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ESV: Chronological
October 15: Mark 1–3

ESV: Chronological

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 12:30


Mark 1–3 Mark 1–3 (Listen) John the Baptist Prepares the Way 1 The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God.1 2 As it is written in Isaiah the prophet,2   “Behold, I send my messenger before your face,    who will prepare your way,3   the voice of one crying in the wilderness:    ‘Prepare3 the way of the Lord,    make his paths straight,'” 4 John appeared, baptizing in the wilderness and proclaiming a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins. 5 And all the country of Judea and all Jerusalem were going out to him and were being baptized by him in the river Jordan, confessing their sins. 6 Now John was clothed with camel's hair and wore a leather belt around his waist and ate locusts and wild honey. 7 And he preached, saying, “After me comes he who is mightier than I, the strap of whose sandals I am not worthy to stoop down and untie. 8 I have baptized you with water, but he will baptize you with the Holy Spirit.” The Baptism of Jesus 9 In those days Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee and was baptized by John in the Jordan. 10 And when he came up out of the water, immediately he saw the heavens being torn open and the Spirit descending on him like a dove. 11 And a voice came from heaven, “You are my beloved Son;4 with you I am well pleased.” The Temptation of Jesus 12 The Spirit immediately drove him out into the wilderness. 13 And he was in the wilderness forty days, being tempted by Satan. And he was with the wild animals, and the angels were ministering to him. Jesus Begins His Ministry 14 Now after John was arrested, Jesus came into Galilee, proclaiming the gospel of God, 15 and saying, “The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand;5 repent and believe in the gospel.” Jesus Calls the First Disciples 16 Passing alongside the Sea of Galilee, he saw Simon and Andrew the brother of Simon casting a net into the sea, for they were fishermen. 17 And Jesus said to them, “Follow me, and I will make you become fishers of men.”6 18 And immediately they left their nets and followed him. 19 And going on a little farther, he saw James the son of Zebedee and John his brother, who were in their boat mending the nets. 20 And immediately he called them, and they left their father Zebedee in the boat with the hired servants and followed him. Jesus Heals a Man with an Unclean Spirit 21 And they went into Capernaum, and immediately on the Sabbath he entered the synagogue and was teaching. 22 And they were astonished at his teaching, for he taught them as one who had authority, and not as the scribes. 23 And immediately there was in their synagogue a man with an unclean spirit. And he cried out, 24 “What have you to do with us, Jesus of Nazareth? Have you come to destroy us? I know who you are—the Holy One of God.” 25 But Jesus rebuked him, saying, “Be silent, and come out of him!” 26 And the unclean spirit, convulsing him and crying out with a loud voice, came out of him. 27 And they were all amazed, so that they questioned among themselves, saying, “What is this? A new teaching with authority! He commands even the unclean spirits, and they obey him.” 28 And at once his fame spread everywhere throughout all the surrounding region of Galilee. Jesus Heals Many 29 And immediately he7 left the synagogue and entered the house of Simon and Andrew, with James and John. 30 Now Simon's mother-in-law lay ill with a fever, and immediately they told him about her. 31 And he came and took her by the hand and lifted her up, and the fever left her, and she began to serve them. 32 That evening at sundown they brought to him all who were sick or oppressed by demons. 33 And the whole city was gathered together at the door. 34 And he healed many who were sick with various diseases, and cast out many demons. And he would not permit the demons to speak, because they knew him. Jesus Preaches in Galilee 35 And rising very early in the morning, while it was still dark, he departed and went out to a desolate place, and there he prayed. 36 And Simon and those who were with him searched for him, 37 and they found him and said to him, “Everyone is looking for you.” 38 And he said to them, “Let us go on to the next towns, that I may preach there also, for that is why I came out.” 39 And he went throughout all Galilee, preaching in their synagogues and casting out demons. Jesus Cleanses a Leper 40 And a leper8 came to him, imploring him, and kneeling said to him, “If you will, you can make me clean.” 41 Moved with pity, he stretched out his hand and touched him and said to him, “I will; be clean.” 42 And immediately the leprosy left him, and he was made clean. 43 And Jesus9 sternly charged him and sent him away at once, 44 and said to him, “See that you say nothing to anyone, but go, show yourself to the priest and offer for your cleansing what Moses commanded, for a proof to them.” 45 But he went out and began to talk freely about it, and to spread the news, so that Jesus could no longer openly enter a town, but was out in desolate places, and people were coming to him from every quarter. Jesus Heals a Paralytic 2 And when he returned to Capernaum after some days, it was reported that he was at home. 2 And many were gathered together, so that there was no more room, not even at the door. And he was preaching the word to them. 3 And they came, bringing to him a paralytic carried by four men. 4 And when they could not get near him because of the crowd, they removed the roof above him, and when they had made an opening, they let down the bed on which the paralytic lay. 5 And when Jesus saw their faith, he said to the paralytic, “Son, your sins are forgiven.” 6 Now some of the scribes were sitting there, questioning in their hearts, 7 “Why does this man speak like that? He is blaspheming! Who can forgive sins but God alone?” 8 And immediately Jesus, perceiving in his spirit that they thus questioned within themselves, said to them, “Why do you question these things in your hearts? 9 Which is easier, to say to the paralytic, ‘Your sins are forgiven,' or to say, ‘Rise, take up your bed and walk'? 10 But that you may know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins”—he said to the paralytic—11 “I say to you, rise, pick up your bed, and go home.” 12 And he rose and immediately picked up his bed and went out before them all, so that they were all amazed and glorified God, saying, “We never saw anything like this!” Jesus Calls Levi 13 He went out again beside the sea, and all the crowd was coming to him, and he was teaching them. 14 And as he passed by, he saw Levi the son of Alphaeus sitting at the tax booth, and he said to him, “Follow me.” And he rose and followed him. 15 And as he reclined at table in his house, many tax collectors and sinners were reclining with Jesus and his disciples, for there were many who followed him. 16 And the scribes of10 the Pharisees, when they saw that he was eating with sinners and tax collectors, said to his disciples, “Why does he eat11 with tax collectors and sinners?” 17 And when Jesus heard it, he said to them, “Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick. I came not to call the righteous, but sinners.” A Question About Fasting 18 Now John's disciples and the Pharisees were fasting. And people came and said to him, “Why do John's disciples and the disciples of the Pharisees fast, but your disciples do not fast?” 19 And Jesus said to them, “Can the wedding guests fast while the bridegroom is with them? As long as they have the bridegroom with them, they cannot fast. 20 The days will come when the bridegroom is taken away from them, and then they will fast in that day. 21 No one sews a piece of unshrunk cloth on an old garment. If he does, the patch tears away from it, the new from the old, and a worse tear is made. 22 And no one puts new wine into old wineskins. If he does, the wine will burst the skins—and the wine is destroyed, and so are the skins. But new wine is for fresh wineskins.”12 Jesus Is Lord of the Sabbath 23 One Sabbath he was going through the grainfields, and as they made their way, his disciples began to pluck heads of grain. 24 And the Pharisees were saying to him, “Look, why are they doing what is not lawful on the Sabbath?” 25 And he said to them, “Have you never read what David did, when he was in need and was hungry, he and those who were with him: 26 how he entered the house of God, in the time of13 Abiathar the high priest, and ate the bread of the Presence, which it is not lawful for any but the priests to eat, and also gave it to those who were with him?” 27 And he said to them, “The Sabbath was made for man, not man for the Sabbath. 28 So the Son of Man is lord even of the Sabbath.” A Man with a Withered Hand 3 Again he entered the synagogue, and a man was there with a withered hand. 2 And they watched Jesus,14 to see whether he would heal him on the Sabbath, so that they might accuse him. 3 And he said to the man with the withered hand, “Come here.” 4 And he said to them, “Is it lawful on the Sabbath to do good or to do harm, to save life or to kill?” But they were silent. 5 And he looked around at them with anger, grieved at their hardness of heart, and said to the man, “Stretch out your hand.” He stretched it out, and his hand was restored. 6 The Pharisees went out and immediately held counsel with the Herodians against him, how to destroy him. A Great Crowd Follows Jesus 7 Jesus withdrew with his disciples to the sea, and a great crowd followed, from Galilee and Judea 8 and Jerusalem and Idumea and from beyond the Jordan and from around Tyre and Sidon. When the great crowd heard all that he was doing, they came to him. 9 And he told his disciples to have a boat ready for him because of the crowd, lest they crush him, 10 for he had healed many, so that all who had diseases pressed around him to touch him. 11 And whenever the unclean spirits saw him, they fell down before him and cried out, “You are the Son of God.” 12 And he strictly ordered them not to make him known. The Twelve Apostles 13 And he went up on the mountain and called to him those whom he desired, and they came to him. 14 And he appointed twelve (whom he also named apostles) so that they might be with him and he might send them out to preach 15 and have authority to cast out demons. 16 He appointed the twelve: Simon (to whom he gave the name Peter); 17 James the son of Zebedee and John the brother of James (to whom he gave the name Boanerges, that is, Sons of Thunder); 18 Andrew, and Philip, and Bartholomew, and Matthew, and Thomas, and James the son of Alphaeus, and Thaddaeus, and Simon the Zealot,15 19 and Judas Iscariot, who betrayed him. 20 Then he went home, and the crowd gathered again, so that they could not even eat. 21 And when his family heard it, they went out to seize him, for they were saying, “He is out of his mind.” Blasphemy Against the Holy Spirit 22 And the scribes who came down from Jerusalem were saying, “He is possessed by Beelzebul,” and “by the prince of demons he casts out the demons.” 23 And he called them to him and said to them in parables, “How can Satan cast out Satan? 24 If a kingdom is divided against itself, that kingdom cannot stand. 25 And if a house is divided against itself, that house will not be able to stand. 26 And if Satan has risen up against himself and is divided, he cannot stand, but is coming to an end. 27 But no one can enter a strong man's house and plunder his goods, unless he first binds the strong man. Then indeed he may plunder his house. 28 “Truly, I say to you, all sins will be forgiven the children of man, and whatever blasphemies they utter, 29 but whoever blasphemes against the Holy Spirit never has forgiveness, but is guilty of an eternal sin”—30 for they were saying, “He has an unclean spirit.” Jesus' Mother and Brothers 31 And his mother and his brothers came, and standing outside they sent to him and called him. 32 And a crowd was sitting around him, and they said to him, “Your mother and your brothers16 are outside, seeking you.” 33 And he answered them, “Who are my mother and my brothers?” 34 And looking about at those who sat around him, he said, “Here are my mother and my brothers! 35 For whoever does the will of God, he is my brother and sister and mother.” Footnotes [1] 1:1 Some manuscripts omit the Son of God [2] 1:2 Some manuscripts in the prophets [3] 1:3 Or crying: Prepare in the wilderness [4] 1:11 Or my Son, my (or the) Beloved [5] 1:15 Or the kingdom of God has come near [6] 1:17 The Greek word anthropoi refers here to both men and women [7] 1:29 Some manuscripts they [8] 1:40 Leprosy was a term for several skin diseases; see Leviticus 13 [9] 1:43 Greek he; also verse 45 [10] 2:16 Some manuscripts and [11] 2:16 Some manuscripts add and drink [12] 2:22 Some manuscripts omit But new wine is for fresh wineskins [13] 2:26 Or in the passage about [14] 3:2 Greek him [15] 3:18 Greek kananaios, meaning zealot [16] 3:32 Other manuscripts add and your sisters (ESV)

Own My Health Daily Podcast

Maintaining good flexibility is important to help you avoid injury. Work this into your routine each week get the best results. Tune in to get some stretching tips from the Mayo Clinic. https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/fitness/in-depth/stretching/art-20047931

KinkyCast
#403 - Fister_Pussycat - Female Sounding

KinkyCast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 25:30


Sounding has been an amazing adventure into all-new sensations for me. There aren't really words to describe it. I often call it "sensation overload". It has been more erotic and addictive than I ever thought possible. Sounding has also become a passion for me to do and share. Before I started, when I was researching how-to's and safety issues, I was really saddened and frustrated by the lack of information for women. Everything is geared towards men. It is like comparing peaches to bananas when sounding. So I started posting my journey on Fetlife to share all my experiences. The good ones and the mishaps. I have found there is a whole community of women curious and/or doing it. It has been such an added bonus to connect with them and share. I hope more women realize it is not just for men!….. Maybe someone will start making toys just for us, lol.. We have an entire other pleasure zone to explore and enjoy that most people never think about. My advice is to find others and ask questions. You won't find a guidebook like minds is your best resource. Happy Perving ~ Fisther https://www.kinkycast.com/archive/2021-archive/403---fister_pussycat--.html

