clay a friend and a mentor, which makes for a great conversation about hacky sacks, account planning and how to get more value out of your tools. Visit Salesloft.com for show notes and insights from this episode.

upside
[Fast Frontiers] Scott Dorsey, co-founder and managing partner at High Alpha and former CEO of ExactTarget

upside

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 44:39


This week on the feed we're featuring the Fast Frontiers Podcast by Refinery Ventures.Refinery Ventures is based in Cincinnati, Ohio. They bridge the gap and mentor teams between post-seed and Series A funding where they invest $1M to $2M.Tim Schigal is the Managing Partner at Refinery Ventures, and the host of Fast Frontiers. Tim created ShareThis, a social media pioneer that nearly a billion people use to share online content every month. ShareThis, based in Palo Alto, CA, was one of the fastest growing companies in the country, growing to $50 million in less than four years which earned him the EY Entrepreneur of the Year in his region. Tim also launched and managed Cintrifuse, one of the best performing fund of funds in the country, investing in 15 top-tier early stage funds across the U.S. Tim has been in venture capital since 1998.In this episode from December 8, 2020, Tim interviews Scott Dorsey, co-founder and managing partner at High Alpha, a venture studio in Indianapolis. Scott is the former CEO and co-founder of ExactTarget, which was acquired by Salesforce in 2013 for more than $2.5 billion dollars.A couple of powerhouses in this episode! You can learn more about Refinery Ventures at refinery.com. OK, enjoy this episode of Fast Frontiers, right after this.Subscribe to Fast FrontiersLearn more about Refinery VenturesLearn more about High AlphaFollow upside on TwitterJoin the upside network

Sales and Marketing Built Freedom
Why More Leads Can Put Startups Out of Business | Sean Cahill

Sales and Marketing Built Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 31:27


Grab your Free Copy of “The 4 Biggest Mistakes That Stop Companies From 10X'ing Their Revenue” at https://www.scalerevenue.io/10xSean Cahill started his career in sales, so it's only natural that he absolutely hated marketing. To Sean, marketing was the group that gave them garbage leads that they couldn't sell.Eventually, he landed a job at Cisco that caused him to fall in love with marketing. From that experience, he developed a thirst for working with startups, where he started working in funnel generation for startups. This led to him starting his own company and developing a pipeline for startups and working to get them into a Series B.Today, Sean works at Unify Marketing as the National Practice Leader for Marketing. He still loves working with startups!To grow pipeline, Sean stays focused on these 3 main areas:PeopleProcessesTechnologySean realized early on in his startup phase that one of the biggest issues in the startup world is that when startups get a Series A , and they develop an MVP to take to market, and then they focus on the Series B.Typically, it takes the startup getting $1M in MRR in order to get a Series B, and founders realize the only way they can close that many sales and generate that much revenue, they have to get more leads.So they work to buy more leads, which then throws off their close rates and then they try to shorten their sales cycles and every time they try to pull another level to make up the slack, it just completely puts the entire process in chaos.Startups don't need more leads. They need better leads.They need the leads that are the most likely to close within 30 days.They need the leads that are going to generate the highest ACV.So how can a startup go about getting all of these ideal leads for the goals they need to accomplish?This is what Sean would call the Perfect Customer Profile.To begin developing this, you could:Go into your CRM and identify everyone that has bought from you.Begin to identify commonalities among those buyers.Take those commonalities and set it against your entire database and start tracking who else has those commonalities.Begin to understand what features you can identify in prospects that could be able to trigger a sale.Then focus all of your sales efforts on that data set that is most likely to become a buyer.This whole process is called building a Propensity Model.The whole idea is that instead of focusing on more leads, you are only focusing on the better leads, so narrow your database down to 1000 of your best leads.Sean suggests targeting these better leads on a smaller level. These leads do not get the spray and pray marketing that gets blasted to the rest of the world.Nurturing these leads comes in many forms, but Sean has had the most success with the following methods:EmailPhone CallsSocial MediaVideo from a tool like Video CardSend a specific and targeted physical giftIf whoever you want to target could have a $30K ACV, then it's ok to spend $1K targeting them.Using this method, Sean was able to get MRR from $10K to $30K and increased close rates to 50%.Because everyone is inundated with more touch points and communications points than ever, the people who end up closing business are the people who end up being creative and thinking further outside the box.The best part about this whole concept of Propensity Modeling and then following up with your 1000 best leads can be set up with automation using tools like Salesforce and integrated tools.Being able to do this in a very personalized way at scale is the magic that can truly change your trajectory.When it's all said and done, you've basically automated your entire SDR process, and then you'd have your ADR or BDR just sort of co-pilot the lead through the entire process.When you follow this process, your conversion rates will go through the roof because you are targeting better, you are following up in a more effective way, which means you will close more sales!The biggest mistakes that companies make when trying to go from Series A, to Series B, to Series C are:Not properly defining product market fitNot having someone be your Chief Devil's Advocate to tell the Founder when they are wrong.Thinking your total addressable market is everybody.Not giving your product the Mom Test.Investing too much in top of funnel.Not moving enough people from top of funnel to end of funnel.Not focusing on having a high conversion rate.Not having the right leadership at the beginning. Just because someone is good at sales doesn't mean they should be your Chief Revenue Officer.On the marketing side of things, some of the biggest mistakes made are:Not adopting industry best practices.SaaS companies still selling perpetual licenses.Not moving towards modern marketing.Change happens slowly inside the Fortune 1000.Connect with Sean on LinkedInNeed help scaling your revenue? Apply to work with Ryan here.

Unthinkable with Jay Acunzo
The Thing About Art | One-Shot #10

Unthinkable with Jay Acunzo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 11:18


The word "art" is often misunderstood, especially by those who don't consider themselves artists. But make no mistake, if you're in the change business, you're in the art business. In this episode, a short but inspiring look at how.SHARE THE SHOW:Help others find Unthinkable in their favorite podcast player by sharing this link: https://pod.link/jaySUBSCRIBE TO THE NEWSLETTER:https://jayacunzo.com/newsletterEvery Friday, I send a new idea, story, or framework for crafting more resonant work to thousands of subscribers, ranging from entrepreneurs, freelancers, and independent creators, to marketers and leaders at brands like Adobe, Red Bull, Shopify, Salesforce, the BBC, Wistia, HubSpot, Drift, ProfitWell, a16z, and the New York Times.SPONSOR: THE JUICEDiscover the world's best and brightest thinking and resources for sales and marketing pros on The Juice. They're like the Spotify of B2B, with content playlists and suggestions based on your job title and level. Avoid the endless lead-gen forms, skip all the system-gamers found via Google searches, and browse the most useful and transformative ideas affecting your work, for free.Learn more at https://thejuicehq.comCONNECT WITH US ELSEWHERE:- Twitter: https://twitter.com/jayacunzo and https://twitter.com/UnthinkableShow- Instagram: https://instagram.com/jacunzo- LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/in/jayacunzo- Email: jay@unthinkablemedia.com PRODUCTION:- Creator, host, writer, and editor: Jay Acunzo - https://jayacunzo.com- Producer and researcher: Ilana Nevins - https://www.ilananevins.com ABOUT THE SHOW:Unthinkable is a storytelling podcast about creative people who break from conventional thinking to make what matters most. We're traveling the business world to learn how to create work that resonates — with powerful stories from makers, marketers, and leaders like the CEOs of Zoom and Patreon, execs from Adobe and Disney, and creators like writer Tim Urban, comedian Sarah Cooper, and photographer Chase Jarvis. From artisans to entrepreneurs, writers, designers, podcasters, video creators, and all the weird and wonderful nooks of the working world, we're meeting inspiring people to learn what we can do to resonate more deeply with the work we create.Listeners have called the show “This American Life for my work” with stories “as captivating as some of the best, like Malcolm Gladwell and Dan Carlin.”Thanks for listening and supporting Unthinkable!

Marketing Trends
Why Direct Mail is Coming Back with Dave Fink, CEO and Founder, Postie

Marketing Trends

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 51:13


Double-tap — or in some cases just tap — to like. Those little filled-in hearts and thumbs-up used to be the currency of marketing campaigns. How many did you get? Then bots disrupted, and the market for selling likes got out of control. Brands started wising up to the super high customer acquisition costs they were seeing in their marketing reports and they wanted to trim the fat, to know more about who was seeing what and for what reason? Passionate about intricate marketing details like these is Dave Fink the CEO & Founder of Postie. He's seen a lot of change in the social media marketing landscape in his times on the scene. “We were starting from an authentic place, which was a need for more control over our growth - beyond the behemoths that are social and search. Watching those channels take more and more power, and marketers lose more and more power over their growth trajectory, but not wanting to acquiesce and give up all of the technology and tools and data and measurement and predictability that comes from those channels.”The realization that social media marketing on Facebook was extremely volatile and based solely on large corporate algorithm decisions made by the tech giants sobered Dave into action to move away from relying on paid social media and into the physical mail sector. On Marketing Trends, hear more about how Dave built Postie into one of the most data-driven marketing platforms and how companies within the Fortune 500 are using Postie to level up its customer experience. All this next on Marketing Trends.  Main TakeawaysAdvantages of Direct Mail to Marketers: There is so much data and 100% of the possible market to be reached, physically with direct mail marketing. So much focus has been spent in recent years on tracking clicks and cookies and other digital marketing metrics that the cost of direct mail marketing has gone down and the effectiveness of it remains high.Generating Data for Direct Mail Campaigns: To be effective in direct mail campaigns you need a lot of data that can support predictive modeling and auto-optimization. All of this data can be fed to computers thereby increasing the effectiveness of machine learning. Direct mail in the modern era is about using data to micro-target the best possible consumer.Invest in having good mentors: The difference between business owners that have and utilize the wisdom to be gained from mentors is significant. Be aggressive and seek out the mentorships and curate those relationships, as it will be of great advantage to you. Key Quotes“We were starting from an authentic place, which was a need for more control over our growth - beyond the behemoths that are social and search. Watching those channels take more and more power, and marketers lose more and more power over their growth trajectory, but not wanting to acquiesce and give up all of the technology and tools and data and measurement and predictability that comes from those channels.” “We think about data and insights probably in two different buckets. The first bucket is direct mail. It's a channel that can provide big data, both first-party data, and third-party data for all sorts of miraculous things —  predictive modeling, auto-optimization. The same kind of characteristics that social has. You get better with bigger data and you get better with testing and insights. A core focus of Postie is big data and machine learning, The biggest product focus that we spend our time on is thinking about how to give all advertisers access to the same data and mathematical advantage that they get from other channels.”“We think about monster companies like Airbnb, Uber and Lyft -- those are still emerging brands, innovators, and disruptors -- then there's the Fortune 500 that almost always falls in the enterprise -- we service both sides. The other is, ‘Is this a brand that's currently invested in indirect mails as a core channel, or is the brand on the complete opposite of the spectrum?' Depending on what quadrant a prospect or a client falls in will determine how we engage with them and what the education process looks like and how we think about their trajectory in the direct mail channel.” “Think about direct mail as a very specific individualized channel. It's a part of your marketing mix. Those advertisers that I see taking advantage of it with the best performance, with the most scale, most control, are those that start not thinking about just ‘How do we make direct mail work?' But, ‘Who is our customer base? What are our core marketing objectives?' Then thinking about a holistic plan for attacking those goals and affecting the achievement of those goals positively. Direct Mail can be a high performance, highly scalable component, but it all starts with markers and understanding, and being honest with themselves around what they're looking to achieve both in the short term and the long term.” “Remember the days when Facebook advertising was all about building your fan page and buying likes? That wasn't that many years ago and at that time I was involved in many brands that had seven, in some cases, eight-figure annual budgets building monstrous fan pages and investing in even bigger budgets of in-house content creators to engage those fans through storytelling. Then Facebook decided to reach those fans, we're going to charge you. That was the warning sign.” “A start-up is a living breathing entity, and it's a journey, and there are good moments and bad moments, good days and bad days if you're in that bunker with someone else. As a co-founder, that's invaluable. One piece of advice is you've got to have multiple mentors and you have to invest in those relationships. The difference in people's careers that I've seen when they have had mentors versus when they don't have mentors, it's a night and day difference. BioA 15-year consumer-internet veteran Dave Fink, CEO & Founder of Postie, is a revenue-focused entrepreneur. With a passion for creating disruptive business models and unique monetization strategies, Dave focuses on discovering opportunities to drive rapid growth. His creative, yet data-driven approach to marketing and monetization has generated hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue for ad-tech, lead generation, and commerce companies. Over the last decade, Dave has launched and scaled over 20 consumer-internet businesses. During the early part of his career, he created performance-marketing platforms helping brands as diverse as Walt Disney World, Proctor & Gamble and The Gap adapt to the rapidly changing digital media strategies available in the internet world.At Intelligent Beauty, he incubated digital media and eCommerce brands targeting fashion, beauty & health verticals. While leading the monetization strategy at the celebrity-commerce company, BeachMint, Dave established the customer acquisition strategy that successfully launched consumer brands with celebrities including Kate Bosworth, Jessica Simpson, Rachel Bilson, and Mary- Kate and Ashley Olsen. At Science, Dave leads the marketing and monetization strategies, platforms, and teams to help the growing portfolio of businesses find a path to rapid growth and scale.---Marketing Trends podcast is brought to you by Salesforce. Discover marketing built on the world's number one CRM: Salesforce. Put your customer at the center of every interaction. Automate engagement with each customer. And build your marketing strategy around the entire customer journey. Salesforce. We bring marketing and engagement together. Learn more at salesforce.com/marketing. 

The Qualitalks Podcast
Things That Have to Change in GMP to Drive Success [Jerry Chapman]

The Qualitalks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 23:37


In this podcast, our guest is Jerry Chapman, a GMP expert with more than 40 years in the industry. Jerry and Yan talk about what has changed in pharma over the years and what has remained the same. He discusses the development of new courses as well as the importance of leadership training in the companies. Who is Jerry Chapman? Jerry Chapman is Senior GMP Quality Expert at Redica Systems. He brings over 40 years of experience in the pharma industry, including 31 years at Eli Lilly, where he worked in product development, biosynthetic human insulin manufacturing, and site and corporate quality. At Redica Systems, Jerry works with the machine learning and data science teams. They build computer models that examine enforcement actions and produce analyses the way an expert would in the past using hard copy documents and a highlighter. He is also an author of many articles detailing and analyzing current hot topics among the pharma industry, and international regulators appear on the Redica Systems Conference Spotlight page. Listening to the podcast, you will learn about: ● The Evolution of Pharma Industry ● FDA Training Requirements ● Required Skills in Quality Domain ● Why Generalists are a Bad Thing ● Better Methods for Training Experts and Leaders ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Watch or read the full podcast and read the article at www.podcast.qualistery.com/things-that-have-to-change-in-gmp-to-drive-success ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ This episode is Sponsored by Dot Compliance, the industry's first ready-to-use Quality Management Solution powered by the SalesForce platform. Implementation of a new eQMS has never been quicker nor easier. #Pharma #GMP #Pharmaceutical #Pharmaceuticalmanufacturing

Surf and Sales
S2E76 - LIVE Bonfire Session - Building a Successful SKO for Your Team

Surf and Sales

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 56:20


Joined by Chloe Stewart (CRO of Pilot.com), Niraj Kapur (Managing Director of Everybody Works in Sales), Belal Batrawy (Startup Advisor at DeathToFluff) and moderated by Tim Clarke (Senior Director of Marketing at Salesforce) we talk about:  To SKO or not to SKO? Are they always necessary? How can we redesign the structure of SKOs What's the key component of an SKO? *Hint* engagement.  How to bring engagement virtually or in-person and we dive deeper into popular opinions and some not-so-popular opinions on hosting events like this.

