Podcasts about Salesforce

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American software company

  • 3,520PODCASTS
  • 10,647EPISODES
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  • 5DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 17, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Salesforce

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Latest podcast episodes about Salesforce

Untold Stories
The Evolution of Web3 with Halsey Minor

Untold Stories

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 36:50


My guest today is Halsey Minor, CEO of Vivid Labs. VIVID enables anyone to create, manage, and sell multimedia NFTs, enabling new use cases and business models and evolving NFTs into complete media experiences. Compatible across all significant blockchains, VIVID offers advanced NFT + features that transform simple NFTs into rich media experiences that are multi-format, multi-asset, permissioned, updateable and resilient. Halsey is a technology founder behind some of the greatest successes in internet and enterprise computing which have anticipated “what's next” in enterprise architecture and technology adoption. His companies have created over $250 billion in cumulative value, and he's built a Nasdaq 100 company from scratch. His achievements as founder or co-founder include CNET, Uphold, Salesforce, Google Voice, OpenDNS, and Vignette. We discuss various topics, including the future of NFTs, the evolution of the web, why NFTs are a new form of the website, and much more. We begin our conversation by discussing how NFTs are creating a new genre of multimedia content. Halsey discusses how NFTs will enhance the fan experience and provide content creators with new and innovative ways to connect with their audience. Halsey explains how various music artists and movie franchises are currently utilizing this technology to build a more profound fan experience for their audiences. Our next conversation topic centered around the evolution of the web. We discuss how Web3 is the natural evolution of the net. Halsey shares his experience building startups and business throughout the different web eras and what attracted him to Web3. We also discuss why NFTs are a new form of the website and the possible implications of that framing. We transitioned our conversation to discuss the importance of sensible regulation around NFTs. Halsey outlines why he has been imploring regulators to treat NFTs as content and not deem them to be securities. Another major conversation topic we discussed was the recent stablecoin news and why algorithmic stable coins are unlikely to work. Our final conversation centered around the future of NFTs and how creators and fans will benefit from the technology as we continue to push the boundaries of what we think is possible in space. Please enjoy my conversation with Halsey Minor. -- This podcast is powered by Blockworks. For exclusive content and events that provide insights into the crypto and blockchain space, visit them at https://blockworks.co

Demand Gen Visionaries
Activate an Emotional Connection with Your Customer with Anna Kostroun, CMO at NewRocket

Demand Gen Visionaries

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 39:14


This episode features an interview with Anna Kostroun, CMO of NewRocket. NewRocket is a modern, all-in-one travel, corporate card, and expense solution, providing over 7,500 customers around the globe unprecedented visibility and control over spend. Anna brings more than 20 years of marketing experience to NewRocket. With expertise in demand generation, brand building, experiential marketing, and sales engagement.On this episode, Anna shares her insights on activating an emotional connection with your customer, why workflow is important for your business, and why it's important to have complete empathy for the customer experience.--- “You can do all of the email marketing, you can do all the events, you can do all of the things, all of the various marketing tactics that everybody knows how to do, but if you're not emotionally connecting with your prospects and customers in a way that's meaningful to them, you're not getting anywhere, and you're not doing anything different than anybody else.”  - Anna Kostroun, CMO of NewRocket---Episode Timestamps:*(03:13) - Anna's role at NewRocket*(05:46) - Segment: Trust Tree*(09:27) - Best practices for building workflows*(11:43) - Emotionally connecting with your prospects*(17:18) - Segment: The Playbook*(19:41) - Driving traffic to your website through content syndication*(29:26) - Segment: The Dust Up*(36:05) - Segment: Quick Hits---SponsorDemand Gen Visionaries is brought to you by Qualified.com, the #1 Conversational Marketing platform for companies that use Salesforce and the secret weapon for Demand Gen pros. The world's leading enterprise brands trust Qualified to instantly meet with buyers, right on their website, and maximize sales pipeline. Visit Qualified.com to learn more.LinksConnect with Anna on LinkedInConnect with Ian on LinkedInLearn more about NewRocketwww.caspianstudios.com

Impact Pricing
Value-Based Pricing in the Subscription Economy: Why It's Hard to Perfectly Align Value, Usage, and Pricing with Ed Arnold

Impact Pricing

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 31:38


Ed Arnold works as an Advisor at Ibbaka, a software provider for high growth companies that helps optimize planning and execution of key growth initiatives while improving company performance. He was the VP of Products at LeveragePoint for 10 years, and was able to work with the pricing legend, Tom Nagle. In this episode, Ed talks about the future of value-based pricing in the subscription economy as he discusses how product-led growth companies achieve their initial growth which later on leads to big wins.   Why you have to check out today's podcast: Understand why pricing in value is the key in very clever segmentation in terms of creating user profiles in the market; Find out how product-led growth companies grow from being a small enterprise to being loved by a bigger market Discover companies that are product-led growth businesses and realize how much they've grown since day one   “Understand how your customer gets value from using your product, not from buying it; not in terms of what the product offering is in terms of features, but how they actually use it.”  – Ed Arnold   Topics Covered: 01:03 – Who is Tom Nagle? 01:41 – How Ed got into pricing + creating a tool and working with Tom Nagle 03:07 – Explaining what LeveragePoint is 03:50 – Future of value-based pricing in subscription: Value as a differentiator in the market 07:11 – Buying vs. negotiating a price: Knowing what you're after 11:43 – Product-led growth practice as a brilliant strategy for business 13:55 – What Ed and everybody else likes about PLG – instant gratification 17:43 – Life-changing benefits of Slack 19:15 – Aligning pricing metrics 21:34 – Why usage-based pricing frustrates Mark 23:41 – Changing and having more than one pricing metric 27:13 – Ed's piece of pricing advice for the listeners 28:06 – What Ed thinks about behavioral economics   Key Takeaways: “If you're thinking about what sort of animal you're hunting in the enterprise game, those are the whales. I think value is the only way you can differentiate yourself in the enterprise market.” – Ed Arnold “No corporate buyer ever heard of Slack until thousands of people in their company were already using it. So, in a sense, the business employee is a consumer, and that's how product-led growth companies are getting that initial growth. They're making it so ridiculously easy for people to start using it before the corporate procurement folks or even IT departments have any idea that they're using it. That's what makes that model so, so attractive for investors.” – Ed Arnold “We like to talk about three types of metrics. And you got to link those three together. Ideally, if you can link those three together, you're in Nirvana, because your price is aligned with value and it's aligned with usage and everything is great.” – Ed Arnold “When it's the right thing to do, and it makes sense, it does pay dividends. But it's tough. And I think it's really a leap of faith and doing it.” – Ed Arnold   People / Resources Mentioned: Ibbaka: https://www.ibbaka.com/ The Strategy and Tactics of Pricing by Tom Nagle: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1138737518/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tpbk_p1_i0 Monitor: https://www2.deloitte.com/global/ LeveragePoint: https://www.leveragepoint.com/ Salesforce: https://www.salesforce.com/ Slack: https://www.slack.com/ Calendly: https://calendly.com/ Zoom: https://www.zoom.us/   Connect with Ed Arnold: Email: arnold@ibbaka.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/edarnold1/   Connect with Mark Stiving: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stiving/ Email: mark@impactpricing.com  

Accelerate! with Andy Paul
A Conversation with Jon Levy

Accelerate! with Andy Paul

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 55:46


Jon Levy is the Founder and Host of Influencers, a Behavioral scientist, consultant, and author of a very interesting new book titled, "You're Invited, The Art and Science of Cultivating Influence." On today's episode we're talking influence, connection and trust. We start with Influence. What is it? What does it mean to have influence? And the role of relationships and community in creating influence. And Jon shares the details behind his Influence Equation. Then Jon and I dive into the importance of connection and connectedness. isolation and loneliness are an increasing fact of life. It presents itself in the stress, burnout and mental health issues we see in sales. As Jon points out chances are high that the people you want to connect with are in need of connection too and may not even realize it. We dig into why sellers need to develop relationships in which everyone is better off, rather than trying to extract as much value as possible from it. Finally, we get into the process of building trust. And why building trust begins with finding a challenge big enough to require people to work together. This conversation was originally recorded in 2021. More on Andy: Connect on LinkedIn Get Andy's new book "Sell Without Selling Out" on Amazon Learn more at AndyPaul.com Sponsored by: Revenue.io | Unlock exponential growth with an AI-powered RevOps platform | Revenue.io Scratchpad | The fastest way to update Salesforce, take sales notes, and stay on top of to-dos | Scratchpad.com Explore the Revenue.io Podcast Universe: Sales Enablement Podcast RevOps Podcast Selling with Purpose Podcast

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch
20VC: Which Stage of the Market Will Be Hit Hardest? The Difference Between Efficiency Driven-Growth and Capital Driven-Growth & Why Now Represents a Great Opportunity for the Secondary Markets with Ravi Viswanathan, Founder @ NewView Capital

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 40:08


Ravi Viswanathan is the Founder & Managing Partner at NewView Capital. Today with over $2.2BN AUM, Ravi has built a portfolio including Plaid, Duolingo, Hims & Hers, MessageBird, and Scopely. Prior to founding NVC, Ravi was a General Partner at NEA, where he co-led the firm's fintech investment practice and made investments in Braintree (acquired by PayPal), MuleSoft (acquired by Salesforce) and Plaid to name a few. In Today's Episode with Ravi Viswanathan: 1.) Entry Into Venture: How Ravi made his way into the world of venture with NEA? What led Ravi to spin out of NEA and raise $1.3BN for the debut NewView fund? How did seeing the multiple booms and busts impact Ravi's mindset investing today? 2.) Impact on Seed and Series A: What is the impact of the current market on the seed ecosystem? Why does Ravi believe we could and will see price inflation at the earlier stages? How does Ravi advise early-stage founders when it comes to managing runway and burn? 3.) Impact on Growth: How does the current macro environment impact the growth landscape today? How does Ravi reflect on his own price sensitivity? Why will this landscape be some of the best times to invest? Where is Ravi most excited? How does Ravi assess the difference between efficiency and capital-driven growth? 4.) Secondaries and M&A: How does Ravi believe the secondary market will be impacted? Why will more and more of the best seed and early funds engage in secondaries? How does Ravi advise managers on sizing the right amount to take off the table when selling? How does Ravi expect the private company to private company M&A market to change? Why is this change in the M&A market so exciting?

Social Pros Podcast
The Salesforce Way to Rethink Your YouTube Approach

Social Pros Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 51:27


Jamie Bland, Video Marketing Manager, and Heike Young, Senior Director of Video Marketing at Salesforce, join Social Pros to give some key insight into Salesforce's approach to video and why YouTube is a huge priority. Huge thanks to our amazing sponsors for helping us make this happen. Please support them; we couldn't do it without their help! This week: Salesforce Marketing Cloud Full Episode Details We've been in the “age of video” for a few years now, and if you're not already charging ahead with your video strategy, you could be missing out. At least that's what Jamie Bland, Video Marketing Manager, and Heike Young, Senior Director of Video Marketing at Salesforce, have to say in this episode of Social Pros. Jamie and Heike take us behind the scenes of Salesforce's YouTube strategy to explain why video is “mission critical” in marketing these days and how to connect with your audience through video. Heike and Jamie give some tips on what metrics to measure, how to pick out true, meaningful engagement, and why YouTube is an underutilized community management tool.  In This Episode: 7:12 – Heike and Jamie walk us through the video team at Salesforce 12:33 – Important lessons Heike brought from social media to the video team 16:35 – Jamie explains the differences between creating B2B and B2C video content 19:53 – Untapped opportunities B2B brands can unlock with YouTube 25:38 – What makes good, compelling YouTube content 29:00 – Why the community aspect of YouTube shouldn't be overlooked 33:22 – Why showing up in search is so important for B2B YouTube channels 35:28 – Tips for integrating a video department with the rest of the business 38:08 – What metrics to measure on YouTube 42:50 – The Big Two questions Resources Schedule a consultation with ICUC Visit SocialPros.com for more insights from your favorite social media marketers.