Artfully Told
Episode 072 - Giovanna Salas

Artfully Told

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 32:18


In today's episode, I welcome Giovanna Salas! Giovanna likes to create, and she has dabbled in and become proficient in multiple medias, including art, literature, and film. She is the founder and owner of Heart of Hollywood Magazine and Motion Pictures, and in this episode, she shares about the importance of making opportunities more accessible for artists along with her heart and passion for helping others' succeed. (Double fun fact: the cover image for this week's episode is not only a recent cover of Giovanna's Heart of Hollywood magazine, but it also featured Sandy Rodriguez, one of our former guests!)    Get in touch with Giovanna Salas: https://www.heartofhollywoodmagazine.com/ | https://www.hohmp.com/ Enroll in Lindsey's dance and wellness courses: www.elevateart.thinkific.com  Support Artfully Told: www.paypal.me/elevateart Artfully Told links: www.facebook.com/artfullytold | www.artfullytold.podbean.com | elevateartskc@gmail.com Get a free audiobook through Audible!  http://www.audibletrial.com/ArtfullyTold Schedule your own interview as a featured guest with Artfully Told! https://calendly.com/artfullytold/podcast-interview   Episode 72 - Giovanna Salas [00:00:00] Lindsey Dinneen: Hello, and welcome to Artfully Told, where we share true stories about meaningful encounters with art. [00:00:06] Krista: I think artists help people have different perspectives on every aspect of life. [00:00:12] Roman: All I can do is put my part in to the world. [00:00:15] Elizabeth: It doesn't have to be perfect the first time. It doesn't have to be perfect ever really. I mean, as long as you, and you're enjoying doing it and you're trying your best, that can be good enough. [00:00:23] Elna: Art is something that you can experience with your senses and that you just experiences as so beautiful. [00:00:31] Lindsey Dinneen: Hi friends, whether you are just getting started or you're a seasoned professional looking to up your game, I have an exciting opportunity for you. Did you know that I am actually the creator of 10 different courses online that range from ballet, jazz, tap. They also include a mindset detox course and two Stretch and Tone courses. So if you're looking to start a new hobby or get a little bit fitter, or you're looking to do a deep dive into your mindset, really perform a true detox, I have the course for you, and I would love to help you out with that. So if you go to elevateart.thinkific.com, you will see all of the different courses I've created. [00:01:26] You don't have to step in a classroom to take your first dance class. I teach a signature 20 Moves in 20 Days course that allows you to learn 20 steps in just 20 days. It's a lot of fun. We have a great time together. And I think you're going to absolutely love the different courses. And Artfully Told listeners get a little something from me. So if you go, you'll sign up and use the promo code "artfullytold," all one word, and when you do so you'll get 15% off the purchase of any and all your favorite courses. All right, listeners, enjoy that. Again, it's elevateart.thinkific.com. See you there. [00:02:11] Hello, and welcome back to another episode of Artfully Told. I'm your host Lindsey and I am very excited to have as my guest today, Giovanna Salas. She likes to create, and she has dabbled in and become proficient in many multiple medias, including art, literature, and film. She also is the founder and owner of Heart of Hollywood Magazine and Motion Pictures. And she also has a streaming platform that is in development, I believe. And I can't wait to dive in and hear all about the different things that you are up to. So thank you so much for being here. I really look forward to our conversation today. [00:02:57] Giovanna Salas: Hi Lindsey! [00:03:00] Lindsey Dinneen: Hi! Well, I was wondering if you don't mind just starting us off by telling us maybe a little bit about your background, how you got involved in art and kind of go from there. [00:03:11] Giovanna Salas: Absolutely. Well, first of all, I want to thank you for inviting me to your podcast. It's a pleasure for me to be here and well to make a story short, I started as a painter. You know, I, I love art. I use that oil media. That's that's my favorite. And one thing take to the other, I am visual person. And so I dive into learning photography and video. And so I have an interest later on into becoming a filmmaker. And so that's how everything is. [00:03:43] Lindsey Dinneen: Wow. Yeah. Okay. And so then you decided to become a filmmaker, which is a huge endeavor and undertaking. So can you tell us about that and what led you to that interest in that passion to create even your own company? [00:03:59] Giovanna Salas: Well, I wanted to become a film director. And so once I came to Hollywood, I saw there was very difficult. It's a lot of difficulties. And in word, it was not going to be easy. And the best way was to learn the business and learn what happened behind the scenes. So I began working with a couple productions and after that, I decided it was time to open my own company because I wanted to bring opportunities for people, they just started. Artists are underground, I feel. They, also people that were foreigner. Okay. And so for everyone, I just wanted to make it a place they have a door open for everyone that they need. It. [00:04:47] Lindsey Dinneen: That's amazing. And so now with your company, and I realized that there are three sort of branches to it. Can you tell us a little bit about each one and sort of who you, you serve as a result of the different branches and, and how that all works together? [00:05:04] Giovanna Salas: Sure. So, well, the company is called Heart of Hollywood Motion Pictures. And from that we had three different divisions. The first division, that's how we started in post-production. So the services that we offer was like color corrections, you know, edit of scoring. We've put together different individuals working in the industry and sometimes here and there, you know, behind the scenes, maybe a project that was already done, but they needed to do something where we can help with some of those services. And also giving consultations such as like screenplays, you know, like a script doctor, I had different consultants. So sometimes I do consultations, but it's more like a producer restructure. And we have a modern consultant. So it's along, all the kind of what it takes to, to get your, your project or package in a, in a better format. I think that's, that's the first one. [00:06:01] The second one is that the vision for the Heart of Hollywood Magazine. And this has started because we want, we have members within the company and we're gonna, we want it to give more exposure to the members. Well, when we published the first magazine, everybody was very positive about and now that became three years of publications. So we are very happy of what we're going. And I believe that the magazine is like a car for everyone to share the stories, get into the car and get more exposure. But also the purpose of this magazine is for our to get inspiration and motivated. [00:06:43] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. And then the third branch is something you're still in development for, or is that also live? [00:06:51] Giovanna Salas: No, we, well, I mean, working the third is a, an a streaming platform of Heart of Hollywood Cinema, and I been working with my engineer team. And it's not easy. It's been for a couple of years, like I say, but we have tested. We created last year. We tested with production. The, I was a producer for a, the Brain 19 Fashion Films. Okay. We did it virtually during COVID and we use the streaming platform to for, for the films. So I think it would take us a little bit longer to, to make it available for all the public, but the finally will be an option for all the filmmakers. They need to put their films in other platform. It's good to have different platforms such as, you know, Amazon and Netflix and all of that other ones that we already know. But it's also good to have another option and where you can put your films as well. [00:07:52] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, that's amazing. Well, it sounds like you are making such a difference for so many different people in so many areas, so yeah. Kudos to you for doing that. That's just amazing. And, you know, you mentioned at the beginning that you personally felt like it was, and I'm sure you're not alone, that it was really difficult to to kind of get into that world. Do you mind telling us a little bit more about your own story of how, you know, some of the challenges that you faced as you were starting off in Hollywood? [00:08:27] Giovanna Salas: Well, I will say one of my first challenges was the language because my first language is not English. It's a Spanish. And so I think the not, I didn't grow in the US, like I came here and I start, you know, working here in the entertainment. And one thing that I know is, is if you don't have connections in LA or people working in the industry, it's very difficult. And a lot of those connections are not easy to build. You have to be in the right place, meet the right people that have family members sometimes. And sometimes you don't, you don't have, you know, family members, so you don't have any connection. So, and then you have the problem with an artist trying to showcase but nobody wants to listen. So I think the why, because people pay more attention. I go rather with a person that has 30 more years experience or 20 years experience, or how are they going to get the experience if they don't get the chance to showcase what they can do or what they can bring to the table? [00:09:34] And so my, I don't, I feel there is not many companies that perhaps are really seriously approaching this issue. And at the beginning of my company, my number one priority was to approach this issue, was to make an statement that this company, it was going to be for the artist that needed. Yes, we're welcoming everyone. There is very well-known, you know, celebrity or a producer, but I think that we all, as artists, we have a responsibility and especially with work in the entertainment about helping all of them, it's about bringing that talent. Otherwise, we cannot move forward. [00:10:20] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, I think that's incredible. Thank you for sharing that story. And I love what you're doing because I've not personally been in that particular world, but, you know, as an artist, as well, I certainly understand some of that initial struggle of kind of getting basically getting your, especially your first job, because that can be, you know, the most challenging and because you know, you're new and I understand that. So yeah, no, that's incredible what you all do. And so congratulations on all of your success and the fact that it just keeps growing and growing is, is huge. That's so exciting. [00:11:01] Giovanna Salas: Yes. I feel very happy about what everything that has been developing and working. And I can tell you how many times I, I thought about quitting, closing the company, not pursuing because it was so many challenges. So the beginning, I just was myself and my ideas and my beliefs, and if what's going to work or not, and my personal finances. So it was a lot of the things to take into consideration. Also to make sure the, I, I do not fit all. There are people, you know, you have family members, you have things all around there, and sometimes all those things can work against you. But if you truly have the passion and that desire to see a three-year vision and you want to pursue that. Don't give that, that don't, don't stop. You have to, to make it happen because otherwise I don't think they, eh, we can end up truly happy. And every, every morning when I wake up, I feel very happy or what I'm doing. [00:12:09] I feel happy that through the years I am developing a team, you know, a more people and I had to train them. I had to explain, and I had to, for example, with the magazine, it's a thing behind it. And then I have a graphic designer. Sometimes it's new. Sometimes I had to explain a lot of things. Sometimes I had to train a customer representative that share, you know, who we are, but in a way, not of we are selling our market. And we, I just tried to tell him, you know, we are dealing with relationships with, with people. And, and I think that, that it has to be community. And so I never taught the, I will be sending magazines in another state, so, or even in another countries. And so that to me is incredible because the first time that I decided to make the magazine, I made the first magazine and it took me seven months just to plan, to get to the first draft in order to communicate my ideas to a graphic designer. And then looking for a team is not an easy challenge. You had to see many people strive to see who sees this issue and who just wants a job for a job, you know, who really cares or not. [00:13:27] And so I would say that in my theme, everyone is not this. My magazine editor is amazing. The contributors are, you know what I can say. They have seen something in the magazine. They wanted to be part of it. We just did a cover shoot in the Netherlands with a whole production team. We have the videos behind the scenes. So you guys want to watch it on the website. Is there any, so other, other things coming along. And so I'm constantly working. I think that would be one of the first ones say I would like to get a clone. But anyway. So I think my one thing that is very important to me right now is my time. I believe the time is very precious. You have to be very careful. You have to think about who you were spending your time with, who you are given your time, and make sure that that time is viable because sometimes people think that what we have time and the truth is that we don't, what we don't have is time. [00:14:28] And so every second, and every minute and you know, doing hours. I think we should try to enjoy ourselves. We should try to do those simple things about walking outside, you know, create an art. And when I started in the entertainment, I, I quit painting pretty much. I mean, not completely. I would make a painting once in a while or once every three months and not long ago because of the COVID and everything that has happened. I was feeling, I am very positive person. I always encouraging the people to do things and helping them in the projects, giving consultations. And then not long ago, like three months ago I started feeling depressed. I started feeling, what am I doing, where my life is going, like what I need to do, you know? [00:15:21] And so I started to paint again and I started to write as well, and I felt I gained a life and this is important for me because if I'm okay, and I can be a creative person as well, and then I can be more productive for my clients, I can be more productive for the team and for the company. And so, because I'm a workaholic, so I saw marriage my time, like working all the time and, and just lately I'm also beginning to learn and understand to take some time for me for, I can be more productive for all. [00:15:57] Lindsey Dinneen: Yes. And that is such an important realization to come to. I'm so glad that you're prioritizing yourself because you're absolutely right. You can't pour into someone else's life with an empty cup, so you have to start full yourself and, and so I'm so glad that you're doing that and prioritizing. That is so, so important. And again, you are just doing such amazing things for people. And so I'm, I'm curious, do any stories in particular come to mind of maybe people that you've helped, clients that you've helped that, you know, really may not have had a different opportunity had you not been there? [00:16:39] Giovanna Salas: Yes. I, I, I feel very happy with the, with the people that I have work. So one of the, in our, my team members, I think, eh, they sometimes when people come in and work for my company and things like that, I always tell them, you know, you have other opportunities or, or, or job opportunities and they can, you can you know, at that. Yes. So let me know, you know, and some in that happen and I feel very bad, you know, but at the same time, if they can grow better, you know, I I'm happy with that. That's, that's part of the team members. I always feel very sentimental when, you know, someone goes to another company. It is like that. And the reason is perhaps because one day I will be able to have their resources for my team. Right. And sometimes so they're big, big, big companies, you know, they, they do have those resources, but that's all about timing and about we, we maintain very good communication. [00:17:35] I like to, you know, be be in contact with, with everyone that has been part of the company, because I see them as family. For, for my clients, I have helped different people, like all the way from like models, I have helped. Well, one of them that I remember, I I was working with an actress and she wanted to have a manager, and at the time I was working with, with a talent, talent and management company. So I was helping her and, but I was producing something else. And then she got curious about that. And so I trained her to be a casting director. Lately I was working with a client and when he asks for consultations, you know, kind of personal coaching and his personality is great and he can do multiple, multiple things, but sometimes when you do multiple things, it's hard to focus and one thing, right. [00:18:30] Or what it will make you some type of income or how the finances. So he found me on LinkedIn and he approached me. And I go, look, yes, I can, I will do a consultation, but I had to charge a fee because right now my time is very important. So I sent in an email is very, very professional, and oh, my! Well, I was surprised he did took the consultations. We worked for a couple months together and he organized his acting career. He, I helped him to do an structure for a podcast. I thought I helped him to do the structure of the memberships, how to, you know, get the, his packages and all of that and making company. So I'm not, I like to develop structures and business models. And so he was very happy. He's, he really just became a big supporter of my company telling all their people how they, he feels great about, about the consultation. That those were his words. Yeah. Yeah. For the magazine. Yes, this is a producer, eh, they told me that his, that his film, his documentary film, it was getting better and more publicity after he was published in our magazine. [00:19:49] So the local newspaper from his state decided to do an interview with, with him and, you know, sales are going up and things like that. So we hear a lot of good feedback from clients, eh, besides to, you know, get a publication in our magazine. And that makes me very happy because one thing that I want is also the advertisement that we put there. I always suggest, you know, make sure that whatever, even in our own articles there, the information is clear. It's focused, it's inspirational and is useful because if it is not useful, people not going to pay attention. [00:20:24] Lindsey Dinneen: Yes. Yes. Yes. Well, like you said, you have to choose how to spend your time and you have to be wise about it. I mean, like you said, until you have your clone, you're just one person. I'm so glad that you have a team to, to help support you now, though, that that's such a, what, what a relief. [00:20:42] Giovanna Salas: Oh, and that was very hard. It was very hard to find a theme and it was very hard to find the consultants. It, it just, it took me probably like a year, a year and a half to, to put that together because people comes and goes and, but if someone shares they, and they are, they are good in what they do and they want to pursue what they want to do best as a part of a team is incredible. Magic happens, things happen, and everybody is happy. Yeah. And I, I'm very trying to be very social, fun, you know, I always ask, "how do you feel, how do you feel working with me? What would you suggest? Can you brainstorm?" So I like to have that interaction with, with the thing that I have, because there is not better way to know if you are doing something proper or offering good services to the audience, your own team doesn't like it or like it, right? [00:21:46] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. Well, that's, that's good. Again, I'm glad you have, you have good people to cheer you on. I am curious-- is, are there any moments that kind of stand out to you, that have an encounter with art, whether it was, you know, you experiencing someone else's art or watching somebody experience something that you've created that really kind of is a moment to remember? [00:22:15] Giovanna Salas: Yes. Yes. Well, several moments to remember. [00:22:19] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh, for sure. [00:22:21] Giovanna Salas: To be honest with you, but the, I have I guess was when someone requests me to paint something for them. That's a very special moment for me because I started as a painter and, I, at that time years ago, my dream was just to become an oil painter, go to France and live like an artist. But all the things change it and I wanted to now being the entertainment and I'm doing this because I know I can do it. I know I can help others. And that's very important in, but I think that going back it, when someone see something and my artwork, that's very special to me, that means something. [00:23:12] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. Well, I I'm sure that there are going to be some of our listeners who would love to reach out to you or get involved with your work or, or at least follow what you do. Is there a way for us to connect with you? [00:23:28] Giovanna Salas: They can go to the Heart of Hollywood Magazine dot com. They can go also to H O H M P, which is our productions for production. One of the, one of the things that I want to mention now that we're talking about art, it's been eight years probably that I have not make a proper, eh, exhibition, art, art exhibition. So, and I'm preparing, I'm painting new artwork is completely different from what I have painted in the past and I'm going to make an art exhibition, in Los Angeles on 2022 in March and the location, we're looking for a location and all of that. But I would like to invite everyone to go to the art show. [00:24:13] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh, how exciting. That is so exciting. And you said in March is when you want to do that? [00:24:19] Giovanna Salas: Yes, I am planning to, well, you will be the first one. I'm going to send you a link for that in a yes, because this it's so much, it's so much that I'm being, I'm keeping for myself during this time. And it has been a very challenges years. And I will like to share not just my mind, but also my heart with people and with the with those ones, they have a love for. [00:24:50] Lindsey Dinneen: I love that. That's, that's really special. Good. Well, I'm excited about that too. So thank you for all of those links that we can go and check out. And I do have a couple of questions that I like to ask my guests if you're okay with that? [00:25:04] Giovanna Salas: Of course. [00:25:06] Lindsey Dinneen: Perfect. So my first question is what is a change that you would like to see happen in the art world? Whether that's, you know, about creating art or displaying art or or making it available to people or basically what's, what's one thing that you would love to change about the art world? [00:25:30] Giovanna Salas: Hmm. That's a difficult one. I think there, I would like to see more united platforms of artists where they can come together. I'm trying to, we, we added a section in our magazine for artists they will like to sell their paintings or their sculptures or some sort of art, okay, media in the magazine. And so, but I would like to know. I think it needs to be more opinions for, for artists where they can display their artwork besides being in the galleries. But through that a little bit more with respect, because sometimes when you see our work in restaurants or see artwork in coffee shops, you really don't get an appreciation for the art. Sometimes you really pay attention. But I don't think that the public is, has information. So I, I, one thing that I would change I guess, is if it is a coffee shop, if it is a place or a location where there is not the, the location is not a gallery, but you want to exhibitit artwork, I think that there is a way to do it and it can be helpful for the artist and it can be helpful for the business. [00:26:56] So I believe that that can be something that is possible and to be done, but I think that those businesses that have those artwork in the locations, they should do like kind a spotlight on the, on the artist or make it a little bit more visual for the clients to see that in half of their operation. Because I think the ones that are they so powerful, the ones that you are in that, that they are in the wall of the restaurant, the coffee shop, boutique, or anything like that, it, you think that it's just part of the wall. You think they're just part of that, because it just kind of belongs in. I don't know how to explain it. It just was meant to be there or something like that. [00:27:43] Lindsey Dinneen: Right. [00:27:44] Giovanna Salas: But it's, but it has a, so that's why another is bad. It's actually very good, but that's why I believe there needs to be more on spotlight of the artwork and say, "Hey, you know, we do have these, you know, feature or something, you know, a newsletter." Because I don't see that much. The other day I enter into a coffee shop. I saw some paintings from a local artist here in Hollywood. He was doing more like an, a street artwork. It was painting people crossing the street, Hollywood signs, things like that. But I thought it was pretty cool. And I didn't see like an expo, like of the artists in that location. And so anyway, I know it took me a while, but I was thinking I have to give you a better response. And I think that, that w that would be the one I think, I think they, the locations can do much better. [00:28:35] Lindsey Dinneen: I think that's a great response and I absolutely agree with you. Okay. And then my second question is, is there a form of art that you have personally not tried yet either just because you haven't had time or you felt intimidated or whatever reason but that you would love to explore at some point? [00:28:57] Giovanna Salas: Yes, it is one form of art that I would like to explore and that would be sculpture. And I think it would be more of that time if I had the time to do it. But that always interests me. [00:29:11] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. Nice. Okay. And then my final question is at the end of your life, what is the one art related experience that you would want to experience for the last time? [00:29:25] Giovanna Salas: The smell of the art supplies, the smell of the paint. [00:29:29] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. I like that. Yeah, it's possibility, right? That's like, what's going to come out today. I love that. That's a great answer. Well, oh my goodness. This has been amazing. I'm so just so amazed by you and what you bring to the world and your, your company and how much impact it has. Thank you so much for doing what you do. I'm really excited that you're still painting and you're going to be exhibiting. I think all of that is just fantastic. So it was amazing to talk with you today. Thank you so much. I really appreciate your time. [00:30:09] Giovanna Salas: I appreciate your time because without you and you know people they have contacted also somehow, at least in about the Heart of Hollywood Magazine, all the company, without, without you Lindsey, we really cannot go far because, eh, there is so many people, so many company, entertainment companies in LA, you know, so it's it's not easy, but with your help, you know, we are letting people know about Heart of Hollywood motion pictures, Heart of Hollywood Magazine. And I'm very, very thankful they you're taking the time to interview. [00:30:46] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh, of course it's been an absolute pleasure. Well, and thank you so much again to everyone who has listened to this episode. And if you're feeling as inspired as I am, I would love if you would share this with a friend or two and we will catch you next time. [00:31:04] If you have a story to share with us, we would love that so much. And I hope your day has been Artfully Told. [00:31:13] Hi friends. I wanted to share with you another podcast that I think you're going to fall in love with just as I have. It's called Harlem with a View, and it is hosted by Harlem Lennox, who was a previous guest of mine on Artfully Told and a dear friend. Just because it looks easy doesn't mean it is. There is so much that goes into the work of your creative. She wants to know how the artists got into their line of work, what inspires them, but most importantly, what keeps them going? She'd asked them about how they make it through the blood, sweat, and tears. She wants to know what it's like to live this creative life: the good, the bad, the ugly, and even the magical. So she goes behind the scenes with creatives, from different genres and she explores their history, their take on life and talks about the business of art and the dedication of making art. She has a brilliant, brilliant platform. I think you will fall in love. I highly recommend that you search for Harlem with a View. Thanks!

GoVols247: A Tennessee Volunteers athletics podcast
Vols surging as buzzsaw stretch arrives

GoVols247: A Tennessee Volunteers athletics podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 55:43


GoVols247's Wes Rucker and Ryan Callahan open Welcome Back Lane Week with a discussion on the Vols' surge into the buzzsaw portion of the schedule, starting this week with Ole Miss. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Beyond the Bike
#118 Stretch Your Fabric

Beyond the Bike

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 7:07


Have a nice week! A. Lovett

New Collective Church
VIBES: Anger

New Collective Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 49:09


Emotions aren't bad - they're built-in.    God is emotional - we are created in the image of God.   Mark 3:5  He looked around at them in anger . . .   ‭‭Proverbs‬ ‭14:29‬ ‭NLT‬‬ “People with understanding control their anger; a hot temper shows great foolishness.” ‭‭Exodus‬ ‭2:11-12‬ ‭NIV‬‬ 11 One day, after Moses had grown up, he went out to where his own people were and watched them at their hard labor. He saw an Egyptian beating a Hebrew, one of his own people. 12 Looking this way and that and seeing no one, he killed the Egyptian and hid him in the sand.   Frame It   Why do I feel this way?    What does it reveal about my character and calling?  Funnel It    Where should I direct it?    Exodus 14:13–16 NIV 13 Moses answered the people, “Do not be afraid. Stand firm and you will see the deliverance the Lord will bring you today. The Egyptians you see today you will never see again.  14 The Lord will fight for you; you need only to be still.”   15 Then the Lord said to Moses, “Why are you crying out to me? Tell the Israelites to move on. 16 Raise your staff and stretch out your hand over the sea to divide the water so that the Israelites can go through the sea on dry ground.   Numbers 20:11–12 NIV 11 Then Moses raised his arm and struck the rock twice with his staff. Water gushed out, and the community and their livestock drank.  12 But the Lord said to Moses and Aaron, “Because you did not trust in me enough to honor me as holy in the sight of the Israelites, you will not bring this community into the land I give them.”   Filter It   What does the gospel say to it? Matthew‬ ‭5:21-24‬ ‭NIV‬‬ ““You have heard that it was said to the people long ago, ‘You shall not murder, and anyone who murders will be subject to judgment.' But I tell you that anyone who is angry with a brother or sister will be subject to judgment. Again, anyone who says to a brother or sister, ‘Raca,' is answerable to the court. And anyone who says, ‘You fool!' will be in danger of the fire of hell. “Therefore, if you are offering your gift at the altar and there remember that your brother or sister has something against you, leave your gift there in front of the altar. First go and be reconciled to them; then come and offer your gift.” Mark 3:1-6 Another time Jesus went into the synagogue, and a man with a shriveled hand was there.  2 Some of them were looking for a reason to accuse Jesus, so they watched him closely to see if he would heal him on the Sabbath.  3 Jesus said to the man with the shriveled hand, “Stand up in front of everyone.” 4 Then Jesus asked them, “Which is lawful on the Sabbath: to do good or to do evil, to save life or to kill?” But they remained silent. 5 He looked around at them in anger and, deeply distressed at their stubborn hearts, said to the man, “Stretch out your hand.” He stretched it out, and his hand was completely restored.  6 Then the Pharisees went out and began to plot with the Herodians how they might kill Jesus.

