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American multinational banking and financial services company

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  • Nov 25, 2021LATEST
Wells Fargo

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Latest podcast episodes about Wells Fargo

Money Talk With Tiff
Small Business Banking with Derek Ellington

Money Talk With Tiff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 16:35


Derek sits down with Tiffany to talk all things small business banking! Derek dives into how to direct your money as a small business owner and how to move forward with a growing business model.  About Our Guest Derek Ellington is head of Small Business Banking for Wells Fargo and is responsible for leading and accelerating the growth and focus on the company's small business clients, which have up to $10 million in revenue. Derek was previously with Bank of America, where his 24-year career spanned leadership roles in retail banking, commercial banking, credit, and small business banking. Most recently, Derek was Business Banking executive for the Atlantic South Region and served as National Business Banking Digital executive and National Business Banking Environment, Social Governance (ESG) executive. Derek also served as president of the North Carolina Triad region, where he led associates across all lines of business, including Consumer, Wealth Management, and Commercial Banking. He is a frequent speaker on small business topics and received the Bank of America Global Diversity and Inclusion Award in 2017. Derek has been consistently active in the community. He has served on the boards of East Greensboro Now, The Greensboro Chamber of Commerce, Guilford Merchants Association and the Board of Visitors of NC A&T State University. Derek is a graduate of Troy University in Alabama with double majors in Computer Science and Business Administration. He later received a Master's Degree focused on International Business from Birmingham Southern College. Connect with Derek LinkedIn Twitter: @dereketriad   Connect with Tiffany on Social Media Facebook: Money Talk With Tiff Twitter: @moneytalkwitht Instagram: @moneytalkwitht LinkedIn: Tiffany Grant

The Productivityist Podcast
Juliet Funt talks about a Minute to Think

The Productivityist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 47:39


Juliet Funt is a renowned keynote speaker and tough-love advisor to the Fortune 500 who is regularly featured in top global media outlets, including Forbes and Fast Company. She is a white-space warrior as the founder and CEO of The Juliet Funt Group, helping business leaders and organizations to unleash their full potential by unburdening talent from busywork. Juliet has earned one of the highest ratings in the largest speaking event in the world, and she has worked with brands such as Spotify, National Geographic, Vans, Costco, Pepsi, Nike, Wells Fargo and ESPN. Juliet shares some key insights from her book ‘A Minute to Think: Reclaim Creativity, Conquer Busyness, and Do Your Best Work'. We also discuss finding your spark, making time for mental space, why we fill time, the humane element of productivity – and increasing the sales of salmon tips.  Talking Points Performative busyness The curse of insatiability How to not confuse activity with productivity What is white space? Time sketching Taking one minute to think Establishing your non-negotiable white spaces Quote "Interlace space throughout the day." Helpful Links ‘A Minute To Think' by Juliet Funt ‘Four Thousand Weeks' by Oliver Burkeman ‘Indistractable' by Nir Eyal ‘The Reinvention of Work' by Matthew Fox Episode 360: A World Without Email with Cal Newport Episode 229: Exploring Digital Minimalism with Cal Newport Episode 93: Deep Work with Cal Newport Episode 238: How to Keep Going with Austin Kleon Why Is My Life So Hard? (Ep. 280) - Freakonomics The Busyness Test JulietFunt.com Want to discover some of the books mentioned on the podcast? Check out Scribd, my reading app of choice.   If you enjoyed the episode, please leave a rating and/or review wherever you listened to the episode. Also don't forget to check out all of our podcast sponsors found on our podcast sponsors page.   If you enjoyed the episode, please leave a rating and/or review wherever you listened to the episode. And if you want to have easy access to the archives of the show and ensure you don't miss the new episodes to come then subscribe to the podcast in the app you're using.

Screaming in the Cloud
Setting up Lattice Climbers to Succeed with Guang Ming Whitley

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 42:30


About Guang Ming Guang Ming Whitley was elected to Mount Pleasant Town Council in 2017 and resides in Old Mount Pleasant with her husband, four children, and a dog.She earned a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Southern California and a J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School, where she was a member of Law Review and a moot court semi-finalist. After completing her law degree, Guang Ming taught at the University of Chicago and practiced intellectual property law in Los Angeles. She then retired from active practice to serve as Chief Operating Officer of the Whitley Household. In 2020, she cofounded Lattice Climbers, a company dedicated to teaching soft and life skills to young adults.Guang Ming is also President of the Girls State Alumnae Foundation and attended the American Legion Auxiliary Girls State in 1996, where she was elected governor. She has volunteered with the ALA Girls State program in a variety of capacities since 2000.Links:Lattice Climbers: https://www.latticeclimbers.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate: is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards, while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other, which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at Honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability, it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: You know how git works right?Announcer: Sorta, kinda, not really Please ask someone else!Corey: Thats all of us. Git is how we build things, and Netlify is one of the best way I've found to build those things quickly for the web. Netlify's git based workflows mean you don't have to play slap and tickle with integrating arcane non-sense and web hooks, which are themselves about as well understood as git. Give them a try and see what folks ranging from my fake Twitter for pets startup, to global fortune 2000 companies are raving about. If you end up talking to them, because you don't have to, they get why self service is important—but if you do, be sure to tell them that I sent you and watch all of the blood drain from their faces instantly. You can find them in the AWS marketplace or at www.netlify.com. N-E-T-L-I-F-Y.comCorey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Sometimes people like to ask me what this show is really about and my answer has always been, “The business of cloud,” which is intentionally overbroad; really gives me an excuse to talk about anything that strikes my fancy at a given time. A recurring theme has always been, “Where does the next generation of folks working on cloud come from?”That's not strictly bounded to engineers; that goes throughout the entire ecosystem. There are a lot of jobs that are important to the functioning of businesses that don't require a whole bunch of typing into a text editor and being mad about YAML all day long. Today, my guest is Guang Ming Whitley. Guang Ming, thank you for joining me, I'll let you tell the story. Who are you exactly?Guang Ming: Oh, my goodness. That's a tough question. Well, I am someone who has lived my life in a series of segments. I started off as an engineer—a chemical engineer—then went off to law school, taught for a year—Corey: Well, let's interject as well. That is how I got looped into this whole nonsense; you were law school classmates with my spouse. And whatever you're in town, she gets very excited at the chance to see you, and we finally got to meet not that long ago, had a great conversation. It was, “Oh, my God, you need to come on the podcast.” Which is neither here nor there. Please, continue.Guang Ming: So, then I had a segment as a stay-at-home mother. I started having babies and I had a lot of them. I had one daughter, then a son, and then I had identical twin boys. And once I started having them in litters, we decided that it was time to stop. So, four kids in and about a decade as a stay-at-home mom, during which time I wrote some books.And then ran for office back in 2017. And then in 2020, was working with someone just, kind of, over coffee, just having, you know, conversation, and we came up with the idea to start a business, and Lattice Climbers was born out of that.Corey: And Lattice Climbers is what I think we're going to be talking about the most today because there's an entire episode baked into every one of those steps. Maybe not every one of them would fit on a cloud-oriented podcast, but there's a lot of interesting backstory there and it resonates with me because my entire life has been lived in phases as well. And the more I talk to people, the more I start to realize that maybe I'm not that bizarre. People go through stages and they'd love to retcon what the story was at the time and make it all look like there's a common thread and narrative running through, but when we're going through it, it feels—to me at least—like I've been careening from thing to thing to thing without ever really having an end goal in mind. But in hindsight, looking back, it just seems like it was inevitable that I would go from where I was to here. It never feels that way at the time for me.Guang Ming: Well, I think for me, where I've ended up with Lattice Climbers has felt sort of inevitable because one of the through-lines of all my segments that I've gone through is a program called Girls State, and it is one that I have volunteered with. It's sponsored by the American Legion Auxiliary and it's a government simulation program. Over the course of one week, you simulate city, county, and state government. And it's all about civic engagement and education of young women, and empowerment. So, it's such a fantastic program.And I love it, but one of the things that I've seen with this program is, as the young women come through the program, some of them have skills, and some of them don't have skills. And there's elements that are missing, and that's something that I want to try to help with, with Lattice Climbers.Corey: So, what is Lattice Climbers in a nutshell? It's still very early days, which is fine, terrific; the fact that you care enough about a problem that is clearly plaguing not just our industry, but arguably our entire society is worth exploring in-depth. And with the understanding that the narrative may very well shift as times go on what is Lattice Climbers today?Guang Ming: So, Lattice Climbers steps into the gap between formal education and the skills necessary to actually adult at life, to survive in the real world.Corey: That is an area that is of intense interest to me. For listeners who may not have listened to every single episode here, my academic background is checkered, to put it politely. On paper, I have an eighth-grade education and no one can take that away from me. I was expelled from two boarding schools in high school, I wound up getting a diploma from a homeschooling organization that years later I discovered was not accredited, then I failed out of college. But again, no one can take that eighth-grade education away from me.But also look at me. I am a white dude in tech where my failure mode is a board seat and a book deal somewhere, and there are winds of privilege at my back when I do that. What also has been a strong contributing factor is that when I was 12 years old, my dad sat me down and had a long conversation with me about how to handle a job interview, what a job interview was—because when I was 12, I had no idea—and what they're looking to gain from asking you these questions, and why they're asking you the things that they do, what answers they're looking for, and the purpose behind the meeting that you're in. And that more than almost anything else as a single moment in my childhood shaped the reason that I became moderately successful [laugh] in my career, depending on what phase of my career we're talking about. That's stuff is super important and they don't teach it formally in any program I've ever seen. How do you approach it?Guang Ming: So, what we do is we have an intake quiz that assesses your skill gaps, sort of like a self-assessment, and then it gives you a customized curriculum just meant to fill your specific skill gaps. So professionalism, where we cover things like interview skills, behavior at events, table manners, those kinds of things. Financial literacy, we have little mantras like, “Credit cards are not free money,” [laugh] which some people never learned that. And then there's different tracks, so depending on whether or not you're college-bound, or vocational school, or military-bound, you can pick a different track for that and receive two-minute lessons, sort of the gems, distilled down. And there's little animations; we try to keep it as brief and information-packed as possible.Corey: Would it be fair to categorize this as more or less micro-lessons in how to adult?Guang Ming: Exactly. That is exactly what we're trying to do.Corey: I somewhat recently read one of the best stories I've ever heard about teaching students in middle school about financial literacy. And invariably, the financial literacy courses are all sponsored by financial institutions, and that's great. So, what happened was, someone from the bank came in and spoke to the students and then took them all to the bank and had them all open a bank account and deposit $5 into it. Great. A couple of years go by and it earns interest—not much because $5—the bank was then acquired and acquired again and eventually became rolled into Wells Fargo, and had a small balance fee, which then of course wiped out all of these accounts.And I don't think that there is any better lesson in the way the financial system works—in some ways—than that. And yes, that's cynical, but that idea of, if you are sort of toward the bottom, this system is basically stacked against you in a bunch of different ways. Look, I'm not here to rail against capitalism or society as it stands, but understanding that basic concept is foundational to realizing that maybe the credit card company isn't always your friend with your very best interests in mind.Guang Ming: Mm-hm. And we tried to explain that, too, you that when you get a credit limit, that is based on what your ability to pay the minimum balance every month. They don't care if you can pay it off. They care about making that interest off of you, and I think that's something that children and young adults need to understand.Corey: It feels like it ties into the idea of thinking critically. The problem with that is the root of that entire financial literacy anecdote that I came out with just now, is that the financial literacy program was developed and promoted by financial institutions. What I like is that I checked your website very briefly, and given the significant absence of a pile of disclosures at the bottom, I don't believe you're a bank.Guang Ming: We are not a bank, and we are not sponsored by a bank. We want to provide practical real-life advice that is useful, and in digestible chunks.Corey: A while back, before I wound up starting down the path that I'm on now, I basically yelled at people for fun on the internet. I know, imagine that. I was the moderator of two particular subreddits: personal finance—which, great, I spent my 20s in crippling debt; there's no one as passionate about that stuff as someone who has been converted. Great. And the other was the legal advice subreddit, which is probably horrifying to people like you who are actual attorneys.But it turns out that an awful lot of what I was doing in both of those subreddits was giving life advice to people on how to function in society. On the legal side of it, “You can't sue a dog.” “Okay, you are not going to be able to go down to the police station and explain your way out of troubles. Get an attorney.” It's baseline-level stuff.“Oh, you've been given a contract that seems unreasonable, but they'd say that you need you to sign it.” “Yeah. How about don't do that without having someone review it?” It's not actually legal advice. It is how to function in society as an adult, but that's a less catchy subreddit title as it turns out.Guang Ming: Well, it's all about raising your awareness level. So, I have a friend and she tells this story, MBA grad and spent her first six months on the job wearing sneakers every day to work—they were cute, fashionable sneakers, but they were sneakers—and they were not part of appropriate business attire for the work environment she was in because she just was oblivious to that as being an issue. And it took someone who was more senior to finally sit her down and say, “You shouldn't do this. You need to wear appropriate shoes to work.” And she was mortified but learned from that experience.So, what if you never had to have that? What if you never had to have that sit-down conversation with someone correcting you? What if you had a little, sort of, pocket guide that gave you that level of awareness? It's like, “Take a look at your office. See what people are wearing. You can't wear what the CEO is wearing because you're not the CEO”—I mean, unless you are the CEO, then you can wear whatever you want, but if you're just an underling at the company, if you're just starting out, you need to understand what the company culture is and you need to conform to that culture. Unfortunately, that's just, like… the truth of the matter.Corey: The common wisdom is, “Oh, if you don't know how to dress or how to behave in a certain scenario, reach out to one of your mentors and ask them for advice.” Not everyone has one of those things. I get some crap sometimes through it, but one of the big reasons I have open DMs on Twitter is specifically so people can message me and ask me questions about the industry generally, life in general; I'm always willing to talk to folks who are trying to figure things out. That's important. Since a disproportionate number of the listeners to this show do work in tech and the idea of having a dress code is ridiculous, yeah, in a lot of tech culture at t-shirt and jeans is just fine, but in other cases, it's not.And, for example, I'll get on stage wearing a full bespoke three-piece suit and give a talk. And it's fun. It's hilarious. It plays with people's expectations, but it's important to understand I view that more as costuming than I do how I believe someone should necessarily dress in that environment. I am, for better or worse, a very distinctive personality in this space, and using me as a blueprint for someone who is starting out their career is going to lead to disaster.Yes, I'm mouthy and I make fun of big companies because that's my thing. I also got fired an awful lot in—Guang Ming: [laugh].Corey: —my career, and those two things are not entirely unrelated, let's be very clear here. There's a lot that we can learn through observation, but dialing it in and figuring out what the expectations, are important.Guang Ming: Well, I think a lot of young adults—one of the things we focus on, as well, is the importance of mentoring and finding good mentors. And then you being the kind of person that a mentor would want to mentor. Because I think there's a lot of formal mentoring in work environments, and those don't always work as well as the organic relationships. So, we want to be that mentor that you never knew that you needed, the mentor that you wish you always had, to give you all that baseline information so that when you do meet with your substantive mentor, they can truly help you in ways that we cannot with our scalable mentoring micro-lessons.Corey: I have to ask, what is your revenue model? Because if this turns into charging kids money to learning these things, that has a giant exploitative flashing warning sign around it.Guang Ming: So, what we're planning to do is work with school districts and with nonprofits, and do sort of like a B2B model where we pilot with the school district, we pilot with the technical college, and give them an opportunity to add 30 to 50 students, work with the program. And if they find it something valuable, they find that it's a value-add and it's helping their students land jobs and have a better career, I think that then they'll use our program for their full technical school.Corey: I'm done a fair number of mentorships in the course of my career. I helped administer and run the LOPSA 00:13:43—or League Of Professional System Administrators—mentorship program for a couple of years. The reason that I have a career at all is that people did favors for me, and you can never repay that; you can only pay it forward. So, I had a number of people assigned to me through that program and through other areas as well, and what I've learned is that the success of a mentorship is almost entirely on the person seeking guidance: how diligent are they about following up, about going and asking great questions? Because otherwise, if someone comes and says, “Hey, can you mentor me?”—they never frame it quite like that, but that's fine; the terminology is always squishy here.Like, “Hey, can you give me advice on things?” “Sure.” And then they don't ask any questions. Well, if I just butt in with unsolicited advice, that's not helping them in a mentoring capacity; that's being a dude on Twitter. So, I'm trying to figure out the way of solving for that, and I don't know if there is an answer. What's your take?Guang Ming: I think that for many young people, there is a baseline level of information that they need, that almost any mentor can give, but it takes up a lot of time to get to that point. So, for example, I had a young woman reach out to me, and she wanted to get a foot in the door in the legal world and wanted some advice. And I couldn't. It was like, pulling teeth. I couldn't get her to say a word about herself. And our conversation lasted less than five minutes because I couldn't get her to speak about herself.And I almost let it end at that. But then I circled back with her a week later, and called her and said, “You know, I'm going to connect you to someone because I want to help you in your journey. But I need you to think before you get to that conversation about who you are, what you want, where you're going, what's your story. You know, I know just from the person who connected us that you're the first in your family to go to college. Speak to that.” And just really tried to help her understand that she needed to craft a narrative around herself. And I think a lot of young adults don't know how to craft that narrative.Corey: The problem that I see when I look at this systemically is that all of this stuff seems like it's very bespoke. It's [spreading an 00:15:45] opportunity, but it is incumbent upon folks to learn about it for themselves. One of the most foundational memories of my ill-fated academic career was in public school for my first sophomore year of high school, where the US history teacher said, all right. Today, we're not doing our traditional stuff, what I'm about to do is not in the curriculum. Please feel free to complain to your parents and then have them take it to the school board.And what he did was he passed at a flyer where each one of us had different numbers on it, and it was a, “You are a family of x number of people; you made this much money last year.” And then he passed out 1040-EZ forms. And he taught us how to file a tax return in the course of that 45-minute session. And it was, instead of learning a series of whitewashed facts about American history, I was learning how to function as an adult in society. And the fact that he had to do this almost as a subversive thing as opposed to being an accepted part of the curriculum is just mind-boggling to me. I see what you're doing is important and valuable, but it also in some level kind of feels like a band-aid over a massive societal failing. Is that accurate or am I missing something?Guang Ming: No, I think that certain school districts are trying to do this, they're trying to integrate financial literacy into calculus. Some schools will even offer a course, but the course isn't an AP course; it doesn't give you special credit, and so students don't take it, or it's viewed as a less valuable course even though it's probably the most valuable course. And there's also a level of embarrassment. Like, for certain things, we cover personal hygiene. The importance of brushing your teeth every day, and taking a shower, and wearing deodorant.Which is something you wouldn't necessarily think you would need to teach someone, but wait till you're in certain work environments, and that is actually something that people need to know that they're bothering their coworkers by this lack. That can be really embarrassing.With Lattice Climbers, you can do this in the privacy of your own home, you can do it in your bedroom, you can do it wherever you are, and you can get these little lessons and not feel embarrassed. Or sometimes you are afraid to ask a question because you feel dumb asking it. When we did a pilot with 17-to 19-year-olds, the favorite video was actually making an appointment. Just giving tips on how to gather the appropriate documentation you would need to, say for example, make a doctor's appointment, and sample scripts—we have downloadables that go along with—sample scripts of how a conversation would potentially run if you were to call.Corey: The way you describe this and the problem you're solving, I have a hard time seeing this as the business opportunity that becomes a $60 billion company because to do that, you would have to do something that is abjectly terrifying. So apparently, becoming rich beyond the wildest dreams of avarice is not the reason that you're doing this. What made you decide that this was a problem you wanted to address?Guang Ming: So, I am the daughter of an immigrant and a first-generation college student. And there were so many things that my parents just didn't know to teach me. They were very focused on academics and there was no focus on anything outside of book smarts. So, when I had my first college interview, my mom took me to the Fashion for Price Boutique next to the Drug Emporium in the strip mall near our home and bought me an interview suit—we didn't have a ton of money—and the interview suit involved zebra print zippers and a very short skirt. And that is what I wore to my Harvard interview. The one [laugh] school I didn't get into.And not only that, not only was I dressed wholly inappropriately, I also was a deer in the headlights. I had never done a mock interview, I had never done anything that would help prepare me for this situation. And I look back at that 17-year-old and I think, “How can I help her? How can I help people like her who don't have the social or cultural capital to know these things, to know how to move in the world that they want to be in desperately? How do I help them overcome that obstacle?” And that is how Lattice Climbers was born.Corey: The idea of having an experience like that as being necessary to forge this is—it's moving. It's the sort of thing that you hear about other people—you [unintelligible 00:20:04] secondhand cringing from hearing that sort of story, at least I do. And I can definitely understand not wanting other folks to have to go through this. We talk about hilarious interview mistakes that we've made, that we've had candidates make, and in some cases, most of the ones that I like to talk about are the folks who are—let's [unintelligible 00:20:23] here—25 years into their career or so, where they really should know better. Because making fun of some naive kid who'd never been in an interview scenario before is just being shitty, let's be clear.At some point, though, you should learn how to comport yourself in a working environment that makes sense. But without having mentorships or guidance like that, it feels like a lot of people have stories like this. I think what makes your story different than most of them is that you're willing to talk about it in public. Most of us bury those things down the memory hole, I would think.Guang Ming: Yes. I very much own the zebra print story, and it is something that I share when I speak at Girls State. I speak at Girls State just about every year to the young women, and I talk a lot about some of these things that we go over in Lattice Climbers to just try to impart, even in a six-minute speech, some of the key nuggets that I want them to take away with them, as they move through life.Corey: Tell me a little more about Girls State. I've heard the term a couple of times, but know remarkably little about it because, for better or worse, my daughters are still at a point where—I regret this constantly—I have to know entirely too much about the Paw Patrol.Guang Ming: So, Girls Day is a program sponsored by the American Legion Auxiliary. It is a week-long civic engagement program that simulates government over the course of one week. And for California Girls State, it is one girl from each sponsored high school, with about 540 young women—and of course, we've had to be virtual for the past couple of years, but they've done it in a webinar virtual sessions—and the program is all about women empowerment and encouraging civic engagement. And one of the things that has really impacted Lattice Climbers has been my observations in Girls State as a counselor for over 20 years. Because we work with young women from all different backgrounds, whether their parents are migrant workers in Modesto or doctors in Big Sur, there are gaps that these young women have that differ based on their backgrounds.And what I'm hoping to do with Lattice Climbers is fill those gaps and help them avoid these missteps and increase their trajectory as they climb the lattice. And that is one thing that we do is we don't talk about climbing the ladder because a ladder implies that there is one pathway to the top, there's room for only one there. We approach it as you're climbing a lattice: we're all in it together and there are infinite paths to success.Corey: All of these things that you talk about are challenging at the best of times, and these are very clearly not the best of times. One of the reasons that, to date, we at The Duckbill Group have not hired junior folks is because in a full-remote environment—and to be clear, even without the pandemic The Duckbill Group has been full-remote since its inception—I don't know that's necessarily the best way to expose someone new to the workforce. It feels to me like there's not a lot of examples around there. There's a requirement to be a lot more self-directed, and it's likely, for example, that someone will get stuck and spin on something for a while rather than asking for help because they don't want to appear like they don't know what they're doing and inadvertently make things worse. Do you think that remote as we move forward is going to be an increasing burden on folks like this, or—which I'm perfectly willing to accept—am I completely wrong, and that in fact having a full-remote environment like this is in fact a terrific opportunity for folks new to the workforce?Guang Ming: No, I think full-remote is an issue. I think that it takes so much more emotional energy to connect through a video than it does to connect in person. And there's also the lack of organic interactions. There are so many mentorships that develop just from walking down the hall and running into someone over coffee, or at the wat—I mean literally at the watercooler and having the opportunity to chat with someone about something non-work-related that can then evolve into a mentoring relationship. And there is just a lack of that.All these young people entering the work environment, they can wear pajamas all day and lay in bed with their laptop on their laps and work, and they may love that, but I think that if you want to work in a professional office environment, you need to understand appropriate attire, you need to understand appropriate behavior at events. I think that, especially if you're from certain backgrounds and you've never been around an open buffet before, it can be very tempting to just pile that plate as high as you can with crab legs or, you know, shrimp cocktail. And it's not appropriate in that setting. And so we cover those—Corey: Wait. It's not?Guang Ming: [laugh]. Well, it depe—if you're the CEO of the company, Corey, you can do whatever you want.Corey: No, no. That's my business partner. I am just the chief cloud economist because it's not professional to put the word shit-poster on a business card. Or so they tell me.Guang Ming: [laugh].Corey: In my experience, the worst of all worlds, though, is not the full-remote; it's not the in-office; it's the hybrid scenario where you have some people that are in an office together working and then you have folks who are remote, and regardless of what your intentions are, it is almost impossible to avoid having a striated structure where the in-person folks collaborate in different ways and make decisions informally to which remote folks are not privy. And it's not to do with cliques or anything like that, but the watercooler discussions, or, “I'm going to go grab lunch. Do you want to come with me?” Type of engagement stories. And I can't shake the feeling that remote really needs to be all or nothing, at least within the bounds of a team, if not company-wide.Guang Ming: I think that a hybrid version could work if there was a concerted effort to include the remote individuals if there was a scheduled Zoom happy hour. So, one of the things that happened during the COVID times is there's a group that I'm a part of, and we just had a happy hour on Saturday nights. At 8 p.m. everyone just kind of logged on and hung out for a period of time. And it was really good to connect with people in that casual environment; there wasn't always pressure to speak, there wasn't always pressure to perform, it was just being together and having that togetherness. So, I think that in a work environment, you could create opportunities for that. And then also, I think, bringing people into the office for specific meetings and things that are important like that. And then potentially—I don't like assigning mentors, but I think you almost have to assign mentors when you have remote workforce.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by something new. Cloud Academy is a training platform built on two primary goals. Having the highest quality content in tech and cloud skills, and building a good community the is rich and full of IT and engineering professionals. You wouldn't think those things go together, but sometimes they do. Its both useful for individuals and large enterprises, but here's what makes it new. I don't use that term lightly. Cloud Academy invites you to showcase just how good your AWS skills are. For the next four weeks you'll have a chance to prove yourself. Compete in four unique lab challenges, where they'll be awarding more than $2000 in cash and prizes. I'm not kidding, first place is a thousand bucks. Pre-register for the first challenge now, one that I picked out myself on Amazon SNS image resizing, by visiting cloudacademy.com/corey. C-O-R-E-Y. That's cloudacademy.com/corey. We're gonna have some fun with this one!Corey: The challenge also becomes one of, great for junior folks, that makes an awful lot of sense. Hire someone with 15 years of experience, and, “Oh, we're going to assign you a mentor here.” And they're like, “Oh, really. So, that's what condescending means. I was always looking for a perfect example.”Guang Ming: [laugh].Corey: That's a delicate balance to strike in my experience.Guang Ming: Oh, very true. Very true. I was thinking more of, like, the young adults starting out in their career because our focus is really early career, as well as young adults in high school.Corey: And that's, I guess, my question for you next is why is that the target age range that you think is best served by this? Now, having, again, spent too much time gazing into the mess that is the Paw Patrol, I understand why preschoolers are not the target market for this, but my approach has generally been targeting folks who are entering the workforce. Although let's be very clear, a large part of that is because I generally don't appreciate the optics of going and hanging out at the local high school trying to talk to kids.Guang Ming: Well, I think that high school is really where it starts. This is the age at which brains are starting to develop a little bit more; they're starting to have more social awareness. This is where beginnings of your network are important. And I think that the sooner that we can convey to young people that they're only as strong as their networks, the better. If they can understand that it's their teachers, their coaches, the parents of their friends are all the beginnings of their network.That's how you get internships, that's how you get a leg up is through these connections because if you're just a resume floating out there, your chances of getting looked at—and we all know how the world works—well, we should all know how the world works, which is it's all about your connections that helps you launch to the next thing.Corey: That's the thing that I think is understated in this is that we wind up telling students a whole bunch of things that are well-intentioned lies. The, “Oh, put your nose to the grindstone and work hard, and one day you will surely be promoted.” Now, I get flack when I say this sometimes from folks who've been at the same company for 15 years and demonstrated growth trajectory internally, but that's the exception, not the rule. Big moves generally look a lot like transitioning between companies.“Oh, you don't want to be a job hopper. It looks bad on the resume.” Yeah, you know who says that? People who don't want you to quit your job because you're unhappy because then they have to backfill you, or people who are trying to recruit you in and want to make sure that you when you show up at this new job, you stay there for a while. It's self-serving.Yeah, there's going to be some questions about it in the interview process, but you should have an answer ready to go for it. It's the interview skills piece of it and make sure that you don't inadvertently torpedo your own candidacy with conversations like that. And this is stuff that I find that is—it's not just the newer generation that we're talking about here; people well into their careers still haven't cracked a lot of these codes, mostly because, for better or worse, it turns out that people aren't nearly as cynical [laugh] about things as I am.Guang Ming: Well, and we also cover things like how to leave a job professionally. Because as we live in a world where you're not going to go work for one company for the next 30 years, or where you shouldn't go work for the same company for 30 years necessarily, but there are stories out there of people just ghosting on the job, ghosting on job interviews, and that burns bridges. And everyone you meet is a potential connection in your network as you climb the lattice, and so you need to preserve those relationships moving forward because you never know who you help out along the way, or who helps you out along the way, you never know how that connection is going to play out later on in life.Corey: That's the trick is that it's talking to people and being friendly with them. And there are ways to do networking properly in my world, and there are ways not to. And, “Oh, I should talk to you because down the road you might be useful to me,” is just cynical and terrible. I hate the pattern.Whereas, I like keeping in touch with people because I find them interesting. My default assumption has always been that I'm going to be talking to someone for longer than either one of us is going to be doing whatever it is we're currently doing, and trying to treat relationships as transactional is a mistake. But that's what networking is often interpreted as.Guang Ming: It's so true. And people can tell. They can tell when you're being fake. They can tell when you're being transactional. They can tell when you just are waiting for the ask.I think it actually is really hard to be genuine and natural for some people that comes across as transactional, and one of the ways that we talked about avoiding that is through just an ongoing relationship. So, you don't only reach out to the person when you have an ask, you reach out to the person quarterly. And you can have a spreadsheet—almost—about it, and of the people that you want to contact and maintain cont—and even if it's just a text message that says, “Hey, this is what I'm up to. Hope all is well with you.” And even if they don't respond, or just it's a one-word answer, you've at least had that touchpoint with them over the course of time.Corey: There's often a criticism levied at folks who are advocating for networking, that it is a lot harder when you're an introvert or when you are neurodivergent, in certain ways. To be clear, I've neurodivergent in ways that do not directly negatively impact my ability to socialize with folks; it just means they think I'm a jerk. But there are folks who definitely have different expressions of different divergences. And that's fine. How do you view the networking aspect for folks who do not work nearly as well interpersonally?Guang Ming: That's so hard because interpersonal skills are something that is so necessary, and I think that unfortunately, there are people who get by one hundred percent on their social skills. Like, their people skills are all they need to move forward in the world. And I think that you have to work at it, and you have to study how to behave in those situations. It's almost like—so for example, my husband is an introvert, but he was also an actor in college. And when he goes into these situations, it's almost like putting on a show.Like you talked about putting on your three-piece suit. There is the extrovert persona that he wears in these environments, and then he takes it off when he gets home. And I think that you almost have to create that persona for yourself. And you can acknowledge that you're neurodivergent, and you can acknowledge that you're an introvert, and I think that's way more acceptable these days than it used to be. And there are lots of people that are in the world that are neurodivergent and are introverts, and so I think it's completely fine to be that way.Corey: I've never had a good answer for folks who ask those questions, just because it is so different from my lived experience that I don't have an answer that's worth listening to, and I try very hard to stay in my lane. I don't ever want that to be interpreted as it's not important because it very much is.So, one last question I have for you is I love, love, love your zebra print suit story, but it's also back when you were applying to school, back in early career, which you are very clearly not now; it's decades old. Do you have any other similar stories from folks that you've been working through, either at Lattice Climbers or through Girls State, that illustrate this in a somewhat more modern era?Guang Ming: Oh, absolutely. So, there was a young woman at Girls State; we were all in a room and they were talking about colleges, the girls were talking about colleges. And this one young woman remains silent during this conversation. And so I approached her. I said, “Well, what about you? What are your plans for college?” And she shared that she wasn't going to go to college because her parents didn't go to college, they didn't have a lot of money, and she just didn't think that college was in the cards for her.And I disabused her of that notion. I told her absolutely not. You're here at Girls State, which means you're the top girl from your high school. You absolutely should go to college, and I told her that there were so many paths to college. You could go to community college and then transfer; you could go to technical college; there's so many different options.And there's so many scholarships out there, especially for low-income individuals. Well, we became friends on social media, and about three years after Girls State—because they attend the summer after their junior years—I received a message from her, sort of, out of the blue, and she let me know that that conversation that we had changed her life because she had gone to community college—she had taken my advice; she had gone to community college and had just been accepted as a transfer student to UC Berkeley. And that story just makes me tear up every time I think about it. And that one conversation had that huge impact on her life, and I'm hoping that through Lattice Climbers and our little lessons, that we can have that kind of impact on young lives, that we can help them avoid these missteps that could have huge impacts on their trajectory, and we could help them increase their trajectory on the lattice.Corey: It's similar in some respects to the folks I talk to who are building products for the cloud industry. It's, “Yes, yes, of course. You're always going to have a story about how it works for you. That's fine. Let's talk about your customers.” Like, “Find me a customer, someone else in the world who has a story like this that really demonstrates the value you provide.”And I love the fact that it is so easy for you to come up with these things off the top of your head, even when you weren't necessarily expecting the question. So, you're onto something. This is a clear problem, and it's not going away anytime soon, and it's largely underserved because there's no opportunity to invest venture capital into it and make a ridiculous return on that investment because there's not money in solving it that I can see—and apparently, most the industry can see—compared to another Twitter for Pets app.Guang Ming: [laugh]. Well, there is not that much money in them there hills because no one owns the problem, and because no one owns the problem, it's very hard to find people willing to pay to solve the problem. But that doesn't mean that the problem isn't there and that doesn't mean that it doesn't need to be solved. And I actually think that companies should have an incentive to do it because it will help with employee retention, it will help with employee performance if they do invest in their workers, and in high school students who, the sooner that they know these things, the better it will be for their long-term careers.Corey: And if nothing else, I think that's the lesson to take away from this for the young folk—the youth, as it were—that this is the single greatest thing I look at and credit my professional trajectory has been in learning to handle expectations in corporate environments. And sure, I have fun with them and I play games with them, but you have to know the rules before you can break them in this context. And there are business meetings in which I assure you, you would question whether it was the same person. And that's what it comes down to, I think, on some level is, if you know how to handle a job interview, you will always be able to find something to put food on the table. Conversely, if you're terrific at any number of different things, but absolutely cannot handle the dynamics of a job interview, you are going to struggle to find work anywhere until you find someone willing to alter their corporate process just in order to bring you aboard.It's a skill that you need to be at least conversant with. And what makes it even worse, as it's a skill that you only really get to practice when you're looking for jobs. I want to thank you for taking the time to speak with me so much about all this stuff. If people want to learn more about what you're up to and how you're approaching it, where can they find you?Guang Ming: So, we are at latticeclimbers.com. And we are currently in waitlist mode, so you can sign up on our waitlist and get more information about when we're ready to launch. We are working with some nonprofits and some school districts on some pilot programs, and we're hoping to have that going, hopefully by the end of the year.Corey: And we will, of course, put a link to that in the [show notes 00:38:07]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. I really appreciate it.Guang Ming: Well, thank you so much for having me. I really appreciate the opportunity to share what we're doing with Lattice Climbers, and I just hope, like I said, if I can get one person to not wear zebra print to that Harvard interview, [laugh] then I will view Lattice Climbers as a success.Corey: [laugh]. Excellent. Thank you so much. Once again, Guang Ming Whitley, co-founder of Lattice Climbers. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with a rambling comment explaining why we're wrong and that a zebra-print suit for a college interview is in fact a best practice.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Bitch Slap  ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!
I need to be reminded of the basics all the time.