The FOSS Pod
Human-Centered Design With Abbey Ripstra

The FOSS Pod

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 62:42


Design researcher Abbey Ripstra has spent her career making technology more approachable, and nowhere has her work and expertise connected with more people than at the Wikimedia Foundation. On this ep Abbey joins us to talk about what human-centered design research means, methodologies for conducting user-experience studies in a wide range of territories and contexts, designing products for billions of people, some of the ways design and research differ in open source versus the corporate world, and more.SHOW NOTESFind out more about Abbey's current work at: https://wearetrimtab.com/And read about the research she conducted at the Wikimedia Foundation here:New Editor Experiences: https://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/New_Editor_ExperiencesNew Readers: https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/New_ReadersThe FOSS Pod is brought to you by Google Open Source. Find out more at https://opensource.google

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova
Building a Strategic Mindset with Roger Martin

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 32:28


Welcome to the What's Next! podcast with Tiffani Bova. Friend to the show, Roger L. Martin, made his third appearance on the What's Next! Podcast to discuss the essentials of strategy and management, highlighting the launch of his new book A New Way to Think: Your Guide to Superior Management Effectiveness. Roger is Professor Emeritus at the Rotman School of Management at University of Toronto, where he served as Dean from 1998 to 2013, and as Institute Director of the Martin Prosperity Institute from 2013 to 2019. In 2013, he was named Global Dean of the Year and in 2017, he was named the world's number one management thinker by Thinkers50. He has published 12 previous books including When More Is Not Better and Playing to Win (with A. G. Lafley), which won the award for Best Book of 2012-13 by Thinkers50. Martin is a trusted strategy adviser to the CEOs of many global companies. A Canadian from Wallenstein, Ontario, he holds a BA from Harvard College and an MBA from Harvard Business School.      THIS EPISODE IS PERFECT FOR…  business leaders and managers that are looking to enhance their operating strategy with an alternative model that ultimately increases effectiveness.   TODAY'S MAIN MESSAGE… The best metrics for success are based on past successful experiences, and conventional wisdom would say to imitate the dominant model to create that same success. But you must also view those strategies in context of the challenges and resources of a specific situation, because models cannot be copy pasted for an exact situation.  The execution of an idea is just as important as the idea itself, and in order to achieve true success, the strategy is always evolving to create a better and more innovative strategy for success.   WHAT I LOVE MOST… For Roger, there isn't any singular model of success, but rather success comes from building a strategic mindset to approach and solve problems. The solutions that we often look for may not always be obvious, but by simply being willing to experiment with the past models of success, we can come out on the other end better than before.     Running time: 32:37 Subscribe on iTunes     Find Tiffani on social: Facebook Twitter LinkedIn   Find Roger online: Official Website Twitter LinkedIn   Roger's Book: A New Way to Think: Your Guide to Superior Management Effectiveness

YOUR INTENTION MATTERS!
Ep. 184 (James Lakes - SVP Sales @ Salesforce.com)

YOUR INTENTION MATTERS!

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 33:38


On this episode, James Lakes -SVP of Sales @ salesforce.com joins us to share his story!Remember, #yourintentionmatters!  Why?  Because that's the result you'll tend to get.www.soarondemand.com

Accelerate! with Andy Paul
1057: Harness the Power of the MEDDIC Framework, with Meghann Misiak

Accelerate! with Andy Paul

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 59:13


Meghann Misiak is the founder of The Path to President's Club, a training and consulting company. She is one of the rising new voices in sales that I like to feature on this show. She's part of the new generation of thought leaders and sales leaders who are shaping the future of selling and the sales profession. On today's episode we talk about a wide range of topics including the work Meghann is doing to train sellers how to harness the power of the MEDDIC framework to help them win more deals. More on Andy: Connect on LinkedIn Get Andy's new book "Sell Without Selling Out" on Amazon Learn more at AndyPaul.com Sponsored by: Revenue.io | Unlock exponential growth with an AI-powered RevOps platform | Revenue.io Scratchpad | The fastest way to update Salesforce, take sales notes, and stay on top of to-dos | Scratchpad.com Explore the Revenue.io Podcast Universe: Sales Enablement Podcast RevOps Podcast Selling with Purpose Podcast

IT Visionaries
Harnessing the Consistent Power of the Sea Through Tech with Inna Braverman, Co-Founder & CEO, Eco Wave Power Ltd.

IT Visionaries

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 34:43


The ocean is massive and powerful, and harnessing its energy has been difficult. Inna Braverman and her business partner, both with outsider perspectives, have worked to develop an elegant tech solution that can harness the continuous power of the moving seas. Their company, Eco Wave Power Ltd., is bringing their low-profile "floaters" that gather ocean energy to ports around the world, including in Gibraltar and Los Angeles. Also, hear Inna's personal story about how surviving the Chernobyl disaster has motivated her to make a positive impact.Tune in to learn:How is Eco Wave Power harnessing ocean energy? (00:45)How does Eco Wave Power's tech ultimately create electricity? (06:13)How did the original idea develop to use already existing structures on shore?  (13:58)Does the tech require a lot of maintenance to be sustained? (20:14)Is there private interest for this solution? (25:40)IT Visionaries is brought to you by  Salesforce Platform. If you love the thought leadership on this podcast, Salesforce has even more meaty IT thoughts to chew on. Take your company to the next level with in-depth research and trends right in your inbox. Subscribe to a newsletter tailored to your role at Salesforce.com/newsletter.Mission.org is a media studio producing content for world-class clients. Learn more at mission.org.

HRchat Podcast
WFH and Employee Benefits with Karen Mangia, Salesforce

HRchat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 21:00


In this HRchat we talk about employee benefits and the dangers of burnout. Our guest today is Karen Mangia, VP of Customer and Market Insights at Salesforce. She is a TEDx Speaker and best-selling author, now publishing her latest book, Success From Anywhere, detailing the shifting landscape of working from home and what that means for the success of your business. Incredible figures have endorsed Success From Anywhere, including Arianna Huffington, Founder of the Huffington Post, and Toni Rodoni, CEO of Salesforce! Questions Include:What will it take for us to close the gap between what employers are willing to offer and what employees expect?What are some of the most innovative new benefits organizations are offering now? What new benefits are being offered to Salesforce employees? What matters more: employer brand or benefits? Burnout is the topic of our time. What advice do you have for employees who are struggling with burnout?What are your top 3-5 predictions about the future of work?We do our best to ensure editorial objectivity. The views and ideas shared by our guests and sponsors are entirely independent of The HR Gazette, HRchat Podcast, and Iceni Media Inc.  

Salesforce Posse Podcast
Ines Garcia Salesforce Agility & Sustainability

Salesforce Posse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 24:57


This episode's guest 'Ines Garcia' has literally written the book on how to run successful Agile projects in Salesforce and has an incredible way of looking at the world, she's an Agile Coach, a Salesforce MVP and is helping organisations build in a sustainable way. So they can have a positive and better impact on the well being of communities and the planet we live in.At the Salesforce Posse podcast, we interview influencers in the Salesforce ecosystem so that we can gain a better understanding of how to excel in everything from AdminToArchitect.com.Twitter LinkedIn www.getAgile.co.uk Amazon Book 'Sustainable Happy Profit' Amazon Book 'Becoming more Agile whilst delivering Salesforce'  Sponsored by AdminToArchitect.com Salesforce Training00:00 Introduction 01:45 Why Agile? 03:14 Why did Agile come about 04:10 What are the mistakes Agile teams make? 06:00 The flows in the system. Leaving 06:46 Ines Garcia's Origin 08:30 How do we make time more engaging and satisfying 09:00 Scrum master certification 11:20 Ines Garcia's Books: Becoming more Agile & Sustainable Happy Profit 17:15 Where should Sustainability start? At movement, company or individual level? 19:00 How do we design things to align with nature 21:30 The Purpose Economy 23:00 How to Contact Ines 23:50 Sustainable Cook Book

Blazing Trails
Seth Godin and Brian Solis: How to Better Connect to Your Customers

Blazing Trails

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 39:44


How can companies better know and connect to their customers and build more trust? That's a question Seth Godin, marketing guru and founding editor of The Carbon Almanac and Brian Solis, VP and Global Innovation at Salesforce and best-selling author, try to answer in this week's episode. They discuss some fascinating findings from our just released State of the Connected Customer report.It's our 5th edition and features insights from nearly 17,000 consumers and business buyers worldwide. Tune in to find out what's at the heart of it

Accelerate! with Andy Paul
1056: Win/Loss Analysis, with Andrew Peterson and Spencer Dent

Accelerate! with Andy Paul

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 45:12


Andrew Peterson and Spencer Dent are the co-founders of Clozd. In today's episode we're talking about the importance and value that companies derive from doing effective win/loss analysis. We all can use more data points to help us improve our ability to help our customers make decisions. To win more deals. And what better source of data is there than talking to your buyers, and prospective buyers, about what you can do to create a better buying experience? We dig into how Clozd conducts the win/loss analysis for it's clients, the sources of information it taps into. And we explore some of the big takeaways they've learned from the various win/loss analyses they've performed for their clients. More on Andy: Connect on LinkedIn Get Andy's new book "Sell Without Selling Out" on Amazon Learn more at AndyPaul.com Sponsored by: Revenue.io | Unlock exponential growth with an AI-powered RevOps platform | Revenue.io Scratchpad | The fastest way to update Salesforce, take sales notes, and stay on top of to-dos | Scratchpad.com Explore the Revenue.io Podcast Universe: Sales Enablement Podcast RevOps Podcast Selling with Purpose Podcast

Inc. Founders Project with Alexa von Tobel
How to Nail the Post-Sale Customer Journey with Todd Olson of Pendo

Inc. Founders Project with Alexa von Tobel

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 27:40


A three-time entrepreneur and seasoned product leader, Todd Olson is on a journey to build software that makes software better. At Pendo, his Raleigh-based company, he's helped over 2,300 customers—from Salesforce to Toast—build product-led organizations. Nearly a decade into building Pendo, Todd feels he's finally found the entrepreneurial success he's been striving for throughout his career. Todd shares how he got his first customers through community-driven events, why companies should have separate product and engineering leaders, and how he incorporates his family into the company, often cooking for investors and customers in his home.

30 Minutes to President's Club | No-Nonsense Sales
98: Writing better emails with data-backed optimization (Will Allred, Co-Founder & COO @ Lavender)

30 Minutes to President's Club | No-Nonsense Sales

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 26:01


FOUR ACTIONABLE TAKEAWAYSAvoid using first names or commands in your subject lines.Use unsure tones (e.g. typically, usually) instead of informative tones in your emails.Never ask more than one question in an email.Sending 50 word emails yields better results than 125 word emails.PATH TO PRESIDENT'S CLUBCo-Founder & COO @ LavenderRESOURCES DISCUSSED:Time is running out to register for our upcoming 30MPC Live webinar.Download our exclusive cold calling battlecard by signing up for the newsletter.Improve sales execution with Outreach. Click to watch our playbook on how to write better subject lines.Gong improves your win rates, starting with their Discovery Cheat Sheet + our top discovery tactics.Share demos, proposals, and customer stories that push opportunities over the finish line with Vidyard. See our top video tips + use promo code 30MPC to upgrade to a Pro account free for 30 days. Dooly instantly syncs notes to Salesforce and automatically adds contacts to accounts. Access the sales template we use to qualify and close more deals, faster.Automate conversational texting for the entire customer journey with Skipio. Check out our best practices for texting prospects.HELP US OUT!What do you love about our podcast? Please consider leaving a rating and review for the show. We always enjoy reading your comments and feedback!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Unthinkable with Jay Acunzo
MINI-Series: Illustration with Haley Weaver (Haley Drew This)

