Podcasts about Dell Technologies

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American technology company

  • 351PODCASTS
  • 942EPISODES
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  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 5, 2022LATEST
Dell Technologies

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Best podcasts about Dell Technologies

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Latest podcast episodes about Dell Technologies

Road to 2030
#34 Edge Computing / Gast: Joachim Thomasberger

Road to 2030

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 50:35


Löst Edge Computing die Cloud ab? Und ist es nur ein neuer Hype oder unerlässlich für unser zukünftiges Leben? Was genau Edge Computing bedeutet und welche Vor- und Nachteile es mit sich bringt, erklärt Joachim Thomasberger von Intel.

TechSperience
Episode 101: RTO and the Future of the Office

TechSperience

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 31:40


How will businesses work safely and smarter in 2022? Will they return to the office 100%? Will they adopt a hybrid work model? In this episode, we address the challenges and possible solutions surrounding RTO. Guest 1 Title and Bio: Tony Dancona; Digital Workspace Evangelist and part of Connection Lab. With more than 25 years of experience in virtualization and end-user computing, Tony is considered a thought leader in the industry. He currently serves on different Technical Advisory Board including Dell Technologies, VMware and CRN Channel Company IOT. Host: James Hilliard Show Notes: [0:20] Introduction of guest [0:45] What did work look like in 2008? [2:36] What does work look like currently? [3:45] How are customers defining in-office collaboration? [4:40] Are we lacking anything from working remotely? [6:15] How do we make today's office safe? [8:01] What technologies are you seeing most organizations trying to implement today to keep their offices safe? [10:13] What benefits are there to utilizing some of this technology? [11:25] Can some of this technology allow for exceptions? [13:13] What technologies are companies looking at inside work environments? [16:23] What verticals can this technology impact? [17:31] How do we make offices smarter than they were a couple of years ago? [20:51] What have been the advancements in conference technology? [23:03] Give us a high-level primer on the Connect Aware app. [27:50] To utilize the features of this app, what technologies are required? [29:03] What changes do you expect to see in physical offices in the coming year?  

Z warsztatu menedżera
ZWL 055: Rozwijaj siebie, zadbaj o motywację innych!

Z warsztatu menedżera

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 59:01


Odcinek 55 podcastu Z Warsztatu Lidera „Rozwijaj siebie, zadbaj o motywację innych!” to rozmowa z Tomaszem Szabunio, Team & People Development Expertem oraz 7-krotnym właścicielem pięknego tytułu:

Insight TechTalk
TechTalk | Edge Computing: The Next Big Bet?

Insight TechTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 11:34


What becomes possible when computation and data storage are done right at the data source? Edge computing solves for real-time data suffering latency issues while also reducing costs, benefiting both your organization and your customers. In this week's episode, Insight's Andrew Nelson and Dell Technologies' Andrew Clingerman discuss the future of edge computing.

NUI Galway
Will AI Help or Hinder Human Empowerment?

NUI Galway

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 37:39


Murray Scott is joined by Bill Schmarzo, Data Management Innovation Customer Advocate, Dell Technologies & Honorary Professor in the J.E. Cairnes School of Business & Economics at NUI Galway – in a discussion on the ethical issues surrounding AI and the importance of human creativity.

ITmedia PC USER
これからのPCや周辺機器はどうあるべき? Dellが複数の「コンセプト」を発表

ITmedia PC USER

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021


これからのPCや周辺機器はどうあるべき? Dellが複数の「コンセプト」を発表。 Dell Technologiesは12月14日から15日(米国東部時間)にかけて、ノートPCや周辺機器のコンセプトを相次いで発表した。あくまでも“コンセプト”なので一般向けに発売される予定はないが、今後の新製品に反映される可能性がある。

B2B Tech Talk with Ingram Micro
Cyber Recovery and Data Protection: Why Everybody Needs a Vault

B2B Tech Talk with Ingram Micro

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 19:26


To date, over a third of organizations have been hacked. As a result of the shocking prevalence of cyberattacks, cyber recovery and data protection are top of mind for the vast majority of executives. Is your organization prepared to deal with this clear and imminent threat? Shelby Skrhak talks with Mark Beaton, senior director for data protection solutions at Dell Technologies, about: - How Dell and Ingram Micro are helping customers prepare - Dell's strategy to create differentiation in the market - Cyber recovery best practices For more information, contact Alex Holler (alexander.holler@ingrammicro.com) or visit Cyber Data Recovery Software and Solutions. To join the discussion, follow us on Twitter @IngramTechSol #B2BTechTalk Listen to this episode and more like it by subscribing to B2B Tech Talk on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or Stitcher. Or tune in on our website.

Driven by Data: The Podcast
S2 | Ep 10 | Schmarzo Unplugged: Actually Monetizing Data with Bill Schmarzo, Customer Advocate and Data Management Incubation at Dell Technologies

Driven by Data: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 47:43


In Episode 10 of Season 2 on Driven by Data: The Podcast, Kyle Winterbottom is re-joined by Bill Schmarzo, Customer Advocate and Data Management Incubation at Dell Technologies, where they discuss how things have gone since his first appearance on the podcast, which includes: What his new role at Dell Technologies entails Why he's getting the chance to put his money where his mouth is Why the transition away from the CIO was required and has happened How his prediction that there will be a CDMO (Chief Data Monetization Officer) is unfolding How the Data Leader is now the person responsible for quantifying value from Data Dell's approach to motivating and guiding organizing to becoming data-focused The importance of an organization understanding their data Why storing data is not enough and prevents organizations from driving value from their data How are organizations applying data and analytics to drive quantifiable benefits

Brave UX with Brendan Jarvis
Tracy McGoldrick

Brave UX with Brendan Jarvis

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 66:27


Tracy McGoldrick talks about the challenges of building a Research Ops practice that supports over 100 UX researchers, and how IBM's increasing the impact of design. Highlights include: ⭐ How do you know if Research Ops is doing a good job? ⭐ What is the biggest misconception people have about Research Ops? ⭐ How has GDPR and CCPA impacted the Research Ops practice? ⭐ Why is IBM investing hundreds of millions of dollars into Design? ⭐ How did you make your massive research repository easy to use? ===== Who is Tracy McGoldrick? Tracy is the Head of UX Research Ops and Design Eminence at IBM in Austin Texas, where she is currently creating the infrastructure to help accelerate IBM's Cloud and Cognitive Software research practice.  A passionate evangelist for User Experience and Design Thinking, Tracy actively works with all aspects of IBM's business to grow the relationships and culture that develop awareness, appreciation, and ability in human-centred design practices. Before joining IBM in 2017, Tracy was the Head of Global Photography and CG Imaging at Dell Technologies. There, she led the talented teams who created visual assets for the company, while also running the operational aspects that supported them.  ====== Find Tracy here: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tracymcgoldrick/ ====== Liked what you heard and want to hear more? Subscribe and support the show by leaving a review on Apple Podcasts (or wherever you listen). Follow us on our other social channels for more great Brave UX content! YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/TheSpaceInBetween/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-space-in-between/  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thespaceinbetw__n/  ====== Hosted by Brendan Jarvis: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/brendanjarvis/ Website: https://thespaceinbetween.co.nz/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/brendanjarvis/

Business Lab
To Accelerate Business, Build Better Human-Machine Partnerships

Business Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 32:01


Businesses that want to be digital leaders in their markets need to embrace automation, not only to augment existing capabilities or to reduce costs but to position themselves to successfully maneuver the rapid expansion of IT demand ushered in through digital innovation. “It's a scale issue,” says John Roese, global chief technology officer at Dell Technologies. “Without autonomous operations, it becomes impossible to keep up with the growing opportunity to become a more digital business using human effort alone.” The main hurdle to autonomous operations, says Roese, is more psychological than technological. “You have got to be open-minded to this concept of rebalancing the work between human beings and the machine environments that exist both logically and physically,” he says. “If you're not embracing and wanting it to happen and you're resisting it, all the products and solutions we can deliver to you will not help.” Technology and infrastructure-driven AI and ML discussions are expanding beyond IT into finance and sales—meaning, technology has direct business implications. “Selling is a relationship between you and your customer, but there's a third party—data and artificial intelligence— that can give you better insights and the ability to be more contextually aware and more responsive to your customer, says Roese. “Data, AI, and ML technologies can ultimately change the economics and the performance of all parts of the business, whether it be sales or services or engineering or IT.” And as companies gather, analyze, and use data at the edge, autonomous operations become even more of a business necessity. “Seventy percent of the world's data is probably going to be created and acted upon outside of data centers in the future, meaning in edges,” says Roese. “Edge and distributed topologies have huge impacts on digital transformation, but we also see that having a strong investment in autonomous systems, autonomous operations at the edge is actually almost as big of a prerequisite…      to make it work.” Show notes and references What is autonomous operations? Perspectives on the impact of autonomous operations

Screaming in the Cloud
Building Distributed Cognition into Your Business with Sam Ramji