Bitch Slap ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 10:59


Am I adding value with this podcast?  It is a great question…  Perhaps I'm helping people and I don't even know.  Sometimes it's up to you to listen and to pull out what is to be learned.  Worst case I'm giving reminders to myself for consistence, fortitude, resilience, all these things. Administrative: (See episode transcript below)Check out the Tools For A Good Life Summit here: Virtually and FOR FREE https://bit.ly/ToolsForAGoodLifeSummitStart podcasting!  These are the best mobile mic's for IOS and Android phones.  You can literally take them anywhere on the fly.Get the Shure MV88 mobile mic for IOS,  https://amzn.to/3z2NrIJGet the Shure MV88+ for  mobile mic for Android  https://amzn.to/3ly8SNjGet A Course In Miracles Here! https://amzn.to/3hoE7sAAccess my “Insiders Guide to Finding Peace” here: https://belove.media/peaceSee more resources at https://belove.media/resourcesEmail me: contact@belove.mediaFor social Media:      https://www.instagram.com/mrmischaz/https://www.facebook.com/MischaZvegintzovSubscribe and share to help spread the love for a better world!As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.Transcript:Mischa Zvegintzov  00:00 It's funny, I was just thinking how? Maybe it's not funny. I was just thinking, how am I adding value? I've been thinking about this? am I adding value with this podcast? Because it's a great question, is it? Is it an exercise in ego gratification and narcissism? On the very left? Or on the very right, is it? You know, helping be of service to the world, that community? To people who need to hear it? or what have you, however, you want to say, you know, that's something very right. And or is it somewhere in between, and I'm sure on any given day, it's somewhere in between leaning a little off center to the left or a little off center to the right. But hopefully on balance, it's mostly to the right of the curve and, and being, being of value.Mischa Zvegintzov  01:08And, you know, one way to be a value is to specifically say the point. So, you know, the last episode that I recorded, I was talking about, you know, being very focused at work, so focused at work that I'd gone to work with different shoes on. But that also the Wells Fargo sales conference, and the Funnel Hacking Live convention. Or what do you call that? Gathering convention on an off convention? Yeah. But it cost I think, on average, $1,000, if you bought early, maybe it was $700. If you bought it right at the last minute, the ticket, if there were any available, it was it. You know, I think $1,500 or something like that, but the event did sell out. So the Funnel Hacking Live sold out. But I had an opportunity there, like I did it, the sales conferences that I went to at Wells Fargo for being a top producer for a while. You know, it's an opportunity to network to learn to get inspired, find new ideas, as well as bring ideas to the table. So I might have left that out on the previous episode.Mischa Zvegintzov  02:41But, you know, there's always somebody coming up behind you that you can share your experience strength and hope with and inspire, and, and encourage, etc. But I'm talking about this stuff on that last episode. And I realized that on many episodes, I don't suss out the point. I don't necessarily say, "Okay, here's what you can learn from this". So for example, Funnel Hacking live, pay to go to a convention or a gathering that's in your industry, or in what you're doing, and go learn and go be of service, bring what you can to the table.  Go network.  Honestly, authentically, have cool conversations with people that are ahead of you on the track. And, and, as I'm saying this, I realize a lot of you probably already do that. So God bless you and I love that. But some of you don't, some of you might be thinking thrifty wise, should I spend the money on something like that? Or? Or is it worthwhile or the contempt of "I won't learn anything" or "I don't have anything to bring" or perhaps one of the speakers is somebody that you don't like, and so you throw the baby out with the bathwater.   Like Tony Robbins is speaking there. I don't like Tony Robbins, therefore, I won't go at all. And I will just say that Tony crushed it. But I just had this thought as I hit record on this episode, that sometimes it's it's, perhaps it's up to you to listen to what you're listening to, to pull out what is to be learned.Mischa Zvegintzov  04:46I think it's an interesting thought, right? Like, is it my responsibility to tell you what you need to glean from the story that I told about having my shorts on backwards?  And being focused and being committed to my craft and learning from my craft and I had a lot of success as a 15 year loan officer.  And was in sales of, you know, high tech and, and financial services for the five years before that. So there's nuggets in there, or reminders in there for any of you that are listening.  Perhaps I don't say, "work on your focus "or "be committed", or "go with an open mind" or, or "put your contempt aside, throw caution to the wind and spend the money that you don't want to spend and go to a convention". And learn and add, see what you can bring, see what you can learn, see how you can add to the inspirations, how you can be inspired. Like, I think all that's so powerful, and I may not have specifically pointed it out. But all that information was embedded in that episode for you to hear.Mischa Zvegintzov  06:19And I will say this too. It's super fun for me to read, listen to my episodes, as I go to edit them and get them published. Because there is great reminders in there for me. Great  reminders in there for me to I need to be reminded all the time of the basics. Be consistent. Show up one day at a time.  Get there early, leave late. See what you can bring to the table, Mischa.  Like I needed to be reminded of that set of basics, but there's so many other basics to be reminded of. So this is just a gentle reminder to myself, maybe a gift from the universe to me that hey, Meesh, I know you have insecurities that can that can drive you or that can make it hard to be creative. Or in the moment, you know, not trust what's happening. And it was just a great reminder of like, hey, trust, keep at it. Like perhaps you're helping people how you don't even know.  And worst case, you're giving reminders to yourself for consistency, consistency, fortitude, resilience, all these things.Mischa Zvegintzov  07:57I will say as well. I think this was a great tangent. I would actually honestly like a little bit of a standing ovation, a little bit of applause perhaps. Now, that might be a little narcissistic. But anyway, I am super glad to be in the game of life. Tackling new entrepreneurial opportunities.  Trying new things going for it. And I'm done. Peace out love to all. So I think a good way to button up this episode is to say, hey, perhaps Perhaps a great reminder for Misha, myself, Hey, I am being of service. And perhaps the listener can take some accountability and not that you're not. But can suss out, hear the story and pull out the key nuggets of information as I am trying to learn better how to structure an episode and say, here's the point. Tell you the point and then tell you the point that I told you. All right, I'm done now. Goodbye.

Faithful Politics
"MAGA Sine Laude" - w/Tristan Snell, Fmr. Assistant AG for New York

Faithful Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 66:31


Many have wondered if President Trump could ever be held accountable for his actions either while president or even before he held the highest office in America. It's no secret that Donald Trump is notoriously known as Teflon-Don for his savviness to evade civil or criminal liability for the many things he's been accused of, but this week we speak with a person who knows a thing or two about prosecuting Trump and his organization. Tristan Snell is the former Assistant Attorney General for New York, and successfully prosecuted Trump University which lead  to a $25 million settlement; the largest settlement against the Trump family.  They talk about the similarities between this case and the existing civil and criminal cases brought forth by New York AG, Letitia James, as well as the status of the January 6th commission investigation and how that might play out. Article referenced in the show:Unpacking the Civil Case That May Destroy the Trump Organization: https://www.smerconish.com/exclusive-content/unpacking-the-civil-case-that-may-destroy-the-trump-organizationProsecution of Trump University: https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/2021/07/03/trump-weisselberg-indictment-documents/New Jan. 6th Subpoenas: https://www.npr.org/2021/11/08/1053632748/jan-6-committee-subpoenas-trump-officials-michael-flynnNew York Prosecutions: https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/trump-still-faces-a-reckoning-in-new-yorkGuest Bio:Tristan's work includes successes in some of the most high-profile legal matters of the century – including the prosecution of Trump University (leading to a $25 million settlement), the Broadcom v. Qualcomm patent litigation (the largest in US history at the time, with a $1.2 billion victory for Broadcom), and landmark deals with Chase, Wells Fargo, and Walmart, among others.He has also started three businesses and served as a startup Product Manager, General Counsel, COO, and CEO, and he has represented dozens of startups and small to medium sized businesses, as well as early-stage venture funds, giving him a deep understanding of the special challenges facing high-growth businesses.Tristan graduated from Princeton University, where he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, then received his law degree from the University of Virginia, where he was an editor of the Virginia Law Review.  He later worked in the renowned intellectual property, appellate, and venture practices at WilmerHale, where he also worked on the Boumediene v. Bush team that won the first habeas writs for detainees at Guantanamo Bay.  He served as a law clerk to the Hon. Eric N. Vitaliano, U.S. District Court Judge for the Eastern District of New York, and as Assistant Attorney General for the State of New York as a civil prosecutor and investigator in consumer protection.Tristan has appeared as a commentator on CNN and Cheddar, and as a contributing writer for CNN and the Washington Post.  His work as a lawyer and founder has been featured in a wide array of media outlets, from the New Yorker to the Atlantic to Last Week Tonight with John Oliver.LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tristansnell/Law firm: https://www.mainstreet.lawTwitter: @TristanSnellSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/faithpolitics)

Alles auf Aktien
Grüner Börsenstar RWE und der Schlüssel zum Krypto-Universum

Alles auf Aktien

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 12:56


In der heutigen Folge „Alles auf Aktien“ berichten die Finanzjournalisten Anja Ettel und Holger Zschäpitz über Holland in Not, Oprah Winfreys Irrtum und die geheimen Wetten der Profis. Außerdem geht es um Home24, Royal Dutch Shell, Unilever, Gamestop, Oatly, Deutsche Telekom, Goldman Sachs Hedge Industry VIP ETF (WKN: A2DWAV), Gingko Bioworks, Lucid Motors, AirBnB, Adobe, Alibaba, Nio, JD, Sea Lmt, Doordash, Cloudflare, Snowflake, Square, Salesforce, Intuitive Surgical, Ui Path, IHS Markit, Palantir, Microsoft, Docusign Adobe, Chipotle Mexican Grill,Visa, Mastercard, Robinhood, Warby Parker, Gingko Bioworks, Lucid Motors, AirBnB, Bank of America, Citi, JPM, Morgan Stanley, Wells Fargo, Ebay, Apple, Meta Platforms, Walt Disney, Amazon Roku, TuSimple, Goldman Sachs Hedge Industry VIP ETF (WKN: A2DWAV), Ark Innovation (WKN: A14Y8H), Tesla, Amplify Transformational Data Sharing ETF (WKN: A2JB5E), Silvergate, Galaxy Digital Holdings, Coinbase, Twitter, Visa, Paypal, IBM, Riot Blockchain, Marathon Digital Holdings, Wisdomtree. "Alles auf Aktien" ist der tägliche Börsen-Shot aus der WELT-Wirtschaftsredaktion. Die Wirtschafts- und Finanzjournalisten Holger Zschäpitz, Anja Ettel, Philipp Vetter, Daniel Eckert und Nando Sommerfeld diskutieren im Wechsel über die wichtigsten News an den Märkten und das Finanzthema des Tages. Außerdem gibt es jeden Tag eine Inspiration, die das Leben leichter machen soll. In nur zehn Minuten geht es um alles, was man aktuell über Aktien, ETFs, Fonds und erfolgreiche Geldanlage wissen sollte. Für erfahrene Anleger und Neueinsteiger. Montag bis Freitag, ab 5 Uhr morgens. Wir freuen uns an Feedback über aaa@welt.de. Disclaimer: Die im Podcast besprochenen Aktien und Fonds stellen keine spezifischen Kauf- oder Anlage-Empfehlungen dar. Die Moderatoren und der Verlag haften nicht für etwaige Verluste, die aufgrund der Umsetzung der Gedanken oder Ideen entstehen. Hörtipps: Für alle, die noch mehr wissen wollen: Holger Zschäpitz können Sie jede Woche im Finanz- und Wirtschaftspodcast "Deffner&Zschäpitz" hören. Außerdem neu bei WELT: Im werktäglichen Podcast „Kick-off Politik - Das bringt der Tag“ geben wir Ihnen im Gespräch mit WELT-Experten die wichtigsten Hintergrundinformationen zu einem politischen Top-Thema des Tages. Mehr auf welt.de/kickoff und überall, wo es Podcasts gibt. +++Werbung+++ Hier geht's zur App: Scalable Capital ist der Broker mit Flatrate. Unbegrenzt Aktien traden und alle ETFs kostenlos besparen – für nur 2,99 € im Monat, ohne weitere Kosten. Und jetzt ab aufs Parkett, die Scalable App downloaden und loslegen. Hier geht's zur App: https://bit.ly/3abrHQm

We Talk About Dead People
134: Black Bart | Enemy of Wells Fargo

We Talk About Dead People

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 73:32


One man's land is stolen by a bank, so he steals the bank. It's a poetic tale as old as time. Guest host: Daniel "The Cleaner" Stefferud VENMO TIP JAR: @wtadp PATREON: www.patreon.com/wetalkaboutdeadpeople SOUNDCLOUD: @wetalkaboutdeadpeople FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/wetalkaboutdeadpeople TWITTER: www.twitter.com/wtadppodcast SPOTIFY: open.spotify.com/show/2OJRFxh9MGNb9AhA4JuOeX itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/we-ta…d1282606749?mt=2 #history #comedy #memes #funny #wtadp #wtadppodcast #podcast #true #story

Bitch Slap  ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!
When you have an opportunity to talk with top producers, listen!

Bitch Slap ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 12:40


First, I just about walk out of the house with my shorts on backwards, which reminds me of my home mortgage days.  And I see the parallels between The Funnel Hacking Live 2021 and the Wells Fargo Home Mortgage top producer sales conferences. You can talk to the high performers and learn how it's done.  The energy is next level.  And everyone is very open.Administrative: (See episode transcript below)Check out the Tools For A Good Life Summit here: Virtually and FOR FREE https://bit.ly/ToolsForAGoodLifeSummitStart podcasting!  These are the best mobile mic's for IOS and Android phones.  You can literally take them anywhere on the fly.Get the Shure MV88 mobile mic for IOS,  https://amzn.to/3z2NrIJGet the Shure MV88+ for  mobile mic for Android  https://amzn.to/3ly8SNjGet A Course In Miracles Here! https://amzn.to/3hoE7sAAccess my “Insiders Guide to Finding Peace” here: https://belove.media/peaceSee more resources at https://belove.media/resourcesEmail me: contact@belove.mediaFor social Media:      https://www.instagram.com/mrmischaz/https://www.facebook.com/MischaZvegintzovSubscribe and share to help spread the love for a better world!As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.Transcript: Mischa Zvegintzov  00:01  I was trying to put my phone in my pocket. As I was getting ready to walk out the door to go for my inspirational walk.  My walks that are deriving so much inspiration for me right now. And the darn phone wouldn't go in my pocket. And I realized because I put my shorts on backwards.  Which is just the funniest damn thing.  If I hadn't been tried to put my phone in my pocket, I would have walked out the door with my shorts on backwards.  Which totally reminded me of a funny moment, back in my mortgage banking days when I was a home loan officer, and working so hard, and grinding, grinding away. And that's not the complete point of this podcast, it's just a really funny story of this episode. The what I'm going to talk about is how, as my friend Lisa Randall likes to say, the information that I was downloading. The inspiration that's been flowing through for me, or through me, or to me, coming out of the Funnel, Hacking Live 2021. How that's coalescing and, and answers are coming clear. And, and a lot of that is a function of patience. Like being being patient, let it come together. So the inspiration was absolutely pure. Just the final answer was not landing what I wanted when I wanted to. So I'll talk a little bit more about that. Anyway, back to the story of walking out the door with my shorts on backwards. So I tried to put the phone in the pocket doesn't happen. And I realized, you know, how, if you put something on your T shirt on the inside out or something, you put something on wrong, may not notice it in the first moment, but but then you're like, oh my god, that is on backwards. So my shorts I said gosh, they are uncomfortable. It's funny, I didn't notice that. So back in the home loan days, especially when I was relatively new, and I was just working hard. Because I had a new baby Cooper Lee, who was you know, a year old, basically, when I started in the business and had my wife, Dawn, the boy's mom. And so I actually started having success fairly quickly. You know, 2000, my first year, I think I made $60,000 or something like that. But then, after that, it was just it was you know, a couple 100,000 year two, I think. And you know, so year two year three on, I was just and I put in the hours, I was dedicated to the craft, learning, learning the craft, getting better at the craft. Whenever I had the opportunity, I would talk to high performing mortgage loan officers and pick their brain. How do you do it? You know, who's your market, what's your niche, all these things? And oftentimes, I wouldn't ask what the niche was, but they would tell me "here's my niche, find your niche focus on it". This is actually really funny because when I was at the Funnel Hacking Live, I saw the parallels between Funnel Hacking Live and the sales conference that I would go to at Wells Fargo home mortgage. So somewhere along the line fairly quickly, I you know, maybe my third or fourth year I probably fourth or fifth year. I made it to the sales conference, the annual Wells Fargo home mortgage sales conference where they you know, send you somewhere super fun for a week.Mischa Zvegintzov  04:52And so like if we end up in Mexico one year or some other country another year.  Elton John. They hired Elton John one year. So I was like, at the stage listening, you know, to Elton John, or who else did we have? Beach Boy. I think Brian Wilson, they brought him in as the Beach Boys, but he was the only one left. So it was constantly joking Beach Boy. The Eagles one year How fun is that? This was all in the 2000s. Beach Boy. The eagles who was the other one? Oh, I remember this the year that that the Patriots went 16 and 0, and made it to the Super Bowl. And I think we were on a cruise. So that was the cruise year. And they brought in who's the guy? Was it Margaritaville? It was like James Taylor. That's who it was James Taylor. I was so disappointed. James Taylor. Like the rumors were circulating that it was going to be the Stones or Aerosmith or you know, a rollicking good time band. And it was James Taylor wha wha wha. Anyhow. I worked my butt off to the mortgage industry. I really did. And this one day, I got to lunch with Gary, who was my assistant. He's a great man. salt of the earth. Dude, old school dude. Gary, I can't remember his last name. But Gary was my assistant for a number of years and smoked cigarettes. Like he take his cigarette breaks and all this and funny guy. So anyway, we're out to lunch. I looked down. And I've got a black work shoe on like a black dress shoe, and a brown dress on at lunch. So I probably started work at seven or eight that morning. Noon, we're out to lunch. And I looked down. And I'm like, wait a minute. I've got different colored shoes on and the different styles to it was like, oh my god, I literally had been working the whole day, walking around, ordered lunch and did not figure it out. Until I sat down. And I remember I was really tired that day. I was just working so hard and so focused on what I was doing that that I totally missed that I'd even that I'd had my shoes on wrong.  Anyway, I can't remember what I did from there. I may have run home to fix it because it was like I'm a freak show right now. Or what have you I might have just finished out today with different shoes on. But I'll button up this nice little episode.  The way this shaped up.  Riches are in the niches. I hear that a lot. So at the sales conferences, I would just pick the brains of a top producers. Be like What are you doing? How do you do it? So, you know, I just get a lot of fundamental, basic, good information. And feeding off that energy.  And getting to know people and getting encouraged. And, you know, yeah, the networking, on and on and on. And new ideas, right, you're getting new ideas. People are very forthcoming with the information too, which is awesome. Everybody's so confident in what they do. They're like, here's my niche, here's how I do it. Here's this, this is how I do it. Here's my secrets and and that isn't an awesome environment to be in. And so I found the same thing at Funnel Hacking Live I was having the same experience.Mischa Zvegintzov  09:17I was like, this is just like a Wells Fargo home mortgage sales conference for all the top producers or any company's sales conference for the top producers. Except in the funnel, hacking community world, we get to pay to go which is good I think pay to play is awesome because it shows a certain level of commitment and accountability and willingness. But the basic structure is the same. You've got the award night you've got all the amazing speakers. The it's a chance to interact with the top people in the Funnel Hacking Online entrepreneurial game and everyone is super open and forthcoming with what they're up to what they do.  So funny I noticed if they feel like you're, you're in effect wasting their time they will shut you down and move on. Which is really funny I think... car just went by not noticing a human so good I'm still alive. Anyway I could go on and on in this episode I will not I will stop and have a great day. Love to all gosh, I feel like it's a lie. I'm not stopping obviously. Yeah, I'm done. That's it. Peace out. Rough ending

Cyber Security Headlines
November 15, 2021

Cyber Security Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 7:23


FBI email system reportedly hacked to send fake DHS cyberattack messages FBI email hacker blames poor coding US Education Department urged to boost K-12 schools' ransomware defenses Thanks to our episode sponsor, Vulcan Cyber Cyber risk isn't easy to quantify, much less mitigate. Use the same approach endorsed by leading security teams at Honeywell, Zoom, and Wells Fargo to tackle cyber risk. Attend the Vulcan Cyber virtual summit on December 9th and learn how the new Vulcan Security Posture Rating will give you the insights you need to reduce risk and secure your business. Go to vulcan.io and click the button at the top of the screen to register for the event. For the stories behind the headlines, head to CISOseries.com.  

Nightly Business Report
Stick a fork in it, and green thumb, green stock?

Nightly Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 44:39


Wells Fargo's message to investors following the latest inflation data: stick a fork in the tech trade! We'll speak with the strategist behind the call on where to invest now. Plus, shares of cannabis company Green Thumb Industries are jumping after doubling profits. We'll speak with the CEO. And, in today's Earnings Exchange: from pre-profit to American staple, we'll preview WeWork, Nvidia & Walmart results on deck.

Accelerate Your Business Growth
How To How to be a Happy High Achieving Salesperson

Accelerate Your Business Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 27:45


Connie Kadansky joins me to share what Happy High Achieving Salespeople have in common and what keeps salespeople from enjoying their careers. Connie is a recognised sales expert who is focused on tackling sales call reluctance, and helping salespeople keep their pipeline full. She has worked with powerhouse organizations including Fortune 50 corporations, like Xerox, Bank of America and Wells Fargo. Connie has also been featured in publications including The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Forbes, and more! Whether you're a seasoned designer or a total novice, with Visme, you can create engaging, dynamic branded content that makes people ask, “How did you do that?!” Visit https://tinyurl.com/seizevisme to explore. If you are a small business owner or salesperson who struggles with getting the sales results you are looking for, get your copy of Succeed Without Selling today. If you haven't seen all Audible.com has to offer, you don't know what you're missing. Sign up for a free trial at audibletrial.com/businessgrowth. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Modern Leadership with Jake Carlson
Work Simply with Carson Tate

Modern Leadership with Jake Carlson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 30:03


Today's Guest Expert: Carson Tate Carson Tate is the founder and managing partner of Working Simply, Inc., a business consulting firm that has served leading global brands, including Delta Airlines, Deloitte, FedEx, Wells Fargo, Chick-fil-A, and Lowe's. She is the author of the best-selling, Work Simply: Embracing the Power of Your Personal Productivity Style, and […] The post Work Simply with Carson Tate appeared first on Jake A Carlson.