Unthinkable with Jay Acunzo

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 27:10


Resonating deeply doesn't require us to do anything big or expensive. The MINI-Series explores four types of created work that don't take up much space -- but still carry tons of meaning to those who encounter it. Last episode was about copywriting. This episode: illustration, featuring Haley Weaver of the wildly popular instagram account, Haley Drew This. Together, we unpack some of her seemingly simple but deeply emotional webcomics -- many of which uplift those suffering with their mental well-being. Haley creates honest, beautiful, yet simple depictions of her own vulnerabilities and her experience of anxiety, relationships with friends, understanding of love, and more. SHARE THE SHOW:Help others find Unthinkable in their favorite podcast player by sharing this link: https://pod.link/jay SUBSCRIBE TO THE NEWSLETTER:https://jayacunzo.com/newsletterEvery other Friday, I send a new idea, story, or framework for crafting more resonant work to thousands of subscribers, ranging from entrepreneurs, freelancers, and independent creators, to marketers and leaders at brands like Adobe, Red Bull, Shopify, Salesforce, the BBC, Wistia, HubSpot, Drift, ProfitWell, a16z, and the New York Times. VOICES IN THIS EPISODE:Haley Weaver is the acclaimed illustrator and writer behind Haley Drew This and the popular instagram account @haleydrewthis featuring her webcomics centered around anxiety + mental health, relationships, and selfhood. Her forthcoming book is Give Me Space But Don't Go Far. SPONSOR: The JuiceThe Juice is like Spotify for B2B learning: a beautiful, curated collection of the best creators and resources serving sales and marketing pros today. Get suggestions based on your job title, search top resources, or create and share playlists of useful ideas and content.Learn more and try it free at https://www.thejuicehq.com/Connect with Hiba Amin on The Juice here: https://app.thejuicehq.com/creators/hiba-aminFollow her on Twitter: https://twitter.com/h5amin CONNECT WITH ME ELSEWHERE:- Twitter: https://twitter.com/jayacunzo and https://twitter.com/UnthinkableShow- Instagram: https://instagram.com/jacunzo- LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/in/jayacunzo- Email: jay@unthinkablemedia.com PRODUCTION:- Creator, host, writer, and editor: Jay Acunzo - https://jayacunzo.com- Producer and researcher: Ilana Nevins - https://www.ilananevins.com

Atlanta Startup Podcast
Learn Why Melinda Gates Funds Ada Developers Academy in Atlanta with Lauren Sato

Atlanta Startup Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 25:08


Founded in 2013, Ada Developers Academy is the top program for empowering women and gender expansive adults to become software developers for companies like Salesforce, Microsoft, and other household tech names. CEO Lauren Sato is expanding into Atlanta and discusses Ada's amazing placement statistics, why Atlanta is the perfect city for Ada's model, and how funding from Melinda French Gates will take the program to new heights in our city.

CX Chronicles Podcast
CXChronicles Podcast 169 with Kristi Faltorusso, Chief Customer Officer at ClientSuccess

CX Chronicles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 39:25


Hey CX Nation,In this week's episode of The CXChronicles Podcast #169 we welcomed Kristi Faltorusso, Chief Customer Officer at ClientSuccess.ClientSuccess is revolutionizing the way SaaS companies manage, retain, and grow their existing customer base. They help SaaS companies proactively manage customer relationships, measure customer health, minimize churn and maximize revenue.ClientSuccess is a simple yet sophisticated solution that both the front-line CSMs and any Executive team will love. For the CSMs, they bring together the tools, best practices, insights and analytics that they will need to proactively manage their customers & future portfolios. For the Executives, they deliver the deep analytics, metric and reports to provide a comprehensive view of the customer health of their SaaS business.In this episode Kristi and Adrian chat through how she has tackled The Four CX Pillars: Team,  Tools, Process & Feedback throughout her career + shares some of the tips & tricks that have worked for the team at ClientSuccess as they've grown their customer portfolio & revenue.**Episode #169 Highlight Reel:**1.  Why customer success is becoming a leader within modern sales & revenue generation  2.  Ideas for setting up your optimal, well-balanced customer success team  as you scale3.  Setting expectations early & often with the customers & teams using your product   4.  Leveraging customer journey maps as your company's blue-print for growth & success 5.   Socializing your customer feedback & democratizing your data to drive innovationHuge thanks to Kristi for coming on The CXChronicles Podcast and featuring her team's work and efforts in pushing the customer experience and customer success space into the future.Click here to learn more about Kristi FaltorussoClick here to learn more about ClientSuccessIf you enjoy The CXChronicles Podcast, please stop by your favorite podcast player and leave us a review. This is the easiest way that we can find new listeners, guests and future customer focused business leaders to tune into our weekly podcast. And be sure to grab a copy of our book "The Four CX Pillars To Grow Your Business Now" on Amazon +  check out the CXChronicles Youtube channel with all of our video episodes & customer focused business leader content!Reach out to CXC at INFO@cxchronicles.com for more information about how we can help your business make customer happiness a habit!Support the show

Adapter's Advantage: Breakthrough Moments that Lead to Success
Finding Your Superpower | Tiffani Bova

Adapter's Advantage: Breakthrough Moments that Lead to Success

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 38:38


Tiffani Bova is the global growth evangelist at Salesforce and the author of the Wall Street Journal bestselling book GROWTH IQ: Get Smarter About the Choices that Will Make or Break Your Business. Tiffani has been named to the latest Thinkers50's list of the world's top management thinkers and is a welcomed guest on Bloomberg, BNN, Cheddar, MSNBC, and Yahoo Finance, among others. Tiffani also contributes to publications including Harvard Business Review, Forbes, Entrepreneur, Diginomica, Quora, Thrive, Rotman School of Management and Duke Dialogue Review. She is a change maker who's thought-provoking and forward-thinking insights have made her a frequent guest on a variety of industry-leading podcasts and live broadcasts. Tiffani was named one of Inc. Magazine's 37 Sales Experts You Need to Follow on Twitter, a LinkedIn Top Sales Expert to follow in 2018, 2019 and 2020, a Top 100 Women in Tech, a Brand Quarterly Magazine Top 50 Marketing Thought Leader, and one of the most Powerful and Influential Women in California according to the National Diversity Council.   Show Notes: https://www.tiffanibova.com/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/tiffanibova/ https://www.tiffanibova.com/whats-next-podcast/ https://www.tiffanibova.com/book/ https://www.salesforce.com/story-of-sales/

Demand Gen Visionaries
Building a Successful Brand Community with Daniel Rodriguez, CMO of Simplr

Demand Gen Visionaries

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 36:10


This episode features an interview with Daniel Rodriguez, CMO of Simplr, a human-first, machine-enabled customer experience solution that meets the demands of the NOW Customer across all digital channels. Daniel is leading a team that is redefining the way brands deliver customer service.On this episode Daniel shares his insights into building a successful brand community, creating a halo effect by having the right investments, and ways to get your target audience to think positively about your brand. ---“Community is an organic process. You can try to do things to encourage people to engage, but I think it's understanding. You really have to understand what is it that people are looking to learn, and one of the things that we've realized is that, there's a lot around career definition.”---Episode Timestamps:*(03:19) - Daniel's role at Ceros*(06:13) - Segment: Trust Tree*(09:12) - How demand gen fits into Simplr's marketing strategy*(12:12) - Segment: The Playbook*(17:05) - Creating a movement with community*(24:46) - Getting you target audience to think positively about your brand*(30:46) - Segment: The Dust Up*(34:04) - Segment: Quick Hits SponsorDemand Gen Visionaries is brought to you by Qualified.com, the #1 Conversational Marketing platform for companies that use Salesforce and the secret weapon for Demand Gen pros. The world's leading enterprise brands trust Qualified to instantly meet with buyers, right on their website, and maximize sales pipeline. Visit Qualified.com to learn more.LinksConnect with Daniel on LinkedInConnect with Ian on LinkedInLearn more about Simplrwww.caspianstudios.comDaniel's Book: Experience is Everything

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher
Can automation fight the great resignation? UiPath CEO Daniel Dines thinks so

Recode Decode with Kara Swisher

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 70:07


Today Nilay Patel talking to Daniel Dines, the founder and CEO of UiPath, one of the biggest automation companies in the world. But not the automation you might think; UiPath sells software automation, or what consultants call “robotic process automation” so they can sound fancy and charge higher fees. UiPath and other software automation companies have a different approach to solving issues with your legacy software: just hire another computer to use software for you. Seriously: UiPath uses computer vision to literally look at what's on a screen, and then uses a virtual mouse and keyboard to click around and do things in apps like Excel and Salesforce. The automations can be mundane, like generating lists of people to contact from public records, or intensely complicated: UiPath can actually monitor how different software is used throughout a company and suggest automations. Huge companies like Uber, Facebook, Spotify, and Google all use UIPath. Links: The robots are coming for your office UiPath AI Computer Vision Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/22828061 Credits: Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today's episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright. The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

IT Visionaries
Respect All Your Clients' Dreams Equally With Miles Ward, CTO of SADA

IT Visionaries

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 41:47


If you're in a service industry, should you honor every client's dream equally? According to Miles Ward, the CTO of SADA, that's absolutely the correct business mindset. Miles also talks about the benefits companies are finding in the cloud and how it's valuable to be an engineer who communicates well too. He even shares a little about his passion for playing a musical instrument called the electric sousaphone.Tune in to learn:What's the history of SADA? (04:14)What does Miles see customers wanting to do in the cloud? (11:28)What innovations are exciting to Miles? (19:18)Does SADA build applications for themselves? (23:37)  Mentions:“What Twitter and friends prove about multi-cloud” (Check out “Miles-low's Hierarchy of Tech Needs”)IT Visionaries is brought to you by The Salesforce Platform. If you love the thought leadership on this podcast, Salesforce has even more meaty IT thoughts to chew on. Take your company to the next level with in-depth research and trends right in your inbox. Subscribe to a newsletter tailored to your role at Salesforce.com/newsletter.Mission.org is a media studio producing content for world-class clients. Learn more at mission.org.