Demand Gen Visionaries
Your Website is an Always-On Billboard with 3-time CMO Keith Messick, SVP of Marketing at LaunchDarkly

Demand Gen Visionaries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 48:27


“[Our website does] both education and conversion and is the way we think about it, but it actually plays all of the classic roles. It plays as our billboard. It's our always-on asset. We have complete control over it, so we want it to be great.” - Keith Messick-----------Episode Timestamps:*(3:03) - Keith's first job in demand gen*(4:25) - LaunchDarkly explained *(6:14) - The Trust Tree*(7:36) - Keith's main marketing strategy*(9:45) - How Keith thinks about spreading marketing resources*(13:00) - Justifying ROI for building community*(15:40) - Rebrands and avoiding the nightmare*(21:46) - The Playbook and Keith's uncuttable budget items*(32:42) - How Keith thinks about his website*(36:16) - Customer marketing strategy and perspectives*(39:00) - A tactic that is fading away to be aware of *(42:25) - The Dust-up*(44:16) - Quick Hits SponsorDemand Gen Visionaries is brought to you by Qualified.com, the #1 Conversational Marketing platform for companies that use Salesforce and the secret weapon for Demand Gen pros. The world's leading enterprise brands trust Qualified to instantly meet with buyers, right on their website, and maximize sales pipeline. Visit Qualified.com to learn more. LinksConnect with Keith on LinkedInFollow Keith on TwitterLaunchDarkly is hiring! Follow Ian on TwitterConnect with Ian on LinkedInwww.caspianstudios.com

Immigration Law for Tech Startups
093: Recruiting with Beth Scheer

Immigration Law for Tech Startups

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 34:14


In this week's Immigration Law for Tech Startups podcast, I'm speaking with Beth Scheer, who has an illustrious background in recruiting and HR with her time at Salesforce and Google. For the last six and a half years, she has been at Homebrew, an amazing VC that focuses on mission-driven founders solving large and urgent problems at the seed stage. They have over 70 companies in their portfolio, including some in Canada and Brazil.    Beth's role is to teach her founders how to fish. She provides counsel and advises their portfolio companies on everything under the talent umbrella. Today, Beth shares some of her insights on how she educates founders on strategies related to recruiting and compensation, sourcing, the interview process, and diversity and inclusion.    Please share this episode with companies, HR and recruiting professionals, startup founders, international talent, or anyone who can benefit from it. Sign up for the Alcorn monthly newsletter to receive the latest immigration news and issues. Reach out to us if we can help you determine the best immigration options for yourself, your company, your employees or prospective employees, or your family whether in the U.S. or abroad. In this episode, you'll hear about: What attracts people to early-stage startups Some challenges startups try to overcome in the recruiting process Investing in a sourcing tool and an applicant tracking system Best practices for attracting and retaining talent Diversity & inclusion and international hiring trends Tips to avoid recruiting missteps   Don't miss my upcoming conversations with top Silicon Valley venture capitalists, startup founders, professors, futurists, and thought leaders on Immigration Law for Tech Startups. Subscribe to this podcast here or on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or whatever your favorite platform is. As always, we welcome your rating and review of this podcast. We appreciate your feedback! Resources: www.homebrew.co   Alcorn Immigration Law: Subscribe to the monthly Alcorn newsletter   Immigration Law for Tech Startups podcast: Episode 73: International Entrepreneur Parole is Back! Episode 81: The Engineers I'm Recruiting Want H-1B Transfers and Green Cards… What Do I Do? Episode 87: All the Ways to Get a Work Permit   Immigration Options for Talent, Investors, and Founders Immigration Law for Tech Startups eBook Extraordinary Ability Bootcamp course for best practices for securing the O-1A visa, EB-1A green card, or the EB-2 NIW (National Interest Waiver) green card—the top options for startup founders. Use promotion code ILTS for 20% off the enrollment fee.

Legends of Sales and Marketing
49. Marketing Legend Scott Holden, CMO ThoughtSpot

Legends of Sales and Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 59:57


Discover how an economics and philosophy major parlayed his passion and experience to lead instrumental marketing teams at Salesforce for seven years. Hear how Scott Holden, CMO of ThoughtSpot, balances creativity and data, harnesses the power of storytelling, and cultivates a growth mindset. Legends of Sales and Marketing is produced by People.ai.

This Week in Startups - Audio
How to manage customer relationships | Customer Basics with Salesforce's Tiffani Bova | E1306

This Week in Startups - Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 19:01


This Startup Basics is all about managing customer relationships. Tiffani Bova from Salesforce joins to talk about the ways startups can improve customer interactions, transforming one-time transactions to reoccurring relationships. Jason and Tiffani give practical tips better serve customers and keep them coming back.

Voices of Customer Experience
Dan Steinman: Customer Success is Vital to the Consumption Model - S8E6

Voices of Customer Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 41:11


On this episode, we talked to Chief Customer Evangelist at Gainsight, Dan Steinman. Dan has been deeply involved in the field of Customer Success before the phrase was coined by Salesforce, then adopted by virtually every major business in the world. He's seen business models shift over the years, from the subscription model to the newer consumption model, and explains how CS has been vital to each of them.

Retail Remix
How Your Loyalty Program Can Unlock First- and Zero-Party Data

Retail Remix

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 40:36


The elimination of cookies is going to make it essentially impossible for retailers to get the third-party data they need to fuel their personalization initiatives. But with the right methods, your loyalty program can save the day!   During this episode of Retail Remix, Alicia Esposito sits down with Rob Garf and Natasha Janic of Salesforce to discuss all of the major shifts happening in the marketing space, including Apple's changing privacy guidelines and Google's removal of third-party cookie tracking, and how that drives major data in loyalty programs. Specifically, they dig into:    The value of zero- and first-party data and how to collect it across channels;   New ways to create value and a mutually beneficial relationship with consumers;   Recommendations (and requirements) for building trust and transparency around data collection practices; and   How to power “data democratization” across the organization, including in stores.   RELATED LINKS  Learn more about Salesforce  Get more insights on how to improve loyalty program performance   

PreSales Podcast by PreSales Collective
74. Cultivating Change in Your PreSales Org w/Todd Janzen

PreSales Podcast by PreSales Collective

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 40:34


On the PreSales Podcast, James Kaikis and Todd Janzen connect on the topic "Cultivating Change in Your PreSales Org". Todd, Global Vice President Solution Engineering, Q Branch at Salesforce, talks about how PreSales Leaders need to start taking charge and implementing change. We can no longer stand around and wait for things to be handed to us. Because this role is looked at as a “do it all”, sometimes we lose sight of what really matters: revenue. We're too busy digging this trench with our hands to fix the spark plugs in the excavator.

Stay Paid - A Sales and Marketing Podcast
291 - How a People-First Attitude Creates Business Success (with Scott Griffin)

Stay Paid - A Sales and Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 34:44


Scott Griffin is the founder and CEO of Scott Griffin Financial, a mortgage brokerage in Los Angeles. Scott has been a past president of the California Association of Mortgage Professionals, a television host and personality, and a guest on programs such as CNBC and Bloomberg TV. Listen to his interview and discover Scott's joyful approach to life, business, success, and helping clients achieve their “want.” And don't forget to check out the show notes for more in-depth information and added details not included in the episode. Visit www.staypaidpodcast.com.   Connect | Resources Call Scott at 818-20-SCOTT [72688] or visit his website: scottgriffin.com

The RAG Podcast - Recruitment Agency Growth Podcast
Season 5 | Ep 2 - Leo Harrison MBA on growing Chapter 2 from 0-33 staff in a Global Pandemic without ever working in the Recruitment Industry!

The RAG Podcast - Recruitment Agency Growth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 63:40


On this weeks episode of The RAG Podcast Live, I will be joined by a friend, client and mentor -https://www.linkedin.com/in/ACoAAADrX0cBGlsBI_MjOKy4WhaXx4Mt3zl430I ( Leo Harrison MBA) Leo is one of the smartest guys I have ever had the pleasure to meet Leo foundedhttps://www.linkedin.com/company/chapter2-agency/ ( Chapter 2) in Jan 2020 and after an obvious slow start, they are now one of the fastest-growing recruitment brands in the world But this isn't Leo's first venture, he was a founding member of the team at OLIVER, a Marketing Agency that builds in-house teams During his time in the business, he helped shape the growth to over 2000 employees! An entrepreneur, husband, and father - Leo has had to build successful habits to manage all areas of his life! --- Thank you to our brand new sponsor Volcanic.com - the best in class recruitment website provider delivering websites that look good and perform even better. Over 1800 recruitment websites globally, they supply 30% of the top 100 UK recruiters and integrate with our partners for efficiency, including Access Recruitment CRM, Access Profile, Access RDB, Broadbean, Logic Melon, Bullhorn, Salesforce, Idibu and more Perfect for start up, scale up and enterprise recruitment businesses Landing page is here: https://www.volcanic.com/hoxo (Hoxo · Volcanic) Volcanic is offering RAG listeners an MOT of their current site – landing page is here (and embedded on the above page) https://pages.theaccessgroup.com/FY22-P04-REC-WEB-BOF-Hoxo-Volcanic-Podcast-MOT-Partnership_LP.html (The Access Group) About the MOT: A visual inspection undertaken by one of our senior website professionals in the business of your current site, analyse performance and identify areas for improvement. Leverage Volcanic's many years' expertise in designing, developing, and delivering recruitment websites to identify how your current site can be improved.  Request your FREE, personalised visual 'MOT' website health check including an overview of your: - candidate attractiveness - client engagement abilities - brand-building capabilities - and more.  This applies to any recruitment website. http://www.volcanic.com/hoxo (www.volcanic.com/hoxo) --- Thanks to our consistent sponsor from Season 4 - District 4 Join the Recruitment Startup Experts at District4 for this exciting 5-day challenge “So you want to start your own recruitment business?” Over 5 days you will explore your why, your vision, your financials, your market and put together a business plan. This challenge is for experienced recruiters who have thought about going it alone and want to explore it at a deeper level. At the end of the challenge you will either be raring to go and start your business or have decided that it is not for you. Want to make 2022 the year that you finally take action? Join in from Mon 8th November to Friday 12th November 2021 and explore what being a recruitment business owner could mean for you.   The link to join the challenge is https://growyourrecruitmentbusinessevent.vipmembervault.com/products/courses/view/1110290 (https://growyourrecruitmentbusinessevent.vipmembervault.com/products/courses/view/1110290)

CPQ Podcast
CPQ Hot Topics Fall 2021

CPQ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 18:50


In this episode Frank Sohn provides some short notes about recent Mergers & Acquisitions in the CPQ space, about the current hiring market, payment integrations, pricing capabilities, Services CPQ, Subscriptions and more.  This episode provides a short, high-level impression of what we provide regularly with a CPQ Circle Subscription. Take a listen and judge for yourself. If interested to learn send an email to Frank.Sohn@NovusCPQ.com

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney
#267 Liz Wiseman- A Leader's Guide to Taking Action, Adapting & Multiplying Your Impact

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 61:21


Today Sean is joined by Liz Wiseman was first on episode #56 of What Got You There. Liz is A former executive at Oracle, she worked over the course of 17 years as the Vice President of Oracle University. Currently Liz  is the President of The Wiseman Group, a leadership research and development firm with clients including -Apple, Disney, Facebook, Nike, Salesforce.com, and Twitter. Liz has been listed on the Thinkers50 ranking and named as one of the top 10 leadership thinkers in the world. On this episode she talks about  her new book IMPACT PLAYERS: How to Take the Lead, Play Bigger, and Multiply Your Impact. IMPACT PLAYERS will provide a much-needed playbook that will give rise to important conversations this fall about how to recognize and develop talent—within oneself, a team, and across an entire company culture. Watch on YouTube Transcript  Subscribe to my Momentum Monday Newsletter Connect with us! Whatgotyouthere Eight sleep is revolutionizing what a great night of sleep means. Receive $150 off by using code Sean at checkout or go to eightsleep.com/Sean. NuSkool Snacks Collagen Protein Bars https://nuskoolsnacks.com/

The Jimmy Rex Show
#304 - Jarom Dastrup - Close Friend Of Jimmy's + CEO Of Touchpoints Gets Vulnerable About Creating A Beautiful Life

The Jimmy Rex Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 49:59


Guest Bio:My experience includes extensive engagement with Executives and business professionals within client organizations and I have successfully leveraged key talent and innovative marketing and sales strategies to expand the global footprint of numerous companies.In my most recent role, I was the Senior VP of Global Sales with Zija International, where I held positions of increasing complexity. Earlier experience includes a Vice President of Sales role with Nuspera International and a Client Relations Manager role with the Veritas Investment Group.Some of my qualities and achievements include:- Drove new business development and revenue growth in established and start-up environments.- Created the Zija International vision for new product launches and expanded the Company presence in Europeand North America.- Engaged across functions to develop effective strategies and drove collaboration at team and organizational level.- Managed Sales and Marketing Representatives in the Jalandhar India Office of Nuspera International, organizedseminars to educate Physicians, and built strategic relationships to facilitate distribution throughout IndiaI hold a Bachelor of Science in Business Management, which is supported by an excellent working knowledge of Salesforce and Microsoft Office Suite.

Good Day, Sir! Show
Too Many Commits

Good Day, Sir! Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 89:47


In this episode, we discuss our Dreamforce reactions, rumors about a CEO transition, being able to read code with an open mind, proposed changes to Chrome's developer tools message filtering, and tips for git commits.

Marketing Trends
Art as An Asset Class with Masterworks' Executive, Michael Wenner

Marketing Trends

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 40:20


There are few things in life that are not volatile. The stock market rises and falls, much like a pendulum swinging from left to right. Crypto is viewed as a rocket ship, but it's returns remain mostly inconsistent, and the housing market has seen its fair share of crashes over the years. But if you're looking for one asset class that bucks the trend when it comes to volatility, fine art might just be it.For centuries art has been seen as an avenue for the rich and famous to flex their wealth, but Masterworks believes it's business model of allowing everyday consumers to invest in multi-billion dollar pieces of art, is shattering that glass ceiling and democratizing art for all.“We consider ourselves fiduciaries or financial advisors. We're doing that because art is a very confusing and brand new asset class. We're the only ones enabling access to this $1.7 trillion market. From a suitability standpoint, to let someone Yolo their life savings into a Banksy is not something that we want our customers to do. We don't think it makes sense for someone that has a $5 million retirement portfolio to put in a hundred dollars. So we'll tell that person, just keep your money; keep the cash; put it in stocks. So we're really getting people, not only to understand what is art as an asset class, why is art important, but to make sure they're investing responsibly and investing a part of their portfolio, that actually makes sense.”Michael Wenner is VP of Marketing and Director of Business Development at Masterworks, a platform that lets everyday consumers invest in pieces of art such as Banksy, Kaws, and Basquiat. Michael joined me on this episode of Marketing Trends to discuss how Masterworks is using centuries of data to its advantage to not just identify which pieces of art the company invests in, but also why they are opening that data up to everyone. Michael also dives into why he is bullish on content marketing, and how Masterworks views itself more as a financial institution rather than an art gallery.  Enjoy this episode.Main TakeawaysData Strategy: When you need to get the attention of your prospective audience in a big way, you need to offer them something that is useful to them. Creating a large set of data about your field or industry that you can leverage to engage clients and leave a good impression with them is a great way to make a splash. Marketing a new asset class: Education is the keystone of grounding a good marketing campaign for a product or service that doesn't have a market yet. You've got to get creative and think about what you can do to bring value to your potential consumers.Content Marketing Doesn't Work: There is an argument to be made that annoying your customers, and prospective customers with an array of content emails, that can trigger bounce rates to go up, is not worth that loss. Those email addresses represent dollars and you should take every opportunity you have in front of your customer to serve them with your products. The most effective approach can be that of brute-force. Be direct with your potential clients; do whatever it takes to get their emails.Key Quotes“We always talk about how Facebook it's such a great platform, that people have given so much information about themselves. LinkedIn is giving you much more relevant information. You can tell exactly how wealthy and how successful someone is. So we don't really do role-based targeting or job-based targeting, but it's really incredible that by what you're able to do by brute force. [Linkedin's] technology's obviously not as good as Facebook, but you can figure out how to set up targeting campaigns. You can get to the wealthiest, most successful people on earth. It's going to cost you, but if you can convince them it's the best way to do it.” “We consider ourselves fiduciaries or financial advisors. We're doing that because art is a very confusing and a brand new asset class. We're the only ones enabling access to this $1.7 trillion market. From a suitability standpoint, to let someone YOLO their life savings into a Banksy is not something that we want our customers to do. And we also don't think it makes sense for someone that has a $5 million retirement portfolio to put in a hundred dollars. So we'll tell that person, just keep your money; keep the cash; put it in stocks. So we're really getting people, not only to understand what is art as an asset class, why is art important, but to make sure they're investing responsibly and investing a part of their portfolio, that actually makes sense.”“Our data science team has been doing incredible things. We have the largest proprietary data set of art market returns. We took 50 years of art auction results that were all published physically in the Sotheby's and Christie's pamphlets. We had a team of about 25 interns go in and [enter], this piece of art was bought for this and then sold for this. And we created this huge database to bring it all together. No one else had done it because it's a pain [to do so].. So we created this database, and our data science team was then able to look at using A.I., all these different, fascinating insights, which artists markets are returning the best, which years within those artists markets, even which type of art. We were able to single out contemporary art, post-World War II art, coming from this time period. We're seeing that it has this type of returns.” “You look at is as art or it's a $1.7 trillion market. And until Masterworks, there was absolutely no way to invest in it. hose who did want to enter it,, who wanted to build a diversified portfolio would need tens of millions of dollars. You could buy one piece. And if that one piece went down in value,you'd spend a million dollars on it and you weren't diversified, it's not really a secure asset or a strategic asset class.” “Our goal is to educate people on art as an asset class. If people get excited about investing in art and they Google it, we're the first search result and we always will be. We are so happy to give our research away. We're working with other banks in investment platforms to educate them, give them all of our data, give them our price database, show them how different artists markets have different loss rates in different correlations, because we want to educate everyone. Not only are we getting new people into the asset class, but we're also growing it at the same time. We can actually have a huge impact on the market and we consider ourselves one of the top buyers in the art market.” “I used to do content marketing and I really disliked it. e just don't think that has any value. I'll tell you why: our user base is very interested in two things, diversity and returns. Diversity, meaning investment diversity diversification. So when we email them we want to give them those two things. We only email people with new investment offerings. We don't want to bug them. Something that's really important to us is our email list. So if we're sending content (which we have in the past, and that gives us higher unsubscribed rates.) We're just not going to do it. We think of our email list as currency. If we're going to do something to devalue our currency, we're not going to do it.““I see NFTs not having a similar impact. I do not believe NFTs are a strategic asset class. Strategic asset classes are ones that have been around for awhile. It can be part of a portfolio. NFTs have a false sense of scarcity. You're basically putting a JPEG on the blockchain and calling it scarce, even though you don't own any of the IP. I am short on NFTs.”. BioMichael Wenner is Vice President of Marketing and Director of Business Development at Masterworks. Michael began his career in finance doing sales and trading for five years. Near the end of this time, he started shifting towards doing more marketing, especially digital. He started a newsletter called MarketSnacks that was eventually acquired by Robinhood. Then he went to work in FinTech at YieldStreet before stepping over to Masterworks. To learn more, click here: {{URL of detail page on found on www.mission.org}}---Marketing Trends podcast is brought to you by Salesforce. Discover marketing built on the world's number one CRM: Salesforce. Put your customer at the center of every interaction. Automate engagement with each customer. And build your marketing strategy around the entire customer journey. Salesforce. We bring marketing and engagement together. Learn more at salesforce.com/marketing. 