BITEradio.me
Stop Fixing Yourself: Wake Up, All is Well with Don Joseph Goewey

BITEradio.me

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 58:00


Stop Fixing Yourself, Wake Up, All is Well with Don Joseph Goewey Don Joseph Goewey is the Executive Director of the Center for Spiritual Exchange, the official archive for the works of Anthony De Mello. Don is the editor of a new book entitled Stop Fixing Yourself / Wake Up, All is Well, based on Anthony DeMello's practical spirituality. Don is also the author of the Amazon bestseller, The End of Stress/Four Steps to Rewire Your Brain. He spent six years directing a think tank that integrated breakthroughs in neuroscience into a psychospiritual model for rewiring the brain to extinguish stress reactions and amplify the higher brain function that enables a human being to flourish. The model has been successfully applied in high pressure work environments like Cisco and Wells Fargo helping people elevate their experience of work and of life in profound and measurable ways. Previously, Don managed the department of psychiatry at Stanford University Medical School and headed an institute that pioneered a psycho-spiritual approach to overcoming catastrophic life events, which in 2005 was awarded the Excellence in Medicine citation by the American Medical Association. For more information visit: www.demellospirituality.com *************************************************** For more information about BITEradio products and services visit: http://www.biteradio.me/index.html To view the photography of Robert at: rpsharpe.picfair.com

Cyber Security Headlines
November 8, 2021

Cyber Security Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 7:45


Feds likely to fall short of deadline for strengthening encryption, multifactor authentication Experts spot phishing campaign impersonating security firm Proofpoint Facebook outage a prime example of insider threat by machine Thanks to our episode sponsor, Vulcan Cyber Cyber risk isn't easy to quantify, much less mitigate. Use the same approach endorsed by leading security teams at Honeywell, Zoom, and Wells Fargo to tackle cyber risk. Attend the Vulcan Cyber virtual summit on December 9th and learn how the new Vulcan Security Posture Rating will give you the insights you need to reduce risk and secure your business. Go to vulcan.io and click the button at the top of the screen to register for the event. For the stories behind the headlines, head to CISOseries.com.

Black, Married & Debt Free
(EP - 120 BONUS) BARRIERS TO HOME OWNERSHIP | CONVERSATION WITH WELLS FARGO

Black, Married & Debt Free

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 8:25


(EP - 120 BONUS) BARRIERS TO HOME OWNERSHIP | CONVERSATION WITH WELLS FARGO --> SUPPORT THE PODCAST --> Debt Free Masterclass --> Black Owned Apparel --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/blackmarrieddebtfree/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/blackmarrieddebtfree/support

Let's Talk Real Estate Investing with Sharon Vornholt
6 Strategies for Closing Off-Market Deals

Let's Talk Real Estate Investing with Sharon Vornholt

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 10:21


Today we're going to talk about 6 strategies for closing off-market deals. So, where exactly do you get the money if you don't have cash in your bank account? I've spent the last couple of weeks talking about off-market deals like probates, absentee owners, and other properties that aren't listed on the MLS. When a property is listed on the MLS, thousands of agents (and investors) have access to those properties. So, there's a lot of competition for every property. That's the reason I like off-market deals so much. There is so much less competition. Don't have any cash to invest in real estate? Here are 6 ways to fund your deals. Why Would Sellers Choose Investors over Agents? One thing that makes investors so attractive to these folks selling off-market deals is their ability to pay all cash and close quickly. These sellers don't have to wait for a retail buyer to get approved for conventional financing (which can take months). Then, they “hope” the buyers will be approved for a mortgage and make it to closing. They're not looking for someone that “might” be able to close down the road. They are looking for certainty. The Promise When it comes to closing on these off-market deals, the same question always comes up with investors.  That question is how to pay for those properties. Remember, the promise we make to sellers is, “I will pay all cash and close quickly”. Let me be clear that a cash buyer is not necessarily one that can write a check for the property, but one that has quick access to cash.  Understanding this is a game-changer. Show Notes - Strategies for Closing Off-Market Deals In today's show, I have 6 strategies for closing off-market deals so that any investor can show up as a cash buyer. 1. Actual Cash Buyers First of all, there are people out there that actually are cash buyers.  I've sold houses to them. They would come to closing and simply write a check. But I have to tell you, that's not the average investor. Most people have a way to “become a cash buyer”. 2. HELOC's The second way would be to use the equity in your home or in a rental property. You can leverage that equity and use it for investing in another property. The most common way to do that is through a HELOC or a home equity line of credit. In most cases you can only use 75-80% of your equity, so you won't be able to take all of the equity out of a property. You can also use the equity in one property to secure a loan for another piece of property. 3. Self Directed Roth IRA's The 3rd  way that a lot of investors buy property is through a self-directed Roth IRA. With a typical IRA, you put your money in before taxes are withheld and you pay taxes when you take it out. Roth IRAs are funded with after-tax dollars. You've already paid the taxes on this money. With self-directed Roth IRAs, you can use the money to buy investment property. There are a whole lot of rules surrounding how all this has to happen, but you just need to know that it's possible.  You could be using funds in your own Roth IRA, or it might be someone loaning you money from their Roth IRA. The beauty of this is that any money you make off of the property is deposited back into the IRA tax-free.  The money you took out might be for the entire purchase or to simply make a down payment on a property where you combine that with financing from an investor-friendly bank. 4. Investor-Friendly Banks This brings me to #4 which is one that a lot of real estate investors use, and that is investor-friendly banks. When we talk about investor-friendly banks, you're not looking for a big national mortgage company like Wells Fargo.  You are looking for a small, local portfolio lender. So, what's a portfolio lender? A portfolio lender will generally be a small local bank or credit union that holds a least some of its loans in-house. Most loans like FHA loans are backed by the government, and these loans are not actually held in-house by the bank or mortgage company you borrowed the money from. When you are looking for investor-friendly banks, start your search with local banks. 5, Hard Money Loans #5 is hard money loans. A lot of investors use hard money because your credit rarely comes into play with this type of loan. It's the property itself that the hard money lender looks at. The loan will be secured by the property.  What are the pros and cons of using hard money? One of the cons of using hard money loans is that it's expensive. Interest rates and up-front fees are costly. The good thing about hard money is that it's easy to get funding for your deals. If you have a great deal, you will always be able to get that deal funded. If using hard money means you can close on a killer deal, my advice is to use it and don't worry about the cost.  A lot of investors use hard money. Just factor the costs into the equation when you buy the property. The cost of the money is one of the costs of doing business. 6. Private Money Partners The 6th way you can fund your deal is with private money partners. You should make it a priority to line up sources of private money for your business. There will come a day, when you will need this; when your other sources just won't work for you. Trust me on this one. Private money is different from hard money. Private money lenders are folks that you might know, or they might be referred to you by people you know. Generally speaking, their rates are more favorable than hard money lenders, but their rates are more than investor-friendly banks. Their rates sit in the middle between these two. Look at these are folks as private money partners. They have some money that's in the bank earning next to nothing, or possibly they're looking for something more stable than the stock market. Whatever their particular situation is, they are looking to get a bigger return on their money than they are currently getting. Since the money they are loaning you is always secured by the property, it's a pretty safe investment. As an investor, buying houses in decent nice is very important here. Private money partners want to loan money on property in nice appreciating areas where they feel like their investment will be safe. One important thing to point out is that in most cases, they're not going to want to tie their money up for long periods of time. They won't be interested in providing long-term financing. Think of these folks as sources of cash for down payments, short-term financing for wholesale deals, or construction loans. Final Thoughts Using OPM or "other people's money" has been the way investors have purchased property for decades. Using OPM gives everyone an equal chance to invest in real estate and build wealth over time. I hope this helps you get a clearer picture of where you can find cash for your deals so that you can confidently put yourself out there as a cash buyer. Knowledge is power! And, having access to other people's money is a real game-changer.  I hope these 6 strategies for closing off-market deals will help you close more deals!   Louisville Gal's Real Estate Blog Stop by the Louisville Gal's Real Estate Blog for more great content and some awesome freebies.       .

Shine
How to Make Any Job Your Dream Job with Carson Tate

Shine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 53:28


In today's podcast interview you will learn how to make any job your dream job. With a reported 4.3 million people having left the US workforce in August of 2021, this is a very timely topic. The questions I have been asking leaders and teams include the following: Why do you want to stay working with your current team and company? What makes you want to leave? Are there parts of your current job or role that you feel frustrated with? Do you have the mindset to stay and make it work because it's not going to be any better anywhere else? If any of these thoughts have crossed your mind, this podcast is for you. Learn how to advocate for yourself and make your current role work for you with my friend and guest Carson Tate. Carson is the founder and managing partner of Working Simply, a productivity consulting and training firm and author of 2 books, her latest- Own it, Love It, Make it Work: Make Any Job Your Dream Job. Together we explore many tips and conversations you can have to invite optimal conditions for thriving and performance at work. We speak about the importance of building trust, so that we have the psychological safety for contracts and agreements that support work that we love, while having the brave exchanges to talk about healthy boundaries and other conditions that would make us love to stay and bring our best gifts to our teams and workplace. Tune into this encouraging episode today.   SHINE Links: Leading from Wholeness Executive Coaching Leading from Wholeness Learning and Development Resources Shine: Ignite Your Inner Game to Lead Consciously at Work and in the World by Carley Hauck Contact Carley Hauck Book Carley for speaking Sign up for the Podcast! Carley on LinkedIn Carson Tate Carson Tate on LinkedIn Working Simply   Mentioned in this Episode SHINE Podcast Episode #40- Psychological Safety in the Workplace Assessment: What's Your Personal Productivity Style? Amazon Upskilling 2025 Programs   The Imperfect Shownotes   Carley Hauck 0:01   Hi, my name is Carley Hauck. I am the host of the SHINE podcast. Welcome to another wonderful episode. I am the founder of Leading From Wholeness, a Leadership and Organizational Development Training firm that has served companies including Intuit, Bank of the West, Capital One, Pixar, Clif Bar, LinkedIn, and many high growth startups since 2010. I am also the author of Shine: Ignite Your Inner Game to Lead Consciously at Work and in the World.   And this podcast is all about the intersection of three things: conscious, inclusive leadership; the recipe for high performing teams; and awareness practices. This season, season five is all about speaking to friends, colleagues, thought leaders, around some of the biggest challenges we are navigating at work and in the world.   And in the midst of the reshuffle with reported 4.3 million people having left the US workforce in August of 2021. I speak about a very timely topic: how to make any job your dream job with my good friend, Carson Tate. This is a topic I've been talking to a lot of leaders and teams about. Why do they want to stay working with their current team and company? And what makes them want to leave? Are there parts of your current job or role that you feel frustrated with? Or maybe you're even looking for other possibilities within your company? Or maybe outside of your company? Or are you have the mindset that it's not going to be any better anywhere else? And instead, how do you advocate for yourself and make your current role work for you?   If you resonate with either one of these options, this is the podcast for you. In this interview, Carson, I talked about the strong inner game she uses to lead consciously at work and in the world. We explore many tips and conversations you can have to invite optimal conditions for thriving and performance at work. We speak about the importance of building trust, so that we have the psychological safety for contracts and agreements that support work that we love, while having the brave exchanges to talk about healthy boundaries, and other conditions that would make us love to stay.   Carson Tate is the Founder and Managing Partner of Working Simply, a productivity consulting and training firm that has served companies including Delta Airlines to Lloyd FedEx, Wells Fargo, and Chick fil A. She's the author of Work Simply: Embracing the Power of Your Personal Productivity Style and her new book, which we're going to talk quite a bit about in this podcast, Own It, Love It, Make It Work: How to Make Any Job Your Dream Job.   Carson, so lovely to have you here on the SHINE podcast. Thank you.   Carson Tate 03:25   Thank you. I've been looking forward to it all week in our conversation. So thanks for the opportunity.   Carley Hauck 03:43   Ah, you're You're welcome. I'm delighted to go into all these juicy places. So let's start from the top. What motivated you to want to become a business coach, support businesses, leaders, and all the wonderful ways that you do it?   Carson Tate 03:58   Hey, we spend almost a third of our waking life at work. And I believe that work can be a place of meaning, purpose and great significance. And in our organizations, our leaders have a significant impact on the well being of their team and the performance of their organization. And I really wanted to help leaders really enable team members to shine- your word- and all facets of that, and not in any way have a focus on developing their folks and connecting to purpose and meaning in any way detract from their driving revenue. I believe both can coexist.   Carley Hauck 04:39   Thank you. And what would you define conscious inclusive leadership because I know that's important to you.   Carson Tate 04:49   So I would take the two words and pull them apart first. So conscious to me, means awake and aware. And it's grounded and radical self awareness, because I believe that we need to be very clear on how we're showing up, what's influencing us, our values, and that level of self awareness isn't going to impede, it's going to permeate our leadership. So, for me, I focus on the self part of consciousness.   And then the inclusion, that it's not just about honoring differences, it's about inviting folks to show up as their authentic selves, and that they feel a sense of belonging, and a connection to the organization, their team members, and the overarching purpose of the work.   Carley Hauck 05:46   Hmm. I love how you just broke those apart into the inner and the outer because you know, for my book, I really focused on that the conscious being the inner the inclusive being the outer game, love it. Yeah. Wonderful.   Well, I know that in your work, you focus on productivity, you focus on teams, you focus on leadership. And your first book, Working Simply, had a lot to do with productivity. And I know you created this really well regarded productivity skill assessment. And we'll leave a link for the show notes.   And then you have a new book, which I have right next to me. Own It, Love It, Make It Work: How to Make Any Job Your Dream Job and super wonderful offering and very timely for right now. And I know this came out about a year ago, correct?   Carson Tate 06:44   Correct. Yeah.   Carley Hauck 06:46   So I, I wanted to talk to you a bit about this book. Because, as we know, and you obviously didn't know this as you're writing this book, because writing a book takes a long time. But somewhere in the unconscious or spirit or however this was channeled to you, there has been this big upset in the workplace. As of August 2021, we had 4.3 million people leave the workplace. This has been called the Great resignation, the great reshuffle. But in the United States, that's about 2.9% of the workforce. That's huge.   And people have been leaving because they want more flexibility, they want more meaning and purpose. They want more empathy and care and psychological safety and inclusion, they want to feel like they belong and don't have to cover parts of themselves and can speak their truth and bring their authenticity like you shared in your definition. They want higher pay. They want the work life balance that maybe they never had. And so this book, again, in so many ways, addresses, how do we make you know, our work, work for us and really own what's important. And so before I go into different aspects of your book, is there anything that you want to say in response to that?   Carson Tate 08:14   Well, first, I don't think I had a premonition. But you're right, it is very timely now. And I think also, I'm excited by these statistics, in the sense of it is a very strong catalyst for action. So when 2.9% of the workforce resigns, that is a message that is, I think, a resounding call for change. And everything that you said that we've seen in the research that employees want, sounds wonderful, psychological safety, being seen and valued authentically for who you are compensation that allows you to live your life, care for your family care for our community, meaning and purpose at work, excellent leaders who are able to lead organizations that succeed financially. That's a pretty wonderful description of work. And so when you have these forcing agents, which this type of resignation is, change, isn't oh, maybe nice to do, change now becomes a necessity, which is great.   Carley Hauck 09:32   Totally. I know that you have a meditation practice and we'll get into this and yes, in a really big part of the Dharma, so to speak, that I have brought into making the workplace better, and that's the world better. But when there is a lot of suffering, is often when we go to meditation, you know, we don't often sit on our cushion when life is fabulous and great, but I do think that suffering is a huge catalyst for change. And there's a lot to let go of in our world from the way we take care of the planet, to the way that we're working to the way that we're taking care of those we care about. And we love. So there's, there's a lot of opportunity for inner and collective transformation right now. Yeah.   So you've, you've really compartmentalized your book in kind of these three sections. Can you tell me what those three sections are?   Carson Tate 10:37   Yes. So the first section is Own It. And Own It is all about you getting clear on what your engagement and fulfillment needs are. There is not a one size fits all, Carley, and Carson's might have some similarities, but you have your needs, I have my needs.   The second piece around Loving It is how do we create that happiness and that joy at work through relationships? Human beings are social animals, we are primed. It's a primal need. So how do we build those connections that are so important? And how do we continue to advance in our career?   And then the third component of the book is Make It Work. So how do you use a technique? It's called job crafting. But how do you start to shape and craft your job and career to meet those fulfillment and engagement needs that you have identified?   Carley Hauck 11:30   Wonderful. Well, I'm gonna go into a couple different exercises and aspects of those three parts. I think that'll be really helpful for our listeners here. So, you know, as, as we're talking about, how do we redesign the workplace, for greater empathy, for well being for psychological safety, for fulfillment, I know that some of the ways that you are able to be the strong leader that you are, and your well being practices are around three pillars. And so I thought we could start there.   And you called it when we talked a few weeks ago, the three legged stool, I loved that meditation, movement and resting. And when I heard you say that, it really corresponds a lot to the framework for my book. And, you know, how do we cultivate this strong inner game? Well, if we're not taking that time for reflection, you know, the meditation, which is the, you know, building the self awareness. If we don't have self-awareness, we can't change what we don't see, you know, whether that's our own habits and our patterns of responding or reacting, how we're doing it in the workplace, but also then how it corresponds to the greater world. And so tell me a little bit about how you take time, every day for this three legged stool.   Carson Tate 16:06   Yes, and I described it as a three legged stool and make a point on the why of that, because I think it's important. I know, in my own life, when one of these legs, let's say, for example, the one I most frequently give up is rest. When that leg isn't secure, the whole entire stool topples over, right, every all of it falls apart.   But the way I make time is I start my day with meditation, prayer, reflection, and movement. And I'm a morning person. So I like to protect the early hours of my day for that, it centers me, It grounds me, and it energizes me for the day ahead.   Now, rest, for me, is also a part of movement. And we chatted about this as well. So it could be an active rest of my workday, you talked about going outside feet in the ground. And for me, it is outside and just maybe a five or 10 minute stroll around my neighborhood between meetings, just to let my brain rest. And then there's obviously the physical rest of sleep.   Carley Hauck 14:13   Thank you. Well, and I brought that in at the beginning because I feel like that's owning the parts of you that are necessary to cultivate first so that you can bring your best to be able to give whatever you're wanting to give at work or in your relationships.   Carson Tate 14:39   Yeah. It's that foundational piece. That is so important.   Carley Hauck 14:46   Mm hmm. Wonderful. Well, thank you for sharing how you're making that a priority in your life.   The part of the Own It section of your book that I really loved was on cultivating a growth mindset. And so when we think about again, meditation as a form of cultivating self awareness supporting the growth mindset, and for folks that are in a work play scenario right now, and I was actually just talking to one of my clients earlier today, and I know you talked to a lot of people as well, and she is focusing on, I can't change this, this isn't working for me, I'm thinking about leaving this current leadership role. And then I encouraged her to focus on Well, what is working? And where actually, can you take some responsibility to maybe ask for what you want in a different way. And so I would love it if you could talk us through this part of your book, but more specifically, you have this fabulous framework called the C framework, could you tell us more about that, and how that supports us to own it.   Carson Tate 15:56   Mm hmm. And so the Own It is about the clarity around what you need. And one way that we can get clarity is through personal self reflections. And meditation is great. But another way to get insights and clarity about developmental opportunities and growth theory is through feedback. And most of the time, if we mentioned the word feedback, I don't know about you, but most of us sweat, like, our brains immediately go to the worst case scenario.   And so the C framework is a feedback framework that we use with our clients to help them get feedback that is specific, where they can get where they share with their leader or their colleagues, they give an example of the type of feedback and they explain part of the feedback process that third, he is explained what I did or did not do. So it's specific, share an example of the type of feedback that I want. And then my ask of you is to explain the behavior that did or did not occur. So we can be very fact based, very specifically and narrowly defined in one area.   So let's say for example, I want to be promoted to a VP of our organization. And I know that succinct, clear communication is one of the competencies of the VPs in our organization. So you're my manager Carley. And so, using this framework to develop and advance in my career to VP, I would come and say, Carley, I want to advance to being a VP, I'm really focused on developing and refining my communication. When we're in meetings together, can you please let me know, if you hear the bottom line, or the central point or my opinion, within the first five minutes of that presentation? Then what you would do, is after the presentation is that, Carson, I heard your central point, I was like, 12 minutes in? Great. So you didn't do it in the first five. And it's very clear, and it's also very narrowly defined. And so it allows me to focus on developing one skill set at a time, without good or bad or great, because that's not feedback. I can't replicate it. And I know that it's going to be behavior that is observed.   Carley Hauck 18:19   Wonderful. Well, and for a lot of people, you know, even though we want feedback, it's hard for us not to take it personally sometimes. And what I love about this framework is that it keeps it focused on the actions, you know, it's you didn't do anything wrong. It's just that you still have refinement to do on this particular action. Right. So it pulls the shame right out of there.   Carson Tate 18:48   Absolutely. Yes. And when you focus on asking your manager for feedback, some of our clients don't want to feel this way and struggle to ask for feedback. But when we connect it to performance, and we connect it to career advancement, I'll also think it takes a little bit less of the anxiety out of it. And then when you are this specific, it is about behavior and actions. I didn't do it or not. And then you're giving me the feedback of what did or did not occur. So I can adjust in my next presentation.   Carley Hauck 19:23   Let's take a body break. Notice your feet connected to the floor. Notice your body standing or sitting. So just take a few minutes, I'd like to lead you through an awareness practice around trust. Take a deep breath in. Deep breath out to any movement and the shaking and the sounding to release tension. Just bringing your awareness into the present moment.   When I am invited to work with teams or senior level leaders and companies, one of the first things that I'm assessing for is the level of trust and psychological safety. Trust is the essential ingredient and foundation for all relationships, but also for all businesses to thrive. Because business is all about relationships. And without trust, you can't build anything that will succeed for the long term. And any kind of organizational change will be seriously challenged if you don't have a foundation of psychological safety and trust.   So what is trust? Well, organizational scholars define trust as our willingness to be vulnerable to the actions of others, because we believe that they have good intentions and will behave well towards us. In other words, we let others have power over us because we don't think they'll hurt us, we think they'll help us and have our backs. And when trust levels high within coworker relationships, it corresponds to trusting the company that employs us. And we feel confident and want to save us or abuse its relationship with us. It has our backs.   But then why are so many people leaving the US workforce? It all comes down to trust. But how do we trust? And in order to trust someone, especially someone who was unfamiliar to us, or someone that has deceived us? There's a lot going on under the surface, there's likely thoughts on both sides such as should I trust you? How much do you trust me? Why should I trust you? Some of us are innately trusting, naturally seeking positive intent and putting the we before the me.   But in my experience, trust is earned. It is not wise to trust someone blindly until you have vetted that they are in fact trustworthy. And just like everything else in life, it starts with the inner game. So I'd love to invite you to just reflect on a couple of these questions. This is about building trust with yourself. And the more that you trust yourself, the more you'll be able to trust others, and develop social contracts and agreements for trust.   What assignment can you follow through on today that will support you in increasing your trust in yourself?   Next, identify someone in your life at work or at home who has violated your trust. After expressing your fears and concerns to this person, negotiate a task or request that he, she or they can do to rebuild trust with you.   Next, invite an open conversation with someone in your life at work or at home, whose trust you have violated. What happened? Did you break an agreement or break a boundary of theirs? After sharing your feelings of remorse and desire to repair, invite a new agreement that begins to restore the original broken agreement.   So these three invitations as you can see, start from the shallow end to the deep end. And it starts on the inside.   If you're interested in growing your inner game, upskilling your soft skills for conscious, inclusive leadership, my book and hardcopy or audiobook has lots of wonderful ways that you can do this. And in fact, the exercise I just shared with you is coming from chapter six, the Inner Game of Authenticity.   If you're interested in learning how to create a foundation of psychological safety, building more trust through authenticity, so that you have the optimal performance for thriving, I would love to speak with you. You can book a free concert floatation. And we can talk about how we can develop training, or a large scale program to support greater psychological safety and supporting this virtual distributed, trusting team in these times.   Now, going back to the second part of the interview, Carson and I will speak more to how to make any job, your dream job.   Before we move into the Love It part, is there anything else you want folks to know about Own It? I mean, you have a lot of pieces in there. And I know we're doing broad strokes, because we don't have all day together. Although I wish.   Carson Tate 25:56   The only thing I would say is that the thesis of the Own It section in the book is that you have an equal and powerful voice in the relationship with your employer. And part of this means you are co-creating a workplace and a job that's mutually beneficial for you and for them.   Which means you need to know what you need. And then also to have the courage as you were coaching your leader, what can we find here that is working well for you? And the question, I'm sure she said, is how do we do more of it? And that puts some Own It on her. And then having the conversation with her manager of how do we create a job where I'm doing more of this work that is additive, allowing us to achieve our strategic goals driving revenue, that is also creating a more fulfilling workplace for myself?   Carley Hauck 26:48   Well, and I think that's what's so interesting about this time right now, you know, I feel like in many ways, workers leaders were just, they were stuffing, what they really wanted, you know, what would really work for them? What would really allow them to bring their best what would allow them to shine, and now in this, I've had it done, I'm leaving, but that feedback was likely not shared before they left, or maybe it was in small ways, or maybe they just didn't feel like it was going to be heard.   And so now as they're looking for the next role, the next company, I feel so curious about what's happening in these negotiations, right? You look at a job and it says 30% travel, or it says, you know, this, this, this and this. And now I think people are feeling empowered to say this is a negotiation, like if I'm going to put in a majority of my waking hours, my love, my innovation, my effort into this job into this team? How do I really make it work for me?   Carson Tate 28:02   Yes, and I believe employers are recognizing that, to get all the richness that you and other folks always bring, it is a negotiation to create optimal conditions for people to thrive and for us to achieve goals 100%. And it's being willing to challenge some of the status quo and norms that are really not in alignment with performance that have been around since the Industrial Revolution. And you know, we have built knowledge base work off of industrial base manufacturing principles. We're not robots, we're human beings, not human doings.   Carley Hauck 28:45   Totally. I say that all the time. Well, wonderful. Let's move it into Love It. And I also use love a lot in my world. And in my book, and so not a lot of us business folks use the word love but hey, if we're not loving our work, if we're not bringing love, then why would we want to work for that team? Or that leader? That company? Right?   Carson Tate 29:10   That's my belief. Yes. Yes!   Carley Hauck 29:17   So, in the Love It focus of the book, you start off in the very beginning of that section on strengths and weaknesses and skill development. And I love again, that you're focusing on upskilling because that is such a huge topic right now as we are trying to figure out what is going to support people to want to stay within their current organization, and what's attracting people to want to go to a different organization.   And especially these younger workers, you know, Gen Z millennials. They're really craving mentorship, coaching. They want on-the-job skills training, they want to know that they're going to be able to be promoted, you know, and have greater opportunities.   And so I'm gonna just focus on one behemoth, an amazing company called Amazon, because they're putting a ton of money towards upskilling. And I was, I was really fascinated to see that. So by 2025, they're committing $1.2 billion to provide free education, skills, training opportunities, to 300,000 of their employees in the US to help them secure new high growth jobs. And they're also investing hundreds of millions of dollars to provide free cloud computing skills training to 29 million people around the world with programs for the public.   And you can actually find this on the regular Amazon site. I was looking at it last night, and I was pretty impressed with it. So they're just one company that says upskilling is important to us, we're gonna make sure that, you know, folks that are working for us have the skills to really develop and stay here and grow their careers.   And so in your chapter, you talk about assessing your current skills. And you focus on three different distinctions of soft skills, hard skills, and then hybrid skills. And first, I'd love to hear your thoughts on what I shared about upskilling. But I'd also love it if you could break down why you focused on those three parts of skills.   Carson Tate 31:38   Well, I first did not know that about Amazon. And I'm so excited to hear their commitment, and their leadership around their commitment to their team members and upskilling. And it is absolutely necessary. I mean, I think we've seen during the pandemic, that there has been such a radical shift in how we work, that that requires a reimagination of our skills. So, AI, computing, we knew, and these have always been really needed skills, but I think that's been accelerated.   And we also have jobs that are going away. But we have talented people in these roles who we need to help, I believe, adjust, learn and grow in new ways. I think that is part of the conscious community of us being of supporting our team members, it's so important.   The reason I focused on soft, hard and hybrid skills, was to break it down for my readers and for our clients. So that they could take incremental steps is I think, when you think about upskilling, that word just what does that mean? Where do I start? I wanted to take the overwhelm out of professional development and growth and break it down into different steps. And depending on where you want to go in your career, there's more of an emphasis sometimes on different sets of these skills.   So soft skills would be communication, it would be empathy, it would be emotional intelligence, it would be persuasion, these are skills that I believe are essential for all folks, versus hard skills, which I define as technical skills. So for example, can you put together an Excel model on a complex financial transaction, that's a technical skill, a technical skill could also be using your company CRM. So if you're a customer service representative, there's a customer there is a CRM tool, or there's some type of software that you are expected to use, that is a technical skill, and a hybrid is a combination of assault and a technical skill. And I think about an example here would be email communication. So do you have the soft skill of communication, written communication skills that are clear? And can you appropriately use the technology to make sure that that communication is received? That you're doing it seamlessly and not wasting a lot of time and energy in that platform?   Carley Hauck 34:12   I feel really curious because I know, as a leader, I'm a learner. And I really value learning all the time and upskilling and my own growth and development. What have you chosen to upskill and learn and grow in the last year and a half? I mean, I would imagine you're always choosing things to grow. But I, I feel curious in just the navigating of so many things like all of us.   Carson Tate 34:45   So where I'm really focused, my learning right now is on change. Because we're in the midst of massive change. Why people change, how you lead change, how you lead broad scale. It'll change, how you shorten the change curve, how you connect head and heart, how we really get into intrinsic motivators that are really driving this change.   And the other piece that I'm really fascinated about is trust. Trust on teams, you're talking about psychological safety, which is an element of it. And how do we cultivate that in a hybrid workplace. Because the interactions on a screen are different than if you and I were sitting at a beautiful coffee shop in Asheville, North Carolina, it's very, very different.   And I don't believe that the future of work is going to be that we're all in an office together all the time, moments, potentially, there are certain segments of the workforce where they will be working together. Our physicians, our teachers, manufacturing fulfillment centers, however, we're still gonna have to build trust, and how do we do that?   Carley Hauck 36:02   Oh, I could totally go down this rabbit hole for a little bit. So I'm going to and then we'll and then we'll break through the book, which is the make it work. But I mean, that's fascinating to me as well, the trust component. And that's something that I take a lot of time, when I'm working with teams. And I think a part of it is vulnerability. But we have to have the psychological safety to feel like we can be vulnerable. What do you think about that?   Carson Tate 36:36   I agree with you, 100%. Yeah, I mean, it is vulnerability. It is, you know, vulnerability's close cousin of authenticity. And there is an empathy component in here as well. But if I'm on a team, where I don't feel safe, sharing, maybe a personal experience that has informed how I think about this decision or this project, and I'm not willing to share, be vulnerable about this piece of who I am. I don't trust the trust isn't there.   And so if you look at you know, the foundations of highly effective teams, trust me as the base of that pyramid, we can build that model. And so how do we do that? I'm, I'm intrigued. I do think it's vulnerability, psychological safety, how do you create those conditions? And quite frankly, how do we get out of our ego selves, where we're protecting, we're fearful, we're contracted, there's not enough that I can open, be open. It's safe, you're safe, I'm saying?   Carley Hauck 37:50   Well, I would say not to plug my own book here.   Carson Tate 38:00   But I think you should plug your own book!   Carley Hauck 38:01   But, you know, I am brought in to teach a lot on building trust or authenticity. And I did a training for Capital One just a few weeks ago, and I was talking to Intel this morning about something they're needing as well.   I mean, and I agree with you, because in this hybrid work environment, there are a lot of people that are going silent, or they're zoomed out, or they're, they're not actually bringing their voice into the space and their cameras, frankly, not even on for some of these meetings, or trainings. And we don't really know what's going on with them. And they might be slowly deciding to leave the workplace or work to, you know, leave the team.   And so I feel like when we're cultivating this strong inner game of self awareness, emotional intelligence, resilience, which that growth mindset, well being love and authenticity, we're able to bring a more self regulated, aware response of loving, true person into the space, you know, where I can honor what's true for me, but also be aware of what might be happening for the other. So I think it's a lot of cultivation of the inner but then having agreements and social contracts that support us to be learning and growing together.   Carson Tate 39:28   Absolutely. I mean, I think you can use really tactical things around agendas, working agreements, you can create clarity and certainty norms. You can have conversations about how we support each other's social and emotional needs, what are yours we're, what are mine and how do we do this collectively as a group.   So there are some very tactical things that you can start to do to kind of scaffold within your team to create more and more psychological safety, more opportunities to cultivate trust and more opportunities for us to be vulnerable.   Carley Hauck 39:58   Well, I'm that's actually where I wanted to go next is in the, you know, Make It Work section, you have this team audit process that I thought was so fabulous. Could you walk us through a little bit of that, because I think that supports greater trust.   Carson Tate 40:15   So the golden rule is, we all know it, most of us know is to treat others the way that you want to be treated. And the platinum rule is a rule that I think works even better for us in our personal and professional relationships, because it invites us to treat others the way they want to be treated. So we're seeing others for who they are. So that's the first paradigm shift, can you start to get to know your team members around how they want to be communicated with and worked with?   And so the way that we use our productivity style assessment tool is a way to audit the team and figure out their different work styles. So are you analytical or logical? Are you more organized and detailed or sequential? Are you more emotional, relational, kinesthetic, or intuitive, big picture and ideation. Each of these four work styles is a different way that they want to work with and interact with you.   So for example, let's say team meeting. And as a leader, you aren't aware yet that your team is predominantly analytical and logical. And you have been starting all of your team zooms with chatting about personal things, and sharing Netflix recommendations, which connection is important. But for these analytical, logical, folks, the way they read that from you, as a leader, is not valuing their time, not getting to the point, not being focused on the outcome that you're disrespecting them and their time.   You as a leader, maybe you're more relational motional kinesthetic, or looking at it is connection before content. I want to connect with my team, I'm building this trust and building this team. Very different experiences.   Carley Hauck 42:06   And so if you are coaching one of these more analytical leaders, what would you encourage them to say, if they're getting really frustrated with the way that this agenda is happening for all these meetings that they're having to attend.   Carson Tate 42:25   So I would invite them to have a one on one, ask their team leader for a quick connect afterward, and share with them that their work day, what works best for them is to be very focused and to know what the goal or the objective is for a meeting and to immediately start the meeting there. So that they can accomplish the meeting objectives in the most efficient way possible, and that they are very thoughtful and intentional about their time. And for them, their experience of what they would maybe say as chit chat is not efficient and feels like wasted time. And so detracts from their engagement in that meeting and their overall productivity for the day.   Carley Hauck 43:08   That's fabulous. Thank you for that tip. Well, and then, if that leader who is actually hosting the meeting was really listening, I would encourage if I was that leader's coach to then actually get a maybe anonymous report, so to speak from everyone or even just have an open discussion of what's working for people about these meetings and what's not? And how do we audit it so that it works for everyone? Would that be something you might suggest?   Carson Tate 43:46   Absolutely. And I think we have a very natural opportunity now to audit all of our team members, all our team meetings, know who we're working with, I think we have an opportunity to audit all of our collaboration systems and processes. So we're in the midst of another massive change. What better opportunity to say, Carley, you know, we haven't been in person for 18 months, we've been working in this remote way. We're now going hybrid. Would you be open to exploring what might really work for us in this new workplace? Tell me what worked for you, what didn't work for you, or now I know that there may be some changes in your personal life. And we need more of this and less of that. It's a natural opportunity for conversation. And I believe everything a leader should be on the table.   Carley Hauck 44:33   Right? I agree. I would really love to be able to help facilitate conversations with teams that are speaking to this is what would have me stay and I'd be so excited to stay and contribute and bring this and bring that and this is what has me want to leave. I mean, if we could be that authentic.   Carson Tate 45:01   Now we know. I mean So all change starts with awareness. I can't change when I'm not aware of. That is a foundational principle, we use it as coaches all the time. So how do we dial up that awareness, but if the leader knows that what is making me want to leave is a lack of what I perceive is career advancement and development. We now can work on that together.   So maybe there isn't the next level position available. But maybe there's an opportunity for me to support you in getting on a company wide committee, maybe we can look at sponsorship and mentorship in a new and different way for you. But once I know as a leader and I've expressed it and owning it as a team member, we can start to affect positive change.   Carley Hauck 45:49   And what would you say to a client that is sharing what they want, and there's no room for change. There's no budging of the senior leadership or that person's direct supervisor.   Carson Tate 46:08   So the first thing I'm going to ask is, do you know this for sure? So do we have, do you have data? Have you or can you tell me about the conversations that you've had? What has been said, what has not been done?   So first, I want to make sure that we are not telling ourselves a story that we actively have taken steps to ask for a mentor, or ask to be nominated for a committee or asked to do more of this type of work, where I shine. And when you're met with resistance, then you can go around. So is there another leader in the organization who might afford you an opportunity to leverage his strength, serve as a mentor, introduce you to a person to cultivate a relationship with so we can go around?   Is there an opportunity within the organization to develop some skills and some relationships that are not being met, if with your manager and your team? Or is this just completely intractable, nothing is going to change, you don't see any other avenues around, then it might be the time to think about leaving this team, this division for a new division in your organization, or time to leave the organization.   But I would challenge anyone to make sure you're very clear on what your engagement and fulfillment needs are, what your boundaries are, what your values are, how you define meaning and purpose and work before you go to look for that new job. Because wherever you go, there you are, if you haven't done the work on yourself, and you aren't clear on how you contributed to that situation, because as much as we don't want to say it sometimes, in that situation, you have been a participant, you have a piece of the action. So let's get really clear on what it was. So that we can create a different experience and a different future in that new workplace.   Carley Hauck 48:11   I love that. Yeah, the radical responsibility, but then also getting really clear on what it is that you need and want. I appreciated you sharing boundaries, because I think that, at least in my own experience, and in my own work, and I'm sure you've struggled navigating it as well, we don't have the same boundary between work and home anymore. They, I mean, they've always been integrated. But now more so than ever, we're not leaving our homes. And as you said, you know, we might be going back into the office a couple of days a week, and we may not some, you know, some companies, it's indefinite. They're not going back today.   And so how do we really create those boundaries between work and home, especially if our company and our team are not showcasing healthy boundaries between work and home? Do you have any thoughts around that? Because I, it's definitely something I've been exploring. I've been talking to teams and clients with.   Carson Tate 49:15   The first place when we are working with teams because it is coming up more now than it ever has, is to invite a conversation. So as a team, and again, use this time, our company has just announced that we will be staying. Our team is going to be a fully remote team. That's a change.   So this again, is this natural opening for us collectively as a team to talk about what does that mean, and what are the working agreements. So I challenge teams to talk about what is your standard email response time? I don't want the assumption. I want the stated implicit expectation of email response time. What is the last hour of the day that we will have a meeting? What is the earliest hour that we will have a meeting, taking into account if we have global colleagues. Some of us are caring for elderly parents, some of us are doing childcare responsibilities in the morning in the afternoon. How do we want to conduct our team meetings? Are we going to record them? So asynchronous work is possible? What are we going to do in terms of preparation? How are we going to honor if there is an emergency and I need Carley to respond right away? What constitutes an emergency? And what communication channels will we use for that, so that the 9:30 pm email or text is not that the unspoken rule is that you have to respond. That it could be that a team member was doing some work in the evening, because they needed the time during the day to care for something else. And for them, this is just their time. But there are no expectations that you respond, because these are no response times. And this is our workday.   Carley Hauck 51:02   Those are wonderful suggestions. So for those of you that are listening, Carson has this fabulous book Own It, Love It, Make It Work: How to Make Any Job Your Dream Job. She also has a workbook. And so a lot of these tips and practices we're talking about are in the book, and you can work through them to really own what's going to work for you.   Carson, what else would you like to leave folks as far as how they can get in touch.   Carson Tate 51:30   So that book is available Own It, Love It, Make It Work on Amazon, all of your outlets where you'd like to buy your book, if you'd like to listen if you love to listen, all of it's available on all the audiobook channels as well. Website workingsimply.com, we do have lots of additional tools and resources and tips and strategies free there on the website for you. And if you're on social media, The Carson Tate on LinkedIn and again, lots of articles and free content there as well.   Carley Hauck 52:01   Wonderful. Again, thank you so much. This was really delightful, and always a pleasure.   Carson Tate 52:10   Likewise, thank you so much.   Carley Hauck 52:12   Thank you Carson for your time, and your light, and friendship. I appreciate the leadership that you're bringing in this pivotal time to folks and companies. If you want to connect more with Carson and tap into some of her amazing offerings, the links are in the show notes. If you enjoy this episode or other SHINE podcast episodes, this is number 50, can't believe we hit 50, I would love for you to share it with friends, family, colleagues or on your favorite social media channel. The more light we can spread amidst the murky waters we're all navigating the better.   If you have any questions, comments for topics you would like me to address on the podcast. Please email me at support@carleyhauck.com I would love to hear from you. Thank you for being part of this community for tuning in. And I have several wonderful episodes throughout the end of the year. So keep coming back. And until we meet again. Be the light and shine the light my friend.

