Podcasts about Construction

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Process of the building or assembling of a building or infrastructure

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  • Jan 20, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Construction

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Latest podcast episodes about Construction

Secrets to Win Big With Arjun Sen
S06E03: Enjoy Every Guest Interaction with VIP Guest Greg Graber

Secrets to Win Big With Arjun Sen

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 21:03


Greg Graber is the CEO and Founder of Heritage Restaurant Brands, the franchisor of 35 restaurants including Huckleberry's Breakfast and Lunch, Cool Hand Luke's Steakhouse and Perko's Café Grill. Greg is a results-driven restaurant executive with extensive senior leadership experience. His diverse management portfolio includes Operations, Marketing, Facilities & Construction, Development, Purchasing, HR and New Product Development. Greg has held executive positions for a variety of segments in the restaurant industry including polished casual, family, buffet and casual dining. Here are some key insights from this week's show: What are the pillars of your business? How to be the same brand to both customers and team members. Why you cannot wait for a crisis to happen to start doing the right thing. Prefer to watch the video? Watch it here: https://youtu.be/XrwOADaXn-s

Elevate Construction
Ep.472 - Swing Capacity & Workable Backlog

Elevate Construction

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 12:41


In this podcast we cover: What is swing capacity What is workable backlog What is swarming Why do we need swing capacity If you like the Elevate Construction podcast, please subscribe for free and you'll never miss an episode.  And if you really like the Elevate Construction podcast, I'd appreciate you telling a friend (Maybe even two 

STO Building Conversations
Construction Quality: A Celebration of Workmanship

STO Building Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 33:36


Why is a zero-punch project so elusive? Join STO Building Group Executive Chairman, Jim Donaghy, as he discusses the ins and outs of delivering a top-quality project with a project team that recently completed a zero-punch move in on a 110,000sf headquarters: BCCI Construction's Studio Director & Quality Manager, Lisa Dunmeyer, and BCCI Field Operations Manager, Matt Ludwig, and Principal with AP+I Design, Meera Agrawal.

Elevate Construction
Ep.471 - Profoundities - An Interview of Jason Schroeder

Elevate Construction

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 65:11


In this podcast we cover: What is lean in construction How do you get owners involved? What is Takt? If you like the Elevate Construction podcast, please subscribe for free and you'll never miss an episode.  And if you really like the Elevate Construction podcast, I'd appreciate you telling a friend (Maybe even two 

Bridging the Gap
Construction: At the Innovation Forefront

Bridging the Gap

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 34:23


If there are a hundred ways that something can go wrong on a project, there are now a thousand ways to fix it. So what's best for you and your company? Join host Todd and guest Bob Armbrister as they discuss the benefits of technology adoption, the difference between adoption by field workers and every other department, how our choices now impact us in the future, and more. Bob Armbrister is the President and CEO of SPARK Business Works. As a member of the leadership team for several organizations over the past decade, he has served as a forward thinking, mission-driven information technology executive. He desires to impact and create significant advancements in efficiency, productivity, and accountability. He enjoys the never-ending challenge of turning complex computer information into understandable and easy-to-access data for strategic thinkers. Todd Takes: When starting to implement new technology, it is important to start with user center design. Think through how people are actually going to use and leverage the technology. What needs to change in their workflow and how are you going to streamline that process. Challenge your assumptions by taking time to sit down with the people that are experiencing the pain points. By getting them involved early in the process, you are helping to ensure you are on the right track that will actually and practically address the issue at hand. Bob brought up the different personas that should be involved in the implementation process. Think through which personas and stakeholders need to be involved and recruit them to join the team.

Bred To Build - Construction Podcast
Ep. 20: Building a generational company w/ Marcus Gores

Bred To Build - Construction Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 80:42


How many times have you heard..."I don't want to train them because they're just going to leave."There's some truth here. You don't have a workforce forever.Marcus Gores thinks about building a construction company differently than most...Some folks may want to stay with Gores Construction forever, great, they will be trained.Some folks may want to learn skills to start their own business, great, they will be trained. And even better...they may become future subcontractors.Building a generational company is a commitment to people and having a long-term mindset.

Talking Home Renovations with the House Maven
Construction Pricing with Kevin Cradock

Talking Home Renovations with the House Maven

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 27:16


Many homeowners want a fixed price contract for their construction project, but is that going to get them the best value for their money? Fine Homebuilder Kevin Cradock joins me to discuss fixed price contracts versus time and materials contracts, or cost plus. About our guest: Kevin Cradock grew up in Jamaica Plain surrounded by classic homes that awakened a love of carpentry and an appreciation for traditional craftsmanship. Beginning his career as a finish carpenter renovating classic Boston homes, Kevin gradually moved toward creating distinctive custom cabinetry for his building and renovation projects. By the mid-1990's he established his own workshop, and in collaboration with local designers, he devoted himself to crafting the finest custom millwork, cabinetry and furniture available. Today Kevin oversees a large crew of managers, carpenters and woodworkers. He works closely with architects, designers and homeowners, building and renovating homes and crafting cabinetry, furniture, and millwork to meet each customer's taste and lifestyle. www.cradockbuilders.com Instagram: @cradockbuilders ******************************************************************************************************* Thanks so much for being with us this week.  Please see the episode enhancement for this and other episodes athttps://www.talkinghomerenovations.com/ ( talkinghomerenovations.com) Do you have feedback you would like to share?  Would you like to be a guest on the podcast?  Email me at thehousemaven@talkinghomerenovations.com If you enjoyed this episode, please share it with your friends Don't forget to subscribe to the show and get automatic updates every Wednesday morning with the latest episode of Talking Home Renovations with the House Maven.   Clickhttp://eepurl.com/gFJLlT ( here) to get the episode enhancements sent directly to your inbox every week. Reviews and ratings help my show gain traction and credibility.  Please leave a review here-https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/talking-home-renovations-with-the-house-maven/id1481716218 ( https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/talking-home-renovations-with-the-house-maven/id1481716218) Visithttps://my.captivate.fm/www.Talkinghomerenovations.com ( Talkinghomerenovations.com) for episode enhancements, containing photos and more information about the episodes as well as transcripts.  There you can leave a voice message through speak pipe that could be included in a future episode. Follow me on instagram: @talkinghomerenovations Join me on Facebook: Talking Home Renovations Follow me on Twitter: @talkinghomereno Join me on TikTok: @The House Maven Talking Home Renovations with the House Maven is part of Gabl Media, the largest, most engaged AEC network on the planet.  Visit http://www.gablmedia.com/ (www.Gablmedia.com) for great content.  Sign up for the weekly newsletter- I send out the episode enhancements every Wednesday morning, http://eepurl.com/gFJLlT (  sign up here) Thanks to Ray Bernoff, the editor of the show.http://www.raybernoff.com/ ( www.RayBernoff.com) Music at the beginning and end of the episode is The House Maven's Jig, written and performed by Neil Pearlman, https://neilpearlman.com/ (www.neilpearlman.com) Show Cover Art by Sam Whitehttp://www.samowhite.com/ ( www.samowhite.com) This podcast is a production of dEmios Architects.http://www.demiosarchitects.com/ ( www.demiosarchitects.com) Do you need a bit of design help? If you are in Massachusetts and need a second set of eyes on your design, my Ask an Architect design help-line can help.  We meet on zoom for an hour to review your issues.  Contact me for more information at kewm@demiosarchitects.com Support this podcast

The Ticket Top 10
Musers- 840 Bit: Randy Coate Talks Stadium Construction and Cowboy Curtains

The Ticket Top 10

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 5:45


1-18-2022 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Qool Marv Aural Memoirs and Buttamilk Archives // MusiQuarium Of Wonder // Instruments Of Mass Construction // Music4Winners
Episode 344: Qool DJ Marv opens The Apollo Music Cafe featuring Liv Warfield - January 15 2022 - Harlem NYC USA

Qool Marv Aural Memoirs and Buttamilk Archives // MusiQuarium Of Wonder // Instruments Of Mass Construction // Music4Winners

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 59:53


Qool DJ Marv opens The Apollo Music Cafe featuring Liv Warfield - January 15 2022 - Harlem NYC USA Thank you, Apollo Theater!Don't Disturb This Groove - Meshelle NdegeocelloGroove DJ - Liv WarfieldFreedom - Sampa The GreatOne Is The Magic # - Jill ScottFreedom (feat. Kendrick Lamar) - BeyoncéTurntables (from the Amazon Original Movie "All In: The Fight for Democracy") - Janelle MonáeGolden – Jill ScottBack To Life – Soul II SoulSaturday Night - ZhaneIf I Ain't Got You (Black Eyed Peas Remix) - Alicia KeysMy Life ft. James Coleman - David MrakporShine (feat. Divageek) - Lalah HathawayMusic – Erick Sermon featuring Marvin GayeIt Makes A Difference - Danny Krivit & Kyle Smith Present Kim EnglishBack Together Again – Roberta Flack and Donny Hathaway Harlem River Drive - Elements of Life https://linktr.ee/qooldjmarv + https://www.apollotheater.org/calendar/

The LA Report
Signs of optimism as new COVID infections slow. Plus: Students delaying higher education, doctors who assault patients, and more – The Morning Edition

The LA Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 6:41


Here's your morning news: Signs of optimism as new COVID infections slow; Echo Park COVID testing site reopens; College students delaying or dropping plans for further education; Construction of new 6th Street bridge hits milestone; Closing loophole that allows doctors to get medical licenses restored after sexually assaulting patients; Fight over Tajon Ranch continues despite legal settlement; Dozens of flights to East Coast cancelled due to storms; Port of Ventura sees light damage from Saturday's tidal surge. This program is made possible in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people.   Support the show: https://laist.com

Angelo Cataldi And The Morning Team
Jeff McLane: Roster construction is on Howie

Angelo Cataldi And The Morning Team

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 10:07


The Inquirer's Jeff McLane joins the show. What are his thoughts on the playoff game as well as the Eagles' season as a whole.