The Marketing Book Podcast
353 Human Centered Communication by Ethan Beute

The Marketing Book Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 74:17


Human-Centered Communication: A Business Case Against Digital Pollution by Ethan Beute and Stephen Pacinelli About the Book: Digital pollution is the problem. Human-centered communication is the solution. We're spending more time than ever in virtual environments. That will only increase, as will the amount of noise we encounter there. The seemingly endless series of unwelcome digital distractions range from frustrating to dangerous. As individuals and businesses, we not only spend time and energy managing this digital pollution, we often create it. At risk are relationships and revenue. The only viable way forward is to be more thoughtful, intentional, and personal. Human-Centered Communication provides a philosophy and practice to help you connect in more meaningful and effective ways with prospects, customers, team members, and every stakeholder in your success. Learn to: Break through the noise and earn attention Build trust and create engagement Enhance your reputation with both people and algorithms The concepts and models in this book apply to any form or channel of communication, but human centricity favors video. More visual and emotional than faceless digital communication, video enhances tone, intent, subtlety, nuance, and meaning. Learn to be clearer and more confident on camera in live video calls, meetings, and presentations, as well as in recorded video emails, social messages, and text messages. The authors of the bestselling Rehumanize Your Business join with eleven industry-leading experts from companies like Salesforce, HubSpot, and RE/MAX to lead the growing conversation on leveraging human strengths in an increasingly digital world. The brightest future is tech-enabled, but authors Ethan Beute and Stephen Pacinelli show that it's also human-centered. The experts studied, interviewed, and featured: Jacco van der Kooij, Founder of Winning by Design Dan Hill, Ph.D., President of Sensory Logic Mathew Sweezey, Director of Market Strategy at Salesforce Julie Hansen, Creator of the Selling on Video Master Class Adam Contos, CEO of RE/MAX Lauren Bailey, Founder and President of Factor 8 and #GirlsClub Mario Martinez Jr, Founder and CEO of Vengreso Viveka von Rosen, Co-founder and Chief Visibility Officer at Vengreso Shep Hyken, Customer Service and Customer Experience Expert Morgan J Ingram, Director of Sales Execution at JB Sales Training Dan Tyre, sales executive and founding team member at HubSpot Among the themes addressed: Trust and relationships Communication and connection Service and value Text and video Noise and pollution Among the types of videos in which you'll become more confident and effective: Live, synchronous video meetings Recorded, asynchronous video messages Video calls and video presentations Video in emails and text messages Video in social feeds and social messages Video for specific individuals and large groups Video for known audiences and anonymous masses Video for prospects, customers, employees, and other stakeholders For immediate benefits and for long-term reputation, now is the time to get ahead of and stay ahead of ever-increasing digital noise and pollution - with Human-Centered Communication. About the Author: Ethan Beute is the Chief Evangelist at BombBomb a video email sales and marketing software platform, is the host of The Customer Experience Podcast, and co-author of Rehumanize Your Business: How Personal Videos Accelerate Sales and Improve Customer Experience (featured on episode 239 of The Marketing Book Podcast in 2019). Ethan has collected and told personal video success stories in hundreds of blog posts, in dozens of webinars, podcasts, and stage presentations, and in countless conversations. He's sent more than 12,000 video messages himself. Prior to joining BombBomb, he spent a dozen years leading marketing inside local television stations in Chicago, Grand Rapids, and Colorado Springs. And, interesting fact - his first real job out of college was driving a school bus for Microsoft! Click here for this episode's website page with the links mentioned during the interview... https://www.salesartillery.com/marketing-book-podcast/human-centered-communication-ethan-beute

Unthinkable with Jay Acunzo
Leaving Expertville

Unthinkable with Jay Acunzo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 57:15


So many of us focus on becoming an expert in our professional field. But what if instead, we wanted to become visionaries? Not THAT kind of visionary, mind you -- the over-hyped media machines that become the business world equivalents of the Kardashians. But instead, a type of useful, practical, attainable, and much-needed visionary. On this episode we begin to unpack what it means to be a visionary. With guidance from Andrew Davis, a speaker, author, and creator of the “Quest Matrix,” we begin to chart a path away from Expertville toward some new territory -- a place where we can resonate deeper in a world trending shallow, and yes, build our businesses and leave our legacies. That place? Visionary Town.Along the way, we hear from John Bonini, director of marketing at Databox, content marketing expert, and prolific side project creator who recently launched Some Good Content, a membership group that fosters engaging conversations and shares resources for marketers searching to create better content. John's on his own path toward becoming a visionary, driven by questions that, as Drew says, Google can't answer.But he's currently at a crossroads -- one we all face, too. What will he decide? What will YOU decide?QUEST MATRIX IMAGE: https://bit.ly/quest-matrix SHARE THE SHOW:Help others find Unthinkable in their favorite podcast player by sharing this link: https://pod.link/jay SUBSCRIBE TO THE NEWSLETTER:https://jayacunzo.com/newsletterEvery Friday, I send a new idea, story, or framework for crafting more resonant work to thousands of subscribers, ranging from entrepreneurs, freelancers, and independent creators, to marketers and leaders at brands like Adobe, Red Bull, Shopify, Salesforce, the BBC, Wistia, HubSpot, Drift, ProfitWell, a16z, and the New York Times. VOICES IN THIS EPISODE:John Bonini is a long-time content marketer, working for brands like IMPACT Branding and Design and the email software company Litmus as head of growth. He's now director of marketing at Databox, a startup based in Boston. John lives in Connecticut. John's also the former host of a podcast he launched, Louder Than Words (now defunct), and the owner of a membership and community group for marketers, Some Good Content, which is run on Patreon and a dedicated group website.Andrew Davis is a bestselling author and internationally acclaimed keynote speaker. Before building and selling a thriving digital marketing agency, Andrew produced for NBC's Today Show, worked for The Muppets in New York and wrote for Charles Kuralt. He's appeared in the New York Times, Forbes, the Wall Street Journal, and on NBC and the BBC. Davis has crafted documentary films and award-winning content for tiny start-ups and Fortune 500 brands. Recognized as one of the industry's "Jaw-Dropping Marketing Speakers," Andrew is a mainstay on global marketing influencer lists. Wherever he goes, Andrew Davis puts his infectious enthusiasm and magnetic speaking style to good use teaching business leaders how to grow their businesses, transform their cities, and leave their legacy. SPONSOR:The Juice is a new kind of media company (like the Spotify of B2B). Specifically, they serve sales and marketing professionals. By registering for free, users can find the most original, deeply resonant ideas and advice in sales and marketing -- things optimized for people, not algorithms. The Juice curates from tens of thousands of sources to find what's popular and also what's most customized to your specific job function and level. Browse the best and brightest thinking, find new sources of inspiration to follow, and create and share content playlists about specific topics that help your career and company grow. Learn more and sign up for free at https://thejuicehq.com CONNECT WITH US ELSEWHERE:- Twitter: https://twitter.com/jayacunzo and https://twitter.com/UnthinkableShow- Instagram: https://instagram.com/jacunzo- LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/in/jayacunzo- Email: jay@unthinkablemedia.com PRODUCTION:- Creator, host, writer, and editor: Jay Acunzo - https://jayacunzo.com- Producer and researcher: Ilana Nevins - https://www.ilananevins.com ABOUT THE SHOW:Unthinkable is a storytelling podcast about creative people who break from conventional thinking to make what matters most. We're traveling the business world to learn how to create work that resonates — with powerful stories from makers, marketers, and leaders like the CEOs of Zoom and Patreon, execs from Adobe and Disney, and creators like writer Tim Urban, comedian Sarah Cooper, and photographer Chase Jarvis. From artisans to entrepreneurs, writers, designers, podcasters, video creators, and all the weird and wonderful nooks of the working world, we're meeting inspiring people to learn what we can do to resonate more deeply with the work we create.Listeners have called the show “This American Life for my work” with stories “as captivating as some of the best, like Malcolm Gladwell and Dan Carlin.”Thanks for listening and supporting Unthinkable!

The Salesforce Admins Podcast
The New IdeaExchange with Scott Allan and Hannah Donovan

The Salesforce Admins Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 26:56


On today's episode of the Salesforce Admins Podcast, we've got two members of the Salesforce team: Scott Allan, Sr. Manager of Product Strategy, Customer & Market Insights, and Hannah Donovan, Product Management Specialist. We're checking in to find out what's new with the IdeaExchange and how they're both working hard to make it even cooler. […] The post The New IdeaExchange with Scott Allan and Hannah Donovan appeared first on Salesforce Admins.

The Ivy Podcast
Conversation on Talent, Innovation & Career Development with COO of Salesforce – Archana Subramanian

The Ivy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 29:31


Archana Subramanian, celebrating her tenth year at Salesforce this year, serves as the COO for the Australia/New Zealand and ASEAN […]

Stay Paid - A Sales and Marketing Podcast
290 - 6 Small Business Holiday Marketing Ideas That Build Relationships

Stay Paid - A Sales and Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 14:23


The holidays are fast approaching, so it's time to get your holiday marketing in order! Now is the perfect time to give thanks, show your appreciation, and strengthen the relationships you have with your customers and clients. There is no season more important to the success of your business than the end-of-year holiday season, so we're sharing useful tips to help you get connected this year. And don't forget to check out the show notes for more in-depth information and added details not included in the episode. Visit www.staypaidpodcast.com.

Deliberate Freelancer
#116: How to Create Case Studies to Land New Clients, with Emma Siemasko

Deliberate Freelancer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 34:20


Today's guest is Emma Siemasko, the founder of Stories By Us, a content marketing business. Emma, who lives in San Jose, California, also offers freelance writing coach and is co-host of the Freelance Writing Coach podcast.  Emma has been a solopreneur for six years. She is an expert on writing case studies to promote our businesses. She created the DIY Case Study Kit and has created dozens of case studies and customer stories for tech companies and solopreneurs. Emma's clients include Figma, Grammarly and Salesforce. A case study is “the story of a customer's transformation because they used your product or services.” Case studies go beyond testimonials and LinkedIn recommendations. Case studies allow you to get more specific about what it was like to work with you, plus you can share results. Melanie thinks of case studies as being sprinkled around solopreneurs' websites. But there are several ways you can use case studies. Case studies can be emailed as pdfs as part of your sales pitch or during onboarding. You can also pull out a quote from a case study and post it as a testimonial on your website. When choosing which clients to write case studies about, you may want to develop a case study for each one of the services you offer or each one of the niches/industries you cover. Your case study should tell a great story. This includes sharing your customer's challenge, how you solved it and the results. The best case studies require getting a client's permission and interviewing them about the relationship and project. Have a good set of questions written down. But if you feel uncomfortable or awkward doing that interview, you can outsource the interview part. Once you write the case study, send it to your client for review. Emma explains how to write a case study if you're “only” writing an article or doing a straightforward project that doesn't seem to lend itself to case studies at first—or you aren't privy to metrics. Results don't have to be metrics. Results can be how you made their job easier and what you were like to work with. Be creative in how you think about results. What was the value of working with you? Emma also talks about the nitty-gritty details: length, format, design.   Biz Bite: Use minimal viable systems. The Bookshelf: “Paradise: One Town's Struggle to Survive an American Wildfire” by Lizzie Johnson   Resources: Emma's Go-To Case Study Interview Questions   Case study examples: The Core Centers How NFI Used WorkStep Retain to Improve Frontline Retention How Laura Got a 711% Return on Her Ad Spend How Kira Hug Helped Business By Design Drive Almost $500,000 in One Launch How Weebly Saved “a Million” Hours on Content Production and Achieved a 3X ROI   Emma's website, Stories By Us Emma on Twitter Emma on LinkedIn Freelance Writing Coach podcast Emma's DIY Case Study Kit to purchase—use the Code PODCAST to get 20% off. Emma's Case Study Email Templates to purchase    

Millennial Momentum
258: From Addict To $100M In Total Sales w/ Ian Koniak

Millennial Momentum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 60:01


Ian Koniak is my guest this week with an unbelievable story. Ian spent 18 years in Enterprise sales at Ricoh and Salesforce, collectively selling over $100M in total revenue. He has an incredible story of overcoming alcohol & drug addiction and come out as a better man on the other side. Ian is currently running his own personal and team sales coaching business, which I'd highly encourage you all to check out. In this conversation, we discussed: How Ian got into sales His problems with drugs and alcohol and how he overcame that Selling $100M and the story behind his biggest sale ever (Over $10M...) His advice for work-life balance and building a family And much more... This podcast is brought to you by Postal.io, A Curated Experience Marketing Platform that Helps You Cut Through the Noise. If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really makes a difference in helping to grow this show and find the best guests possible for you. Follow The Podcast: Apple/Spotify: Millennial Sales Twitter: @TommyTahoe Instagram: @TommyTahoe YouTube: TommyTahoe Website: Millennialmomentum.net

Handle with Care:  Empathy at Work
Empathy and Connection for Start-ups: an interview with Selfless.ly