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 39:56


About SamA 25-year veteran of the Silicon Valley and Seattle technology scenes, Sam Ramji led Kubernetes and DevOps product management for Google Cloud, founded the Cloud Foundry foundation, has helped build two multi-billion dollar markets (API Management at Apigee and Enterprise Service Bus at BEA Systems) and redefined Microsoft's open source and Linux strategy from “extinguish” to “embrace”.He is nerdy about open source, platform economics, middleware, and cloud computing with emphasis on developer experience and enterprise software. He is an advisor to multiple companies including Dell Technologies, Accenture, Observable, Fletch, Orbit, OSS Capital, and the Linux Foundation.Sam received his B.S. in Cognitive Science from UC San Diego, the home of transdisciplinary innovation, in 1994 and is still excited about artificial intelligence, neuroscience, and cognitive psychology.Links: DataStax: https://www.datastax.com Sam Ramji Twitter: https://twitter.com/sramji Open||Source||Data: https://www.datastax.com/resources/podcast/open-source-data Screaming in the Cloud Episode 243 with Craig McLuckie: https://www.lastweekinaws.com/podcast/screaming-in-the-cloud/innovating-in-the-cloud-with-craig-mcluckie/ Screaming in the Cloud Episode 261 with Jason Warner: https://www.lastweekinaws.com/podcast/screaming-in-the-cloud/what-github-can-give-to-microsoft-with-jason-warner/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. Set up a meeting with a Redis expert during re:Invent, and you'll not only learn how you can become a Redis hero, but also have a chance to win some fun and exciting prizes. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Are you building cloud applications with a distributed team? Check out Teleport, an open source identity-aware access proxy for cloud resources. Teleport provides secure access to anything running somewhere behind NAT: SSH servers, Kubernetes clusters, internal web apps and databases. Teleport gives engineers superpowers! Get access to everything via single sign-on with multi-factor. List and see all SSH servers, kubernetes clusters or databases available to you. Get instant access to them all using tools you already have. Teleport ensures best security practices like role-based access, preventing data exfiltration, providing visibility and ensuring compliance. And best of all, Teleport is open source and a pleasure to use.Download Teleport at https://goteleport.com. That's goteleport.com.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud, I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and recurring effort that this show goes to is to showcase people in their best light. Today's guest has done an awful lot: he led Kubernetes and DevOps Product Management for Google Cloud; he founded the Cloud Foundry Foundation; he set open-source strategy for Microsoft in the naughts; he advises companies including Dell, Accenture, the Linux Foundation; and tying all of that together, it's hard to present a lot of that in a great light because given my own proclivities, that sounds an awful lot like a personal attack. Sam Ramji is the Chief Strategy Officer at DataStax. Sam, thank you for joining me, and it's weird when your resume starts to read like, “Oh, I hate all of these things.”Sam: [laugh]. It's weird, but it's true. And it's the only life I could have lived apparently because here I am. Corey, it's a thrill to meet you. I've been an admirer of your public speaking, and public tweeting, and your writing for a long time.Corey: Well, thank you. The hard part is getting over the voice saying don't do it because it turns out that there's no real other side of public shutting up, which is something that I was never good at anyway, so I figured I'd lean into it. And again, I mean, that the sense of where you have been historically in terms of your career not, “Look what you've done,” which is a subtext that I could be accused of throwing in sometimes.Sam: I used to hear that a lot from my parents, actually.Corey: Oh, yeah. That was my name growing up. But you've done a lot of things, and you've transitioned from notable company making significant impact on the industry, to the next one, to the next one. And you've been in high-flying roles, doing lots of really interesting stuff. What's the common thread between all those things?Sam: I'm an intensely curious person, and the thing that I'm most curious about is distributed cognition. And that might not be obvious from what you see is kind of the… Lego blocks of my career, but I studied cognitive science in college when that was not really something that was super well known. So, I graduated from UC San Diego in '94 doing neuroscience, artificial intelligence, and psychology. And because I just couldn't stop thinking about thinking; I was just fascinated with how it worked.So, then I wanted to build software systems that would help people learn. And then I wanted to build distributed software systems. And then I wanted to learn how to work with people who were thinking about building the distributed software systems. So, you end up kind of going up this curve of, like, complexity about how do we think? How do we think alone? How do we learn to think? How do we think together?And that's the directed path through my software engineering career, into management, into middleware at BEA, into open-source at Microsoft because that's an amazing demonstration of distributed cognition, how, you know, at the time in 2007, I think, Sourceforge had 100,000 open-source projects, which was, like, mind boggling. Some of them even worked together, but all of them represented these groups of people, flung around the world, collaborating on something that was just fundamentally useful, that they were curious about. Kind of did the same thing into APIs because APIs are an even better way to reuse for some cases than having the source code—at Apigee. And kept growing up through that into, how are we building larger-scale thinking systems like Cloud Foundry, which took me into Google and Kubernetes, and then some applications of that in Autodesk and now DataStax. So, I love building companies. I love helping people build companies because I think business is distributed cognition. So, those businesses that build distributed systems, for me, are the most fascinating.Corey: You were basically handed a heck of a challenge as far as, “Well, help set open-source strategy,” back at Microsoft, in the days where that was a punchline. And credit where due, I have to look at Microsoft of today, and it's not a joke, you can have your arguments about them, but again in those days, a lot of us built our entire personality on hating Microsoft. Some folks never quite evolved beyond that, but it's a new ballgame and it's very clear that the Microsoft of yesteryear and the Microsoft of today are not completely congruent. What was it like at that point understanding that as you're working with open-source communities, you're doing that from a place of employment with a company that was widely reviled in the space.Sam: It was not lost on me. The irony, of course, was that—Corey: Well, thank God because otherwise the question where you would have been, “What do you mean they didn't like us?”Sam: [laugh].Corey: Which, on some levels, like, yeah, that's about the level of awareness I would have expected in that era, but contrary to popular opinion, execs at these companies are not generally oblivious.Sam: Yeah, well, if I'd been clever as a creative humorist, I would have given you that answer instead of my serious answer, but for some reason, my role in life is always to be the straight guy. I used to have Slashdot as my homepage, right? I love when I'd see some conspiracy theory about, you know, Bill Gates dressed up as the Borg, taking over the world. My first startup, actually in '97, was crushed by Microsoft. They copied our product, copied the marketing, and bundled it into Office, so I had lots of reasons to dislike Microsoft.But in 2004, I was recruited into their venture capital team, which I couldn't believe. It was really a place that they were like, “Hey, we could do better at helping startups succeed, so we're going to evangelize their success—if they're building with Microsoft technologies—to VCs, to enterprises, we'll help you get your first big enterprise deal.” I was like, “Man, if I had this a few years ago, I might not be working.” So, let's go try to pay it forward.I ended up in open-source by accident. I started going to these conferences on Software as a Service. This is back in 2005 when people were just starting to light up, like, Silicon Valley Forum with, you know, the CEO of Demandware would talk, right? We'd hear all these different ways of building a new business, and they all kept talking about their tech stack was Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP. I went to one eight-hour conference, and Microsoft technologies were mentioned for about 12 seconds in two separate chunks. So, six seconds, he was like, “Oh, and also we really like Microsoft SQL Server for our data layer.”Corey: Oh, Microsoft SQL Server was fantastic. And I know that's a weird thing for people to hear me say, just because I've been renowned recently for using Route 53 as the primary data store for everything that I can. But there was nothing quite like that as far as having multiple write nodes, being able to handle sharding effectively. It was expensive, and you would take a bath on the price come audit time, but people were not rolling it out unaware of those things. This was a trade off that they were making.Oracle has a similar story with databases. It's yeah, people love to talk smack about Oracle and its business practices for a variety of excellent reasons, at least in the database space that hasn't quite made it to cloud yet—knock on wood—but people weren't deploying it because they thought Oracle was warm and cuddly as a vendor; they did it because they can tolerate the rest of it because their stuff works.Sam: That's so well said, and people don't give them the credit that's due. Like, when they built hypergrowth in their business, like… they had a great product; it really worked. They made it expensive, and they made a lot of money on it, and I think that was why you saw MySQL so successful and why, if you were looking for a spec that worked, that you could talk through through an open driver like ODBC or JDBC or whatever, you could swap to Microsoft SQL Server. But I walked out of that and came back to the VC team and said, “Microsoft has a huge problem. This is a massive market wave that's coming. We're not doing anything in it. They use a little bit of SQL Server, but there's nothing else in your tech stack that they want, or like, or can afford because they don't know if their businesses are going to succeed or not. And they're going to go out of business trying to figure out how much licensing costs they would pay to you in order to consider using your software. They can't even start there. They have to start with open-source. So, if you're going to deal with SaaS, you're going to have to have open-source, and get it right.”So, I worked with some folks in the industry, wrote a ten-page paper, sent it up to Bill Gates for Think Week. Didn't hear much back. Bought a new strategy to the head of developer platform evangelism, Sanjay Parthasarathy who suggested that the idea of discounting software to zero for startups, with the hope that they would end up doing really well with it in the future as a Software as a Service company; it was dead on arrival. Dumb idea; bring it back; that actually became BizSpark, the most popular program in Microsoft partner history.And then about three months later, I got a call from this guy, Bill Hilf. And he said, “Hey, this is Bill Hilf. I do open-source at Microsoft. I work with Bill Gates. He sent me your paper. I really like it. Would you consider coming up and having conversation with me because I want you to think about running open-source technology strategy for the company.” And at this time I'm, like, 33 or 34. And I'm like, “Who me? You've got to be joking.” And he goes, “Oh, and also, you'll be responsible for doing quarterly deep technical briefings with Bill… Gates.” I was like, “You must be kidding.” And so of course I had to check it out. One thing led to another and all of a sudden, with not a lot of history in the open-source community but coming in it with a strategist's eye and with a technologist's eye, saying, “This is a problem we got to solve. How do we get after this pragmatically?” And the rest is history, as they say.Corey: I have to say that you are the Chief Strategy Officer at DataStax, and I pull up your website quickly here and a lot of what I tell earlier stage companies is effectively more or less what you have already done. You haven't named yourself after the open-source project that underlies the bones of what you have built so you're not going to wind up in the same glorious challenges that, for example, Elastic or MongoDB have in some ways. You have a pricing page that speaks both to the reality of, “It's two in the morning. I'm trying to get something up and running and I want you the hell out of my way. Just give me something that I can work with a reasonable free tier and don't make me talk to a salesperson.” But also, your enterprise tier is, “Click here to talk to a human being,” which is speaking enterprise slash procurement slash, oh, there will be contract negotiation on these things.It's being able to serve different ends of your market depending upon who it is that encounters you without being off-putting to any of those. And it's deceptively challenging for companies to pull off or get right. So clearly, you've learned lessons by doing this. That was the big problem with Microsoft for the longest time. It's, if I want to use some Microsoft stuff, once you were able to download things from the internet, it changed slightly, but even then it was one of those, “What exactly am I committing to here as far as signing up for this? And am I giving them audit rights into my environment? Is the BSA about to come out of nowhere and hit me with a surprise audit and find out that various folks throughout the company have installed this somewhere and now I owe more than the company's worth?” That was always the haunting fear that companies had back then.These days, I like the approach that companies are taking with the SaaS offering: you pay for usage. On some level, I'd prefer it slightly differently in a pay-per-seat model because at least then you can predict the pricing, but no one is getting surprise submarined with this type of thing on an audit basis, and then they owe damages and payment in arrears and someone has them over a barrel. It's just, “Oh. The bill this month was higher than we expected.” I like that model I think the industry does, too.Sam: I think that's super well said. As I used to joke at BEA Systems, nothing says ‘I love you' to a customer like an audit, right? That's kind of a one-time use strategy. If you're going to go audit licenses to get your revenue in place, you might be inducing some churn there. It's a huge fix for the structural problem in pricing that I think package software had, right?When we looked at Microsoft software versus open-source software, and particularly Windows versus Linux, you would have a structure where sales reps were really compensated to sell as much as possible upfront so they could get the best possible commission on what might be used perpetually. But then if you think about it, like, the boxes in a curve, right, if you do that calculus approximation of a smooth curve, a perpetual software license is a huge box and there's an enormous amount of waste in there. And customers figured out so as soon as you can go to a pay-per-use or pay-as-you-go, you start to smooth that curve, and now what you get is what you deserve, right, as opposed to getting filled with way more cost than you expect. So, I think this model is really super well understood now. Kind of the long run the high point of open-source meets, cloud, meets Software as a Service, you look at what companies like MongoDB, and Confluent, and Elastic, and Databricks are doing. And they've really established a very good path through the jungle of how to succeed as a software company. So, it's still difficult to implement, but there are really world-class guides right now.Corey: Moving beyond where Microsoft was back in the naughts, you were then hired as a VP over at Google. And in that era, the fact that you were hired as a VP at Google is fascinating. They preferred to grow those internally, generally from engineering. So, first question, when you were being hired as a VP in the product org, did they make you solve algorithms on a whiteboard to get there?Sam: [laugh]. They did not. I did have somewhat of an advantage [because they 00:13:36] could see me working pretty closely as the CEO of the Cloud Foundry Foundation. I'd worked closely with Craig McLuckie who notably brought Kubernetes to the world along with Joe Beda, and with Eric Brewer, and a number of others.And he was my champion at Google. He was like, “Look, you know, we need him doing Kubernetes. Let's bring Sam in to do that.” So, that was helpful. I also wrote a [laugh] 2000-word strategy document, just to get some thoughts out of my head. And I said, “Hey, if you like this, great. If you don't throw it away.” So, the interviews were actually very much not solving problems in a whiteboard. There were super collaborative, really excellent conversations. It was slow—Corey: Let's be clear, Craig McLuckie's most notable achievement was being a guest on this podcast back in Episode 243. But I'll say that this is a close second.Sam: [laugh]. You're not wrong. And of course now with Heptio and their acquisition by VMware.Corey: Ehh, they're making money beyond the wildest dreams of avarice, that's all well and good, but an invite to this podcast, that's where it's at.Sam: Well, he should really come on again, he can double down and beat everybody. That can be his landmark achievement, a two-timer on Screaming in [the] Cloud.Corey: You were at Google; you were at Microsoft. These are the big titans of their era, in some respect—not to imply that there has beens; they're bigger than ever—but it's also a more crowded field in some ways. I guess completing the trifecta would be Amazon, but you've had the good judgment never to work there, directly of course. Now they're clearly in your market. You're at DataStax, which is among other things, built on Apache Cassandra, and they launched their own Cassandra service named Keyspaces because no one really knows why or how they name things.And of course, looking under the hood at the pricing model, it's pretty clear that it really is just DynamoDB wearing some Groucho Marx classes with a slight upcharge for API level compatibility. Great. So, I don't see it a lot in the real world and that's fine, but I'm curious as to your take on looking at all three of those companies at different eras. There was always the threat in the open-source world that they are going to come in and crush you. You said earlier that Microsoft crushed your first startup.Google is an interesting competitor in some respects; people don't really have that concern about them. And your job as a Chief Strategy Officer at Amazon is taken over by a Post-it Note that simply says ‘yes' on it because there's nothing they're not going to do, or try, and experiment with. So, from your perspective, if you look at the titans, who is it that you see as the largest competitive threat these days, if that's even a thing?Sam: If you think about Sun Tzu and the Art of War, right—a lot of strategy comes from what we've learned from military environments—fighting a symmetric war, right, using the same weapons and the same army against a symmetric opponent, but having 1/100th of the personnel and 1/100th of the money is not a good plan.Corey: “We're going to lose money, going to be outcompeted; we'll make it up in volume. Oh, by the way, we're also slower than they are.”Sam: [laugh]. So, you know, trying to come after AWS, or Microsoft, or Google as an independent software company, pound-for-pound, face-to-face, right, full-frontal assault is psychotic. What you have to do, I think, at this point is to understand that these are each companies that are much like we thought about Linux, and you know, Macintosh, and Windows as operating systems. They're now the operating systems of the planet. So, that creates some economies of scale, some efficiencies for them. And for us. Look at how cheap object storage is now, right? So, there's never been a better time in human history