Streetwise Hebrew
#355 I'm Not Built For This

Streetwise Hebrew

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 11:12


An Argentinean architect listener of the podcast wrote to say that we had to do an episode about the word לבנות (livnot), which means to build. We don't have it in us to tear down his hopes. So today we check out the root בנה. Hear the All-Hebrew Episode on Patreon   New Words and Expressions: Adrichal – Architect – אדריכל Hu bana – He built – הוא בנה Baniti – I built – בניתי [Like kaniti, ratsiti, bachiti – קניתי, רציתי, בכיתי] “Kan noladeti, kan noldu li yeladai” – I was born here, my children as well – כאן נולדתי, כאן נולדו לי ילדיי “Kan baniti et beiti bi-shtei yadai” – This is where I built my house with my own two hands – כאן בניתי את ביתי בשתי ידיי Harkada – Israeli dancing gathering – הרקדה Ha-bonim ha-hofshiyim – Freemasonry – הבונים החופשיים Bikoret bona – Constructive criticism – ביקורת בונה Bné, bni, bnu – Build (Imperative) – בנה, בני, בנו Bné betcha – Build your (own) home – בנה ביתך Bniya – Construction – בנייה Atar bniya – Construction site – אתר בנייה Atarei bniya – Construction sites – אתרי בנייה Betichut be-atarey bniya – Worker safety on construction sites – בטיחות באתרי בנייה “Kablan, kshe-ata bona bayit, al taharos bayit acher” – Contractor, when you build a house, don't destroy another one – קבלן, כשאתה בונה בית, אל תהרוס בית אחר Bniyat atarim – Building websites – בניית אתרים Bniyat bayit – Building a house – בניית בית Bniyat beit ha-mikdash – (Re)building of the temple in Jerusalem – בניית בית המקדש Bniyat tsipornayim – Nail building – בניית ציפורניים Bniyat deck – Building a deck – בניית דק Bniyat tabun – Building a tabun – בניית טאבון Bniya yeruka – Green construction – בנייה ירוקה Harigot bniya – Deviation from the construction permit – חריגות בנייה Banui – Built (Past participle) – בנוי Ani lo bnuya le-ze – I am not cut out for this – אני לא בנויה לזה “Anu banu artsa livnot u'lehibanot ba” – We came to the land to build it and to be built – אנו באנו ארצה לבנות ולהיבנות בה Holechet lehibanot po sifriya – A library is going to be built here – הולכת להיבנות פה ספרייה Holech lehibanot po binyan gavoha – A tall building will be built here – הולך להיבנות פה בניין גבוה Binyan, binyanim – Building, buildings / Verb formats – בניין, בניינים Mivne – Structure, building – מבנה Mivni – Structural – מבני Shinuy mivni – Structural change – שינוי מבני Banai – Builder – בנאי Tavnit – Pattern – תבנית Tavnit afiya – Baking pan – תבנית אפייה “Ha-uga halcha ba-derech la-mesiba” – The cake was destroyed on the way to the party – העוגה הלכה בדרך למסיבה   Playlist and Clips: Orna & Moshe Datz – Kan (lyrics) Israel in Eurovision 1991 Atarei bniya – Construction sites Ha-yehida 2 – Lo bnuya le-ze Ha-gevatron – Anu Banu Artsa (lyrics) Tavniyot afia – Baking Pans

Elevate Construction
Ep.470 - You Are the Captain! - Keep the Ship Afloat!

Elevate Construction

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 16:51


In this podcast we cover: Keeping your ship stocked Ensuring teams are high functioning Proving training for everyone on board Making sure systems are operational Knowing where you are going Communicating how to get there Keeping the ship afloat If you like the Elevate Construction podcast, please subscribe for free and you'll never miss an episode.  And if you really like the Elevate Construction podcast, I'd appreciate you telling a friend (Maybe even two 

Hardworking Happy Hour
Episode 6: Branding

Hardworking Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 69:43


Sean and Catherine discuss why branding your business is such an important concept for any and every entrepreneur! We break down what exactly branding means and how to best implement strategies to further create the best reputation for your business. Branding has become a buzzword recently, and it can be confusing to know where to start!

Digital Builder
Actionable Insights on the Economic Outlook for Construction

Digital Builder

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 44:09


As we leave 2021 behind, it's time to look at the economic outlook for the construction industry in 2022. For that, we turn to Richard Branch, Chief Economist at Dodge Data & Analytics and anchorman for the prestigious and widely-circulated Dodge Construction Outlook. In this episode, he highlights some of the challenges and opportunities the industry will face in the coming year. We discuss: Which construction sectors can expect the most growth and opportunity in the United States Guidance on how to tackle the biggest challenges facing the construction industry How the newly passed infrastructure bill will impact the industry outlook   Mentioned during the podcast: Episode 22 of Digital Builder w/ Karalynn Cromeens Episode 23 of Digital Builder w/ Stephan Mansour   Digital Builder is hosted by Eric Thomas of Autodesk. Hear more episodes like this one by subscribing to Digital Builder on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play, or wherever you listen to podcasts. Can't see the links? Just search for Digital Builder in your favorite podcast player.

The Contracting Handbook
Gena Hoyt of Big Dog Construction talks labor shortage and solutions

The Contracting Handbook

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 58:34


Mike Knoche has been running his general contracting business for 16 years. It's been trial by fire and in The Contracting Handbook, Mike shares his successes, his failures and asks other industry leaders to join him in a discussion of how to run a contracting business! The Contracting Handbook podcast discusses the behind the scenes running of a small contracting company. It's everything from starting up, working with employees, subcontractors, and clients. Remember, it won't just be Mike's perspective as he will talk to contractors from all over the world about theirs too! Why the world over? Because through his travels in the off season he's come to see that contractors everywhere have similar business needs, struggles, and ideas in common. We a are a global community of builders! Contact Mike at info@thecontractinghandbook.com for questions, comments, or to be interviewed.Please hit the subscribe button, leave a review, comment or question. I want your feedback. Guest: Gena HoytWebsite: @bigdogconstructio.gmHammr: @genahoyt Host: Mike KnocheWebsite: The Contracting HandbookHammr: @mikeknocheInstagram: @thecontractinghandbookPatreon: Mike Knoche   

Qool Marv Aural Memoirs and Buttamilk Archives // MusiQuarium Of Wonder // Instruments Of Mass Construction // Music4Winners
Episode 343: Qool DJ Marv Live at Soho House Manhattan - January 11 2022 - Modals of Mood

Qool Marv Aural Memoirs and Buttamilk Archives // MusiQuarium Of Wonder // Instruments Of Mass Construction // Music4Winners

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 281:23


Qool DJ Marv Live at Soho House Manhattan - January 11 2022 - Modals of Mood  https://linktr.ee/qooldjmarv + https://sohohouseny.com/   + Photo https://www.instagram.com/p/CYj9ikapDUA/?utm_medium=share_sheet

The ConTechCrew
The ConTechCrew 296: A Covid Project for Construction with Jonathan Marsh of Steel Toe Consulting

The ConTechCrew

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 77:34


This week's construction tech news with Josh Bone (@BIM2theBone), Jeff Sample (@IronmanofIT) & Jonathan Marsh (@ErieForage) Featuring: -Interview with Jonathan Marsh -ConTech News Follow @TheConTechCrew on social media for more updates and to join the conversation! Listen to the show at http://thecontechcrew.com Powered by JBKnowledge Learn more at http://thecontechcrew.com or follow @JBKnowledge & @TheConTechCrew on Twitter.

Game Time with Nick Bahe
January 14 – Segment 5 – Nebraska Basketball's Roster Construction

Game Time with Nick Bahe

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 12:34


Connor picks apart the roster for Nebraska basketball and wonders why it isn't better

The Real Build
124. How Construction And Real Estate Go Hand In Hand

The Real Build

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 20:50


In this episode of The Real Build, I answer a question from a show listener named Bashir. Bashir is an architect and builder from Nigeria. Bashir asked, "I have been trying to go into Luxury real estate In Nigeria for some time, but no headway. what am I not doing right?" I have been asked a similar question of how I combine both real estate and construction. This episode covers how I built my real estate business while working full-time in construction and utilized my construction background to sell more luxury real estate. Construction and real estate go hand in hand. If you build a home, you are building it on a piece of real estate. That finished home becomes a piece of real estate. Why wouldn't you want to add a real estate license to your resume as a builder? This opens up many new doors for you, and I explain how. Host Info Email: Bill@rkreiman.com CONNECT WITH ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA: ▶︎ YOUTUBE | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxAdSxHN0dIXZPhA-6p1HYA ▶︎ INSTAGRAM | https://www.instagram.com/imbillreiman ▶︎FACEBOOK| https://www.facebook.com/billy.reiman ▶︎ LINKEDIN | https://www.linkedin.com/in/bill-reim... ▶︎ TWITTER | https://twitter.com/ImBillReiman ▶︎ WEBSITE | https://www.rkreiman.com

Inside The Force: A Star Wars Podcast
Beyond the Saga - Star Wars: The Ashes of Jedha

Inside The Force: A Star Wars Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 24:11


The Death Star has changed everything. Its destruction proves the Empire is not irresistible. Construction of another Death Star can't happen again. From the desolation of Jedha to the search for new bases, the rebels continue to fight for a better tomorrow. David and Hannah discuss Star Wars: The Ashes of Jedha, the seventh volume of the Star Wars comic series. For more Star Wars content visit insidetheforce.com. Join our Facebook Group, follow us on Twitter, and subscribe to our YouTube Channel. If you like the show, please leave us a review and share us with your friends and family. May the Force be with You!

The Situation with Michael Brown
Infrastructure Projects in Colorado

The Situation with Michael Brown

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 33:40


Hour 1: Half-ass construction projects around the state. The light rail isn't well-kept, but it is clean-ish for now. Local 7 strike with King Soopers employees because they didn't have a say. Union leaders and King Soopers filed unfair labor practices against each other.