Candid Athletic Training
#143 - Do You Ask for Help On A Tough Injury

Candid Athletic Training

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 78:34


The Candid Guys talk about how, when, if and should you ask for help on an injury. Should we have more faith in oursleves? FAT: FORGETTING SARAH MARSHALL....Finally FoF: Gatorade CupHolders???? FMK: If you had to have a piece of equipment be broken? Top5: What is the Worst Stretch? https://www.healthyroster.com/ https://network.structuralelements.com/a/2147488435/M4Tzcxyf https://www.masterdryneedling.com/ https://www.medbridgeeducation.com/?a_aid=8179&a_cid=

ESV: Daily Office Lectionary
October 9: Psalm 137; Psalm 144; Psalm 104; Jeremiah 35; 1 Corinthians 12:27–13:3; Matthew 9:35–10:4

ESV: Daily Office Lectionary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 11:53


Proper 22 First Psalm: Psalm 137; Psalm 144 Psalm 137 (Listen) How Shall We Sing the Lord's Song? 137   By the waters of Babylon,    there we sat down and wept,    when we remembered Zion.2   On the willows1 there    we hung up our lyres.3   For there our captors    required of us songs,  and our tormentors, mirth, saying,    “Sing us one of the songs of Zion!” 4   How shall we sing the LORD's song    in a foreign land?5   If I forget you, O Jerusalem,    let my right hand forget its skill!6   Let my tongue stick to the roof of my mouth,    if I do not remember you,  if I do not set Jerusalem    above my highest joy! 7   Remember, O LORD, against the Edomites    the day of Jerusalem,  how they said, “Lay it bare, lay it bare,    down to its foundations!”8   O daughter of Babylon, doomed to be destroyed,    blessed shall he be who repays you    with what you have done to us!9   Blessed shall he be who takes your little ones    and dashes them against the rock! Footnotes [1] 137:2 Or poplars (ESV) Psalm 144 (Listen) My Rock and My Fortress Of David. 144   Blessed be the LORD, my rock,    who trains my hands for war,    and my fingers for battle;2   he is my steadfast love and my fortress,    my stronghold and my deliverer,  my shield and he in whom I take refuge,    who subdues peoples1 under me. 3   O LORD, what is man that you regard him,    or the son of man that you think of him?4   Man is like a breath;    his days are like a passing shadow. 5   Bow your heavens, O LORD, and come down!    Touch the mountains so that they smoke!6   Flash forth the lightning and scatter them;    send out your arrows and rout them!7   Stretch out your hand from on high;    rescue me and deliver me from the many waters,    from the hand of foreigners,8   whose mouths speak lies    and whose right hand is a right hand of falsehood. 9   I will sing a new song to you, O God;    upon a ten-stringed harp I will play to you,10   who gives victory to kings,    who rescues David his servant from the cruel sword.11   Rescue me and deliver me    from the hand of foreigners,  whose mouths speak lies    and whose right hand is a right hand of falsehood. 12   May our sons in their youth    be like plants full grown,  our daughters like corner pillars    cut for the structure of a palace;13   may our granaries be full,    providing all kinds of produce;  may our sheep bring forth thousands    and ten thousands in our fields;14   may our cattle be heavy with young,    suffering no mishap or failure in bearing;2  may there be no cry of distress in our streets!15   Blessed are the people to whom such blessings fall!    Blessed are the people whose God is the LORD! Footnotes [1] 144:2 Many Hebrew manuscripts, Dead Sea Scroll, Jerome, Syriac, Aquila; most Hebrew manuscripts subdues my people [2] 144:14 Hebrew with no breaking in or going out (ESV) Second Psalm: Psalm 104 Psalm 104 (Listen) O Lord My God, You Are Very Great 104   Bless the LORD, O my soul!    O LORD my God, you are very great!  You are clothed with splendor and majesty,2     covering yourself with light as with a garment,    stretching out the heavens like a tent.3   He lays the beams of his chambers on the waters;  he makes the clouds his chariot;    he rides on the wings of the wind;4   he makes his messengers winds,    his ministers a flaming fire. 5   He set the earth on its foundations,    so that it should never be moved.6   You covered it with the deep as with a garment;    the waters stood above the mountains.7   At your rebuke they fled;    at the sound of your thunder they took to flight.8   The mountains rose, the valleys sank down    to the place that you appointed for them.9   You set a boundary that they may not pass,    so that they might not again cover the earth. 10   You make springs gush forth in the valleys;    they flow between the hills;11   they give drink to every beast of the field;    the wild donkeys quench their thirst.12   Beside them the birds of the heavens dwell;    they sing among the branches.13   From your lofty abode you water the mountains;    the earth is satisfied with the fruit of your work. 14   You cause the grass to grow for the livestock    and plants for man to cultivate,  that he may bring forth food from the earth15     and wine to gladden the heart of man,  oil to make his face shine    and bread to strengthen man's heart. 16   The trees of the LORD are watered abundantly,    the cedars of Lebanon that he planted.17   In them the birds build their nests;    the stork has her home in the fir trees.18   The high mountains are for the wild goats;    the rocks are a refuge for the rock badgers. 19   He made the moon to mark the seasons;1    the sun knows its time for setting.20   You make darkness, and it is night,    when all the beasts of the forest creep about.21   The young lions roar for their prey,    seeking their food from God.22   When the sun rises, they steal away    and lie down in their dens.23   Man goes out to his work    and to his labor until the evening. 24   O LORD, how manifold are your works!    In wisdom have you made them all;    the earth is full of your creatures.25   Here is the sea, great and wide,    which teems with creatures innumerable,    living things both small and great.26   There go the ships,    and Leviathan, which you formed to play in it.2 27   These all look to you,    to give them their food in due season.28   When you give it to them, they gather it up;    when you open your hand, they are filled with good things.29   When you hide your face, they are dismayed;    when you take away their breath, they die    and return to their dust.30   When you send forth your Spirit,3 they are created,    and you renew the face of the ground. 31   May the glory of the LORD endure forever;    may the LORD rejoice in his works,32   who looks on the earth and it trembles,    who touches the mountains and they smoke!33   I will sing to the LORD as long as I live;    I will sing praise to my God while I have being.34   May my meditation be pleasing to him,    for I rejoice in the LORD.35   Let sinners be consumed from the earth,    and let the wicked be no more!  Bless the LORD, O my soul!  Praise the LORD! Footnotes [1] 104:19 Or the appointed times (compare Genesis 1:14) [2] 104:26 Or you formed to play with [3] 104:30 Or breath (ESV) Old Testament: Jeremiah 35 Jeremiah 35 (Listen) The Obedience of the Rechabites 35 The word that came to Jeremiah from the LORD in the days of Jehoiakim the son of Josiah, king of Judah: 2 “Go to the house of the Rechabites and speak with them and bring them to the house of the LORD, into one of the chambers; then offer them wine to drink.” 3 So I took Jaazaniah the son of Jeremiah, son of Habazziniah and his brothers and all his sons and the whole house of the Rechabites. 4 I brought them to the house of the LORD into the chamber of the sons of Hanan the son of Igdaliah, the man of God, which was near the chamber of the officials, above the chamber of Maaseiah the son of Shallum, keeper of the threshold. 5 Then I set before the Rechabites pitchers full of wine, and cups, and I said to them, “Drink wine.” 6 But they answered, “We will drink no wine, for Jonadab the son of Rechab, our father, commanded us, ‘You shall not drink wine, neither you nor your sons forever. 7 You shall not build a house; you shall not sow seed; you shall not plant or have a vineyard; but you shall live in tents all your days, that you may live many days in the land where you sojourn.' 8 We have obeyed the voice of Jonadab the son of Rechab, our father, in all that he commanded us, to drink no wine all our days, ourselves, our wives, our sons, or our daughters, 9 and not to build houses to dwell in. We have no vineyard or field or seed, 10 but we have lived in tents and have obeyed and done all that Jonadab our father commanded us. 11 But when Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came up against the land, we said, ‘Come, and let us go to Jerusalem for fear of the army of the Chaldeans and the army of the Syrians.' So we are living in Jerusalem.” 12 Then the word of the LORD came to Jeremiah: 13 “Thus says the LORD of hosts, the God of Israel: Go and say to the people of Judah and the inhabitants of Jerusalem, Will you not receive instruction and listen to my words? declares the LORD. 14 The command that Jonadab the son of Rechab gave to his sons, to drink no wine, has been kept, and they drink none to this day, for they have obeyed their father's command. I have spoken to you persistently, but you have not listened to me. 15 I have sent to you all my servants the prophets, sending them persistently, saying, ‘Turn now every one of you from his evil way, and amend your deeds, and do not go after other gods to serve them, and then you shall dwell in the land that I gave to you and your fathers.' But you did not incline your ear or listen to me. 16 The sons of Jonadab the son of Rechab have kept the command that their father gave them, but this people has not obeyed me. 17 Therefore, thus says the LORD, the God of hosts, the God of Israel: Behold, I am bringing upon Judah and all the inhabitants of Jerusalem all the disaster that I have pronounced against them, because I have spoken to them and they have not listened, I have called to them and they have not answered.” 18 But to the house of the Rechabites Jeremiah said, “Thus says the LORD of hosts, the God of Israel: Because you have obeyed the command of Jonadab your father and kept all his precepts and done all that he commanded you, 19 therefore thus says the LORD of hosts, the God of Israel: Jonadab the son of Rechab shall never lack a man to stand before me.” (ESV) New Testament: 1 Corinthians 12:27–13:3 1 Corinthians 12:27–13:3 (Listen) 27 Now you are the body of Christ and individually members of it. 28 And God has appointed in the church first apostles, second prophets, third teachers, then miracles, then gifts of healing, helping, administrating, and various kinds of tongues. 29 Are all apostles? Are all prophets? Are all teachers? Do all work miracles? 30 Do all possess gifts of healing? Do all speak with tongues? Do all interpret? 31 But earnestly desire the higher gifts. And I will show you a still more excellent way. The Way of Love 13 If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal. 2 And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing. 3 If I give away all I have, and if I deliver up my body to be burned,1 but have not love, I gain nothing. Footnotes [1] 13:3 Some manuscripts deliver up my body [to death] that I may boast (ESV) Gospel: Matthew 9:35–10:4 Matthew 9:35–10:4 (Listen) The Harvest Is Plentiful, the Laborers Few 35 And Jesus went throughout all the cities and villages, teaching in their synagogues and proclaiming the gospel of the kingdom and healing every disease and every affliction. 36 When he saw the crowds, he had compassion for them, because they were harassed and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd. 37 Then he said to his disciples, “The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few; 38 therefore pray earnestly to the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest.” The Twelve Apostles 10 And he called to him his twelve disciples and gave them authority over unclean spirits, to cast them out, and to heal every disease and every affliction. 2 The names of the twelve apostles are these: first, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother; James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother; 3 Philip and Bartholomew; Thomas and Matthew the tax collector; James the son of Alphaeus, and Thaddaeus;1 4 Simon the Zealot,2 and Judas Iscariot, who betrayed him. Footnotes [1] 10:3 Some manuscripts Lebbaeus, or Lebbaeus called Thaddaeus [2] 10:4 Greek kananaios, meaning zealot (ESV)

Seibertron.com Transformers Twincast/Podcast
Seibertron.com Twincast / Podcast #286 "They Might Be Giants"

Seibertron.com Transformers Twincast/Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 103:54


On Episode 286 of the Seibertron.com Twincast Podcast the topics begin yet again with a final status update on the Victory Saber HasLab crowdfunding project, with a check-in on its progress towards stretch goals now that it has surpassed its initial funding goals. Takara Tomy's just revealed MPG-01 Shouki, the first part of its Masterpiece Raiden combiner, has been revealed so the crew talks about that next. A leaked image from a retailer presentation has confirmed the existence of next year's Titan Class entry for the Generations: Legacy lineup, which is none other than Cybertron Metroplex. Opinions split there before the discussion moves on to learn about Hasbro and Takara's listings for Tenseg figure stands. Catch-up chat on the Amazon Exclusive Kingdom Golden Disk collection follows with thoughts provided on all the entries from Ranger to Jackpot to Terrorsaur and more. The episode concludes with the recurring Bragging Rights segment.

Off the Woodwork
What formation will serve Atlanta United best down the stretch?

Off the Woodwork

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 35:45


Today's Stoppage Time discusses what Atlanta United's best lineup/shape could look like in the last 6 games this season, what the magic number of points could be for ATL to make the playoffs, and previews the USMNT upcoming World Cup qualifiers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Off The Lip Radio Show
OTL#586 - Stretch

Off The Lip Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021


Legendary surfboard shaper Willam “Stretch” Riedel returned to the show, to talk about …. a smorgasbord of subjects, Stretch as usual speaks his mind!

Harvest Eating Podcast-Plant Based Vegan Recipes
Episode 443-Inexpensive Meals That Stretch Your Food Budget

Harvest Eating Podcast-Plant Based Vegan Recipes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 61:07


Today I will be trying to inspire you to create simple family-style meals using inexpensive proteins and starches. With food prices on the rise, many families need some inspiration to keep things interesting, tasty and not break the bank. Today I will focus on the following foods to use as a starting point: Ground Beef Chicken Thighs Rotisserie Chicken Black Beans Rice I won't go into super detail on each recipe idea rather just go over some of the basics and ways to switch them up to make simple meals your family loves. Here are some of the ideas I'll speak about: meatballs, meatloaf, taco salad/Burritos, stuffed peppers, stuffed cabbage with tomatoes over rice Thai chicken over rice, butter chicken, skewers with peppers, onions, grilled over rice Chicken salad, chicken caser salad, chicken noodle soup, use carcass to make stock Black beans and rice, black bean, roasted squash, cheese burritos, taco bowl, rice beans, ground beef, avocado, cheese, tomato, black bean chili, black bean burgers Green rice, chicken and rice soup, fried rice-add just about anything to stretch, rice pudding, risotto, Arroz con pollo I make many of these dishes each month and we thoroughly enjoy them and they save us money on grocery bills and most importantly-they keep us out of restaurants. Resources for this episode: Buy Harvest Eating Merch Enroll Now-Food Storage Feast Shop-Harvest Eating Store Harvest Eating On Telegram Harvest Eating on Mewe Harvest Eating on Instagram Harvest Eating on Facebook Harvest Eating Cookbook Harvest Eating Podcast Support Harvest Eating

Kickass Every Day with Tanya Tringali
Strengthening Your 6 Higher Mental Faculties (Superpowers)

Kickass Every Day with Tanya Tringali

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 23:58


Episode 63 dives into learning about our 6 mental faculties and how to strengthen them. This week's episode continues on the great vibe that we have been on and really dives into our minds and how amazing they really are. As I told you right from the start with episode 1 your mindset is where everything starts and that is why it is CRUCIAL to spend as much time as possible strengthening that. The first time I ever heard about our 6 higher mental faculties was from Mary Morrisey of the Brave Thinking Institute. She is another personal development great that I will be sharing more about with you in an upcoming episode. She introduced these to me in a email that was highlighting a new program that her and Bob Proctor had put together called the Magic in Your Mind. I have put a link to this program below. That program and what I have been learning about these faculties and my personal experience with tapping into them are the inspiration for this episode. You will learn-  The 6 higher mental faculties, what they bring to your life and how they work with each other, a few ways to strengthen each of them, how to work with them in conjunction with everything else we have been talking about Once again the word possibility is the star here in this episode. It is in the possibilities where all of the magic of life exists. Where the life you want to create for yourself exists. Emily Dickenson said- “I dwell in possibilities” well me too and that is where I want you to dwell also. Stretch your mind and new doors will always open. Continue with me on this journey and subscribe! Also, invite your friends to join the conversation as well so they can be a part of the fun. Let's inspire and grow with each other. If you would like to get the show notes for this episode, head on over to: https://tanyahelen.com/show-notes

ESV: Chronological
October 6: Matthew 11–12

ESV: Chronological

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 10:09


Matthew 11–12 Matthew 11–12 (Listen) Messengers from John the Baptist 11 When Jesus had finished instructing his twelve disciples, he went on from there to teach and preach in their cities. 2 Now when John heard in prison about the deeds of the Christ, he sent word by his disciples 3 and said to him, “Are you the one who is to come, or shall we look for another?” 4 And Jesus answered them, “Go and tell John what you hear and see: 5 the blind receive their sight and the lame walk, lepers1 are cleansed and the deaf hear, and the dead are raised up, and the poor have good news preached to them. 6 And blessed is the one who is not offended by me.” 7 As they went away, Jesus began to speak to the crowds concerning John: “What did you go out into the wilderness to see? A reed shaken by the wind? 8 What then did you go out to see? A man2 dressed in soft clothing? Behold, those who wear soft clothing are in kings' houses. 9 What then did you go out to see? A prophet?3 Yes, I tell you, and more than a prophet. 10 This is he of whom it is written,   “‘Behold, I send my messenger before your face,    who will prepare your way before you.' 11 Truly, I say to you, among those born of women there has arisen no one greater than John the Baptist. Yet the one who is least in the kingdom of heaven is greater than he. 12 From the days of John the Baptist until now the kingdom of heaven has suffered violence,4 and the violent take it by force. 13 For all the Prophets and the Law prophesied until John, 14 and if you are willing to accept it, he is Elijah who is to come. 15 He who has ears to hear,5 let him hear. 16 “But to what shall I compare this generation? It is like children sitting in the marketplaces and calling to their playmates, 17   “‘We played the flute for you, and you did not dance;    we sang a dirge, and you did not mourn.' 18 For John came neither eating nor drinking, and they say, ‘He has a demon.' 19 The Son of Man came eating and drinking, and they say, ‘Look at him! A glutton and a drunkard, a friend of tax collectors and sinners!' Yet wisdom is justified by her deeds.”6 Woe to Unrepentant Cities 20 Then he began to denounce the cities where most of his mighty works had been done, because they did not repent. 21 “Woe to you, Chorazin! Woe to you, Bethsaida! For if the mighty works done in you had been done in Tyre and Sidon, they would have repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes. 22 But I tell you, it will be more bearable on the day of judgment for Tyre and Sidon than for you. 23 And you, Capernaum, will you be exalted to heaven? You will be brought down to Hades. For if the mighty works done in you had been done in Sodom, it would have remained until this day. 24 But I tell you that it will be more tolerable on the day of judgment for the land of Sodom than for you.” Come to Me, and I Will Give You Rest 25 At that time Jesus declared, “I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that you have hidden these things from the wise and understanding and revealed them to little children; 26 yes, Father, for such was your gracious will.7 27 All things have been handed over to me by my Father, and no one knows the Son except the Father, and no one knows the Father except the Son and anyone to whom the Son chooses to reveal him. 28 Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. 29 Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. 30 For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.” Jesus Is Lord of the Sabbath 12 At that time Jesus went through the grainfields on the Sabbath. His disciples were hungry, and they began to pluck heads of grain and to eat. 2 But when the Pharisees saw it, they said to him, “Look, your disciples are doing what is not lawful to do on the Sabbath.” 3 He said to them, “Have you not read what David did when he was hungry, and those who were with him: 4 how he entered the house of God and ate the bread of the Presence, which it was not lawful for him to eat nor for those who were with him, but only for the priests? 5 Or have you not read in the Law how on the Sabbath the priests in the temple profane the Sabbath and are guiltless? 6 I tell you, something greater than the temple is here. 7 And if you had known what this means, ‘I desire mercy, and not sacrifice,' you would not have condemned the guiltless. 8 For the Son of Man is lord of the Sabbath.” A Man with a Withered Hand 9 He went on from there and entered their synagogue. 10 And a man was there with a withered hand. And they asked him, “Is it lawful to heal on the Sabbath?”—so that they might accuse him. 11 He said to them, “Which one of you who has a sheep, if it falls into a pit on the Sabbath, will not take hold of it and lift it out? 12 Of how much more value is a man than a sheep! So it is lawful to do good on the Sabbath.” 13 Then he said to the man, “Stretch out your hand.” And the man stretched it out, and it was restored, healthy like the other. 14 But the Pharisees went out and conspired against him, how to destroy him. God's Chosen Servant 15 Jesus, aware of this, withdrew from there. And many followed him, and he healed them all 16 and ordered them not to make him known. 17 This was to fulfill what was spoken by the prophet Isaiah: 18   “Behold, my servant whom I have chosen,    my beloved with whom my soul is well pleased.  I will put my Spirit upon him,    and he will proclaim justice to the Gentiles.19   He will not quarrel or cry aloud,    nor will anyone hear his voice in the streets;20   a bruised reed he will not break,    and a smoldering wick he will not quench,  until he brings justice to victory;21     and in his name the Gentiles will hope.” Blasphemy Against the Holy Spirit 22 Then a demon-oppressed man who was blind and mute was brought to him, and he healed him, so that the man spoke and saw. 23 And all the people were amazed, and said, “Can this be the Son of David?” 24 But when the Pharisees heard it, they said, “It is only by Beelzebul, the prince of demons, that this man casts out demons.” 25 Knowing their thoughts, he said to them, “Every kingdom divided against itself is laid waste, and no city or house divided against itself will stand. 26 And if Satan casts out Satan, he is divided against himself. How then will his kingdom stand? 27 And if I cast out demons by Beelzebul, by whom do your sons cast them out? Therefore they will be your judges. 28 But if it is by the Spirit of God that I cast out demons, then the kingdom of God has come upon you. 29 Or how can someone enter a strong man's house and plunder his goods, unless he first binds the strong man? Then indeed he may plunder his house. 30 Whoever is not with me is against me, and whoever does not gather with me scatters. 31 Therefore I tell you, every sin and blasphemy will be forgiven people, but the blasphemy against the Spirit will not be forgiven. 32 And whoever speaks a word against the Son of Man will be forgiven, but whoever speaks against the Holy Spirit will not be forgiven, either in this age or in the age to come. A Tree Is Known by Its Fruit 33 “Either make the tree good and its fruit good, or make the tree bad and its fruit bad, for the tree is known by its fruit. 34 You brood of vipers! How can you speak good, when you are evil? For out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaks. 35 The good person out of his good treasure brings forth good, and the evil person out of his evil treasure brings forth evil. 36 I tell you, on the day of judgment people will give account for every careless word they speak, 37 for by your words you will be justified, and by your words you will be condemned.” The Sign of Jonah 38 Then some of the scribes and Pharisees answered him, saying, “Teacher, we wish to see a sign from you.” 39 But he answered them, “An evil and adulterous generation seeks for a sign, but no sign will be given to it except the sign of the prophet Jonah. 40 For just as Jonah was three days and three nights in the belly of the great fish, so will the Son of Man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth. 41 The men of Nineveh will rise up at the judgment with this generation and condemn it, for they repented at the preaching of Jonah, and behold, something greater than Jonah is here. 42 The queen of the South will rise up at the judgment with this generation and condemn it, for she came from the ends of the earth to hear the wisdom of Solomon, and behold, something greater than Solomon is here. Return of an Unclean Spirit 43 “When the unclean spirit has gone out of a person, it passes through waterless places seeking rest, but finds none. 44 Then it says, ‘I will return to my house from which I came.' And when it comes, it finds the house empty, swept, and put in order. 45 Then it goes and brings with it seven other spirits more evil than itself, and they enter and dwell there, and the last state of that person is worse than the first. So also will it be with this evil generation.” Jesus' Mother and Brothers 46 While he was still speaking to the people, behold, his mother and his brothers8 stood outside, asking to speak to him.9 48 But he replied to the man who told him, “Who is my mother, and who are my brothers?” 49 And stretching out his hand toward his disciples, he said, “Here are my mother and my brothers! 50 For whoever does the will of my Father in heaven is my brother and sister and mother.” Footnotes [1] 11:5 Leprosy was a term for several skin diseases; see Leviticus 13 [2] 11:8 Or Why then did you go out? To see a man . . . [3] 11:9 Some manuscripts Why then did you go out? To see a prophet? [4] 11:12 Or has been coming violently [5] 11:15 Some manuscripts omit to hear [6] 11:19 Some manuscripts children (compare Luke 7:35) [7] 11:26 Or for so it pleased you well [8] 12:46 Or brothers and sisters; also verses 48, 49 [9] 12:46 Some manuscripts insert verse 47: Someone told him, “Your mother and your brothers are standing outside, asking to speak to you” (ESV)

Montana Wildfire News
A 7,000 acre fire in Fergus County has closed a stretch of Highway 81

Montana Wildfire News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 1:40


Extreme fire behavior with wind-driven runs and ember spotting has pushed the South Moccasin Fire to some 7,000 acres as of noon Tuesday. The fire is burning in timber and short grass 7 miles northwest of Lewistown in Fergus County and is zero percent contained.