Sixteen:Nine
Geoff Bessin, Intuiface

Sixteen:Nine

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 38:26


NOTE - Podcasts normally come out on Wednesdays, but as a favor to Intuiface - which is at this week's ISE trade show in Spain - I moved it up a day to coincide with the show's opening day ... The 16:9 PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY SCREENFEED – DIGITAL SIGNAGE CONTENT One of the big trends in the software world is the whole idea of no code development - the premise that both programmers and mere mortals can create applications without getting their typing fingers dirty and brains fried doing traditional computer programming. The proposition is that no code development platforms can cut out a lot of time and cost associated with pulling applications together, and also deal with the reality that good programmers are in high demand and therefore scarce. The French software firm Intuiface is in the interesting position of having offered a no code platform long before no code was a discussion point, so the folks there are a great resource for discussing the implications for the digital signage and interactive display market. I spoke with Geoff Bessin, the CMO and main voice for Intuiface, about the distinctions between no code and low code development platforms, and how they differ from the simple drag and drop, what you see is what you get user interfaces that are common in digital signage content management systems. We also dig into the benefits, the limitations, and more than anything, why you should know and care about no code. Subscribe to this podcast: iTunes * Google Play * RSS TRANSCRIPT Geoff, thank you for joining me. Can you give me the rundown first on what Intuiface is all about?  Geoff Bessin: Will do, Dave, thank you for having me. So Intuiface is a no-code platform dedicated to the creation of interactive digital content. That includes digital signage, but really it can anything in the venue. It could be a museum exhibition, could be a sales pitch for a movie sales team, could be anything at a trade show, something in a real estate office, et cetera. So you create it, you deploy it, you can do analytics with it. It's all good. And the company is based in France, correct?  Geoff Bessin: We are headquartered in a town called Labège, which is right outside Toulouse in France. Although I'm not, but it's funny, my name is Geoffrey Besson, so both my first and last name look French. So people always assume it's French, but that's not the case. I'm in Boston. Can you speak a lick of French? Geoff Bessin: Oui. Yes.  Good for you! I wanted to talk about no-code software, cause you guys have been no-code before people were even using that term and no-code is one of these trends, just like headless CMS, that seems to be bubbling up and maybe people don't understand a lot about it yet. Geoff Bessin: Yeah, you could go back to the 80s and find things like HyperCard where you were enabling non-developers to create an application of some sorts. So it goes back a long way, but in terms of a movement, generating notice, gaining investment and having companies spend money on it, it's only been the past few years.  I can tell you that statistics are now saying that the market size, the amount of money being spent on no-code software used to create apps is almost $14 billion. It's a lot of money being pumped into these apps. And in fact, more than 65% of apps are now created using no-code tools. So more than 50%, more than half of apps are being built with no-code software. It is the predominant means of delivering applications these days.  What's the distinction between no-code and low-code, because I've heard both terms. Geoff Bessin: There's no formal distinction. You can't point at it and go, “Oh, this one's no-code” like you just went over the line. But the idea is that with low-code, there are back doors. There are means to enhance, to extend, to facilitate integration that might involve a little bit of coding. Even that coding could be simplified based on maybe either a scripting language that is native to the tool or a public scripting language like Ruby.  Whereas no-code is just 100%, you're not going to see code anywhere, and so you are in a way limited to the sandbox provided by the no-code platform, what it is you're able to deliver is limited by what you can piece together with the Lego blocks of that platform. no-code gives you those little back doors to branch yourself out.  So what does it mean for development? Does it distance or mediate the need for application developers completely, and just any old end-user can produce an application without having to engage developers or is it more something that accelerates the development process and just gets some cost and time out of the way? Geoff Bessin: I think that question brings us to who's doing it, and why are they doing it? As I mentioned, no-code has exploded recently, and it is due to a set of developments that have driven application development to what is now called the “citizen developer.”  Trends such as a shortage of developers, it's not that we're trying to get rid of them. It's that there's not enough. I saw one statistic that back in 2020, there were 1.2 million unfilled developer jobs in the United States, just the US but 1.2 million developer jobs unfilled in the US and colleges and universities were only cranking out about 400,000 developers. There's a shortage. So it's not that we don't want them, we don't have them. What do you do about that? There was also COVID, which has greatly accelerated investment in these no-code platforms, because everything moved online, and when everything moved online, everything needed to be digitized and companies realized we have to move now but we don't have enough resources, so how the heck are we going to digitize these things?  And then there's also tangential, but influential, the fact that even in our own home, we're not coders, but we are programmers. If I'm working with my Nest thermostat, that's programming. I just got a puppy and they have these apps that you can then program to see how many steps they've taken and how much water they drink, that's programming, and the digital native is used to controlling their environment digitally. There are tools out there that enable them to realize their ideas as an application, and somebody has to build it because there's not enough developers to go around. That's what really kicked the no-code market in the butt. What we're seeing subsequently is that the developer shortage is being filled by these citizen developers producing applications, maybe for personal use, maybe for internal employee use, maybe for customer us, it depends. Those developers are now being transitioned to work on larger projects, more intricate projects. They have more time arguably to focus on the big tickets stuff that still needs the hardcore development, offloading their responsibility from the simpler things that can now be handled by that citizen developer. Are there trade offs that you have to accept, to use no-code instead of just doing your own thing? Geoff Bessin: Certainly. There are obvious advantages, there's speed and there's costs benefits. There's a big productivity boost, but of course there's trade offs. I like this notion of Legos. You have these prebuilt blocks and this is a finite number of block options that you can combine in an infinite number of ways. At the end of the day, you're still limited to those blocks, right? And so if I'm using a no-code platform and I need a block that doesn't exist, I'm stuck.  Now, I suppose if it's a low-code platform, depending on what I need to achieve,okay, maybe I can put something together if I have the skill, maybe I don't, but if I don't have the skill or if the opportunity with the platform doesn't exist, I am limited, and I think that might be the fundamental challenge is what can I do? What can I realize? Cause recognize that a lot of these platforms are built to be generic, to address sort of breadth, not always depth, and so that can be a challenge. You are also, of course, relying on them to be responsible for performance and reliability. You are handing over that duty, that responsibility to the provider, the no-code platform. I hope they're doing a good job. Because it's out of my hands, I can't control that, and so those are the big risks: can I achieve exactly what I want or am I making compromises? Am I achieving the level of performance? My ability to deploy? My ability to collect data analytics? My ability to manage that deployment?  There's 150-200 platforms across the spectrum offering no-code and low-code options. You might be making some compromises on the way, certainly are, but as I shared with you, 65% of apps are now built with no-code platforms. So companies have decided it's worth the risk.  What's the distinction between no-code and what you see is what you get (WYSIWYG) user interfaces? Geoff Bessin: No-code, I think it's more of a connotation, not a denotation. I think you could argue that a lot of no-code platforms are WYSIWYG. Intuiface is a no-code platform, it's a drag and drop tool. It's a WYSIWYG. The connotation of WYSIWYG, it could be for a developer. It could be for anybody of any skill set. So it's more of a generic catchall for applications enabled to create other applications by dragging components and you can see what they look like at design time and development time.  No-code connotes the non-developer, the citizen developer that you don't have coding skills and you're not expected to have those skills. So I think that's it.  You sent me a white paper that kind of goes into this and you're making the argument that while no-code is out there, it's exploding and growing and everything else, there's really no application, I think you called it a ‘no-code blind spot' in terms of in-venue applications. What do you mean by that?  Geoff Bessin: So let's define in-venue because that is exactly our contention. In-venue is an encapsulation of any digital deployment out of the home. It could be digital signage, could be all those things I mentioned with Intuiface as well, the museum exhibition, the sales presentation, real estate office, et cetera. It is out of the home. It is not my phone though. It is not my PC. I'm not browsing the web at home. I'm out of my home, I'm in a venue and there is some digital content trying to communicate to educate, to promote, to sell to me.  That domain has been, I think with the exception of Intuiface, untouched by the no-code movement. For sure, if you look at the landscape of companies delivering solutions to address the needs of the citizen developer, there is nothing out there addressing these in-venue deployments. It's all about web and mobile apps and some websites, that's it. So if you want to create digital signage, if you want to create that museum exhibition, the sales pitch, there is no option out there now, and which brings us David, I know you're going to want to ask this, which is, will, aren't all digital signage platforms, no-code? Which is great question, Dave, by the way... You are a psychic! Geoff Bessin: That's a yes, but, it is absolutely true that you don't write code, but there are certain expectations of a no-code platform that the traditional digital signage CMS cannot fulfill, and it's interesting if I take a step back, really by definition, it has always been the non-developer on the digital signage side, hasn't it? You buy a platform, there's a CMS, the user of the content management system is the content person. They're not coding anything. They're working with the CMS, they're assigning content to zones and they're day partying. By definition from day one, digital signage was always a non-developer domain, whereas web and mobile apps and these sorts of things were always the developer domain.  The no-code movement was, “Hey, this complicated stuff, we gotta make it simpler. We need the citizen developer involved.” So they brought no-code to the domain that started with developers, which I think is one of the explanations for why it didn't really come over to the in-venue side yet, because it was always non-coder users, but there are certain expectations of the no-code platform, that is not really in scope of the platform delivering in-venue content. A simple example, just to give you one would be the notion of context. To react to the user, react to the environment, in real time in that context, and do something as a result that is inherently this notion of logic. If this, then that. That's coding, right? It's got the whiff of coding and how do you do that? And there's a list of things we can discuss about what makes in-venue unique. But it requires the accommodation of additional concerns that are beyond the scope of what a traditional CMS does and that no other no-code platform does across the no-code spectrum.  I guess what you're saying in certain respects is you can develop a playlist, do all the basic functionality of a digital sign, you can target content and everything else, but the moment you get into a request to do something different, that's interactive, that as you say, maybe responds to triggers and so on, that gets a lot more complicated, and at that point you're putting in, if you're an end user, you're putting in a request to your reseller or to the software company directly saying, can you do this? And they'll say, yes, we can, but it's going to take this amount of time, this amount of money and, we can't get this to you for six months cause it's off of our roadmap or whatever… Is that one of the arguments you'd make?  Geoff Bessin: I would say that for sure. You see, a lot of companies have libraries. Here's our template library, here's our plugin library, here's our integration library. Oh, you want something we don't have? We can build that for you. Here's the cost. Here's how long it's going to take. That's one example. I can tell you that from a Intuiface perspective, we don't have any libraries. We haven't really prebuilt anything. Our paradigm is to enable integration with any web service, to create any UI, to integrate with any content management system, to have that ubiquity, which means that we don't have to build anything for our clients. The customer can do that. But it also means that, well, you better have a good idea and you better need to know what you. Because you're starting with a tabula rasa, but yes, that is certainly one good example of how you fulfill these sort of unique needs you might have thought about. I'll give you another example, which is retail point of sale. How would you build that thing? To me, that qualifies as an in-venue application. That's in the venue, right? I can order through a website, but do I want to put a website on a kiosk? It's a different domain. It's a different paradigm. It has different design requirements, different expectations, different issues about security, about being able to run potentially offline. But having to work with peripherals, having hyper-local context dependence, there are all of these concerns that will impact that user experience in the venue that may not be relevant or at all to a web experience. If I want to build that thing, how much flexibility am I going to have? Now there are companies like Grubber, which are pretty much pre-built everything, right? All you do is you push your menu into their back office system, and you're good to go. You just have to hope it does exactly what it is you want because you're constrained within the confines of what they offer for design, with the offer for business process, what they offer in terms of context, awareness, and reaction and if you need to make any kind of changes, you're dependent on them to make those changes, and that has a cost and a time penalty to it.  What kind of skillsets do you realistically need to use a no-code particularly in the context of Intuiface? I'm assuming the proposition is anybody can sit down, but you still have to plan out, you have to have some methodical thinking about what you want to do with what the decision tree is on all that stuff, right? Geoff Bessin: You do, and that gives me an opportunity to give you just a brief history of Intuiface because we were never a no-code company, that wasn't how we were oriented. The company was actually founded back in 2002. It was founded by a couple of PhDs with expertise in touch technology. And from day one, it was about bringing user experiences to a lot of it was, believe it or not, the defense industry, but also retail, touch-driven user experiences for something, to accomplish something. The company was always about the user experience.  At the end of the day, as great as your touch technology might be, nobody cares if it's not usable. If it doesn't make it easy to achieve some goal, and so Intuiface, when it was born it was all about the user experience, and in fact, most of its early hires were focused on that, on how to make something intuitive and that where the company name comes from, an intuitive interface. To make intuitive user experiences that we're driven by interaction like touch. What happened was we were servicing all of these organizations, again, a lot of defense, Intuiface is headquartered just outside the Toulouse, as i mentioned. So you have the big aerospace and defense industry located in Toulouse like Airbus. So a lot of those clients, but also retail, commerce. Focused on user experience, and it was hard to scale the business because you had this deep technical dependency underneath because it's driven by touch and we're going back 15 years, so expensive hardware, challenging technology, and at the same time, trying to come up with these really intuitive user interfaces, it was a challenge, and we decided internally, I say we, but I wasn't here yet. Intuiface decided internally that we need to come up with something that can accelerate our ability to deliver good user experiences on top of this touch technology. The company builds something called Intuikit, it was used internally by user experience experts, designers, and people good at aesthetics, people good at thinking about the customer. They were not developers. Ultimately, we decided this thing called Intuikit is pretty awesome, maybe that's our business, and so we're. It's a short story about how the software platform Intuiface was born. We were always about the user experience. It is our expectation that our users are experts in the users, creating intuitive interfaces, not In having any necessary knowledge about development. So that is our expectation, and that's what we think is appropriate. You need to be creative. You need to understand the user. You need to understand the domain. You don't have to worry about the platform you're building it on. That should not be your problem. You should be all about solving the customer's problem. I realize you work with a bunch of industries, but a lot of your activity is in digital signage. If I am an end-user and I'm using ACME digital signage software, can I use the Intuiface with it? Does it plug into it or are there restrictions? Do you have to go through door number one or door number two, you can't use both doors? Geoff Bessin: Probably, you can't do. Typically the content management system used by the DS platform is proprietary. It's a closed system. It doesn't have a published API. So we couldn't read from it. Intuiface conversely has its own runtime as well. We can run side by side. In fact, on Windows, we have the ability to run side by side with other applications, we have had customers who are not ready to transition off their existing DS investment. So they were sort of a cohabitating interactive Intuiface based content at one part of the screen and traditional DS content and others were cohabitating that screen. But normally no, that wouldn't be how one would do it.  Certainly Intuiface is positioned around interactivity. We believe that by definition, once you introduce interactivity and the need to be responsive and context, and to accommodate not just touch, but sensors and voice and computer vision, when you need to account for all of these things, you need to be very good at that if-when, right? And that notion of conditional responses to events which are completely typically outside the realm of the traditional DS platform. That's where we start, and then clients can decide, do I want these Intuiface to co-exist with this DS platform? Or do we need to make some sort of transition. If I'm an end-user and I start with Intuiface and have a series of interactive screens that are doing some sort of functionality, whatever it may be and then I decide, I want to also have an expanding network of “dumb screens” that are just running traditional digital signage content in some sort of a sequence. Can you do that too?  Geoff Bessin: Sure, the content doesn't know it's in a dumb playlist, right? The content is fine. Certainly you can do that. The Intuiface was born, solving the interactive problem. And it's interesting, Dave, because in the early days of selling our platform, digital signage was something else. You didn't touch signage. So our communication to the marketplace was not interactive signage. There wasn't such a thing. There was interactive content for kiosks. That was the world when we first walked in, you were touching something such as a table or a kiosk. There were touch screens, very expensive touch screens. You could be bound on a wall, never a perceptive pixel from a million years ago. Like those CNN screens and that sort of thing. You spend $2,500, you can have a touchscreen, but bylarge, it was kiosks and that sort of thing.  What happened was that they had this largely commoditized, digital signage space, hundreds of companies offering traditional digital signage and customers had iPhones in their pocket and they had iPads at home, and they started thinking about interactivity. They see the voting coverage on CNN and people tapping screens. So can you do that? That's why we started getting questions about traditional digital signage. Can you fulfill that as well? We were like yeah, we can, and over the years we developed additional capability to accommodate it.  The paradigm is still different. We don't have a traditional notion of a playlist for example, but you can create a playlist within Intuiface. We're using our Lego blocks, not just to build interactive content, but non-interactive content as well. You can do both.  So it was something you could do, but it's not your focus?  Geoff Bessin: I would say, we'res interactive first, but the traditional broadcast signage, and I don't mean this in a judgy way, it's not typically that complicated. So if it is a playlist of stuff, images, videos, documents, it's very easily done, but people very rarely come to us, Dave, with traditional first. They're coming to us because they need to solve an interactive need, and oh, by the way, long-term you can transition to traditional content as well. I agree that, the conventional side of digital signage, the meat potatoes, run this stuff at this time and these locations and all that is commoditized and pretty simple, and I always say that the complicated stuff is behind the scenes, the device management, the API integrations and all that sort of stuff. Are you at a level now where you can provide the building blocks, the Lego blocks to do the interactive piece, but also enable the end user to monitor and remotely manage all that?  Geoff Bessin: We do offer that, and in fact we offer both of what you mentioned, cause you also mentioned the API integration, we can accommodate that as well. On the device management side, certainly we have an awareness of the devices in the field and you can set up notifications if things are going wrong, that sort of thing, you can see what's running on those devices. On certain platforms, you can remotely update on runtime, that sort of thing. We're not averse to working with a device and platform management options, to collaborate with them in a deployment, but we do offer some of that. And with API integration, we've actually offered for six years. It's been a long time and it's one of those things, Dave, where, as I said, we weren't born with no-code. We were born worried about user experience and we realized we looked in the mirror and wen, oh, we're actually no-code.  We've been offering a software called API Explorer.  You can automatically create an integration, an integration with a web API without writing code And it is a real time integration reading from writing to that web API. It could be a back office system, ERP application, CRM application could be a database wrapped in an API, could be a device on the internet of things, all of these options can be integrated with a running Intuiface experienced by a non-developer, using API Explorer. So we've offered that for some time.  We now have our own CMS but you don't have to use it. Our original value prop is to use whatever you want. We have API Explorer, you can plug into whatever you want. We have now introduced our own because depending on the scenario and the requirements of the project, it just makes better sense to use ours. But we still have customers that would rather use that other thing, or Dave, they're integrated with the ERP application. They're building a retail point of sale application with Intuiface, and they have integrated with the ERP system, they need to work with the API and you can do that. Who would you describe as your kind of core end-users, core customers?  Geoff Bessin: I would say 50 to 60% of our customers are agencies and integrators. So we can discuss with the actual user might be, but I would say more than half of our installed base are agencies and integrators with their own clients. And there is a spectrum of reasons why they're using Intuiface. Some of them, they don't have the development skill, but they want to offer interactivity. Others have men and women on the bench with the skill, but they don't have the scale. That's the problem with people is that they can work on one thing at a time. And what we find is that a lot of the integrators in particular will be taking Intuiface so they can scale. They can take on a larger volume of maybe small and mid-sized projects that they can do with Intuiface, and then put the men and women on the bench onto the bigger high value projects. We find that customers are saving 80% of time and 60% of costs versus customer that don't use Intuiface. So it's very easy for them, and it's an easy pitch. Conceptually, if you can build an interactive application, doing exactly what you want with a no-code platform is probably cheaper and faster than if I wrote code, so it's an easy idea to wallow and it is what our customers experience. So that's what you'll find. I would say the majority 60%-55% agencies and integrators, the rest are the small and midsize museums, schools, retailers, sales offices, marketing, and sales teams, they want to do it themselves. And do they want to do it themselves because of cost or control? Geoff Bessin: Often it's because of cost. They have ambition or they've been bitten, Dave, where they have outsourced it. You don't see this going in, but you meet an agency. You tell them what you want, they agree and deliver something in two months that doesn't resemble what you wanted, so you ask for revisions, and this cycle continues while you pay for the time. It's not an agile process, and again, I'm not casting aspersions at the agency, they are our customers. But their sales pitch is we use Intuiface so we can deliver what you want faster than the other guys that do exactly what you want, and by the way, if you don't like the work we did, you can take it with you. If I pay an agency to write custom code and I'll be dissatisfied, I'm starting from zero with another agency. So you have that kind of portability benefit as well. So yes, a lot of the small and midsize, it's budget driven or based on their experience, they have limited budgets. They outsourced it, and they were just satisfied. We do have the occasional large enterprise. They want to have maybe an interactive sales pitch. So the marketing and sales team is driving the creation of the collateral, hiring a developer to make. I could use PowerPoint. Why am I hiring? It's hard to justify this pay developers to code a sales pitch, I can just use PowerPoint. Hold on a second, here's this thing called Intuiface. I can build an interactive sales pitch for my Salesforce. I'm still using the tool. I'm the creative team on the marketing sales team. But I'm creating something that is far more novel and engaging than a PowerPoint. When the pandemic hit, I speculated and I'm sure many people speculated that this was going to be a difficult time for people who were in the touch and interactive business. What happened instead is that touch actually went up in demand and self service applications became very much a big development initiative. Have you seen that happening in the last couple of years?  Geoff Bessin: We have, and then ultimately it turns out people are more afraid of other people than touch screens. And our business has rebounded quite well. What we were hoping for, and it seems to be the case is that demand didn't drop. It got stuck behind a wall. There was a dam and the demand was building behind the dam, and you couldn't open the dam cause nobody was out of the house and the waters were rising, people are finally out of the house, and you opened up the floodgates. So we're seeing a really nice rebound that is complimented, not just by the building interest anyway, but the kind of renewed interest in facilitating a non-human interaction, which sounds horrible culturally, in their place of business or what have you. And again, it's not just touch. Yes, I think probably most people would rather take a little Purell. They're fine with that, but still some people are not, and maybe they can use their mobile phone or scan a QR code.  But it's also a labor issue. It's harder to hire people and if you can use self service, then you don't have to worry so much about staffing. Geoff Bessin: There's that whole other thing too which is the cost of staffing and training and enabling and equipping and there's that as well. So for sure, there is certainly a perceived increase in interest, and interactivity of any kind and Intuiface has always been focused on any kind of interactivity, not just touch, and certainly this ability to use my mobile phone to interact with content is an increasingly interesting example, using gestures to interact, using voice to interact. So I'm not touching but I'm still working with technology directly rather than mediating through somebody else. So all of that is going on.  Last question: you guys have certainly in the last few years had a presence at ISE and at other trade shows, what are you doing in the next few weeks and months? Is Intuiface going to be something that people can walk up and get demos for?  Geoff Bessin: We will be at ISE, so that'll be our first trade show in however many years we'll be there. So you and I are speaking on April 26th and that's why I say in just a couple of weeks, we will be there with a booth, and we certainly hope we'll see others there.  We used to actually have our user conference in parallel with ISE, in-person and the pandemic put the kibosh on that. We've done virtual user conferences every year since then, and we like that because you don't have to travel, and so our user conference will be forever more be virtual. We actually have our user conference in three weeks that people are welcome to join. It's free, it'll be online, but we plan to be at ISE. We plan to be a DSE in the US and I think it's now November, and we'll be participating when your colleagues at Avitas are running DSE in parallel and ISE will be participating in that as well. So we're starting. We're treating this as back to normal. It's interesting, Dave working on my travel plans, flying into Spain. But you can't just get on a plane, you need to jump through certain things because of COVID. But it looks as of today, they're not even requiring masks onsite. That doesn't seem to be a requirement. Just the honor system that you are vaccinated or recovered and we'll see how that goes, but we're excited to be there. We'll have a big booth and about eight of us, we'll have a lot of people there.  And where can people find Intuiface online?  Geoff Bessin: Dave, thank you for asking, Intuiface.com. They can also just contact us. You are listening to Jeff Besson. You can just email me bessin@intuiface.com. The product can be tried for free, Dave. No credit card required. People can poke at it and see if what we're saying is true.  All right, thank you. Geoff Bessin: Dave. It's a pleasure. Thanks for having me.