Building Ideas
Episode 58_Annie Angueira

Building Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 55:53


Annie Angueira is President of A2 Project Services, a North-Carolina based Owners Representation and Construction Consulting Practice. She was raised in Miami and is a first generation American born to parents who fled the Cuban Communist revolution. Annie graduated in Civil Engineering from the University of Florida and began her career working on government infrastructure projects with a large international contracting firm. She transitioned into Collegiate Facilities and Planning Administration where she served at the Vice President level at multiple higher education institutions in the Eastern US. Annie is passionate about the importance of campus planning and integration into the design and construction process, and is currently serving as Owners Construction Reprentative for Centre College on their $50 million Initiative for Wellness and Athletic Excellence - the most significant project in the 200+ year history of the College. A2 Project Services - (315) 825-1578

Greater Than Code
266: Words Carry Power – Approaching Inclusive Language with Kate Marshall

Greater Than Code

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 58:04


01:48 - Kate's Superpower: Empathy * Absorbing Energy * Setting Healthy Energetic Boundaries * Authenticity * Intent vs Impact 10:46 - Words and Narratives Carry Power; Approaching Inclusive Language * Taking Action After Causing Harm * Get Specific, But Don't Overthink * Practice Makes Progress * Normalize Sharing Pronouns * No-CodeConf (https://webflow.com/nocodeconf) * No-CodeSchool (https://nocodeschool.co/) * Gender Expresion Does Not Always Equal Gender Identity 21:27 - Approaching Inclusive Language in the Written Word * Webflow Accessibility Checklist (https://webflow.com/accessibility/checklist) * Asking For Advice * Do Your Own Research/Work 29:18 - Creating Safe Places, Communities, and Environments * Absorbing and Asking * Authenticity (Cont'd) * Adaptation to Spaces * Shifting Energy 42:34 - Building Kula (https://kulayogadenver.com/) While Working in Tech * Community Care, Mutual Aid-Centered Model * Using Privilege to Pave the Way For More People * Alignment Reflections: John: The dichotomy between perfectionism and authenticity. Arty: Words carry power. Kate: Having an open heart is how you can put any of this into action. This episode was brought to you by @therubyrep (https://twitter.com/therubyrep) of DevReps, LLC (http://www.devreps.com/). To pledge your support and to join our awesome Slack community, visit patreon.com/greaterthancode (https://www.patreon.com/greaterthancode) To make a one-time donation so that we can continue to bring you more content and transcripts like this, please do so at paypal.me/devreps (https://www.paypal.me/devreps). You will also get an invitation to our Slack community this way as well. Transcript: PRE-ROLL: Software is broken, but it can be fixed. Test Double's superpower is improving how the world builds software by building both great software and great teams. And you can help! Test Double is hiring empathetic senior software engineers and DevOps engineers. We work in Ruby, JavaScript, Elixir and a lot more. Test Double trusts developers with autonomy and flexibility at a remote, 100% employee-owned software consulting agency. Looking for more challenges? Enjoy lots of variety while working with the best teams in tech as a developer consultant at Test Double. Find out more and check out remote openings at link.testdouble.com/greater. That's link.testdouble.com/greater. JOHN: Welcome to Greater Than Code. I'm John Sawers and I'm here with Arty Starr. ARTY: Thanks, John. And I'm here with our guest today, Kate Marshall. Kate is a copywriter and inclusivity activist living in Denver. Since entering tech 4 years ago, she's toured the marketing org from paid efforts to podcast host, eventually falling in love with the world of copy. With this work, she hopes to make the web a more welcoming place using the power of words. Outside of Webflow, you'll find Kate opening Kula, a donation-based yoga studio, and bopping around the Mile High City with her partner, Leah. Welcome to the show, Kate. KATE: Hi, thank you so much! ARTY: So we always start our shows with our famous first question. What is your superpower and how did you acquire it? KATE: My superpower, I've been thinking about this. My superpower is empathy. It can also be one of my biggest downfalls [laughs], which I actually think happens more often than not with any superpower. I once heard from a child, actually, they always seem to know best that too much of the good, good is bad, bad. [laughter] So it turns out sometimes too much empathy can be too overwhelming for my system, but it has really driven everything that I've done in my career and my personal life. As for how I acquired it, I don't know that you can really acquire empathy. I think it's just something you have, or you don't. I've always been extremely intuitive and if you're going through something, it's likely that I can feel it. So I think I'm just [laughs] I hate to steal Maybelline's line, but I think I was born with it. JOHN: You talked about having a downside there and I've heard – and I'm curious, because most people talk about empathy as a positive thing and wanting more people to develop more empathy, but I'd to love hear you talk a little bit more about what you see the downsides are. KATE: Yeah. As someone who struggles with her own mental health issues, it can be really overwhelming for me to really take on whatever it is you're going through. Especially if it's a loved one, you tend to care more about what they're feeling, or what they're going through and an empath truly does absorb the energy of what's happening around them. So although, it does influence a lot of the work that I do, both in my full-time career and opening my yoga studio and everything in between, it's also hard sometimes to set those boundaries, to set healthy, really energetic boundaries. It's hard enough to voice your boundaries to people, but setting energetic boundaries is a whole other ballgame. So it can tend to feel overwhelming at times and bring you down if the energy around you is lower than what you want it to be. ARTY: So what kind of things do you do to try and set healthy, energetic boundaries? KATE: Ah. I do a lot of what some people would call, including myself, woo-woo practices. [chuckles] Obviously, I practice yoga. I teach yoga. I'm super passionate about holistic, or energetic healing so I go to Reiki regularly. I'm in therapy, talk therapy. All of those things combined help me build this essentially an energetic shield that I can psych myself up to use any time I'm leaving the apartment. If it feels a high energy day, or if I'm meeting up with a friend who I know is going through something, I really have to set those boundaries is. Same thing kind of at work, too. So much of the time that we spend in our lives is spent at work, or interacting with coworkers or colleagues and same thing. Everyone's going through their own journey and battles, and you have to carry that energetic shield around you wherever you go. JOHN: One way I've often thought about having those sort of boundaries is the more I know who I am, the more what the limits of me are and the barrier between me and the universe is. So the work that I do, which includes therapy and other things, to understand myself better and to feel like I know what's me and what's not me, helps me have those boundaries. Because then I know if there's something going on with someone else and I can relate to it, but not get swept up by it. KATE: Yeah. It's so funny you say that because I was actually just having a conversation with a friend a couple weeks ago that has really stuck with me. I was kind of feeling like I was messing up, essentially. Like I was not fully able to honor, or notice all of the triggers of the people around me. I think especially at the end of the year and as a queer person who is surrounded by queer community, it can be really tough around the holidays. So that energy can just be generally more charged and I was finding it difficult to reconcile with my idea of perfection in that I really want to honor every person around me who has triggers, who has boundaries that maybe haven't been communicated, and it almost feels like you're almost always crossing some sort of line, especially when you're putting those perfectionism expectations on yourself. My friend was like, “I don't think it's as much about being perfect at it as much as it is feeling like you're being authentically yourself and really authentically interacting with those people.” I don't know if I can really voice what the connection is between being able to honor triggers and boundaries of the people around you and feeling like your authentic self, but there's something about it that feels really connected to me. As long as you're trying your best and feeling like you're coming from a place of love, or connection, or compassion, or empathy whatever feels most to you, that's really all we can do, right? JOHN: Yeah. I feel like that authenticity is such a tricky concept because the thoughts that you're having about wanting to be perfect and take care of everyone and make sure you're not triggering anybody and not stepping on any of your own things, that's also part of you that is authentically you. You may not want it to be that way, but it still is. [laughs]. ARTY: Yeah. JOHN: So I still don't have a really clear sense in my mind what authenticity really is. I think probably it settles down to being a little bit more in the moment, rather than up in the thinking, the judging, the worrying, and being able to be present rather than – [overtalk] ARTY: Totally. JOHN: Those other things, but it is tricky. KATE: Yeah. It can be tricky. Humans, man. [laughter] It really is like being a human and part of the human experience is going to be triggering other people. It's going to be causing harm. It's going to be causing trauma to other humans. That's just part of it. I think the more you can get comfy with that idea and then also just really feeling like you're doing everything you can to stay connected to your core, which usually is in humans is a place of love. You're rooted in love for the people around you. How could you criticize yourself too much when you know that you're coming from that place? ARTY: I feel like things change, too as you get feedback. In the context of any intimate relationship where you've got emotionally connected relationship with another person where you are more unguarded and you're having conversations about things that are more personal, that have at least the potential to hurt and cause harm. Like sometimes we do things not meaning to and we end up hurting someone else accidentally, but once that happens—and hopefully, you have an open dialogue where you have a conversation about these things and learn about these things and adapt—then I think the thing to do is honor each person as an individual of we're all peoples and then figure out well, what can we do to adapt how we operate in this relationship and look out for both people's best interests and strive for a win-win. If we don't try and do that, like if we do things that we know we're harming someone else and we're just like, “Well, you should just put up with that,” [laughs], or whatever. I think that's where it becomes problematic is at the same time, we all have our own limitations and sometimes, the best thing to do is this relationship doesn't work. The way that we interact causes mutual harm and we can't this a win-win relationship and the best thing to do sometimes is to separate, even though it hurts because it's not working. KATE: Yeah. I feel like sometimes it's a classic case of intent versus impact, too. Like what's your intention going into a conversation and then how does that end up actually impacting that person and how can you honor that and learn from that? That's actually one thing that I love so much about being a writer is that words do carry so much power—written word, spoken word, whatever it is. They hold so much power and they can cause harm whether we want them to, or not. Part of being an empath is caring a lot about people's lived experiences and I really see it as more than putting – being a writer and doing this every day, I see it so much more than just putting words on a page and hoping signs up for the beta, or watches the thing registers, or the conference. It's words can foster connection, words can build worlds for people; they can make people feel like they belong and I believe that I'm on this planet to foster that connection with each other and with ourselves. So it all connects for me. It all comes back around whether we're talking about being in a romantic relationship, or our relationship with our parents, or our caregivers, or the work that I do every day it all comes back to that connection and really wanting to make people feel more connected to themselves, to each other, and like they have a place with words. ARTY: Yeah. It's very powerful. Words and narratives, I would say too, just thinking about the stories that we tell ourselves, the stories that we tell one another that become foundational in our culture. It's all built upon were words. Words shape the ideas in our head. They shape our thoughts. They shape how we reflect on things, how we feel about things, and then when people give us their words, we absorb those and then those become part of our own reflections. KATE: Yeah. ARTY: We affect one another a lot. I think that's one of the things I'm just seeing and talking to you is just thinking about how much we affect one another through our everyday interactions. KATE: Yeah, and I think a lot of this comes down to – there's something you said earlier that resonated in that it's really about the action you take after you cause the harm, or after you say the thing that hurts the other person and it's less about – and that's what made me say intent versus impact because you see the impact, you acknowledge it, and you make a decision to lessen that next time, or to be aware, more aware next time. This is really at the core of all the work I do for inclusive language as well. It's just the core principle of the words we use carry a lot of power. And I was actually just chatting with someone in the No-Code space. We connected through Webflow a couple weeks ago and he said, “I think people are so scared to get it wrong when it comes to inclusive language,” and I experience this all the time. People freeze in their tracks because they don't know how address someone and then they're so scared to get it wrong and they're like, “Oh, so sorry, sorry, sorry, sorry,” and they're so apologetic. And then that makes it worse and it's just a whole thing. In this conversation, we were talking specifically about misgendering people. My partner is non-binary. They're misgendered every single day when we go to restaurants, when we are just out and about. So this is something that is a part of my life every day. I told him that fear is so real and I carry that fear, too because I don't want to hurt people because I want to like get it right. It comes back to that perfectionism, that expectation that I put on myself, especially as a queer person to get it right all the time. But so much of the good stuff lies in how you approach it and then how you fix it when you mess it up. Like, it's not so much about the thing, it's about the way that you approach it. If you approach inclusive language with an open mind, an open heart, and a real willingness, like true willingness to learn, that's what's important going into it and then you're already doing the work. You're already an ally. You're already however you want to put it. And then when you use an ableist word, or you use a racist word, or you misgender someone, your actions for following that speak volumes. I think we can really get caught up in the action itself and it's more about how you go into it and then how you try to fix it. ARTY: So I'm thinking for listeners that might identify with being in a situation of being in the headlights and not knowing how to respond, or what to do. Other than what you were just talking about with coming at it with an open heart, are there any specific recommendations you might have for how to approach inclusive language? KATE: Yeah. Yeah, I have a couple really, really good ones. So often, the way to speak more inclusively, or to write more inclusively is just to get more specific about what you're trying to say. So instead of saying, “Oh, that's so crazy,” which is ableist, you can say, “Oh, that's so unheard of.” That's a good example. Or instead of unnecessarily gendering something you're saying like, “Oh, I'm out of wine, call the waitress over.” It's server instead of waiter, or waitress. You kind of start to essentially practice replacing these words and these concepts that are so ingrained into who we are, into society at large, and really starting to disrupt those systems within us with challenging the way that we've