Handle with Care: Empathy at Work

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 50:39


- Joshua Driver And so it's always been confusing to me why startups don't think about their culture from day one. And because we spend so much of our wake time at work, especially on our stage and the positive vibes or feelings you get out of helping others or contributing to the betterment of your community or society or making a difference for somebody else is such an important experience I think everybody should have,   INTRO   Why aren't we focusing on culture from Day 1?  Today, we look at building connection in the world of start-ups.  My guests are Josh Driver and Zach Rodenbarger from Selfless.ly.  They have a lot to say about how to build connection AND their technology platform is also a platform for companies to give back, so this is like a double-impact interview.    Zach and Josh's origin story begins just before the pandemic, launching their platform with high hopes and ideals into a pretty brutal business environment.    They are talking about how they sustained connection, built their company, and expanded the scope of influence in the midst of the dual pressures of start-up life and a bruising global pandemic.  As a bit of a teaser, you will hear about the importance of taking a walk, how “hangry” can get in the way of communication, and why Nerf guns could be a good idea for your office culture.    Zach and Josh are both tech guys who are from the same Indiana town of Valparaiso.  The met in 2018, committed to the concept of building a platform where companies and individuals can give not just money but time and effort to support causes that matter.  The website describes the platform memorably:  “Selfless.ly is a unique company that was designed by selfless people to help the world become a better place.”     - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes I'd love to hear from both of you. Why do you think that that is even an important conversation to be having? And how would you define empathy work to me.   - Zach Rodenbarger There's a few tangible examples.   That is Zach Rodenbarger, the COO of Selfless.ly   - Zach Rodenbarger Sometimes in our interactions, Josh will come in or I'll come in and we'll have something and go back and forth. And then one of us will say, do you need to go for a walk?   - Zach Rodenbarger And I was like.   - Zach Rodenbarger Yes, I need to go for a walk. I need a little fresh air, you. And maybe that's just because we've been at our computers for a couple of hours or longer and need to have take a pause and have a step back. And so we've had that over the year, especially when we're working hard and looking at new timelines and goals and things. And I know I've needed a walk or two here and there.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes We had other good practices. Sometimes it's a walk. I also find that sometimes it's a snack. I have you eaten recent links to a snack?   - Joshua Driver Yes. We've encountered the snack situation as well. Yes. Hunger is a thing so much.   And this is Josh Driver, fellow-hangry sufferer and the Founder of Selfless.ly   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes That was like one of my biggest learning curves early on in my marriage. I I used to think it was just Luke. It's totally both of us be like, Is this really a thing, or am I just really hungry right now? And you can't know until you're no longer hungry, like, you can't even find out.   - Zach Rodenbarger I think that's a good follow up on empathy. It's probably easier to see in other people. And then when do we take that step back and look at ourselves and actually admit that? And I think that is really helpful to business partnership or even as we continue to onboard new employees, you know, thinking through, how am I coming across to others?   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes But also, do you put yourself in their shoes and how are they feeling and so kind of both well and hearing that it actually takes a foundation of some relationship and trust to be able to take someone suggestion to do something like, go for a walk. I can imagine that a less mature or self aware moments. Somebody being like, maybe even the way it could be delivered. Just go take a walk. Somebody being like, I don't need a walk. You need a walk? No, I'm just making a really good point.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes But to be able to be at a place where I imagine it takes some work get to that point.   - Zach Rodenbarger Absolutely.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes A lot of times I find with guests or people I get to work with those that really, like, are doing the work of promoting more human workplaces and more connection at work. There's an element that comes out of their own personal experience. So I would love to hear from both of you a time where meeting that connection and empathy at work was really important in your own personal story, so that could be giving it to someone or a time where you were like, I'm not. Okay. I need some support right now.   - Joshua Driver Yeah. I think when I left the startup space and went into a corporate job, I came into a workplace environment and culture that might have been a little hostile and toxic. Like, there is a big disconnect between the leadership and the teams and the mentality of you're lucky to have a job versus we're lucky to have you as an employee. I wasn't exactly realized yet. And I had noticed when I join the company in my role that there was a lot of hostile communication. People had segregated themselves on one side or another and coming into that since I had been startups for so long and been on the ground for creating that culture.   - Joshua Driver That was very new to me to be in the middle of this disconnect. And it taught me personally about how I want my next company to run and where I think we needed to head and be ego free and transparent and communicate in more of a we're all on the same level here. Like, don't view me as your boss. We're just jumping in together to fix an issue. And I think as far as feeling left out or where I really could have used some support was when my first full time job was as an EMT here, then wished hospital and going through some of the things for the first time and all the trauma there.   - Joshua Driver There's no debrief or support. I think it's better now than it was, but you kind of had to process and cope individually with some of the things that you would see. And so that was really difficult for me to overcome at times when you have to process seeing the such negative things at times.   - Joshua Driver Quite frankly, like volunteering someplace and getting the I feel like I'm making a positive difference outside of the trauma of emergency medicine was a big driving factor. A lot of my coworkers and stuff would turn to substance abuse and other things sometimes, but I was fortunate enough to have a good support system, whether it was my family or friend group to where if things were really getting rough, that somebody would jump in and say, hey, let's catch up or reconnect. And so I was lucky in that regard.   - Joshua Driver But a lot of first responders, unfortunately, don't have that type of network to help them with that.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Thank you for sharing that. And I imagine even as you talk about the importance of volunteering, that there's a through line to some of what you're currently doing.   - Joshua Driver Yeah.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Zach, how about for you?   - Zach Rodenbarger So for me, with thinking through empathy in my past experiences, we can look to even just in the early days of self asleep and thinking about, hey, we both took this leap to start something new. And then about six months later, COVID hits. And so how do we work through this time where everything just radically changed, where we just launched the company? We launched the company in January and February of 2020. And then a month later, radically different thinking through. How is my co founder feeling right now?   - Zach Rodenbarger How do I stay optimistic and pass that along to him and vice versa? We're both kind of feeling these challenges and seeing this real time, right that we had these ideas and projections and we're going to create group, volunteering outdoors, and we're going to invite people to these events and then that's not going to happen. And so how do we really think through and change that strategy? But also, how did I think through, you know, both of us leaving our corporate jobs to do this. And so losing that security and saying, okay, I understand that this is maybe something he's going through right now and the pressure he's going through.   - Zach Rodenbarger So how do I stay optimistic to then pass that along and vice versa? And that was really helpful during those times?   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Did you ever have days where you were both just like, really down in the dumps? It wasn't like one person could encourage the other. It was just both low, especially early on in that pandemic.   - Zach Rodenbarger For me, I think for the most part, one or the other would see that and feel that and maybe because we're both high empaths. So if Josh was down, I was like, I can't be or vice versa. He may have a different perspective, but I remember thinking that. And so even though it was a really tough day, this is what it's all about. And so I'll stay positive or vice versa. And he would look at me be like, this is when he needs to step up.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Yeah,   - Joshua Driver I can't remember specifically when we had those times. But I remember even if we were going to be talking to a specific person turning in, saying, I don't have an inmate today to have this conversation. Do you mind just taking this on your own and doing that? I remember a few times where we had that discussion where if we're both feeling challenged, which is actual, we there. See, I think there were a few times where we might have just said, let's just call it a day early and go for a walk or go get a slice of pizza or something and and get out of the office for a little bit or go to the Lake each like, I think within reason we would step up on behalf of each other where we needed to.   - Joshua Driver It was just not the perfect day. Just saying, alright, let's take a break in re energize and come back to it tomorrow.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes That can be so good. And it sounds like really, of course, of course, that would be a good thing to do. But it's amazing how hard sometimes it can feel in the moment, especially with the entrepreneurial churn and pressures and one's own expectations. So I acknowledge how important that can be and how like sometimes it can feel harder to do than it seems is a good job cutting.   - Joshua Driver I like to just get burn myself out trying to work on the issue at hand. Zach, does a really good job of cutting me off for like of a meter and saying, this is all the time we have for this. We need to move on. Otherwise, I'll sit down whatever whatever issue is at hand. So he does a good job of saving my own sanity.   - Zach Rodenbarger I definitely like to break tasks up into the smallest parts and pieces and just get something done for that day or something like that. And Josh definitely wants to power through and accomplish it all in one day.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Yeah, I am that trait, Josh. It makes me think there was a there was a friend that I had in College and we used to kind of like joke about his mindset. We would joke that Ben would break his whole day down into micro goals, and it always allowed him to feel good about himself because he would be like, I'm on even the little things. Like, I'm gonna walk through the quad more efficiently than ever before and talk to two people. And I used to think like, what a funny quirk about how Ben's mind works.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes But now I look and I'm like, man, Ben was probably just 15 years ahead of all of us in self awareness of like, oh, that's maybe a key to living like a more bounded and contented existence than the rest of us had a handle on at 22.   - Joshua Driver Yes, Zach is close to that, and I envy that very much because I don't have that level of organization and granularity that see and your friends have.   MUSICAL TRANSITION Building connection at work is important…and it can be hard to know where to start.  What can you do to support the mental health of your people, to care for them and keep them engaged in the midst of all of the pressures and disruption?  You don't have to figure it out on your own; let Handle with Care Consulting help.  With keynote options, certificate programs, and coaching sessions available, we have a solution to meet your needs and budget.  Sign up for a free consultation at lieselmertes.com.  Together, we can put empathy to work.    MUSICAL TRANSITION   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes I find in building connections with people, there are times where it feels really easy and natural and times where it's a lot more challenging. What are times in either of you or both of you can answer where building connection at work feels really easy for you. And why.   - Joshua Driver Interesting. I would say that I'm   - Joshua Driver I love to people watch, and I'm always interested in everybody's story. How did you get to where you are today? What experiences have you had? And so it's easy for me to get to know people because I'm just naturally just so curious about everyone's story.   - Zach Rodenbarger I find I have to be maybe a little more intentional to provide that space to connect. And maybe that even goes to our overall topic of empathy to take a second and say, okay, if I was coming in on the first day or the second week, how would I want to be treated? Because I think it's easy for me. And as I mentioned earlier, probably Josh, it's easy for us to just kind of put our heads down and work. And so taking that time and being giving that space as well to make the connection, even if it's at lunch time only or something.   - Zach Rodenbarger But at least you're very focused on allowing that space to chat and providing that because I know for me during the workplace, well, we'll chat later or something, but if you don't provide that space, then obviously it's harder to make that connection, especially in the first week, the first six months, and things like that and thinking, when would I want to have someone reach out to me whether they're a colleague, a boss, or even an intern can be anything.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Yeah. That reminds me of even a slide that I was showing yesterday and a talk that I was doing about imagination and empathy. I hear that a little bit of what you're saying, and although that doesn't always get you exactly to the right place, because you can't ever fully know what another person is wanting or experiencing, it oftentimes will move you closer. What would I want on my first day or first week? And then to be able to act out of that can really close what can sometimes seem like a big distance.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes You both kind of offered some things in your answer, but I'll ask it explicitly as well. What are sometimes we're building connection at work feels difficult.   - Joshua Driver I've started to embrace more of when I am feeling extroverted versus introverted and sometimes when I'm hyper focused on something in the distraction of having to communicate or interact can be frustrating because I need the focused time and especially with new employees coming on. You want to be available and transparent and present. And at our stage right now it's really difficult to be present with everything that we need to get done. And so making sure that I'm not coming off as disinterested is something that I always in the back of my mind.   - Joshua Driver I want to make sure that I'm not conveying because it's not true. But there are some times where I just want to get something done and want to be sequestered for a little bit.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Do you have yourself in moments like that, like needing to actively engage in self talk, even about things. So I'll get my hand like I have to think about my body language and moments like that of being like, oh, I need to show attention and care right now. I'm going to do something different. Like do you do mental pivots like that? And what do they look like?   - Joshua Driver Sometimes Zach and I have been together for so long now. I can tell with his expression where I've crossed the line of of being rational more. So there are certain triggers, I think too. And he'll say, yeah, you need to maybe just spend some time by yourself for a minute and go for a lock so I will replay a situation like that in my mind and try to think through. Alright, what did I say? Did I mean to come off this way or if I don't really came off a different way than I meant to trying to understand?   - Joshua Driver Like how did this person infer that this was what I was trying to say. And so that has been helpful to rethink the experience so that I try not to replicate that. Moving forward. I.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes I Imagine there's a line walk between replaying the experience and getting stuck in a never ending loop. How do you thread that needle?   - Joshua Driver Not. Well. I like to solve everything and have closure. So if there's still a difference of opinion, I like to try to really put the pressure on myself to get it resolved. And in some cases I think I don't look at difference of opinion is like who's going to win this fight and get their way? I think it's more from their background and their perspective. Is there some truth to it and allow that was Zach especially? There are some things that he's very passionate about and has a perspective that he really feels strongly.   - Joshua Driver And I'd like to think for the most part if he fully believes in something that I may not be so sure on and wants to go that I just trust him implicitly that it's the right thing and that he's very good at doing his research and looking at different aspects of things.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Well, and out of that foundation of relationship, you know what you can extend to them.   - Joshua Driver Yeah. I think we're a lot of co founders that are state right now. We don't have time to be working on every project together, be on every call together and make decisions together. And so I think if you have a co founder that you don't feel that you feel like you have to micromanage or be a part of every decision, then that's going to be a really difficult culture to scale. It's going to make your company really difficult to grow. And so everybody that we've hired and when Zach joined Selflessly is very clear.   - Joshua Driver I want the empowerment. I want to create the space for them to be empowered to make decisions that are best for a company and feel confident that they are able to execute on whatever task.   - Zach Rodenbarger Is this where I say the complete opposite?   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes This is a safe space.   - Zach Rodenbarger I've been trying to obviously likewise empowering each other. And we did used to be on most of the calls and get to feel how each is thinking. And so it did help in the first month to six months to be on a lot of the calls together or as he mentioned, in the same room even. And so I can overhear his call, whether he wants me to or not and understand kind of what he's thinking, the action maybe he would take or his thinking on that his rationalization, right.   - Zach Rodenbarger What would he be thinking in the same spot and so helpful to be able to, you know, have his perspective in in the back of my mind and probably vice versa from sharing that office for the first twelve months and everything. So that's been really good.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes I hear a lot of respect and self inquiry in what you both have said. And yet I imagine there's still moments where like on an emotional on a practical on an interpersonal level, you guys have missed and or hurt one another in your journey. What has making meaningful repairs looked like.   - Zach Rodenbarger Nerf guns. Yeah. I think for one of my birthday, Josh got a couple of Nerf guns for me, and so if we need, we can shoot each other, but also part of the startup mentality, right? We wanted to bring a little bit of fun into the office, but if you needed, you could shoot someone from across the room. That's been one way.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes At least I'm totally thinking of my two sons right now, and the moment where Magnus turns to Moses, and he's like, okay, you can just hit me five times in the chest. That's fine. Just don't tell mom.   - Joshua Driver The biggest issue with that is that I'm a bad shot, so I'm not even like to get I like you. I can't make my points in the same way he can, because I tend to miss him completely, whereas he's really good at targeting me. So that was, in hindsight, not a great decision for a birthday gift start.   - Joshua Driver She has to make a lot of lessons learned.   - Joshua Driver Yeah, I would recommend that to other companies unless you're really good at aiming   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes either that or you want to devote part of your work day to target practice.   - Joshua Driver Yes.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Well, maybe you guys would like to expand on the I hear like some fun, some levity, like not taking yourself too seriously. Are there other things that you do to make repairs when you guys have gotten a little bit off?   - Joshua Driver I think that we find out if if we're having a conflict, that taking the time, like taking some space and cooling down is helpful, but also eventually, once we've had time to kind of process that situation. General, I think there was a time where I went and got a Blizzard or a box of dilly bars and dropped them off at the house. His house is like a don't let go of me. Ever don't leave me gift. I'm sorry. I was cantankerous and vice versa where I think we have a cool down moment and then we Zoom out and think about it there's.   - Joshua Driver There's always an apology and then some type of affirmation about the other one.   - Zach Rodenbarger I know I take a little more time sometimes to each person has their kind of respective way to do that and to cool down. And some people want to solve it. Same day some people take the night, take the weekend and so, you know, kind of learning the team, learning the other person and thinking through that, you know, how to talk through that and when and maybe even is more important if it's right away or give some space.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Have you guys ever had misses? Because I hear a little bit. You know, Josh, you said I'm gonna solve it now. Person. And Zach, I need a little bit more time. Did you guys have a learning curve initially and full disclosure. I have had to unlearn in my adult relationships that tendency and belief of like, if I can just say it to you four different times in four different ways, we can figure it out right now. Let's keep trying. And sometimes people are like, no, just shut up.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Hard lesson.   - Joshua Driver I have had to learn that in general, my husband is similar. Where his cool down? He needs to think for a little bit and take a break. I think maybe in our early days I went back to like, don't walk away. Let's figure this out so we can move on. But then realizing that he needs a little bit more time and understanding to from his perspective, like, if he doesn't want to talk about it, it's not going to help for me trying to pull it out of them either.   - Joshua Driver So I've learned to kind of let that go that we're not going to necessarily resolve it today. But I do continue to like to think that I prioritize that moving forward so that we can eventually get through whatever that wall is that hurdle.   - Zach Rodenbarger I think my learning is definitely around witnessing people and then witnessing yourself. But it's very rare to convince someone of your perspective in an argument. And if you're both on one side, an argument is not going to convince the other person to jump on your side. And so where is that our email leading or can you take a step back and then provide the reason why you're thinking this way? The reason why that person is thinking that way. It's just interesting to see how arguments heat up and things, and there's no side switching.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes It's so true. Yeah. It makes me think of even a yet unresolved conversations argument that my husband and I are having and to be like, yeah, nobody ever switches sides in the middle like nobody is in the heat of it or very, very, very, very, very like the 1% does it happen and then usually with a fair degree of resentment.   - Joshua Driver So.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Yes, that rings true.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes I'm struck that you are like building culture internally, but it selflessly is also like the product itself is something that is hopefully building culture and connection in the workplace. Tell me a little bit about how selflessly and volunteering and thinking outside of yourself is good for people in for workplaces.   - Joshua Driver But I think as we see culture being a normal discussion and given that we're still in a pandemic and becomes such a volatile polarizing environment in the world everywhere.   - Joshua Driver I always try to find, like silver linings or ways to maybe take take a moment to step away from the reality. And for me, my coping mechanism is to help others. And the reason why I've been able to spend that time to help others is because I've been very privileged and had the ability to do that where I understand that's not everybody's story coming out at our platform in understanding from not every company is a Lily or a Salesforce that has massive teams that work on these big the initiatives and have the resources.   - Joshua Driver There are a lot of companies I mean humans are humans, whether you work at a Fortune 50 company or a small startup.   - Joshua Driver And so it's always been confusing to me why startups don't think about their culture from day one. And because we spend so much of our wake time at work, especially on our stage and the positive vibes or feelings you get out of helping others or contributing to the betterment of your community or society or making a difference for somebody else is such an important experience.   - Joshua Driver I think everybody should have, but unfortunately, we work all the time or we have kids or other responsibilities that limit that time. So we set out to build selflessly so that companies didn't have to try to scrape the bottom the barrel to be able to provide purpose or the positive opportunities or the community engagement. We wanted to be a partner, so every company can experience the positive effects of being a crime brand or socially responsible organization, and that for a long time has only been afforded to gigantic organizations.   - Joshua Driver And so we wanted to be be the platform everyone can use. And so we have to be obviously an innovative with the pandemic and all these things that have changed the logistics on the nonprofit side. And unfortunately, a lot of this responsibility falls on nonprofits who are trying to keep their doors open and working on their mission. And so we took on the responsibility of of taking that work off of nonprofits and working on educating companies on how they can integrate philanthropy into normal business practices like employee engagement or team building or culture or heck, even the competitiveness of the sales Department.   - Joshua Driver How do we leverage a philanthropic component while a bunch of type as I go tell each other or something? And I think if there's always even a component of that philanthropic, if there's just even a small piece that goes back or gives back, I think that that's a really great thing to hard wire into a company's culture.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Zach, anything you want to add?   - Zach Rodenbarger Yeah, I think obviously what Josh said, one of my kind of tag lines, even as we reach out to teams and think about them is kind of selfless. Teams make the best teams. And when you're have employees that are thinking about each other and how to help each other and not always just focused on their task, that's obviously going to make a better team and environment and better teamwork. And so by thinking through, how do we make selfless employees that's really part of selflessly is to help those employees encourage those employees, not Joe's employees to find a volunteer opportunity or find a way to give back to support a cause they care about to have those matching donations from the company and actually use those.   - Zach Rodenbarger And so all of these nudges that we want to help create selfless employees that are thinking about others and not just themselves. And so when you think about others that leads to that teamwork, really, everyone creating a better environment. And so putting all that together with what Josh said is exciting, that this is something we get to work on each day.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Yeah. Well, my brain can't help but go to some sociological context. You know, I think in generations before, what you are tapping into is this, like human desire to be a part of something bigger, to be giving back, and that there was a while in the US where that was filled by a Church that was asking for a time, and hopefully they were giving towards meaningful things in that way. But that has become less and less central in American communities. There's still this impulse, but not quite the same.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes You know, there were good and bad things about that prior model, but there's not that same sort of, like regular outlet. And we're also more connected in theory, to the needs of the world. But through the lens of social media, which doesn't often lead to direct action. So, like emotional sensing, selves are out there like feeling all these things. But there's not this bridging, it towards action that feels like it builds up like a physical, real community that we're regularly a part of. And that selflessly kind of helps to bridge some of those, like sociological shifts with a meaningful offering.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Yeah.   - Joshua Driver I think without sounding like a sound bite, I feel philanthropy in the connection between a donor and a nonprofit or a company in its community or wherever this for profit and nonprofit connection is. For decades, we've given money to our Church, to the United Way, these intermediaries to trust that that's been utilized in the best way or is going towards the mission. And I think with technology improving and transparency, we've seen over time organizations that may not have made the best choices with the money that have come in and the the biggest concern is that this person had maybe a bad experience with this organization.   - Joshua Driver Are they going to find another one to support, or are they just going to stop supporting? And that's a big concern. And so now there's this big push for having more control over where people can donate and not necessarily have to be relegated to the confines of somebody's of an organization, agencies or whatever. But what that means is more transparency needs to be done on the nonprofit side. And the nonprofits don't have the resources necessarily to be able to give up regular updates about a campaign or whatever.   - Joshua Driver And so we've set up nonprofits to kind of fail from that regard. And then Conversely, I think we nonprofits. They're always fundraising. I've started my own nonprofit. We're always trying to raise more money so we can continue with our mission. And that leaves people out that may not have the liquidity or the resources to be able to participate financially, and we have to jump in. Or at least we take on some of the responsibility of how do we jump in and equate somebody skills and volunteer time to be worth just as much, if not more than them writing a check.   - Joshua Driver And so I think it's a generational shift about what philanthropy is starting to look like when we launch selflessly as we continue to grow selflessly. There's always people from the charitable sector that have their own perspective. You need to trust. This organization has been around for a century that they're just going to be doing the right thing. But we tend to grow because people want to break out of what the mold of philanthropy has been and want to have more control and be able to make more direct impact by us connecting those two sides and really always innovating on how to keep those two sides connected.   - Joshua Driver That means more resources go to the charitable sector. It just looks a little different. It's not an entry on a bank account. It might look like a donated product or a brainstorming session or some skilled services, but it can be helpful to breaking up some of the foundational infrastructure is a good thing, and I think we're along over you to really start shaking the tree and and changing what is no longer working. And that's a hard thing for people that have been in this space for a long time to necessarily want to accept.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes Yeah, something that I heard both of you say as a mark of differentiation that you have cultivated and enjoy is a sense of whimsy, and maybe not taking ourselves too seriously. Tell me how that shows up in selflessly.   - Joshua Driver Well, my office looks like a kid play room. I just have random stuff all over the place, and then we have a Bulldog in the office. But I think the way that we talk to people, the way that we put ourselves out there, we didn't win the virtual background thing when you made those for your background as your company logo and all the strategic stuff. We didn't do that. I put on a background of me standing at the podium on Jeopardy or just keeping it. I'm sure people for first impression at times like, who the hell is this guy?   - Joshua Driver But I think that if we were always trying to display, everything is running great. We don't have any problems. We're constantly growing and just a few months away from being the Jeff Bezos to this is really nobody believes that. First of all, instead of constantly say everything is working. There isn't one company that everything's running smoothly, but I think we personality, my personality. We would probably suppress a lot of who we are individually if we always had to worry about being a highlight reel and being being always on and calculated and putting on this this front.   - Joshua Driver And I think having more real conversations, joking around, making mistakes, owning them and moving on or being open about what we've messed up for, mistakes we've made, I think, is so much more valuable in creating a deeper connection with our staff, which our network, our investors and being open and also accepting of the feedback too.   Joshua Driver We don't want to be a vendor or a tech provider. We want to be a partner. And I think that us being vulnerable and embracing that were not perfect, I think, is important to set that expectation for whom we're interacting with.   - Zach Rodenbarger Absolutely. You want to be able to have fun with your team. You want your team to be able to have fun with customers and on those conversations. And you want people to look forward to having time together, whether it's on a Zoom call or in person, especially for your internal team. But then that customers start to feel that as well and enjoy the conversations with you. And maybe in the software, you start to see certain aspects and certain animations come across the screen or something like that.   - Zach Rodenbarger You're starting to see a little bit of other software as well, but we want to be have that enjoyment, especially if we're looking at company culture and encouraging people to get out and have some enjoyment and purpose and things like that. We want to come through in our mission and our software and allow really customers internal external everyone to start to see that, feel that and really enjoy the software and enjoy working with selflessly and working for selflessly.   - Liesel Mindrebo Mertes If listeners are intrigued about the platform, the mission, you guys in your story, where can they go to find out more about selflessly and how it can be used to build and increase the sense of connection at work?   - Joshua Driver Yeah.   - Joshua Driver Our website is Selflessly. I and our social media Tags or give selflessly on the Twitter and Facebook and Instagram and our email address the general email for Zach, it is Hello at Selflessly IO.   - Joshua Driver And.   - Joshua Driver We get all kinds of requests companies that want to become B Corps or our favorite messages or hey, I want to. We're a small company and we don't think that we can really make an impact. Can you show us how to do it like those are the things we really enjoy spending time with. Also, I think hearing from people that may want to start their own company or want to brainstorm. Sometimes we make time to have a coffee with a potential entrepreneur or give some feedback, help others where we can.   - Joshua Driver We'd love to hear from anybody who wants to reach out.   MUSICAL TRANSITION   Here are three key takeaways to build connection and care in the workplace…   Fun matters.From Nerf guns to dilly bar deliveries, introducing a little bit of levity, especially in tense and freighted situations, can be a game changer.  Where can you build some fun and some laughter into your office life? There is power in taking a break and thinking the best of the other person.You heard these two threads throughout the interview:  in offering a break or a walk to the other person, hoping and trusting that their moment of overwhelm is not their truest or best self.  This attention to the emotional temperature of a given situation is so important.  And I use it often in both my personal and professional interactions.  One way that people can move through their own disruption and overwhelm is by giving back to others.The act of moving beyond the constraints of your own situation, doing something positive for someone else, has all sorts of positive effects on the health of individuals and organizations.  If what you have heard today piques your interest, I encourage you to look up the good work that is going on at Sefless.ly.  More information about Zach, Josh, and the company can be found in the show notes.    OUTRO   To find out more about the work of Selfless.ly, visit https://selflessly.io