The Association Podcast
Serial Entrepreneur and Founder of Nimble AMS Talks Lean Work Culture with Sig VanDamme

The Association Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 59:51


Longtime industry veteran, Sig VanDamme, joins The Association Podcast to talk about his experiences as an entrepreneur throughout his career, working with and building AMS platforms, and what led to him deciding to build Nimble AMS on top of Salesforce.We get into what the workplace looks like today and how he runs his Salesforce consultancy, Gojectory, differently than he did with other ventures in the past.  Other topics include his philosophy on small, daily improvements and quick wins, and keeping his staff lean and well-rested so that they can deliver their best work.https://www.gojectory.com/ 

Freight Broker Boot Camp Audio Experience
Top 5 Freight Broker Sales CRM's For 2022

Freight Broker Boot Camp Audio Experience

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 9:31


We all know that increasing your sales is hard especially if you are just getting started with your business. In this episode of Freight Broker Boot Camp, I'm gonna share with you what's a CRM, the importance of having a CRM and my Top 5 CRM's that you can use that I personally had used before and reviewed. Enjoy!   Timestamps: [00:25] What is a Sales CRM? [01:35] The #1 Reason Why Freight Broker Needs a CRM [03:11] Different types of CRM's [04:30] #1 - Hubspot [05:20] #2 - Pipedrive [05:45] #3 - Zoho [06:05] #4 - Salesforce [06:46] #5 - Less Annoying CRM [07:40] Recap [08:33] Get Your Freight Broker Training NOW!!! - www.FreightBrokerBootCamp.com [08:55] Subscribe, Rate & Review! ---------------------------------- If you enjoyed this episode, please RATE / REVIEW and SUBSCRIBE to ensure you never miss an episode. Connect w/ Dennis & Learn More! Connect with me on LinkedIn Learn to Become A Freight Broker/Agent in 30 Days or Less! Watch Freight Broker Training Videos FREE Recently Ranked "Top 30 Freight Podcast"

Salesforce Developer Podcast
123: Salesforce Development with Dan Appleman Pt. 2

Salesforce Developer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 21:58


This is part 2 of our conversation with Dan Appleman, author, software engineer, and entrepreneur, where he shares some things he has learned about developing on Salesforce over the years. We pick up talking about his Advanced Apex book, which is now in its fifth edition, and what the new updates look like.  Dan notes that while there have been many new changes in Apex programming such as improved platform events and easier metadata updating, most of the changes are in the triggers. He also foresees the future of Salesforce development for any medium to large application. Show Highlights: Updates in Apex programming including triggers Things to consider when creating a framework Why focus on principles instead of frameworks The question of modularization The future of Salesforce development for medium to large application Custom metadata driving a trigger dispatch system The benefits of SFDX The power of focusing on foundational concepts Dan's favorite presentations What makes the process builder evil   Links: Dan on Twitter: http://twitter.com/danappleman Dan on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/danappleman/ Dan on Github: https://github.com/DesawarePublishing Personal blog: https://danappleman.com Advanced Apex blog: https://advancedapex.com/ Custom search engine for all things Salesforce: https://searchtheforce.com Pluralsight courses: https://www.pluralsight.com/authors/dan-appleman