described things in the past. So just essentially getting more specific when we're speaking. When it comes to misgendering people specifically, it's really important to not be overly apologetic when you misgender someone. I can give an example. If a server, for example, comes up to me and my partner and says, “Can I get you ladies anything else?” And I say, “Oh, actually my partner uses they/them pronouns. They are not a lady,” and they say, “Oh my God, I'm so sorry. Oh shit!” And then that makes my partner feel bad [chuckles] for putting them in that position and then it's kind of this like ping pong back and forth of just bad feelings. The ideal scenario, the server would say, “Oh, excuse me, can I get you all anything else?” Or, “Can I get you folks anything else?” Or just, if you're speaking about someone who uses they/them pronouns and you say, “Yeah, and I heard she, I mean, they did this thing.” You just quickly correct it and move on. Don't make it into a production. It's okay. We get it. Moving on. Just try not to overthink it, basically. [laughs] Get more specific, but don't overthink it. Isn't that like, what a dichotomy. [laughter] JOHN: That ties back to what you were saying about perfectionism also, right? Like you said, you freeze up if you try and be perfect about it all the time, because you can't always know what someone's pronouns are and so, you have to make a guess at some point and maybe you're going to guess wrong. But it's how you deal with it by not making everybody uncomfortable with the situation. [laughs] KATE: Yeah. JOHN: And like you said, ping pong of bad feelings just amplifies, the whole thing blows out of proportion. You can just be like, “Oh, my apologies.” Her, they, whatever it is and then very quickly move on and then it's forgotten the next minute. Everything moves on from that, but you're not weeping and gnashing and – [laughter] KATE: Yeah. JOHN: Well, it means you don't have to keep feeling bad about it for the next 3 days either, like everyone can move on from that point. KATE: Right. Yeah, and just doing your best to not do it again. JOHN: Yeah. KATE: Once you learn, it's important to really let that try to stick. If you're having trouble, I have a friend who really has trouble with they/them pronouns and they practice with their dog. They talk to their dog about this person and they use they/them pronouns in that. Practice really does make perfect in this – not perfect, okay. Practice really does make progress in this kind of scenario and also, normalize sharing pronouns. JOHN: Yeah. KATE: It's more than just putting it in your Zoom name. It's more than just putting it in your Instagram bio. A good example of really starting this conversation was during Webflow's No-Code Conf, our yearly conference. It was mostly online and we had a live portion of it and every single time we introduced someone new, or introduced ourselves, we said, “My name is Kate Marshall, my pronouns are she/her, and I'm so happy to be here with you today.” Or just asking if you don't know, or if you're in a space with someone new, you say, “What are your pronouns?” It's really is that easy. Webflow made some year-round pride mech that we launched over the summer and we have a cute beanie that says “Ask me my pronouns.” It's like, it's cool to ask. It's fine to ask and that's so much better than unintentionally misgendering someone. It's going to take some time to get there, but normalize it. JOHN: Yeah, and I think there's one key to that that has always stuck out of my mind, which is don't ask pronouns just for the people you think might have different pronouns than you would expect. KATE: Yes. JOHN: Make it part of all the conversations so it's not just singling somebody out of a group and saying, “I want to know your pronouns because they're probably different.” That's not good. KATE: Right, because gender expression does not always equal gender identity. JOHN: Yeah. KATE: You can't know someone's gender identity from the way that they express their gender and that's also another huge misconception that I think it's time we talk more about. JOHN: So we've been talking a lot about conversations and person-to-person interactions and inclusive language there. But a lot of what you do is it on the writing level and I imagine there's some differences there. So I'm curious as to what you see as far as the things that you do to work on that in the written form. KATE: Yeah. So this is actually a really great resource that I was planning on sharing with whoever's listening, or whoever's following along this podcast. There is a really wonderful inclusive language guidelines that we have published externally at Webflow and I own it, I update it regularly as different things come in and inclusive language is constantly evolving. It will never be at a final resting point and that's also part of why I love it so much because you truly are always growing. I'm always learning something new about inclusive language, or to make someone feel more included with the words that I'm writing. This table has, or this resource has ableist language, racist language, and sexist language tables with words to avoid, why to avoid them, and some alternatives and just some general principles. I reference it constantly. Like I said, it's always evolving. I actually don't know how many words are on there, but it's a good amount and it's a lot of things have been surfaced to me that I had no idea were racist. For instance, the word gypped. Like if you say, “Oh, they gypped me” is actually racist. It's rooted in the belief that gypsy people are thieves. [chuckles] So it's things like that we really kind of go deep in there and I reference this constantly. Also, ALS language is a really big consideration, especially in the tech space. So instead of – and this can be avoided most of the time, not all of the time. We do work with a really wonderful accessibility consultant who I run things by constantly. Shout out to Michele. Oh, she was actually on the podcast at one point. Michele Williams, shout out. Lovely human. So a good example is instead of “watch now,” or “listen now,” it's “explore this thing,” “browse this thing,” “learn more”. Just try not to get so specific about the way that someone might be consuming the information that I'm putting down on the page. Stuff like that. It truly does come down to just getting more specific as just a general principle. JOHN: So it sounds to me some of the first steps you take are obviously being aware that you have to mold your language to be more accessible and inclusive, then it's informing yourself of what the common pitfalls are. As you said, you have consultants, you've got guides, you've got places where you can gather this information and then once you have that, then you build that into your mental process for writing what you're writing. KATE: Yeah, and truly just asking questions and this goes for everyone. No one would ever – if I reached out to our head of DEI, Mariah, and said, “Mariah, is this thing offensive?” Or, “How should I phrase this thing to feel more inclusive to more people?” She would never come back at me and say, “Why are you asking me this? You should already know this,” and that is the attitude across the board. I would never fault someone for coming to me and asking me how to phrase something, or how to write something to make it feel better for more people. So it's really a humbling experience [laughs] to be in this position. Again, words carry so much power and I just never take for granted, the power essentially that I have, even if it is just for a tech company. A lot of people are consuming that and I want to make them feel included. JOHN: Yeah. The written face of a company is going to tell readers a lot about the culture of the company, the culture of the community around the product. KATE: Yeah. JOHN: Whether they're going to be welcome there, like what their experience is going to be like if they invest their time to learn about it. So it's really important to have that language there and woven into everything that's written, not just off the corner on the DEI page. KATE: Yeah. That's what I was just about to say is especially if you're a company that claims to prioritize DEI, you better be paying close attention to the words that you're using in your product, on your homepage, whatever it is, your customer support. I've worked with the customer support team at Webflow to make sure that the phrasing feels good for people. It truly does trickle into every single asset of a business and it's ongoing work that does not just end at, like you said, putting it on a DEI page. Like, “We care about this,” and then not actually caring about it. That sucks. [laughs] JOHN: Oh, the other thing before we move too far on from last topic, you're talking about asking for advice. I think one of the keys there, a, being humble and just saying, “I would like to know,” and you're very unlikely to get criticized for simply asking how something can be better. But I feel like one of the keys to doing that well is also not arguing with the person you've asked after they give you an answer. KATE: Right. Yes. Especially if that person is a part of the community that your words are affecting, or that your question is affecting. It's such a tricky balance because it's really not the queer community's job to educate people who are not queer about inclusive language. But when that person is willing to share their knowledge with the you, or willing to share their experience with you, you've got to listen. Your opinions about their lived experience don't come into that conversation, or shouldn't come into that conversation. It's not questioning the information that you're given, but then it's also taking that and doing your own research and asking more people and having conversations with your friends and family trying to widen this breadth of information and knowledge as a community. Like I said, kind of dismantling the things that we're taught growing up by capitalism, by society, everything that kind of unnecessarily separates and then doing better next time. I've actually had conversations with people who are very curious, who come to me with questions and then the next time I interact with them, they're just back to factory settings. That's so disappointing and just makes me feel like my energy could have been better spent having that conversation with someone who is more receptive. So I think it really is just about being open to hearing someone's experience, not questioning it, and then really taking that in and doing the work on your own. JOHN: Yeah, and part of that doing the work is also for the things that you can Google for the things where you can look at it from the guide, do that first before asking for someone's time. KATE: Yeah. JOHN: So that they're not answering the same 101 questions every time that are just written in 15 different blog posts. KATE: Yes. Especially if you're asking a marginalized person to do the work for you. JOHN: Yeah. KATE: Intersectionality matters and putting more work on the shoulders of people who are already weighed down by so much ain't it. [laughs] ARTY: Well, I was wanting to go back to your original superpower that you talked about with empathy. We talked a lot about some of these factors that make empathy of a difficult thing of over empathizing and what kind of factors make that hard. But as a superpower, what kind of superpowers does that give you? KATE: Ah, just being able to really connect to a lot of different people. I mentioned earlier that I believe it's my purpose, it's my life's work on this planet at this time to connect people to themselves and to each other. The more asking I can do and the more absorbing I can do of other people's experiences, the better I am at being able to connect with them and being able to make them feel like they belong in whatever space I'm in. I can't connect with someone if I don't try and get it. Try and get what they're going through, or what their experiences are. That's why I do so much time just talking to people, and that's why I love yoga and why I want to start this studio and open this space. Because we live in a world where we don't have a lot of spaces, especially marginalized communities don't have a lot of spaces that feel like they're being understood, or they're truly being heard, or seen. Me being an empath, I'm able to access that in people more and therefore, bringing them closer to safer spaces, or safer people, safer communities where they really feel like they can exist and be their full, whole, and complete selves. It's really special. ARTY: We also touched this concept of authenticity and it seems like that also comes up in this context of creating these safe spaces and safe communities where people can be their whole selves. So when you think about authenticity, we talked about this being a difficult and fuzzy word, but at the same time, it does have some meaning as to what that means, and these challenges with regards to boundaries and things. But I'm curious, what does authenticity mean to you? How does that come into play with this idea of safety and creating these safe spaces for others as well? KATE: Yeah. I feel like there's so much in there. I think one of the biggest things to accept about the word authenticity, or the concept of authenticity is that it's always changing and it means something different to everyone. We are all authentic to ourselves in different ways and at different times in our lives and I think it's so important to honor the real evolution of feeling authentic. There are times and days where I'm like who even am. It's like what even, but there's always this sort of core, root part of me that I don't lose, which is what we've been talking about. This ability to connect, this feeling of empathy, of compassion, of wanting to really be a part of the human experience. That, to me, kind of always stays and I feel like that's the authentic, like the real, real, authentic parts of me. There are layers to it that are always changing and as people, we are also always evolving and always changing. So those different parts of authenticity could be what you wear that make you feel like your most authentic self. It can be how you interact with your friends, or how you interact with the person, getting your popcorn at the movies, or whatever it is. Those can all feel like parts of your authentic self. That means something different to everyone. But I think that's such a beautiful part about it and about just being human is just how often these things are changing for us and how important it is to honor someone's authenticity, whatever that means for them at that time. Even if it's completely different from what you knew about them, or how you knew them before. It's this constant curiosity of yourself and of others, really getting deeply curious about what feels like you. ARTY: I was wondering about safety because you were talking about the importance of creating these safe communities and safe environments where people could be their whole, complete selves, which sounds a lot like the authenticity thing, but you trying to create space for that for others. KATE: Yeah. Well, the reality of safety is that there's no one space that will ever be a “safe space for everyone,” and that's why I like to say safer spaces, or a safer space for people because you can never – I feel like it's all coming full circle where you can never meet every single person exactly where they need to be met in any given moment. You can just do your best to create spaces that feel safer to them and you do that with authentic connection, with getting curious about who they are and what they love, and just making sure that your heart's really in it. [chuckles] Same with inclusive language. It's all about the way you approach it to make someone feel safer. But I do think it's an I distinction to remember. You're never going to be safe for everyone. A space you create is never going to be safe for everyone. The best you can do is just make it safer for more people. ARTY: When I think about just the opposite of that, of times that I've gone into a group where I haven't felt safe being myself and then when you talk of about being your complete whole self, it's like bringing a whole another level of yourself to a space that may not really fit that space and that seems like it's okay, too. Like we don't necessarily have to bring our full self to all these different spaces, but whatever space we're a part of, we kind of sync up and adapt to it. So if I'm in one space and I feel the kind of vibe, energy, context of what's going on, how people are interacting, the energy they put forth when they speak with whatever sorts of words that they use. I'm going to feel that and adapt to that context of what feels safe and then as more people start adapting to that, it creates a norm that other people that then come and see what's going on in this group come to an understanding about what the energy in the room is like. KATE: Yeah. ARTY: And all it takes is one person to bring a different energy into that to shift the whole dynamic of things. KATE: Yeah. The