to create a database company because we can take the storage out of the database and hand it over to Amazon, or Google, or Microsoft to handle it with 13 nines of durability on a constantly falling cost basis.So, that's super interesting. So, you have to prosecute the structure of the world as it is, based on where the giants are and where they'll be in the future. Then you have to turn around and say, like, “What can they never sell?”So, Amazon can never sell something that is standalone, right? They're a parts factory and if you buy into the Amazon-first strategy of cloud computing—which we did at Autodesk when I was VP of cloud platform there—everything is a primitive that works inside Amazon, but they're not going to build things that don't work outside of the Amazon primitives. So, your company has to be built on the idea that there's a set of people who value something that is purpose-built for a particular use case that you can start to broaden out, it's really helpful if they would like it to be something that can help them escape a really valuable asset away from the center of gravity that is a cloud. And that's why data is super interesting. Nobody wakes up in the morning and says, “Boy, I had such a great conversation with Oracle over the last 20 years beating me up on licensing. Let me go find a cloud vendor and dump all of my data in that so they can beat me up for the next 20 years.” Nobody says that.Corey: It's the idea of data portability that drives decision-making, which makes people, of course, feel better about not actually moving in anywhere. But the fact that they're not locked in strategically, in a way that requires a full software re-architecture and data model rewrite is compelling. I'm a big believer in convincing people to make decisions that look a lot like that.Sam: Right. And so that's the key, right? So, when I was at Autodesk, we went from our 100 million dollar, you know, committed spend with 19% discount on the big three services to, like—we started realize when we're going to burn through that, we were spending $60 million or so a year on 20% annual growth as the cloud part of the business grew. Thought, “Okay, let's renegotiate. Let's go and do a $250 million deal. I'm sure they'll give us a much better discount than 19%.” Short story is they came back and said, “You know, we're going to take you from an already generous 19% to an outstanding 22%.” We thought, “Wait a minute, we already talked to Intuit. They're getting a 40% discount on a $400 million spend.”So, you know, math is hard, but, like, 40% minus 22% is 18% times $250 million is a lot of money. So, we thought, “What is going on here?” And we realized we just had no credible threat of leaving, and Intuit did because they had built a cross-cloud capable architecture. And we had not. So, now stepping back into the kind of the world that we're living in 2021, if you're an independent software company, especially if you have the unreasonable advantage of being an open-source software company, you have got to be doing your customers good by giving them cross-cloud capability. It could be simply like the Amdahl coffee cup that Amdahl reps used to put as landmines for the IBM reps, later—I can tell you that story if you want—even if it's only a way to save money for your customer by using your software, when it gets up to tens and hundreds of million dollars, that's a really big deal.But they also know that data is super important, so the option value of being able to move if they have to, that they have to be able to pull that stick, instead of saying, “Nice doggy,” we have to be on their side, right? So, there's almost a detente that we have to create now, as cloud vendors, working in a world that's invented and operated by the giants.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: When we look across the, I guess, the ecosystem as it's currently unfolding, a recurring challenge that I have to the existing incumbent cloud providers is they're great at offering the bricks that you can use to build things, but if I'm starting a company today, I'm not going to look at building it myself out of, “Ooh, I'm going to take a bunch of EC2 instances, or Lambda functions, or popsicles and string and turn it into this thing.” I'm going to want to tie together things that are way higher level. In my own case, now I wind up paying for Retool, which is, effectively, yeah, it runs on some containers somewhere, presumably, I think in Azure, but don't quote me on that. And that's great. Could I build my own thing like that?Absolutely not. I would rather pay someone to tie it together. Same story. Instead of building my own CRM by running some open-source software on an EC2 instance, I wind up paying for Salesforce or Pipedrive or something in that space. And so on, and so forth.And a lot of these companies that I'm doing business with aren't themselves running on top of AWS. But for web hosting, for example; if I look at the reference architecture for a WordPress site, AWS's diagram looks like a punchline. It is incredibly overcomplicated. And I say this as someone who ran large WordPress installations at Media Temple many years ago. Now, I have the good sense to pay WP Engine. And on a monthly basis, I give them money and they make the website work.Sure, under the hood, it's running on top of GCP or AWS somewhere. But I don't have to think about it; I don't have to build this stuff together and think about the backups and the failover strategy and the rest. The website just works. And that is increasingly the direction that business is going; things commoditize over time. And AWS in particular has done a terrible job, in my experience, of differentiating what it is they're doing in the language that their customers speak.They're great at selling things to existing infrastructure engineers, but folks who are building something from scratch aren't usually in that cohort. It's a longer story with time and, “Well, we're great at being able to sell EC2 instances by the gallon.” Great. Are you capable of going to a small doctor's office somewhere in the American Midwest and offering them an end-to-end solution for managing patient data? Of course not. You can offer them a bunch of things they can tie together to something that will suffice if they all happen to be software engineers, but that's not the opportunity.So instead, other companies are building those solutions on top of AWS, capturing the margin. And if there's one thing guaranteed to keep Amazon execs awake at night, it's the idea of someone who isn't them making money somehow somewhere, so I know that's got to rankle them, but they do not speak that language. At all. Longer-term, I only see that as a more and more significant crutch. A long enough timeframe here, we're talking about them becoming the Centurylinks of the world, the tier one backbone provider that everyone uses, but no one really thinks about because they're not a household name.Sam: That is a really thoughtful perspective. I think the diseconomies of scale that you're pointing to start to creep in, right? Because when you have to sell compute units by the gallon, right, you can't care if it's a gallon of milk, [laugh] or a gallon of oil, or you know, a gallon of poison. You just have to keep moving it through. So, the shift that I think they're going to end up having to make pragmatically, and you start to see some signs of it, like, you know, they hired but could not retain Matt [Acey 00:23:48]. He did an amazing job of bringing them to some pragmatic realization that they need to partner with open-source, but more broadly, when I think about Microsoft in the 2000s as they were starting to learn their open-source lessons, we were also being able to pull on Microsoft's deep competency and partners. So, most people didn't do the math on this. I was part of the field governance council so I understood exactly how the Microsoft business worked to the level that I was capable. When they had $65 billion in revenue, they produced $24 billion in profit through an ecosystem that generated $450 billion in revenue. So, for every dollar Microsoft made, it was $8 to partners. It was a fundamentally platform-shaped business, and that was how they're able to get into doctors offices in the Midwest, and kind of fit the curve that you're describing of all of those longtail opportunities that require so much care and that are complex to prosecute. These solved for their diseconomies of scale by having 1.2 million partner companies. So, will Amazon figure that out and will they hire, right, enough people who've done this before from Microsoft to become world-class in partnering, that's kind of an exercise left to the [laugh] reader, right? Where will that go over time? But I don't see another better mathematical model for dealing with the diseconomies of scale you have when you're one of the very largest providers on the planet.Corey: The hardest problem as I look at this is, at some point, you hit a point of scale where smaller things look a lot less interesting. I get that all the time when people say, “Oh, you fix AWS bills, aren't you missing out by not targeting Google bills and Azure bills as well?” And it's, yeah. I'm not VC-backed. It turns out that if I limit the customer base that I can effectively service to only AWS customers, yeah turns out, I'm not going to starve anytime soon. Who knew? I don't need to conquer the world and that feels increasingly antiquated, at least going by the stories everyone loves to tell.Sam: Yeah, it's interesting to see how cloud makes strange bedfellows, right? We started seeing this in, like, 2014, 2015, weird partnerships that you're like, “There's no way this would happen.” But the cloud economics which go back to utilization, rather than what it used to be, which was software lock-in, just changed who people were willing to hang out with. And now you see companies like Databricks going, you know, we do an amazing amount of business, effectively competing with Amazon, selling Spark services on top of predominantly Amazon infrastructure, and everybody seems happy with it. So, there's some hint of a new sensibility of what the future of partnering will be. We used to call it coopetition a long time ago, which is kind of a terrible word, but at least it shows that there's some nuance in you can't compete with everybody because it's just too hard.Corey: I wish there were better ways of articulating these things because it seems from the all the outside world, you have companies like Amazon and Microsoft and Google who go and build out partner networks because they need that external accessibility into various customer profiles that they can't speak to super well themselves, but they're also coming out with things that wind up competing directly or indirectly, with all of those partners at the same time. And I don't get it. I wish that there were smarter ways to do it.Sam: It is hard to even talk about it, right? One of the things that I think we've learned from philosophy is if we don't have a word for it, we can't be intelligent about it. So, there's a missing semantics here for being able to describe the complexity of where are you partnering? Where are you competing? Where are you differentiating? In an ecosystem, which is moving and changing.I tend to look at the tools of game theory for this, which is to look at things as either, you know, nonzero-sum games or zero-sum games. And if it's a nonzero-sum game, which I think are the most interesting ones, can you make it a positive sum game? And who can you play positive-sum games with? An organization as big as Amazon, or as big as Microsoft, or even as big as Google isn't ever completely coherent with itself. So, thinking about this as an independent software company, it doesn't matter if part of one of these hyperscalers has a part of their business that competes with your entire business because your business probably drives utilization of a completely different resource in their company that you can partner within them against them, effectively. Right?For example, Cassandra is an amazingly powerful but demanding workload on Kubernetes. So, there's a lot of Cassandra on EKS. You grow a lot of workload, and EKS business does super well. Does that prevent us from working with Amazon because they have Dynamo or because they have Keyspaces? Absolutely not, right?So, this is when those companies get so big that they are almost their own forest, right, of complexity, you can kind of get in, hang out, do well, and pretty much never see the competitive product, unless you're explicitly looking for it, which I think is a huge danger for us as independent software companies. And I would say this to anybody doing strategy for an organization like this, which is, don't obsess over the tiny part of their business that competes with yours, and do not pay attention to any of the marketing that they put out that looks competitive with what you have. Because if you can't figure out how to make a better product and sell it better to your customers as a single purpose corporation, you have bigger problems.Corey: I want to change gears slightly to something that's probably a fair bit more insulting, but that's okay. We're going to roll with it. That seems to be the theme of this episode. You have been, in effect, a CIO a number of times at different companies. And if we take a look at the typical CIO tenure, industry-wide, it's not long; it approaches the territory from an executive perspective of, “Be sure not to buy green bananas. You might not be here by the time they ripen.” And I'm wondering what it is that drives that and how you make a mark in a relatively short time frame when you're providing inputs and deciding on strategy, and those decisions may not bear fruit for years.Sam: CIO used to—we used say it stood for ‘Career Is Over' because the tenure is so short. I think there's a couple of reasons why it's so short. And I think there's a way I believe you can have impact in a short amount of time. I think the reason that it's been short is because people aren't sure what they want the CIO role to be.Do they want it to be a glorified finance person who's got a lot of data processing experience, but now really has got, you know, maybe even an MBA in finance, but is not focusing on value creation? Do they want it to be somebody who's all-singing, all-dancing Chief Data Officer with a CTO background who did something amazing and solved a really hard problem? The definition of success is difficult. Often CIOs now also have security under them, which is literally a job I would never ever want to have. Do security for a public corporation? Good Lord, that's a way to lose most of your life. You're the only executive other than the CEO that the board wants to hear from. Every sing—Corey: You don't sleep; you wait, in those scenarios. And oh, yeah, people joke about ablative CSOs in those scenarios. Yeah, after SolarWinds, you try and get an ablative intern instead, but those don't work as well. It's a matter of waiting for an inevitability. One of the things I think is misunderstood about management broadly, is that you are delegating work, but not the responsibility. The responsibility rests with you.So, when companies have these statements blaming some third-party contractor, it's no, no, no. I'm dealing with you. You were the one that gave my data to some sketchy randos. It is your responsibility that data has now been compromised. And people don't want to hear that, but it's true.Sam: I think that's absolutely right. So, you have this high risk, medium reward, very fungible job definition, right? If you ask all of the CIO's peers what their job is, they'll probably all tell you something different that represents their wish list. The thing that I learned at Autodesk, I was only there for 15 months, but we established a fundamental transformation of the work of how cloud platform is done at the company that's still in place a couple years later.You have to realize that you're a change agent, right? You're actually being hired to bring in the bulk of all the different biases and experiences you have to solve a problem that is not working, right? So, when I got to Autodesk, they didn't even know what their uptime was. It took three months to teach the team how to measure the uptime. Turned out the uptime was 97.7% for the cloud, for the world's largest engineering software company.That is 200 hours a year of unplanned downtime, right? That is not good. So, a complete overhaul [laugh] was needed. Understanding that as a change agent, your half-life is 12 to 18 months, you have to measure success not on tenure, but on your ability to take good care of the patient, right? It's going to be a lot of pain, you're going to work super hard, you're going to have to build trust with everyone, and then people are still going to hate you at the end. That is something you just have to kind of take on.As a friend of mine, Jason Warner joined Redpoint Ventures recently, he said this when he was the CTO of GitHub: “No one is a villain in their own story.” So, you realize, going into a big organization, people are going to make you a villain, but you still have to do incredibly thoughtful, careful work, that's going to take care of them for a long time to come. And those are the kinds of CIOs that I can relate to very well.Corey: Jason is great. You're name-dropping all the guests we've had. My God, keep going. It's a hard thing to rationalize and wrap heads around. It's one of those areas where you will not be measured during your tenure in the role, in some respects. And, of course, that leads to the cynical perspective as well, where well, someone's not going to be here long and if they say, “Yeah, we're just going to keep being stewards of the change that's already underway,” well, that doesn't look great, so quick, time to do a cloud migration, or a cloud repatriation, or time to roll something else out. A bit of a different story.Sam: One of the biggest challenges is how do you get the hearts and the minds of the people who are in the organization when they are no fools, and their expectation is like, “Hey, this company's been around for decades, and we go through cloud leaders or CIOs, like Wendy's goes through hamburgers.” They could just cloud-wash, right, or change-wash all their language. They could use the new language to describe the old thing because all they have to do is get through the performance review and outwait you. So, there's always going to be a level of defection because it's hard to change; it's hard to think about new things.So, the most important thing is how do you get into people's hearts and minds and enable them to believe that the best thing they could do for their career is to come along with the change? And I think that was what we ended up getting right in the Autodesk cloud transformation. And that requires endless optimism, and there's no room for cynicism because the cynicism is going to creep in around the edges. So, what I found on the job is, you just have to get up every morning and believe everything is possible and transmit that belief to everybody.So, if it seems naive or ingenuous, I think that doesn't matter as long as you can move people's hearts in each conversation towards, like, “Oh, this person cares about me. They care about a good outcome from me. I should listen a little bit more and maybe make a 1% change in what I'm doing.” Because 1% compounded daily for a year, you can actually get something done in the lifetime of a CIO.Corey: And I think that's probably a great place to leave it. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, how you think about these things, how you view the world, where can they find you?Sam: You can find me on Twitter, I'm @sramji, S-R-A-M-J-I, and I have a podcast that I host called Open||Source||Datawhere I invite innovators, data nerds, computational networking nerds to hang out and explain to me, a software programmer, what is the big world of open-source data all about, what's happening with machine learning, and what would it be like if you could put data in a container, just like you could put code in a container, and how might the world change? So, that's Open||Source||Data podcast.Corey: And we'll of course include links to that in the [show notes 00:35:58]. Thanks so much for your time. I appreciate it.Sam: Corey, it's been a privilege. Thank you so much for having me.Corey: Likewise. Sam Ramji, Chief Strategy Officer at DataStax. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with a comment telling me exactly which item in Sam's background that I made fun of is the place that you work at.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Business Lab
The Employee-Driven Future