Agency Intelligence
Power Producers: Yes! with Joel Stevenson

Agency Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 55:27


In this episode of The Power Producers Podcast, David Carothers and co-host Kyle Houck interview Joel Stevenson, CEO of Yesware. Joel talks about sales and technology and how Yesware is changing the face of technology for salespeople.  Episode Highlights: Joel shares his background and what he does in the software for salespeople industry. (4:04) Joel shares his experience with CRMs and the tools that led him to a software company for salespeople. (7:38) Joel explains that their services are highly recommended for entrepreneurs, salespeople, and people from the company that is transactional. (12:30) Joel shares some of the marketing tools and software they use. (14:17) Joel talks about the biggest win they have heard from a client from using Yesware. (18:46) Joel shares that most of their clients today come from tech sales, and they are currently doing business with Flywire and Monday.com. (22:30) Joel talks about the integration that they have with Salesforce, which is currently being integrated for a better customer experience. (24:41) Joel elaborates on the notable changes in the software industry before and compared to today when everything is easier and cheaper to get. (35:05) Joel talks about the integration they are currently building for Yesware. (38:37) Joel explains that not using a tool like Yesware gives you an information disadvantage over your competitors. (48:19) Tweetable Quotes: "The founding sort of philosophy of Yesware was like, Let's build technology, actually, for salespeople, and not for the manager." - Joel Stevenson "It's about the conversations and the questions that you're asking people, the things that really, really matter in sales." - Joel Stevenson "As soon as people think that they're being spoken to by a machine, or it's just automation, and there's no human behind it, you're done." - Joel Stevenson Resources Mentioned: Joel Stevenson LinkedIn Yesware David Carothers Kyle Houck Florida Risk Partners The Extra 2 Minutes

Power Producers Podcast
Yes! With Joel Stevenson

Power Producers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 53:42


In this episode of The Power Producers Podcast, David Carothers and co-host Kyle Houck interview Joel Stevenson, CEO of Yesware. Joel talks about sales and technology and how Yesware is changing the face of technology for salespeople.  Episode Highlights: Joel shares his background and what he does in the software for salespeople industry. (4:04) Joel shares his experience with CRMs and the tools that led him to a software company for salespeople. (7:38) Joel explains that their services are highly recommended for entrepreneurs, salespeople, and people from the company that is transactional. (12:30) Joel shares some of the marketing tools and software they use. (14:17) Joel talks about the biggest win they have heard from a client from using Yesware. (18:46) Joel shares that most of their clients today come from tech sales, and they are currently doing business with Flywire and Monday.com. (22:30) Joel talks about the integration that they have with Salesforce, which is currently being integrated for a better customer experience. (24:41) Joel elaborates on the notable changes in the software industry before and compared to today when everything is easier and cheaper to get. (35:05) Joel talks about the integration they are currently building for Yesware. (38:37) Joel explains that not using a tool like Yesware gives you an information disadvantage over your competitors. (48:19) Tweetable Quotes: "The founding sort of philosophy of Yesware was like, Let's build technology, actually, for salespeople, and not for the manager." - Joel Stevenson "It's about the conversations and the questions that you're asking people, the things that really, really matter in sales." - Joel Stevenson "As soon as people think that they're being spoken to by a machine, or it's just automation, and there's no human behind it, you're done." - Joel Stevenson Resources Mentioned: Joel Stevenson LinkedIn Yesware David Carothers Kyle Houck Florida Risk Partners The Extra 2 Minutes

Salesforce for Everyone by Talent Stacker
007. There Are No Jobs Available? Think again!

Salesforce for Everyone by Talent Stacker

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 38:39


In this episode, Anita and Brad bust another major misconception: that there are no Salesforce jobs available.    There is a major disconnect here, especially when recruiters and employers are consistently lamenting the fact they can't seem to hire Salesforce professionals quickly enough.   Tune in to find out how Talent Stackers can crack the code and plug the job search gap!    Handy Timestamps:     2:16: Here's why so many people mistakenly think that there are no Salesforce jobs available. 4:31: Don't let cut-and-paste job descriptions deter you from applying. These are often wishlists that the hiring company will not be able to fill due to the demand for Salesforce professionals. 8:30: Many companies are still learning that their unrealistic job descriptions aren't cutting it in today's job market. In the meantime, here's how to stay on their radar until reality bites their futile hiring efforts. 13:04: Here's another myth we need to bust. People think that getting a certification entitles them to a job. On the contrary, that's just the price of admission! 18:08: Imposter syndrome: we all feel it sometime. Here's how to dispell yours when looking for a Salesforce job. 21:51: Another tip: don't just look for opportunities in your city or state! Cast a wider net! 24:48: Find out how many job applications is too many. 27:05: If you are in a niche industry, you have an extra edge landing your first Salesforce job. 29:37: Not every job vacancy is going to be posted - 1 out of 3 people get recruited within The Hidden Job Market. Here's how to optimize for that. 37:26: A preview of next episode.   Links and Resources: TalentStacker.com/start TalentStacker LinkedIn Page Salesforce For Everyone Facebook Group

M&A Science
157. Implementing an Actionable GTM Strategy

M&A Science

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 41:45


Hannah Leung, Senior Manager, Global Distribution M&A at Salesforce (NYSE: CRM) Implementing a GTM strategy is one of the most crucial parts of integration. The GTM strategy is what makes achieving synergies and scaling post-close possible.  In this episode of the M&A Science podcast, Hannah Leung, Senior Manager, M&A at Salesforce, talks about the challenges of implementing an actionable GTM strategy. In this episode you will learn about: - The relationship between corp dev and integration team - How integration teams do GTM planning - The challenges in implementing an actionable GTM strategy - How to ensure team alignment - How to track value from buying plans To join our network of M&A practitioners and sign up for our newsletter, go to mascience.com.

CPQ Podcast
Interview with Emil Westrin, co-Founder & CEO of vloxq

CPQ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 30:37


In this episode you hear from Emil Westrin, co-Founder and CEO of vloxq. Emil has 8 years of business experience and lives in Stockholm, Sweden. Here he talks about Vloxq's challenges as a CPQ startup founded in 2020, their Products & Services, what they mean by "Plug & Play CPQ", what an ideal customer is for their solution, how long a typical implementation project is, what 3rd party solutions they integrate with and more vloxq.com  LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/emil-at-vloxq/  email emil@vloxq.com 

Love Selling Hate Sales Podcast
Product-Led Growth As The Future Of B2B SaaS with Esben Friis-Jensen

Love Selling Hate Sales Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 35:10


In this episode of the Love Selling Hate Sales podcast, Joshua talks to Userflow Co-Founder and Chief Growth Officer Esben Friis-Jensen. Esben talks about product-led growth and how the shift from traditional sales-led operations is changing the game for B2B Software as a service (SaaS) companies. Through strategies such as freemium models or limited free trials, SaaS companies are redefining the roles of sales and customer success departments and may even indicate the need for a new type of CRM better suited to subscription-type revenue models. If Esben and other product-led growth evangelists are right, we may be already underway to a disruption that will change how we do business altogether. HIGHLIGHTSTransitioning from a product-led to sales-led organization and back againHow product-led growth is the future of SaaS Product-led models still need sales and customer success peopleSilos impede the connectivity of data in many companiesThe case for a software as a service CRMHow the product-led model is changing procurement conversations Should we merge sales and customer success? QUOTESEsben: "Product-led growth is reducing the need to have sales and customer success involved in certain aspects,  but it's not removing the need. I would say it's changing the role of sales and customer success to basically be a bit different and I think it's still a journey that many companies are going through." Esben: "In my experience, even in a sales-led modeling, the best AEs were the ones who understood the use-cases, understood the product. Like if there was a question about the product, they didn't have to go and ask a solutions engineer, how do I do this, right? They really knew the product inside-out and if the customer had a use-case, they could say, yeah that's how you do it because that shows integrity." Esben: "I think there's a need for a new player to come in and actually build a software as a service B2B CRM. Today, with Salesforce and Hubspot, they're like legacy solutions. They were built for another era, they were not built for software as a service. Today, you can mention many things but they don't do well with handling product data. They don't do very well handling subscription-based models and user-based models which are like the most popular pricing models in SaaS." Esben: "I've always been a big spokesperson for to some extent, merging sales and customer success. Because I think the best customer success people are the ones who can do sales, and the best salespeople are the ones who can answer the customer's questions and give proper support." Learn more about Esben and his work in the links below:Website (Company): https://userflow.com/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/esbenfriisjensen/Community: https://productled.com/About Josh Wagner: Josh is a growth advisor and the host of the Love Selling Hate Sales podcast. He specializes in helping executives understand modern marketing and sales to drive growth in a scalable way. To learn more about Josh and his work, follow the links below:LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/joshwagnerazCompany website: https://www.leadmd.com Personal Website: https:///www.joshuadwagner.comPodcast: https://www.lovesellinghatesales.com

Accelerate! with Andy Paul
A Conversation with Mike Bosworth

Accelerate! with Andy Paul

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 63:50


Mike Bosworth is one of the true legends in the sales profession. He is the author and creator of both "Solution Selling" and "Customer Centric Selling." I enjoy it every time Mike comes on the show. Because I learn something new. And today's no exception. In today's episode we talk about a growing problem in sales: discovery resistance. Discovery resistance is resistance to being questioned – pushback – verbalized or not, from a buyer you would like to get to know. Discovery Resistance originates with the 99% of buyers who have come away from previous encounters with 'salespeople' feeling coerced, pressured, manipulated, or flat-out PUSHED into doing something that they did not want to do. This is critical for individual contributors to understand as well as sales leaders. This conversation was originally recorded in 2021. More on Andy: Connect on LinkedIn Get Andy's new book "Sell Without Selling Out" on Amazon Learn more at AndyPaul.com Sponsored by: Revenue.io | Unlock exponential growth with an AI-powered RevOps platform | Revenue.io Scratchpad | The fastest way to update Salesforce, take sales notes, and stay on top of to-dos | Scratchpad.com Explore the Revenue.io Podcast Universe: Sales Enablement Podcast RevOps Podcast Selling with Purpose Podcast

Being an Engineer
Steven MacGregor | Expert in Workplace Health + Author of 6 Books

Being an Engineer

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 33:23


Steven MacGregor is a global expert in workplace health, wellbeing and performance with PhD and Master's degrees in design thinking and virtual teams.  He is the founder of The Leadership Academy of Barcelona with clients including Salesforce, McKinsey and Uber. Additionally, he is the author or lead co-author of 6 books in the past 12 years, notably Chief Wellbeing Officer and Sustaining Executive Performance.  Steven is a frequent keynote speaker and guest professor with experience in research and teaching at Stanford, Carnegie Mellon, IE, IMD, IESE, CEIBS and Pompeu Fabra.  He has also a former national duathlon champion, and has trained with Tour de France riders,  Ironman champions, and Olympic track athletes. Steven is currently racing for FC Barcelona. The Daily StoicThe Daily Reset: 366 Nudges to Move Your Life Forwardhttps://www.amazon.com/Daily-Reset-Nudges-Move-Forward-ebook/dp/B09GVN1N6C The Being an Engineer podcast is a repository for industry knowledge and a tool through which engineers learn about and connect with relevant companies, technologies, people resources, and opportunities. We feature successful mechanical engineers and interview engineers who are passionate about their work and who made a great impact on the engineering community.The Being An Engineer podcast is brought to you by Pipeline Design & Engineering. Pipeline partners with medical & other device engineering teams who need turnkey equipment such as cycle test machines, custom test fixtures, automation equipment, assembly jigs, inspection stations and more. You can find us on the web at www.teampipeline.us 

Venture Unlocked: The playbook for venture capital managers.
GGV's Jeff Richards on making sense of the market today, growing a $9B+ firm, and whether geo-political tensions may affect international venture investing

Venture Unlocked: The playbook for venture capital managers.