reality is you'll never be able to change every space and I think that's such a good point. It makes me feel like saying you have to be protective of your energy. If you go into a space and it just doesn't feel right, or there's someone who is in the room that doesn't feel safe to you, or that doesn't feel like they're on the same page as you, it's okay to not feel like you need to change the world in that space. Like you don't always have to go into a space and say, “I'm going to change it.” That is how change is made when you feel safe enough. That's why it's so important to foster that energy from the jump. That's just a foundational thing at a company in a yoga studio, in a home, at a restaurant. It can be changed, but it really should be part of the foundation of making a safer space, or a more inclusive space. Because otherwise, you're asking the people who don't feel safe, who are usually marginalized people, or intersectionally marginalized in some way. You're asking them essentially to put in the work to change what you should have done as the foundation of your space. So it's a such a delicate balance of being protective of your energy and really being able to feel out the places where you feel okay saying something, or making a change, or just saying, “No, this isn't worth it for me. I'm going to go find a space that actually feels a little bit better, or that I feel more community in.” ARTY: And it seems like the other people that are in the group, how those people respond to you. If you shift your energy, a lot of times the people that are in the group will shift their energy in kind. Other times, in a different space, you might try to shift energy and then there's a lot of resistance to that where people are going a different way and so, you get pushed out of the group energy wise. These sorts of dynamics, you can feel this stuff going on of just, I just got outcast out of this group. Those are the kinds of things, though that you need to protect your own energy of even if I'm not included in this group, I can still have a good relationship with me and I can still like me and I can think I'm still pretty awesome and I can find other groups of folks that like me. It definitely, at least for me, I tend to be someone who's like, I don't know, I get out grouped a lot. [laughs] But at the same time, I've gotten used to that and then I find other places where I've got friends that love me and care about me and stuff. So those are recharge places where I can go and get back to a place where I feel solid and okay with myself, and then I'm much more resilient then going into these other spaces and stuff where I might not be accepted, where I might have to be kind of shielded and guarded and just put up a front, and operate in a way that makes everyone else feel more comfortable. KATE: Yeah, and isn't it so powerful to feel cared for? ARTY: I love that. KATE: Like just to feel cared for by the people around you is everything. It's everything. That's it. Just to feel like you are wanted, or you belong. To feel cared for. It can exist everywhere is the thing. In your Slack group, or whatever, you can make people feel cared for. I have never regretted reaching out to a coworker, or a friend, or whoever an acquaintance and saying, “Hey, I love this thing about you,” or “Congratulations on this rad thing you just launched,” or whatever. It's the care that's so powerful. ARTY: I feel like this is one of those things where we can learn things from our own pain and these social interactions and stuff. One of the things that I've experienced is you're in a group and you say something and nobody responds. [laughs] KATE: Yeah. ARTY: And after doing that for a while, you feel like you're just shouting into the void and nobody hears you and it's just this feeling of like invisibility. In feeling that way myself, one of the things I go out of my way to do is if somebody says something, I at least try and respond, acknowledge them, let them know that they're heard, they're cared about, and that there's somebody there on the other side [chuckles] and they're not shouting into the wind because I hate that feeling. It's an awful feeling to feel invisible like that. KATE: Awful, yeah. ARTY: But we can learn from those experiences and then we can use those as opportunities to understand how we can give in ways that are subtle, that are often little things that are kind of ignored, but they're little things that actually make a really big difference. KATE: Yeah, the little things. It really is the little things, isn't it? [laughs] Like and it's just, you can learn from your experiences, but you can also say, “I'm not doing this right now.” You can also check out. If you are giving and giving. and find that you're in the void essentially, more often than not, you can decide that that's no longer are worth your time, your energy, your care, and you can redirect that care to somewhere else that's going to reciprocate, or that's going to give you back that same care and that's so important, too. JOHN: Yeah, and it sounds like starting a yoga studio is not a trivial undertaking and obviously, you're highly motivated to create this kind of an environment in the world. So is there anything more you'd like to say about that because that ties in very closely with what we're talking about? KATE: Yeah. It's so weird to work full-time and be so passionate about my tech job and then turn around and be like, “I'm opening a yoga studio.” It's such a weird, but again, it's all connected at the root, at the core of what I'm trying to do in this world. The thing about Kula is that it's really built on this foundational mutual aid model. So being donation-based, it's really pay what you can, if you can. And what you pay, if you're able to give an extra $10 for the class that you take, that's going to pay for someone else's experience, who is unable to financially contribute to take that class. That's the basis of community care, of mutual aid and it's really this heart-based business model that is really tricky. I'm trying to get a loan right now and [chuckles] it's really hard to prove business financials when you have a donation-based model and you say, “Well, I'm going to guess what people might donate per class on average.” So it's been a real journey, [laughs] especially with today's famous supply chain issues that you hear about constantly in every single industry. I have an empty space right now. It needs to be completely built out. Construction costs are about triple what they should be. Again, coming from this real mutual aid community care centered model, it's really hard, but I have to keep coming back. I was just telling my partner about this the other day, I have to keep coming back to this core idea, or this real feeling that I don't need to have a beautifully designed space to create what I'm trying to create. When I started this, I envisioned just a literal empty room [chuckles] with some people in it and a bathroom and that's it. So of course, once I saw the designs, I was like, “Oh, I love this can lighting that's shining down in front of the bathroom door.” It's like so whatever, stereotypical. Not stereotypical, but surface level stuff. I really have had to time and time again, return to this longing almost for a space that feels safer for me, for my community, for Black people, for disabled people, for trans people, for Asian people; we don't have a lot of spaces that feel that way and that's just the reality. So it's a real delicate balance of how do I like – this is a business and I need money, [laughs] but then I really want this to be rooted in mutual aid and community care. It comes back to that car and that inclusivity, creating authentic connections. It's tricky out there for a queer woman entrepreneur with no collateral. [laughs] It's a tricky world out there, but I think we'll flip it someday. I really think pioneering this idea, or this business model at least where I'm at in Denver, I think it's going to start the conversation in more communities and with more people who want to do similar things and my hope is that that will foster those conversations and make it more accessible to more people. JOHN: Yeah, and I think every time someone manages to muster up the energy, the capital, and the community effort to put something like this together, it makes it just slightly easier for someone else a, they can learn the lessons and b, they're more examples of this thing operating in the world. So it becomes more possible in people's minds and you can build some of that momentum there. KATE: Yeah. And of course, it's really important to note and to remember that I come from a place of immense privilege. I have a great job in tech. I'm white. I am upper middle class. Technically, I'm “straight passing,” which is a whole other concept, but it is a thing and this is the way that I'm choosing to use my privilege to hopefully pave the way for more people. I do not take for granted the opportunity that I'm given and like I said, intersectionality matters and all of that, but I still have a lot of privilege going into this that I hope turns into something good for more people. ARTY: It also takes a special kind of person to be an entrepreneur because you really have to just keep on going. No matter any obstacle that's in your way, you've just got to keep on going and have that drive, desire, and dream to go and build something and make it happen and your superpowers probably going to help you out with that, too. It sounds like we've got multiple superpowers because I think you got to have superpowers to be an entrepreneur in itself. KATE: Yeah. I don't know, man. It's such a weird feeling to have because it just feels like it's what I'm supposed to be doing. That's it. It doesn't feel like I'm like – yes, it's a calling and all of that, but it just feels like the path and that, it feels more, more natural than anything I guess, is what I'm trying to say. The more people follow that feeling, the more authentic of a world, the more connected of a world we're going to have. I see a lot of people doing this work, similar things, and it makes me so happy to see. The words of one of my therapists, one of my past therapists told me, “Always stick with me,” and it was right around the time I was kind of – so I'd started planning before COVID hit and then COVID hit and I had to pause for about a year, a little bit less than a year. It was right around the time I was filing my LLC and really starting to move forward. It was actually December 17th of last year that I filed my LLC paperwork. So it's been a little over a year now. He told me, “How much longer are you willing to wait to give the community this thing that you want to give them? How much are you willing to make them wait for this space?” And I was like, “Yesterday. Yesterday.” Like, “I want to give people this space immediately,” and that has truly carried me through. This supply chain stuff is no joke. [laughs] and it has really carried me through some of the more doubtful moments in this journey. Yeah, and I feel like, man, what powerful words. Like, I just want to keep saying them because they are such powerful words to me. How much longer are you willing to make them wait? And it's like, I don't want to. [chuckles] So I guess I'm going to go do it. [laughter] Throw caution to the wind. [laughs] JOHN: Well, I think that ties back into what you were talking about is as you were thinking about designing the space and what kind of buildout you're going to need, and that can be a guide star for what actually needs to be there. What's the actual MVP for this space? Does it need a perfect coat of paint, or is what's there good enough? Does it need all the things arranged just so in the perfect lighting, or does it just need to exist and have people in the room and you can really focus in on what's going to get you there? And then of course, you iterate like everything else, you improve over time, but. KATE: Right. JOHN: I love that concept of just cut out everything that's in the way of this happening right now as much as possible. KATE: Yeah, and what a concept, I think that can be applied to so many things. Who am I trying to serve with this thing and what do I need to do to get there? It doesn't have to be this shiny, beautiful well-designed creation. It just needs to serve people. The people that you want to serve in the best way possible, and for me, that's getting this space open and actually having it in action. ARTY: I think once you find something that feels in alignment with you, you seem to have lots of clarity around just your sense of purpose, of what you want to move toward of a deep connection with yourself. One thing I found with that is no matter how much you get rejected by various groups in the world, if you can be congruent and authentic with yourself and follow that arrow, that once you start doing that, you find other people that are in resonance with you. They're out there, but you don't find them until you align with yourself. KATE: Yeah. Community. Community is so powerful and I love that you just said alignment because that really is truly what it is. It's finding the thing that makes you feel like you're doing something good and that feels authentic to your core, to those core principles of you that never really change. The things that are rooted in love, the things that are rooted in compassion, or whatever it is you care about. Community, that alignment is absolutely key. It's also, when I say I was born with my superpower of being an empath, this desire to create this space feels, it feels like I was also born with this desire, or born with this alignment. So I feel like so many times it's just going back to the basics of who you are. ARTY: Like you're actualizing who you are. KATE: Yeah. Like full alignment, enlightenment, that all kind of falls into place when you're really making the effort to be connected to your core. ARTY: It seems like a good place to do reflections. So at the end of the show, we usually go around and do final reflections and takeaways, final thoughts that you have and you get to go last, Kate. JOHN: There are a whole lot of different things that I've been thinking about here, but I think one of the ones that's sticking with me is the dichotomy between perfectionism and authenticity, and how I feel like they really are pulling against one another and that, which isn't to say things can't be perfect and authentic at the same time. But I think perfectionism is usually a negative feeling. Like you should do something, you're putting a lot of pressure, there's a lot of anxiety around perfectionism and that is pretty much an opposition to being authentically yourself. It's hard to be in touch with yourself when you're wrapped up in all those anxieties and so, thinking about the two of them together, I hadn't made that connection before, but I think that's something that's interesting that I'll be thinking about for a while. ARTY: I think the thing that's going to stick with me, Kate is you said, “Our words carry so much power,” and I think about our conversation today out just vibes in the room and how that shifts with the energy that we bring to the room, all of these subtle undercurrent conversations that we're having, and then how a sort of energy vibe becomes established. And how powerful even these really little tiny things we do are. We had this conversation around inclusive language and you gave so many great details and specifics around what that means and how we can make little, small alterations to some of these things that are just baked into us because of our culture and the words that we hear, phrasing and things that we hear, that we're just unaware of the impact of things. Just by paying attention and those little subtle details of things and coming at things with an open heart, regardless of how we might stumble, or mess things up, how much of a difference that can make because our words, though carry so much power. KATE: Yeah. And the thing you just said about having an open heart is truly how you can put any of this into action, how you can remain open to learning about authenticity, or what it feels like to not fall into a trap of perfectionism, or how to speak, or write, or interact more inclusively with other human beings. I feel like being open, being openminded, being open-hearted, whatever it is, is just really a superpower on its own. Remaining open and vulnerable in today's world is hard work. It does not come naturally to so many people, especially when you're dealing with your own traumas and your own individual interactions and maybe being forced into spaces where you don't feel safe. To remain open is such a tool for making other people feel cared for. So if that's the goal, I would say just being open is truly your superpower. JOHN: I think that's the quote I'm going to take with me: being open is the key to making people feel cared for. KATE: Yes. I love that. ARTY: Well, thank you for joining us on the show, Kate. It's been a pleasure to have you here. KATE: Thank you so much. This has been just the energy boost I needed. Special Guest: Kate Marshall.