Montana Public Radio News
A 7,000 acre fire in Fergus County has closed a stretch of Highway 81

Montana Public Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 1:40


Extreme fire behavior with wind-driven runs and ember spotting has pushed the South Moccasin Fire to some 7,000 acres as of noon Tuesday. The fire is burning in timber and short grass 7 miles northwest of Lewistown in Fergus County and is zero percent contained.

The Michael Yardney Podcast | Property Investment, Success & Money
Fearless living in challenging times with Rhonda Britten

The Michael Yardney Podcast | Property Investment, Success & Money

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 36:17


The general theme of my podcast is property investment, success, and money. But today's show is more about you. If you're like many Australians you're sick of Covid; and by that I don't mean sick with Covid. But sick of the limitations, the restrictions, the lockdowns, the inability to get on with your life or your investing, or your business. I know many of us are feeling angry, cross, or frustrated and that's why today I'm having a chat with Rhonda Britten who is a repeat Oprah guest, a TEDx speaker and an Emmy award winner. And even if you're coping well with Covid you'll love this chat today as I'm sure Rhonda will give you some ideas to make your life even better. Rhonda Britten is not just another American “Rah Rah” motivational speaker, but she's the real deal as you'll find out in my chat with her today, so welcome to today's show. What Rhonda Britten has to say about fearless living Rhonda presented 2 sessions for my team at Metropole over the last month and my team were so taken by her inspiring message I invited Rhonda to pass on her message to you through this podcast. Currently many of us are being challenged by lockdowns, restrictions and uncertainty. This too shall pass, we know there is an end in sight and that's most likely when 80% of Australians will be vaccinated. But we're not really sure of the timing of this and if life will really get back to normal, so how do we cope between now and then? Rhonda's history and why she's qualified to give this kind of advice and information Rhonda shares her traumatic personal history, how it affected her, and what led from that Advice for Australians who are feeling that they've lost control of their lives Understanding the importance of letting go of things that aren't actually under our control Releasing the things that we can't control leaves room for us to take responsibility for what we can control Whether fearless living is really possible The importance of learning and identifying the ways that fear shows up in our lives The Stretch, Risk, or Die exercise and what it's for Why it's important to eliminated negative self-talk How to move yourself forward Rhonda's favourite exercise, Acknowledgements What we can do to better deal with anger How anger can be in service to freedom   Resources: Michael Yardney Get the team at Metropole to help build your personal Strategic Property Plan Click here and have a chat with us Rhonda Britten – www.FearlessLiving.org   Download Rhonda Britten's free guide – www.FearlessLiving.org/risk Shownotes plus more here: Fearless living in challenging times with Rhonda Britten Some of our favourite quotes from the show: “We're worried, we're scared, we're stressed, and we're continuously bombarded by negative messages in the media.” – Michael Yardney “I think the other thing is, a lot of people feel they've lost control over their lives.” – Michael Yardney “Feelings are just energy, so you want to move that energy through you.” – Rhonda Britten PLEASE LEAVE US A REVIEW Reviews are hugely important to me because they help new people discover this podcast. If you enjoyed listening to this episode, please leave a review on iTunes - it's your way of passing the message forward to others and saying thank you to me. Here's how  