Business Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 43:22


The global pandemic accelerated the trend toward a work-from-anywhere, distributed workforce. As we approach a post-pandemic world, companies—and employees—expect this trend to become the norm. While IT departments are rapidly configuring and deploying devices, infrastructure, and software to support the shift in a secure and productive way, employees are likewise having to reset priorities and learn new ways to engage with their coworkers and managers, and to navigate their career goals. This shift requires not only changes in technology and IT approaches, but also culture changes for companies and employees alike. Jenn Saavedra, Dell Technologies' chief human resources officer, distills the required cultural shift through the lens of Dell's mission to be people centered. “Our people philosophy,” explains Saavedra, “is ultimately about how to inspire people to be their best and do their best work.” To achieve this goal, Dell focuses on four core areas: (A) achievement, (B) balance, (C) connection, and (D) diversity and inclusion. “We want to enable people to achieve their career goals, to be successful, and continue to grow,     learn, and perform,” she says. None of this was easy—companies across the globe struggled to mitigate the technological and cultural changes required to meet a work-from-anywhere business environment. “Like every other IT organization, we really rallied and made that happen,” says Jen Felch, chief digital officer and chief information officer at Dell Technologies. “You need to keep up so that you are ready for anything, she says. “Companies that were prepared with remote access, with having modern equipment, etc., were more prepared for the rapid work from home.” Looking to the future, Saavedra says companies need to continue to work with—and for—employees. “Because of the degree to which people's lives and routines were disrupted over the past 18 months, we've challenged and redefined the long-held assumptions about the world of work, where we work, how we spend our time.” It's important, Saavedra says, to get past the common mantra that we can't wait for things to go back to normal and to get back to doing things the way we were. “It's really important that we move forward into the future, not look backwards— that's not ever a strategy for success.”   Show notes and references ·      Study: The Data Paradox ·      Study: “Work from anywhere: Empowering the future of work”  ·      Perspectives on workforce and culture trends ·      Dell Digital - Learn more about Dell Technologies' own digital transformation

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

VR en la universidad / Nanotecnología para los infarrojos / Robo de regalías en YouTube / Nadie quiere Nvidia+ARM / Más Qi en IKEA / Elección de navegador en Windows Patrocinador: La nueva Roomba J7+ https://www.irobot.es/roomba/serie-j es el aspirador inteligente más completo para tu hogar. Incorpora más sensores, es más eficiente y con mayor capacidad de limpieza https://www.irobot.es/roomba/serie-j. Funciona con Alexa, Google y su app para móviles. Hasta dos meses sin cambiar su depósito https://www.irobot.es/roomba/serie-j. VR en la universidad / Nanotecnología para los infarrojos / Robo de regalías en YouTube / Nadie quiere Nvidia+ARM / Más Qi en IKEA / Elección de navegador en Windows

Download On Tech
Bridge for Information Event Series: Cross-Sector Partnerships to Decarbonize our Economy

Download On Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 60:31


Listen to ITI President and CEO Jason Oxman speak with Page Motes, Head of Sustainability at Dell Technologies, Sophia Leonora Mendelsohn, the Chief Sustainability Officer and Head of Environmental Social Governance at Cognizant and Sean Kinghorn, who is the Global Sustainability Leader at Intuit, as part of ITI's Bridge for Innovation event series, which focuses on how good policy and new technologies are crucial to solving today's most daunting issues. The leaders shared their perspectives on tech's role in combatting climate change and ensuring a sustainable future.