Building Men
Integrity, Education and the Power of Mentoring with Matt Beaudreau

Building Men

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 65:53


Matt Beaudreau is a keynote and TEDx speaker, Founder/President of Acton Academy Placer, Co-Creator of Apogee Strong Mentorship Program, and host of The Essential 11 Podcast. As a keynote speaker and consultant, Matt has spoken to over 250,000 people around the world from companies like American Eagle and Lockheed Martin to Wells Fargo and the United States Air Force. His experience working with Fortune 500 companies has helped him to design the network of K-12 schools under the Acton Academy Placer umbrella. Apogee and The Essential 11 were both born from the Acton philosophies, The top leaders from around the world pour into young men from multiple countries on a weekly basis with our Apogee Strong program, and those same leaders answer questions directly from young heroes on The Essential 11 podcast. Connect with Matt BeaudreauMatt Beaudreau InstagramMatt Beaudreau Facebookhttps://apogeestrong.com/Building Men YouTubeBuilding Men FacebookBuilding Men InstagramBuilding Men WebsiteBuildingmencoach@gmail.comBook a free discovery call with Building MenCheck out our sponsors Finish The Race – Home of the official Building Men gearBecome Stronger Industries Please consider giving us a 5 star rating and leaving a review.  If this podcast resonates with you, please share it with anyone you think might benefit from the message.   

Compliance into the Weeds
More on DAG Monaco Speech-DPAs and NPAs

Compliance into the Weeds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 23:09


 Compliance into the Weeds is the only weekly podcast which takes a deep dive into a compliance related topic, literally going into the weeds to more fully explore a subject. Today, Matt and Tom continue their look at the recent speech by DAG Lisa Monaco to the ABA White Collar Institute on some very significant change to white collar, including FCPA enforcement. Today we consider potential changes to DPAs and NPAs and other settlement mechanisms. Some of the issues we consider are: ·      Are DPAs and NPAs simply the cost of doing business? ·      Is the Wells Fargo growth cap a valid model? ·      What about greater DOJ or Monitor oversight?  ·      Longer terms for DPAs? ·      New enforcement tools coming? ·      New review of DPAs and NPAs. Resources Matt in Radical Compliance So What Happens Next with DPAs Tom in the FCPA Compliance and Ethics Blog Monaco Speech - Individual Accountability Monaco Speech - Monitors Text of DAG Monaco Speech Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Dental Marketer
363: Dr. Hector Cabrera | Dental Designs at Oakley Seaver

The Dental Marketer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021


Brought to you by:Try Carestack for FREE! Click this link to schedule a free 10 DAY TRIAL: https://lp.carestack.org/thedentalmarketerYou can even reach out to Jim Gerson (my "go to" person) from Carestack: jgerson@carestack.comAlso, mention "The Dental Marketer Podcast" if you do decide to go with Carestack, and they will give you an EXCLUSIVE DEAL!Check out CARESTACK now: https://carestack.com/Guest: Dr. Hector CabreraBusiness Name: Dental Designs at Oakley Seaver‍Check out Hector's Media:‍Personal Instagram: @hecabreraOffice Instagram: @dentaldesigns.clermontEmail: drcabrera@ddsclermont.com‍‍‍Host: Michael Arias‍Website: The Dental Marketer‍‍Join the podcast's Facebook Group: The Dental Marketer Society JOIN MY EMAIL LIST HERE FOR GROUND MARKETING STRATEGIES AND TACTICS.‍‍‍My Key Takeaways:Why did Hector go with BoA instead of Wells Fargo?Why did Hector decide to go with Conversion Whale and how much is it costing him?If you're not feeling that every patient is your friend, you're missing the boat.What did Hector learn at working at his previous DSOs and their marketing strategies.Hitting a plateau and feeling like the spark is gone as a practicing dentist.‍‍Please don't forget to share with us on Instagram when you are listening to the podcast AND if you are really wanting to show us love, then please leave a 5 star review on iTunes!‍‍DON'T FORGET TO:Join The Newsletter here and be a part of The Dental Marketer FamilyClick here to see how you can attract new patients immediately and consistently!Click Here to join the Ground Marketing Facebook Group

Next Stop Crazytown
Leeanna Gantt: Founder of TookTake

Next Stop Crazytown

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 29:37


“I've always thought if I started a business, it would be a product that can help people.” - Leeanna Gantt   Leeanna is the founder and inventor of TookTake dosage reminder labels. She didn't just come up with TookTake because she wanted to start a company and thought it was a good idea that might help a few people, it was more than that.   In 2017, a few weeks after Leeanna's daughter was accepted to the college of her dreams and three days after Christmas, she was diagnosed with breast cancer.  2018 started with her facing one solid year of treatment starting with 6 rounds of chemotherapy, followed by another 7 months of infusions, along with surgery, and 31 radiation treatments.    Leeanna's husband and daughter were there to make sure that she ate as best as she could and took all the medications that the doctors and nurses asked her to. In her case, all of the medications she had were to try to help with the side effects of treatments. She had medication that she needed to take for 4 days after treatment, one once a day and one twice a day to minimize bone pain, had other pain medication, anti-nausea medication, cough medicine, heartburn medicine, and many, many lotions and creams for rashes and reactions. They were all on different schedules, it was ridiculous!   So Leeanna started to make little labels out of sticky notes to remind her to take medications. There were different colors for different schedules: daily, twice a day and hourly. Eventually, it became a really easy-to-use system that made things easier for everyone.   One day, Leeanna grabbed her laptop and looked online for a pre-made version of something like what she had been making and she couldn't find anything like it, nothing even close. Just old-fashioned plastic pillboxes in various shapes or really complicated apps and electronic devices which didn't work for what she had going on.   Leeanna decided that these labels had helped her so much that they should be available to everyone. That's when TookTake was created.    Prior to TookTake, she helped lead the 501c3 charity, Rainbow Pack, which provided backpacks full of homework supplies to economically disadvantaged elementary school students in The Los Angeles Unified School District. Going back a bit further, Leeanna created the award-winning community art and craft studio, Tinker, which brought people together to create and make in an inspiring and judgement-free space. All of this was preceded by a celebrated career as a creative director at several notable advertising agencies where she created award-winning work for clients such as Lexus, Wells Fargo, Acura, Yonex Tennis, and Hartford Insurance. Above all, she is most proud of her family. Sponsor Today's episode is sponsored by TookTake, the best way to know if you took, or still need to take your medication & supplements. Visit them at https://tooktake.com/. Get 10% off upon check out by using this code: NEXTSTOP   Follow TookTake on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram.   Find Us Online! Website: iamJulietHahn.com Instagram: @iamjuliethahn Twitter: @iamjuliethahn LinkedIn: Juliet Hahn FB: @iamjuliethahn Fireside: Juliet Hahn Clubhouse: @iamjuliethahn YouTube: Juliet Hahn

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
How Ransomware, Trojanware, and Adware Hurt You