Artfully Told
Episode 071 - Ashey Taylor

Artfully Told

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 46:11


In this week's episode, I again welcome Ashley Taylor! Ashley was our very first podcast guest and we're delighted she came back to share about her manifesto to artists about the importance of intentionality in every choice when creating and sharing their work. She offers blunt yet insightful advice about how artists can be meaningful in their works' presentation. (Fun fact: the cover image of this episode is of Ashley & Lindsey when they were promoting the 2019 premiere of "Cracked! A Reimagined Kansas City Nutcracker.")   Get in touch with Ashley Taylor: https://www.ashleyrebeccataylor.wordpress.com  Enroll in Lindsey's dance and wellness courses: www.elevateart.thinkific.com  Support Artfully Told: www.paypal.me/elevateart Artfully Told links: www.facebook.com/artfullytold | www.artfullytold.podbean.com | elevateartskc@gmail.com Get a free audiobook through Audible!  http://www.audibletrial.com/ArtfullyTold Schedule your own interview as a featured guest with Artfully Told! https://calendly.com/artfullytold/podcast-interview   Episode 71 - Ashley Taylor [00:00:00] Lindsey Dinneen: Hello, and welcome to Artfully Told, where we share true stories about meaningful encounters with art. [00:00:06] Krista: I think artists help people have different perspectives on every aspect of life. [00:00:12] Roman: All I can do is put my part in to the world. [00:00:15] Elizabeth: It doesn't have to be perfect the first time. It doesn't have to be perfect ever really. I mean, as long as you, and you're enjoying doing it and you're trying your best, that can be good enough. [00:00:23] Elna: Art is something that you can experience with your senses and that you just experiences as so beautiful. [00:00:31] Lindsey Dinneen: Hi friends, whether you are just getting started or you're a seasoned professional looking to up your game, I have an exciting opportunity for you. Did you know that I am actually the creator of 10 different courses online that range from ballet, jazz, tap. They also include a mindset detox course and two Stretch and Tone courses. So if you're looking to start a new hobby or get a little bit fitter, or you're looking to do a deep dive into your mindset, really perform a true detox, I have the course for you, and I would love to help you out with that. So if you go to elevateart.thinkific.com, you will see all of the different courses I've created. [00:01:26] You don't have to step in a classroom to take your first dance class. I teach a signature 20 Moves in 20 Days course that allows you to learn 20 steps in just 20 days. It's a lot of fun. We have a great time together. And I think you're going to absolutely love the different courses. And Artfully Told listeners get a little something from me. So if you go, you'll sign up and use the promo code "artfullytold," all one word, and when you do so you'll get 15% off the purchase of any and all your favorite courses. All right, listeners, enjoy that. Again, it's elevateart.thinkific.com. See you there. [00:02:11] Hello, and welcome back to another episode of Artfully Told. I'm your host Lindsey and I am extremely delighted to have as my guest today a returnee. She actually had the very, very first episode that I ever released with a guest was with Ashley Taylor. So thank you, Ashley, for being back. I'm just beyond excited. Ashley is a dancer. She is a choreographer, teacher. She is also a writer. In fact, maybe sneak peak. Can I say that you're working on a novel? [00:02:47] Ashley Taylor: Of course you can! [00:02:49] Lindsey Dinneen: Awesome. Yeah. And then also, goodness gracious. I think your artistic list goes on and on. You can paint, draw, what can't you do? Maybe we should start there. [00:03:02] Ashley Taylor: Well, I'm going to answer that question later. [00:03:04] Lindsey Dinneen: Okay. Fair. That's true. Anyway, artist extraordinaire, very creative and very good at what she does. So, Ashley, thank you for being back. [00:03:17] Ashley Taylor: Thank you for having me. I'm super excited to chat with you again about artsy things. [00:03:22] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. Well, first I'm really curious to know sort of what what you've been up to lately, especially considering, you know, when we did our recording last year, of course it was COVID central and it kind of still is, but things have changed and opened back up. So I'm curious how you've been able to navigate sort of getting back into more artsy things? [00:03:50] Ashley Taylor: Yeah. So I would not say I'm fully back in, in the way that I would like to be, but that's fine. I've had the time to explore a lot of writing and editing and found a community of creative writing people, which is great. So we meet virtually once a week and read each other what we're working on and give feedback, which has been wonderful, highly recommend creative community as a side note. So yeah, I, as you said, I have been working on a novel. I, I am editing it. I think this is my third draft right now. I've got some feedback recently from some readers, so I'm editing it. And the goal is to get it sent to some agents and see what the possibilities are there in the next couple of months. [00:04:44] So that'll be, that'll be an adventure for sure. In addition to that, I am starting to gather ideas for another writing project, which would be my own and other people's stories about being in the professional dance world and the good, the bad and the ugly of that. But focusing on the good hopefully. And so, yeah, writing, lots of writing. As far as dance goes, that's my other main thing. And I am starting to do some auditions and have a performance with you coming up, which I'm super excited about. And yeah, I that's pretty much it for now. I will see if any other opportunities arise, but I am trying to go with the flow. [00:05:33] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Well, and by going with the flow, obviously you are also very involved in lots of things. So that seems like quite a bit to keep you busy, not to mention, you know, you're a wife and mother and, you know, details. Well, congratulations on finishing or working on draft three of the novel. I mean, first of all, that's a huge undertaking to finish, let alone to get to this next point. So congratulations on that. And obviously I'm wishing you the best in your publishing journey and I'm sure our listeners are as well. And once that happens, you'll have to be on again and talk all about your book. [00:06:15] Ashley Taylor: I would be glad to do that. [00:06:17] Lindsey Dinneen: All right. And then so you mentioned getting back into various forms of art. And then I'm also curious because when we talked last time, you were essentially a brand new mom. And now you-- I mean, I guess you'd maybe consider yourself still kind of a brand new mom, I don't know-- but... [00:06:44] Ashley Taylor: It changes every day pretty much, a little bit. [00:06:49] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. And I'm curious how that has impacted your either expression of art or I mean, obviously ability to do art changes a little bit I'm sure. Or a lot, but I'm just curious if it, if you feel that also being a mom or having a little one has, has impacted just the way that you express yourself through art. [00:07:13] Ashley Taylor: Hmm. That's a great question. I think, I think I have two answers to that. So the first thing is now that I'm a mom, I obviously have additional demands on my time and energy. So that's, it can be a difficult thing, but it's also a good thing in the sense that I am a lot pickier now about what artistic endeavors I spend time on. So early on in any artistic person's career or foray into artistic things, just kind of taking whatever opportunities come your way, because you want to get out there and get recognized and build experience. And I've done that. And I've spent a lot of time doing that in the past. And I-- it's not that I have every experience I'd ever want under my belt and you know, I'm an expert now-- certainly not, but I think I am a little less willing to just kind of do whatever at this point. I'm interested in spending time on projects that I find really meaningful, which means I weed things out very quickly if I see audition listings or whatever it may be, and I think that's good. [00:08:25] I think, I think it's good to have that perspective now. Like I'm not, I'm not desperate enough to just do whatever. So that's good. And then as far as how it affects the expression of art, I do think it's not like I'm thinking about my son all the time while I'm making art, but I, I do think you, there's less pressure to throw your entire identity onto your art, because you know that you have other more important things waiting for you at home. Just gives you a different perspective and you realize you are more than, you're more than being a mother. You're also more than being an artist. You are all of those things at once. And you get to use the wholeness of that. You bring the wholeness of that into whatever you're doing at the moment, if that makes sense. [00:09:15] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, it absolutely does make sense. And I think that's really an amazing perspective to have, because it is so easy to get caught up in, you know, I'm, I'm a dancer. I've always been a dancer. I, you know, struggled with that myself quite a bit last year with COVID and not dancing for a year. I mean, not performing for a year and feeling like I've always identified myself, you know. When people meet me and I tell them that I'm a dancer. They're like, "Oh yeah, that makes sense." You know, it's just part of my DNA. And, and so there were many times last year I sort of had these like identity crisis moments of, "Well, who am I without this?" And, you know, and what, what do I need for my soul to, to feel like I can still identify as a dancer? Yeah. So I definitely relate to that, but I love the perspective that you have of sort of there's, there's more to you. Like you have, you have a myriad of sides to you and they're, they're important and they're all valuable, I guess. So, yeah, like that. [00:10:30] Ashley Taylor: Yeah. And I think we, we do ourselves a disservice by identifying as only one thing, honestly. Because we're all so much more than that. [00:10:39] Lindsey Dinneen: Absolutely. So earlier you had alluded to the fact that you're writing more about dance and people's experiences and things like that. And I know recently you wrote a really intriguing blog post that I kind of wanted to dive into a little bit. It was a manifesto of sorts, if that's fair, about some trends that you've been noticing in, I suppose, the dance world in particular, but in general in the arts world. And I'm curious if you don't mind sharing what you wrote about and sort of your thought process behind all that? [00:11:19] Ashley Taylor: Yeah. So I think the idea for this stemmed from, you know, I haven't performed in a while either, and, but I have seen over the past year or two, I've seen a few companies' virtual performances. And even that prompted me to think back to performances I've been involved in in the past. And I mean, I'll just be blunt. I'm pretty blunt in the blog post. There are times when I'm watching dance and I'm a dancer and I am actually bored. And I was trying to figure out why is that? Because it's not that it's not at all that the dancers aren't talented, they're very talented. And I came to realize it's because the choreography is rather mediocre. And I, you know, I have to couch this by saying everybody sees something different in a piece of art. And some people will find a piece of art meaningful that another person will not, right?. We all know it's, it's very subjective. [00:12:24] However, what I think, what I think people get caught up in sometimes is, you know, somebody who is not familiar with dance, might watch a dance and think, "Wow, they're so talented." Or, "Wow, that looks so hard," or, "Wow, that was beautiful." And those are all good reactions, right? But as a dancer, myself, I might have similar reactions, but I also might ask, "Okay, well, what are you trying to say through this dance?" I'm like, "What's the point of this? Why are we doing this?" And what I kind of argue for in the, in the post is like, I, I'm not always sure that artists are actually asking that question, 'cause especially dancers, we love dancing. We love doing our art. We love it. So we do it because that's what we do and we've trained, we've spent years studying it and we think, well, we have to dance. That's what we worked all this time for. And so then we end up putting out these dances that might be fun to do as performers, they might be meaningful personally as performers, and the audience might be wowed by our talent. [00:13:35] But did they actually get something meaningful out of it? Like, did you communicate through that dance? And I don't know. I guess I've been, I've been thinking lately that we really need to do a better job of being clear about what we're trying to say and what our intent is. So like, if the intent is, I just want to entertain people. So it's like, I don't know if the Radio City Rockettes say, or a fun movie. That's like a goofy chick flick. Okay. Entertainment. Great. No problem with that. But I think what we do is forget that there is a difference in some regard between entertainment, and art or between just like pure creative expression and art. So entertainment is, you know, you walk away and you're like, "Wow, I feel relaxed. I got out of my head for a minute." So it was great. They were talented. That was fun. Creative expression is like, any, anything that you do that's, that's creative, artistic, which is always great. [00:14:32] And it's like, I baked some cookies. I painted a sunset. I, I made a dance, right? That's all great, but I, I feel that a primary-- what's the word-- a primary purpose of art is to communicate something, to express something. And it has to be something from which the viewer can glean meaning, and it doesn't have to be the exact meaning that the artist intended, but there should be something like you should react to a piece of art in my opinion. So I questioned the approach of artists who don't, who are not clear about what they're trying to communicate. And therefore are not even editing it appropriately in order to communicate that more. So an example that I use in the, in the post is just because you know how to write words down and you find some interesting words and then you put them on a page that does not mean that you've actually written a story, right? [00:15:37] There's a lot that goes into writing a story with characters and plot and you know, development and all of this, right? So you can't just put words on a page and say, "I made art now. You know, enjoy it, pay for it." It's like, well, why, why would anybody do that? They could have written the page, the words on the page. So in, in dance, similarly, I feel like we pick some music and we're like, well, we have to dance because we have a show coming up and we gotta make money. So we'll make a dance about something random and put it up, put it on stage. And like here's talented dancers and here's like a couple of interesting moves. And we put it on stage and we call it art and then people don't come and we lament the fact that people just don't get it. It's like, well, was there anything there for them to get? Like, that's really my question. It's like, I don't think with the amount of content there is these days, like I just don't think it's realistic to assume that people will want to come watch you just because you're talented. Like there, the world is full of, the world is full of art and entertainment and all these things. So what makes yours different? Like, why are people gonna want to come and then come back? Are you giving them something transformative or something meaningful? Beyond just a spectacle. Does that make sense? [00:16:57] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. No, I resonate with everything that you're saying so much. Good gravy. Yeah. I, yes, that definitely makes sense. And I think, you know, gosh, a lot of thoughts were forming in my head as you were talking about it, but working kind of backwards. One thing that I just thought about too, is that with COVID one of the lovely things to come out of it, I suppose, is the fact that the world opened up even more. And so art that may have only been accessible to a certain geographic region is now being live-streamed across the world, you know, or, or it's been recorded and made into a film that's then, you know, again, available literally anywhere. So I think you touched on a really good point. That's even more relevant today. And that is that there's a lot, there's a lot of art. So what makes you different? [00:17:57] Ashley Taylor: Yeah, exactly. Yeah, I think artists sometimes sort of have this sense of entitlement, of like, well, I have years of training and I spent money and time and energy to do this. So you should come watch me because of that. And it's like, that's not fair. I mean, I don't know. I think that's unrealistic and I would love, I would love it if people came just to watch us because we're talented, but it's unrealistic. And so we need to give them something more than that. Okay. [00:18:28] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Yeah. No, absolutely. And I think sort of to that point, I mean, you would hold any other profession to that too, right? So just because a doctor has trained for years and years, super highly educated, if he constantly misdiagnosis and, you know, or treats people terribly, you're not coming back. There's plenty of doctors in the world, or, you know, if a plumber doesn't, you know, again, highly educated probably, you know, years of experience, but if they can't fix the problem, you don't go back. [00:19:03] Ashley Taylor: Yeah. [00:19:04] Lindsey Dinneen: So I think, you know, there's a lot of, I agree that, that there is some entitlement of sort of like, well, I have devoted my life to this, so then you should devote your life to me, you know, or whatever. [00:19:18] Ashley Taylor: Yeah. [00:19:19] Lindsey Dinneen: Well, and I think it's, it's actually something I've thought about before. You also have to be really careful as, as an artist. And as, let's say, you know, a show director, a company director, or whatever that you just recognize the fact that it will always matter more to you than to anyone else. So if you're going to be effective at what you do, you, like you said, you have to have a message that you can, that can be translated that that's not. [00:19:48] Ashley Taylor: And I think in order to do that, you really have to, you have to have an editing eye, and/or you need outside perspectives telling you "I'm not getting it" before it goes out to a wider audience. And like, think of the book publishing industry, you know, your book goes through multiple rounds of edits and proofreads and suggestions before it ever hits the shelves of a bookstore, unless you're self publishing, but you still should go through those steps if you're self publishing. So there have been many outside eyes looking at this project and saying, "I'm not quite getting it" or like "that character needs something more," but with the average dance company, in my personal experience, that doesn't happen. So there's no accountability to make sure that what you're trying to say is coming across. And again, you don't always have to have a message, but, but there needs to be, you need to be clear about the fact that you don't have a message, then you can't try half heartedly to put some kind of message in there. And it just doesn't go anywhere. If that makes sense. [00:20:57] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. So I'm, I'm gathering you're not a fan of the whole Untitled Number One concept. [00:21:03] Ashley Taylor: Oh my gosh. [00:21:04] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh. Oh man. I think that should be banned in the art world, man. You have to come up with something. [00:21:12] Ashley Taylor: Yeah, good grief. Yeah, that just seems, it seems lazy to me and I, yeah, again, I said this would be blunt. [00:21:20] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, no, no, for sure. And, but I think that's, that's actually really interesting. I actually, I think you touched on something that's important and it is blunt, but I think that essentially part of what you're getting at is if you don't do this self editing or outside editing, it is lazy, right? Like you aren't doing your due diligence, you aren't kind of respecting the art form in a way. [00:21:46] Ashley Taylor: Yeah. Yeah. I agree. Or you're assuming that the art form is so sacred or something that people will come anyway. I'm trying to think of an example that's not dance, but I don't know. I mean, even, you know, modern art, a lot of people don't get modern art, visual art. So I, and I feel like sometimes modern artists are like, "Well, I painted this, so you should look at it because it's painting and because I'm talented and I'm an artist and here it is. It's art." And, to which I would respond "Fine, but don't expect anybody to feel the same way about it than you do." I mean, I don't know. I think you have to communicate something, even if you're communicating everything is meaningless. Like, okay. That's, that's a message. But anyway. [00:22:40] Lindsey Dinneen: Yes. That's a choice. Yeah. It's interesting that you put it kind of like that, because that is something that-- yeah-- so our friends over at Kansas City Aerial Arts, apparently in their rehearsal process when they're actively choreographing and then sort of doing the edits like you're talking about, their sort of funny catchphrase is, "Well, that's a choice." And, and I love it because it's true. You, you have lots of choices along the process of creating art and editing art. And you know, you can make a choice that ends up needing to be changed in the future. I mean, that's, that's what happens a lot too. I mean, goodness, actually a real world example is in going back and looking at some of the choreography that I've previously done, or right now that I'm resetting on our dancers, is looking back and going, "What was that, you know, you know?" [00:23:39] Ashley Taylor: We all do it. [00:23:40] Lindsey Dinneen: Right, and perspective. And you go, "That doesn't make sense. Why would I have that person come on from that side of the..." You know, just it's so funny, but it is so important to go back and, and improve every time I think too. [00:23:54] Ashley Taylor: I was going to go off on another little rant-- not a ranch-- just a tangent. Yeah, I, yeah. So back when you were saying, talking about choices, "Well, that's a choice," so I don't have a problem with choices and I, and again, I don't think every piece of art is meant to be loved necessarily. So if you're choosing to communicate everything is meaningless and it's this very dark piece of art about that. You know, I don't have a problem with that as long as everything you do has a reason behind it and it supports your message. And I think a lot of times people miss that part. So I feel like, I think that we should start with the why and then go to the how and the what, and, and I'll explain that in a second, but I think a lot of people start with the what. They're like, "Well, we have to make a ballet." [00:24:42] And then they go into the why sort of, if they even get there, but more or less, it's just, well, we had to make a ballet. So here's a fun little piece of music. And, you know, we'll put people on stage versus, to say, to go back and say why first? Why am I even doing this? Why am I here today? What am I trying to say? And, and once you know that, then you can say, "Okay, now how best do I say that?" So, personal example really quick. I have started writing things before and I thought it would be in prose form. And like, as soon as I started, I thought, "You know what? This wants to be a poem." And I can't explain it other than that, it was like this wants to be poetry, not prose. And I think, you know, in that case, it worked out better to express the idea that way or, you know, I know we're a ballet company. I know we normally dance on pointe, but this piece really needs to be danced barefoot, and that will enhance the vision of what I'm trying to say. So again, it's like your why is informing your what ,or your how versus the other way around, if that makes sense. [00:25:48] So again, it's just, it's just about like every, every choice you make artistically needs to have a reason behind it and you need to be evaluating how that fits into your broader vision for this piece. Everything should support it. I remember in college my professors saying every, every person on stage needs to have a reason to be there. And if they're doing the exact same thing as everybody else, you need to question why they're there. So again, just having a reason. I'll stop there. [00:26:18] Lindsey Dinneen: No, no, that's great advice. I love that. Actually I remember in choreography classes in college, them talking about if you're going to use the prop, you have to use the prep. You can't just have a random bench on stage that you don't interact with except for the beginning, or maybe the end. Like there don't do that. Or, you know, 'cause again, and what I've been trying to actually communicate to my choreography students is intentionality is everything, right? So you have everything has to have intentionality because I agree with you once you start being like, "Oh, whatever," you run into all the issues that emerged from that of, okay, but so there's no thought put into that. And you, I think you do need to constantly be asking yourself and or what you're editing, "well, why?" Like, as a, as an artist, you should be able to answer that very clearly. [00:27:16] Ashley Taylor: Right. And if the answer is, " well, I just wanted to have them dance on a chair or, well, I just needed to use four couples instead of one." It's like, that's not a really good answer, frankly. So basically what you're saying is you had to adjust or water down the art in order to accommodate some limitation. And like, there are times to do that, but if you don't have to then, for heaven's sake, don't like, anyway, that's my thoughts. Or like, or people will say, "well, the music I want to use is 12 minutes. So this is going to be a 12 minute piece." And it's like three minutes in you've said everything you needed to say. I get it. And now I have to sit here and watch the repetition for another nine minutes. And like, I'm bored out of my mind. It's like, again, not that the dancers aren't good, but I don't need to, I didn't need to see that for 12 minutes. So cut the music, you know, make your, make your art or make your artistic choices work for the art. [00:28:17] Lindsey Dinneen: What a brilliant little way to sum that up. [00:28:21] Ashley Taylor: Thanks. [00:28:22] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Yup. I like that. So I am curious when, okay, so we've talked about, you know, obviously you need to be communicating something, you need to be doing it well, which means a lot of editing and evaluation and re-editing again or whatever, but how do you feel about someone who's like, especially in the dance world, somebody who might produce a piece and their whole thing is, " I just want to make this as abstract as possible." Do you still feel that they need to communicate that that is the intention behind it? Or do you just not care for that style? [00:29:07] Ashley Taylor: I-- this is my personal preference-- if you're going to do that and say this has no story, this has no message, it's just movement on stage, personally, if I'm going to watch a piece that has no meaning, I want it to be still moving. And what I mean by that is, I want the music to be interesting. I don't want some soundscape, you know? You know what I mean? It's like the sort of tuneless music during massage. Exactly. Yeah. It's like, yeah, I don't want that because that's, that doesn't do anything for me. And then, and then, so I want some interesting music and I want the movement to respond to the music or enhance it and I want it to be memorable movement. So if some, so that if a piece is so beautiful or so dynamic or so in your face, whatever it is that I stopped caring if there's a meaning behind it, I think you've still made art because you've, you've managed to say, to use a metaphor, the earlier metaphor-- you've managed to make really amazing sentences, just beautiful sentences with beautiful words. And I don't care what you're saying, if that makes sense, but so, but that's a challenge. Like that's really challenging to make a dance so interesting that like everybody's just mesmerized, right? [00:30:37] So, and what I, so what I feel often happens is people will say, "Well, I'm going to make this abstract dance and then it's like nothing. Not only is it not communicating, but it's not interesting or unique or dynamic enough to, to move somebody." Like I could probably count on one hand the number of abstract, totally abstract dances. I've seen that I didn't care that there was no meeting. So, and like, I'm not even sure that I could make one. So like it's a challenge, but that's kind of how I would respond to that. Like if you're going to make that choice, fine. But then the art has to be like really different or just really moving. I keep using that word "moving." [00:31:19] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Dynamic moving. Yeah. I agree. I actually think it's probably a harder artistic challenge to go that route well than it is to be communicating a specific message or story and, and that kind of touches back into what we were talking about with intentionality of, I absolutely agree. So I always say that I love tap dancing because you can't do a sad tap dance. And, and that's, that's the thing about tap is it just would be so absurd and ridiculous. Like you wouldn't be communicating well, if you tried to do that, I suppose trying to do a comedically tragic piece, right? But you know, which I think that could be fun. But my point is that, you know, if, if my goal is to communicate happy, then, you know, tap is a good choice. If my goal is to communicate sadness and loneliness, probably tap's not the best choice. So what would best communicate that? So I, I agree with you. I really liked the idea of starting with the why, and then working backwards. It's like Event Planning 101, right? You know, you, what's the, what's the date of the event and what are you trying to do with that event? Why are you hiring you and then you work back, right? [00:32:38] Ashley Taylor: How do you want people to feel when they walk away from this event? [00:32:41] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Yeah, exactly. What do you want them to have gained or learned or, yeah. Yeah. I love that. Right. Very cool. Well the manifesto is very well written and really worth the time to read as are Ashley's other musings. Do you mind sharing a link to your blog? [00:33:01] Ashley Taylor: Yeah. So I'm at ashleyrebeccataylor.wordpress.com. And that's Ashley with a Y, Rebecca with two C's, ashleyrebeccataylor.wordpress.com. And if anybody is interested, on the contact page on my blog, I also have links to my YouTube channel, which is for dancing and also my Facebook page, which is for basically all the arts that I do. [00:33:29] Lindsey Dinneen: All of the things. [00:33:30] Ashley Taylor: All the things. Yes. [00:33:32] Lindsey Dinneen: Yes. Awesome. I love it. Yeah, cool. Well, thank you for sharing about that, that particular post and kind of your, your musings and your feelings about, about, you know, an artist process and, and I really, I, you know, like you said, it's blunt, but I think it is a good gut check for any time that you do sort of want to just make a quick decision rather than a intentional decision or, you know, so I do think there's a lot of value to that. So thank you for kind of also bringing that back to awareness. I think especially maybe during COVID there were many of us who were like, I just need to create something, but you know, and that there's, there can be a lot of value in that and there can be a lot of value in doing so for you, but if you're going to be doing it for an audience of some kind, then, you know, let's, let's put that intentionality in it. Yeah. I really liked that. Exactly. All right. Well, I have three questions that I would love to ask you if you don't mind answering them. [00:34:45] Ashley Taylor: All right. [00:34:46] Lindsey Dinneen: So, first of all, what change would you like to see in the world of creating art or displaying art? Or making it available to people. So it essentially, what's, what's one big change you'd like to see in the art world? [00:35:03] Ashley Taylor: Well, I think I've spent most of our time talking about it. But actually I, so I have a different answer which is more about the artists themselves in a way. So I don't know about other forms of art so much, but in the ones that I'm involved in, I feel like the message that we get as we get more serious about pursuing them is there's kind of one right way to pursue a career in this field, or, you know, even a serious hobby or whatever. So, you know, if you're a dancer, you kind of get the impression-- it's like, well, if you don't dance in a company or you're not appearing in commercial music videos or whatever it may be, then you're not, you haven't really made it, right? And I think so, you know, this is something I've been wrestling with a lot over the past few years because I don't have a regular dancing gig at the moment. [00:36:00] And I feel like that message is harmful because it kind of makes you feel like you've failed if you either can't do that or don't want to do. And not wanting to go that route is totally valid. So how can we find more creative ways to make the art that we that we're passionate about, which may not be that traditional career route, right? So what I would like to see change is more people feeling the freedom if they don't see what they're looking for, the opportunity they're looking for, go make it right. I mean, create what isn't there yet. And give opportunities to other people who might feel the same way as you do about the career path that you've chosen or are up to not to choose. [00:36:52] Lindsey Dinneen: Amen to that. Yeah, no good answer. But I really, obviously, I personally resonate with that because, you know, I had gotten to a point in my career where the opportunities to be apart of a full-time company here locally, we're just not the right fit anymore. And so that's exactly what I did. I, I didn't see something that could continue to work well, so I created a company. And thankfully there were enough people who were like, "Yes, we agree. We, we like this. Let's go that route." And we, we don't dance all the time. We, we do, you know, two big shows a year and then little gigs here and there throughout. But yeah. And I think that's, I think that's great. [00:37:38] Ashley Taylor: Yeah, and it's, it's great because you don't, you know, there isn't one definition of what a dance company is or there shouldn't be so just because yours doesn't look like someone else's doesn't mean it's not a valid way to make art. Maybe might be an even a better atmosphere for making art. So why not try it, you know? [00:37:58] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. And I, yes, exactly. Well, and I, I try to especially tell my students this. But I just think in general, so true what you said. I think that there are many avenues to a dream and if you can remain open to it, to them, to the other options, then you're going to be a lot happier and a lot more fulfilled, you know, in the long run, because there are a lot of ways to do it. Yeah. [00:38:34] Ashley Taylor: Yeah. And you might even be more impactful. I mean, you never know. [00:38:37] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. So, absolutely. Yes. Well, great answer. And then my second question is, is there something art related that stands out to you as something that you would love to do that is completely outside of your wheelhouse and maybe you've so far felt intimidated to try it and maybe that kind of held you back from trying it? So essentially, is there something that you artistically would like to venture into, but maybe haven't for whatever reason? [00:39:10] Ashley Taylor: Yeah, there are many things. I mean, if I had my way, I would be good at everything, but I'm not. So I feel like the primary one is I would love to play the violin. I'm not really that musical. I mean, I am as a dancer, but not in the sense of playing an instrument. And I've, I have tried with, with disastrous results to play a few notes on other friend's stringed instruments before, so I would need some training, but yeah, but I would, I would love to try that, that instrument. And I think that'd be really fun. I, so that's very outside of my wheelhouse. The other one that comes to mind is musical theater which is more related to dancing and what I have experienced doing, but it's, it also feels very intimidating to be that well-rounded and sort of that showy in a way, but it sounds like a lot of fun. It always looks like they're having fun. So I'd love to try that too. [00:40:07] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, that's, that's really cool. I totally relate to the musical theater thing. I just love watching it so much that I always thought it'd be really fun, but I am so intimidated by the idea of having to be a triple threat and like, yeah, well, maybe we should audition for something together at some point, just, you know, at least for the experience of it. [00:40:31] Ashley Taylor: What? Abject failure? [00:40:34] Lindsey Dinneen: We can pick each other off the floor. It'll be fine. That'll be fine. Awesome. And then my final question is, at the end of your life, what's the one art-related experience you would want to experience again for the last time? [00:40:52] Ashley Taylor: So this is such a hard question because there are so many. So my answer is kind of funny because there's a, there's a piece of music that I have choreographed to. And I think it's probably the most beautiful piece I've ever heard, although that's hard to say, but it just moves me every time I hear it. And so I started telling people, I want this played at my funeral, which sounds like super morbid, and people would always sort of laugh awkwardly and be like, "Okay." Well, I think what I'm trying to get at with that statement is it's, it's so transcendent to me that that's kind of how I want to go on like thinking of, I'm thinking of a higher plane, I suppose, and something bigger than me and like kind of what lies ahead of death or what lies beyond death. So anyway, that's my little manifesto about it, but the piece of music is "Nearer My God to Thee," by The Piano Guys. So it's an arrangement of a hymn done on cello, multiple cellos, harmonizing with each other, and it is gorgeous, highly recommend listening to it. [00:42:03] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Yeah. That is a gorgeous, gorgeous piece of music. I, I agree with you. It's, it's amazing. There are, I mean, there's a lot of beautiful music out in the world, but there are certain ones that stand out as just every time I hear them, I'm like transported, or you said transcended, are you feeling like that? But yeah, that's yeah, you know, in fact it's really interesting. There was, there was somebody recently who was suggesting to do-- so, so I think there's probably a lot of us that find it difficult to just sit still and meditate. You know, come back to your breath, come back to your breath or whatever, you know, it's, it's hard to do that. [00:42:47] But one suggestion that I heard recently was to put on a piece of music like that. And it's, that's just that you just listen to it and you don't do anything else. You close your eyes, you know, let that experience sort of envelop you and that's what you kind of not like necessarily meditate on, but the idea of like clearing your head and not being distracted by other things and things like that. And yeah, I did it once and it was really amazing because it's just, you know, you get sort of distracted if you're alone, even if you love the piece of music, if you're not like solely focused on that, it's easy to sort of let it not wash over you, right? [00:43:29] Ashley Taylor: Oh yeah. But to bring your full focus to it. Yeah, I can, yeah, I can attest to that as meditative. [00:43:35] Lindsey Dinneen: Yes, indeed. Yeah. Awesome. Well, Ashley, this has been amazing as I fully expected. So thank you so much for being here. And I know we have the information for your website and that's probably a good way for people to connect with you or to at least follow your work. [00:44:03] Ashley Taylor: And I have an email on there too, so I'm always happy to chat about artistic things if that's desired. [00:44:10] Lindsey Dinneen: Awesome. Perfect. Well, again, I really appreciate you. Thank you for sharing your heart and thank you for being blunt, and, and for challenging us to, to be our best and, and do our best. I think that's really important and I am very excited to follow the path of this novel and can't wait to purchase it when it's available for purchase. [00:44:39] Ashley Taylor: And you'll be the first to know. [00:44:42] Lindsey Dinneen: Excellent. All right. And thank you so much to everyone who has listened to this episode, and if you're feeling as inspired as I am right now, I'd love if you'd share this with a friend or two and we will catch you next time. [00:44:57] If you have a story to share with us, we would love that so much. And I hope your day has been Artfully Told. [00:45:07] Hi friends. I wanted to share with you another podcast that I think you're going to fall in love with just as I have. It's called Harlem with a View, and it is hosted by Harlem Lennox, who was a previous guest of mine on Artfully Told and a dear friend. Just because it looks easy doesn't mean it is. There is so much that goes into the work of your creative. She wants to know how the artists got into their line of work, what inspires them, but most importantly, what keeps them going? She'd asked them about how they make it through the blood, sweat, and tears. She wants to know what it's like to live this creative life: the good, the bad, the ugly, and even the magical. So she goes behind the scenes with creatives, from different genres and she explores their history, their take on life and talks about the business of art and the dedication of making art. She has a brilliant, brilliant platform. I think you will fall in love. I highly recommend that you search for Harlem with a View. Thanks!

Burns & Gambo Podcasts
Burns and Gambo: A big stretch upcoming for the Cardinals

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Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 37:15


Burns and Gambo look at not just the Rams matchup, but the next three games for the Cardinals. What will those games decide about the rest of the season? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Scoops with Danny Mac
The Danny Mac Show w/BK - October 1st, 2021 - Dylan Carlson is heating up for the Cardinals down the stretch. Plus, Joe Posnanski joins the show to talk about his new book the Baseball 100!

Scoops with Danny Mac

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 51:24


The Joie Miller Podcast
God in the Stretch

The Joie Miller Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 26:20


Do you feel like God is calling you into a new season? In order to make room for God wants to do in your life, you have to stretch! While stretching is uncomfortable it does not break you; it produces growth! When you submit to the process and choose to stretch, you're saying that you want to accommodate the increase God wants to give you. In today's episode, I'll share with you three ways that you can challenge your capacity and become more equipped to do what God has called you to do.

The Ask Mike Reinold Show
Should All Baseball Pitchers Perform the Sleeper Stretch?

The Ask Mike Reinold Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 9:53


Ah, the sleeper stretch. It seems like every doctor thinks that the sleeper stretch should be performed on every baseball pitcher. I don't think so. And, in pitchers that do have a loss of internal rotation, I still don't use the sleeper stretch. The post Should All Baseball Pitchers Perform the Sleeper Stretch? appeared first on Mike Reinold.