Moneycontrol Podcast
3527: “The edge of 5G revolution: Dell Technologies”

Moneycontrol Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 19:06


13.5 GB data is consumed by an Indian consumer every month, the highest in world. As we get ready for 5G connectivity, Dell Technologies is creating open software solutions and services designed to cater to the unique requirements of the telecom industry powered with 5 G technology for next gen connectivity. To understand how new and enhanced offerings for communication service provider will change the telecom landscape we have Mr. Saurabh Tewari, Director & Chief Technology Officer (Telecom), Dell Technologies, India and Mr. Manish Gupta, Senior Director & General Manager, Infrastructure Solutions Group, Dell Technologies India 

Business Lab
‘Security is Everyone's Job' in the Workplace

Business Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 26:01


Hackers around the globe are smart: they know that it isn't just good code that helps them break into systems; it's also about understanding—and preying upon—human behavior. The threat to businesses in the form of cyberattacks is only growing—especially as companies make the shift to embrace hybrid work.   But John Scimone, senior vice president and chief security officer at Dell Technologies, says “security is everyone's job.” And building a culture that reflects that is a priority because cyber attacks are not going to decrease. He explains, “As we consider the vulnerability that industry and organizations face, technology and data is exploding rapidly, and growing in volume, variety, and velocity.” The increase in attacks means an increase in damage for businesses, he continues: “I would have to say that ransomware is probably the greatest risk facing most organizations today.”   And while ransomware isn't a new challenge, it is compounded with the shift to hybrid work and the talent shortage experts have warned about for years. Scimone explains, “One of the key challenges we've seen in the IT space, and particularly in the security space, is a challenge around labor shortages.” He continues, “On the security side, we view the lack of cybersecurity professionals as one of the core vulnerabilities within the sector. It's truly a crisis that both the public and private sectors have been warning about for years.”   However, investing in employees and building a strong culture can reap benefits for cybersecurity efforts. Scimone details the success Dell has seen, “Over the last year, we've seen thousands of real phishing attacks that were spotted and stopped as a result of our employees seeing them first and reporting them to us.”   And as much as organizations try to approach cybersecurity from a systemic and technical perspective, Scimone advises focusing on the employee too, “So, training is essential, but again, it's against the backdrop of a culture organizationally, where every team member knows they have a role to play.”   Related resources: ●     The Data Paradox - Research & Insights ●     Global Data Protection Index

Tech&Co
Stéphane Huet, SVP General Manager de Dell Technologies France – 18/11

Tech&Co

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 13:52


Stéphane Huet, SVP General Manager de Dell Technologies France, était l'invité de François Sorel dans Tech & Co, ce jeudi 18 novembre. Il est notamment revenu sur l'accompagnement des entreprises dans leurs mutations stratégiques, sur BFM Business. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au jeudi et réécoutez la en podcast.

The Internship Show
5 Myths About Working in Technology Sales—Debunked

The Internship Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 14:08


On this episode in our special Dell Technologies series, we chat with Candace Levesque. Candace is an Enterprise Account Manager whose journey into technology sales at Dell technologies is amazing. We chat about how she got into technology sales, why Dell Technologies sales training experience was impactful on her sales acumen and we end the show debunking some common sales myths.

Dell Technologies Power2Protect Podcast
Power2Protect_EP058 Customer Spotlight: Rob Petrone, VP of IT, TRC Companies

Dell Technologies Power2Protect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 10:44


This week, we are joined by Rob Petrone, Vice President of IT, TRC Companies. Moving to a cloud-first IT model, TRC Companies needed simpler, more reliable and higher-performing data protection for their SQL databases and other critical data. They chose Dell EMC Data Protection Suite, Dell EMC PowerProtect DD Virtual Edition/Azure, and Dell EMC PowerProtect Appliances to reduces backup and restore times and lowers storage consumption and costs. Tune in to discover how Dell Technologies gave them peace of mind with fast, uncomplicated cloud data protection

Bernard Marr's Future of Business & Technology Podcast
Telecom Transformation As An Enabler For Economic Growth

Bernard Marr's Future of Business & Technology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 38:09


In this conversation I am joined by Sandro Tavares, Director, Telecom Systems Marketing at Dell Technologies to explore topics including 5G, edge computing, and the telecom industry as an enabler for change.

Cyber Security Inside
65. Supply Chain Security Goes Digital, Learn Why

Cyber Security Inside

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 30:09


Supply chain security has taken on new importance, especially in a post-COVID world; from healthcare to finance, the cybersecurity threats posed to people's lives are very real. On this episode of Cyber Security Inside, Tom and Camille are joined by Rick Martinez, Sr. Distinguished Engineer, Office of CTO at Dell Technologies, and John Boyle, Cybersecurity Solutions & Supply Chain Security Product Management at Dell Technologies, to break down what companies are doing to mitigate these risks, what best practices entail, how Dell and Intel have partnered up on the road to boosted supply chain security and more.   They cover: -  The significance of a transparent supply chain -  The details of the partnership between Intel and Dell, and why it's important -  The timelines involved in figuring out adversaries' next moves and applying mitigations -  How supply chain security is optimized -  What Secure Verification Component is -  Best practices for companies to follow ... and more.  Join the conversation now!   The views and opinions expressed are those of the guests and author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Intel Corporation.   Here are some key take-aways: -  Security has become a top tier concern for customers, and being proactive is key to mitigating any threats coming customers' way. -  In addition to security, sustainability has also become a primary concern for customers. -  Secure Component Verification ensures that customers receive exactly what has been shipped to them. -  Nowadays, the stakes are much higher considering attackers can target institutions from healthcare to finance that impact real lives. -  It's important to be involved with the security community, security researchers and hackers, in order to best mitigate threats. -  It's also best to have the latest and greatest updates to your system in order to prevent attacks.   Some interesting quotes from today's episode: “It's kinda cool that we get to hang out with hackers and hang out with other security community and practitioners so that we can really have that three to five-year crystal ball of what the adversaries are going to be doing in that timeframe.” “Our context isn't just getting the system from our shipping facility to the customer's loading dock. It's the entire end-to-end--from when we design a system to the end of life of the system in the customer's environment, and making sure that the system is secure throughout that entire life cycle.” “We are constantly evolving, just the hardening of the platform, our supply chain security, pretty much everything that we do around manufacturing and developing and shipping systems to users.” “We're checking the security posture of the devices in the supply chain before we send it to customers with the tools that customers can use on their end to do this exact same thing.” “When you have these attackers bringing down environments for healthcare, financial services, energy...it is impacting real lives.” “We are impacting businesses that impact real lives; and when those are compromised, it's not good for people around in the global community.”

The Daily Stoic
Michael Dell on Calculating Risk and Playing Nice But Winning

The Daily Stoic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 65:44


Ryan talks to founder and CEO of one of America's largest technology companies Michael Dell about his new book Play Nice But Win: A CEO's Journey from Founder to Leader, the balance between trusting yourself and trusting the opinions of experts, focusing on what you can control, and more. Michael Dell is chairman and chief executive officer of Dell Technologies, an innovator and technology leader providing the essential infrastructure for organizations to build their digital future, transform IT and protect their most important information. He is ranked 24th richest person in the world by Bloomberg Billionaires Index. He founded Dell Technologies with $1000 in 1984 at the age of 19. In 1992, Michael became the youngest CEO ever to earn a ranking on the Fortune 500.Cometeer partners with the best locally owned roasters in the world and through their breakthrough brewing technology, provides a delicious, high-quality, balanced cup of coffee for a fraction of the price. For a limited time, you can save 20 Dollars off your first order - that's 10 free cups on your first order, and shipping is always free - but only when you visit cometeer.com/STOICTalkspace is an online and mobile therapy company. Talkspace lets you send and receive unlimited messages with your dedicated therapist in the Talkspace platform 24/7. To match with a licensed therapist today, go to Talkspace.com or download the app. Make sure to use the code STOIC to get $100 off of your first month and show your support for the show.LinkedIn Jobs is the best platform for finding the right candidate to join your business this fall. It's the largest marketplace for job seekers in the world, and it has great search features so that you can find candidates with any hard or soft skills that you need. And now, you can post a job for free. Just visit linkedin.com/STOIC to post a job for free. Sign up for the Daily Stoic email: https://DailyStoic.com/signupFollow us: Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, TikTok, FacebookFollow Michael Dell: Homepage, TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

SDxCentral Weekly Wrap
SDxCentral 2-Minute Weekly Wrap: VMware, Dell Complete Spinoff

SDxCentral Weekly Wrap

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 2:06


SDxCentral 2-Minute Weekly Wrap Podcast for Nov. 5, 2021 Plus, VMware and Eero bring SASE to home offices, and SUSE acquired NeuVector VMware and Dell Technologies completed their spinoff deal; Eero and VMware partnered to bring SASE to remote workers; and SUSE acquired NeuVector. VMware, Dell Complete Spinoff Deal VMware Pushes SASE Into Amazon's Eero and Your Home SUSE Rancher Nabs NeuVector for Container Security Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Futurum Tech Podcast
Cybersecurity Shorts: Cybersecurity Response and Trends, Supply Chain Attacks, Updates on Fed Policy, Zero Trust and More

Futurum Tech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 40:24


In today's episode of the Futurum Tech Webcast, Cybersecurity Shorts Series, I'm joined by Dell Technologies' John Boyle and Rick Martinez. John is a cybersecurity and supply chain defense product manager and Rick is a senior distinguished engineer and a senior director at Dell. Our conversation today revolved around the current state of the cybersecurity industry, supply chain attacks, fed policy and orders, why zero trust is a thing these days, and more. Some highlights of the discussion with Rick and John included: Recent breaches and trends. Discussion around the major cybersecurity breaches that have recently happened, including: Colonial pipeline JBS Foods New Cooperative hack and response and trends around those attacks, as well as how/whether COVID and other things have contributed to the frequency of attacks. Speaking of supply chain. Supply chain attacks are expected to quadruple in 2021 – and why a posture of ‘strong security protection' is no longer enough. President Biden's executive order. This order, signed at the end of July to protect America's critical infrastructure and what that involves. Zero Trust. We're hearing a lot about zero trust being the right security posture for the future. Rick elaborates a bit on that and provided some examples. What industries are most at risk? Our conversation moved to thoughts on what industries are most at risk and how organizations who don't have a security posture in place are struggling. What can businesses do to protect themselves and some key technologies that can be adopted that will make a difference. Overview of Dell security offerings both above and below the OS worth considering.

This Week in Health IT
Digital Pathology: The Case, The Drivers, and The Solution with WWT and Dell Technologies

This Week in Health IT

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 30:58


November 3, 2021: When you digitize pathology, it creates all sorts of advantages. Pathologists and laboratory staff are able to send results anywhere near or far for diagnosis, consultation, and second opinion. What are the drivers for Digital Pathology? What are the use cases? What is the future of AI in this space? How does interoperability, scalability, performance and security play into it? Dr. Justin Collier, Chief Healthcare Advisor for World Wide Technology and Michael Valante, CTO Digital Pathology for Dell Technologies join us today to discuss. Key Points:00:00:00 - Intro00:02:00 - Digital pathology is an area of pathology that focuses on the data management elements of digital imaging. So the acquisition, the transmission, the display and the storage of the information that's generated from digitizing glass slides.00:03:00 - We have a major shortage of pathologists 00:05:00 - How do we improve the workflow for pathologists and laboratory services?World Wide TechnologyDell Technologies

Dell Technologies Power2Protect Podcast
Global Data Protection Index 2021

Dell Technologies Power2Protect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 16:26


Digital disruption is on the rise, with modern workload adoption, increasing risks of cyber threats, and a shift to working from home. To understand the impact of cloud and the complexities of advanced technologies on data protection readiness, Dell Technologies surveyed 1,000 IT decision makers from organizations around the world in the new Global Data Protection Index 2021 Snapshot. Join our experts Colm Keegan and Michael Wilke as they discuss the findings from the new report.