Raw Data By P3
Imke Feldmann

Raw Data By P3

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 75:37


Imke Feldmann is among the first few to have recognized the incredible value and potential of this thing called Power Pivot in Excel (which was the precursor to Power BI).  And did she ever run with it, launching quite the successful solo consultancy and training service!  She exemplifies the helpful nature of the data community through her blog, The BIccountant, where she shares her amazing Microsoft BI tool knowledge. Her background is in Finance and Accounting, but you'll quickly realize she knows a great deal more than just Finance and Accounting! Contact Imke: The BIccountant Imke's Twitter References in this Episode: Imke's Github MS Power BI Idea - Customizable Ribbon - Please Upvote :) MS Power BI Idea - Speed Up PQ By Breaking Refresh Chain - Please Upvote :) Episode Timeline: 3:00 - The value of outsourcing certain business functions, Imke's path to Power BI starts with Rob's blog, a multi-dimensional cube discussion breaks out! 19:45 - One of Power BI's strengths is collaboration, Imke LOVES her some Power Query and M and loves DAX not so much 33:45 - Imke has a BRILLIANT idea about how to improve Power Query and some other improvements that we'd like to see in PQ 52:30 -  Rob's VS code experience, how COVID has affected the consulting business, Staying solo vs growing a company and how Imke determines which clients she takes on Episode Transcript: Rob Collie (00:00:00): Hello friends. Today's guest is Imke Feldmann. We've been working for a long time, nearly a year to arrange the schedules to get her on the show, and I'm so glad that we finally managed to do it. For a moment, imagine that it's 2010, 2011, that era. During that timeframe, I felt not quite alone, but a member of a very slowly growing and small community of people who had glimpsed what Power Pivot could do. And for those of you who don't know what Power Pivot is, and that was the version of Power BI, the first version that was embedded only in Excel. And at the time, the way the community grew, we'll use a metaphor for this. Imagine that the community was a map of the world and the map is all dark, but slowly, you'd see these little dim lights lighting up like one over here in the UK, one in the Southwest corner of the United States, very faintly. Rob Collie (00:00:51): And these would be people who were just becoming aware of this thing, this Power Pivot thing, and you'd watch them. They'd sort of show up on the radar, very tentatively at first kind of dipping their toe, and then that light would get brighter, and brighter, and brighter over time, as they really leaned in, and they learned more and more, and they became more adept at it. And this was the way things went for a long time. And then in 2011, out of nowhere in Germany on the map, this light comes on at full intensity, brightly declaring itself as super talented and powerful. And that was what it felt like to come across Imke Feldmann. Rob Collie (00:01:27): Like all of our guests, there's a little bit of that accidental path in her career, but also a tremendous sense of being deliberate. When this stuff crossed her radar, she appreciated it immediately. And I didn't know this until this conversation, but she quit her corporate job in 2013, the same year that I founded P3 as a real company, and became a freelancer. So for eight plus years, she has been a full time Power BI professional. There truly aren't that many people who can say that in the world. Our conversation predictably wandered. At one point, we got pretty deep into the notion of M and Power Query and it's screaming need for more buttons on its ribbon. And Imke has some fantastic ideas on how they should be addressing that. Rob Collie (00:02:14): We also, of course, naturally talked about the differences between remaining a solo freelancer as she has, in contrast to the path that I chose, which is scaling up a consulting practice business. Along the way we reprised the old and completely pointless debate of DAX versus M, I even try to get Tom hooked on M as his new obsession. We'll see how well that goes. Most importantly though, it was just a tremendous pleasure to finally get to talk to Imke at length for the first time after all these years, we literally crossed paths 10 years ago. So it was a conversation 10 years in the making compress down to an hour and change. I hope you enjoy it as much as we did, so let's get into it. Announcer (00:02:56): Ladies and gentlemen, may I have your attention, please? Announcer (00:03:00): This is The Raw Data by P3 Adaptive podcast, with your host Rod Collie, and your cohost Thomas LaRock. Find out what the experts at P3 Adaptive can do for your business. Just go to P3adaptive.com. Raw Data by P3 Adaptive is data with the human element. Rob Collie (00:03:24): Welcome to the show Imke Feldmann. How are you today? Imke Feldmann (00:03:27): Thank you, Rob. Great. It's a great day here over in Germany. Rob Collie (00:03:30): We have been talking about doing this for the better part of a year. So I'm glad that we're landing the guest, Imke is here. I really appreciate you doing this. So why don't we start with the basics. What are you up to these days? What do you do for a living? Imke Feldmann (00:03:48): I have people building great Power BI solutions these days. Rob Collie (00:03:55): Ah, yes. Imke Feldmann (00:03:55): That's how I fill my days. Rob Collie (00:03:58): I hear that that's a good business. Imke Feldmann (00:03:58): Yeah, it is. Rob Collie (00:04:03): So, and your website is? Imke Feldmann (00:04:06): Thebiaccountant.com. Rob Collie (00:04:07): Is that what you are on Twitter as well? Imke Feldmann (00:04:08): Yes. That's also my Twitter handle theBIccountant without an A in the middle. I just replaced the A from accountant with a BI. Rob Collie (00:04:17): There you go. Imke Feldmann (00:04:18): Yeah. Rob Collie (00:04:18): That's right. So that means that I'm going to make a tremendous leap here, wait till you see these powers of observation and deduction. You must have an accounting background? Imke Feldmann (00:04:29): I do, yes. Rob Collie (00:04:30): See you look at that. That's why I make the money. Okay, let's start there, was accounting your first career out of school? Imke Feldmann (00:04:39): Yes. I went to university and studied some economics or business stuff there, they'll know it's translated into English. And then I worked as a business controller. After that, I took over a job to lead a bookkeeping departments or to work with an area where the numbers came from basically. And then after that, I worked as the finance director, where I was responsible for a whole bunch of areas, controlling bookkeeping, IT, HR, and production. So that was quite a job with a broad range of responsibilities. Rob Collie (00:05:18): So you mentioned, kind of slipped IT into that list, right? Imke Feldmann (00:05:23): Yeah. Rob Collie (00:05:23): There's all these things in that list of responsibilities that all seemed they belong together, right? Bookkeeping, accounting, control or finance, IT. We've run into this before, with actually a number of people, that a lot of times the accounting or finance function in a company kind of wins the job of IT by default. Imke Feldmann (00:05:45): Yeah. It seems quite common in Germany, at least I would say. Rob Collie (00:05:48): I get multiple examples, but one that I can absolutely point to is Trevor Hardy from the Canadian Football League, he is in accounting, accounting and finance. And just by default, well, that's close to computers. Imke Feldmann (00:06:00): Yes. Rob Collie (00:06:01): And so it just kind of pulls the IT function in. Now is that true at really large organizations in Germany or is it a mid market thing? Imke Feldmann (00:06:09): No I would say a mid market thing. Rob Collie (00:06:12): That's true here too. So when there isn't an IT org yet it ends up being, oftentimes it falls to the finance and accounting function. Hey, that's familiar. It's kind of funny when you think about it, but it's familiar. And isn't finance itself pretty different from accounting? How much of a leap is that? What was that transition like for you taking over the finance function as well? We tend to talk about these things, at least in the US, is like almost like completely separate functions at times. Imke Feldmann (00:06:43): It depends, but at least it had something to do with my former education, which wasn't the case with IT. So, I mean, of course on a certain management level, you are responsible for things that you're not necessarily familiar with in detail. You just have to manage the people that know the details and do the jobs for you. So that was not too big an issue I must admit. Rob Collie (00:07:10): My first job out of school was Microsoft, an organization of that size, I was hyper specialized in terms of what I did. At this company at P, we are nowhere near that scale, and there's a lot more of that multiple hat wearing. I've definitely been getting used to that over the last decade, the first decade plus of my career, not so much. Imke Feldmann (00:07:31): Yeah. That's interesting because I basically went completely the other way around. I see myself now as working as a technical specialist and as a freelancer, I don't have to manage any employees anymore. Rob Collie (00:07:47): Well, so now you wear all the hats? Imke Feldmann (00:07:49): Yes. In a certain way, yes. Rob Collie (00:07:51): Okay. There's no HR department necessarily, right, so it's just you. But marketing, sales, delivery, everything. Imke Feldmann (00:08:01): Yep, that's true. Yep. And when I first started, I tried to do everything by myself, but the test changed as well. So in the past I started to outsource more things, but to external companies, not internal staff. Rob Collie (00:08:17): So you're talking about outsourcing certain functions in your current business, is that correct? Imke Feldmann (00:08:22): Yes, yes. Rob Collie (00:08:22): So it's interesting, right? Even that comes with tremendous risk when you delegate a certain function to an outside party whose incentives and interests they are never going to be 100% aligned with yours. Even we have been taken for a ride multiple times by third-party consulting firms that we've hired to perform certain functions for us. Imke Feldmann (00:08:46): Oh, no I don't outsource and your services that I directly provide to my clients. Rob Collie (00:08:49): Oh, no, no. Imke Feldmann (00:08:50): No. Rob Collie (00:08:50): No, we don't either. But I'm saying for example, our Salesforce implementation for instance- Imke Feldmann (00:08:56): Okay, mm-hmm (affirmative). Rob Collie (00:08:57): ... Has been a tremendous money sink for us over the years. Where we're at is good, but the ROI on that spend has been pretty poor. It's really easy to throw a bunch of money at that and it just grinds and grinds and grinds. And so this contrast that I'm getting around to is really important because that's not what it's like to be a good Power BI consultant, right? You're not that kind of risk for your clients. But if you go out and hire out some sort of IT related services for example, like Salesforce development, we're exposed to that same sort of drag you out into the deep water and drown you business model, that's not how we operate. I'm pretty sure that's not how you operate either. And so anyway, when you start talking about outsourcing, I just thought, oh, we should probably talk about that. Have you outsourced anything for your own sort of back office? Imke Feldmann (00:09:52): Back office stuff, yeah. My blog, WordPress stuff, or computer stuff in the background. So security [inaudible 00:09:59] the stuff and things like that, things that are not my core, I hire consultants to help me out with things that I would formally Google, spend hours Googling with. Rob Collie (00:10:09): Yes. Imke Feldmann (00:10:10): Now I just hire consultants to do that. Or for example, for Power Automate, this is something that I wanted to learn and I saw the big potential for clients. And there I also did private training basically, or coaching, or how you called it, hire specialists. Rob Collie (00:10:27): To kind of getting you going? Imke Feldmann (00:10:29): Exactly, exactly. Rob Collie (00:10:30): And those things that you've outsourced for your back office, have there been any that felt like what I described you end up deep in the spend and deepen the project going, "What's going on here?" Imke Feldmann (00:10:41): I'm usually looking for freelancers on that. And I made quiet good experiences with it, I must say. Rob Collie (00:10:49): Well done. Well done. All right. So let's rewind a bit, we'll get to the point where you're in charge of the finance department, which of course includes IT. Imke Feldmann (00:10:58): Not necessarily so. I felt quite sad for the guys who I had to manage because I said, "Well, I'm really sorry, but you will hear a lot of questions from me, especially at the beginning of our journey," because I had to learn so much in order to be a good manager for them. So that was quite different situation compared to the management roles in finance that I had before, because there I had the impression that I knew something, but IT was basically blank. Rob Collie (00:11:30): I would imagine that that experience turned out to be very important, the good cross pollination, the exposure to the IT function and sort of like seeing it from their side of the table, how valuable is that turned out to be for your career? Imke Feldmann (00:11:45): I think it was a good learning and really interesting experience for me just to feel comfortable with saying that I have no clue and ask the people how things work and just feel relaxed about not being the expert in a certain area and just be open to ask, to get a general understanding of things. Rob Collie (00:12:09): That's definitely the way to do it, is to be honest and transparent and ask all the questions you need to do. It's easier said than done. I think a lot of people feel the need to bluff in those sorts of situations. And that usually comes back to haunt them, not always. Imke Feldmann (00:12:25): No, that's true. Rob Collie (00:12:27): Some people do get away with it, which is a little sad. So at what point did you discover Power BI? Imke Feldmann (00:12:35): I didn't discover Power BI, I discovered Power Pivot, for your blog of course. Rob Collie (00:12:41): Oh, really? Imke Feldmann (00:12:43): Yes, yes, yes, yes. I think it was in, must be 2011, something like that. Rob Collie (00:12:50): Early, yeah. Imke Feldmann (00:12:51): Yeah. Quite early. When I was building a multidimensional cube with a freelancer for our finance department, then I was just searching a bit what is possible, how we should approach this and things like that. So we started with multi-dimensional cube because that was something where I could find literature about and also find experts who could have me building that. But when doing so, I really liked the whole experience and it was a really excellent project that I liked very much. And so I just searched around in the internet and tried to find out what's going on in that area. And this is where I discovered your blog. Rob Collie (00:13:35): I have no idea. First of all, I had no idea that my old blog was where you first crossed paths with this. Imke Feldmann (00:13:42): I think [inaudible 00:13:43]. Rob Collie (00:13:44): And secondly, I had no idea that it was that early. I mean, I remember when you showed up on the radar, Scott [inaudible 00:13:51] had discovered your blog and said, "Hey, Rob, have you seen this? Have you seen what she is doing? She is amazing." That wasn't 2011, that was a little bit later. I don't remember when but... Imke Feldmann (00:14:06): No, I think we've met first. I think we met on the Mr. XR Forum on some crazy stuff I did there. I cannot even remember what that was, but I started blogging in 2015 and we definitely met before. Rob Collie (00:14:21): That's what it was. It was the forums. And Scott was the one that had stumbled upon what you were doing there and brought my attention to it. I was like, whoa. It was like... Imke Feldmann (00:14:34): That last really some crazy stuff. I think I was moving data models from one Excel file to another or something like that. Some crazy stuff with [inaudible 00:14:43] and so on. Rob Collie (00:14:44): You obviously remember a better than I do. But I just remember being jaw dropped, blown away, impressed, by what you were doing. And the thing is the world of Power Pivot interest at that point in time still seems so small. The community still seems so small that for you to emerge on our radar fully formed, already blowing our minds, that was the first thing we ever heard from you. That was a real outlier because usually the way the curve of awareness went with other members of the community is that like, you'd see something modest from them. And you'd sorta like witnessed their upward trajectory as they developed. Of course, you've continued to improve and learn and all of that since then. But as far as our experience of it, it was you just showed up already at the graduate level, just like where did she come from? So cool. So you said that you enjoyed the multi-dimensional cube project? Imke Feldmann (00:15:43): Mm-hmm (affirmative). Yes. I don't know MDX, but I totally enjoyed the project. So being able to build a reporting solution for my own company, basically then for the company I worked for, and doing it live with a consultant with a freelancer on my hand, discussing how things should look like and just seeing the thing form before my eyes and grow. And this was just such an enjoyable experience for me. Rob Collie (00:16:11): So the thing that's striking about that for me is, there's no doubt that the multi-dimensional product from Microsoft was a valuable product. It did good things. But I never have heard someone say that they really enjoyed the implementation process as a client, right? Imke Feldmann (00:16:31): Okay. Rob Collie (00:16:31): You had a freelancer doing the work. So something you said there really jumped out at me, it was, sort of like doing the project live. So the way that this worked traditionally, at least in the US, is the consultant would interview you about your requirements and write a big long requirements document and then disappear and go build a whole bunch of stuff and come back and show it to you, and it's completely not what anyone expected. It's almost like you're on completely different planets. Obviously, if you'd had that experience, you would not be saying that you enjoyed it. So there had to be something different about the way that you and that freelancer interacted. Do you remember what the workflow was like? Imke Feldmann (00:17:16): What we did is that we often met together and just looked at where we're at and what the next steps should be. And we definitely had specific targets in mind. So there were some reports that I had defined as a target, and around these reports I was aware that we needed something that a proper data model, because I also knew that I wanted to have some sort of a general set up that could be carried from Excel as well. So I knew about cube functions, and I knew that on one hand I needed these reports that had formerly been within our ERP system. Also, I wanted them to be in a separate solution that was under my control and independent from the ERP system. And on the other hand, I wanted some more. So I wanted the flexibility to be able to vary this data and for certain other purposes in the controlling department as well. So basically being able to do ad hoc analysis on it. Imke Feldmann (00:18:23): And we met often and I showed a certain interest in how the table logic was created. So I knew that the MDX was over my head at the time, but I showed a very strong interest in which table are created, how they relate to each other, and that was quite unusual. At least this is what the [inaudible 00:18:47] the freelancer told me. Rob Collie (00:18:49): I bet. Imke Feldmann (00:18:50): He said that he doesn't see that very often that clients showed this sort of interest. Rob Collie (00:18:56): Did he say, "Yeah. You really seem to be having fun with this. Most of my clients don't enjoy this." You said that you met very often, so were there times where he was writing MDX while you were in the room? Imke Feldmann (00:19:10): Sometimes yes, because I said, "Well, can we switch this a bit or make some changes?" And sometimes he said, "Well, I can try adjust now." Because he came over for one day or half a day, and then we spoke things through and defined further things. And if we were finishing early, he would just stay and do some coding there. But apart from that, he would work from home and do the big stuff. Rob Collie (00:19:37): OLAP originally it stands for online analytical processing, where online meant not batch, right? It meant you could ask a question and get the answer while you were still sitting there. Imke Feldmann (00:19:51): Okay. Oh, really? Rob Collie (00:19:53): That's what online meant. Imke Feldmann (00:19:54): It's interesting. Rob Collie (00:19:56): It basically meant almost like real time. It's a cousin of real time, that's what online meant at that point, as opposed to offline where you write a query and submit it and come back next week right? So that's what the online and OLAP comes from. Imke Feldmann (00:20:12): Oh, interesting. Rob Collie (00:20:13): We would pick a different terminology of OLAP were it invented today. So something interesting about, it sounds like your experience, and I did not anticipate