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 85:09


How Ransomware, Trojanware, and Adware Hurt You. And Why ExpressVPN Isn't Safe to Use. Ransomware, Trojanware Adware. What's the difference between these different types of malware.? And when it comes down to our computers, which should we worry about the most and which should we worry about the most? [Automated Transcript Follows] [00:00:17] There are a lot of different types of malware that are out there and they're circulating and scaring us. [00:00:23] And I think for good reason, in many cases, ransomware of course, is the big one and it is up, up, up. It has become just so common. Now that pretty much everybody is going to be facing a serious ransomware attack within the next 12 months. The numbers are staggering. And what are they doing while now they're getting you with the double whammy. [00:00:50] The first whammy is they encrypt your data. Your computers are encrypted, everything on them. So you can't use them anymore. Bottom line. Yeah, they'll boot they'll run enough in order to be able for you to pay that ransom. But any document that you might care about, any PDF, any word doc, and the spreadsheet is going to be encrypted. [00:01:14] And the idea behind that is. You have to pay in order to get that decryption key about 50% of the time. Yeah. About half of the time. Even if you pay the ransom, you'll get your data back the rest of the time. No, you you'll never see it again. So what do you do about that type of ransomware? Well, obviously most people just pay the rent. [00:01:39] But that's gone up as well. We've seen over a hundred percent increase in the amount of ransom people happy. So what's the best thing to do. What's the easiest thing to do in order to help you with this type of ransomware while it's obviously to have good backups. Now I'm going to be doing a bootcamp. [00:02:00] We're going to talk about this and a workshop. I really want to get going with these one week long workshops. So we'll do a, at least a couple of times a month in these boot camps that we'll do pretty much every week here, but they're coming up fairly soon. You'll only know about them. If you are on my email list, that is Craig peterson.com and the number one thing that you can do to. [00:02:27] You when you're hit with this type of rent somewhere, because if you're not taking all of the other precautions, you should be digging under really good that you're going to get hit the better than 50%. And once you do is have a good backup, and I want to warn everybody because I've seen this again and against people just keep making this mistake, probably because they don't get it. [00:02:51] They don't understand why and where and how, when it comes to ransom. The mistake is they do a backup to a local desk. Now, many times the backup is on a thumb drive or USB drive. So you just go to the big box store. You go to Amazon, you order an external drive. You're just amazed how cheap they are. [00:03:16] Nowadays. Once you've got that drive, you plug it in. You turn on some backup software. Maybe it's something you've used for some years, maybe. If you have a Mac, you're just using the built-in backup software. Even the windows operating system now comes with some built-in backup and you think you're off and running because every so often it back. [00:03:40] If we're using a Mac is smart enough to not only back up your whole machine, but as you're editing files, it's going to go ahead and make a backup of that file as you're editing it. So if there is a crash or something else, you're not going to lose much. I just love the way apple does that. Huge problem. [00:03:59] Because if the disc is attached to your machine, or let's say that disc is on a file server, cause you're smart, right? You set up some network attached storage of some sort and your machine has access to it. And so you're sending it off of your machine to a central. Well, you still got a problem because if your machine can read or more particularly right to a location on your network or locally, that ransomware is going to also encrypt everything, it can find there. [00:04:37] So, if you are sharing a network drive and you get ransomware, when you remember the odds are better than 50%, you're gonna get it. Then what happens? What would this type of ransomware it not only encrypts the files on your computer, but encrypts them on the backup as well. And it also encrypts them on any of the. [00:04:58] File servers or network attached storage the, to have on your network. So now everything's encrypted. You wonder why someone and people pay the ransom? Oh, that's a large part of the reason right there. And I keep saying this type of ransomware because there isn't another type of ransomware and they usually go hand in hand. [00:05:21] The bad guys were not making enough money off of holding your files. Rants. So the next thing the bad guys have done is they've gone to a different type of extortion. This one is, Hey, if you don't pay us, we are going to release your files to the world. Now they might do it on a dark website. They might do it on a publicly available site, which is what many of them are starting to do now. [00:05:51] And you're going to either be embarrassed or subject to a lot of fines or both, because now if your files have. Confidential information. Let's say it's your intellectual property. Now, anybody who bothers to search online can find your intellectual property out there. If you have anything that's personally identifiable information. [00:06:18] And it gets out. Now you are subject to major fines. In fact, in some states like California and Massachusetts, you are subject to fines. Even if the bad guys don't post it online. So that's the second type of ransomware and it's a bad type. And usually what'll happen is the bad guys, get their software on your machine and they can do it in a number of different ways. [00:06:45] One of the popular ways to do it now is to just break in because. Our businesses, we've, we've set up something called remote desktop, and we're using remote desktop for our users to get in. And maybe we're using some form of a VPN to do it with, or maybe we've made the mistake of using express VPN. And, uh, we have that now connected up to our homes and we think that that's keeping us safe. [00:07:13] And I got a few things to say about that as well. These VPN services. What happens now while Microsoft remote desktop has been under major attack and there are some major flaws. Some of these were patched more than a year ago now, but according to recent studies, 60%, almost two thirds of businesses have not applied the patches. [00:07:42] You know, th this is basic stuff. And I understand how hard it can be and it can be confusing and you can break your systems, but you have to weigh that against well, what's going to happen if our systems are broken into, because we didn't apply the patch. So that's the second type of ransomware and that's what most people are afraid of and for good reason. [00:08:07] And one of the things we do for businesses and we do ransomware audits, we have a look at your systems, your firewalls, et cetera, and make recommendations to. Man. I got to talk about this too, cause it really upset me this week. I signed up for a webinar just to see what was going on. There's a company out there that sells these marketing systems to managed services providers. [00:08:33] And I, I, I had to turn it off like instantly because it was just such. Garbage that they were telling managed services providers MSPs to do. I couldn't believe it. So this guy was talking about how, again, I turned it back on and I said, Hey, I've got to watch us anyways, because I need to know what's going on. [00:08:54] And this guy was telling these managed services providers, how they can double their clothes. I couldn't believe this guy. Cause he was saying that what they do is they offer to do a ransomware audit for businesses and they say, normally we charge $6,000 to do a ransomware audit, but I tell you what we'll do it for you for. [00:09:20] Now, this is a guy that he had an MSP managed services provider. Apparently he had started it and he was bringing in more than $1 million per month in revenue. Can you imagine that monthly recurring revenue over a million dollars? And so he's telling people businesses, Hey, I have a $6,000 audit that we'll do. [00:09:47] For free, Hey people, how long have we said, if you're not paying for something your, the product remember Facebook, right? Google, Instagram, all of those guys, Twitter, you don't pay for it, but your information is the product. So what's this guy doing well, guess what? His audit, it's going to show his audit. [00:10:10] It's going to show that you need him. And he's sucked in hundreds of businesses and he didn't even know what he was doing when it came to the audits or protecting them. It is insane. What's going on out there. I am ashamed of my industry, absolutely ashamed of it. You know, I've got my first attack, successful attack against my company back in 91 92. [00:10:42] And I learned this stuff because I had to, and I help you guys because I don't want you to get stuck. Like I was so important, important word of advice. If you want to nod it, go to someone that charges you for the audit. That's going to do a real one. It's going to give you real advice that you can really need and use rather than, Hey, you knew do use me. [00:11:11] Because my free audit tells you so, so many scams. [00:11:15] What is ad where in what is crypto, where these are two types of real, kind of bad things. Won't gray areas, things that are hurting us, our mobile devices, our businesses. And our homes. [00:11:32] Adware is also a type of malware that's been around a long time. But it does live in a gray area. [00:11:42] And that gray area is between basically marketing and, uh, well outright fraud. And I don't even want to call it just marketing because it's very aggressive market. What they will do with add where is they? They will have some JavaScript code or something else that's embedded on a webpage, and that's usually how you get it. [00:12:09] And then once it's in, in your browser, it sits there and it pops up things. So it'll pop up an ad for this, pop up an ad for that, even if it's. Uh, part of the site that you're on right now, and it can live for months or years on your computer. We've known for a long time about ad where on the windows environment and how it has just been just terribly annoying at the very least Microsoft and genetic Explorer. [00:12:40] One of the worst web browsers ever. Perpetrated on humankind was well-known for this. And of course, Microsoft got rid of internet Explorer, and then they came up with her own symposer browser, the edge browser that was also openly scorned. And so Microsoft got rid of their edge browser and switched over to basically Google Chrome chromium, and then changed his name to the edge browser. [00:13:11] And so you think you're running edge, but you're kind of not, you kind of are. So they did all of that in order to help with compatibility and also to help with some of these problems that people have had using that Microsoft browser online, very, very big problems. So what can you do about it and what does it do to you and where can be very. [00:13:37] You might've had it before words always popping up again and again and again on your browser, just so crazy knowing it it's insane, but it can also be used to spy on where you're going online and potentially to, to infect you with something even worse. Sometimes some of this ad where we'll purposely click on ads, that the people who gave you the ad were, are using as kind of like a clickbait type thing. [00:14:09] So you go to a website and it was. Automatically click certain ads and click on unbeknownst to you, right? It's as though you went there so that people have to pay for that ad. And sometimes aids are very, very complicated. Sometimes they'll use. In order to drive a competitor out of business or out of the market, because the ads are so expensive because so many people are supposedly clicking on the ads. [00:14:40] But in reality, you didn't click on the ad. You're not going to see that page that you supposedly clicked on, and it's going to cost that advertiser money, whole bunch of money. You might not care. Right. But it is. Ad ware over on the Mac, however, is the only real malware menace at all I had to where is something that choosed fairly frequently on the Mac? [00:15:09] It is pretty darn easy to get rid of. And as a general rule, it doesn't work very well on the Mac. Although I have seen some cases where it got very, very sticky. Where someone ended up installing it, it wasn't just running in the browser, but they installed it on their Mac, which is something you should never do. [00:15:29] But apple has some things in place to help stop any of this from happening. And it's gotten a lot better. I haven't seen this problem in a couple of years, but apple is using the signature based blocking technology called export. They also have at apple, this developer based notarization of apps. And so the run of the mill malware, which includes most of this Al where really can't find a foothold. [00:15:57] But I want to remind everybody that if they can get Al add where onto your computer, they might be able to get something worse. So you really got to keep an eye out for no two ways about it. There are some companies out there, for instance, there's this one. Parrot, which is a program linked to this Israeli marketing firm that gains persistence on your browser and potentially could gain root access to the Mac system. [00:16:30] So careful, careful on all fronts now. Anti-malware stuff that we use for our clients is called amp, which is an advanced malware protection system. That's been developed by our friends over at Cisco it's amp is very, very good. Unfortunately, you cannot get it unless you buy it from somebody like us and you have to buy so many seats for some of this stuff, it gets gets expensive quickly. [00:17:00] Um, if you can't do that much, a lot of people like Malwarebytes, there are some very good things about it, but be careful because in order for this to work, this is Railey parrot software to work. It has a fake install. So again, it's just be careful if you know how apple installed software, you know that unless you have instigated it, it's not going to be installed. [00:17:30] You're not just going to see an installer. And say, Hey, we're apple install us. Right? Apple just does it in the background when it comes to updates patches. But they're very sneaky here trying to install things like the Adobe floor. Player, which has been deprecated. Deprecated is completely now gone from Mac systems and from windows systems, you should not be using flash at all anymore. [00:18:02] It was very, very bad. So up becomes you, you go to wound stole the leaders flash player, or, and I'm sure they're going to change this or something else, right? It won't be flashed in a future. It'll be a Adobe. Would you also don't need on a Mac. So anyhow, that's what you got to be careful of ad were still a big problem in windows. [00:18:25] Not much as much as it used to be. Uh, thanks to the change to Google Chrome, which Microsoft has rebranded as of course its own edge browser. Much of a problem at all on Macs, but be very, very careful in either platform about installing software that you did not start installing. Now earlier this year, there's a security firm called red Canary that found something that's been named silver Sparrow. [00:18:58] That was on a. 30,000 Mac computers. And apparently the developers for this malware had already adapted it to apples and one chip architecture and have distributed this binary, this program as a universal binary. Now in the macro, the member doesn't just use Intel. It used to use power PCs and then it used Intel. [00:19:21] And now it's using its own architecture for the chips themselves. So a universal binary is something that will run on Mac Intel based and Mac architecture base. But, uh, the bottom line is that this proof of concept. Malware, if you will had no payload. So we know it's out there, we seen it now on almost 30,000 Mac computers, but at this point it's not really doing much, much at all. [00:19:53] So. These are malicious search engine results and they're directing victims to download these PKGs, which are Mac packaged format installers based on network connections from your browser shortly before download. So just be very careful about all of that. It can be something as annoying as malware or something as a malicious. [00:20:17] Well, potentially as ransomware. Particularly if you're running windows, Hey, if you want to find out more about this, if you want to get into some of my free courses here, we got free boot camps coming up. Make sure you go to Craig peterson.com/subscribe. More than glad to send you my show notes, a little bit of training, and of course, let you attend these free bootcamps that are now to sell you stuff, but solve problems for you. [00:20:49] Hey, if you use VPNs to try and keep yourself safe, particularly if you use express VPN. Wow. What just came out is incredible. It is anything but safe and secure. [00:21:06] Express VPN was purchased by a company called Cape K A P E. Cape is a company that had changed its name because oh, things were bad. [00:21:19] Right. It was originally founded under the name of cross writer. And you might've seen notices from your anti-malware software over the years for everything from Malwarebytes on saying that, oh, it blew up. To this cross writer piece of malware, most of the time it's ad ware, but it is really interesting to see because this company was founded by a person who was part of the Israeli secret service. Right? So it wasn't of course not. It's not called the secret service over there in Israel. And it, frankly, it compares to our NSA, you know, no such agency. Yeah. It's part of unit 8,200 in the Israeli intelligence military. And it's been dubbed, of course, Israel's NSA. Teddy Saggy, which was one of these investors also was mentioned in the Panama papers. [00:22:24] Remember those? We talked about those back in 2016, those were leaked and that showed these law firm, this one particular law firm in panel. And that we're sheltering assets for people all over the world. And so now that express VPN is owned by this company that is, this company built entirely by intelligence agents for almost a billion. [00:22:55] Dollars in cash and stock purchases. That's a much, they sold express VPN for almost a billion dollars, which is kind of crazy when you think of it as a VPN service, but makes a lot of sense. If you're going to want to monitor what people are doing, where they're going, maybe even break into their systems or better choice than a VPN provider and the. [00:23:20] The company has been buying up VPN providers and is now the proud owner of express VPN. If you attended my VPN workshop that I had, oh, it's probably been a year and I'm going to start doing these again. I promise, I promise. I promise, but you know how much I just like VPNs. In fact, one of you guys, I'm sorry, I forgot your name. [00:23:46] Send me. A couple of weeks ago now about VPNs and saying, I know how much you disliked VPN look at this article. And it was talking about this whole thing with express VPN. So they just now all over the place, the discussions online about what. Been to hear who the founder was, the CEO, the CTO, this growing portfolio that they have in Sunbrella of ownerships, that now is centralized in a multiple VPNs. [00:24:15] Now, Cape technology only started acquiring VPN companies about four years ago. And they've been in business now for over a decade. And what were they doing before? They started buying VPN companies? While they own VPN companies. Oh, they were a major manufacturer and distributor of. Malware of varying types. [00:24:40] Now the first part of the show today, of course, I was explaining some of the differences, like ad words, et cetera, so that you could understand this story. Right? Ghulja that? So you can understand this. That's what these guys have been doing. It's absolutely crazy. So the F the co-founder of Cape technology and former CEO started his career in information technologies while serving in the Israeli defense forces. [00:25:08] As I mentioned, Israeli intelligence Corps under unit 8,200 it's that unit is responsible for. Dean what's called signal intelligence and data decryption. Now we have signal intelligence here as well, and that's basically intercepting signals, figuring out what's being said, what's going on? Where they are, the size of the forces, et cetera. [00:25:32] I have a friend of mine, a young lady who is in signal intelligence in, I think it's the Navy, but every part of our military has it is. However, our military doesn't directly control VPM services like express VPN that can be used in a very big spike capacity. That's what I'm really concerned about. Now. I also, I found an interesting article on zero hedge about this, uh, you know, this company express, VPN being acquired. [00:26:06] But they're also pointing out that companies that were founded by former operatives of unit 8,200. That again, the Israeli version of the NSA included. Ways Elbit systems, which is right in my hometown of Merrimack, New Hampshire and slews of other startups now ways. Right. I, I used ways I recommended people to use it and of course, Google bought it a few years back and that's when I stopped using it, but it was really nice. [00:26:39] It worked really well. And I had no idea the information was likely going to. The Israeli defense Corps. Oh my goodness. There's spy agencies, uh, and a bunch of other startups, by the way. It's estimated that there have been over 1000 stack tech startups that came out of the people working at unit 8,208. [00:27:07] Again, they're CIA NSA, uh, guys, their spine on everybody. You can, you believe that? And they've been bought by a mentioned Google, but other companies like Kodak, PayPal, Facebook, Microsoft have bought them. So in addition to the thousands of companies, according to zero. Uh, unit 8,200 has also fostered close working relationship with the U S government, which you would expect, right? [00:27:33] Edward Snowden. You remember him? He disclosed leaked documents. He obtained, which included an agreement between the NSA and the Israeli defense force. The agreement showed that the U S intelligence. Agency would share information. It collected under domestic surveillance operations with it. Israeli counterpart. [00:27:53] You remember we talked before about the five eyes, seven eyes searching eyes. It's up in the twenties. Now these countries that spy on each other citizens. For the other countries, right? Yeah. Your information might not be collected by the U S government, but the U S government gets it by buying it from private contractors, which it says it can do because we're only barred from collecting it ourselves. [00:28:17] We can use private contractors that collected on you. And also by going in partnership with foreign government. Because again, we can't collect that information, but we can certainly have the Israelis or, or the Brits or the Australians or Canada. They could collect it from. Can you believe this, how they're just stretching these rules to fit in what they want to fit. [00:28:39] Okay. Completely ignoring not only the constitution, but the laws of the United States. It's, it's just absolutely incredible. So critics of this unit, Eddy 200 attested that the Israeli intelligence outfit routinely uses the data received from the NSA by providing it to. Politicians Israeli politicians for the basics of blackmailing. [00:29:06] Yes. Blackmailing others. Yes. Indeed. Other whistle blowers have revealed any two hundreds operations have been able to disrupt Syrian air defense systems, hack Russia. Cap Kaspersky labs. You remember I told you guys don't use Kaspersky antivirus and has outfitted several Israeli embassies with Glendale, seen surveillance systems, cleanse Stein. [00:29:31] However you want to pronounce it. By the time Cape technologies acquired his first VPN company. Uh, the CE original CEO had left and he went on to found cup pie before leaving as it CEO in 2019, it goes on and on, uh, bottom line gas, SWAT express VPN, which is advertised by so many conservatives. Now looks like it is actually part of a spy operation. [00:30:01] So sign up now. Craig peterson.com. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. You're going to want to attend my free VPN webinar. Hey, I don't have anything to sell you when it comes to VPNs. I just want you to know the truth. [00:30:17] Labor shortages are making businesses turn direction. And now that we're laying off people or firing them because they didn't take the jab, what are businesses going to do? Well, I have news for you that reduced workforce, well, guess what?. [00:30:34] U.S. Businesses are really seriously moving to automation. [00:30:39] Now they've been doing this since the start of this whole lockdown. They were doing it even before then. I tell the story of when I was in France, a boom went four or five years ago now, and I stayed off the beaten path. I was not in the touristy areas. I speak French. So I went just where the. I decided to go, my wife and I, so we rented a car and we spent a month just kind of driving around where do we want to go next to, or do we want to go next? [00:31:08] It was a whole lot of fun. And while we were there on a Sunday, I came to realize that these small French towns have no restaurants open on Sunday, nothing at all, talking about a bit of a culture shock. That's not true. There was one restaurant opened in the town and that restaurant was, and McDonald's. [00:31:30] So when I go to McDonald's here a few years ago in France, central France. And when I walk in, there's nobody at the counter, but they're all. Oh, half a dozen kiosks out front. So you go and you order your hamburger, whatever might be, or your drinks, et cetera, right there in the kiosk, you pay for them riding the kiosk. [00:31:53] And there's some people working out back that are then making the hamburgers or the milkshakes or coffee, whatever you ordered and bringing it up to the front. And then they just put her right there for you to grab that simple. And this was of course, pre. Down days, I assume that it has gone even more automated. [00:32:14] Uh, they're in France, but hard to say. And I've seen the same thing here in the us. I was out in Vermont just about a month ago and I was riding with a buddy of mine, motorcycle riding, couple of buddies, actually. And we stopped in this small. Town. And we went to this little breasts, breakfast restaurant and the breakfast restaurant had maybe four or five tables inside. [00:32:42] And you just sat at the table. No waitress came up, but there's little sign with the QR code. So it said a scan, the QR code to get started. So you scanned it, it knew based on the QR code, which table you were at, and it showed you the menu that was in effect right then and there. So the lunch menu or the breakfast or the all day, you got to pick it and then you selected what you wanted. [00:33:08] It used whatever payment you wanted. I used apple pay. And in order to pay for my breakfast and my buddy ordered what he wanted. And then out came a waitress who delivered the food. Once it was already in the drinks, it was very automated. It allowed them to cut back on some people and others, this small restaurant, they probably had one last waitress, but when you kind of had in the shifts. [00:33:33] Days and vacation days is probably two waitresses. So they're saving some serious money because a system like this that you just scan a QR code and do the order and it prints up in the kitchen is cheap compared to hiring. Well, of course, it's hard to hire people, especially in the restaurant industry nowadays heck and in my business where we go in and we do analysis of computer networks and systems, it's almost impossible to find people that are really well qualified that understand the regulations that apply to these different businesses. [00:34:10] So it's like, forget about it. There's more than a million of these jobs open right now. And just in this cybersecurity. Well, September mark, the end of the real lockdown induced unemployment benefits workers. Didn't just flood the labor market as we kind of expected. And we have now few, we have more people now. [00:34:38] Who are out of the workforce. Who've decided not to look for a job than we did in 2008. So that's telling you something 2008 during the great recession. Interesting things are about to happen, but there's a great little article that I found in. Times this week, and it's talking about this quality local products company out of Chicago, the prince logos on merchandise, like t-shirts water bottles, you know, the little stress balls, all of that sort of stuff. [00:35:10] And he said prior to the pandemic, we had over 120 employees. That's the co-founder talk in there. And he said, Primary focus was on growth. We simply plugged any holes or any efficiencies that we could along the way with human capital, bringing people in. But once the lockdown happened, of course, all of a sudden now you don't have the access to employees you had before. [00:35:36] So they had a huge decrease also in business. So those two went hand in hand. They let a lot of people go and they use the opportunity to program many of the previous manual and human controlled activities into computers. So now 18 months later, yeah, two weeks to flatten the curve. Right? 18 months later, the company employees, 83 workers. [00:36:03] And as managing a workload, that's pretty much the same as pre lockdown. So they went from over 120 employees down to 83. So basically they cut 40 employees from the workforce. That's a whole lot of quarter of the workforce gone. They don't need them anymore. So that's going to help produce more profits for them. [00:36:27] A lot more profits. Cause usually automating. Yeah, it can be painful, but it usually has major paybacks and that's exactly what it had for them. And they're saying that they anticipate that they can reduce employees even more by the end of this year and get their head count below. 50 now 50 is a magic number. [00:36:48] So it was a hundred when it comes to employees. Well, one is like the biggest magic number because when, once you have one employee, you all of a sudden have to comply with all kinds of rules, regulations, state, local, federal. But if you hit 50 employees, you have the next step of major new regulations that are gonna affect your business. [00:37:09] And then when you hit a hundred employees, Even more, so many people try and keep their businesses below 50 employees because it's just not worth it to have all of those regulations, additional regulation, taxes, and everything else. Another company, this is a California based property management. The managing more than 90,000 commercial and residential properties. [00:37:33] And what they've done is they added a chat feature to the website, the company's called sea breeze. And he says, even though we have the live chat, you can still reach us outside of business hours. Well, You are using the chat or you can call us either way, but they're saying people like the simple form and someone gets back to them as soon as they can. [00:37:57] So they're avoiding now having staff available 24 7 to respond to chat messages and to respond to the voicemails and phone calls that come in. So it's pretty good all the way around, frankly, new shopping models are in place. I'm looking at a picture of a business and it has. Of course, a window up front and in the window they have jewelry. [00:38:21] This is a jewelry store and they've got QR codes in front of each of these pieces of jewelry right on the inside of the window. So if you're interested in finding out more about that piece of jewelry, Just scan the QR code. It'll take you to the right page on their website and we'll even let you buy the jewelry and they will mail it to you again. [00:38:46] How's that for? Great. If you have a business in a tourist jury area and you don't want to be open until 11:00 PM at night, your story can keep selling for you. Even when you're close. This is window shopping, taken to an extreme, very simple. To do as well. This company is called full me waiter. Obviously they've got a bit of a sea theme here. [00:39:10] So once someone orders the jewelry and the other merchandise sent right to them, or they can have it set for pickup in the store, when they next open it's phenomenal. They're calling. Alfresco shopping space, right from the sidewalk. So businesses again are returning to pre pandemic levels and he, this guy is available in the store by appointment only he's loving it. [00:39:37] And he says that customers have been so satisfied with this QR code window shopping contract. That he wrote a guidebook. You can get it@scantshopsolution.com or excuse me, scan, just shop solution.com. I misread that. So any retailers who want to use this method, if you don't know what QR codes are, or you don't know how to code it into a website, et cetera, she's got webinars she's taught on it and she's got the guide book. [00:40:05] I think this is great. Right? So she's now making some money on. Explain to other people, how she did this. It's phenomenal across industries. Epic times is saying the staffing shortages could be temporary, but as firms are further embracing, embracing automation and all of its benefits, some of these jobs that people just don't want anymore may actually be going away. [00:40:33] And I think this is ultimately a problem. We had, uh, you know, again, I'm older generation, right? Us baby boomers. We had opportunities when we were younger. I had newspaper routes. I had the biggest drought in the area. I can't remember. It was like 120 homes. It was huge. It took me hours to do, but I made money. [00:40:56] I learned how to interact with people. I knew, I learned how to do bill collection, how important it was not to let customers get too far behind on their bills. Although I have been slack on that one, I'm afraid, but it helped me out a lot. So, what are kids going to do that need to learn a work ethic that need to be able to have a job, make the mistakes, maybe get fired a once or twice or, or three times maybe learn how to interact with customers. [00:41:27] Everyone, I think can benefit from some retail experience. Get that when you're young and if these jobs don't exist, then. Or the younger generations here, are they just going to be trying to find jobs they can do with Instagram? Right? They're all I know. A few kids who have said, well, I'm a social media influencer and you look them up and okay. [00:41:50] So they got a thousand people following them. I have far more than that, but you know, it, that's not a job. It's not going to last. Your looks are only going to last so long. Right now you start having a family and you start working hard outdoors, et cetera. There's a lot of things that make that all go away. [00:42:09] So I think many businesses now we're going to continue to accelerate our plans program out and. A lot of weld pain positions, as well as these entry-level positions in the next five or 10 years. Really? I don't even know if it's going to be 10 years retool retrain our workforce, or everyone's going to be in for a world of hurt. [00:42:33] Hey, make sure you subscribe. So you're not in a world of hurt. Get my latest in news, especially tech news and cybersecurity. Craig peterson.com. [00:42:46] In this day and age, if you don't have a burner identity, you are really risking things from having your identities stolen through these business, email compromises. It's really crazy. That's what we're going to talk about. [00:43:03] An important part of keeping ourselves safe in this day and age really is con to confuse the hackers. The hackers are out there. They're trying to do some things. For instance, like business, email compromise. It is one of the biggest crimes out there today. You know, you hear about ransomware and. It hits the news legitimately. [00:43:26] It's very scary. It can really destroy your business and it can hurt you badly. If you're an individual you don't want ransomware. Well, how about those emails that come in? I just got an email in fact, from a listener this week and they got a phone call. His wife answered and it was Amazon on the phone and Amazon said, Hey, listen, your account's been hacked. [00:43:54] We need to clear it up so that your identity doesn't get stolen. And there's a fee for this. It's a $500 fee. And what you have to do is just go to amazon.com. Buy a gift card and we'll then take that gift card number from you. And we'll use that as the fee to help recover your stolen information. So she went ahead and did it. [00:44:20] She went ahead and did all of the things that the hackers wanted and now they had a gift card. Thank you very much. We'll follow up on this and. Now she told her husband, and of course this isn't a sex specific thing, right. It could have happened to either one. My dad fell for one of these scams as well. [00:44:44] So she told her husband or her husband looked at what had happened and said, oh my gosh, I don't think this is right. Let me tell you, first of all, Amazon, your bank, various credit card companies are not going to call you on the phone. They'll send you a message right. From their app, which is usually how I get notified about something. [00:45:10] Or they will send an email to the registered to email that. Uh, that you set up on that account. So that email address then is used by them to contact you right. Pretty simple. Or they might send you a text message. If you've registered a phone for notifications, that's how they contact you. It's like the IRS. [00:45:35] I was at a trade show and I was on the floor. We were exhausted. And I got no less than six phone calls from a lady claiming to be from the IRS and I needed to pay right away. And if I didn't pay right away, they were going to seize everything. And so all I had to do. Buy a gift card, a visa gift card, give her the number and she would use that to pay the taxes it and this lady had a, an American accent to one that you would recognize. [00:46:10] I'm sure. And it's not something that they do now. They do send emails, as I said. So the part of the problem with sending emails is, is it really them? Are they sending a legitimate email to a legitimate email address? Always a good question. Well, here's the answer. Yeah, they'll do that. But how do you know that it isn't a hacker sending you the email? [00:46:42] It can get pretty complicated. Looking into the email headers, trying to track. Where did this come from? Which email servers did it go through? Was it authenticated? Did we accept? Did the, uh, the provider use proper records in their DNS, the SPIF, et cetera, to make sure that it's legitimate. Right? How do you follow up on that? [00:47:07] That's what we do for our clients. And it gets pretty complicated looking at DKMS and everything else to verify that it was legitimate, making sure that the email came from a registered MX server from the, the real center. There is a way around this. And this has to do with the identities, having these fake burner identities. [00:47:33] I've been doing this for decades myself, but now it's easy enough for anybody to be able to do. There are some services out there. And one of the more recommended ones. And this is even the New York times, they have an article about this. They prefer something called simple log-in. You can find them online. [00:47:57] You can go to simple login dot I O. To get started now it's pretty darn cool. Cause they're using, what's called open source software it's software. Anybody can examine to figure out is this legitimate or not? And of course it is legitimate, but, uh, they it's, it's all out there for the whole world to see. [00:48:17] And that means it's less likely in some ways to be hacked. There are people who argue that having open source software means even more. In some ways you are, but most ways you're not, anyways, it doesn't matter. Simple login.io. Now, why would you consider doing this? Uh, something like simple login? Well, simple login is nice because it allows you to create dozens and dozens of different email address. [00:48:51] And the idea is with simple log-in it will forward the email to you at your real email address. So let's say you're doing some online shopping. You can go ahead and set up an email address for, you know, whatever it is, shopping company.com, uh, that you're going to use a shopping company.com. So you'd go there. [00:49:13] You put in two simple log-in, uh, I want to create a new identity and you tag what it's for, and then you then go to some, um, you know, shopping company.com and use the email address that was generated for you by simple login. Now you're a simple login again. Is it going to be tied into your real email account, wherever that might be if using proton mail, which is a very secure email system, or if using outlook or heaven forbid Gmail or one of these others, the email will be forwarded to you. [00:49:52] You will be able to see that indeed that email was sent to your. Shopping company.com email address or your bank of America, email address, et cetera, et cetera, that makes it much easier for you to be able to tell, was this a legitimate email? In other words, if your bank's really trying to get ahold of you, and they're going to send you an email, they're going to send you an email to an address that you use exclusive. [00:50:22] For bank of America. In reality, you only have the one email box that is over there on wherever proton, mail, outlook, Gmail, your business. You only have that one box you have to look at, but the email is sent to simple login. Does that make sense? You guys, so you can create a, these alias email boxes. It will go ahead and forward. [00:50:49] Any emails sent to them, to you, and you'll be able to tell if this was indeed from the company, because that's the only place that you use that email address. That makes it simple, but you don't have to maintain dozens or hundreds of email accounts. You only have the one email account. And by the way, you can respond to the email using that special aliased email address that you created for the shopping company or bank of America or TD or whomever. [00:51:22] It might be, you can send from that address as well. So check it out online, simple log-in dot IO. I really liked this idea. It has been used by a lot of people over, out there. Now here's one other thing that it does for you, and this is important as well. Not using the same email address. Everywhere means that when the hackers get your email address from shopping company.com or wherever, right. [00:51:56] pets.com, you name it. They can not take that and put it together with other information and use that for business, email compromise. Does that make sense? It's it makes it pretty simple, pretty straightforward. Don't get caught in the whole business email compromise thing. It can really, really hurt you. [00:52:19] And it has, it's one of the worst things out there right now, dollar for dollar it's right up there. It, by the way is one of the ways they get ransomware into your systems. So be very careful about that. Always use a different email address for every. Website you sign up for. Oh, and they do have paid plans like a $30 a year plan over at simple IO will get you unlimited aliases, unlimited mailboxes, even your own domain name. [00:52:50] So it makes it pretty simple, pretty handy. There's other things you might want to do for instance, use virtual credit cards. And we'll talk about those a little bit. As well, because I, I think this is very important. Hey, I want to remind everybody that I have started putting together some trainings. [00:53:12] You're going to get a little training at least once a week, and we're going to put all of that into. We have been calling our newsletter. I think we might change the name of it a little bit, but you'll be getting those every week. And the only way to get those is to be on that email list. Go to Craig peterson.com/subscribe. [00:53:35] Please do that right. I am not going to harass you. I'm not going to be one of those. And I've never been one of those internet. Marketers is sending you multiple dozens of emails a day, but I do want to keep you up to date. So stick around, we will be back here in just a couple of minutes. And of course you're listening to Craig Peterson. [00:53:59] And again, the website, Craig peterson.com stick around because we'll be right back. [00:54:05] One of the best ways to preserve your security on line is by using what we're calling burner identities, something that I've been doing for more than 30 years. We're going to talk more about how to do that right. [00:54:20] We've talked about email and how important that is. I want to talk now about fake identities. Now, a lot of people get worried about it. It sounds like it's something that might be kind of sketchy, but it is not to use fake identities in order to confuse the hackers in order to make it. So they really can't do the things that they. [00:54:46] To do they can't send you fishing ear emails, particularly spear phishing emails. That'll catch you off guard because you're using a fake. How do you do that? Well, I mentioned to you before that I have a thousands of fake identities that I created using census data. And I'm going to tell you how you can do it as well. [00:55:13] Right? There's a website out there called fake name a generator. You'll find it online@fakenamegenerator.com. I'm on that page right now. And I'm looking at a randomly generated identity. It has the option right on this page to specify the sex. And it says random by default, the name set, I chose American the country United States. [00:55:44] So it is applying both American and Hispanic names to this creative. And now remember it's doing the creation based on census data and some other public data, but it is not giving you one identity of any real. I think that's important to remember, and you're not going to use these identities for illegal purposes. [00:56:11] And that includes, obviously when you set up a bank account, you have to use your real name. However, you don't have to use your. If you will real email address, you can use things like simple login that will forward the email to you, but we'll let you know who was sent to. And if you only use that one email address for the bank, then you know that it came from the bank or the email address was stolen from the bank. [00:56:40] Right. All of that stuff. We've talked about that already. So in this case, The name has come up with for me is Maurice D St. George in Jacksonville, Florida even gives an address, uh, in this case it's 36 54 Willis avenue in Jacksonville, Florida. So if I go right now, Uh, two, I'm going to do use Google maps and I am going to put in that address. [00:57:11] Here we go. Jacksonville willows avenue, all the guests. What there is a Willis avenue in Jacksonville, and it's showing hoes from Google street view. Let me pull that up even bigger. And there it is. So ta-da, it looks like it gave me. Fairly real address. Now the address it gave me was 36 54, which does not exist. [00:57:40] There is a 365, but anyways, so it is a fake street address. So that's good to know some, if I were to use this, then I'm going to get my. Uh, my mail saying why about I pass? So, uh, Maurissa tells you what Maurice means, which is kind of neat. It'll give you a mother's maiden name. Gremillion is what a gave me here, a social security number. [00:58:06] So it creates one that passes what's called a check sum test. So that if you put it into a computer system, it's going to do a real quick check and say, yeah, it looks. To me. So it's was not just the right number of digits. It also passes the check, some tasks. Well-known how to do a check sum on their social security numbers. [00:58:27] So again, it's no big deal. And remember, you're not going to use this to defraud anyone. You're going to use this for websites that don't really need to know, kind of give me a break. Why do you need all this information? It gives me a phone number with the right area code. Uh, and so I'm going to go ahead and look up this phone number right now. [00:58:50] Remember, use duck, duck go. Some people will use Google search and it says the phone number gave me is a robo call. As I slide down, there's some complaints on that. Uh, so there you go. So they giving us a phone number that is not a real person's phone number, country code, of course one, cause I said United state birth date. [00:59:13] Oh, I was born October 7th, year, 2000. I'm 20 years old. And that means I'm a Libra. Hey, look at all this stuff. So it's giving me an email address, which is a real email address that you can click to activate or right there. Again, I mentioned the simple login.io earlier, but you can do a right here and it's got a username and created for me a password, which is actually a pretty deep. [00:59:41] The password. It's a random one, a website for me, my browser user agent, a MasterCard, a fake MasterCard number with an expiration and a CVC to code all of this stuff. My height is five six on kind of short for. Uh, my weight is 186 pounds own negative blood type ups tracking number Western union number MoneyGram number. [01:00:11] My favorite color is blue and I drive a 2004 Kia Sorento and it also has a unique ID. And, uh, you can use that wherever you want. So the reason I brought this up again, it's called fake name generator.com is when you are going to a website where there is no legal responsibility for you to tell them the true. [01:00:39] You can use this. And so I've, I've used it all over the place. For instance, get hub where you have, uh, it's a site that allows you to have software projects as you're developing software. So you can put stuff in, get hub. Well, they don't know to know, need to know who I really am. Now they have a credit card number for me. [01:01:01] Because I'm on a paid plan. I pay every month, but guess what? It isn't my real credit card number. It isn't the number that I got from fake name generator. My credit card company allows me to generate either a single use credit card numbers, or in this case, a credit card. Number four, get hub doc. So just as an example, that's how I use it. [01:01:24] So if get hub gets hacked, the hackers have an email address and a name that tipped me off right away, where this is coming from. And if the email didn't come from GitHub by no, they either sold my information to a marketing company, or this is a hacker. Trying to manipulate me through some form of his fishing scheme. [01:01:47] So I know you guys are the breasts and best and brightest. A lot of you understand what I'm talking about and I'm talking about how you can create a burner identity. And let me tell you, it is more important today to create a burner identity. Then it has ever been at any point in the past because frankly burner identities are one of the ways that you can really mess up some of the marketing firms out there that are trying to put the information together, these data aggregator companies, and also the hackers. [01:02:24] And it's really the hackers that were off up against here. And we're trying to prevent them from. Getting all of this information. So when we come back, I want to talk about the next step, which is which credit cards can you get? These single use card numbers from? Should you consider using PayPal when my Google voice be a really good alternative for you? [01:02:52] So we're going to get into all of that stuff. Stick around in the meantime, make sure you go to Craig peterson.com/subscribe. Get my newsletter. All of this. Is in there. It makes it simple. It's a simple thing to do. Craig peterson.com. And if you have any questions, just email me M e@craigpeterson.com. [01:03:20] Having your credit card stolen can be a real problem for any one of us. It gives the bad guys, a lot of options to spend a lot of money very quickly. We're going to talk right now about virtual credit cards. What are they, what does it mean? [01:03:37] Virtual credit cards come in two basic forms. [01:03:41] One is a single use credit card, which was quite popular back when these things first came out and another one is a virtual credit card that has either a specific life. In other words, it's only good for 30 days or that can be used until you cancel it. If you have a credit card, a visa, MasterCard, American express discover all of the major card issuers will give you the ability to reverse any charges that might come onto your cards. [01:04:19] If your card is stolen or missing. Now that makes it quite easy. Doesn't it? I want to point out that if you're using a debit card, as opposed to a credit card, there's not much challenging you can do with the credit card. You can say, I am not going to make my pain. And, uh, because of this, that, and the other thing, this was stolen, et cetera, they can file it as a disputed charge. [01:04:46] They can do an investigation find out. Yeah. I'm you probably were not at a bus terminal down in Mexico city, which happened to me. 'cause I was up here in New Hampshire, quite a ways down to Mexico city. And so they just reversed it out. That money never came out of my bank account because it was on a credit card. [01:05:08] If I were using a debit card. That money would have come right out of my account. Now, mind you, a bus ticket in Mexico city is not very expensive, but many people have had charges of many thousands of dollars. And if you need that money in your checking account, and you're using a debit card, you got a problem because your check for, well, if you ever have to pay rent again, red check is going. [01:05:38] Bound because they just empty it out to your bank account. So now you have to fight with the bank, get the money back. They will, they will eventually refund it, but it could make some of you. Transactions that you might've written a check or something, it'll make them bounce. And that could be a real problem. [01:05:57] These, it could make them bounce. So using a credit card is typically less of a hassle online. So why would you want to use a virtual card or also known as a master credit card? Masked and may S K E D? Well, the main reason behind this is to allow you. Control payment. I've used them. In fact, I use them exclusively on every website online. [01:06:29] And I'm going to tell you the names of some of them here in just a couple of minutes, but I use them all of the time. And part of the reason is let's say, I want to camp. Uh, service. Have you ever tried to cancel a service before and you have to call them many times, right. And so you're, you're arguing with somebody overseas somewhere who doesn't want you to close the account. [01:06:53] And of course the. Bump you up to the next level person who also doesn't want you to close the account. And so you have to fuss fuss, fuss, fuss. Have you ever had that experience and I'm sure you have. It just happens all the time. So with using the virtual credit card, Well, the advantage to me is, Hey, if you are going to try and fight with me, I don't care because I'm just going to cancel that credit card number. [01:07:24] So I don't have to cancel my credit card. I don't have to have the company reissue credit card for me. I don't have to do any of this sort of thing that makes my life pretty easy. Doesn't it? And so, because of that, I am now I think in a much better. Place, because it just, I don't have to fight with people anymore. [01:07:43] So that's one of the reasons I used it. The other big reason is if it gets stolen, they can cause less harm. Some of these credit card it's virtual credit cards are set up in such a way that you can limit the amount that's charged on them. Do you like that? So if you are using it on a site that maybe is charging you $50 a month, no problem. [01:08:09] $50 a month comes off of the credit card. And if someone tries to charge more bounces and then hopefully you find out, wait a minute, it just bounced on me right now. Then next step up is okay. It bounced and. Uh, I am just going to cancel the card and then you issue a new credit card number for that website. [01:08:32] So an example. In my case has get hub.com. We keep software up there and they charge me every month if get hub were to get hacked and that credit card number stolen I'm I really don't care because there's almost nothing that can happen. And if good hub doesn't properly cancel. My account, I can just cancel the credit card and, you know, let them come after me. [01:08:57] Right. This isn't going to happen. So then it's also called a master credit card number because it's a little safer than using your real credit card details. I also want to point out something about debit card. I went for years with no credit cards at all. Nowadays, many of my vendors will take a credit card for payment. [01:09:20] And in fact, give me a bit of a better deal. And then with the credit card, I can get 2% cash back, which I use to pay down the credit card. Right. It couldn't get any better than that, but when you're using a debit card, what I always. Is I had two accounts that I could transfer money between at the bank. [01:09:42] So I had one checking account. That was my main operating, if you will account. And then I had another checking account where I would be. Just moving money out of it. Or you could even do it with a savings account, but some banks, they only let you do so many transactions a month on a savings account. So the idea is I know that I have this much in credit card obligate while debit card obligations for this month, that money is going to be coming out. [01:10:11] So I make sure that. In the debit card account to cover the legitimate transactions I know are coming up and then I keep everything else in the other account. And then I manually transferred over every month. So that's how I dealt with the whole debit card thing. And it worked really well for me. Bottom line. [01:10:30] I think it's a really great. So there you go, who are the companies that you can use to do this? I've used some of these before all of them have worked really well. If you have a capital one credit card, they have something called Eno, E N O, and it's available to all capital one card. You know, even has an extension for your web browsers. [01:10:59] So if it notices you're on a webpage, it's asking for credit card number, it'll pop up and say, do you want me to create a credit card number or a virtual one for this websites you can make your payment. Does it get much easier than that? Citibank has something they call a virtual credit cards available to all Citibank card holders, master pass by MasterCard. [01:11:23] That's available to any MasterCard visa, American express discover Diner's club card holders, credit, debit, and prepaid cards by their way. So you might want to check that one out. Uh, yeah, so that's the only one I see on my list here. That will do it for debit cards, Masterpass by MasterCard American express checkouts, available to all American express card holders. [01:11:51] Chase pay available to all chase card holders, Wells Fargo, wallet, uh, visa checkouts, available to all visa, MasterCard, and American express and discover color card holders, credit and debit cards. Plus. Prepaid cards. Okay. So it does do the debit cards as well. Final that's all owned by Goldman Sachs and is not accepting any new applicants and entro pay. [01:12:19] Also not accepting new applicants. There's a couple online. You might also want to check out our Pyne. Premium Al buying. I'm buying a, B I N E blur premium. You might want to check that out as well. All right, everybody make sure you check me out. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. [01:12:43] We're going to wrap up how you should be using these burner identities of few more tips and tricks that are going to help keep you safe from the hackers that are out there. So here we go. [01:12:58] There are a lot of hackers out there. [01:13:01] The numbers are just astounding. The cost of these hackers coming in and stealing our information is just unbelievable. And it goes all the way from big corporations, from things like the colonial pipeline, the U S government all the way on down through you and me. I want to tell you a little story about a friend of mine. [01:13:28] He is about 75 years old and he supplements his income by driving for Uber eats and one other company. And so what he'll do is someone puts in an order for food somewhere. He'll go pick it up and then he'll drive it to where whoever wanted wanted, whoever ordered it. Now, there are. Pricing number of scams with this. [01:13:55] So he's very careful about some of that orders, a cookie, for instance, because it's usually a bit of a scam anyways, we won't get into those, but I'll tell you what happened to him. His information was stolen online as it was probably yours. Mine I know was as well. So it's all stolen. What do you do? While in his case, what ended up happening is they managed to get into his email account. [01:14:27] Once they're in his email account, they now had access to the emails he was getting from one of these companies. Now it wasn't the Uber eats guy. He was, there was another company. So let's just explain this a little bit. Uber eats sends him a request for him to go ahead and do a double. So, you know, go to the restaurant, pick it up and take it to this client's house. [01:14:54] And in order for him to register, he had to register an email address. Now, of course, he uses the same email address for everything, all of the. Now, personally, that drives me a little bit insane, but that's what he does. And he has just a few passwords. Now. He writes them down a little book and heaven forbid he ever lose the book so that he can remember them. [01:15:24] He just wants to keep his life simple. Right. He's 75. He's not technophobic, but you know, he's not up on all of this stuff. What he found was a paycheck didn't show. And it was an $800 paycheck. We're talking about real money that he should have had in his. It didn't show up. So he calls up the company and says what happened to my paycheck and their record show? [01:15:53] Yes, indeed. It had been paid. We paid you, we deposited right into your account. Just like you asked. Yeah. You know, ACH into the account. Great. Wonderful. What had happened is bad guys had gone, gained control of his email address and use that now. Because they figured, well, I see some emails in his account from this food delivery service, so, well, let's try and see if this email address that we're looking at right now. [01:16:26] All of his emails let's look and see. Okay. Yeah. Same. Email address and same password as a used ad at this email address. Yeah, it worked. Okay. Great. So now we have access to this guys food delivery account. So they changed. The bank account number now, easy enough to confirm, right. They change it and send you an email. [01:16:54] Hey, I want to make sure that it was you until the bad guys, the hackers click out, yada yada. Yeah, it was me and then delete the email. So he doesn't see it. And now his $800 paycheck. In fact, I think there were a couple of different checks is deposited directly into the bad guy's bank account and. The money of course is transferred out pretty quickly. [01:17:18] Now the, that guys, these hackers are using what are called mules. You might be familiar with that in the drug trade. They'll have a third party deliver the drugs just to mule. They don't know what all is going on. They probably know the delivering drugs in this case, most of the meals are useful idiots of which there are many in this country. [01:17:43] Unfortunate. Uh, political and otherwise. And these people are convinced that all they need to do is transfer the money into this account so that the hackers can then pull it out. And you know, now they're going to take care of their grandmother who is stuck in the hospital and they have no way to pay for it. [01:18:07] And they can't transfer the money out of the country during. That's one of the stories they use for people. And in many cases, these meals know what they're doing. The FBI earlier this year arrested a whole group of mules out in California that were purposefully transferring the money. They knew what they were doing. [01:18:28] So his money was now out of the country. No way to get it. And this food delivery company was not about to pay him. So it, isn't just the big guys it's you and me as well. So what I want to talk about right now is multi-factor authentication. Now. You guys are the best and brightest. I hope you understand this. [01:18:54] If you have questions, please reach out to me. I am more than