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 53:18


Follow me @samirkaji for my thoughts on the venture market, with a focus on the continued evolution of the VC landscape.We have a great conversation on top this week with Jeff Richards, Managing Partner at GGV Capital. Founded in 2000, GGV manages nearly $10B in AUM and invests across stages in both the US and Asia, and has invested in companies such as AirBnB, Wish, Opendoor, and Grab. This was a great conversation as Jeff has been both on the founder and investor side, and has spent the last 14 years at GGV where he’s had a front-row seat to the incredible evolution of the firm to what it is today. He provided us with some great thoughts on the markets today, the challenges of growing a firm, and how the current geopolitical tensions may affect international investing. About Jeff Richards:Jeff focuses on enterprise/cloud and marketplace investments, and led GGV’s investments in Appirio (acq by Wipro), Belong, BigCommerce (NASDAQ: BIGC), BlueKai (acq by Oracle), Boxed, Brightwheel, Buddy Media (acq by Salesforce), Coinbase (NASDAQ: COIN), Electric.ai, Evolv OnDemand (acq by Cornerstone), Gladly, Handshake, HotelTonight (acq by Airbnb), Lambda School, Mindee, Namely, People.ai, PlushCare/Accolade (NASDAQ: ACCD), Slice, Tala, Tile, Vic.ai, Workboard, and Zylo.Prior to joining GGV, Jeff founded two software companies: R4, a supply chain SaaS business acquired by VeriSign (NASDAQ: VRSN), and QuantumShift, a telecom software business backed by Texas Pacific Group (TPG). Earlier in his career, Jeff worked in Asia and Latin America with PriceWaterhouseCoopers. He graduated from Dartmouth College.Our sponsor:At Brex, we build financial software and services to help startups scale faster. We understand that founders need to focus on building, not banking. So we’ve reimagined traditional financial systems to enable greater speed and productivity — no matter where founders and their teams are working.We offer a smart corporate card, business account, and mobile app that are easy to use from day one. No manuals needed here. Within minutes, you can deposit funds, send free wires and ACH worldwide, separate investor funds from operating expenses, earn great rewards, automate expenses, and more. Everything we do at Brex is to help founders spend less time managing expenses and reporting on your runway — and more time building your business.Get started at brex.com/ventureIn this episode we discuss:02:06 Jeff’s journey into venture capital08:30 What it took to scale GGV to what it is today14:32 How they had to shift internal mindset as they scaled fund sizes20:55 How the current market compares to previous cycles27:33 The health of the current venture market and areas where Jeff sees growth potential33:46 Advice to investors looking to create a venture portfolio39:30 How the geopolitical climate is affecting investing both in the US and globally46:26 Why emerging markets are still a strong place to look for alpha in the current market48:11 The best piece of career advice he’s receivedI’d love to know what you took away from this conversation with Jeff. Follow me @SamirKaji and give me your insights and questions with the hashtag #ventureunlocked. If you’d like to be considered as a guest or have someone you’d like to hear from (GP or LP), drop me a direct message on Twitter.Podcast Production support provided by Agent Bee Agency This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit ventureunlocked.substack.com

The Salesforce Admins Podcast
Live from TrailblazerDX

The Salesforce Admins Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 21:56


Today on the Salesforce Admins Podcast, we take the show on the road, live from TrailblazerDX. Join us as we talk about how we put on events like these, what it's like to go to a live event for the first time, and tips from a Salesforce expert about why networking is so important. You […] The post Live from TrailblazerDX appeared first on Salesforce Admins.

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova
The Capitalist of Tomorrow with Alan Murray

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 32:38


Welcome to the What's Next! podcast with Tiffani Bova. Entering with a bang, Alan Murray comes on the show this week to talk about the transformation of the corporate world in this modern era. Alan is CEO of Fortune Media. He oversees the business and editorial operations of the independent media company and is known for expanding its digital and conference franchises. Murray also writes a closely-read daily newsletter for Fortune, CEO Daily. Prior to joining Fortune in 2015, Murray led the rapid expansion of the Pew Research Center's digital footprint as president of that organization. Before that, Murray was at the Wall Street Journal for many years, serving as deputy managing editor, executive editor online, Washington bureau chief, and author of the Political Capital and Business columns. He served for several years as Washington bureau chief for CNBC, and cohost of the nightly show Capital Report. He is the author of multiple books, including Showdown at Gucci Gulch: Lawmakers, Lobbyists, and the Unlikely Triumph of Tax Reform.   THIS EPISODE IS PERFECT FOR…  consumers, employees, or business leaders that seeks the understand the ways in which profit-driven models for businesses have transformed and shifted towards value-driven motives.   TODAY'S MAIN MESSAGE… Our guest says that Capitalism has been a dynamic driving force in the development of the economy, guiding the startup of largest companies that are now known as the Fortune 500. But the Capitalism doesn't play by the same set of rules as it did before – now more than ever, companies are shifting towards a model of business that Alan Murray refers to as “shareholder capitalism.” In this modern era of Capitalism, company values must reflect consumer values, placing an emphasis towards Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) issues to meet the demands of socially conscious investors, shareholders and consumers.    WHAT I LOVE MOST… Company culture, diversity and public values now take the front seat when considering business success models. Alan says this mode of thinking is here to stay and that we, as consumers, as employees, as the general populace can continue to influence businesses just by changing the public sentiment.     Running time: 32:37 Subscribe on iTunes     Find Tiffani on social: Facebook Twitter LinkedIn   Find Alan online: Official Website Twitter LinkedIn   Alan's Book: Tomorrow's Capitalist: My Search for the Soul of Business

Accelerate! with Andy Paul
1055: Next Level Sales Leadership, with Derek Jankowski

Accelerate! with Andy Paul

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 46:12


Derek Jankowski is the Vice President of Sales at ServiceCore. Which is a great example of a company that is using software to disrupt an industry that most people think of a decidedly low tech. On today's episode we dig into Derek's journey in his sales career; including the start he got in sales in college and how that ultimately led to his current role scaling a sales team at Service Core. We also talk about Derek's passion project, his side venture called Next Level Sales Leadership. Which is focused on helping new(ish) sales leaders get the knowledge and skills they need to be more successful, faster! Most FLMs are craving this type of support and we dig into what Derek is providing through his venture. More on Andy: Connect on LinkedIn Get Andy's new book "Sell Without Selling Out" on Amazon Learn more at AndyPaul.com Sponsored by: Revenue.io | Unlock exponential growth with an AI-powered RevOps platform | Revenue.io Scratchpad | The fastest way to update Salesforce, take sales notes, and stay on top of to-dos | Scratchpad.com Explore the Revenue.io Podcast Universe: Sales Enablement Podcast RevOps Podcast Selling with Purpose Podcast

The Talent Development Hot Seat
Bonus Q&A with Shana Sharan

The Talent Development Hot Seat

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 16:06


In this episode of The Talent Development Hot Seat, Andy's guest is Shana Sharan. She is a multi-faceted talent development professional with experience across multiple SaaS companies. She is currently the Head of Talent Management at New Relic, a software company based in San Francisco. Before she took over her position at New Relic, Shana had multiple roles at SalesForce and is experienced in directing large, complex global programs across HR, including leadership development, employee engagement, and performance management. Shana Sharan holds an M.A. from Columbia University, is a DISC facilitator, and recently earned a certification in corporate mindfulness facilitation. In this bonus episode, you'll hear: 7. Shana Sharan's biggest career success and how that has helped her continue to grow her career. 8. What she's learned in her field that she thinks people need to know. 9. The tool that's always in her toolbox no matter what project she's working on. 10. The biggest challenge she believes talent development is facing today. 11. Why she's excited about the current trend of mindfulness in the workforce. 12. Her favorite books to recommend to others. 13. The one piece of career advice she gives to people who want to advance their careers. Connect with Andy Storch here: https://andystorch.com/ (Website) https://www.linkedin.com/in/andystorch/ (LinkedIn) https://tdtt.us/ (Join us in the Talent Development Think Tank Community)! Connect with Shana Sharan: https://www.linkedin.com/in/shanasharan/ (LinkedIn)

IT Visionaries
Staying Curious, Keeping a Wide View, and Getting Into the Details With Vittorio Cretella, CIO of Procter & Gamble

IT Visionaries

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 38:40


Is being successful tied to being perpetually inquisitive? Vittorio Cretella, the CIO of Procter & Gamble, discusses how maintaining a posture of curiosity has been a constant throughout his career. Also, he chats about Procter & Gamble's digital transformation at an international scale and that AI is now being used across the company. Listen in to learn a little about Vittorio's passion for motorcycles too.Tune in to learn:How is digital transformation manifesting at Procter & Gamble? (03:47)How does P&G manage to operate in so many countries? (10:29) Is AI used across the entire company? (15:09)How might the consumer experience get better in the future? (17:39)What's the balance for innovating quickly yet maintaining trust? (21:22)What is Vittorio most excited about in his role as CIO at P&G? (27:22)What sort of peers can Vittorio commiserate with and learn from? (30:04) IT Visionaries is brought to you by The Salesforce Platform. If you love the thought leadership on this podcast, Salesforce has even more meaty IT thoughts to chew on. Take your company to the next level with in-depth research and trends right in your inbox. Subscribe to a newsletter tailored to your role at Salesforce.com/newsletter.Mission.org is a media studio producing content for world-class clients. Learn more at mission.org.