drilling into your experience with multi-dimensional on this conversation, but I think it's really important is that at least some portion of that project that you sponsored and implemented with the freelancer, at least some portion of the work was similarly performed online. Meaning the two of you were sort of in real time communication as things evolved. And the old model and the vast majority of multidimensional solutions that have ever been built in the world, the MDX powered solutions, were built and an offline model, where the majority of the communication supposedly takes place in the form of a requirements document. Rob Collie (00:21:05): And that was a deeply, deeply, deeply flawed approach to the problem, that just doesn't actually work. So I guess it's not surprising to me that the one time I've ever heard someone say they really enjoyed that multi-dimensional project, that at least a portion of that multidimensional project was sort of almost like real-time collaboratively performed rather than completely asynchronous, right? I guess we want to be really geeky, we could say it was a synchronous model of communication as opposed to an asynchronous one. And Power BI really facilitates that kind of interaction. Imke Feldmann (00:21:41): Absolutely. Rob Collie (00:21:42): The reason why the MDX multi-dimensional model worked the way it did, or there was two reasons, one is a legitimate one on one of them is more cynical. So the legitimate reason is, is that it required reprocessing of the cube for every change, it's just too slow, right? The stakeholder, the business stakeholder doesn't typically have the time or the patience to sit there while the code's being written, because it's so long between even just implementing a formula change sometimes would be, well, we need to wait an hour. And so the attention span of the business person can't be held for good reason there, right? And so that sort of drove it into an asynchronous model. Rob Collie (00:22:23): The other reason is, is that that is asynchronous model turned out to be a really good business model for the consultants, because the fact that it didn't work meant that every project lasted forever. And so that's the cynical reason. But Power BI is not long delays. You change the measure formula, or you add an extra relationship, or heck even bringing in a new table, just a brand new table, bring it in, it wasn't even in the model, now it's in the model. End to end that can sometimes be measured in minutes or even seconds. And so you can retain engaged collaborative interest. Now it's not like you're always doing that, right? There's still room for offline asynchronous work in our business, but really critical portions of it can be performed the other way. And I think that makes a huge difference. Imke Feldmann (00:23:13): Yep. And that's what I like about it. So it's so great to be able to have, as a consultant, to perform really relatively large tasks without any further involvement of other people. Which, I mean, honestly, I don't call myself a team worker, not because I don't love other people also, but teamwork means you have to communicate with other people, make sure that they know what you're working on. So there are so many interfaces that have to be maintained if you're working with other people. And so I really laugh the way I work currently being able to deliver full solutions as a one woman show consultant. That is really a pleasure for me. That's really my preferred way of work, I must say. Because I can really focus on the things that have to be done and I'm able to deliver value in a relatively short time for the clients. Rob Collie (00:24:14): That's a really interesting concept. There are certain kinds of problems in which collaboration, a team collaboration is absolutely necessary. The magic of collaboration sometimes can beat problems that no individual could ever beat. At the same time though, there's this other dynamic, right, where having a team working on a problem is actually a real liability because the communication complexity between the people becomes the majority of the work. Here's a really hyper simplified example. There used to be sort of a three-person committee, if you will, that was running our company P3, me and two other people. Imke Feldmann (00:24:57): Mm-hmm (affirmative). Rob Collie (00:24:58): And so all leadership decisions were essentially handled at that level. Well, things change, people move on, right? And so we went from a three person committee to a two person committee. We didn't anticipate the two of us who stayed, right? We did not anticipate how much simpler that was going to make things. We thought, just do the math, right, it's going to be like, well, it's one less person to get on the same page. So it's going to be a one-third reduction in complexity. It was actually double that because we went from having three pairs of communication, right, the triangle has three sides, to a line that only has one side, right? So there was only one linkage that needed to be maintained as opposed to three geometrically, combinatorially, whatever we're going to say, right? It just became- Imke Feldmann (00:25:45): Exponential. Rob Collie (00:25:45): ... Exponetially simpler. And so for problems that can be soloed, you have this amazing savings in efficiency, in clarity, even, right? Imke Feldmann (00:25:59): Yup. Rob Collie (00:25:59): There's just so many advantages when you can execute as one person, then there's the other examples like our company at our size now, even ignoring the number of consultants that we need to do our business, just the back office alone, we need the difference in skills. We need the difference in talents and interests and everything. We simply could not exist without that kind of collaboration. However, when our consultants were working with a client, usually it's essentially a one-on-one type of thing, right? We don't typically put teams of consultants on the same project. We might have multiple consultants working for the same client and they might be building something that's somehow integrated, but it's still very similar, I think to your model, when you actually watch sort of the work being done, there's this amazing savings and complexities. Imke Feldmann (00:26:50): Yup, that's true. Of course I have a network in the background. So when big problems arise where I need brain input, of course, I have a network, but it's not a former company. Rob Collie (00:27:02): And that's how we work too, right? We have all kinds of internal Slack channels. For some reason we adopted Slack years ago before Teams was really a thing. So Slack is sort of like our internal social network. There's a lot of discussion of problems, and solutions, and a lot of knowledge sharing, and people helping each other out behind the scenes in that same way. Again, we do bring multiple consultants into particularly large projects, but it's not like there's three people working together on the same formula. In Power BI, the things that you do in ETL, the things that you do in power query are intimately interrelated with the data model and the decks that you need to create. And imagine parceling that out to three different people. You have one formula writer, one data modeler, one ETL specialist, you would never ever get anywhere in that kind of approach. Imke Feldmann (00:28:00): Not necessarily. I mean, the tax people are the person responsible for the data model. He could write down his requirements. He could define the tables basically. And then someone could try to get the data from the sources. But of course, then you get some feedback that the data isn't there or that the model has to be shaped in a different way. So it has two sides to it. But that's interesting to see that you have the same experience, that Power BI models or solutions of a certain size that can very well be handled by one person alone. And that really brings speed, and flexibility, and agility to the whole development process I think. Rob Collie (00:28:41): You communicate with yourself at what's above giga? Peta, petabit? you communicate with yourself at petabit speed and you communicate with others through a noisy 2,400 baud modem that's constantly breaking up. It's amazing what that can do for you sometimes. So there comes a point in your journey where you decide to go freelance. Imke Feldmann (00:29:07): Yup. Rob Collie (00:29:08): That's a courageous leap. When did that happen and what led you to that conclusion? Imke Feldmann (00:29:13): I made the decision in 2012 already to do that. Rob Collie (00:29:19): Wow. Imke Feldmann (00:29:20): And I just saw the light. I just saw the light in Power Pivot and then Power Query came along and I saw what Microsoft was after. And as I said, I enjoyed the building of the cube, getting my hands dirty, reading about the technologies behind it and so on. And this was what I felt passionate about. And I also had the idea that I needed some break from company politics. And so I just thought, well, I give it a try. And if it doesn't work, I can find a job after that or find a company where I work for at any time after that. So I just tried it and it worked. Rob Collie (00:30:05): So you decided in 2012, did you make the break in 2012 as well? Imke Feldmann (00:30:12): I prepared it, and then I just in 2013, I started solo. Rob Collie (00:30:18): Okay. 2013 is also when we formally formed our company. For 2010-2013, it was a blog. I had other jobs. I had other clients essentially, but I wasn't really hanging out the shingle so to speak, as you know, we're not an actual business really until 2013. And I guess it's not much accident that we both kind of did the same thing about the same time, it's that demand was finally sufficient I think in 2013 to support going solo. In 2012, there weren't enough clients to even support one consultant. And so, oh, that's great. And I think you really liked Power Query too, does M speak to you? Imke Feldmann (00:31:02): Yes. Yes. Yeah. Rob Collie (00:31:03): It does, doesn't it? Imke Feldmann (00:31:04): I really prefer Power Query or M over DAX, I must admit. It has been much more liable to me than DAX. Rob Collie (00:31:15): Oh, and I liked you so much before you said that. I'm team DAX all the way. Imke Feldmann (00:31:23): I know. I know. I know. I mean, of course I love to use DAX as well, but I really feel very, very strong about Power Query. And I mean, I had such a great journey with it. I mean, it was really [inaudible 00:31:35] work for me personally, that I did with it. And it was just a great journey to understand how things work. I mean, this has been the first coding language for me that I really learned. And it was just a great journey to learn all the things and starting to blog about it. And of course, I started basically helping people in the forum, that's where I basically built my knowledge about it, solving other people's problems. And this was just a great journey. And Polar Query has always been good to me than DAX. Rob Collie (00:32:14): This is really cool, right? So you fell in love with Power Pivot, so DAX and data model, right? There was no Power Query. Imke Feldmann (00:32:21): Mm-hmm (affirmative)-, that's true. Rob Collie (00:32:23): Okay. And because we had no Power Query, there were many, many, many things you couldn't do in Power Pivot unless your data source was a database. Imke Feldmann (00:32:30): Yup. Rob Collie (00:32:31): Because you needed views created that gave you the right shape tables, right? If your original data source didn't have a lookup table, a dimension table, you had to make one. And how are you going to make one without Power Query? It gets crazy, right? At least unbelievable. So try to mentally travel back for a moment to the point in time where you're willing to, and not just, it doesn't sound like you were just willing to, you were eager to go solo to become a freelancer, right, with just DAX and data modeling. And then after that, this thing comes along that you light up when you talk about. You didn't have this thing that you love, but you were already in, that doesn't happen very often. Imke Feldmann (00:33:18): It could be that loved DAX at the beginning, but it just started to disappoint me at sometimes. Rob Collie (00:33:29): Oh, okay. Thomas LaRock (00:33:29): It disappoints everyone. Rob Collie (00:33:29): I'm just devastated. Imke Feldmann (00:33:35): No, I mean, it's amazing what DAX can do, but I mean, we all know it looks easy at the beginning, but then you can really get trapped in certain situations. Rob Collie (00:33:46): Yeah. I described these two things is like the length and width of a rectangle, Power Query and DAX. Take your pick, which one's the width, which one's the length? I don't care. And then we ask which one is more responsible for the area of the rectangle, right? Neither. You can double the length of either of them and it doubles the area of the rectangle. So it's really ironic that I'm so sort of firmly on team DAX for a number of reasons. Number one, is that I'm really not actually that good at it compared to the people who've come along since. Like my book, for instance, I think, I look at it as this is the 100 and maybe the 200 level course at university, maybe the first in the second course, maybe, but it's definitely not the third course. The thing that you take in your third or fourth year of university, that's not covered in my book in terms of DAX. Rob Collie (00:34:44): And basically every one of the consultants at our company is better at DAX than I am. And that's great. That's really good. And the other thing that's ironic about my love of DAX over M, is if these two were in conflict, which they aren't. Imke Feldmann (00:35:00): No they are. Rob Collie (00:35:02): Is that I actually was trying for years to get a Power Query like project started on the Excel team. I knew how much time was being chewed up in the world just transforming data, not analyzing it even, just getting things ready for analysis. It's just ungodly amounts of time. And so I was obsessed with end-user ETL. When I was on the Excel team, it was like a running joke, someone would mention in a meeting, "Well, that's kind of like ETL," and other people would go, "Oh no, no, don't say that in front of Rob, he's going to get started and he won't shut up about it for the next 30 minutes." On the podcast with the Power Query team, I told them I'm really glad that no one ever agreed to fund my project on the Excel team because now that I see what Power Query is like I grossly underestimated how much work needed to go into something like that. And I'm glad that Microsoft isn't saddled with some old and completely inadequate solution to the Power Query space, because now that I've seen what the real thing looks like, I'm like, "Oh my gosh, we would've never been able to pull that off." Rob Collie (00:36:14): So the thing that I was most obsessed with is the thing that now that it's actually been built, for some reason, I just find M to be, I don't know, there's like a reverse gravity there that pushes me away. Imke Feldmann (00:36:26): What I actually would like to see is that there's less need to use M in the Power Query product. So first, the only thing I was dreaming about was finally to have a function library that can easily be shipped from then, or that you can download from internet or wherever, where you can use additional functions in your M code. So this was the first thing that I was really passionate about and thought that we should have such a thing in Power Query to be able to make more cool things, or group steps together. But now what I really think we should actually have and see in Power Query is the ability to build our own ribbons and to the query editor. Rob Collie (00:37:13): Yes. Imke Feldmann (00:37:13): Like we have in an Excel. So this is something that in my eyes would really bring a big push to the product and actually would make so much sense for the people who start using these products. I mean the whole Power platform can have so many benefits for finance department, all departments, but I mean, I'm passionate about finance departments. But have you counted how many low-code languages are in there, if you include Power Apps and Power Automate and all these things? Rob Collie (00:37:50): Low-code. Imke Feldmann (00:37:50): And honestly, in order to come up with any solution that makes sense in a business environment, I would say in all of these solutions, there is no way around the code at the end. I mean, you get quite far with clicky, clicky, but I haven't seen solutions where you get around the languages. And now imagine the typical finance people who really they know the Excel formulas and some of them might know VBA as well. And now their server uses new low-code, no-code word, and just get your head around about five or six new languages that you all have to know and learn in order to get something useful and so on. So I think that's just not feasible for people who have real jobs in the business to learn all that. Rob Collie (00:38:42): Well, that's what you're here for, right? That's what your business is for and that's what P3 is for. Imke Feldmann (00:38:48): We get them started and the products are great. And if there are people in the companies who have a drive to learn things and take the time they get their heads around it, but it could be easier. It could be easier with things like that, where we could provide additional user interfaces and just make it even easier for people to build great solutions for them or adapt solutions that consultants had build initially, but to maintain them by themselves and make adjustments to them if needed. Rob Collie (00:39:19): So [inaudible 00:39:20] has an old joke where he says, when he's doing a presentation or something, he says, "That's a good question. And I define good question as a question I know the answer to, right." And then he says, "But then a great question is a question that is covered by the very next slide." So there's a similar parallel joke to make here, which is that, that idea you just talked about with the ribbons and everything, right? So if I said, it's a smart idea, what I would mean is, again, this is a joke, right? I would mean that that's an idea that I agree with and have kind of already had. But if I say it's a brilliant idea- Imke Feldmann (00:39:55): Okay. Rob Collie (00:39:56): ... Then it's an even better version of an idea that I've already had that has never occurred to me. Your idea is a brilliant idea. Imke Feldmann (00:40:02): Okay. Rob Collie (00:40:06): It goes beyond. So I have been advocating privately behind the scenes with the Power Query team forever telling them that they need about three or four more ribbon tabs. There's just way too many commonly encountered problems for which you can imagine there being a button for, and there's no button. Imke Feldmann (00:40:28): Exactly. Rob Collie (00:40:29): And it's like, I don't understand. I used to be on teams like that, but I don't understand why they haven't gotten to this. Because it seems so low hanging fruit. They've already built the engine, they've built the language, right? The language can already handle this, but you actually had two brilliant ideas in there that had never occurred to me. First of all, I'm used to the idea that the community can't contribute libraries of functions, they can't do that for DAX. Imke Feldmann (00:40:57): Mm-hmm (affirmative). Rob Collie (00:40:58): That's not even like engineering possible for DAX. And the reason for it is, is that the DAX engine is so heavily optimized in so many ways that there'd be no way to plug in some new function that's unpredictable in terms of what it needs to do. All of these things, they're all inherently interrelated and they make changes in the storage and the query engine to make this function work better and vice versa, because it has to take advantage of the index compression scheme and all of that kind of stuff. It's actually not possible, is the wrong word, but it's actually orders of magnitude more difficult, if not impossible to allow DAX to have UDF, user-defined function type of feature. Rob Collie (00:41:42): I don't think Power Query is like that though. Maybe naively, because again, I'm not on the internals team on the Power Query side. But it does seem like a UDF capability is at least much more feasible- Imke Feldmann (00:41:53): Absolutely. Rob Collie (00:41:54): ... For Power Query, which does execute row by row essentially. Other languages have this, right? One of the reasons that R is so popular is not that R is so awesome, is that R has tremendous libraries of commonly solved problems that you can just go grab off the internet or off the shelf and plug into your solution. Imke Feldmann (00:42:14): I have my own library I've created. You can go to my GitHub and you'll see 50, 60 custom M functions. You can package them in a record and [inaudible 00:42:24] them as a library and your M code, or you could even connect live to them and run them with an execute statement. But this is too difficult, although it's just a couple of clicks, but it's too difficult or at least intimidating for the beginners, who really Power Query beginners who start with the products, I think there's so much potential to make their life easier. And that's not through some coding stuff, or I know this function, I know that function, that's really can only come in my eyes through user interface with buttons. Rob Collie (00:42:59): Yeah, I agree. And just as importantly for me, is that I might actually come around and be like, just as much team Power Query as team DAX. Honestly, my frustration is just the M language and just