The Overlook Hour Podcast
#280 - Robbie Smith (10 Short Films, Morning Deliveries, Snake Bite)

The Overlook Hour Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 88:16


Old friend and current Massachusetts resident, Robbie Smith comes on to talk about what he's seen at Fantastic Fest, living in a historic home, and his recent ventures with film festivals and upcoming projects. Get Robbie's shorts on VHS here: https://alreadydeadtapes.bandcamp.com/album/10-short-films Info and everything else: https://robertsmithmaps.myportfolio.com/  Films: Hush (2016), Midnight Mass (TV), V/H/S/94 (2021), We Are the Flesh (2016), Agnes (2021), Climate of the Hunter (2019), Knocking (2021), Candyman (1992), Name Above Title (2020), Beyond the Infinite Two Minutes (2021), Life (1999), 10 to Midnight (1983), Silent Rage (1982), Amsterdamned (1988), The Lift (1983), Baby Walkure (2021), Bijitâ Q (2001), Nr. 10 (2021), Old (2021), Borgman (2013), Caveat (2020), Luzifer (2021), To the Night (2018), Transit (2018), Kandisha (2020), Among the Living (2014), Copshop (2021), Stretch (2014), River of Fundament (2014), The Stone Killer (1973), Hard Times (1975), Kinjite: Forbidden Subjects (1989), Satantango (1994). The Golden Glove (2019), Bloody Oranges (2021), Mother Schmuckers (2021), The Devils (1971), Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)   Hey, we're on YouTube!  Listening on an iPhone? Don't forget to rate us on iTunes!   Fill our fe-mailbag by emailing us at Podcast@TheOverlookTheatre.com    Reach us on Instagram (@theoverlooktheatre) Facebook (@theoverlookhour) Twitter (@OverlookHour)

Since the Sandbox Podcast
Fantasy Football Update: Moves to Make After Week 3

Since the Sandbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 18:50


Our first fantasy update of the season! On top of our Weekly Fantasy Rankings & Impression episode's, we are bringing you a Fantasy Update! Some of the biggest questions throughout Fantasy will be answered in this episode!Which Players have Underperformed ?Which Players do you Trust Down the Stretch ?Who are you Targeting via Trade ?What injuries concern you going forward Make sure to tune in to the res of the episodes coming this week!Next week is our first in season Power Rankings ! Leave us a review: https://www.sincethesandbox.net/leave-us-a-reviewhttps://apple.co/3dsFWTD (Scroll to the bottom of our show page and click, "Write A Review")Podcast link: https://www.sincethesandbox.net/listen-nowhttps://link.chtbl.com/iLoveSincetheSandboxFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/SincethesandboxpodInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/since.the.sandbox/Website: https://www.sincethesandbox.netYouTube: https://youtu.be/HxGXYtlYmIEBuy your "Born and Raised in EASTIE" Shirts now! https://www.sincethesandbox.net/product-page/preorder-born-and-raised-in-eastieSupport the show (http://paypal.me/SinceTheSandbox)

ESV: Chronological
September 29: Psalms 140–145

ESV: Chronological

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 21:28


Psalms 140–145 Psalms 140–145 (Listen) Deliver Me, O Lord, from Evil Men To the choirmaster. A Psalm of David. 140   Deliver me, O LORD, from evil men;    preserve me from violent men,2   who plan evil things in their heart    and stir up wars continually.3   They make their tongue sharp as a serpent's,    and under their lips is the venom of asps. Selah 4   Guard me, O LORD, from the hands of the wicked;    preserve me from violent men,    who have planned to trip up my feet.5   The arrogant have hidden a trap for me,    and with cords they have spread a net;1    beside the way they have set snares for me. Selah 6   I say to the LORD, You are my God;    give ear to the voice of my pleas for mercy, O LORD!7   O LORD, my Lord, the strength of my salvation,    you have covered my head in the day of battle.8   Grant not, O LORD, the desires of the wicked;    do not further their2 evil plot, or they will be exalted! Selah 9   As for the head of those who surround me,    let the mischief of their lips overwhelm them!10   Let burning coals fall upon them!    Let them be cast into fire,    into miry pits, no more to rise!11   Let not the slanderer be established in the land;    let evil hunt down the violent man speedily! 12   I know that the LORD will maintain the cause of the afflicted,    and will execute justice for the needy.13   Surely the righteous shall give thanks to your name;    the upright shall dwell in your presence. Give Ear to My Voice A Psalm of David. 141   O LORD, I call upon you; hasten to me!    Give ear to my voice when I call to you!2   Let my prayer be counted as incense before you,    and the lifting up of my hands as the evening sacrifice! 3   Set a guard, O LORD, over my mouth;    keep watch over the door of my lips!4   Do not let my heart incline to any evil,    to busy myself with wicked deeds  in company with men who work iniquity,    and let me not eat of their delicacies! 5   Let a righteous man strike me—it is a kindness;    let him rebuke me—it is oil for my head;    let my head not refuse it.  Yet my prayer is continually against their evil deeds.6   When their judges are thrown over the cliff,3    then they shall hear my words, for they are pleasant.7   As when one plows and breaks up the earth,    so shall our bones be scattered at the mouth of Sheol.4 8   But my eyes are toward you, O GOD, my Lord;    in you I seek refuge; leave me not defenseless!59   Keep me from the trap that they have laid for me    and from the snares of evildoers!10   Let the wicked fall into their own nets,    while I pass by safely. You Are My Refuge A Maskil6 of David, when he was in the cave. A Prayer. 142   With my voice I cry out to the LORD;    with my voice I plead for mercy to the LORD.2   I pour out my complaint before him;    I tell my trouble before him. 3   When my spirit faints within me,    you know my way!  In the path where I walk    they have hidden a trap for me.4   Look to the right and see:    there is none who takes notice of me;  no refuge remains to me;    no one cares for my soul. 5   I cry to you, O LORD;    I say, “You are my refuge,    my portion in the land of the living.”6   Attend to my cry,    for I am brought very low!  Deliver me from my persecutors,    for they are too strong for me!7   Bring me out of prison,    that I may give thanks to your name!  The righteous will surround me,    for you will deal bountifully with me. My Soul Thirsts for You A Psalm of David. 143   Hear my prayer, O LORD;    give ear to my pleas for mercy!    In your faithfulness answer me, in your righteousness!2   Enter not into judgment with your servant,    for no one living is righteous before you. 3   For the enemy has pursued my soul;    he has crushed my life to the ground;    he has made me sit in darkness like those long dead.4   Therefore my spirit faints within me;    my heart within me is appalled. 5   I remember the days of old;    I meditate on all that you have done;    I ponder the work of your hands.6   I stretch out my hands to you;    my soul thirsts for you like a parched land. Selah 7   Answer me quickly, O LORD!    My spirit fails!  Hide not your face from me,    lest I be like those who go down to the pit.8   Let me hear in the morning of your steadfast love,    for in you I trust.  Make me know the way I should go,    for to you I lift up my soul. 9   Deliver me from my enemies, O LORD!    I have fled to you for refuge.710   Teach me to do your will,    for you are my God!  Let your good Spirit lead me    on level ground! 11   For your name's sake, O LORD, preserve my life!    In your righteousness bring my soul out of trouble!12   And in your steadfast love you will cut off my enemies,    and you will destroy all the adversaries of my soul,    for I am your servant. My Rock and My Fortress Of David. 144   Blessed be the LORD, my rock,    who trains my hands for war,    and my fingers for battle;2   he is my steadfast love and my fortress,    my stronghold and my deliverer,  my shield and he in whom I take refuge,    who subdues peoples8 under me. 3   O LORD, what is man that you regard him,    or the son of man that you think of him?4   Man is like a breath;    his days are like a passing shadow. 5   Bow your heavens, O LORD, and come down!    Touch the mountains so that they smoke!6   Flash forth the lightning and scatter them;    send out your arrows and rout them!7   Stretch out your hand from on high;    rescue me and deliver me from the many waters,    from the hand of foreigners,8   whose mouths speak lies    and whose right hand is a right hand of falsehood. 9   I will sing a new song to you, O God;    upon a ten-stringed harp I will play to you,10   who gives victory to kings,    who rescues David his servant from the cruel sword.11   Rescue me and deliver me    from the hand of foreigners,  whose mouths speak lies    and whose right hand is a right hand of falsehood. 12   May our sons in their youth    be like plants full grown,  our daughters like corner pillars    cut for the structure of a palace;13   may our granaries be full,    providing all kinds of produce;  may our sheep bring forth thousands    and ten thousands in our fields;14   may our cattle be heavy with young,    suffering no mishap or failure in bearing;9  may there be no cry of distress in our streets!15   Blessed are the people to whom such blessings fall!    Blessed are the people whose God is the LORD! Great Is the Lord 10 A Song of Praise. Of David. 145   I will extol you, my God and King,    and bless your name forever and ever.2   Every day I will bless you    and praise your name forever and ever.3   Great is the LORD, and greatly to be praised,    and his greatness is unsearchable. 4   One generation shall commend your works to another,    and shall declare your mighty acts.5   On the glorious splendor of your majesty,    and on your wondrous works, I will meditate.6   They shall speak of the might of your awesome deeds,    and I will declare your greatness.7   They shall pour forth the fame of your abundant goodness    and shall sing aloud of your righteousness. 8   The LORD is gracious and merciful,    slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love.9   The LORD is good to all,    and his mercy is over all that he has made. 10   All your works shall give thanks to you, O LORD,    and all your saints shall bless you!11   They shall speak of the glory of your kingdom    and tell of your power,12   to make known to the children of man your11 mighty deeds,    and the glorious splendor of your kingdom.13   Your kingdom is an everlasting kingdom,    and your dominion endures throughout all generations.   [The LORD is faithful in all his words    and kind in all his works.]1214   The LORD upholds all who are falling    and raises up all who are bowed down.15   The eyes of all look to you,    and you give them their food in due season.16   You open your hand;    you satisfy the desire of every living thing.17   The LORD is righteous in all his ways    and kind in all his works.18   The LORD is near to all who call on him,    to all who call on him in truth.19   He fulfills the desire of those who fear him;    he also hears their cry and saves them.20   The LORD preserves all who love him,    but all the wicked he will destroy. 21   My mouth will speak the praise of the LORD,    and let all flesh bless his holy name forever and ever. Footnotes [1] 140:5 Or they have spread cords as a net [2] 140:8 Hebrew his [3] 141:6 Or When their judges fall into the hands of the Rock [4] 141:7 The meaning of the Hebrew in verses 6, 7 is uncertain [5] 141:8 Hebrew refuge; do not pour out my life! [6] 142:1 Probably a musical or liturgical term [7] 143:9 One Hebrew manuscript, Septuagint; most Hebrew manuscripts To you I have covered [8] 144:2 Many Hebrew manuscripts, Dead Sea Scroll, Jerome, Syriac, Aquila; most Hebrew manuscripts subdues my people [9] 144:14 Hebrew with no breaking in or going out [10] 145:1 This psalm is an acrostic poem, each verse beginning with the successive letters of the Hebrew alphabet [11] 145:12 Hebrew his; also next line [12] 145:13 These two lines are supplied by one Hebrew manuscript, Septuagint, Syriac (compare Dead Sea Scroll) (ESV)

Scoops with Danny Mac
The Danny Mac Show w/BK - September 28th, 2021 - How will the Cardinals handle Dakota Hudson and Jack Flaherty down the stretch. Plus, Jayson Stark joins the show!

Scoops with Danny Mac

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 44:07


Hearts at Rest with Sarah Keeling
God is My Help - Psalm 63:7 Prayer

Hearts at Rest with Sarah Keeling

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 6:54


Connect with your kids during a short prayer and reflection on how God is our help and what it means to be under the shadow of His wings.Verse:Because you are my helpI will sing in the shadow of your wings.Psalm 63:7 (NIV)Define: Help - aid, assist, make easier for someoneShadow of your wings - place of shade & protection when we come close to GodAsk Your Kids:* How has God helped you this week?* How can you sing about how God has helped you?* How can you stand close to God each day?Engage Your Kids:* Role play with your kids that you are a mama chicken trying to protect her chicks (your kids) from a predator.* Stretch out your arms and tell your kids to stand super close to your sides.* If possible, have someone else throw things at you (like pillows) and protect your kids from them.Go Deeper:* Become my email friend and receive a weekly guide to help your family go deeper with these verses.  

Inspire Church
It's in the Stretch with Pastor Mike Kai

Inspire Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 33:33


Thank you for joining us for our 20th anniversary message, It's in the Stretch. Pastor Mike Kai takes us through our 20 year journey as a church and keys to experiencing expansion. If you made a decision to follow Jesus, we'd love to take the journey with you! Click to Connect with our team at: http://www.Inspirechurch.live/online Get Pastor Mike's NEW book "That Doesn't Just Happen" at https://www.MikeKai.Tv We would love to connect with you-- To find out more about Inspire Church, visit us at: http://www.inspirechurch.live/online Facebook: Inspire Church Instagram: @inspirechurchtv Twitter: @inspirechurchtv Twitch: InspireChurch

Nashville SportsRadio
The Afternoon Stretch 9 - 27 - 21

Nashville SportsRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 111:11


The Afternoon Stretch hosted by Zach Williams and Bruno Reagan with Ray Dosky.

Longhorn Blitz
The Flagship: Texas enters gauntlet stretch of Big 12 play beginning Saturday at TCU

Longhorn Blitz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 51:33


Texas football got off to a solid start to Big 12 play in the Longhorns' 70-35 win over Texas Tech. The stout performance will need to continue in the coming weeks as Texas prepares for a gauntlet stretch of the 2021 schedule, which starts this weekend against TCU. The Flagship Podcast starts off the week with a loaded show as Horns247 columnist Chip Brown and managing editor Taylor Estes weigh in on the Longhorns' dominant win over the Red Raiders and look ahead to what Texas will face this weekend at TCU. The Flagship talks about the Horned Frogs' upset loss to SMU, particularly the questionable at best performance by the TCU defense, which allowed 350 yards rushing to the Mustangs. Chip and Taylor discuss how Texas will likely see a far improved TCU team this week considering the Horned Frogs' success in preparing for Texas since joining the Big 12 and weigh in on ways the Longhorns can further expose this TCU defense with the continued production shown by Casey Thompson and the plethora of dominant running backs Texas has at its disposal, starting with Bijan Robinson. The Flagship also weighs in on the Texas defense's performance to start Big 12 play and discuss some key areas of focus for the unit as the Longhorns make their way through conference play. After a quick break, The Flagship returns with our 'Love it or leave it' segment, with this week's topics touching on the surprising performance by both the Texas offense and the TCU defense last week, how prepared this Horned Frogs' team will be when they take on the Longhorns Saturday and give some way-too-early odds for Texas' chances at being in a Big 12 title game after some of the top teams in the conference struggling early in the season. Catch all of that and much more on The Flagship Podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rumble in the Morning
Ask Shelley 9-27-2021 …How come I can't hear when I stretch or yawn?

Rumble in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 6:03


Ask Shelley 9-27-2021 …How come I can't hear when I stretch or yawn? …Why are there lines on Solo Cups? Will kicking someone in their butt help them pee better?