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
The Great Logistics Industry Consolidation with Chris Wofford

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 43:35


The Great Logistics Industry Consolidation with Chris Wofford Chris Wofford and Joe Lynch discuss the great logistics industry consolidation. Chris is the Founder and Managing Partner of Wofford Advisors LLC, a strategic advisory boutique that provides best-in-class strategic advice to clients competing in the global supply chain, which includes all forms of transport, logistics, B2B and B2C movements of goods — and increasingly tech-enabled consumer and industrial services. About Chris Wofford Chris Wofford is the Founder and Managing Partner of Wofford Advisors LLC, an independent, strategic advisory boutique focused on M&A transactions in B2B and B2C movement of goods in the global supply chain. Chris started his career in the M&A group at DLJ-LA under Ken Moelis. His career path is unusual for having spent 10 years as a M&A banker prior to becoming the lead coverage officer in T&L. As a senior banker, he has run numerous industry groups at major investment banks for the past 30 years. He has executed over $120bn of buyside and sellside M&A assignments, including numerous cross-border transactions. Chris earned an MBA, Finance & Strategy, Booth School of Business from University of Chicago and a BA, History & East Asian Studies at Oberlin College. While at Oberlin Chris was All-Conference & Most Valuable Offensive Lineman, Varsity Football Team; Twice All-Conference & Captain, Varsity Lacrosse Team. About Wofford Advisors Wofford Advisors is an independent advisory firm focused on strategic idea generation and M&A transaction execution within the global supply chain and tech-enabled services sectors.  We have a proven track-record of delivering successful outcomes for large public companies, family-owned businesses, as well as financial sponsors.  Our team's M&A expertise ranges in size from $50 million to $50 billion enterprise value and encompasses contested and cross-border transactions. Founded by Chris Wofford, former head of Transport & Logistics Investment Banking at large financial institutions, such as Wells Fargo, Bank of America and Macquarie Capital, the firm reunites former colleagues from the earlier Bear Stearns M&A days, where Chris was a Senior Managing Director.  During his 30+ year career, Chris has represented major corporations, such as UPS, FedEx, Ryder, Neptune Orient Lines (APL Logistics), GENCO, Norbert Dentressangle (now part of XPO/GXO), Ozburn-Hessey (now part of Geodis) and many others. Wofford Advisors' core services include Buyside Advisory, Sellside Advisory, Strategic Consulting and Complex and Cross Border Transactions.  Please visit our website for a more comprehensive explanation of our credentials and capabilities. Key Takeaways: The Great Logistics Industry Consolidation  Chris Wofford is the Founder and Managing Partner of Wofford Advisors, an independent, strategic advisory boutique focused on M&A transactions in B2B and B2C movement of goods in the global supply chain. Chris Wofford explains what's driving the great logistics industry consolidation, along with who is buying and who is selling. The great logistics industry consolidation is being driven by: The growth of ecommerce and home delivery (B2B shift to B2C) Tech disruption especially by companies backed by venture capital Low cost of borrowing money The hot logistics market is enabling financial buyers to buy, grow, and sell companies in a much faster time period (2-3 years instead of 3-5 years) Who is buying? Private equity companies who buy, grow, and sell logistics and transportation companies Larger companies that want to better serve their customers by adding new services, geographic footprint, capability, etc. Big logistics and transportation companies often face the choice of building new divisions/services or buying a company to gain those services Who is selling? Private equity companies who buy, grow, and sell logistics and transportation companies Entrepreneurs and family owned companies looking to exit Wofford Advisors was established as a platform to provide best-in-class strategic advice to clients competing in the global supply chain, which includes all forms of transport, logistics, B2B and B2C movements of goods — and increasingly tech-enabled consumer and industrial services. Learn More About The Great Logistics Industry Consolidation Chris Wofford LinkedIn Woffor Advisors LinkedIn Wofford Advisors The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