my total lack of desire to learn it. [crosstalk 00:43:16]. It is what it really comes down to. It's not about M, it's not about Power Query, it's about me. Whereas again, I know the need that it fills is massively important. So it's not that I think it's a bad mission, I think it's like the mission in a lot of ways. I was obsessed with it long before I ever crossed paths with business intelligence, I was obsessed with data transformation, end user data transformation. It's just a problem that's about as ubiquitous as it gets. So let's make it happen. We agree, the two of us, that's it, right? It's like we need to go provide a unified front. Imke Feldmann (00:43:52): I think that that's an idea in the idea forum, I might send the link that you can maybe post. Rob Collie (00:43:56): We want that thing up, voted to the moon. I'll even go figure out what my sign in is on the ideas side. Imke Feldmann (00:44:08): Oh, good luck with it. Rob Collie (00:44:09): Which is absolutely impossible. I have no idea which of the 14 counts. And then I'll try to create a new one and it'll go, "Nah, you're not allowed to. We know it's you, but we won't tell you who it is, what your email address is." So I completely agree. So there's so many problems. I always struggle to produce the list. It's like I need to be writing down the list of things that are crucial, but here's an example. Remove duplicates, but control which duplicate you keep. That's a problem that can't be solved in the GUI today. Imke Feldmann (00:44:48): And you need the intimidating type of buffer that you have to write by hand around it, which is just pain. Rob Collie (00:44:56): Remove dups and don't care which one you keep. Okay, fine. That's a great simple button. There should be an advanced section that allows you to specify, oh, but before you keep the dups, sort by this column or sort in the following manner. Imke Feldmann (00:45:10): Exactly. Rob Collie (00:45:10): And then keep the first one of each group. It's easy for us to say outside the team, but apparently that is a, we just make a joke, right? That's apparently a Manhattan project level of software to add that extra button. Anyway, we'll get that. Thomas LaRock (00:45:27): That doesn't make sense to me though. I'm fascinated by all of your conversation and you guys are a hundred miles away from me in a lot of this stuff, but I could listen to it all day. But no, the fact that Excel can't do the remove duplicates, except for like the first of each one of something, that's a simple group by. In my head, I sit there and go that's easily solvable because Excel and DAX does such great stuff that I would never want to do in TSQL, how the hell do we stumble across a thing that's been solved by straight up SQL language that somehow can't get into an Excel? Rob Collie (00:46:01): Well, let's explain the problem very clearly and see if we're on the same page as to what the problem is, but either way it'll be valuable. So let's say you have a whole bunch of orders, a table full of orders. That is a really wide Franken table. It's got things like customer ID, customer address, customer phone number, but also what product they ordered, and how much of it, and how much it cost. Okay, and a date, a date of the order. All right. And you've been given this table because the people that are responsible for this system, they think that what you want is a report and not a data source. And this is incredibly common. Okay. So you need to extract a customer's dimension or lookup table out of this. You need to create a customer's table so that you can build a good star schema model. Okay. And Power Query is right there to help you. Power Query will help you invent a customer's look up table where one wasn't provided, and that's awesome. Rob Collie (00:46:58): Okay. So you say, okay, see customer ID this column. I want to remove duplicates based on that column. Okay, great. But now it's just that the order that the data came in from the report file or the database or whatever that will determine which duplicate is kept. What you really want to do of course is take the most recent customer order of each customer ID because they've probably moved. They may have changed phone numbers, whatever, right? You want their most recent contact information. You don't want their contact information for 15 years ago. And the M language allows you to solve this problem essentially sort by date, and then keep the most recent, but only if you get into the code manually, and as Imke points out, it's not even if you go into the code, the things that you would want to do, if you do a sort, you can add a sort step to the Power Query with the buttons, with the GUI, and then you do the remove duplicates and it ignores the source. Imke Feldmann (00:47:59): Yes. Rob Collie (00:48:02): The GUI almost tries to tell you that it's impossible, but if you know about table dot buffer. Imke Feldmann (00:48:07): So the question is why do we have a sort command in Power Query when it doesn't give the sort order? I mean, that is the question to ask. But that's how it is. Rob Collie (00:48:16): It sorts the results. It sorts the results, it just doesn't sort for the intermediate steps. Imke Feldmann (00:48:20): Why? No, that's quite technical. But would just be great if such a common task could be done with buttons that is reliable at the end. I fully agree. Rob Collie (00:48:35): So Tom, I think this one's really just an example of, again, I truly think that M and Power Query, just like DAX and data modeling, the Power BI data modeling, both of these things belong in the software hall of fame of all time. It is amazing, Power Query, M, is just ridiculously amazing. It's one of the best things ever invented. Remember this is someone who's associated with being a critic of it. Imke Feldmann (00:49:04): Yeah, you're making progress, it's great to see. Rob Collie (00:49:07): And yet I'm telling you that it's one of the top five things ever invented probably. And I think there's a certain tendency when you've done something that amazing to lose track of the last mile. I think it's more of a human thing. Imke Feldmann (00:49:19): Maybe, but I mean, what I see is that they are investing quite a lot in data flows, which makes a lot of sense as well in my eyes. Rob Collie (00:49:27): All that really does though, as far as you and I are concerned, Imke, is it makes it even more important that they solve this problem. Because it's now exposed in two different usage scenarios. Imke Feldmann (00:49:37): Yeah, you're right. Rob Collie (00:49:39): And I want my data flow to be able to control which duplicates are kept too. So that's what I'm saying. There's all these big sort of infrastructural technical challenges that do tend to draw resources. And it's not a neglect thing. Imke Feldmann (00:49:54): No, no. Rob Collie (00:49:54): It isn't like a willful failure or anything like that, I don't want to paint that kind of negative of a picture. Imke Feldmann (00:49:59): No. Rob Collie (00:50:00): It's just that out here in reality, the inability to do, even if we just identified the top 10 things like this, addressing those top 10 things with GUI, with buttons, what have I think in the world, maybe even a bigger impact than the entire data flows project, right? Because you would expand the footprint of human beings that are advocates of this stuff and then you go build data flows. You don't have to think of it as either or, right? They should do both. It's just that I think it's hard to appreciate the impact of those 10 buttons when you're on the software team. It's easier to appreciate the impact of data flows, which is massive. I don't mean to denigrate that. I think it's crazy good. It's just that this other thing is of a similar magnitude in terms of benefit, but it's harder to appreciate when you're on the software team. It's easier to appreciate when you're out here in the trenches, living it every single day. And every time I run into a problem like this, I have to put my hand up and say to my own team, I have to say, " Help." Thomas LaRock (00:51:02): So a casual observation I have is that you wish for there to exist one tool that will handle all of your data janitorial needs. And that tool doesn't necessarily exist because life is dirty, so is your data and you're never going to anticipate everything possible. Now, should that sorting functionality exist in that duplicates, the scenario gave me? Yeah, probably. But there's always going to be something next. And that's why I go to you and I say, the thing that you've described to me is you need your data to be tidy so that it can be consumed and used by a lot of these features that we've talked about today. And in order to get to tidy data, there's no necessarily one tool. Thomas LaRock (00:51:48): You're a big fan of the ETL, Rob. You know that, hey, maybe I need to take the source data and run it through some Python scripts, or some M, or something first before it goes to this next thing. And that's the reality that we really have. What you're wishing for is the one tool, the one button to rule it all. And that's going to take a while before that ever comes around. Rob Collie (00:52:09): The thing is though, is that M is ridiculously complete. Imke Feldmann (00:52:14): Yeah. Rob Collie (00:52:15): You can do anything with it. And it's a language that's optimized for data transformation. So I know you can do anything with C++ too, right? But this is a data crunching, data transformation, specialized language that is really complete. And its UI is woefully under serving the capabilities of the engine. And so I suppose we could imagine and deliberately design a data transformation scenario that maybe M couldn't do it. Imke Feldmann (00:52:45): No. Rob Collie (00:52:46): I think that'd be a very difficult challenge considering how good M is. Imke Feldmann (00:52:49): I think in terms of logic, M can do anything, but in terms of performance, there is some room for improvements. So because there's a streaming semantic running in the background, and as long as the stream runs through all the steps, if you have complex queries, this can really slow things down. And currently there is no button or command in the M language to cut the stream and say, well, stop it here and buffer what you have calculated until here, and then continue from there. So if you have really complex stuff that would benefit from an intermediate buffer, then you can store that in an Azure blob or CSV, or whatever. Specifically if you're working with data flows, you can create some automatic processes that would enable this kind of buffering. Imke Feldmann (00:53:45): And then you will see that the speed of the whole process that can really increase dramatically because in some situations, the speed in M drops exponentially. And these are occasions where a buffer would really helped things, but we don't have it yet in the engine of Power Query. So this was what really be something else that would be fairly beneficial if we wouldn't have to make these work-arounds through things. Rob Collie (00:54:14): Tom, that just occurred to me, I can't believe this is the first time that this thought has crossed my mind. But I think that you might fall into an abyss of love with M. Thomas LaRock (00:54:28): Well, I'm a huge James Bond fan, but... Rob Collie (00:54:30): Oh, no. I think you would really, really just dig it. Thomas LaRock (00:54:38): I don't think I have time to take on a new relationship at this point. I'm still with Python and R, so I mean, I don't know. I'm not going to disagree, I'm just, please don't start a new addiction for me. Rob Collie (00:54:51): Think of the content though, that you could produce over time. The M versus SQL versus Python treatises. Thomas LaRock (00:54:59): Cookbook. Rob Collie (00:55:00): You were made for this mission Tom. Thomas LaRock (00:55:03): Okay. So we'll have to talk later about it. You can sweet talk me. You know I've let you sweet talk me into any [inaudible 00:55:08]. Rob Collie (00:55:08): That's right, that's right. Come on, Tom. Get into M, you know that thing that I have nothing but praise for, that I just love to death, you need to do that. Thomas LaRock (00:55:18): For you. That's what you want to do, is you want to learn it but [inaudible 00:55:21] through me. Rob Collie (00:55:22): Oh, that wouldn't work. I would be, "Oh yeah, well this is still M." Thomas LaRock (00:55:29): You're going to be like, "Tom, where's your latest blog post on M so I can read it and hate upon it even more?" Rob Collie (00:55:37): No, I would not read. Just as the first step. Thomas LaRock (00:55:42): I'm going to read it, but not leave a comment about how much I hate it. Rob Collie (00:55:45): Let's go back to talking about how we did a bunch of big fat Fisher-Price buttons for me to mash my thumbs in the UI. That's what I need. Thomas LaRock (00:55:54): You know what? I'll do that. I'll open up VS code and I'll just build this one big button, it's Rob's button. Rob Collie (00:56:00): Hey, you won't believe this, but I recently installed VS code. Thomas LaRock (00:56:03): I don't believe it, why? Rob Collie (00:56:05): Well, because I needed to edit, not even write, because I'm not capable of it. I needed to edit an interface, add on customization for World of Warcraft. And the only purpose of this World of Warcraft add on interface modification was to allow me to drop snarky comments into a particular channel of the conversation based on the button that I press. I needed a menu of snarky comments to drop at particular points in time. It's hard to type them out all the time, right? So it's just like, now here we go. I dropped one of those. I dropped one of those. Thomas LaRock (00:56:37): We got to get you a real job or something. You got way too much time on your hands. Rob Collie (00:56:42): That was my number one contribution to the World of Warcraft Guild. For a couple of months, there was the snarky rogue chat. Thomas LaRock (00:56:48): You know that is on brand. Rob Collie (00:56:56): It prefixed every comment in the chat with a prefix, you came from rogue chat 9,000. So that people who aren't on the joke were like, "Why is this guy, he's usually very quiet, become so obnoxious. Look at the things he's saying." Anyway. So VS code. And that also involved GitHub. Because my friend who wrote the stub, the shell of this add on for me is a vice president at GitHub. So of course he puts the code in GitHub and points me to it and then points me to VS code, and I'm like, "Oh, you're making me work now? Okay. But you wrote the shell for me, so okay. All right. I'll play ball." So it doesn't sound like you regret your decision to go solo. Imke Feldmann (00:57:40): Absolutely. Rob Collie (00:57:41): You're not looking to go back to corporate life. Imke Feldmann (00:57:43): Absolutely not. Rob Collie (00:57:44): Not missing that. So what can you tell us about the last year or two? What impact, if any, did COVID have on your business? Imke Feldmann (00:57:52): Business has grown especially the last year. So people needed more reports than ever and solutions. So it really, I don't know whether it was COVID effect or just the fact that Power BI is growing and growing. Rob Collie (00:58:07): I'm sure it's both. So the dynamic we saw during 2020. So 2020 would be the, if you're going to have a year that was negatively impacted by COVID, it would have been 2020. And what we saw in 2020 was that we were definitely not acquiring new clients. We weren't making new relationships at nearly the rate we had been people weren't taking risks on meeting a new BI firm. That wasn't something that there was as much appetite for as there had been. However, amongst the clients where we already had a good relationship, we'd already been working with them for a while, their needs for data work expanded as a result of COVID because it did, it created all kinds of new problems and it invalidated so many existing blueprints of tribal knowledge of how we run the business. When reality changes, you need new maps, you need new campuses. Rob Collie (00:59:04): And so on net, we ended up our overall business still grew modestly over the course of 2020, year over year compared to 2019. But then when the new clients started to become viable again, people started looking, we're interested in making new relationships, 2021 has been a very, very strong year of growth, not moderate, really kind of crazy. How do you keep up with increased demand as a one person shop? Imke Feldmann (00:59:35): Saying no. Rob Collie (00:59:36): You have to make your peace with saying no. At one point in my history, I faced sort of the same thing and I decided not to say no, and instead decided to grow the company. That brought an enormous amount of risk and stress- Imke Feldmann (00:59:55): I can imagine. Rob Collie (00:59:55): ... Into my life that I did not anticipate its magnitude. I'm sure I anticipated it, but I didn't anticipate the magnitude of it. I'm very grateful that I'd made that decision though, because where we are today is incredible. That's a rocky transition. So today everything runs like clockwork basically. We have a lot of growth ahead of us that seems almost like it's just going to happen, we're just going to keep growing for a long time. But we had to set the table we had to build our organism as a company into a very different form than what it had been when it was just me. And that molting process it was very painful. I don't pretend that the scaling decision is the right decision, it's very much a personal one. I've certainly lived that. If the version of me that made the decision to scale the company knew everything that was coming, it would have been a much harder decision to make. You kind of have to have a little bit of naive optimism even to make that leap. Imke Feldmann (01:00:57): I can imagine that once you get these things figured out and with the dynamic that the product has, that has a good chance to get it going into a very successful business, I believe. Rob Collie (01:01:10): Well, with your profile and with the growing demand for these sorts of services, the percentage of no that you have to say is just going to keep going up. Imke Feldmann (01:01:20): Yeah. But I made my decision and that's just fine. Rob Collie (01:01:25): I'm very supportive of that decision. I don't have any criticism of it, again, especially knowing what I know now. But if there's going to be come a point where you're going to be saying yes 1% of the time, and the answer to that is ultimately, well, you just raise your rates, which is also very difficult to do. In the end, it's almost like an auction for your services. You need to run yourself like Google. There's a 40 hour block of Imke time coming up for availability. We'll just put it on eBay. Imke Feldmann (01:01:59): I mean, it's just nice to be able to choose with whom you work with. That's just nice. And I earned enough money, so that's fine. So I'm happy with that. Rob Collie (01:02:12): How do you choose who you work with? Is it mostly based on industry? Is it mostly based on job function that you're helping? Or is it more about the specific people? There's all kinds of things that could... Let's say if I came to your website today, I filled out your contact form, what are the things that I could say in that contact for a message that would lead you to say no, versus leads you to say maybe? Imke Feldmann (01:02:37): What I really like to do is to work with finance directors. So basically not people exactly like me, but I like to see that the managers approached me and they have an interest in the product itself and also therefore an interest to push it into their departments. So this is for me, a very, very good starting point because it's an area I'm familiar with. I know that there's enough critical support to get the decisions that have to be made and maybe also push IT to help with certain things. This is really one of my favorite set ups, I would say. Rob Collie (01:03:19): Yeah, we do a lot of work with finance departments as well. How long does sort of your average relationship run with a client? How long do you end up working with the same organization on average? Imke Feldmann (01:03:31): That's hard to say, that's really completely different. It can be the initial five days kickoff where we set up a PNL statement connect all the finance data and they go along with that. And basically, never hear again, or just occasionally hear again, "Can you help me with this problem or that problem?" And it could also be going on for years, basically with breaks in between of course, but some customers, they come every now and then when they want to expand things. Now I have a customer that I'm working on some hours or even days ever week since over a year by now. Rob Collie (01:04:15): That sounds similar to my experience as a freelancer, when it was just me, less similar to our business today, a little bit less. I mean, I think it's still more similar than not. It's just that the dial has moved a little bit. Imke Feldmann (01:04:32): So how long are your engagements then, usually? Rob Collie (01:04:35): Most of our engagements are, if we start out doing kind of that kickoff you're talking about, we started like a project with people, that tends to not be the end. We don't typically have people just immediately vanish after that because that's usually the point at which, I mean, they've got something working already, very often after the first week or so of working with a client, they've usually got some really amazing things built already at that point. But at the same time, that's really just at the beginning of the appetite. Usually there are things that are