Oil and Gas Tech Podcast
The Wide World of Unstructured Data with Dell’s Daniel Gomes

Oil and Gas Tech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 44:54


Welcome back to the Oil & Gas Tech podcast — brought to you on the Oil and Gas Global Network, the largest and most listened-to podcast network for the oil and energy industry. This week our host Michael O'Sullivan talks with industry tech veteran Daniel Gomes from Dell Technologies about unstructured data and the importance of a strong foundational infrastructure. More Oil and Gas Global Network Podcasts OGGN.com OGGN Street Team LinkedIn Group OGGN on Social LinkedIn Group | LinkedIn Company Page | Facebook | modalpoint | OGGN OGGN Events Get notified each month Michael O'Sullivan LinkedIn  

Packet Pushers - Network Break
Network Break 356: Aruba Beefs Up ToR Switch With DPUs; VMware Stands Free

Packet Pushers - Network Break

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 57:01


This week on the Network Break podcast we discuss a new ToR switch from Aruba that includes built-in silicon to offload security and network services. Dell Technologies says the VMware spin-off will be complete by November 1st, and SASE startup Cato Networks raises $250 in an F round of funding. The post Network Break 356: Aruba Beefs Up ToR Switch With DPUs; VMware Stands Free appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe
Network Break 356: Aruba Beefs Up ToR Switch With DPUs; VMware Stands Free

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 57:01


This week on the Network Break podcast we discuss a new ToR switch from Aruba that includes built-in silicon to offload security and network services. Dell Technologies says the VMware spin-off will be complete by November 1st, and SASE startup Cato Networks raises $250 in an F round of funding. The post Network Break 356: Aruba Beefs Up ToR Switch With DPUs; VMware Stands Free appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed
Network Break 356: Aruba Beefs Up ToR Switch With DPUs; VMware Stands Free

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 57:01


This week on the Network Break podcast we discuss a new ToR switch from Aruba that includes built-in silicon to offload security and network services. Dell Technologies says the VMware spin-off will be complete by November 1st, and SASE startup Cato Networks raises $250 in an F round of funding. The post Network Break 356: Aruba Beefs Up ToR Switch With DPUs; VMware Stands Free appeared first on Packet Pushers.

c't uplink (HD-Video)
Hacking-Tools für Heim und Handwerk | c't uplink 40.2

c't uplink (HD-Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021


Landläufig gelten Hacker als Kapuzenpullis tragende Kriminelle, die ohne Erlaubnis in fremde Computersysteme einbrechen. Doch viele Hacker nutzen ihr technisches Können dazu, die IT-Sicherheit zu verbessern. Entweder in ihrer Freizeit, oder als angeheuerte Sicherheitsexperten, klopfen sie Software und Computer-Systeme auf Sicherheitslücken ab. Ganz gleich, ob aus edlen oder verwerflichen Motiven: Hacker bedienen sich vieler praktischer Werkzeuge, die ihnen ihre Arbeit erleichtern und Angriffe automatisieren. Viele der Tools sind Open-Source-Software. Sie sind frei erhältlich und laufen oft auch unter Windows. Warum also nicht in den Hacker-Werkzeugkasten greifen und selbst damit die eigenen Systeme prüfen oder das vergessene Passwort einer geschützten Datei knacken? Außerdem lernt man sehr viel über den eigenen Computer. Welche Hacking-Tools es gibt und was es bei ihrem Einsatz zu beachten gilt, darüber sprechen c't-Redakteure Alexander Königstein und Sylvester Tremmel mit Moderator Keywan Tonekaboni. Sie berichten zudem von eigenen Erfahrungen, welche Tools sie am liebsten mögen und wie man mit Hacking auch Spaß haben kann. Links zur Sendung: Hinweise an das Heise Investigativ-Team anonym melden https://www.heise.de/investigativ/ Hacking-Wettbewerb Try Hack Me [https://tryhackme.com/room/picklerick c't-Schwerpunkt Hacking-Tools: Die Werkzeuge der Hacker als Problemlöser https://www.heise.de/hintergrund/Die-Werkzeuge-der-Hacker-als-Problemloeser-6221357.html === Anzeige / Sponsorenhinweis === Diese Ausgabe des c't uplink ist gesponsert von Dell Technologies. Besuchen Sie uns online unter: Dell.de/KMU-Beratung === Anzeige / Sponsorenhinweis Ende ===

c't uplink (SD-Video)
Hacking-Tools für Heim und Handwerk | c't uplink 40.2

c't uplink (SD-Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021


Landläufig gelten Hacker als Kapuzenpullis tragende Kriminelle, die ohne Erlaubnis in fremde Computersysteme einbrechen. Doch viele Hacker nutzen ihr technisches Können dazu, die IT-Sicherheit zu verbessern. Entweder in ihrer Freizeit, oder als angeheuerte Sicherheitsexperten, klopfen sie Software und Computer-Systeme auf Sicherheitslücken ab. Ganz gleich, ob aus edlen oder verwerflichen Motiven: Hacker bedienen sich vieler praktischer Werkzeuge, die ihnen ihre Arbeit erleichtern und Angriffe automatisieren. Viele der Tools sind Open-Source-Software. Sie sind frei erhältlich und laufen oft auch unter Windows. Warum also nicht in den Hacker-Werkzeugkasten greifen und selbst damit die eigenen Systeme prüfen oder das vergessene Passwort einer geschützten Datei knacken? Außerdem lernt man sehr viel über den eigenen Computer. Welche Hacking-Tools es gibt und was es bei ihrem Einsatz zu beachten gilt, darüber sprechen c't-Redakteure Alexander Königstein und Sylvester Tremmel mit Moderator Keywan Tonekaboni. Sie berichten zudem von eigenen Erfahrungen, welche Tools sie am liebsten mögen und wie man mit Hacking auch Spaß haben kann. Links zur Sendung: Hinweise an das Heise Investigativ-Team anonym melden https://www.heise.de/investigativ/ Hacking-Wettbewerb Try Hack Me [https://tryhackme.com/room/picklerick c't-Schwerpunkt Hacking-Tools: Die Werkzeuge der Hacker als Problemlöser https://www.heise.de/hintergrund/Die-Werkzeuge-der-Hacker-als-Problemloeser-6221357.html === Anzeige / Sponsorenhinweis === Diese Ausgabe des c't uplink ist gesponsert von Dell Technologies. Besuchen Sie uns online unter: Dell.de/KMU-Beratung === Anzeige / Sponsorenhinweis Ende ===

c’t uplink
Hacking-Tools für Heim und Handwerk | c't uplink 40.2

c’t uplink

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 44:33


Landläufig gelten Hacker als Kapuzenpullis tragende Kriminelle, die ohne Erlaubnis in fremde Computersysteme einbrechen. Doch viele Hacker nutzen ihr technisches Können dazu, die IT-Sicherheit zu verbessern. Entweder in ihrer Freizeit, oder als angeheuerte Sicherheitsexperten, klopfen sie Software und Computer-Systeme auf Sicherheitslücken ab. Ganz gleich, ob aus edlen oder verwerflichen Motiven: Hacker bedienen sich vieler praktischer Werkzeuge, die ihnen ihre Arbeit erleichtern und Angriffe automatisieren. Viele der Tools sind Open-Source-Software. Sie sind frei erhältlich und laufen oft auch unter Windows. Warum also nicht in den Hacker-Werkzeugkasten greifen und selbst damit die eigenen Systeme prüfen oder das vergessene Passwort einer geschützten Datei knacken? Außerdem lernt man sehr viel über den eigenen Computer. Welche Hacking-Tools es gibt und was es bei ihrem Einsatz zu beachten gilt, darüber sprechen c't-Redakteure Alexander Königstein und Sylvester Tremmel mit Moderator Keywan Tonekaboni. Sie berichten zudem von eigenen Erfahrungen, welche Tools sie am liebsten mögen und wie man mit Hacking auch Spaß haben kann. Links zur Sendung: Hinweise an das Heise Investigativ-Team anonym melden https://www.heise.de/investigativ/ Hacking-Wettbewerb Try Hack Me [https://tryhackme.com/room/picklerick c't-Schwerpunkt Hacking-Tools: Die Werkzeuge der Hacker als Problemlöser https://www.heise.de/hintergrund/Die-Werkzeuge-der-Hacker-als-Problemloeser-6221357.html === Anzeige / Sponsorenhinweis === Diese Ausgabe des c't uplink ist gesponsert von Dell Technologies. Besuchen Sie uns online unter: Dell.de/KMU-Beratung === Anzeige / Sponsorenhinweis Ende ===

Winning Retail
Being Bold as a Change Leader with Chris Rupp, EVP & Chief Customer & Digital Officer at Albertsons Companies

Winning Retail

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 35:26


This episode features an interview with Chris Rupp, EVP & Chief Customer & Digital Officer at Albertsons Companies. For over 20 years, Chris has successfully led and scaled strategic business units for companies like Sears, Amazon, and now Albertsons. On today's episode, Chris discusses what it was like to run the first Amazon Prime day, the “build vs. buy” conundrum of picking technology, and partnering with places like DoorDash and Pinterest to meet customers wherever they might be thinking of dinner.--“You have to stay in touch with your customers' needs. All the time. You can't get complacent. And you certainly should be watching out for how new entries are serving customers in new ways, because they have a whole lot less to lose than big established companies.” -Chris Rupp--Show Notes(1:20) Tony's takeaways on the conversation(2:56) Chris's background across different companies and cultures(7:11) Creating the first Prime Day at Amazon(9:03) Albertsons and a focus on the overall customer journey(14:28) Grocery problems: hiring, picking technology, and an uncertain supply chain(24:07) Creating partnerships with DoorDash and Pinterest to combat last mile(28:20) Why digital transformations fail and the moment where all is lost(31:25) Lightning round--SponsorThis podcast is presented by Dell Technologies and Intel. Together they help you realize digital transformation across retail by driving IT innovation to better engage with today's connected consumer. Learn more at DellTechnologies.com/retail and Intel.com/retail.--LinksConnect with Chris on LinkedInConnect with Tony on LinkedInConnect with Tony on TwitterTony Saldanha - Transformant

Tecnocast
214 – E se o real fosse digital?