Screaming in the Cloud
Teasing Out the Titular Titles with Chris Williams

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 39:59


About ChrisChris Williams is a Enterprise Architect for World Wide Technology — a technology solution and service provider. There he helps customers design the next generation of public, private, and hybrid cloud solutions, specializing in AWS and VMware. His first computer was a Commodore 64, and he's been playing video games ever since.Chris blogs about virtualization, technology, and design at Mistwire. He is an active community leader, co-organizing the AWS Portsmouth User Group, and both hosts and presents on vBrownBag. He is also an active mentor, helping students at the University of New Hampshire through Diversify Thinking—an initiative focused on empowering girls and women to pursue education and careers in STEM.Chris is a certified AWS Hero as well as a VMware vExpert. Fun fact that Chris doesn't want you to know: he has a degree in psychology so you can totally talk to him about your feelings.Links: WWT: https://www.wwt.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/mistwire Personal site: https://mistwire.com vBrownBag: https://vbrownbag.com/team/chris-williams/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate: is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards, while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other, which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at Honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability, it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the things I miss the most from the pre-pandemic times is meeting people at conferences or at various business meetings, not because I like people—far from it—but because we go through a ritual that I am a huge fan of, which is the exchange of business cards. Now, it's not because I'm a collector or anything here, but because I like seeing what people's actual titles are instead of diving into the morass of what we call ourselves on Twitter and whatnot. Today, I have just one of those folks with me. My guest is Chris Williams, who works at WWT, and his business card title is Enterprise Architect, comma AWS Cloud. Chris, welcome.Chris: Hi. Thanks for having me on the show, Corey.Corey: No, thank you for taking the time to speak with me. I have to imagine that the next line in your business card is, “No, I don't work for AWS,” because you know a company has succeeded when they get their name into people's job titles who don't work there.Chris: So, I have a running joke where the next line should actually be cloud therapist. And my degree is actually in psychology, so I was striving to get cloud therapist in there, but they still don't want to let me have it.Corey: Former guest Bobby Allen is now a cloud therapist over at Google Cloud, which is just phenomenal. I don't know what they're doing in a marketing context over there; I just know that they're just blasting them out of the park on a consistent, ongoing basis. It's really nice to see. It's forcing me to up my game a little bit. So, one of the challenges I've always had is, I don't like putting other companies' names into the title.Now, I run the Last Week in AWS newsletter, so yeah, okay, great, there's a little bit of ‘do as I say, not as I do' going on here. Because it feels, on some level, like doing unpaid volunteer work for a $2 trillion company. Speaking of, you are an AWS Community Hero, where you do volunteer work for a $2 trillion company. How'd that come about? What did you do that made you rise to their notice?Chris: That was a brilliant segue. Um—[laugh]—Corey: I do my best.Chris: So I, actually prior to becoming an AWS Community Hero, I do a lot of community work. So, I have run and helped to run four different community-led organizations: the Virtualization Technology User Group of New England; the AWS Portsmouth User Group, now the AWS Boston User Group; I'm a co-host and presenter for vBrownBag; I also do the New England AWS Community Day, which is a conglomeration of all the different user groups in one setting; and various and sundry other things, as well, along the way. Having done all of that, and having had a lot of the SAs and team members come and do speaking presentations for these various and sundry things, I was nominated internally by AWS to become one of their Community Heroes. Like you said, it's basically unpaid volunteer work where I go out and tout the services. I love talking about nerd stuff, so when I started working on AWS technologies, I really enjoyed it, and I just, kind of like, glommed on with other people that did it as well. I'm also a VMware vExpert, which basically use the exact same accolade for VMware. I have not been doing as much VMware stuff in the recent past, but that's kind of how I got into this gig.Corey: One of the things that strikes me as being the right move with respect to these, effectively, community voice accolades is Microsoft got something very right—they've been doing this a long time—they have their MVP program, but they have to re-invite people who have to requalify for it by whatever criteria they are, every year. AWS does not do this with their Heroes program. If you look at their Heroes page, there's a number of folks up there who have been doing interesting things in the cloud years ago, but then fell off the radar for a variety of reasons. In fact, the only way that I'm aware that you can lose Hero status is via getting a job at AWS or one of AWS competitors.Now, the hard part, of course, is well, who is Amazon's competitors? Basically everyone, but it mostly distills down to Microsoft, Google, and Oracle, as best I can tell, for Hero status. How does VMware fall on that spectrum? To be more specific, how does VMware fall on the spectrum of their community engagement program and having to renew, not, “Are they AWS's competitor?” To which the answer is, “Of course.”Chris: So, the renewal process for the VMware vExpert program is an annual re-up process where you fill out the form, list your contribution of the year, what you've done over the previous year, and then put it in for submission to the board of VMware vExperts who then give you the thumbs up or thumbs down. Much like Nero, you know, pass or fail, live or die. And I've been fortunate enough, so my vBrownBag contributions are every week; we have a show that happens every week. It can be either VMware stuff, or cloud in general stuff, or developer-related stuff. We cover the gamut; you know, people that want to come on and talk about whatever they want to talk about, they come on. And by virtue of that, we've had a lot of VMware speakers, we've had a lot of AWS speakers, we've had a lot of Azure speakers. So, I've been fortunate enough to be able to qualify each year with those contributions.Corey: I think that's the right way to go, from my perspective at least. But I want to get into this a little bit because you are an enterprise architect, which is always one of those terms that is super easy to make fun of in a variety of different ways. Your IDE is probably a whiteboard, and at some point when you have to write code, I thought you had a team of people who would be able to do that all for you because your job is to cogitate, and your artifacts are documentation, and the entire value of what you do can only be measured in the grand sweep of time, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera.Chris: [laugh].Corey: But you don't generally get to be a Community Hero for stuff like that, and you don't usually get to be a vExpert on the VMware side, by not having at least technical chops that make people take a second look. What is it you'd say it is you do hear for, lack of a better term?Chris: “What would you say ya, do you here, Bob?” So, I'm not being facetious when I say cloud therapist. There is a lot of working at the eighth layer of the OSI model, the political layer. There's a lot of taking the requirements from the customer and sending them to the engineer. I'm a people person.The easy answer is to say, I do all the things from the TOGAF certification manual: the requirements, risks, assumptions, and constraints; the logical, conceptual, and physical diagrams; the harder answer is the soft skill side of that, is actually being able to communicate with the various levels of the industry, figuring out what the business really wants to do and how to technically solution that and figure out how to talk to the engineers to make that happen. You're right EAs get made fun of all the time, almost as much as consultants get made fun of. And it's a very squishy layer that, you know, depending upon your personality and the personality of the customer that you're dealing with, it can work wonderfully well or it can crash and burn immediately. I know from personal experience that I don't mesh well with financials, but I'm really, really good with, like, medical industry stuff, just the way that the brain works. But ironically, right now I'm working with a financial and we're getting along like a house on fire.Corey: Oh, yeah. I've been saying for a while now that when it comes to cloud, cost and architecture are the same things, and I think that ties back to a lot of different areas. But I want to be very clear here that we talk about, I'm not super deep into the financials, that does not mean you're bad at architecture because working on finance means different things to different folks. I don't think that it is possibly a good architect in the cloud environment and not have a conception of, “Huh, that thing seems really expensive if I do it that way.” That is very different than having the skill of reading a profit and loss statement or understanding various implications of the time value of money calculation that a company uses, or how things get amortized.There are nuances piled on top of nuances in finance, and it's easy to sit here and think that oh, I'm not great at finance means I don't know how money works. That is very rarely true. If you really don't know how money works, you'll go start a cryptocurrency startup.Chris: [laugh]. So, I plugged back to you; I was listening to one of your old shows and I cribbed one of your ideas and totally went with it. So, I just said that there's the logical, conceptual, and physical diagrams of an environment; on one of your shows, you had mentioned a financial diagram for an environment, and I was like, “That's brilliant.” So, now when I go into a customer, I actually do that, too. I take my physical diagram, I strip out all of the IP addresses, and our names, and everything like that, and I plot down how much it's going to cost, like, “This is the value of the EC2 instance,” or, “This is how much this pipe is going to cost if you run this over it.” And they go bananas over it. So, thanks for providing that idea that I mercilessly stole.Corey: Kind of fun on a lot of levels. Part of the challenge is as things get cloudier and it moves away from EC2 instances, ideally the lie we would like to tell ourselves that everything's in an auto-scaling group. Great—Chris: Right.Corey: —stepping beyond that when you start getting into something that's even more intricately tied to a specific user, we're talking about effectively trying to get unit economic measures of every user, every thousand users is going to cost me X dollars to service them on average, on top of a baseline of steady-state spend that is going to increase differently. At that point, talking to finance about predictive models turn into, “Well, this comes down to a question of business modeling.” But conversely, for engineering minds that is exactly what finance is used to figuring out. The problem they have is, “Well, every time we hire a new engineer, we wind up seeing our AWS bill increase.” Funny how that works. Yeah, how do you map that to something that the business understands? That is part of what they do. But it does, I admit, make it much more challenging from a financial map of an environment.Chris: Yeah, especially when the customer or the company is—you know, they've been around for a while, and they're used to just like that large bolus of money at the very beginning of a data center, and they buy the switches, and they buy the servers, and they virtualize them, and they have that set cost that they knew that they had to plunk down at the beginning. And it's a mindset shift. And they're coming around to it, some faster than others. Oddly enough, the startups nowadays are catching on very quickly. I don't deal with a lot of startups, so it takes some finesse.Corey: An interesting inflection that I've seen is that there's an awful lot of enterprises out there that say, “Oh, we're like a startup.” Great. You mean with weird cultural inflections that often distill down to cult of personality, the constant worry about whether you're going to wind up running out of runway before finding product-market fit? And the rooms filled with—Chris: The eighty-hour work weeks? The—[laugh]—Corey: And they're like, “No, no, no, it's like the good parts.” “Oh, so you mean out the upside.” But you don't hear it the other way around where you have a startup that you're interviewing with, “Ha-ha, we're like an enterprise. We have a six-month interview process that takes 18 different stages,” and so on and so forth. However, we do see startups having to mature rapidly, and move up the compliance path as they're dealing with regulated entities and the rest, and wanting to deal with serious customers who have no sense of humor about, “Yeah, we'll figure that part out later as part of an audit document.”So, what we also see, though, is that enterprises are doing things that look a lot more startup-y. If I take a look at the common development environments and tools and techniques that big enterprises use, it looks an awful lot like how startups were doing it five or ten years ago. That is the slow and steady evolution of time. And what startups are doing today becomes enterprise tomorrow, and I can't shake the feeling that there's a sea of vendors out there who, in the event that winds up happening are eventually going to find themselves without a market at all. My model has been that if I go and found a Twitter for Pets style startup tomorrow and in ten years, it has grown to become an S&P 500 component—which is still easier to take seriously than most of what Tesla says—great.During that journey, at what point do I become a given company's customer because if there is no onboarding story for me to become your customer, you're in a long-tail decline phase. That's been my philosophy, but you are a—trademarked term—Enterprise Architect, so please feel free to tell me if I'm missing any of the nuances there, which I'm sure I am because let's face it, nuance is hard; sweeping statements are easy.Chris: As an architect, [laugh] it would be a disservice to not say my favorite catchphrase, it depends. There are so many dependencies to those kinds of sweeping statements. I mean, there's a lot of enterprises that have good process; there are a lot of enterprises that have bad process. And going back to your previous statement of the startup inside the enterprise, I'm hearing a lot of companies nowadays saying, “Oh, well, we've now got this brand new incubator system that we're currently running our little startup inside of. It's got the best of both worlds.”And I'm not going to go through the litany of bad things that you just said about startups, but they'll try to encapsulate that shift that you're talking about where the cheese is moving so quickly now that it's very hard for these companies to know the customer well enough to continue to stay salient and continue to be able to look into that crystal ball to stay relevant in the future. My job as an EA is to try to capture that point in time where what are the requirements today and what are the known detriments that you're going to see in your future that you need to protect against? So, that's kind of my job—other than being a cloud therapist—in a nutshell.Corey: I love the approach. My line has been that I do a lot of marriage counseling between engineering and finance, which is a fun term that also just so happens to be completely accurate.Chris: Absolutely. [laugh]. I'm currently being a marriage counselor right now.Corey: It's an interesting time. So, you had a viral tweet recently that honestly, I'm a bit jealous about. I have had a lot of tweets that have done reasonably well, but I haven't ever had anything go super-viral, where it was just a screenshot of a conversation you had with an AWS recruiter. Now, before we go into this, I want to make a couple of disclaimers here. Before I entered tech myself, I was a technical recruiter, and I can say that these people have hard jobs.There is a constant pressure to perform, it is a sales job that is unlike most others. If you sell someone a pen, great, you can wrap your head around what that's like. But you don't have to worry about the pen deciding it doesn't want to go home with the buyer. So, it becomes a double sale in a lot of weird ways, and there's a constant race to the bottom and there's a lot of competition in the space. It's a numbers game and a lot of folks get in and wash out who have terrible behaviors and terrible patterns, so the whole industry gets tainted—in some respects—like that. A great example of someone who historically has been a terrific example of recruiting done right has been Jill Wohlner. And she's one of the shining beacons of the industry as far as how to do these things in the right way—Chris: Yes.Corey: —but the fact that she is as exceptional as she is is in no small part because there's a lot of random folks coming by. All which is to say that our conversation going forward is not and should not be aimed at smacking around individual recruiters or recruiting as a whole because that is unfair. Now, that disclaimer has been given. Great, what happened?Chris: So, first off, shout out to Jill; she actually used to be a host on vBrownBag. So, hey girl. [laugh]. What happened was—and I have the utmost empathy and sympathy for recruiting; I actually used to have a side gig where I would go around to the local recruiting places around my area here and teach them how to read a cloud resume and how to read a req and try to separate the wheat from the chaff, and to actually have good conversations. This was back when cloud wasn't—this was, like, three or four years ago.And I would go in there and say, “This is how you recruit a cloud person nowadays.” So, I love good recruiters. This one was a weird experience in that—so when a recruiter reaches out to me, what I do is I take an assessment of my current situation: “Am I happy where I'm at right now?” The answer is, “Yes.” And if they ping me, I'll say, “Hey, I'm happy right now, but if you have something that is, you know, a million dollars an hour, taste-testing margaritas on St. John island in the sand, I'm all ears. I'm listening. Conversely, I also am a Community Hero, so I know a ton of people out in the industry. Maybe I can help you out with landing that next person.”Corey: I just want to say for the record, that is absolutely the right answer. And something like that is exactly what I would give, historically. I can't do it now because let's be clear here. I have a number of employees and, “Hey, Corey's out there doing job interviews,” sends a message that isn't good when it comes to how is that company doing anyway. I miss it because I enjoyed the process and I enjoyed the fun, but even when I was perfectly happy, it's, “Well, I'm not actively on the market, but I am interested to have a conversation if you've got something interesting.”Because let's face it, I want to hear what's going on in the market, and if I'm starting to hear a lot of questions about a technology I have been dismissive of, okay, maybe it's time to pay more attention. I have repeatedly been able to hire the people interviewing me in some cases, and sometimes I've gone on interviews just to keep my interview skills sharp and then wound up accepting the job because it turned out they did have something interesting that was compelling to me even though I was reasonably happy at the time. I will always take the meeting; I will always at least have a chat about what they're doing, and I think that doing otherwise is doing yourself a disservice in the long arc of your career.Chris: Right. And that's basically the approach that I take, too. I want to hear what's out there. I am very happy at World Wide right now, so I'm not interested, interested. But again, if they come up with an amazing opportunity, things could happen. So, I implied that in my response to him.I said, “I'm happy right now, thanks for asking, but let's set up the meeting and we can have a chat.” The response was unexpected. [laugh]. The response was basically, “If you're not ready to leave right now, it makes no sense for me to talk to you.” And it was a funny… interaction.I was like, “Huh. That's funny.” I'm going to tweet about that because I thought it was funny—I'm not a jerk, so I'm going to block out all of the names and all of the identifying information and everything—and I threw it up. And the commiseration was so impressive. Not impressive in a good way; impressive in a bad way.Every person that responded was like, “Yes. This has happened to me. Yes, this is”—and honestly, I got a lot of directors from AWS reaching out to me trying to figure out who that person was, apologizing saying that's not our way. And I responded to each and every single one of them. And I was like, “Somebody has already found that person; somebody has already spoken to that person. That being said, look at all of the responses in the timeline. When you tell me personally, that's not the way you do things, I believe that you believe that.”Corey: Yeah, I believe you're being sincere when you say this, however the reality of what the data shows and people's lived experience in the form of anecdotes are worlds apart.Chris: Yeah. And I'm an AWS Hero. [laugh]. That's how I got treated. Not to blow my own horn or anything like that, but if that's happening to me, either A, he didn't look me up and just cold-called me—which is probably the case—and b, if he treats me like that, imagine how he's treating everybody else?Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by something new. Cloud Academy is a training platform built on two primary goals. Having the highest quality content in tech and cloud skills, and building a good community the is rich and full of IT and engineering professionals. You wouldn't think those things go together, but sometimes they do. Its both useful for individuals and large enterprises, but here's what makes it new. I don't use that term lightly. Cloud Academy invites you to showcase just how good your AWS skills are. For the next four weeks you'll have a chance to prove yourself. Compete in four unique lab challenges, where they'll be awarding more than $2000 in cash and prizes. I'm not kidding, first place is a thousand bucks. Pre-register for the first challenge now, one that I picked out myself on Amazon SNS image resizing, by visiting cloudacademy.com/corey. C-O-R-E-Y. That's cloudacademy.com/corey. We're gonna have some fun with this one!Corey: Every once in a while I get some of their sourcers doing outreach to see folks who are somewhat aligned on them via LinkedIn or other things, and, “Oh, okay, yeah; if you look at the things I talked about in various places, I can understand how I might look like a potentially interesting hire.” And they send outreach emails to me, they're always formulaic, and once in a while, I'll tweet a screenshot of them where I redact the person's name, and it was—and there's a comment, like, “Should I tell them?” Because it's fun; it's hilarious. But I want to be clear because that often gets misconstrued; they have done absolutely nothing wrong. You've got to cast a wide net to find talent.I'm surprised I get as few incidents of recruiter outreach as I do. I am not hireable and that's okay, but I don't begrudge people reaching out. I either respond with a, “No thanks,” if it's a particularly good email, or I just hit the archive button and never think about it again. And that's fine, too. But I don't make people feel like a jerk for asking, and that is an engineering behavioral pattern that drives me up a wall.It's, “So, I'm thinking about a job here and I'm wondering if you might be a fit,” and your response is just to set them on fire? Well, guess what an awful lot of those people sending out those emails in the sourcing phase of recruiting are early career, and guess what, they tend to get promoted in the fullness of time. Sometimes they're no longer recruiting at all; sometimes they wind up being hiring managers in different ways or trying to figure out what offer they're going to extend to someone. And if you don't think that people in those roles remember when they're treated poorly as a response to their outreach, I have news for you. Don't do it. Your reputation lingers long after you no longer work there.Chris: Just exactly so. And I feel really bad for that guy.Corey: I do hope that he was not reprimanded because he should not be. It is clearly a systemic problem, and the fact that one person happened to do this in a situation where it went viral does not mean that they are any worse than other folks doing it. It is a teachable opportunity. It is, “I know that you have incredible numbers of roles to hire for, all made all the more urgent by the fact that you're having some significant numbers of departures—clearly—in the industry right now.” So, I get it; you have a hard job. I'm not going to waste your time because I don't even respond to them just because, at AWS particularly, they have hard work to do, and just jawboning with me is not going to be useful for them.Chris: [laugh].Corey: I get it.Chris: And you're trying to hire the same talent too. So.Corey: Exactly. One of the most egregious things I've seen in the course of my career was when that whole multiple accounts opened for Wells Fargo's customers and they wound up firing 3500 people. Yeah, that's not individual tellers doing something unethical. That is a systemic problem, and you clean house at the top because you're not going to convince me that you're hiring that many people who are unethical and setting out to do these things as a matter of course. It means that the incentives are wrong, it means that the way you're measuring things are wrong, and people tend to do things out of fear or because there's now a culture of it. And if you fire individuals for that, you're wrong.Chris: And that was the message that I conveyed to the people that reached out to me and spoke to me. I was like, there is a misaligned KPI, or OKR, or whatever acronym you want to use, that is forcing them to do this churn-and-burn mentality instead of active, compassionate recruiting. I don't know what that term is; I'm very far removed from the recruiting world. But that person isn't doing that because they're a jerk. They're doing that because they have numbers to hit and they've got to grind out as many as humanly possible. And you're going to get bad employees when you do that. That's not a long-term sustainable path. So, that was the conversation that I had with them. Hopefully, it resonated and hits home.Corey: I still remember from ten years ago—and I don't always tell the story, but I absolutely will now—I went up to San Francisco when I lived in Los Angeles; I interviewed with Yammer. I went through the entire process—this was not too long before they got acquired by Microsoft so that gives you some time basis—and I got a job offer. And it was a not ridiculous offer. I was going to think about it, and I [unintelligible 00:24:19], “Great. Thank you. Let me sleep on this for a day or two and I'll get back to you definitely before the end of the week.”Within an hour, I got a response rescinding the offer claiming it had been sent by mistake. Now, I believe that that is true and that they are being sincere with this. I don't know that if it was the wrong person; I don't know if that suddenly they didn't have the req or they had another candidate that suddenly liked better that said no and then came back and said yes, but it's been over a decade now and every time I talk to someone who's considering something in that group, I tell this story. That's the sort of thing that leaves a mark because I have a certain philosophy of I don't ever resign from a job before I wind up making sure everything is solid—things are signed, good to go, the background check clears, et cetera—because I don't want to find myself suddenly without income or employment, especially in that era. And that was fine, but a lot of people don't do that.As soon as the offer comes in, they're like, “I'm going to go take a crap on my boss's desk,” which, let's be clear, I don't recommend. You should write a polite and formulaic resignation letter and then you should email it to your boss, you should not carve it into their door. Do this in a responsible way, and remember that you're going to encounter these people again throughout your career. But if I had done that, I would have had serious problems. And so that points to something systemically awful at a company.I have never in my career as a hiring manager extended an offer and then rescinded it for anything other than we can't come to an agreement on this. To be clear, this is also something I wonder about in the space, when people tell stories about how they get a job offer, they attempt to negotiate the offer, and then it gets withdrawn. There are two ways that goes. One is, “Well if you're not happy with this offer, get out of here.” Yeah, that is a crappy company, but there's also the story of people who don't know how to negotiate effectively, and in turn, they come back with indications that you do not know how to write a business email, you do not know how negotiations work, and suddenly, you're giving them a last-minute opportunity to get out before they hire someone who is going to be something of a wrecking ball in the company, and, “Whew, dodged a bullet on that.”I haven't encountered that scenario myself, but I've seen it from other folks and emails that have been passed around in various channels. So, my position on this is everyone should negotiate offers, but visit fearlesssalarynegotiation.com, it's run by my friend, Josh; he has a whole bunch of free content on his site. Look at it. Read it. It is how to handle this stuff effectively and why things are the way that they are. Follow his advice, and you won't go too far wrong. Again, I have no financial relationship, I just like what he's done a lot and I've been talking to him for years.Chris: Nice. I'll definitely check that out. [laugh].Corey: Another example is developher—that's develop H-E-R dot com. Someone else I've been speaking to who's great at this takes a different perspective on it, and that's fine. There's a lot of advice out there. Just make sure that whoever it is you're talking to about this is in a position to know what they're talking about because there's crap advice that's free. Yeah. How do you figure out the good advice and the bad advice? I'm worried someone out there is actually running Route 53 is a database for God's sake.Chris: That's crazy talk. Who would do that? That's madness.Corey: I can't imagine it.Chris: We're actually in the process of trying to figure out how to do a panel chat on exactly that, like, do a vBrownBag on salary negotiations, get some really good people in the room that can have a conversation around some of the tough questions that come around salary negotiation, what's too much to ask for? What kind of attitude should you go into it with? What kind of process should you have mentally? Is it scrawling in crayon, “No. More money,” and then hitting send? Or is it something a little bit more advanced?Corey: I also want to be clear that as you're building panels and stuff like that—because I got this wrong early on in my public speaking career, to be clear—I built talks aligned with this based on what worked for me—make sure that there are folks on the panel who are not painfully over-represented as you and I are because what works for us and we're considered oh, savvy business people who are great negotiators comes across as entitled, or demanding, or ooh, maybe we shouldn't hire her—and yes, I'm talking about her in a lot of these scenarios—make sure you have a diverse group of folks who can share lived experience and strategies that work because what works for you and me is not universal, I promise.Chris: So, the only requirement to set this panel is that you have to be a not-white guy; not-old-white guy. That's literally the one rule. [laugh].Corey: I like the approach. It's a good way to do it. I don't do manels.Chris: Yes. And it's tough because I'm not going to get into it, but the mental space that you have to be in to be a woman in tech, it's a delicate balance because when I'm approaching somebody, I don't want to slide into their DMs. It's like this, “Hey, I know this other person and they recommended you and I am not a weirdo.” [laugh]. As an old white guy, I have to be very not a weirdo when I'm talking to folks that I'm desperate to get on the show.Because I love having that diverse aspect, just different people from different backgrounds. Which is why we did the entire career series on vBrownBag. We did data science with Ayodele; we did how to get into cybersecurity with Christoph. It was a fantastic series of how to get into IT. This was at the beginning of the pandemic.We wanted to do a series on, okay, there's a lot of people out there that are furloughed right now. How do we get some people on the show that can talk to how to get into a part of IT that they're passionate about? We did a triple series on how to get into game development with Dennis Diack, the founder of Apocalypse Studios. We had a bunch of the other AWS Heroes from serverless, and Lambda, and AI on the show to talk, and it was really fantastic and I think it resonated well with the community.Corey: It takes work to have a group of guests on things like podcasts like this. You've been running vBrownBag for longer than I've been running this, and—Chris: 13 years now.Corey: Yeah. This is I think, coming up on what, four years-ish, maybe three, in that range? The passing of time, especially in a pandemic era, is challenging. And there's always a difference. If I invite a white dude to come on the podcast, the answer is yes before I get the word podcast fully out of my mouth, whereas folks who are not over-represented, they're a little more cautious. First, there's the question of, “Am I a trash bag?” And the answer is, “No.” Well, no, not in the way that you're concerned about other ways—Chris: [laugh]. That you're aware of. [laugh].Corey: Oh, God, yes, but—yeah. And then—and that's part of it, and then very often, there's a second one of, “Well, I don't think I have anything, really, to talk about,” is often a common objection here. And it's, yeah, if I'm inviting you on this show, I promise that's not true. Don't worry about that piece of it. And then it's the standard stuff that just comes with being me, of, “Yeah, I've read your Twitter feed; you got to insult me here?” It's, “No, no, not really the same tone. But great question; throw the”—it goes down to process. But it takes constant work, you can't just put an open call out for guest nominations, and expect that to wind up being representative of our industry. It is representative of our biases, in many respects.Chris: It's a tough needle to thread. Because the show has been around for a long time, it's easier for me now, because the show has been around for 13 years. We actually just recorded our two thousandth and sixtieth episode the other night. And even with that, getting that kind of outreach, [#techtwitter 00:31:32] is wonderful for making new recommendations of people. So, that's been really fun. The rest of Twitter is a hot trash fire, but that's beside the point. So yeah, I don't have a good solution for it. There's no easy answer for it other than to just be empathic, and communicative, and reach people on their level, and have a good show.Corey: And sometimes that's all it takes. The idea behind doing a podcast—despite my constant jokes—it's not out of a love affair of the sound of my own voice. It's about for better or worse, for reasons I don't fully understand, I have a platform. People listen to the show and they care what people have to say. So, my question is, how can I wind up using that platform to tell stories that lift up narratives that are helpful for folks that they can use as inspiration—in my case, as critical warnings of what to avoid—and effectively showcasing some of the best our industry has to offer, in many respects.So, if the guest has a good time and the audience can learn something, and I'm not accidentally perpetuating horrifying things, that's really more than I have any right to ask from a show like this. The fact that it's succeeded is due in no small part to not just an amazing audience, but also guests like you. So, thank you.Chris: Oh no, Thank you. And it is. It's… these kinds of shows are super fun. If it wasn't fun, I wouldn't have done it for as long as I have. I still enjoy chatting with folks and getting new voices.I love that first-time presenter who was, like, super nervous and I spend 15 minutes with them ahead of the show, I say, “Okay, relax. It's just going to be me and you facing each other. We're going to have a good time. You're going to talk about something that you love talking about, and we're going to be nerds and do nerd stuff. This is me and you in front of a water cooler with a whiteboard just being geeks and talking about cool stuff. We're also going to record it and some amount of people is going to see it afterwards.” [laugh].And yeah, that's the part that I love. And then watching somebody like that turn into the keynote speaker at a conference ten years down the road. And I get to say, “Oh, I knew that person when.”Corey: I just want to be remembered by folks who look back fondly at some of the things that we talk about here. I don't even need credit, just yeah. People who see that they've learned things and carry them forward and spread to others, there's so many favors that people have done for us that we can only ever pay forward.Chris: Yeah, exactly. So—and that's actually how I got into vBrownBag. I came to them saying, “Hey, I love the things that you guys have done. I actually passed my VCIX because of watching vBrownBags. What can I do to help contribute back to the community?” And Alistair said, “Funny you should mention that.” [laugh]. And here we are seven years later.Corey: Well, to that end, if people are inspired by what you're saying and they want to hear more about what you have to say or, heaven forbid, follow in your footsteps, where can they find you?Chris: So, you can find me on Twitter; I am at mistwire.com—M-I-S-T-W-I-R-E; if you Google ‘mistwire,' I am the first three pages of hits; so I have a blog; you can find me on vBrownBag. I'm hard to miss on Twitter [laugh] I discourage you from following me there. But yeah, you can hit me up on all of the formats. And if you want to present, I'd love to get you on the show. If you want to learn more about what it takes to become an AWS Hero or if you want to get into that line of work, I highly discourage it. It's a long slog but it's a—yeah, I'd love to talk to you.Corey: And we of course put links to that in the [show notes 00:35:01]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me, Chris. I really appreciate it.Chris: Thank you, Corey. Thanks for having me on.Corey: Chris Williams, Enterprise Architect, comma AWS Cloud at WWT. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with a comment telling me that while you didn't actively enjoy this episode, you are at least open to enjoying future episodes if I have one that might potentially be exciting.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Solar Maverick Podcast
SMP 111: Innovative Data Driven Solar Insurance Solutions

Solar Maverick Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 40:39


Episode Summary In this episode of the Solar Maverick Podcast, Benoy talks with Jason Kaminsky who is COO at kwh Analytics which is insuring the energy transition through the most comprehensive renewable energy data.  Jason speaks about many interesting topics like how kwh uses data to create insurance products like their solar revenue put product, how hail storm in Texas damaged a solar plant and how that impacted the insurance market, and underperformance of solar projects is common based on the forecast production.  Benoy Thanjan Benoy Thanjan is the Founder and CEO of Reneu Energy, as well as an advisor for several solar startup companies. Reneu Energy is a premier international solar energy consulting firm and developer, and the company focuses on developing commercial and industrial solar, as well as utility-scale solar plus storage projects. The company also sources financing for solar projects and hedges both energy and environmental commodities.  Benoy received his first experience in Finance as an intern at D.E. Shaw & Co., which is a global investment firm with 37 billion dollars in investment capital. Before founding Reneu Energy, he was the SREC Trader in the Project Finance Group for SolarCity, which merged with Tesla in 2016. He originated SREC trades with buyers and co-developed their SREC monetization and hedging strategy with the senior management of SolarCity, to move into the east coast markets. Benoy also worked at Vanguard Energy Partners, Ridgewood Renewable Power, and Deloitte & Touche. Jason Kaminsky Jason Kaminsky is the COO at kWh Analytics. Just prior to joining kWh Analytics, Jason spent more than three years as a Vice President of Environmental Finance at Wells Fargo Bank. As a senior member of the Wells Fargo deal team, Jason originated, underwrote, and financed tax-equity investments during a time when the bank added nearly $1bn of solar assets. Prior to joining Wells Fargo in 2011, Jason worked at SPG Solar, where he supported the CEO on strategic corporate initiatives. Jason received both his B.S. in Mathematics and his B.S. in Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Environmental Sciences from UCLA. He holds an M.S. degree in Environment and Resources from Stanford University, and also completed his M.B.A. at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. Stay Connected: Benoy Thanjan Email: info@reneuenergy.com  LinkedIn: Benoy Thanjan Website: https://www.reneuenergy.com   Jason Kaminsky Website:  https://www.kwhanalytics.com Linkedin:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/jasonkam/ Email:  jason.kaminsky@kwhanalytics.com Contact US at kwh Analytics https://www.kwhanalytics.com/contact Email:  Contact@kwhanalytics.com Solarscape(formerly Lendscape): https://www.kwhanalytics.com/solarscape Sponsor:  Summit Ridge Energy Thank you to Summit Ridge Energy for sponsoring this episode of the Solar Maverick Podcast! Summit Ridge Energy is the leading owner-operator of community solar projects in the United States. The team has been a strong force within the U.S. commercial solar market for years and was instrumental in the creation of "virtual" power purchase agreements and associated financing structures. Summit Ridge Energy has leveraged this experience to launch Summit Ridge Capital, a dedicated funding platform that acquires pre-operational community solar and battery storage projects.  SRE also works with land owners across the country to maximize the value of their acreage by offering predictable lease income to host their solar farms.  From site identification and system design, to take-out financing and construction management, Summit Ridge is the most complete solutions provider in the community solar space.   https://srenergy.com info@srenergy.com  Subscribe to our podcast + download each episode on iTunes,Podbean, youtube, and most of the major podcast platforms. This episode was produced and managed by  Podcast Laundry (www.podcastlaundry.com)                

MarketFoolery
PayPal/Pinterest is Off, Tesla's New High is On

MarketFoolery

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 18:35


PayPal breaks off acquisition talks with Pinterest. Tesla raises the price of certain models and strikes a $4.2 billion dollar deal with Hertz. Wells Fargo gets ready to roll out a new virtual assistant named “Fargo”. Asit Sharma analyzes those stories and shares why mini-candy bars are underrated at Halloween.

TV Guidance Counselor Podcast
TV Guidance Counselor Episode 494: Jeff Lieberman

TV Guidance Counselor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 90:53


Happy Halloween! This week Ken welcomes writer, producer, director and author of the new autobiography "Day of the Living Me" Jeff Lieberman! jeffliebermandirector.com Ken and Jeff discuss floods, the end of the world, car boats, tapping into the Zeitgeist, Squirm, Remote Control, labels, 70s horror, race in horror, talent, being an advocate for the dead, having a unique body of work (but hating that term), Keith Richards, having a voice, Phil Silvers, New York, overacting, being an editor, Janus Films, Westerns, Gayle Storm, being funny, Jeff's short film The Ringer, Who Killed Mary Westling, Red Buttons, advertising, loving 50s sci-fi, being a talented artist, drawing, cartoons, being efficient at dating girls, living in Mad Men, Streets of San Francisco, Have Gun Will Travel, Don Knotts, Steve Allen, noticing everything, being a TV kid, Popular Mechanics, meeting Pinky Lee, Jane Mansfield and her friends, Pall Mall, cigarettes, chocolate trainer cigarettes, The Danny Thomas Show, Wells Fargo, Route 66, Bus Stop, the cold reality of life, the amazing work and influence of Jean Shepard, Donald Fagan, John Lennon, Bob Newhart, loving stand up, But...Seriously, King Kong, George Burns, the incredible footage of Richard Pryor singing, Zorro, and wearing Antonio Banderas' clothes with Tippi Hedren's permission.

On The Virg
Tom Brandstater - S3E37

On The Virg

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 83:26


Joining me this week On The Virg is former Denver Broncos QB, Tom Brandstater. We discuss his rise from an 8 year old QB to Fresno State, to the NFL. He shares his processes and systems he applied to reach the top. He also shares how his experience as a QB has helped him be such a successful financial advisor for Wells Fargo. He discusses his investment strategies and how he plans to navigate the future uncertainty in the market. Plus he shares what he chooses to do to recharge.

An Intimate Conversation with Women of Color
"What's the T?" with E. Monique Evans

An Intimate Conversation with Women of Color

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 97:37


In this week's episode, I flipped the script my Sister Friend Monique Evans, an EquipFin Transaction Coordinator in Commercial Banking Operations at Wells Fargo & Company, who answered “What's the T?”. Instead of my normal Q&A style, I tossed out topics and Monique weighed in. We talked Dating to the Pride Umbrella to Privilege and brought it back to ICW fashion with the importance of using our voices, specifically Trans WOC + Wealth. Could not leave this out especially with Monique being in Banking. Check out the episode for the full scoop. BTW, it's a long one so pause then play if you must. Annndddd, let's wish Moniquea Happy Birthday October 24th Birthday!!! This week's Guest is E. Monique Evans With more than 15 years of professional experience in the financial services industry, Monique Evans currently serves as a Deal Closer for Wells Fargo Vendor Financial Services LLC. Monique's pronouns are she/her/hers. Throughout her career, Monique has obtained industry experience in various financial lines of business, including consumer and commercial/ wholesale bank operations, wealth and investment management, treasury, and fiduciary services and more. Outside of her day-to-day role, Monique is an Advisor on the Gender Identity and Expression Advisory Committee, which is part of the PRIDE Enterprise Leadership Team at Wells Fargo. Locally, she is a member on the board of directors for Resource Center Dallas (myresourcecenter.org). She also represents Wells Fargo at various LGBTQIA+ industry events and speaking engagements on the topic of transgender-related issues. Previously, she's served as a member and was the 2021 Keynote Speaker for Out & Equal's Southern States Forum. Monique studied finance and accounting. She loves travel, podcasts, writing poetry, cycling, interior design and architecture. She grew up in the Midwest but considers herself a Texan at heart. Ways to Connect/Resources IG: @iammoniqueevans Article Features: From Finance to Poetry By Michelle Brown, Collections by Michelle Brown https://www.audible.com/pd/Collections-by-Michelle-Brown-WSG-E-Monique-Evans-from-Finance-to-Poetry-Podcast/B0936GDJ3W https://soundcloud.com/user-23922431 Women Leading The Finance Industry: Wells Fargo's E. Monique Evans on The 5 Things You Should Do To Increase Your Financial Literacy By Tyler Gallagher, Authority Magazine https://medium.com/authority-magazine/women-leading-the-finance-industry-wells-fargos-e-monique-evans-on-the-5-things-you-should-do-to-9d674193f4a6 She Represents: E. Monique Evans By Sherri Yarbrough, The Dallas Weekly https://www.dallasweekly.com/articles/she-represents-e-monique-evans/ Clearing the Obstacles By David Taffet, Dallas Voice Magazine: https://dallasvoice.com/clearing-the-obstacles/ WATCH + LISTEN + SUBSCRIBE + SHARE Let's #Soar and #ElevateWOCVoices #IntimateConversationWOC

Investing For Good
How To Pay Off Debt To Raise Solid Financial Foundation with Megan Lamke

Investing For Good

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 44:56


EPISODE NOTESHow to pay off your debt quickly?Are small apartments a safer investment?Benefits of investing in opportunities zonesWhy you should look for value-add dealsWhat you need to do before investing in real estateLife and Money Impact RoundWhat is the one thing to do now to live a meaningful and intentional life by design?What is one life or money hack that you can share to make an impact on others' lives?What is one thing to do right now to make the world a better place?RESOURCES/LINKS/BOOKS MENTIONEDCashflow quadrant by Robert T. KiyosakiRich dad poor dad by Robert T. Kiyosaki Syndicated Deal AnalyzerVentureThe miracle morning by Hal ElrodFinancial Peace UniversityABOUT MEGAN LAMKEMegan is the CEO and managing partner of Megan Lamke Real Estate. She started in the real estate industry working for Wells Fargo Home Mortgage in 2008. While at Wells Fargo, Megan built a network of real estate investors and learned some best practices for real estate investing during a recession. While working full-time, Megan began house hacking her primary residence while also convincing her tenants to help her implement the Buy, Renovate, Rent, Refinance, and Repeat (BRRRR) strategy. Megan was able to resign from all of her side hustles and corporate job to pursue real estate investing full time. Shortly after becoming a passive investor, Megan became a General Partner in her first real estate syndication. Today, Megan and her husband Darik have a rapidly growing portfolio of over 2,225 units valued at over $531 million dollars. CONNECT WITH MEGANWebsite: www.meganlamke.comInstagram: @meganlamkeLinkedIn: Megan (Zweber) LamkeCONNECT WITH USTo connect with Annie and Julie, as well as with other Investing For Good listeners, and to get the latest scoop on new and upcoming episodes, join Life and Money Show Podcast Community on Facebook.To learn more about real estate syndication investment opportunities, join the Goodegg Investor Club.Be sure to also grab your free copy of the Investing For Good book (just pay S&H)--Thanks for listening, and until next time, keep investing for good!

Tallahassee Business Podcast
Ep. 96 Local Resources Helping to Prepare Entrepreneurs for Global Success, Keith Bowers, FAMU Small Business Development Center

Tallahassee Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 18:15


The needs of a business are never universal and are continuously changing throughout every phase of the business life cycle. The Small Business Development Center at Florida A&M University (Florida SBDC) works with existing and startup small businesses to help them grow and compete in today's global economy. Whether you're looking to create a business plan, analyze your financials, or need help navigating an HR issue, the experts with the FAMU SBDC offer customized consulting at no cost to you.   Keith Bowers, Regional Director of the SBDC joins this week's episode of the Tallahassee Business Podcast, presented by The Health Network, and dives deeper into the resources available to help business owners make more informed decisions. Keith also shares some exciting news for minority and women-owned businesses through the help of Wells Fargo.   Learn more about how the FAMU Small Business Development Center can help you at http://sbdcfamu.org/

Freddie Mac Multifamily
Philanthropy in Affordable Housing with Eileen Fitzgerald

Freddie Mac Multifamily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 33:55


Philanthropy is a key player in addressing some of today's most important housing related challenges. In this episode, Corey and Steve are joined by Eileen Fitzgerald, Head of Housing Affordability Philanthropy at Wells Fargo, to talk through the fundamental roles of philanthropy in affordable housing and what we can learn from their involvement.

Leave the Pin In
Episode 154- Swing Changes, Rory, PIP $, Driver Limits and MORE!!!