Marketing Trends
New Products Demand Innovation from Leaders like Amy Welsh, VP of Marketing at Agile Therapeutics

Marketing Trends

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 52:34


Swipe right on... Twirla? Creating ads for a contraceptive patch on dating apps is emblematic of the innovative approach that Amy Welsh, the Vice President of Marketing takes at Agile Therapeutics. Welsh has no shame in working with marketing agencies to utilize the advantages that they offer, while also maintaining close control of her brand's integrity.  It's safe to say, Welsh has no shame in taking a different approach that spurs traditional marketing tactics“The novel -- the different ways of doing it -- is strategic media partnering,” Welsh said. “For instance, [at Agile] we were able to be the first contraceptive to advertise on dating apps like Match. I couldn't have done that if I didn't have somebody outside who was street-smart, and partnered with us to appropriately come up with a plan for that.” Welsh continued,  “I want to ensure that the marketing team is the brand steward. We better know our brand better than everybody. And I want to use my agency for things that I don't know or can't do. It's a bit of a hybrid but the marketing team better be the brand stewards and the strategists a hundred percent.”Launching a contraceptive in the middle of 2020 might not have been the tactical dream for Welsh, but she did it anyway. Welsh has alway acted quick on her feet. It's part of what makes him a good marketer and it's part of what made this conversation with her so fun.Throughout her career in big and small pharma Amy's launched many products and is a fountain of wisdom for having had all that experience. As she creates a new team, for a new company, in a new product market, her thirst to innovate is high. She's found a need to create new roles for people who can specialize in marketing on popular new tools and apps. On this episode of Marketing Trends, Welch explains the unique challenges of marketing to Gen Z as well as creating awareness for an entire product class; she also talks about how she is creating new roles on her marketing team. I hope you enjoy this episode.Main TakeawaysMarketing to Gen Z: New iterations of media modalities require tailored marketing tactics. Marketers are treading water and testing out the best ways to market to this upcoming generation. Thinks that worked for millenials, don't necessarily work on a younger generations with different values and needs. Getting in front of your audience via advertising on apps and other new media, is the way of today. Campaigns that are Purely Educational: When your product market is so young, and largely unknown to your target audience, you've got to embark on some educational campaigns. You've also got to listen, which means asking the right questions -- actually talking to people so you can learn what they are looking for and gathering feedback and data from those conversations is priceless for marketers. It's a brandless campaign that's teaching consumers about what it is and it's an important foundation for marketing in a product field. Creatively Building Teams: Sometimes the positions that you need filled don't really match with traditional job descriptions. As new needs in new markets arise, CMO's and VP's of Marketing are creating new roles in their teams to address advertising on new social media platforms. Marketing Needs to Learn from Sales: Market research, focus groups and other methods of gathering information about your audience are all helpful but if you have sales reps that you can talk about the reaction and perception of your product to your customers, you can learn so much about what you're doing right and how you need to shift to address the needs of your customer better.Key Quotes“This felt like an opportunity to authentically connect and not push the brand. Pharma loves to push our agenda. Let's just sit and build a community and listen, ‘Does she even know patches exist?' or ‘Does she know 15 or more options exist?' And almost even more importantly, ‘Does she know things are changing? t the time, the ACA allows you to get any one of these options for free,' so we started this campaign, shortly after I got on board in the middle of the summer called the ‘I'm so Done' campaign where we just really wanted to have some fun and educate, and build a community before we were going to be all in.” “[In this industry] understanding Planned Parenthood and Student Health Clinics [which] are big in my world and the different marketing challenges there [are critical.] How do you make yourself meaningful there? It's telemedicine, but bigger than telemedicine. It's understanding the digital entrepreneurial world. What are the new businesses out there and what's next for either Twirla or Agile? Because we're not just a patch company, we're a women's health company.” “The novel -- the different ways of doing it -- that is strategic media partnering. For instance, we were able to be the first contraceptive to advertise on dating apps like Match. I couldn't have done that if I didn't have somebody outside who was street-smart, and partnered with us to appropriately come up with a plan for that. I want to ensure that the marketing team is the brand steward. We know our brand better than everybody. And I want to use my agency for things that I don't know or can't do. It's a bit of a hybrid, but the marketing team better be the brand stewards and the strategists a hundred percent.”“I only have so many dollars, so every bit of it better go to the person that actually can and will consider my product. In the beginning for Twirla, my challenge was to let [the consumer] know that a patch even exists as a birth control option. And a patch named Twirla is the better option for you to consider. Twirla is not only getting new patients, but they're all staying (no pun intended), they're sticking with us. For the first year, I needed to make sure that everything we were doing was firing on all cylinders against the right eyeballs and no wasted space.” “You have people that may defer to timelines rather than thought. You have people that worry about budget -- you should always worry about budget -- but [they] maybe sit on a big idea that could have advanced things. So, how do you set up an atmosphere [respecting] the budget, but [also] let's talk about something that we love every month. Let's talk about something that we were inspired by every week.”To learn more, click here: {{URL of detail page on found on www.mission.org}}---Marketing Trends podcast is brought to you by Salesforce. Discover marketing built on the world's number one CRM: Salesforce. Put your customer at the center of every interaction. Automate engagement with each customer. And build your marketing strategy around the entire customer journey. Salesforce. We bring marketing and engagement together. Learn more at salesforce.com/marketing. 

This Week in Startups - Audio
How to understand customer engagement | Customer Basics with Salesforce's Tiffani Bova | E1301

This Week in Startups - Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 13:50


Startup Basics is BACK! This series focuses on one of the most important aspects of any successful startup: the customer. On episode two, Salesforce's Tiffani Bova joins to break down all things customer engagement: defining it, authenticity, blending automation with a human touch, social media strategies and more!