Bridging the Gap
Misconceptions Around Modular Construction

Bridging the Gap

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 45:02


When you picture modular construction, what comes to mind? Do you have some preconceived notions that should be challenged? Join host Todd and guest Chip Parsley as they discuss the ins and outs of modular construction, everything that goes into modular manufacturing, and how prefab saves time, money, and effort in the long run. TODD-TAKES We all need to be aware of our presumptions about things and regularly take time to make sure they are still accurate. With that in mind, be patience with others and take time to educate them on the realties of the industry. Help spread the word on the innovative trends happening like modular to show these trends are practical and actively happening. Take time to reimagine what it means to be productive and learn from those outside the industry, like manufacturing. We can pull valuable, hard learned insights into construction. Chip Parsley is the Director of Prefabrication Solutions at Poynter Sheet Metal. He has additional experience as a National Sales Director, Business Development Manager, Sales Project Manager, and an Owner/President.

The Green Building Matters Podcast with Charlie Cichetti
Cloud-Based Construction Infrastructure Software with Balaji Sreenivasan

The Green Building Matters Podcast with Charlie Cichetti

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 26:36


Balaji Sreenivasan is the founder, Chief Executive Officer (CEO), and board member at Aurigo Software Technologies based in Austin, TX. Balaji has played a critical role in shaping Aurigo over the last 18 years to be a modern enterprise cloud software business that is helping (construction) infrastructure owners plan and build over $300 billion of capital projects more efficiently. Balaji spends his time on product strategy, customer delight, and enabling the amazing people at Aurigo to be their best. He is an alumnus of the National Institute of Technology (NIT), Trichy, and the University of Florida, Gainesville. Aurigo has helped plan and deliver over 40,000 projects across North America. Their customers include eight US DOTs, the Ministry of Transportation, Ontario, and several large agencies, including Cities of Seattle, Houston, and Las Vegas, and the Dallas Area Rapid Transit, to name a few. Aurigo is North America's #1 provider of Enterprise Cloud Software that helps Infrastructure owners plan and build smarter so they can build better. Their mission is to digitally transform the way capital infrastructure, such as roads, highways, sea ports, airports, water authorities and light rail transits are planned and delivered in North America. They have a leading portfolio of software subscription offerings with over $100M bookings.   Show Highlights Aurigo, a cloud based enterprise focused on infrastructure and the construction lifecycle from an owner's perspective. Combination of business opportunity and core skills to benefit infrastructure. What drove Balaji to fill gaps in this industry? Entrepreneurship tips on building a network, finding mentors, and later angel investors. A platform to deliver funded projects across the US. ​​Infrastructure and resiliency and so much more? Native mobile apps that harness data across the entire construction lifecycle to make better decisions at every stage. Project Sentiment Analysis from conceptual design to ribbon cutting.  “Everyone out there, if they're not thinking of sustainability, thinking about how to have an infrastructure asset that can protect the environment and not harm it…they're not thinking of building a better tomorrow. They may not be asking themselves: how do I build a better tomorrow? You build a better tomorrow by planning with confidence; you build with quality and you maintain with efficiency.” -Balaji Sreenivasan   Balaji Sreenivasan Transcript   Balaji Sreenivasan's Show Resource and Information Linkedin Aurigo Software Technologies Books | Bill Gates Klara and the Sun:      Connect with Charlie Cichetti and GBES Charlie on LinkedIn Green Building Educational Services GBES on Twitter Connect on LinkedIn Like on Facebook Google+ GBES Pinterest Pins GBES on Instagram   GBES is excited our membership community is growing. Consider joining our membership community as members are given access to some of the guests on the podcasts that you can ask project questions. If you are preparing for an exam, there will be more assurance that you will pass your next exam, you will be given cliff notes if you are a member, and so much more. Go to www.gbes.com/join to learn more about the 4 different levels of access to this one-of-a-kind career-advancing green building community! If you truly enjoyed the show, don't forget to leave a positive rating and review on iTunes.  We have prepared more episodes for the upcoming weeks, so come by again next week! Thank you for tuning in to the Green Building Matters Podcast!   Copyright © 2021 GBES

Mass Construction Show
Temporary Heat on Construction Sites

Mass Construction Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 39:24


This episode of the Mass Construction Show is a conversation with Lt. Chris Towski of Cambridge Fire Dept who is a Principle Member of the NFPA 241 Technical Committee. Chris and I discuss Temporary Heating on Construction Sites. Topics including: CO monitoring, regulations, indirect vs direct and more. Follow the Mass Construction Show here: Linkedin Instagram Twitter Facebook Intro music by Sound Revolution --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/joekelly/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/joekelly/support

Elevate Construction
Ep.469 - When the Company Outgrows an Individual

Elevate Construction

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 16:07


In this podcast we cover: How company leaders oversee the business What happens when the business expands Why the company may outgrow certain leaders What to do about it If you like the Elevate Construction podcast, please subscribe for free and you'll never miss an episode.  And if you really like the Elevate Construction podcast, I'd appreciate you telling a friend (Maybe even two 

Elevate Construction
Ep.468 - Is Command & Control Bad?