Artfully Told
Episode 070 - Rachel Moore

Artfully Told

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 42:21


In this week's episode, I welcome Rachel Moore! Rachel is a licensed marriage and family therapist, specializing in psycotherapy for the creative community of writers, artists, and musicians. As a prolific artist herself--having trained in piano, voice, improv, writing, acting, photography, and more--Rachel brings a unique perspective to her therapy practice in a way that authentically connects with artists. Her episode is full of great stories and sage advice. (Fun fact: the cover image for this episode is one of Rachel's photos!)   Get in touch with Rachel Moore: https://www.rachelmoorecounseling.com/ Enroll in Lindsey's dance and wellness courses: www.elevateart.thinkific.com  Support Artfully Told: www.paypal.me/elevateart Artfully Told links: www.facebook.com/artfullytold | www.artfullytold.podbean.com | elevateartskc@gmail.com Get a free audiobook through Audible!  http://www.audibletrial.com/ArtfullyTold Schedule your own interview as a featured guest with Artfully Told! https://calendly.com/artfullytold/podcast-interview   Episode 70 - Rachel Moore [00:00:00] Lindsey Dinneen: Hello, and welcome to Artfully Told, where we share true stories about meaningful encounters with art. [00:00:06] Krista: I think artists help people have different perspectives on every aspect of life. [00:00:12] Roman: All I can do is put my part in to the world. [00:00:15] Elizabeth: It doesn't have to be perfect the first time. It doesn't have to be perfect ever really. I mean, as long as you, and you're enjoying doing it and you're trying your best, that can be good enough. [00:00:23] Elna: Art is something that you can experience with your senses and that you just experiences as so beautiful. [00:00:31] Lindsey Dinneen: Hi friends, whether you are just getting started or you're a seasoned professional looking to up your game, I have an exciting opportunity for you. Did you know that I am actually the creator of 10 different courses online that range from ballet, jazz, tap. They also include a mindset detox course and two Stretch and Tone courses. So if you're looking to start a new hobby or get a little bit fitter, or you're looking to do a deep dive into your mindset, really perform a true detox, I have the course for you, and I would love to help you out with that. So if you go to elevateart.thinkific.com, you will see all of the different courses I've created. [00:01:26] You don't have to step in a classroom to take your first dance class. I teach a signature 20 Moves in 20 Days course that allows you to learn 20 steps in just 20 days. It's a lot of fun. We have a great time together. And I think you're going to absolutely love the different courses. And Artfully Told listeners get a little something from me. So if you go, you'll sign up and use the promo code "artfullytold," all one word, and when you do so you'll get 15% off the purchase of any and all your favorite courses. All right, listeners, enjoy that. Again, it's elevateart.thinkific.com. See you there. [00:02:11] Hello, and welcome back to another episode of Artfully Told. I'm your host Lindsey and I am so excited to have as my guest today, Rachel Moore. She is a licensed marriage and family therapist based in San Diego and she works primarily with creative people and artists, which is most of us. So I'm so, so excited that you're here, Rachel, and so excited to chat with you. Thank you for being here too. [00:02:38] Rachel Moore: Thanks so much, Lindsey, I'm really excited about it too. I can't wait to just chat with you about fun, artsy things. [00:02:45] Lindsey Dinneen: Right? It's my favorite. All right. Yeah. Well, I would love if you wouldn't mind sharing just a little bit, maybe about your background, kind of what got you interested in art and then of course, a little bit about what you're up to these days. [00:03:00] Rachel Moore: You bet. Gosh. Yeah. So actually my first intro into the creative world was through music. And so when I was seven, I started taking piano lessons, really liked it, did not like practicing, but that's another thing. And did piano from seven to 14, started playing a saxophone and in, in middle school and then went into high school and continued with that and jazz band and stuff. And then also started playing auxiliary percussion in marching band and met some really great friends there. So lots and lots and lots of music, instrumental music. And meanwhile, I forgot this other track this whole time. I was always a writer. Pretty much been writing since I was like five and I made my first little book or whatever. So writing and music, sort of the more performative arts, have always been something I've been interested in and good at. [00:03:53] I not a great drawer. I tried my best, but this art isn't quite what I do with it. So, you know slap something together. But yeah, for me, music and writing and I actually, my first career was as a newspaper copy editor. So when I was in college, I got a degree in creative writing focused mainly on poetry. And I think it's kind of cool actually that I then went on to a 14 year career in newspapers where I would do editing. I would do design of the news pages. And I also importantly, would write headlines, which required the skills of finding the best words and also looking at line breaks, right? And if you're writing a headline. So that was going on. And then in the meantime, I, I finally went into singing when I was like 30. I lived in LA, I went to this great community college program. They had an applied music program. I was still working and also doing this program where I got private lessons, singing lessons for the first time. And really it was able to kind of develop my voice and learn a lot of technique that was just super helpful. And so that's been really fun. [00:04:57] And so that's kind of all of the basis of the, the fun, creative stuff I like to do. Then when I was about 35, 36, I decided to become a therapist, went back to school, got my master's degree. All that had to do 3000 hours of supervised internship before I could get licensed. And meanwhile, thinking to myself like, well, who am I going? Who are my clients going to be? You know, what, what am I going to focus on? Who am I going to serve? When actually it was kind of right in front of me the whole time, which is people like me, people who were into art. And I can talk more about kind of what that's like from my perspective as a therapist and why I think that's important, but that's, that's kind of the, the quick and dirty version of my life. There you go. [00:05:41] Lindsey Dinneen: Perfect. Oh my goodness. I love it. So many questions based off of that. I love it, but, but let's, yeah, I would love to hear more about what you just talked about with your practice and working with creatives and things like that. I would love to hear more about that whole thing and how that became your focus as opposed to, I mean, therapists are needed all the time. So I'm just curious how that kind of became your, your niche. [00:06:07] Rachel Moore: Sure. Yeah. I actually had a particular therapy experience with my own therapist when I was trying to explain to her that I went to a friend's house and I sat down at her digital piano. And, you know, I live in San Diego. It's kind of hard to like haul pianos around. I don't really have a lot of access to pianos. With that piano, the piano was my first instrument and it really means a lot to me. And so explaining to my therapist, how I sat down with this digital piano. And I had no idea that they, they've improved them so much now that they really do feel a lot like a piano when you sit at it. And I felt like I was playing a piano and, and what that meant to me, you know, how it felt in my body and how it felt emotionally and, and all this stuff. And my therapist, like, it's, you know, she didn't do anything wrong. There's nothing wrong with her, but she was just kinda like, oh, okay. Like she just didn't get it. You know? [00:06:59] I thought, wow, wouldn't it be cool to just off the bat, be able to have that connection with my clients where I understand, generally speaking-- you know, it's different for everybody, but I understand that for them, art may be like a life or death type thing. Art may be the reason that they are alive and, and the most important thing in their life. I just thought it would be cool to be that type of therapist who could serve people like that. And, you know, the most practical thought there is that it just saves a lot of time. You know, I'm like, okay. Yeah, I get it. Great. You know, I don't have to, they don't have to explain it to me on a deeper level. I think it's just cool to be able to be a person who gets it on some level and when it comes to being a creative. [00:07:45] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Yeah. I absolutely agree. And I can even just hearing you tell that story, I can definitely relate to, you know, it, it's totally fine when you, when you're talking to people who don't have the same experiences and, you know, and being able to share like, well, this art means this to me because, and you can sort of explain it, but until you have experienced it yourself, it's just not the same. So I can totally see that. So, and I'm curious too, do you find, or have you found that-- I'm trying to figure out how to word this exactly-- that I guess, like I've said, I, I'm a firm believer in therapy, but I think that I'm just curious, how has it been to attract creatives to your practice? Is it, is it helpful because you're also an artist and that's sort of, again, how they've connected with you? Because I still feel like there's a little bit of stigma, even in the art world of like, "oh, you know, I can't, I can't do that because you know that that's not for me," I guess. [00:08:46] Rachel Moore: Yeah, that's a really good question. I mean, I think that, you know, when it comes to, you know, by the time people are finding me, they know they want to go to therapy, I guess, really, you know? And so it's like, well, who, who do I want to see? I mean, I've had, you know, prospective clients say to me, oh, I saw immediately, for example, that you work with writers and I'm a writer. So I want to work with you. Like, because you just-- I'm shocked actually that I don't see more people working with people in the arts. I mean, maybe they are, and I just don't know where to find them or I'm not looking in the right places. I don't know. But like, I think it's really, and it's, you know, you talk about the stigma, even as I say that out loud, I'm like, am I saying like, artists need more help? It's, it's not so much even that it's just that I think that again, like, and I wish I had better ways to explain it too, but there's something about, you know, somebody who again has that, has that experience with art really gets on a deep level. [00:09:46] I mean, even, I was just thinking also in a practical ways, like, I know what it's like to have stage fright. Like literally I have it all the time because I'm performing a lot or I used to, you know, before the pandemic and, and yeah, there, there's, there's a connection there that I think is, can be really important and really vital in the relationship with my clients. And I will say that it's been, you know, there've been studies showing that the relationship between the therapist and the client is actually the healing part of therapy, which I think is pretty cool, like, or the most healing part. There's other things that are important too, but the relationship and the rapport is the most important part. [00:10:24] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. I can personally relate to that. I absolutely agree. And I think, you having that experience like you, like you were saying, even just the stage fright element. It's huge. So being able to also affirm the way that somebody is feeling, you know, and, and acknowledge the fact just also, you know, how much hard work goes into it. And I feel like there's a lot of misunderstanding about the art, about artists. And I joke about it a lot because people will say to me, "oh, you know, you have such a glamorous job." I'm a professional dancer and I'm like, "well, ninety of the time, not glamorous at all, you know?" [00:10:59] Rachel Moore: Yup. Most of the time, like I was just thinking about it today. I don't, I don't know if I mentioned to you before, but I'm actually been doing an "improv for therapists" class online. I've been participating in that as it as a an improv and it's been so fun, but today we did our dress rehearsal for our show and it reminded me how, you know, oh, I'm like, oh yeah --most of the time in a production, you're just sitting around like waiting. Right. So true. Preparing something. I know I'm just like, okay, all right. This week, not really glamorous. No. [00:11:32] Lindsey Dinneen: Right. It's all those long days in the theater where you're just like, oh my gosh, how is it midnight? And we're not done. But I think it's just nice to have somebody to be able to talk to, somebody who, who totally gets it, like on a fundamental level. You've been there. You've done that. I love that. I think that's super cool. [00:11:49] Rachel Moore: Well, that's great. Cause that's what I'm going for. Yeah. [00:11:51] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, I just love that. So, you know, you had mentioned starting to sing, you know, a little bit late, well having voice lessons, I'm sure you were singing here your whole life, but having voice lessons and really pursuing it as an adult. And I'm super interested in that. Was that kind of a leap of faith? And I asked partly because like is always been this like thing in the back of my mind, "oh, someday I'll go take voice lessons," but I haven't because I'm like, "oh my gosh. That's so nerve wracking." Tell me about your experience. [00:12:22] Rachel Moore: Okay. Yeah. Well, a friend of mine at the newspaper I was working at told me that he was in this program and how fun it was and, and he's also the person who introduced me to yoga. So I knew that he's like, he's got some good stuff going on. So I was like, "okay, I'll check it out." And the first time I ever performed in my group class, my hands were shaking so hard. I was up on the little stage in the classroom and I could not stop them, just shaking, shaking, shaking. And I'm like, okay, I guess that's what we're doing here. I'm happy to say that it got better, but yeah, it is, it can be scary. I think that the coolest part of that experience was that I learned a lot of technique that I had no idea about and actually made singing easier and made it easier for me to perform in a way where I felt confident. And, and, and even made it easier like on my body. Cause you know, when you're singing, just like when you're dancing, your body is the instrument. So to find a technique that, you know, I know how to sing really loud without hurting my voice, stuff like that, you know, was really cool. [00:13:22] And I will say I had a really interesting experience when I was kind of wrapping up my, my time with that. And I will admit to you-- to admit, I know there's an interesting word. My therapist brain just caught that. I stopped pursuing it because I didn't want to do it as a career. And my, my teacher at the time was encouraging me to continue and I didn't want to have the life of a singer, whatever I imagined that would be. And I have never gotten paid for singing, and I don't want to get paid for singing. It's too close to me as a human. I don't know how to explain it, but I had this experience where I was working on an aria from "Samson and Delilah" and the mezzo soprano. And I was, I was working on this aria for, for like a few months you know, really, really working really hard, like you said, because that's what we do as artists. We work really hard and finally sang it for my teacher and I, she was on the piano accompanying me. And I'm just getting chills thinking about it right now. Cause we got to the end of the aria. I got to the end and she looked at me and she said, "you could sing that on any stage in the world." And I looked at her and said and said, "I know." [00:14:40] And you know, what's so funny about that. I was, I was done. I was good. I didn't have to-- I was like, "okay, I've, I've done it. I've reached my potential and now go try something else." It was really cool. [00:14:53] Lindsey Dinneen: Surreal! What a moment! And I just, you know, and I actually think that is so important too, because I think there are a lot of people who wouldn't, who would discount being an artist on some level, because they don't make money off of it, or they-- that's not for other people, it's for themselves. And that doesn't discount anything. I mean, it's, it's okay. Like if that's not what you want to pursue, then that's fine. You know, so even having that perspective too. Yeah, I think there's a lot of discreditation that happens with... [00:15:27] Rachel Moore: I think you're right. Like, there's that word? And I, I don't know that I pronounce it right. But dilettante, I think is the word, like, you know, it's sort of a derogatory word saying like, oh, you're just a person who dabbles in things. And you know, I've tried to really embrace that. And I'm like, yeah, I do, because I, I have one life and I want to do a lot of stuff. I want to do a lot of different stuff. I want to do a lot of different art now. And I mean, I've had two different careers, you know, so I don't know. I mean, I, that's not to say on the other hand too, I really do admire people who dedicate their lives to one form of art and, and perfect it in, you know, in the ways that they do. And that's what they want to do. That's great too. I, you know, I think you're right. That it's like, it's different for everybody. And it doesn't, we don't have to discredit people just because they're not like an expert. That's a very, Hmm. It makes me wonder, you know, it's just kind of a very Western, so to speak, way of looking at things, you know, just like it's a little patriarchal, to be honest with you, just like, well, if you're going to do this, you better get paid for it. That type of thing. [00:16:23] Lindsey Dinneen: Right. No, I agree. Yeah. And, and I do love that perspective and yeah. Well, thank you for sharing about that experience. It was actually really encouraging. [00:16:33] Rachel Moore: Oh good. [00:16:33] Lindsey Dinneen: I was like, maybe I could do it, and my hands could be shaking the whole time, but I still tried. [00:16:39] Rachel Moore: Yes. Well, that's the thing. The more you do it, just like it's true, you know, the more you do it, the more confident you get, the less your body rebels and thinks you're going to die. So it'll be, it'll be fine. Yes. [00:16:49] Lindsey Dinneen: It's so funny too, because it depends on the performance that for myself, even when I go out into stage and I've been doing this for years, I'm a very confident performer. I love it, but I'll go out on stage for that first like opening thing. And I'm like, what? My legs are jelly now. Like... [00:17:07] Rachel Moore: Yeah. That adrenaline always gets you, right? Yeah. The adrenaline rush right at the beginning. Right. Like, okay. Then we settle in. Yeah. [00:17:16] Lindsey Dinneen: Yup. Oh man. Oh, that's fantastic. Okay. And you kind of briefly mentioned this improv project that you're a part of. So first of all, I love the concept --improv for therapists or therapists improving or whatever. That's super fun, but yeah, tell me a little bit about, oh my gosh. How did you get into improv? [00:17:35] Rachel Moore: Well, I actually got into improv in the real world. I don't know how to, we're talking about it these days, but before the pandemic-- oh, I actually got into it through music because I had always been wanting to try improv. I thought it'd probably be okay at it and have fun with it. But it always kind of felt really intimate. And so the first improv class I took in person was musical improv. And it's great. You just go on stage and you make up songs and you sing and it's awesome. I don't know how awesome it might feel for you at this point. But for me it was like, right, if you told me to get up and dance, I don't know how I do-- but the singing, I was like, yeah, I can do this. And it was so fascinating to me because I can tell when I'm doing musical improv or like regular talking improv, I can honestly like literally feel the different parts of my brain being activated. [00:18:22] And for some reason, for me, it's a lot easier to make up stuff as I'm singing than to make up stuff as I'm talking. It must be just literally different parts of the brain. So anyway, that's how I got into it was through musical improv. And then I decided to take like the whole series of improv classes locally here. We had a a show a December 2019. And that was just like the most fun thing ever. And yeah, and then later I think on a Facebook ad or something, I, I found this improv for therapists group. It's actually run by some folks out of Second City in Chicago. One of the cool things about the pandemic is now we can do things on Zoom and have a lot more access that way. And so it's a zoom class and it's been really fun. [00:19:04] Lindsey Dinneen: That sounds like so much fun. I love that you're doing that. Yeah. Well, and you know, your background has been so diverse and I just love the fact that you are not stopping. Like you said, you have one life, but you're, you're choosing to dabble in a lot of different things, I think. Yeah. So much value to that. You're, you're constantly learning and growing and, and just, I know it's funny to say this as an outsider, but I just keep thinking like, "oh man, kudos to you for just continuing to like push yourself." Cause it's easy to get comfortable, you know? [00:19:35] Rachel Moore: No, I don't know what that feels like. I don't know. Yeah. Thank you for saying that. Like, yeah. I, I can't imagine what it would be like to stop creating and performing. And I mean, I don't know about you. Like, it's just where, Hmm. How do I put this? Like, this is where I feel like life is. That's where I find that, you know, life, spirit or whatever you want to call it. There's probably so many words for it, but you know, to me, that's what life is about. I remember watching this documentary on a plane randomly, but I'm watching this documentary about-- oh my gosh. Her name is escaping me. " Take a Little Piece of My Heart." That singer. What's her name? [00:20:14] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh no. Oh man. You're asking the wrong person. Everyone knows that song. And I'm like, probably! I have no idea. [00:20:22] Rachel Moore: I'm refraining, I'm refraining from breaking out. It's a song, but I will not do that right now. There was this documentary about her and she was a very troubled person. And one of those people who died at 27, like in the sixties, you know, there's like a lot of people who died of overdoses and things like that. I can't remember exactly how she died and I can't remember her name. Anyway, I'm watching it. The important part is I'm watching this documentary and they said, yeah, the, the trouble, the trouble she had in her life was that when she was on stage, she thought that was, you know, the real life in the real world. And I remember sitting there, oh, it's not. I was like, oh no. I didn't realize that stage was not like the actual real world and everything else was something else in between times you're onstage. But anyway, that's kind of how I see life sometimes. [00:21:07] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, no, I love it. When you, when you said that line, something about, yeah, life, life is not unsafe, but I'm like, but it is. [00:21:14] Rachel Moore: I felt so strange. Cause they were like, you know, for her, for this person, this analysis was saying like, "oh, well she got so many accolades and people loving her" and I could see how, you know, it might be a problem in life if you're not understanding the difference between like people liking your art, as opposed to people responding to you as a human. I mean, you know, that's something that can get a little weird. I think sometimes for us creative folks too, having that healthy separation. But, but yeah, but just that general idea of life, real life is onstage. I'm like, "ah, I don't think I, I don't think that's true for me." Nope. [00:21:50] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Nope. I would agree with you. And I definitely resonate too with, with what you were talking about of like, yeah. I don't, I, I can't relate to the idea of not continuing to learn and grow and try new things. Yeah. Literally somebody the other day in social media was talking about being bored. And I was like, man, I have no concept of bored. Like I don't remember being bored since I was maybe five. You know, I just there's so much to explore. There's so much to learn. How can you be bored? [00:22:19] Rachel Moore: I know. Sometimes I think it's so funny, and it's funny to me because I don't think it's true and I don't think it'll happen, but my husband will say like, "what if we run out of things to talk about?" and I'm like, "what are you talking about? Like, do you know how many things there are in the world that we could talk about?" [00:22:36] Lindsey Dinneen: Right. I love that. Yeah. Well, I know a few specific stories had kind of come to mind when you were contemplating how art has impacted you and I'd love if you wouldn't mind sharing some of those? [00:22:50] Rachel Moore: You bet. Yeah. I mean, I did have on my list singing my art, that aria, for my teachers and other performance things, which maybe we'll have time for, maybe not. But I think there were a couple of things that like, yeah, I really wanted to, to talk about, and I guess talking about visual art, like I remember the first time I got to go to a real art museum. So I grew up in Idaho and when I was growing up, like especially then, you know, now there's more stuff there to do, but when I was growing up, one of the bummer things was, you know, nobody would come to our town to perform. Like no big names or anything like that. That wasn't even a thing. And like the closest city to us was Salt Lake City, which is five hours away. [00:23:30] So it's like, I didn't have access to a lot of, you know, First-class high quality art or whatever. That was the bummer part. The good part was that, that meant that kind of like we're talking about like, my friends, my siblings, like we would make stuff ourselves. You know, we were, I would, they just encouraged me to like, make my own little videos and shows and stuff. So that was cool. The first time that I went to a real art museum, I had a layover in Chicago and I had time to hang out with a friend. That was in 1995. And we went to the Art Institute and I saw paintings who I love and I, and I saw like, like all these people and that's actually reminded me of another memory that I hadn't written down, but I thought about. So I told you I studied poetry in school and creative writing and stuff. A few years after this, I went to London and I went to Westminster Abbey and, you know, saw the people buried there. [00:24:22] And then, you know, Geoffrey Chaucer, I think is buried there, but then they also have memorials to like Shakespeare and Keats and Shelley. And I was just in tears, like realizing that these people actually existed. You know, I was like, oh, wow. Yeah, it's real. You know, the, they did live, you know, these, these things that they created, like are from actual people. And here's the proof, I don't know. It just hit me. Yeah. Like I said, it was just crying and happy. And so anyway, that's just a couple of little stories yet. [00:24:55] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, I love that. I've also been to Westminster Abbey and it is a very surreal experience when you're, you're reading these names and you go, oh, my word, like it is, it's like a transformative experience. You're like, there's hundreds of, thousands of years of history, like here, right here. It's the most crazy experience. I relate to that. Yeah. Those stories are powerful. And you know, I'm also curious and obviously you don't have to be specific at all, but I'm wondering if you've experienced-- I'm sure you have some really like interesting breakthrough moments from some of your clients that you've worked with, where it was sort of like, "oh wow. I needed that today." You know? [00:25:41] Rachel Moore: Yeah. You know, I think I actually, this kind of ties into what we were talking about earlier about, you know, maybe being a dabbler in different things or, you know, or do you have to be an expert or blah, blah, blah. I have had with a couple of clients who have, have come in and they've told me, like, I need to do this particular, you know, I need to reach this particular artistic pinnacle. And if I don't, it means I'm not an artist. And I remember, you know, early on when I say things to them, like, you know, if self-expression is something that's important to you. If, if that's, you know, what you are really going for here? Which, which it sounds like it is as opposed to sort of the ego idea, right, of being a, a whatever artist. I said, you know what, there's lots and lots of different ways that you can do that. That means that look nothing like that. You know, maybe, I don't know. I'm just going to throw this out there. Like, you know, being a symphony musician for, you know, for example, some that you may even like better. And when I, when I say that early on to some of my clients, they just look at me like, so pitifully, like I have no idea. [00:26:43] And then eventually, sometimes there'll be like, "Oh, yeah. Okay. Maybe I can do my own thing and create my own artistic life and do the things that I want to do that really speak to me that maybe other people may look at and say like, oh, that's not real art or, oh, that's, you know, I don't see that as legitimate." It's like, you know, "Hey, in my opinion, I'm like, who cares about them? This is not about them. This is about you and your life and what again, what you want to do with your one life." Right? So yeah, that's always an interesting experience. I just love it. You know, with, I know what they're thinking. They're like, "oh, poor Rachel. She just has no idea what it's really like," which that may be also be true. I wouldn't say that's not true, but yeah, it's, it's always a good discussion at least. [00:27:34] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh, I love that. I'm so glad that you bring that into your practice because I think there's-- that something that I've talked about a lot with my students, because I also teach is, you know, sometimes they'll come to me and yeah, "I have this starry-eyed vision of like, oh, I just want to dance with X company or whatever." And you know, a lot of times I talk about how there are a lot of avenues to your dreams, to reaching your dreams. [00:27:57] Rachel Moore: Oh, I like how you say that. Like I'm gonna borrow that. [00:28:01] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Cause there's not one straight path. And even if you would like there to be, it just doesn't exist. So I think that having the idea in your mind of, there are lots of ways to accomplish your dreams if you're open to different opportunities, because, you know, if you're so stuck on one avenue, you're going to miss all the different spikes out that that are all of these other options too. So I love that you do that because I think that's just so important. I mean, I'm maybe not exactly exhibit A, but I have to say that, like, you know, I had the privilege of getting to dance for other companies, but it wasn't really until I branched out and started my own, that I finally was fulfilled. And that's a very risky thing to do in the dance world, just because it's like starting something from scratch, and nobody knows who I am and why should they come to see my shows and all that? And it's a lot of hard work, but oh my gosh, I've never felt more fulfilled, you know? And, and so sometimes just being open to like a different avenue, you know. [00:29:08] Rachel Moore: That's being creative, right? You know what I mean? Yeah. That's the spirit of the soul of creativity right there. Right. It's like, oh, maybe I don't have to do it like everybody else does. Or like people say I have to. [00:29:20] Lindsey Dinneen: Right. Exactly. And I just love that. Yeah. So I'm curious, I'm sure you have a lot of, well, I'm totally extrapolating so let me start over. I imagine that you have people that come to you who are maybe more in the beginning stages of their careers. And, and what advice would you have for somebody who's either kind of trying to make this happen? And it's like super nervous or whatever, or maybe they're at a point, maybe they're at a turning point in their career or they're ready to do something else. I mean, what kind of advice do you have for people who are kind of on that path. [00:30:03] Rachel Moore: Hm. Wow. You know, I'm not sure. And this, this actually might kind of open up another can of worms, which is to talk about kind of the type of therapy that I do. Because it's true that I work with therapists. A lot of people think I'm an art therapist by the way, which I'm not that's a whole nother thing, but I actually do a type of therapy called EMDR, which is Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing, which is such a mouthful. But honestly what I, what I would actually do is we would start a treatment plan on that issue. So I would ask like, "okay, what's the issue you want to work with, work on? Tell me more about it." They would explain to me like, like you're saying, you know, like maybe like, "I'm not sure what I want to do. Do I want to keep pursuing this? I've got this and this issue, you know, about it." And then we would look at maybe some memories, some past history that might be affecting how they feel right now. We would talk about some present triggers that are affecting them. And then we would talk about how they want to deal with it in the future. [00:31:00] So I've just kind of given you like a little brief summary of what EMDR is like, but the idea of EMDR-- we may have traumas in the past that are affecting us now. And what happens with trauma is that it just doesn't get processed in our brain. So, I mean, I have some early artistic traumas. One of them, you know, caused me to not write a song for like 30 years after it happened. You know, I wrote a song when I was eight, got this great response from my family and then wrote another song and they kind of ignored it and said they didn't like it as much. And that caused me to not write again for like 25, 30 years. That for example, would be a good memory for me to try to reprocess. And I can tell you about what that reprocessing is like, if you want to know, but that's a whole nother thing. [00:31:45] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah! [00:31:45] Rachel Moore: But. Well, yeah, well, okay. So here's the idea is that they think that they're not sure why EMDR works, but they think that perhaps when we're sleeping and our eyes are moving back and forth in REM sleep, that that is actually the brain processing memories, you know? So like, oh, let's see. I had a sandwich for lunch today. I think I can put that long-term storage. We won't need to grab that anytime soon, you know, that type. But when there's trauma, like, oh, I had a sandwich for lunch today and like it had a cockroach in it or something, if there was a lot of trauma around that, what can happen is that that memory will just kind of be floating around and not really have a place to land and not be processed. And then later you might find you get triggered and it's almost like you're back in that old memory and you can see, hear, feel, see the things as if it's happening right now. That's kind of the way that trauma works in our minds and our bodies. [00:32:35] And so we literally will, you know, sort of bring it, the memory and then literally do eye movements. And so I've been doing this online, but you could do it in the office too, you know, kind of with different ways to have people move their eyes back and forth to reprocess that memory. And then I'll ask them, "okay, what do you notice?" They'll tell me. I say, "okay, go with that." So we reprocess, we bring down-- that's the desensitization or part, we bring down the distress of that memory so that they can just think of it like any other memory. You don't forget it, but you're not totally freaked out about it anymore. And then the next part is like, they may have some negative connotations that come with that memory. [00:33:12] So like, you know, "I'm not good enough or I'm unsafe," things like that. We work with that, reprocess that, do the eye movements with like a more true statement, like "I'm safe now," or, you know, "I'm, I am a good person." And then the last part, which you may like this part too, being a dancer, the last part is that we pay attention to the body. So I'll ask, "okay. When you think of this memory and maybe the words, I'm a good person, where do you feel in your body?" They'll tell me, "well, I feel some tightness in my throat or my chest," something like that. And then we'll do eye movements on that. Reprocess that until the body is clear. And then we move on to the next memory. [00:33:49] So once we're done with the memories, again, you know, we talk about present situations and then we talk about how you want to deal with it in the future. So in this case, dealing with it in the future, it might be like, "okay, how do you want to approach your next your next audition," for example, and "let's talk about the positive belief you want to have about yourself in that moment." And then we work through that. So that's kind of what it's like, that's what I do. [00:34:13] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh, I love that. Well, and that's the perfect segue because I know that you are fully booked. You are obviously a very effective therapist, which is fantastic. But I know that you are now kind of in the process of creating sort of an online opportunity. So I would love if you would tell us more about that. [00:34:33] Rachel Moore: Sure. Sure. Thanks for asking. Yeah. I have done for like 10 or 12 years groups based on the book, "The Artist's Way" by Julia Cameron. We just go through like each chapter. There's 12 chapters, so it would take 12 weeks and go through each chapter. Up to this point, all the groups have been in person. Now, you know, after the pandemic or during, or wherever we are when we're recording this, I feel ready to do a program or workshop, 12 week workshop based on "The Artist's Way" online, feel comfortable enough in that venue now to do that. So I'm super excited about it and it's always, it's honestly, like one of my very favorite things to do in life is to run these. [00:35:09] Lindsey Dinneen: Awesome. And where could we maybe find out about that or, or connect with you so that when it is live, we could jump on board with that? [00:35:19] Rachel Moore: Sure. You can go to my website at rachelmoorecounseling.com. And there is the, you'll find a link to "The Artist's Way" group. You'll also find a button where you could set up a time to chat with me and I'll talk with anybody, you know, about it. We'll do a free 15 minute chat about whatever I can help you with. So if you've got questions about "The Artist's Way" group, if you need to find a therapist in California to work with, I love helping people with referrals because it can be really hard to find a therapist for various reasons. So I'm super happy to help out. [00:35:49] Lindsey Dinneen: That's awesome. Thank you. And then I do have three questions that I always like to ask my guests if you're okay with that. [00:35:56] Rachel Moore: Ah, yeah. Sounds great. [00:35:58] Lindsey Dinneen: Awesome. So first of all, how do you personally define art or what is art to you? [00:36:04] Rachel Moore: Oh, that's a great question. Wow. The first thing that comes into my mind for what it's worth is, is, is actually my friend's definition of music. And she says that in order for something to be music, it has to have a rhythm. And I, yeah, I kind of feel like I could apply that to almost all art forms, right? Like I like to do a lot of photography too, you know, just, just like in, you know, amateur photography, whatever. But I like to find like, okay, what's in the front of this photo, what's in the back? What are the patterns of this flower that I'm taking a picture of? Right? Like what's the rhythm of this. There's something in there and I could probably write or talk more about this at some point, but there's something in there about the rhythm of music or visual art or dance or writing, especially I definitely, I, when I was a newspaper copy editor, I always have to check myself because I tended to like the headlines that sounded the best rather than maybe were the best written. So I'm like, okay, wait, it has to be accurate too, not just sound great. So yeah, something about that, that the rhythm and the sound. Yeah. That's the best I can do for an answer to that question. [00:37:14] Lindsey Dinneen: I love that. I love that. Okay. And then what do you think is the most important role of an artist? [00:37:21] Rachel Moore: I know it's kind of a, that's been kind of a weird idea lately --the truth, but I think to shine a light on things that maybe for various reasons, society or people have said, you know, we can't look at this to shine a light in a way that is accessible. I think that if we just like, you know, shove things in people's faces like, eh, that's not really doing the job of art in my opinion. To invite people to see things differently, that's what I think the role of an artist. [00:37:50] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Yeah. I love that. And then my final question, and I'll define my terms a little bit, but do you think that art should be inclusive or exclusive? And what I mean by that is inclusive referring to an artist who puts their work out into the world and provide some context behind it, whether it's a title or program notes or the inspiration versus exclusive referring to an artist who puts their work out into the world, but doesn't provide the context, so it's left solely up to the viewer to determine what they will. [00:38:22] Rachel Moore: Right. So I used to be a journalist. You might be able to guess where I would fall on this. I love learning about things. So for me personally, yeah, I think I'd have to go with inclusive because then I thought about this, of course just like every, I guess creative person does, you know, do we need to know the story, but like, I always want to know the story. I always want to know more about where it came from, what the context was, what it means. And I love how that can always change too. When we find out different things or we have different perspectives as a culture, like, yeah, I don't, I don't think that art ever exists in a vacuum nor do I think it should. So I'd have to land on inclusive for that, that answer. [00:39:03] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Yeah. Very good. That makes sense. Yes. I guess I would have probably been surprised having talked to you if you went the other way, but yeah. Oh, I love that. Well, oh my goodness. Rachel, you are just so amazing and inspiring and I just really just want to commend the work that you do and not just for yourself. And you know, like I know even a lot of your art has been a little bit, maybe more for yourself, but you're just constantly-- I just love that you're kind of still learning and growing and you're still performing and you're doing all these cool things, but then you also have this practice and that is seriously helps other people. And obviously, you know, as an artist, I'm, I'm partial. So thank you for focusing on artists. I think that's just a gap in the market and I appreciate that. So thank you so much for what you bring to the world. I, I just want to say that I know you're making a difference and it's so obvious just even talking to you. So thank you. Thank you. Thanks for being here. [00:40:07] Rachel Moore: Thank you. Thank you. Thank you, Lindsey, for saying that. I really, really appreciate it. And it means a lot to me that, that you can see the value of having a therapist for artists, because I really think there is a lot of value in that. And thank you for doing this podcast, it's so much fun and I'm so glad that you're doing it and, and bringing artsy things into the world. It's great. Love it. [00:40:25] Lindsey Dinneen: Thank you. Yes. Oh yeah. It's, it's my happy place. And thank you so much to everyone who has listened to this episode. Please definitely check out Rachel's website and if you're so inclined, like she said, she offers these awesome 15 minute calls that you can take advantage of and really, you know, get some advice or learn more about this upcoming group that she's going to be hosting and jump on board with that too. Obviously, like I said, Rachel brings a lot of value and inspiration to the world. So definitely want to hop on with that. And if you're feeling as inspired as I am right now, I would love if you would share this with a friend or two and we will catch you next time. [00:41:07] If you have a story to share with us, we would love that so much. And I hope your day has been Artfully Told. [00:41:16] Hi friends. I wanted to share with you another podcast that I think you're going to fall in love with just as I have. It's called Harlem with a View, and it is hosted by Harlem Lennox, who was a previous guest of mine on Artfully Told and a dear friend. Just because it looks easy doesn't mean it is. There is so much that goes into the work of your creative. She wants to know how the artists got into their line of work, what inspires them, but most importantly, what keeps them going? She'd asked them about how they make it through the blood, sweat, and tears. She wants to know what it's like to live this creative life: the good, the bad, the ugly, and even the magical. So she goes behind the scenes with creatives, from different genres and she explores their history, their take on life and talks about the business of art and the dedication of making art. She has a brilliant, brilliant platform. I think you will fall in love. I highly recommend that you search for Harlem with a View. Thanks!