Tecnocast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 56:00


Uma moeda digital emitida e controlada pelo governo. Esse é o conceito da Central Bank Digital Currency, ou moeda digital do banco central. Atualmente, dezenas de países trabalham na criação das suas, inclusive o Brasil, que prevê o real digital para os próximos anos. No episódio de hoje, batemos um papo sobre os aspectos técnicos e práticos desse tipo de tecnologia, explorando suas potenciais vantagens e riscos. Também recebemos o pessoal Dell Technologies para uma conversa sobre o Dell Expert Network, programa de relacionamento da Dell para profissionais de TI. O bloco vai de 0:50 até 17:40. Dá o play e vem com a gente! # Participantes Thiago Mobilon Paulo Higa Felipe Ventura Bruno Ignacio ## Créditos Produtor: Josué de Oliveira Edição e Sonorização: Raquel Igne Arte da capa: Vitor Pádua

5 Questions With Dan Schawbel
Episode 156: Michael Dell

5 Questions With Dan Schawbel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 6:55


My guest today is the chairman and CEO of Dell Technologies, Michael Dell. Michael started Dell in his dorm room at the University of Texas and today it's become of the most successful technologies companies in the world. He is one of the 25 richest people in the world with a net worth of $51.7 […]

What I Know
Michael Dell: A New Way To Think About Risk

What I Know

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 35:49


One of America's best-known entrepreneurs, Michael Dell, founded his eponymous company out of a University of Texas dorm room. More than three decades later, he's led his company through multiple transformations, including taking it private, and taking on $50 billion in debt to complete a major acquisition. Dell Technologies is in a new phase of its life--and Dell explains his leadership philosophies that have shaped it all in his new book, Play Nice But Win. Christine Lagorio-Chafkin interviews him about the early growth of his computer company, how his thinking and actions as a leader have changed over the years, and how he'd advise entrepreneurs to reconceptualize their risk-taking.

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes
Cloud Wars and Company Wars: Play Nice But Win

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 52:57


A16z Podcast Podcast Notes Key Takeaways It is not a question of “either-or” but “both-and” (public and private cloud), and beyond that- it is about edge computing“There are estimates that say there will be more applications and more data at the edge and it is not all going to come back to the center of the universe,” – Michael DellThe massive shift to SAS (software for statistical analysis and data visualization) could be cloud wars 2.0Because of AI and ML rise, programmers will have to deal with the software on a new level of abstractionInnovation is the main reason a startup should use cloud computingDell's company went public, then private, then public againThey hired tons of engineers, salespeople, invested organically and it worked really quicklyThe demise of the PC narrative gave them an incredible opportunity to buy the company backMergers and acquisitions are the No. 1 reason to go publicLeaving college to start a business: “It is not for everybody; you need to be deviant, mischievous, and a rule-breaker,” – Michael DellGet something up and running and then decide to leave or not – this is much better adviceThere is something about the times we are in; the pull and drive of the moment (think about cryptocurrency)Read the full notes @ podcastnotes.orgThere are lots of challenges in being public while trying to innovate, and limits to being a private company as well; but it's rare to see a company go public then private then back to public again. As is the case with Dell Technologies, one of the largest tech companies -- which went private 2012-2013 and then also pulled off one of the most epic mergers of all time with Dell + EMC + VMWare 2015-2016 (and which we wrote about here at the time).Is there a method to the madness? How does one not just start, but keep, and transform, their company and business? Especially as it adapts to broader, underlying tech platform shifts. Michael Dell shares all this in his upcoming new book, Play Nice to Win: A CEO's Journey from Founder to Leader... he also, tellingly, may be one of the longest-standing founder-CEOs (37 years so far).Because this is really a story about innovation, who decides, who judges, who does it, and where: In the markets, in public, in private; in the both the big picture and the inner detailed workings of a business beyond "cells in a spreadsheet"; and even in fighting -- or harnessing! -- narratives, whether it's the demise-of-PC or cloud wars 1.0 /2.0... And where trends like the cost paradox of cloud, and "end of cloud" edge computing, among others like AI & ML, also come in. In this special book-launch episode of the a16z Podcast with Marc Andreessen, Martin Casado, and Sonal Chokshi debate the Cloud Wars to the Company Wars (along with some behind-scenes stories and even some star wars) with Michael Dell... and whether you can really play nice to win. image: Dell EMC World 2016/ © Dell Inc. The views expressed here are those of the individual AH Capital Management, L.L.C. (“a16z”) personnel quoted and are not the views of a16z or its affiliates. Certain information contained in here has been obtained from third-party sources, including from portfolio companies of funds managed by a16z. While taken from sources believed to be reliable, a16z has not independently verified such information and makes no representations about the enduring accuracy of the information or its appropriateness for a given situation.This content is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be relied upon as legal, business, investment, or tax advice. You should consult your own advisers as to those matters. References to any securities or digital assets are for illustrative purposes only, and do not constitute an investment recommendation or offer to provide investment advisory services. Furthermore, this content is not directed at nor intended for use by any investors or prospective investors, and may not under any circumstances be relied upon when making a decision to invest in any fund managed by a16z. (An offering to invest in an a16z fund will be made only by the private placement memorandum, subscription agreement, and other relevant documentation of any such fund and should be read in their entirety.) Any investments or portfolio companies mentioned, referred to, or described are not representative of all investments in vehicles managed by a16z, and there can be no assurance that the investments will be profitable or that other investments made in the future will have similar characteristics or results. A list of investments made by funds managed by Andreessen Horowitz (excluding investments for which the issuer has not provided permission for a16z to disclose publicly as well as unannounced investments in publicly traded digital assets) is available at https://a16z.com/investments/.Charts and graphs provided within are for informational purposes solely and should not be relied upon when making any investment decision. Past performance is not indicative of future results. The content speaks only as of the date indicated. Any projections, estimates, forecasts, targets, prospects, and/or opinions expressed in these materials are subject to change without notice and may differ or be contrary to opinions expressed by others. Please see https://a16z.com/disclosures for additional important information.

HIMSSCast
Dell Technologies Presents: How Healthcare IT can securely enable innovation and the evolution of the care delivery model

HIMSSCast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 9:11


As Healthcare organizations explore how to evolve the care delivery model, they must consider how to safely evolve within an ever-increasing threat landscape. Modernizing Healthcare IT solutions provide great promise to improve Secure Care environments, but in order to ensure adoption and achieve maximum value, all stakeholders must be involved.Join  Kevin Crosby, Dell Technologies Healthcare Director, Americas as he discusses how Healthcare IT can enable innovation and the evolution of the care delivery model, ultimately helping Healthcare providers provide better outcomes for the organization and their patients.

Leadership Next
Michael Dell: We've Only Seen Tech's 'Pre-Game Show'

Leadership Next

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 27:38


Michael Dell had a reputation for not paying attention in school. But apparently, reading computer magazines in the back of his high school classrooms paid off - he went on to found Dell Technologies. This story, and many others, appear in Dell's new book, 'Play Nice But Win.' And today he's sharing several of them on Leadership Next. Alan Murray and Ellen McGirt spend some time digging into Dell's decision to take his company private in 2013 and then return to the public markets in 2018. You may not be surprised to hear that the CEO of Dell Technologies also has a lot to say about tech itself. He believes "nobody is going to be spared" from transformation, that the experience will be "wicked and brutal" but also "wonderful and amazing."

The James Altucher Show
767 - Michael Dell (Part 1): From a Tiny Dorm to Big Time Founder and Leader

The James Altucher Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 25:20


We all have heard of Dell Computers, Dell Server, Dell Monitors, and everything Dell. However, what's the story behind Dell? How did it get started? Who has the idea of breaking apart computers, and put them back again? In this part 1 (of 2 parts) episode, Micahel Dell, an American billionaire businessman, and philanthropist. He is the founder, chairman, and CEO of Dell Technologies, came on The James Altucher Show to talk about his new book, Play Nice But Win: A CEO's Journey from Founder to Leader. He also brought us all the way back when he was a student in a tiny dorm room, breaking apart computers, how the idea came to him, and how he brought the idea to life and eventually became one of the world's largest technology infrastructure companies! Listen to this Part 1 out of 2, and Part 2 will come out the same day too! My new book Skip The Line is out! Make sure you get a copy wherever you get your new book! Join You Should Run For President 2.0 Facebook Group, and we discuss why should run for president. I write about all my podcasts! Check out the full post and learn what I learned at jamesaltucher.com/podcast. Thanks so much for listening! If you like this episode, please subscribe to “The James Altucher Show” and rate and review wherever you get your podcasts: Apple Podcasts Stitcher iHeart Radio Spotify   Follow me on Social Media: YouTube Twitter Facebook See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

a16z
Cloud Wars and Company Wars: Play Nice But Win

a16z

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 52:57


There are lots of challenges in being public while trying to innovate, and limits to being a private company as well; but it's rare to see a company go public then private then back to public again. As is the case with Dell Technologies, one of the largest tech companies -- which went private 2012-2013 and then also pulled off one of the most epic mergers of all time with Dell + EMC + VMWare 2015-2016 (and which we wrote about here at the time).Is there a method to the madness? How does one not just start, but keep, and transform, their company and business? Especially as it adapts to broader, underlying tech platform shifts. Michael Dell shares all this in his upcoming new book, Play Nice to Win: A CEO's Journey from Founder to Leader... he also, tellingly, may be one of the longest-standing founder-CEOs (37 years so far).Because this is really a story about innovation, who decides, who judges, who does it, and where: In the markets, in public, in private; in the both the big picture and the inner detailed workings of a business beyond "cells in a spreadsheet"; and even in fighting -- or harnessing! -- narratives, whether it's the demise-of-PC or cloud wars 1.0 /2.0... And where trends like the cost paradox of cloud, and "end of cloud" edge computing, among others like AI & ML, also come in. In this special book-launch episode of the a16z Podcast with Marc Andreessen, Martin Casado, and Sonal Chokshi debate the Cloud Wars to the Company Wars (along with some behind-scenes stories and even some star wars) with Michael Dell... and whether you can really play nice to win. image: Dell EMC World 2016/ © Dell Inc. The views expressed here are those of the individual AH Capital Management, L.L.C. (“a16z”) personnel quoted and are not the views of a16z or its affiliates. Certain information contained in here has been obtained from third-party sources, including from portfolio companies of funds managed by a16z. While taken from sources believed to be reliable, a16z has not independently verified such information and makes no representations about the enduring accuracy of the information or its appropriateness for a given situation.This content is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be relied upon as legal, business, investment, or tax advice. You should consult your own advisers as to those matters. References to any securities or digital assets are for illustrative purposes only, and do not constitute an investment recommendation or offer to provide investment advisory services. Furthermore, this content is not directed at nor intended for use by any investors or prospective investors, and may not under any circumstances be relied upon when making a decision to invest in any fund managed by a16z. (An offering to invest in an a16z fund will be made only by the private placement memorandum, subscription agreement, and other relevant documentation of any such fund and should be read in their entirety.) Any investments or portfolio companies mentioned, referred to, or described are not representative of all investments in vehicles managed by a16z, and there can be no assurance that the investments will be profitable or that other investments made in the future will have similar characteristics or results. A list of investments made by funds managed by Andreessen Horowitz (excluding investments for which the issuer has not provided permission for a16z to disclose publicly as well as unannounced investments in publicly traded digital assets) is available at https://a16z.com/investments/.Charts and graphs provided within are for informational purposes solely and should not be relied upon when making any investment decision. Past performance is not indicative of future results. The content speaks only as of the date indicated. Any projections, estimates, forecasts, targets, prospects, and/or opinions expressed in these materials are subject to change without notice and may differ or be contrary to opinions expressed by others. Please see https://a16z.com/disclosures for additional important information.