LinkedIn Ads Show
LinkedIn Ads Tool Spotlight: Supermetrics -Ep 61

LinkedIn Ads Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 44:46


Show Resources Here were the resources we covered in the episode: Data Studio dashboard that Anna Shutko and AJ created together @AnnaShutko on twitter Marketing Analytics Show LinkedIN: Send DM and posting NEW LinkedIn Learning course about LinkedIn Ads by AJ Wilcox Contact us at Podcast@B2Linked.com with ideas for what you'd like AJ to cover.   Show Transcript Have you heard of Supermetrics? If you're a LinkedIn advertiser, it's your new best friend. We're covering the capabilities on this week's episode of the LinkedIn Ads Show. Welcome to the LinkedIn Ads Show. Here's your host, AJ Wilcox. AJ Wilcox Hey there LinkedIn Ads fanatics. So we're highlighting another tool today in the LinkedIn advertisers arsenal. We're discussing a tool that I've been using now for years. It's absolutely indispensable for our team, because we're managing so many different accounts. And we're dealing with so much data. That tool is called Super metrics. And it's a very simple way of getting all of your ads data into a spreadsheet, or visualization tool for better reporting and analysis. I'm excited to welcome Anna Shutko from Supermetrics to answer my questions, and give you the inside scoop on what's coming. Anna and I go way back. And we've even collaborated on a free dashboard for LinkedIn advertisers, that you'll all get here in the show notes and I think you'll enjoy it. Without further ado, let's jump into the interview. Okay, I'm really excited here to have Anna Shutko from Supermetrics. She is the Brand Strategist at Supermetrics. She's also host of the awesome podcast, The Marketing Analytics Show, make sure you go and subscribe to that right now,if you're not already. She is based in Helsinki, Finland. And she was number seven on the Supermetrics team. She has been there over five and a half years she is one of the OGs for sure. She's also an avid cyclist and skier. Anna, I'm so excited to have you on the show. We've been friends for a long time. Thanks so much for joining us. Anna Shutko 1:42 I know, right?! Thank you so so much for having me. I'm super excited to be on the show. AJ Wilcox 1:49 I'm just as excited to have you I have so many great questions for you. Well, I'm the host. And so if I say that they're great, it's a little bit biased, but didn't really have some questions I think are gonna be really good for you. And for those of us who are listening, tell us anything about yourself that you want anything I may not have covered in your intro. Anna Shutko 2:05 Yeah, sure. So I think you nailed my bio. So I did a piece of furniture with Supermetrics. As I like to joke about it. I've been at the company for quite a while now more than five years. Wow. It's crazy when you think about it. So what people usually find interesting because I sometimes go in client calls and then when my colleagues introduce me, they're like, yeah, she's been here with us for such a long time. And people who knows Supermetrics are very, very surprised, because I guess not so many people like me have been with the company for a long time. We were a tiny team back then. Now we've grown fantastically. And we've grown so fast. Now we're over 250 people. It's crazy. So yeah, it's been a wild ride. And yeah, like I said, I've been moving between different areas of marketing between different departments. So I started as a growth marketer, then I went on to become a product marketing manager. I was also product manager, I was managing the relays and different connectors. And then I moved on to brand marketing. And now I'm super excited about my new role. So I'm building the brand measurement system, and I'm pretty sure we're gonna hear more about it. But yeah, that's a little bit about me. So many different areas. It's super exciting to see the company grow. It's super exciting to change all these different roles and learn more about connectors, including or favorite LinkedIn connectors. So that's a bit of a thing. AJ Wilcox 3:39 Oh, beautiful. And I am a fan of the LinkedIn connectors for sure. So thank you for your great work on those. Let's go ahead and start in here on the first question. So for those who are not already familiar with Supermetrics, what are the challenges that Supermetrics solve. Why is Supermetrics originally in business? Anna Shutko 3:58 Yeah, definitely. So Supermetrics essentially, is a data pipeline tool, as I like to call it. So we transfer data from a variety of different data sources or connectors, how we call them interchangeably. And these are LinkedIn Ads, Facebook Ads, Google Analytics, HubSpot, e-commerce platforms like Shopify. We cover over 80 different platforms. And like I said, literally any most popular and big marketing platform, you name it. And we transfer all this data to set up different data destinations. So we have sub categorized them into spreadsheets. So these are your Google Sheets and your Excel. Then there are different data visualization tools like Google Data Studio, or Power BI, Tableau, so data analytics/data visualization tools. And the third group is our data warehousing clusters. So we transfer data to different data warehouses like Azure, Google BigQuery, etc., etc., etc., And data links so you can combine your all your data in one place and store it securely. So that's a little bit about Supermetrics. So because we cover a lot of data destinations, and we connect to many different platforms and transfer the data, we cover a variety of different scenarios here. And this is actually historically has been the challenging part within product marketing, which also makes it very, very interesting that because we have so many products, we can help you cover multiple scenarios of what you want to do with your data. So you can have your reporting and dashboarding. So these are your client facing reports for agencies. And if you're an in house marketer, you can create your so called boss pacing reports, you have to create within your team. So these can be done in tools like Google Sheets, there are lots of writers who take advantage of Google Sheets and Excel and the formulas they can create there. And also, of course, do the visualization tools like Google Data Studio, super easy to add connectors there, it's super easy to create beautiful reports there and share them with your team. Then there are some cases of ad hoc analyses. And these are usually related to the questions you need to answer right now. So for example, why is my LinkedIn Ad spend so high and I have not seen the results? Or why does target audience A perform better than target audience B? So if you have this question and you really want to quickly acquire your data to answer the specific question, Supermetrics for Google Sheets can be a really good tool because we have the sideboard technology where you can select the metrics and dimensions you want to pick, and then it will pull the data into the spreadsheet, so that you can quickly answer very pressing questions. And another use case we have is the data warehousing use case where you can tie data across multiple different sources. So instead of just looking at one or two, or three or five data sources, you can create really complex models. But in order to create these models, you need to store your data in one place in order to join all this data. So here, you can pull all the data into your Google big query and then visualize it with a helpful view. But you can also perform the necessary data transformations within this data warehouse. So for example, you can compare the performance of your ad networks such as Google versus Facebook, again, you can segment and test different audiences, you can join data in the way you want to see sequel. And also you can report on the whole user journey. So for example, your clients started by clicking on your LinkedIn ads campaign, and they went to your website. And then you capture their website behavior with Google Analytics, maybe some of this data is coming from your CRM. And then with the help of a data warehouse, you can store all these data and then inquiry to connect the pieces together and see the whole user journey. So here are our most popular use cases. AJ Wilcox 8:20 Okay, so just out of curiosity for being able to track the whole buyer journey. What sort of software or tools do you need in place in order to I guess, get that journey across all the different platforms? Is that requiring that they're in a CRM or something that's already natively tracking all of that? Anna Shutko 8:36 Yeah, so usually depends on the company. Some companies might not necessarily have the budget or the need for a CRM. Of course, having a CRM is ideal. So if you have something like HubSpot, or it's Salesforce, it's really, really good also because their API's are so robust. They allow you to create custom dimensions and custom metrics to track your unique use cases. So for example, your users have, like I said, clicked on your LinkedIn Ads, and then they land on a website. And then they have to fill in a form. And the form might be somewhere, like on a different website, maybe it's an event and you're hosting a registration on Eventbrite, say for example. So when they put their data into Eventbrite or somewhere else, you also need to somehow capture this data within your CRM. So an alternative solution here could be to build a web page there where they would fill all their details. And then you can store all this data within the server ad. And then at the same time, you can combine it with the data coming from LinkedIn Ads. So it really depends. I would recommend starting with a combination of like ad networks, and reporting on that data and then combining it with data from Google Analytics. This can be the easiest when you're using a CRM, but at the same time, you can already start seeing a better overview of your user journey, and then connect to your CRM and then build on top these custom goals and metrics to create more of a reporting system. AJ Wilcox 10:16 Very cool. This is a topic that's been really top of mind for me, as I'm thinking about, as cookie apocalypse continues, and we losing our dependence on third party cookies. How effective are we as marketers going to be being able to track someone across the whole user journey when we know that, that cookies disappearing? This is fascinating to me So thanks for helping us out with that. So those are the problems that Supermetrics solves. Why is Supermetrics in such a good position to solve this problem? Why not, you know, Google themselves, just replace you with having a simple tool that just spits out their data. Same thing with LinkedIn? Like, why is Supermetrics solving this problem and not anyone else? Anna Shutko 10:57 Yeah, that's definitely a really, really good question. I can talk about this for hours. But we only have a limited amount of time, I guess. So first of all, Google is one of our partners. So Google, of course, is a massive, massive company and they have an amazing set of tools, but they are not the whole ecosystem. So there are lots of other players like Facebook, like LinkedIn, like Twitter, like HubSpot. And they also provide a set of really, really good API's, which allow you to export the data on the campaigns that are run. So super metrics, like mentioned, helps combine all this data and then we push this data to a number of different destinations. These are not just Google Sheets, these are Excel, for example. So for example, if your company is using Microsoft and you are required to use the office space, then Supermetrics can be a real really good tool because we can help push this data to your Excel desktop, say you set up your inquiries, and then you go offline completely. And then you can analyze your data using Excel. So like I said, we don't only connect to Google platforms. We help connect different players within the ecosystem together. And another good example is our Data Studio product. So Google Data Studio is a free data visualization tool for those of you who do not know. And they have native integrations with Google Analytics, Google Ads and other Google platforms, that is true. But for example, many marketers use Supermetrics to get data from Facebook or LinkedIn to the same data visualization tool. And if you're running ads on multiple different platforms, it would be a little bit silly to just analyze your Google Ads data without analyzing what you're doing on your LinkedIn as a platform, kind of like together. So we help marketers gain a very holistic view of their performance in the tools they already know, in the tools they already can use in the tools they already know how to use. So for example, if you know how to use Google Sheets, you can just install Supermetrics add on. And then you can continue using your favorite tool without this learning curve without the need to learn a new tool, and just query the data from the platform you want, say LinkedIn Ads, and just create the reports there. Or you can use these tools in combination. So we have a native Data Studio connector for our required products, for example, you've combined the data from multiple different sources in your inquiry project, and then you want to visualize this data. So you can use our Data Studio connector to do this. And the names of metrics and dimensions will have clear descriptions to to be very easy for you to understand what kind of metric you're visualizing, and how you can create a better report using all these tools together. AJ Wilcox 13:54 Oh, I like it. Alright, thanks for sharing that. I definitely think I'm of the same opinion you are that any of the other networks or channels could easily come out with a product that allows easier access to the data they have. But the Supermetrics advantage here is just being able to aggregate from all of these different connectors, regardless of whether or not any of them come out with an easier way for us to do it ourselves. Tell us about your relationship with LinkedIn, as well as the other platforms. What do you get from that partnership? How long have you been partners, that kind of thing? Anna Shutko 14:26 Yeah, sure, definitely. So with LinkedIn, we've been partners for quite some time. And there are many, many marketers, 1000s of marketers, is what we're talking about that reported their LinkedIn Ads. And then concrete budget pacing reports with Supermetrics. So we've recently demoed our product to your team. And like I said, we have really, really good and close collaboration there. And in addition to LinkedIn, we partner with Stack Adapt, HubSpot, Google, like I mentioned, AdRoll and many, many other data source and data destination companies. So when we partner with a company, we try to create the best possible value for the end user, of course. So we love creating templates for Data Studio especially. We've created some with the HubSpot. So we sit together with their product managers and think, Okay, what kind of metrics would be great to visualize for users. And we create completely free reporting templates with all the needed metrics and dimensions that our user can use as they are, or they can just take them as a blueprint for their own reports, they can tweak the metrics, they can tweak dimensions they can do that they want. And it's really amazing to partner with these companies, because we can combine the best of both both worlds so to say, so we have the reporting and analytics and data consolidation expertise, and the platform's bring their own know how, their knowledge to the table. So AJ you and I created this really, really good LinkedIn Ads dashboard. And this is one very good example of how your know how or some platform managers know how can be combined with Supermetrics know how. AJ Wilcox 16:20 Which is beautiful, we are going to link to that dashboard down below in the show notes so everyone can get access to it. But, Anna I'm so glad you brought this up. Because this has been a couple years ago, or a few years ago now. But we worked for about six months, I think on creating this dashboard, we call it the ultimate LinkedIn Ads dashboard. It's in Data Studio, it's totally free, like you mentioned, and anyone out there can go and get really complex analysis of their LinkedIn Ads. And that was because of you and I working so hard on that. I'm a big fan, I hope everyone goes and grabs that. Just to make it clear as to what Supermetrics is doing for LinkedIn advertisers. I mean, it's it's cool that you guys aggregate all of the different data and channels together into one spot. I think marketers who are responsible for more than one channel would love that. But for LinkedIn, specifically, you advertisers who are listening, you know how hard it is to get data out of LinkedIn. If every time you want to do a report, you have to go and click the export feature inside of campaign manager, and then put it into Excel, and then you know, do whatever formatting changes, you need to do, create pivot tables, then all of a sudden, all of that data is it's a snapshot of it, you can't do anything else with it. And so the next time your boss asks for a report, you're going and doing it again. What Supermetrics does is it will take, even on a schedule, this is my favorite part about it, you can say I want this data going into Excel or into Google Sheets, and I want it every day at 2am. I want it to go pull the next day's data. And then it's always there any report any pivot table that you build, all you have to do is just refresh. And now you'd never have to build that same report ever again. So, so cool. We'll talk about more of my favorite features of Supermetrics here a little bit later. But I just wanted everyone to know like, this is why it's so valuable for you. This is why I'm doing this tool spotlight on Supermetrics. Because there just is no other way to do with LinkedIn, what Supermetrics does. So I want to hear from you. What are the capabilities of Supermetrics, especially as it pertains to LinkedIn advertisers? Anna Shutko 18:28 Yeah, definitely. So I've mentioned a couple of capabilities. And like I said, because we have a product umbrella, it allows us to help customers solve multiple reporting and reporting related issues. So we have your ad hoc reporting, where we can acquire the data on the fly. And this is your Google Sheets, Excel products. We help with the data consolidation. These are your data warehousing products, building beautiful data visualizations, or you can have little exploration in Looker or Tableau or Power BI. Another really interesting thing I'd like to highlight here is that as you know, LinkedIn ads API constantly changes will always constantly change. LinkedIn is always coming up with new features. And he was right, you mentioned that it's challenging to export the data out of LinkedIn Ads. And this is something we're really help with, but it will also help you export this data in the right format. And we can help you create reports with really, really high data granularity. So what it means in practice is that you can test and report on many different pieces of a LinkedIn Ads campaign audiences. You have your campaign types, creatives, objectives, and you can break down your campaign into different pieces, pass these pieces individually or perform an AB test, and then make really, really smart optimizations. So this is one thing that I really, really like and would like to highlight here. And typically, we help achieve this with our Google Sheets product. And one very precise example is, again, the dashboard AJ and I have built. Belt. So you can report on not one, but four different types of spend. So there are formulas that help you calculate your total spend, projected spend, goal spend, as in the amount of you have to spend without under over spending. And then the cumulative spend to something you've spent overall. And here, we've taken one metric, which is spend, and then your budget goal, and then transformed into four different kinds of spend. And this brings me to my earlier point about data granularity, you can report on really granular data. So you can break down your sp