Nashville SportsRadio
The Afternoon Stretch 9 - 24 - 21

Nashville SportsRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 111:31


The Afternoon Stretch hosted by Zach Williams and Bruno Reagan with Ray Dosky.

RSL GM Elliot Fall on a strong stretch of play, a trip to Portland, Pablo Mastroeni's leadership + more

"The Drive" with Spence Checketts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 12:40


Real Salt Lake general manager Elliot Fall joins The Drive to discuss the club's recent surge, Pablo Mastroeni's stint at the helm so far + more

Bless You Boys: for Detroit Tigers fans
BYB Podcast 103: Stretch Drive Q&A

Bless You Boys: for Detroit Tigers fans

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 63:32


Welcome back folks. We're firing up the pod again as the season winds down in preparation for a busy offseason, and we've got some big questions to answer. We got a lot of responses to our call for questions, but four main themes emerged. So rather than going question by question, we're just grouping it all under four main questions, and host Brandon Day will take them all on in turn. Who is Ryan Garko, the Tigers new VP of Player Development, and does this feel like a good hire? Who are the Tigers likely to send to the Arizona Fall League in October? Were the Tigers lucky this year, or just pretty good? Are there players who seem ripe for regression? In short, how stable is this 2021 foundation to build on? What should the Tigers attitude be toward free agency this offseason, and how would you go about ranking positions of need and then filling them? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Overflow Church talks
Balancing life‘s demands 4: Spiritually Balanced exercises

Overflow Church talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 25:38


8 Spiritual exercises 1 Renew your strength through worship. 2 Deepen your peace of mind through prayer. 3 Strengthen your commitment through fellowship. 4 Expand your perspective through Bible study. 5 Increase your joy through witnessing. 6 Practice your love through giving. 7 Develop your talents through service. 8 Stretch your faith by risking.

Baskin & Phelps
Robert Mays: If the Browns offense can carry the team while the defense is figuring things out, they'll be okay down the stretch

Baskin & Phelps

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 17:24


Robert Mays joined Baskin and Phelps to preview the Browns' upcoming match up with the Chicago Bears. He shared his thoughts on Justin Fields making his first NFL starts as well as Matt Nagy's future with the team. He also discussed the struggles of the Browns defense and why fans shouldn't be worried, and what Odell Beckham Jr. brings to the Browns' offense.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Talk Yeti To Me
The 160E - A Half Decade in the Making

Talk Yeti To Me

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 68:07


Here at Yeti we affectionately call our engineering team, the Nerds. In this episode of TYTM Marty sits down with the biggest nerd of them all to bring you the inside story of how the beautiful mind of Stretch (aka Peter Zawistowski, Yeti's Director of Engineering) and his team of bike nerds were able to create Yeti's first e-MTB. Also sitting in on this party is Rocket (Ryan Thornberry), our Bike Product Manager, who is responsible for making sure that the designs that comes out of Stretch's head actually gets delivered to you, in a form of a real bike. Strap on your school helmet's folks. It's about to nerdy.

Couch Talk w/ Dr. Anna Cabeca
Bipolar or Hormonal? with Dr. Anna Cabeca

Couch Talk w/ Dr. Anna Cabeca

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 49:28


Are you feeling crazy? It may just be your hormones talking. Dr. Anna explains how your hormones have a direct impact on your emotions and moods, and when things fall out of balance, you can feel like you've been swept up in a storm of anxiety, depression, rage, and everything in between. Learn how to rebalance your hormones with the Keto Green diet and supplements, and by doing the things that make you smile. [2:10] There are two days of the year where Dr. Anna allows herself some space, her son's birthday and angel day. The day her son passed away is an important day for celebrating his life. [3:20] The loss of her son in 2006 took her on a journey, spiritually, mentally, physically, and emotionally. It was a journey that took her around the world looking for answers in trying to understand how to live after such grief. [5:00] Dr. Anna was a researcher before she went to medical school, but all the schooling she had didn't prepare her for living the experience. Our hormones can play havoc with our moods and physiology drives behaviors. Unhealthy choices can destroy our physiology. [6:15] There are many times in a woman's life where these hormonal fluctuations occur, including pre menstruation and the hormonal transition into menopause. When you have had post traumatic stress or adverse childhood experiences, it generally translates to more challenges in menopause. [7:05] If you consider the hormonal milieu like a pressure cooker, progesterone acts as a lid to the pot. When you add in stress it increases the pressure, and in menopause when progesterone declines, it's like taking the lid off the pot. [8:30] In December 2018, there was an article published that explored the second peak of age where women suffer from psychosis. [9:45] There are certain things you should not say to your significant other regarding their hormones. Behaviors that don't normally bother you will suddenly cause you serious stress during certain periods. Our hormones are integrally related to our neural transmitters and have a serious impact on our emotions. [12:25] Progesterone is the main hormone that all other hormones are derived from. In times of stress our reproductive hormones are sacrificed to create cortisol. Gaba is a feel-good hormone that helps us relax, and it's directly affected by the downstream direction of progesterone production. [14:20] During Dr. Anna's second menopausal transition, she experienced severe hormonal disruption. It was a very difficult time before she made the decision to do things that increased oxytocin and supported production of progesterone. [15:55] Oxytocin is the most powerful hormone in our body. Doing things that we find fun and make us smile is crucial to a happy life. Supporting progesterone with supplements also helps with overdrive and burnout. [17:55] When you are experiencing mood swings, it's a function of your hormones. Estrogen is essentially for the production of the neurotransmitter serotonin. Most of our serotonin is produced in the GI tract, which is why the microbiome is so important. [19:00] When estrogen and serotonin dip during perimenopause, it affects the amount of glucose produced in the brain which results in brain fog. [20:55] During PMS, women are often prescribed SSRIs. These might deal with some of the symptoms, but you aren't increasing your natural production of serotonin, which usually results in progressively higher doses. This is why functional medicine focuses first on repairing the gut. [22:45] Dopamine is the other neurotransmitter to think about. It's responsible for seeking novelty and to have healthy levels of dopamine. You also need healthy levels of testosterone which will increase dopamine, and in turn, can increase the desire for new experiences. [26:30] As our testosterone depletes we feel like we have lost our edge. It can lead to a loss of desire in doing most things. [27:10] We have to address our hormones in a holistic way. When your hormones shift, it's your body sending out a cry for help. Avoid just powering through until “it gets better” because there is no telling what casualties will be left in your path from that approach. [29:00] There are over 200 symptoms associated with PMS and menopause. If you only hate your husband for two weeks out of the month, it's not your husband, it's your hormones. [30:45] Have a good night's sleep (7-9 hours) whenever possible. A relaxing night time ritual is critical. Avoid blue light generated from computer screens. Stretch before bed and do things that help you relax. [32:25] Supplement with progesterone. There are a number of different supplements on the market that you can use that will help balance your hormones overall. [36:20] The dietary changes that we make can improve our willpower and physiology. Break up with sugar and embrace the Keto Green lifestyle. [37:20] Indulge in dark chocolate. Dark chocolate is rich in antioxidants and can help with PMS at the time of your period. [38:10] Don't forget to schedule some play time. Think about the people and activities that put a smile on your face and make sure you make time for those in your calendar. Restoring the hormones of connection will help balance the feelings of isolation and loneliness. [39:50] Nourish yourself so you are not pouring from an empty cup. Avoid things that disrupt your diet and damage your gut microbiome. [40:40] Supplement with herbal combinations like Mighty Matcha Plus and Omega 3. Over 10% of people are poor methylators, so adding methylation support to your supplements is crucial. [44:20] We want to do everything we can to clear our bodies of toxic hormones and endocrine disruptors. [44:45] Tips for helping your wife through hormonal symptoms: don't mention hormones, be extra nice, helpful, and supportive, draw a warm bath with something sweet, cook a nice healthy meal, serve breakfast in bed, or take your kids out for a run. Every effort will be appreciated. [46:00] You don't get a reward for being a martyr during menopause. Take care of yourself, and it will make a difference for yourself and your family.     Mentioned in this Episode: youtube.com/thegirlfrienddoctor dranna.com/show   Always seek the advice of your own physician or qualified health professional before starting any treatment or plans. Information found here and results are provided for informational purposes only and are not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified healthcare professional and are not intended as medical advice.

OurDailyPodcast
#273 - OurDailyPodcast: Big Games Ahead (ft. Travis Roeder)

OurDailyPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 91:19


With Fank out on vacation, ODB's own Travis Roeder joins the podcast to look back at Kansas, preview Iowa State, and talk about his thoughts on why Gerry Bohanon is the real deal. 00:00 - Cold Open: Gerry Bohanon 11:16 - The Team's Development Thus Far 18:15 - Welcome (lol) 20:34 - QBs that can Stretch the Field 23:24 - Kansas Recap Start 26:50 - Adjustments on the Fly 28:30 - Looking at the Stats 32:22 - Offense 36:16 - Running Backs 42:50 - Defensive Pressure 47:18 - Iowa State Preview: Starting with Brock Purdy 51:40 - Breece Hall & RBs 55:20 - Baylor's Defensive Game Plan 1:00:03 - Baylor's Offense vs. Iowa State's Defense 1:11:58 - Going for it on Fourth Down 1:15:38 - Picks of the Week 1:28:44 - Outro

Speed and Power Podcast
Ep 63: Ty Terrell, NBA Physical Preparation Coach- Training A Slow Vs Fast Stretch Shortening Cycle, Teaching Athletes How To Handle Momentum, Implementing New Training Strategies

Speed and Power Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 65:44


Ty Terrell is the strength coach of the Atlanta Hawks. Ty's experience working with Lee Taft, Bill Hartman, and Mike Robertson have given him a great understanding of developing athletes and solving movement problems.    Presented By:  www.exxentric.com/speedandpower   Instagram: @ty.terrell Email: tylterrell@gmail.com   Checkout my Multidirectional Plyometric Course:  www.multidirectionalpower.com  

The Intelligence
The homes stretch: Evergrande

The Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 19:03


China's property behemoth has slammed up against new rules on its giant debt pile. We ask what wider risks it now poses as a cash crunch bites. Britain has begun a demographic trend unusual in the rich world: its share of young people is spiking—and will be for a decade. And what the pandemic has done for the future of office-wear.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Economist Radio
The homes stretch: Evergrande

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 19:03


China's property behemoth has slammed up against new rules on its giant debt pile. We ask what wider risks it now poses as a cash crunch bites. Britain has begun a demographic trend unusual in the rich world: its share of young people is spiking—and will be for a decade. And what the pandemic has done for the future of office-wear.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Over The Monster: for Boston Red Sox fans
The Over the Monster Podcast: Down the stretch they come!

Over The Monster: for Boston Red Sox fans

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 53:41


Matt and Bryan start with a Chris Sale discussion, which becomes a Nathan Eovaldi discussion after a COVID sidebar. Then they talk about Garrett Whitlock and what the bullpen will look like in his likely absence, the minor leagues, José Iglesías as Manny Ramirez, and more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Nashville SportsRadio
The Afternoon Stretch 9 - 21 - 21

Nashville SportsRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 111:01


The Afternoon Stretch with Zach Williams and Bruno Reagan.

Bob, Groz and Tom
Hour 4 - The Scott Servais Show - Jarred Kelenic's hot stretch and Tyler Anderson's importance to the rotation

Bob, Groz and Tom

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 40:34


There are plenty of potential Super Bowl contenders that sit at 1-1 after two weeks, including the Seahawks, so when can you confidently know if your team is actually any good? Jake and Stacy start the hour examining that question. With only a couple weeks left in the regular season, how encouraging has it been to watch Jarred Kelenic put together his best stretch of his 2021 year? How much has Tyler Anderson given to Seattle's rotation since coming over at the deadline? The Skipper, Scott Servais, joins Stacy, Jake, and Shannon Drayer to round out Tuesday's second hour. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Nashville SportsRadio
The Afternoon Stretch 9202021

Nashville SportsRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 103:43


The Afternoon Stretch - Zach Williams & Bruno Reagan

Ryan and Christa Jooste
Stretch Out The Tent Pegs | Episode 489

Ryan and Christa Jooste

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 14:34


We are called to take territory!