Elevate Construction

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 14:33


In this podcast we cover: Why command and control may not be the enemy How construction was 15 years ago What it is today Why we are having problems as an industry If you like the Elevate Construction podcast, please subscribe for free and you'll never miss an episode.  And if you really like the Elevate Construction podcast, I'd appreciate you telling a friend (Maybe even two 

Simple Passive Cashflow
January 2022 Monthly Market Update

Simple Passive Cashflow

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 47:03


A new year and another monthly market update!This January 2022 monthly market update we're taking a look at how inflation affects you and the rental properties, how the U.S. economy isn't slowing anytime soon, and will keep on kicking even during this time. Construction, interest rates, and active adult sector contribution, all affect investing in real estate.All monthly market updates are archived!You can go back and check out past and future market updates,simply visit https://simplepassivecashflow.com/investorletter00:30 What is inflation? Will it affect you?08:00 Multifamily Investment Volumes in Sunbelt10:07 Strong Performance During Financial Crisis for the Active Adult Sector14:18 Construction Activity Today17:00 Interest Rates Going Up. Does it matter?22:47 Texas Hot Single Single Family Market26:26 U.S. Economy Is Strong Amidst Pandemic29:32 Business and Personal See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Hardworking Happy Hour
Episode 5: Mental Health

Hardworking Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 41:33


In this weeks episode, Sean and Catherine break down the stigma around mental health. Not everyone has mental illness, but everyone has mental health, and its important we all take the time to take care of it to be the best versions of ourselves! We discuss the struggles we have faced, as well as ways to overcome them. Mental health is a big topic these days, and we think its important to start the conversation! If you or someone you know is struggling, there are many resources to find help! The following are just a few: NAMI: nami.org SAMHSA: samhsa.gov NMHI: nmhi.org

The Contracting Handbook
Walk on Plans with Founder Andrew Vanderwoerd

The Contracting Handbook

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 35:32


Mike Knoche has been running his general contracting business for 16 years. It's been trial by fire and in The Contracting Handbook, Mike shares his successes, his failures and asks other industry leaders to join him in a discussion of how to run a contracting business! The Contracting Handbook podcast discusses the behind the scenes running of a small contracting company. It's everything from starting up, working with employees, subcontractors, and clients. Remember, it won't just be Mike's perspective as he will talk to contractors from all over the world about theirs too! Why the world over? Because through his travels in the off season he's come to see that contractors everywhere have similar business needs, struggles, and ideas in common. We a are a global community of builders! Contact Mike at info@thecontractinghandbook.com for questions, comments, or to be interviewed.Please hit the subscribe button, leave a review, comment or question. I want your feedback. Host: Mike KnocheWebsite: The Contracting HandbookHammr: @mikeknocheInstagram: @thecontractinghandbookPatreon: Mike Knoche  Guest: Andrew VanderwoerdWebsite: Walk on PlansInstagram: @walkonplans

Real Estate Espresso
Modular Construction with Dylan Sliter of Deka Pro Panels

Real Estate Espresso

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 8:26


On today's show we're taking a closer look at modular construction and we're going to be live on location at a modular construction plant. Modular construction comes in two principal methods. The first is where the manufacturer complete entire modules of the buildings. These modules are fully finished. They are fully painted, with flooring, utilities, and even the appliance fully installed and strapped in place to prevent them from shifting during transportation. Since these boxes can often be transported hundreds of miles from the factory to the final construction site, they have to be of extremely high build quality and extremely rigid so they don't have lots of cracks in the finishes happen during transportation. The site work for these projects consists of the foundation and the rough-in of the utilities to a single connection point through a centralized utilities duct. The extra lengths of pipe and wires are all coiled up to enable the plumbers and electricians to complete the final utility connections in the basement level. The cost of modular box construction is usually on par with stick build. The savings come from the fact that the work performed in the factory environment is much more efficient from a labor standpoint. They don't need licensed or unionized trades for the factory work, and the most expensive trades like plumbers and electricians are only needed for the final service connections. The total cost of construction involves adding together the site work with the factory construction and the much higher transportation cost for the finished boxes. These will be wide loads and will often require a carefully planned route with special permits and sometimes police escort. You will require heavy cranes on site for the final assembly of the modules. The second form of modular construction consists of panels. These panels can be flat packed on a flatbed truck on put in a shipping container. Transportation is much simpler. But understand that this form of assembly is much further from completion. You're basically accelerating the framing portion of the construction. Everything else, the utilities rough in, mechanical systems like heating, ventilation and air conditioning all need to be installed onsite. The construction follows the usual permit process with all of the inspections happening onsite with the building inspector. There will be a foundation inspection, framing inspection, a rough-in inspection, insulation inspection and so on. The main benefit for panel construction is by saving time onsite. You get a much higher quality assembly. You don't need very heavy equipment. Most of the onsite assembly can be done with a boom truck or even a forklift. This can be particularly important if you're trying to build new construction in the winter months. If it's -20 degrees outside, you can't always count on the framing crew to be super careful with their measurements, ensuring the proper spacing of fasteners. You tend to get a bit of chain saw carpentry happening. When measurements are not accurate, then you will have gaps in the building envelope because things don't fit together properly and the insulation of your property will be compromised. On today's show we're onsite with Dylan Sliter at Deka Pro Panels in Almonte Ontario. I'll warn you in advance that we are in a very noisy factory environment with plenty of pneumatic tools firing in the background. So the audio quality is not the best. But we will be doing a small walking tour of the factory environment. ---------------- Host: Victor Menasce email: podcast@victorjm.com

The ConTechCrew
The ConTechCrew 295: Putting Excel Out to Pasture! with Anthony Chiaradonna from Consigli Construction

The ConTechCrew

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 73:20


This week's construction tech news with James Benham (@JamesMBenham), and Jeff Sample (@IronmanofIT) Featuring: - Interview with Anthony Chiaradonna from Consigli Contruction - Construction Tech News of the Week Follow @TheConTechCrew on social media for more updates and to join the conversation! Listen to the show at http://thecontechcrew.com Powered by JBKnowledge Learn more at http://thecontechcrew.com or follow @JBKnowledge & @TheConTechCrew on Twitter.

Elevate Construction
Ep.467 - Making Elevating Construction Surveyors, Final Part, Feat. Brandon Montero

Elevate Construction

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 64:19


In this podcast we cover: Train others Becoming a mentor Weigh-in on costs & participate in bidding Determine your sweet spot Interpreting and writing scopes and verbiage Managing multiple teams Managing multiple clients and multiple trades Build a cohesive department Create a culture How a general contractor can work effectively with Surveyors If you like the Elevate Construction podcast, please subscribe for free and you'll never miss an episode.  And if you really like the Elevate Construction podcast, I'd appreciate you telling a friend (Maybe even two 

Mousetalgia Fastpass - Weekly Disneyland News
Ep. 32: Tram route construction, Three Kings Day, resort news

Mousetalgia Fastpass - Weekly Disneyland News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 31:22


Episode 32 - December 7th, 2022   The tram drop off for Disneyland Resort has been fenced off and construction crews have started working on something, we chat Three Kings Day inside Disney California Adventure, rumblings from inside the park about the Main Street Electrical Parade's return, this weekend Festival of the Holidays comes to a close, Salt n' Straw debuts their January menu specials, Disney Artist collectible dolls hit Elias & Co. with a hefty price tag, Episode 2 of Book of Boba Fett debuted and Eternals is set to hit Disney+ this next week, and D23 announces their 2022 Expo details returning to the Anaheim Convention Center!

Contractor Success Map with Randal DeHart | Contractor Bookkeeping And Accounting Services

This Podcast Is Episode Number 453, And It's About Construction Industry Insights For 2022 There is a natural ebb and flow in the business cycle, which in regular times operates, somewhat predictable.   In normal times, contractors who pay close attention to their Five Key Performance Indicators financial reports and stay aware of the macro global economy and the microlocal economy can plan and earn an expected profit after paying themselves a reasonable salary.   The past two years have been anything but ordinary, and frankly, we are having a tough time with the economic forecasts models we follow, including our internal ones.   Something similar occurred from 1976 to 1980, and suddenly in early 1981, the national and global economy began to turn around, and there was a severe shortage of contractors and qualified construction workers.   During the remainder of that expansion and boom cycle, many construction company owners made substantially high profits, and the wise ones who thought ahead invested their windfall profits in real estate, stocks, and other investment vehicles. The good news is the Universe is always in balance, and we could be nearing the beginning of a period of massive expansion, the likes of which we had not witnessed since the end of World War II when the housing boom was explosive for the next 20 years. Pent-Up Demand For Construction Projects 1. Deferred maintenance. Due to the lack of cash flow, many commercial property owners have been putting off sealing parking lots, painting, renovating, and other general maintenance projects.  2. Drive the neighborhoods in your cities and towns all across the USA, Alaska, and Hawaii and see for yourself how many houses have weathered "Blue Tarps" covering portions of the roofs which are leaking and need repair. If the homeowner has trouble putting food on the table, then a new roof is not a high priority. 3. In the evening hours, drive the residential neighborhoods in your target market and notice how many cars are parked in the driveways and surrounding areas. This indicates that many people rent out rooms to help make their mortgage payments. 4. Visit the home improvement stores and observe the shift from nine months ago when there were lots of lost and frustrated homeowners roaming the aisles searching for materials and tools for do-it-yourself projects, and now there is an increasing number of contractors and handymen. When you have a clearly defined and documented Business Strategy, you will know what steps to take and when. Just like when you took a test in school in your favorite subject, it was fast and easy! When you know the answers, the questions will not bother you! When the economy is expanding, demand for construction rapidly and almost overnight outstrips supply because many contractors gave up and left the industry. Well-intentioned yet unseasoned contractors seize the opportunity to rapidly grow their businesses by haphazardly bidding and winning projects without considering calculating their company Expansion Path Isoquants, infrastructure, logistical support, working capital requirements, Job Costs, or Key Performance Indicators (KPI). The Inevitable Chaos - Caused by too much work and not enough labor, material, other costs, and subcontractors (LMOS) leads to the contractor becoming a pipe through which money flows with increasing velocity and not in a fun way. This is the leading cause for large contractors going bankrupt. The construction company starts small; the owner is a visionary who understands the "Tangible" side of the business. They know how to bid, sell, produce and manage the company as it grows to roughly $5,000,000 in annual sales without having a clearly defined Business Process Management System or Strategy. When they take their business to the next level, not having a strategy or, as I refer to it, the "Intangible" side of the management equation, they often end up going bankrupt, several times in most cases, before hiring us or someone else to help them put together a strategy that includes the "3 P's" Processes, Procedures, and Policies. It has been said, "The same law that binds the ignorant frees the wise." A new mindset leads to a new result. Prepare by being proactive - invest time and money getting your Business Process Management systems in place using The 80/20 Rule to grab a nice big thick slice of Market Share Pie and laugh all the way to the bank. Final thoughts  I sincerely understand and empathize with the challenges that all construction owners, workers, and support staff have faced for the past several years. The good news is that everything will change for the better. Hang on through this invisible global threat and be patient.  Also, if you're new to our website or blog, you can check out our new Contractor Success MAP Toolkit - it's more than 15 pages of Marketing, Accounting, and Production tips, checklists, and best practices that you can use year-round for your construction business success. Free download here. About The Author: Sharie DeHart, QPA is the co-founder of Business Consulting And Accounting in Lynnwood, Washington. She is the leading expert in managing outsourced construction bookkeeping and accounting services companies and cash management accounting for small construction companies across the USA. She encourages Contractors and Construction Company Owners to stay current on their tax obligations and offers insights on how to manage the remaining cash flow to operate and grow their construction company sales and profits so they can put more money in the bank. Call 1-800-361-1770 or sharie@fasteasyaccounting.com  

Elevate Construction
Ep.466 - MINI-POD - It is NOT in Procore!