Leave the Pin In

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 49:42


Welcome back Podcast Patrons to Episode 154 of Leave the Pin Podcast. Rory wins. Seems like forever but would you believe that its only been 5 months since his last win at Wells Fargo? Morikawa and Fowler battled but they came up short. Phil is shouting at clouds again and complaining about the USGA's decision to limit driver length to 46"s. Lane Kiffin got pelted by a dirty range ball as he was losing to Ole Miss. The PGA tour says no mas to tour players who just mill around the TPC clubs eating and playing the clubs out of house and home. We talk about why golfers change their swings when things are going well and what is wrong with us mentally. Finally the PIP money is about to be handed out and the deserving winner has not hit a golf shot this entire year. Shout out the sponsor EAGLES AND ARROWS. Welcome back podcast patrons. Tell your friends, we're back with another episode of Leave the Pin Podcast. Please leave a review and rating on iTunes if you enjoy the episode. Shop our newly re-stocked merchandise at https://www.bonfire.com/store/leave-the-pin-podcast/ and check out all our new apparel designs. Follow us on Instagram @leavethepin Tag us on your social media feed with #Leavethepin Follow us on TikTok @leavethepin Checkout our sponsor Eagles and Arrows on instagram @eaglesandarrowsco and at www.eaglesandarrows.com Email us at Leavethepin@gmail.com Get busy golfing or get busy dying --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/leave-the-pin/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/leave-the-pin/support

Earnings Season
Wells Fargo & Company, Q3 2021 Earnings Call, Oct 14, 2021

Earnings Season

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 69:09


Wells Fargo & Company, Q3 2021 Earnings Call, Oct 14, 2021

Bom Dia USA
Resultados e mais resultados: Bank of America, Citi, Morgan Stanley, Wells Fargo, Domino's e outros

Bom Dia USA

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 12:57


O seu podcast sobre o mercado americano.

Squawk Box Europe Express
SQUAWK BOX, FRIDAY 15TH OCTOBER, 2021

Squawk Box Europe Express

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 24:39


The S&P posts its best day since March as earnings season kicks into gear on a upbeat day for US markets. All three major averages are now on track to end the week in positive territory. Banking stocks are among the winners on Wall St. Bank of America, Morgan Stanley, Citi and Wells Fargo all post earnings beats as trading ramps up and credit reserves are released. As the gas crisis grips Europe and prices soar, Russia's Deputy Prime Minister Alexander Novak tells CNBC that the Nord Stream 2 pipeline is a ready-made solution, waiting to go. And Hugo Boss hikes its full-year outlook, amid strong demand in Europe and the Americas, but the German fashion retailer warns of the impact of renewed Covid restrictions in the Asia Pacific region.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The FarrCast : Wealth Strategies

Earnings season starts, and The FarrCast is here helping you see through the headlines! This week's show begins with a discussion with Kenny Polcari on the numbers, housing issues, and Don Ho. (It will all make sense when you hear it!) Michael then welcomes political analyst Dan Mahaffee and he finds a silver lining in the latest political turmoil -- Congress may actually have to begin to discuss the substance of policy proposals. For our special guest segment, Michael is joined by Dr. Jay Bryson, Chief Economist from Wells Fargo. Jay has long been a FarrCast fan favorite, explaining esoteric market jargon in ways investors understand. He explains why inflation is a concern, but there are good reasons to think it will subside. Bringing you experts and insiders -- it's The FarrCast!

WSJ Minute Briefing
New Jobless Claims Fall Below 300,000 for First Time During Pandemic

WSJ Minute Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 1:59


Plus: Bank of America, Wells Fargo and Morgan Stanley report strong third-quarter profits. Boeing deals with new Dreamliner defect. J.R. Whalen reports. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Real Investment Show Podcast
Markets Sustain Key Support, as Banks Soldier On

The Real Investment Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 3:53


NOTE: Watch the video version of this report by subscribing to our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9EuTwzQKMKU&list=PLVT8LcWPeAujOhIFDH3jRhuLDpscQaq16&index=1&t=4s (10/14/21) Markets Rally Above the 100-DMA as Earnings Season gathers speed; support remains intact--a good sign, suggesting markets will work their way to the 50-DMA. However, we're rapidly eating up money flow buy signal; best idea is to use this rally to rebalance risk in portfolios. Most banks are reporting better earnings--thanks to share buy-backs and lower loan-loss reserves, boosting bottom line EPS. BOA, Wells Fargo, Morgan Stanley, CitiGroup; UnitedHealthCare in the spot light today. - Hosted by RIA Advisors Chief Investment Strategist, Lance Roberts -------- Get more info & commentary: https://realinvestmentadvice.com/newsletter/ -------- Visit our Site: www.realinvestmentadvice.com Contact Us: 1-855-RIA-PLAN -------- Subscribe to RIA Pro: https://riapro.net/home -------- Connect with us on social: https://twitter.com/RealInvAdvice https://twitter.com/LanceRoberts https://www.facebook.com/RealInvestmentAdvice/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/realinvestmentadvice/ #MarketRally #100-DMA #BankEarning #CorporateEarnings #EarningsOutlook #InterestRates #PortfolioRebalancing #SpendingBill #MarketLiquidity #Stocks #Trading #Rates #Money #Markets #Finance

Numbers by Barron's
4 Banks Reporting Earnings This Morning

Numbers by Barron's

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 3:42


Delta anticipates higher fuel costs. Gold surges 2%. Morgan Stanley, Bank of America, Citigroup, and Wells Fargo all release their third-quarter financials. Host: Nicholas Jasinski. Producer: Katie Ferguson. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Wells Fargo Asset Management: On The Trading Desk(R)
Has the bitcoin boat left the shipyard? Let's find out

Wells Fargo Asset Management: On The Trading Desk(R)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 18:08


Today's podcast features a discussion around bitcoin – its mining, its adoption, and other questions about its role as an asset. To discuss is Frank Cooke, Quantitative Portfolio Manager with our Multi-Asset Solutions Team. Wells Fargo Asset Management (WFAM) is the trade name for certain investment advisory/management firms owned by Wells Fargo & Company. These firms include but are not limited to Wells Capital Management Incorporated and Wells Fargo Funds Management, LLC. Certain products managed by WFAM entities are distributed by Wells Fargo Funds Distributor, LLC (a broker-dealer and Member FINRA).This material is for general informational and educational purposes only and is NOT intended to provide investment advice or a recommendation of any kind—including a recommendation for any specific investment, strategy, or plan. PAR-1021-00847 INVESTMENT PRODUCTS: NOT FDIC INSURED • NO BANK GUARANTEE • MAY LOSE VALUE

Bitch Slap  ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!
I seemingly couldn't work more even if I wanted to.

Bitch Slap ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 10:17


I've quit many addictive compulsive behaviors in my life.  Including drinking, drugging, and  gambling. And I definitely had a case of workaholism.  And these days as I build an online business...on my days of weakness where I think, "if I could just work more". I'm like, “Yeah.  No. You can't." Administrative: (See episode transcript below)Check out the Tools For A Good Life Summit here: Virtually and FOR FREE https://bit.ly/ToolsForAGoodLifeSummitStart podcasting!  These are the best mobile mic's for IOS and Android phones.  You can literally take them anywhere on the fly.Get the Shure MV88 mobile mic for IOS,  https://amzn.to/3z2NrIJGet the Shure MV88+ for  mobile mic for Android  https://amzn.to/3ly8SNjGet A Course In Miracles Here! https://amzn.to/3hoE7sAAccess my “Insiders Guide to Finding Peace” here: https://belove.media/peaceSee more resources at https://belove.media/resourcesEmail me: contact@belove.mediaFor social Media:      https://www.instagram.com/mrmischaz/https://www.facebook.com/MischaZvegintzovSubscribe and share to help spread the love for a better world!As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.Transcript: Mischa Z: 00:01 There's a line in the big book of Alcoholics Anonymous that says "seemingly he couldn't drink again, even if he wanted to". Now, in other words, a person that had been crippled with alcoholism and not being able to stop drinking, and it was physically killing him and destroying his relationships. And, uh, he embraces the program, the 12 steps of Alcoholics Anonymous and, you know, ends up where seemingly he couldn't drink again, even if he wanted to. And I'm going to relate that to working a lot. Seemingly I couldn't work again a lot, even if I wanted to. And we could say call that alcohol, uh, workaholism. So, uh, you know, I've had an opportunity in my life to clean up lots of, uh, addictive compulsive behaviors. So quit drinking. Um, a long time ago, decades ago, 35 years ago, as of this recording and I am not here representing Alcoholics Anonymous.Mischa Z: 01:34 So let's just get that clear. Um, I also got to quit drugs. I also got to quit gambling and I definitely had a case of yeah, workaholism. I think you could call it a workaholism when I was in sales, you know, my quest for success, financial success for, you know, notoriety you with, with it being number one, within whatever company I was in. Um, perhaps I worked an inordinate amount inordinate, too much. How's that to the detriment of family, to the detriment of relationships, to the detriment of, um, my physical health, maybe. Um, definitely. Uh, but, and I'm not saying anybody should or should not want to work that much or. Hey, somebody is so inspired to work, create whatever, you know, I'm not here to judge that or say what that amount is. I will say that, you know, the pattern I was in with work needing to achieve, needing to make X amount of money needing to, uh, do these kinds of things I would throw surfing in there as well.Mischa Z: 03:26 Um, but anyway, um, it was interesting because as I think about it, and as I record this, I was really good about taking weekends off work-wise I was really good about, um, not bringing the work home. It's just, I would leave really early in the morning and, uh, perhaps, you know, get home. I tried not to, to, to work 18 hour days, let's say it definitely. Some people will absolutely work from home work on the weekends or these sorts of things. I'm dating myself as well because not many of us were working from home as much as we are today. And the recent COVID pandemic has escalated that.Mischa Z: 04:23 But I mean to say, is that when I'm done working, I'm done working, but my routine had become this. I would, I would, you know, exit the house very early, so I could surf and maybe that's six in the morning surfing and then work for the two priorities and, and, you know, I would, so what would happen? And then on the weekends, it was all about surfing and Mischa time. And, and then, you know, I, I was working so much in producing so much in having success that I started putting on realistic expectations on Dawn, my wife, you know. I'm the producer and this sort of arrogant attitude look what I'm doing for the house, paying the bills. Therefore I don't need to provide perhaps other emotional support and stuff like that. I dunno. It's very interesting. Uh, just, just know that, you know. That drive for being number one that drive for ultimate success that drive for making a lot of money. You know, especially when I was in mortgages was there, I wanted to be number one at Wells Fargo. I wantedSpeaker 2: 05:57 that notoriety and the financial fulfillment of that. And so then, you know, it came to quitting the mortgage business and staying home with my two boys being a stay at home ish dad. So I did that back in 2016. I think it was when I finally quit mortgages. Um, maybe it was 2017. I've sort of lost track. I need to figure out that exact timeline. I think it was 2016. It's definitely, yeah, it must be five years by now, again, as I record this. But as I'm in the 2CCX, as I'm creating these online, working on creating an online business and doing all this stuff. I, I couldn't put in 12 hour days seemingly if I wanted to. Like that lack of balance and the capacity to, to go out of balance has been stripped from me. I couldn't go back to workaholism seemingly even if I wanted to.Speaker 2: 07:26 And sometimes, you know, the drive to have followers and do all this stuff and build this business and make it happen fast and all these things and the illusion of more time, more time spent will help accelerate that process. You know, I can, I can think that I want that, but I can't literally physically do it, which is pretty freaking cool. So on my days of weakness where I'm like, if I could just work more, I'm like, "yeah, no, you can't." I literally can't work more than the, you know what, as I've said before, I'm, I'm maybe putting in five or six hours, but it's good solid hours, but I seemingly couldn't do more even if I wanted to. So anyway, there you go. Um, love that, uh, I'm done have a good day peace out.

No Limits Selling
Rick Barrera on Becoming Essential To Your Clients

No Limits Selling

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 26:51


Rick Barrera is known as the Revenue Accelerator for the work he does with entrepreneurs, small businesses and enterprise organizations to smooth the on-ramp and make them easier to do business with. He believes that you can generate any level of revenue you choose, whenever you choose to generate it.     Rick worked with Dave Zerfoss, CEO at Husqvarna to take the company from 29 million dollars to half a billion in just over 10 years. Rick is frequently called upon to turn around troubled companies, returning them to robust profitability. He has personally started many companies including a seed company, newspaper delivery, babysitting, landscaping, photo studio, restaurant, vitamin company, sales and customer service training, concierge services, financial services, real estate, an online training company and a professional speaking firm. He is currently engaged with two M&A companies doing consolidations in two different industries. His current passion project is PartnerHere.com, an online marketplace enabling entrepreneurs to find business partners and resources...without cash. His goal is to build the world's largest online community for entrepreneurs of every stripe. As you will soon learn, he believes that entrepreneurship is the solution to many of the issues that we face as individuals, families and as a global community.   Rick is also the Head of Faculty for the Center for Heart Led Leadership in Denver, Colorado where he works with SEAL Team leaders, world class mountain climbers, Fortune 500 CEO's, journalists, actors and astronauts to teach We Before Me, relationship focused leadership, to the next generation of leaders. His client list numbers in the thousands and includes Abbott Labs, American Airlines, Ameriprise, AT&T, AutoCrib, AutoZone, Bayer, Black and Decker, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Caterpillar, Chevron, Cigna, Conoco, Dairy Queen, eBay, EMC, Fidelity, Ford Motor Company, Four Seasons Hotels, GE, GlaxoSmithKline, Hallmark Cards, Harley-Davidson, Hilton, Honda, Honeywell, HP, Husqvarna, IBM, Intel, Intuit, John Hancock, Johnson Controls, Kaiser, Lenovo, Les Schwab Tires, Lexus, Marriott, Merrill Lynch, Monsanto, Nissan, REMAX, Ritz-Carlton, Time Warner, Verizon, Volvo, Weyerhaeuser and Wells Fargo. Rick is a well-known business thought leader having written 8 books on leadership, branding, customer service, sales, and personal development including two best-sellers, Non-Manipulative Selling & Overpromise and Overdeliver.   Contact Rick: Website Company Website LinkedIn YouTube Instagram

MarketFoolery
Southwest Airlines Grounds Itself

MarketFoolery

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 18:31


With earnings later this week from Goldman Sachs, Bank of America, Wells Fargo and other big banks, how are deposits and loan activity looking? And why is JPMorgan Chase more interested in inflation than the others? Jason Moser previews the latest episode of “Industry Focus” and analyzes Southwest Airlines' rough weekend and the box office results for “No Time To Die”.

Energy Cast
125 | Institutional Incubator | Wells Fargo

Energy Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 27:30


We discuss a new energy incubator model between financial institutions and national labs with Wells Fargo's Ramsay Huntley. For pictures and more info, visit http://www.energy-cast.com/125-wf.html

Our Voices Matter Podcast
Leading in the Age of DEI - Monica Cole

Our Voices Matter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 43:19


Leading in the age of DEI is a hot topic in corporate circles these days.  My guest this week has earned her place in those circles as a leader and mentor to those finding their way up the corporate ladder. Including those traditionally left at the bottom.Tell Me What the Team Looks LikeMonica Cole's path to Executive Vice President at Wells Fargo is paved with lessons learned on a college basketball court.  Skills she acquired on the hardwood help set her apart and set her up to lead effectively in the age of DEI.Today at Wells Fargo, Monica leads a team of 230 within Agribusiness, Food and Hospitality.  And would you believe she knew nothing about those sectors when she raised her hand and said "yes?!"That's because, regardless of the challenge, Monica's first shot is always: "Tell me what the team looks like."   Who are the role players?  How do their skills and experiences complement one another?  And how can they help us win?  Whether on the court or in corporate America, Monica knows the more diverse the team, the better the odds of coming out on top.  Leading With VulnerabilityBut as a leader in the age of DEI, Monica also knows there is another key component to success:  leading with vulnerability.During our conversation, she shares deeply personal experiences as a Black woman that helped change her corporate culture, because she was willing to "go there."Because she shared her truth, she helped those in authority look at themselves and their actions from a different perspective.And she routinely urges her team to call her out when "she's nuts!", so that she can be a better leader.There's Enough for All of UsLeading in the age of DEI certainly comes with a set of challenges.   One of the biggest is a common belief that "your success is to my detriment."  But as Monica shares in this episode, and I wholeheartedly agree, there's enough for all of us.  It's way past time for us to embrace the diversity that makes our companies and our lives better.www.ourvoicesmatterpodcast.comwww.lorellemedia.comThis podcast is devoted to empowering us all to better understand each other's differences...one story at a time.  Emmy Award-winning journalist, Linda Lorelle, guides guests through insightful, unexpected conversations that reveal our common humanity.  This show is not about politics per se; it is about finding a way to reclaim civility in the context of the contentious times in which we live, by sharing our personal and professional stories, in hopes that others might find a glimpse of themselves.Support the show (http://patreon.com/OurVoicesMatterPodcast)

No Barriers
The Ability App with Alex Knoll

No Barriers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 37:53


16-year-old Alex Knoll is a tech founder and international speaker with a passion for helping others. He has been featured on The Ellen DeGeneres Show, BBC, Irish Times, NBC Nightly News, Sky News & many more.Alex developed Ability App, a global crowd-sourced web app that helps people with cognitive, hearing, vision, and/or mobility disabilities and caregivers search for specific accessible and inclusive features at locations around the world. Ability App launched globally on May 1, 2020. Please visit the Ability App website for more information at TheAbilityApp.com.Most recently, Alex was awarded The Diana Award, given out by the charity of the same name with the support of The Duke of Cambridge and The Duke of Sussex, and was created to honor Princess Diana's work while inspiring others to action.Special thanks to Wells Fargo for their sponsorship of today's podcast in a series featuring folks who are breaking barriers in the business and the workplace.Resources:Visit the Ability App Website: https://theabilityapp.com/Watch Alex on EllenHow Ability App Works

Zero Percent
1 - Zero Percent

Zero Percent

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 18:01


The Jewish People make up just .2% of world population. How does a People that makes up virtually zero percent of humanity have such a huge impact on our world?Check out the Dear Rabbi Podcast at https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dear-rabbi/id1565016262Episode Transcript:Mark Twain wrote, "If the statistics are right, the Jews constitute but 1% of the human race. Properly, the Jew ought hardly be heard of, but he is heard of, has always been heard of. He is as prominent on the planet as any other people, and his commercial importance is extravagantly out of proportion to the smallness of his bulk. His contributions to the world's list of great names in literature, science, art, music, finance, medicine, and abstruse learning are also way out of proportion to the weakness of his numbers."This 1% is a gross exaggeration. The Jewish people today actually make up way less than a percent. We make up 0.2% of the world's population. Now, math was never my strong point, but if we're going to round 0.2 to the closest number, that's zero. The Jewish people make up just 0% of world population. Now, how does a people who make up just 0% have such a huge impact on the world? As Mark Twain wrote, "The Jew ought hardly be heard of," and yet we cannot escape the fact that the Jewish people have contributed so much to our world. I'm Menachem Lehrfield, and this is Zero Percent, a podcast where we explore the enormous impact a tiny people has made that enhances and affects all of our lives on a daily basis.We will explore ancient wisdom for modern living. As the second president of the United States, John Adams, said, "I will insist that the Hebrews have done more to civilize men than any other nation. If I were an atheist and believed in blind eternal fate, I should still believe that fate had ordained the Jews to be the most essential instrument for civilizing nations." Whether you love the Jewish people or you hate them, it is very difficult to deny the impact that the Jewish people have had on the world, that the Jewish people have had on civilizing nations. I believe that we have access to the longest-running case study on success.Now, as a Jew, I'm so uncomfortable with the topic of Jewish success, and I know many others are as well. Whenever someone begins talking about how successful the Jewish people are, it naturally makes us uncomfortable, but it's hard to deny the numbers. No matter what your definition of success is, the Jew is over-represented. Perhaps the best benchmark of success is the Nobel Prize. It was established by the Swedish inventor Alfred Nobel in 1895. Nobel was most well-known for the discovery of dynamite. And at the end of his life, in his will he bequeathed all of his assets to be used to establish five prizes, which we now know as the Nobel Prize.And they'd go to individuals in recognition of cultural or scientific advances in six categories, literature, chemistry, economics, physics, world peace, and medicine. Between 1901 and 2020, last year, the Nobel Prize has been awarded to more than 900 individuals and organizations. Now, how many of those recipients would you expect to be Jewish? Being that the Jewish people make up just 0.2% of world population, we would expect 1.8 Nobel Prize laureates to be Jewish. That would be the proportionate number based on population. In fact, 208 Jewish people have won Nobel Prizes. 208 is an over-representation of more than 11,500%.That's huge, but it's not just in Nobel Prizes that we see such over-representation. Look at practically every arena that can be measured. Can you imagine the scientific world without the contributions of Einstein to modern physics or Freud to psychoanalysis or Asimov to robotics? The scientific world would be a completely different place. And let's say you're going to look at finance and economics as your benchmark of success. It's interesting to note that according to Forbes, Jews make up 22% of the world's top 50 billionaires, 33% of the world's top 15 billionaires, and 28% of the top 25, not to mention finance household names like Goldman Sachs, Rothschild, Warburg, Kohlberg, Kravis and Roberts, Wells Fargo.What would the world of technology look like without Intel's Andrew Grove and Leslie Vadasz, or Google without Sergey Brin and Larry Page, or Oracle's Larry Ellison, or Microsoft's Steve Ballmer, Dell's Michael Dell, Qualcomm's Irwin Jacobs, Facebook without Mark Zuckerberg or Sheryl Sandberg? And what about medicine? There's an old Jewish joke where a Jewish person is finally elected president of the United States, and he calls up his mother and says, "Mom, I'm the president of the United States. Are you going to come to the inauguration?" And she says, "Well, I've got nothing to wear." So he says, "Ma, I'm going to be the president. I'll get you a dressmaker. She'll make you a beautiful dress. Don't worry about that."And she says, "Well, I only eat kosher." He says, "Ma, I'm the president. I'll get you a kosher meal." She says, "Well, how am I going to get there?" He says, "Mom, I'll send Air Force One to pick you up. Just come to the inauguration." So she comes, and she ends up at the inauguration and she's standing there on the reviewing stand, and on her left are all the Supreme Court justices, and on the right is the president's cabinet. And the ceremony begins, and her son, the new president, raises his hand as he's about to be sworn into office, and his mother nudges the person next to her and says, "You see that guy with his hand up? His brother is a doctor."You may be familiar with the stereotype of the nice Jewish doctor, but it comes from somewhere. Throughout the world, consistently on lists of top doctors, you will find Jewish names. And that's not to mention the enormous Jewish contributions to medical research and pharmacology, including the invention of Prozac, Valium, the synthetic fertilizer, radiation, chemotherapy, the artificial kidney dialysis machine, the defibrillator, the cardiac pacemaker, laser technology, not to be confused with Jewish space lasers, the invention of blood transfusions and penicillin, the mammogram, the pill, vaccines against the deadly polio and hepatitis B and measles, not to mention the vaccinating needle itself.And we can't forget about the enormous impact that Dr. Albert Bourla, the CEO of Pfizer, has had in developing the world's first safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine. And Dr. Bourla is the son of Holocaust survivors. Today, Israel is on the forefront of medical innovation. Israel is the home to Teva, the world's largest generic pharmaceutical company. Israel is number one in the world for medical device patents per capita. The medical technology that's coming out of Israel is the stuff of science fiction. I don't know if you saw the ReWalk, which was featured years ago in the hit show Glee, but it's basically a bionic robotic exoskeleton which allows paraplegics the ability to walk and even run.Runners in London and Tel Aviv have actually completed marathons with the ReWalk. Here are paraplegics that thought they would never walk again, and they're running marathons thanks to Israeli technology. The PillCam, which allows doctors to see the inside of the digestive track without any invasive procedures or colonoscopies or anything. You just swallow a pill and they can see the inside of your body. Or this thing called Bio Weld, which is used now instead of stitches or glue, which uses cold plasma, and within minutes, it seals the wound and disinfects it with almost no scarring and no recovery time.And have you seen this thing called Bio-Retina? It's a technology that restores vision to people blinded by retinal disease. It's basically this tiny implantable device that's inserted into the retina in a 30 minute outpatient procedure, and it turns into an artificial retina that melds to the neurons in the eye. And it charges itself with this pair of glasses that it comes with. And if somebody is blind or visually impaired and that's not an option, there's another Israeli technology called OrCam, which is a camera that magnetically attaches to the side of a pair of glasses. You can barely even see it, and it reads text displayed on any surface, and it can also identify objects or specific faces or amounts of currency or anything that somebody who's visually impaired or blind would need to see.So it has this discreet earpiece which will basically, through audio, tell you everything that you would be seeing with your eyes. So blind people can interact with their world without the need of somebody else. It really gives them a sense of independence. There are so many successful cancer treatments coming out of Israel, and we can spend hours discussing the impact the Jewish people have had in the world of medicine. But let's say you want something a little lighter. Maybe entertainment is your benchmark of success. Well, if it is, six of the eight biggest Hollywood studios were founded by Jews. And still today, the rolling credits of almost every single movie can be confused for a Hebrew school roll call. It's just Jew after Jew after Jew.For full transcript please visit: www.joidenver.com/zeropercent/1---zero-percent

Jim Hightower's Radio Lowdown
The Grand Larceny of Bank(er) Robbery

Jim Hightower's Radio Lowdown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 2:10


Exciting news from Wall Street: Our wealth markets are booming! Everything from the Dow Jones Average to gold prices are rocketing to new records, showering us with wealth from above. Oh… wait. Maybe you're one of the big majority of workaday Americans who don't own stocks or gold, so maybe you're not celebrating Wall Street's big boom. But just chill, because conventional corporate wisdom assures us that the wealthy will invest their good fortunes in enterprises that eventually will produce trickle-down gains for everyone. Excuse my rudeness, but let's take a peek at how those who're reaping today's big-buck bonanza are actually investing that wealth. Look at Wall Streeters themselves. The big banks have been making money like… well, like bankers, with their stock prices zooming up by 28 percent just since January. So, how are these moneyed elites spending this windfall? Not by making job-creating investments, but by simply giving the money to their big shareholders, including their own top executives – nearly all of whom are already among the richest people on Earth. The main way they do this is through a slight-of-hand called a “stock buyback.” The honchos simply cash out the bulk of that 28 percent increase in the value of the banks' stock price, using that money to repurchase more of their banks' own stock from lesser shareholders. Hocus-pocus, this manipulation artificially pumps-up the value of the stock these insider shareholders already own – making each of them even richer than rich, although they've done absolutely nothing to earn this increased wealth. It's not a small scam. JPMorgan Chase is now sinking $30 billion into buying its own stock. Wells Fargo is shifting $18 billion into the scheme, and Bank of America is throwing $25 billion into its buyback. Hello – Wall Street bankers are the biggest robbers in America.

TV Guidance Counselor Podcast
TV Guidance Counselor Episode 490: John Sayles

TV Guidance Counselor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 90:49


This week Ken welcomes writer, director, actor, and one of Ken's most looked up to Renascence Men, John Sayles. Ken and John discuss outer space, TV as babysitter, how 1960 was far before Ken was born, late night TV, inappropriate commercials, human remote controls, the lack of choice, 30 Westerns on TV, Have Gun Will Travel, signature guns, TV theme songs, how you set the tone and mood for a story, Wanted Dead or Alive, Steve McQueen, how some actors are just cool, Ernie Kovacs, sight gags, surreal TV, The Rebel, Nick Adams wannabe status, Johnny Cash singing the theme to The Rebel, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, how The British actually really love Murder, Elmer Bernstein's theme to Johnny Staccato, John Cassavetes, west coast white jazz musicians, the Ed Sullivan Show, variety shows, Johnny Puleo and the Harmonica Gang, SCTV, The Beatles, Jackie Mason flipping off America on live TV, Peter Gunn, lack of ambiguity in television, first seeing color on TV in a baseball game, learning story structure via watching TV, Sergio Leone, being and undercover western detective for Wells Fargo, Adventures in Paradise, Ricardo Montauban, Dobie Gillis, Bob Denver as Maynard J. Krebbs, Tuesday Weld acting on TV with Warren Beatty, Archie, making your own On the Road as Route 66 with very minor changes, The Riflemen, Chuck Connors, doing your chores, TV and movies being banned from shooting in Chicago for years, The Untouchables, Crime Story, M Squad, Lee Marvin, Police Squad being influenced by M Squad's theme song, Joe Dante directing Police Squad, the best sight gags on the show, John Ford, Andy Devine's Hollywood status after Ward Bond's death, The Millionaire, dueling Bat Mastersons, being a super fan of mafia succession, how Ring Lardner in 8 Men Out was Robert Stack's voice, Robert Stack's jokes, Walter Winchell, Neville Brand, Al Capone, Friday Night Fights, The Gillette Cavalcade of Sports, how boxing was the perfect subject to air on television, Emile Griffith killing Benny Paret in the ring live on TV, The Twilight Zone, Lee Marvin in the Twilight Zone Episode Steel, Hemingway's story "50 Grand", and the oddness of TV sign offs.