Hello UX
How to Best Prepare for a Mentorship

Hello UX

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 36:54


When pivoting into UX Design, at what step of your journey should you seek a mentor? How about now!!! In this episode, we have a conversation with Miguel Roblero, a Sr. Product Designer at Dell Technologies, Adjunct Professor-Instructor at UT Austin UX/UI Bootcamp and seasoned mentor. Before asking someone to mentor you, you will learn what mindset to bring into the mentorship and how to best prepare for a mentorship. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Thank you for listening! Please show your support by sharing this episode with friends and family and don't forget to rate it! ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ #uxdesign #uxdesigner #productdesigner #helloux #uxdesignerlife #uxmentor --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/helloux/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/helloux/support

Winning Retail
Achieving Efficiency & Associate Engagement with Daryl Porter, Senior Partner & Global Omni Operations Lead at Tomorrow Retail Consulting

Winning Retail

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 38:09


This episode features an interview with Daryl Porter. Daryl recently transitioned from his post as Global Head of Retail Stores at Anheuser-Busch InBev to Senior Partner & Global Omni Operations Lead at Tomorrow Retail Consulting. With over 25 years of retail and leadership experience at Walmart Canada and Anheuser-Busch InBev, Daryl is an omni-channel practitioner with a passion for online grocery.On today's episode, Daryl discusses the importance of rallying your team around a “just cause,” emerging technology and labor trends in the eGrocery space, and the distinction between mature retailers and immature retailers.--“Everybody's focused on productivity, and I believe you can achieve it without pushing people to their breaking point. Humans and technology can work together and achieve amazing things.” -Daryl Porter--Show Notes(1:58) Daryl's background as an Omnichannel practitioner(5:45) Rallying your team around the idea of a “just cause”(10:17) Taking a more humanistic approach to technology and worker optimization(12:31) What Daryl learned from working with Walmart and Anheuser-Busch InBev(15:49) Omnichannel and DTC store trends(20:02) A pain point for physical stores (20:50) Is on-demand labor a trend that will accelerate dramatically for retailers?(25:28) The maturity curve of automation and robot picking technology(29:11) The distinction between “mature retailers” and “immature retailers”(33:41) Lightning round--SponsorThis podcast is presented by Dell Technologies and Intel. Together they help you realize digital transformation across retail by driving IT innovation to better engage with today's connected consumer. Learn more at DellTechnologies.com/retail and Intel.com/retail.--LinksConnect with Daryl on LinkedInConnect with Tony on LinkedInConnect with Tony on TwitterTony Saldanha - Transformant

Dell Technologies Power2Protect Podcast
Power2Protect_EP054 - Simplify Multi-cloud Data Protection

Dell Technologies Power2Protect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 20:05


Protecting your data in the cloud shouldn't be difficult, and that's where Dell Technologies comes in. Join our expert, Colm Keegan as we discuss the unique cloud data protection solutions from Dell that can help you simplify data protection and cyber-resiliency across your environment. Link to blog: https://www.delltechnologies.com/en-us/blog/three-ways-to-simplify-multi-cloud-data-protection/?dgc=SM&cid=170868&lid=spr5545985818&linkId=132836587

The Tim Ferriss Show
#534: Michael Dell, Founder of Dell — How to Play Nice But Win

The Tim Ferriss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 59:20


Michael Dell, Founder of Dell — How to Play Nice But Win | Brought to you by Wealthfront automated investing, Helix Sleep premium mattresses, and Tonal smart home gym. More on all three below.Michael Dell (@MichaelDell) is chairman and chief executive officer of Dell Technologies, an innovator and technology leader providing the essential infrastructure for organizations to build their digital future, transform IT, and protect their most important information. He is the author of Play Nice But Win: A CEO's Journey from Founder to Leader.Michael is an honorary member of the Foundation Board of the World Economic Forum and is an executive committee member of the International Business Council. In 1999, he and his wife, Susan Dell, established the Michael & Susan Dell Foundation.Please enjoy!*This episode is brought to you by Wealthfront! Wealthfront pioneered the automated investing movement, sometimes referred to as ‘robo-advising,' and they currently oversee $20 billion of assets for their clients. It takes about three minutes to sign up, and then Wealthfront will build you a globally diversified portfolio of ETFs based on your risk appetite and manage it for you at an incredibly low cost. Smart investing should not feel like a rollercoaster ride. Let the professionals do the work for you. Go to Wealthfront.com/Tim and open a Wealthfront account today, and you'll get your first $5,000 managed for free, for life. Wealthfront will automate your investments for the long term. Get started today at Wealthfront.com/Tim.*This episode is also brought to you by Tonal! Tonal is the world's most intelligent home gym and personal trainer. It is precision engineered and designed to be the world's most advanced strength studio. Tonal uses breakthrough technology—like adaptive digital weights and AI learning—together with the best experts in resistance training so you get stronger, faster. Every program is personalized to your body using AI, and smart features check your form in real time, just like a personal trainer.Try Tonal, the world's smartest home gym, for 30 days in your home, and if you don't love it, you can return it for a full refund. Visit Tonal.com for $100 off their smart accessories when you use promo code TIM100 at checkout.*This episode is also brought to you by Helix Sleep! Helix was selected as the #1 overall mattress of 2020 by GQ magazine, Wired, Apartment Therapy, and many others. With Helix, there's a specific mattress to meet each and every body's unique comfort needs. Just take their quiz—only two minutes to complete—that matches your body type and sleep preferences to the perfect mattress for you. They have a 10-year warranty, and you get to try it out for a hundred nights, risk free. They'll even pick it up from you if you don't love it. And now, to my dear listeners, Helix is offering up to 200 dollars off all mattress orders plus two free pillows at HelixSleep.com/Tim.*If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really makes a difference in helping to convince hard-to-get guests. I also love reading the reviews!For show notes and past guests, please visit tim.blog/podcast.Sign up for Tim's email newsletter (“5-Bullet Friday”) at tim.blog/friday.For transcripts of episodes, go to tim.blog/transcripts.Discover Tim's books: tim.blog/books.Follow Tim:Twitter: twitter.com/tferriss Instagram: instagram.com/timferrissFacebook: facebook.com/timferriss YouTube: youtube.com/timferrissPast guests on The Tim Ferriss Show include Jerry Seinfeld, Hugh Jackman, Dr. Jane Goodall, LeBron James, Kevin Hart, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Jamie Foxx, Matthew McConaughey, Esther Perel, Elizabeth Gilbert, Terry Crews, Sia, Yuval Noah Harari, Malcolm Gladwell, Madeleine Albright, Cheryl Strayed, Jim Collins, Mary Karr, Maria Popova, Sam Harris, Michael Phelps, Bob Iger, Edward Norton, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Neil Strauss, Ken Burns, Maria Sharapova, Marc Andreessen, Neil Gaiman, Neil de Grasse Tyson, Jocko Willink, Daniel Ek, Kelly Slater, Dr. Peter Attia, Seth Godin, Howard Marks, Dr. Brené Brown, Eric Schmidt, Michael Lewis, Joe Gebbia, Michael Pollan, Dr. Jordan Peterson, Vince Vaughn, Brian Koppelman, Ramit Sethi, Dax Shepard, Tony Robbins, Jim Dethmer, Dan Harris, Ray Dalio, Naval Ravikant, Vitalik Buterin, Elizabeth Lesser, Amanda Palmer, Katie Haun, Sir Richard Branson, Chuck Palahniuk, Arianna Huffington, Reid Hoffman, Bill Burr, Whitney Cummings, Rick Rubin, Dr. Vivek Murthy, Darren Aronofsky, and many more.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Winning Retail
Innovation, Heritage, and the Panthère de Cartier with Andrew Haarsager, Head of Retail Innovation Lab, Cartier North America

Winning Retail

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 34:56


This episode features an interview with Andrew Haarsager, Head of Retail Innovation Labs for Cartier North America. Since 2017, Andrew has worked to design and test new forms of retail experiences while exploring new frontiers outside the world of jewelry and luxury goods.On today's episode, Andrew talks about the mission of the Cartier Lab, fostering relationships with artists outside a commercial environment, and the balance between heritage and innovation. --"Developing the human understanding with regard to any new service, any piece of furniture, any technology that will go into the boutique is paramount.” -Andrew Haarsager--Show Notes(1:45) Andrew's background and the mission of the Cartier Innovation Lab(4:38) Examples of what they are working on right now(8:35) Cartier's Liaison program: creating spaces between sales associates and artists (10:46) The human side of retail innovation(14:38) Why Andrew thinks Cartier opened its first innovation lab in Brooklyn rather than Paris(18:13) Balancing heritage and change at a nearly 200 year-old brand(23:05) The challenges of internal persuasion and education at Cartier(26:51) Finding the relevant context in technological trends(30:30) Lightning round--SponsorThis podcast is presented by Dell Technologies and Intel. Together they help you realize digital transformation across retail by driving IT innovation to better engage with today's connected consumer. Learn more at DellTechnologies.com/retail and Intel.com/retail.--LinksConnect with Andrew on LinkedInConnect with Tony on LinkedInConnect with Tony on TwitterTony Saldanha - Transformant

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed
Network Break 349: T-Mobile Fails To Protect Millions Of Customer Records; Ciena Buys Vyatta Router

Packet Pushers - Full Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 32:26


Today's Network Break podcast opines on why Ciena acquired the Vyatta router from AT&T (and why AT&T wanted to sell), how T-Mobile failed current and former customers via a breach that exposed sensitive details on millions of people, financial results from HPE and Dell Technologies, and more. The post Network Break 349: T-Mobile Fails To Protect Millions Of Customer Records; Ciena Buys Vyatta Router appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Network Break
Network Break 349: T-Mobile Fails To Protect Millions Of Customer Records; Ciena Buys Vyatta Router

Packet Pushers - Network Break

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 32:26


Today's Network Break podcast opines on why Ciena acquired the Vyatta router from AT&T (and why AT&T wanted to sell), how T-Mobile failed current and former customers via a breach that exposed sensitive details on millions of people, financial results from HPE and Dell Technologies, and more. The post Network Break 349: T-Mobile Fails To Protect Millions Of Customer Records; Ciena Buys Vyatta Router appeared first on Packet Pushers.

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe
Network Break 349: T-Mobile Fails To Protect Millions Of Customer Records; Ciena Buys Vyatta Router

Packet Pushers - Fat Pipe

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 32:26


Today's Network Break podcast opines on why Ciena acquired the Vyatta router from AT&T (and why AT&T wanted to sell), how T-Mobile failed current and former customers via a breach that exposed sensitive details on millions of people, financial results from HPE and Dell Technologies, and more. The post Network Break 349: T-Mobile Fails To Protect Millions Of Customer Records; Ciena Buys Vyatta Router appeared first on Packet Pushers.