Elevate Construction

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 13:05


In this podcast we cover: What systems are needed to run a great project Why you need a buyout and procurement log Why it is not in Procore If you like the Elevate Construction podcast, please subscribe for free and you'll never miss an episode.  And if you really like the Elevate Construction podcast, I'd appreciate you telling a friend (Maybe even two 

Elevate Construction
Ep.465 - MINI-POD - Treat the patient, not the tools!

Elevate Construction

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 10:57


In this podcast we cover: Why it is important to not just focus on tools Why the scope, trade, or process must be the focus If you like the Elevate Construction podcast, please subscribe for free and you'll never miss an episode.  And if you really like the Elevate Construction podcast, I'd appreciate you telling a friend (Maybe even two 

Elevate Construction
Ep.464 - MINI-POD - Production Comparisons

Elevate Construction

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 9:19


In this podcast we cover: The key indicators of a successful projects Why self-perform must do a production comparison Why making improvement every day is key to production If you like the Elevate Construction podcast, please subscribe for free and you'll never miss an episode.  And if you really like the Elevate Construction podcast, I'd appreciate you telling a friend (Maybe even two 

The Building Code
Scaling a nonprofit to do more good with tech with Lynette Farhart

The Building Code

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 26:45


Construction software has helped thousands of builders optimize their operations, and it's also powering life-changing charity right in Buildertrend's backyard. On 2022's first episode of “The Building Code,” Lynette Farhart of Project Houseworks tells Zach and Charley all about the Omaha nonprofit's mission to help seniors with free home repairs. Lynette describes how the Buildertrend helped them better serve seniors and the benefits of the Estimate and Time Clock features for her team's fundraising. WHEN DID YOU KNOW YOUR TEAM NEEDED PROJECT MANAGEMENT SOFTWARE? “We were serving more, and the projects were getting really big. We're trying to manage all of this on Word documents and spreadsheets. And I think it was pivotal when someone accidentally messed up one of our spreadsheets and saved it. And all of our data was completely messed up. And it was like, "Okay, we can't do that anymore." Because I think what's important to know is that our funding comes a lot from grants, and we have deliverables on those grants. And so, if we told a donor through the grant process that we're going to serve X amount of people, we've got to report that we did that work. So trying to manage our data with spreadsheets just didn't make sense for us anymore”   HOW ELSE DOES BUILDERTREND HELP YOU WIN OVER DONORS? “Some of our grants are reimbursable, which means we have to do all of the work, and then we ask for funding. So we have really accurate reports to submit. And that just earns the trust of our donors knowing that we're keeping such good records on everything that we do.”   LINKS AND MORE   Related content:   Read more about their Buildertrend story here.   To help Project Houseworks serve more seniors, visit their website here.   Want to get your finances in shape for the new year? Listen here for accounting pro-tips. Got podcast topic suggestions for 2022? Reach out to us at podcast@buildertrend.com. “The Better Way” a podcast by Buildertrend: Resolved to improve how your team plans projects with the world's No. 1 construction management software this year? Pick up Buildertrend project planning pro tips on the newest season of “The Better Way, a podcast by Buildertrend.” Subscribe and stream all five bing-eable episodes on your favorite listening app now. Follow us on social: Instagram and Facebook: @Buildertrend   Listen to “The Building Code” on YouTube! And be sure to head over to Facebook to join The Building Code Crew fan page for some fun discussions with fellow listeners.

The Jackson Hole Connection
Episode 171 – Si Ferrin, The Cattle Baron of Jackson Hole with Janis Ferrin Allen and Donna Clark

The Jackson Hole Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 48:55


In this week's episode of the Jackson Hole Connection, Stephan chats with Janis Ferrin Allen and Donna Clark. Janis and Donna share the same great-great-grandfather, Josiah “Si” Ferrin.  Si was one of the original homesteaders in the valley and at one time he was the largest property owner and taxpayer in Jackson Hole. In this episode, Janis and Donna talk about their family lineage and the life of Si Ferrin. They discuss how Si built up his cattle-ranching land and earned the nickname The Cattle Baron of Jackson Hole.  At the peak of land ownership, the Ferrin family had over 3,600 acres of land and 2,000 head of cattle. Foreseeing changes in the cattle industry and the struggles of ranching in a Jackson Hole, Si decided to eventually sell his property to the Snake River Land Company. Listen to this episode to find out some interesting facts about the Ferrin family, like what percentage of the Grand Teton National Park is made up of land once owned by The Ferrins. Also, find out how much 3,600 acres of land in Jackson Hole was worth back in 1928.  The Ferrins aren't only known for cattle ranching, their family has very deep roots and history in Jackson. In the episode, Janis talks about how her grandfather helped build the first Cowboy Bar and maintained the Grand Teton Lodge Company for over 20 years. Donna's family started a large and impactful construction company called Clark's Ready Mix and Construction. Over 48 years Clark's Ready Mix helped build a good portion of the infrastructure of the Jackson community.  For more information on Josiah Ferrin and the history of Elk Ranch, visithttps://jacksonholehistory.org/the-elk-ranch/ ( JacksonHoleHistory.org)  If you'd like to connect with Janis, email janislallen@hotmail.com and Donna can be reached at donnaclark7@hotmail.com This week's episode is sponsored in part by Teton County Solid Waste and Recycling. Want to become a better recycler?  Well, there's an app for that – the Recycle Coach app!  Now available for Jackson Hole locals and visitors. More athttps://www.tetoncountywy.gov/2315/What-Goes-Where ( TetonCountyWY.gov) or athttps://www.instagram.com/roadtozerowaste.jh ( @RoadToZeroWaste.JH on Instagram) Support also comes from The Jackson Hole Marketplace. The Deli at Jackson Hole Marketplace offers ready-made soups, sandwiches, breakfast burritos, and hot lunch specials. More athttp://jhmarketplace.com/ ( JHMarketplace.com) https://www.tetoncountywy.gov/2315/What-Goes-Where () Want to be a guest on The Jackson Hole Connection? Email us at connect@thejacksonholeconnection.com. Marketing and editing support byhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelmoeri ( Michael Moeri) (http://michaelmoeri.com/ (michaelmoeri.com),https://www.instagram.com/thatsamoeri/ (@thatsamoeri)).

A Little Bit Of Everything With Me!
Barbara Kavovit - Queen of Construction

A Little Bit Of Everything With Me!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 19:19


Ep. 670 - Barbara Kavovit - Queen of Construction Barbara, the Queen of Construction, Best Selling Author of Heels of Steel and Reality Star of The Real Housewives of New York City sits down with me to speak about how she created this amazing empire. She is a trailblazer in construction and an advocate for women in construction. Thank you Barbara for your time, it was amazing to get to know the Queen of Construction. Barbara's Links: Articles: Books: Heels of Steel, Invest in Your Nest, Room for Improvement New York Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/01/realestate/the-boss-youre-looking-at-her-7-women-in-the-building-business.html Fortune: https://fortune.com/2020/12/09/meet-the-woman-demolished-harvey-weinsteins-office/ CNBC: https://youtu.be/sd041d0cfnc INC.: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CTw-lyi5ZZc PIX11 Changemakers: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HtYRDjRubSs FOX Business: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1X7sUYKbBPE DIYVA K: https://www.diy-va.com Search: A Little Bit Of Everything With Me! on 20 podcast platforms  Link in Bio! Website: anchor.fm/everythingwithange #newyear #newgoals #podcastermom #podcastersofinstagram #applepodcast #iheartradiopodcast #spotifypodcast #googlepodcasts  #podcast #podcasting #torontopodcast #torontotalkshow  #podcaster #realitytv #thecoop #coop #RHONY #realitytv #queenofconstruction #heelsofsteel #barbarak #construction #womeninconstruction #buildinganempire #barbarakavovit --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/everythingwithange/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/everythingwithange/support

Paint ED Podcast
Traits of an Ideal Bookkeeper: Contractor Evolution

Paint ED Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 63:17


Effective accounting knowledge and technical skills are necessary for running a successful business! You, more than likely, didn't start your business to stare at Quickbooks, reconcile receipts, or painstakingly track every expense down to the penny. You started your business because you had a vision, you wanted to lead, and you wanted to create. Being an entrepreneur was the best vehicle for that. And while your big picture thinking is critical to success, let's not forget at the end of the day your business needs to make money. This part of the equation can be extremely difficult without solid bookkeeping and accounting systems. You can build teams and process all you want, but if your business doesn't reliably generate profit, you won't be playing this game very long. While this concept is simple enough to understand... it's a lot harder to implement. Let's not kid ourselves... tracking financial data really well and using it to make the right decisions requires great accounting infrastructure and the right person to do it diligently. The good news is that person doesn't need to be you. Your responsibility is to assemble the right people around you to get this done successfully. The bad news is that a lot of bookkeepers can often be incompetent, unreliable, or straight-up shady. And as a busy business owner, it can be hard to find the true pros that ARE out there. To shed some light on this thorny issue we brought Morgan Ray onto the show. Morgan is Managing Partner at Bookkeeping for Trades - a professional bookkeeping firm built exclusively for entrepreneurs in the Trades and Construction space. Morgan's firm has managed the accounting cycle for over 200 trades businesses helping them gain true financial clarity and increased margins. When it comes to bookkeeping for trades, she understands the needs of the market. In this episode we unpack: - Why bookkeeping is so frustrating for contractors and why you aren't alone in thinking it is. - The 2 kinds of bookkeeping and why 1 sucks and the other is pretty fun, but few contractors use it. - What a good bookkeeper SHOULD be doing, and also what they SHOULDN't be doing. - The crucial security pieces every contractor needs to have in place to avoid fraud, embezzlement, or a nasty call from the taxman. - What good bookkeeping FEELS like to you the business owner, and how to know when you've nailed it. - The 3 traits you should be looking for when you hire a bookkeeper. Watch the episode on PCA Overdrive PCA Overdrive is free for members. Not a member? Try our 30-day, free trial; $5.99/mo after. Download the app on the Apple Store or Google Play. Become a PCA member

Elevate Construction
Ep.463 - The Right Way to Play Monopoly!

Elevate Construction

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 12:27


In this podcast we cover: How to play Monopoly How running a project is like playing Monopoly Why you need metrics to play the game Questions: Do you know where you are going? Do you know where you are? Do you know all your risks? Do you know all your opportunities? Do you have visual data you can see at a glance? Do you have a buyout log, procurement log, roadblock removal system, Takt plan, risk and opportunity register, and financial projections? If you like the Elevate Construction podcast, please subscribe for free and you'll never miss an episode.  And if you really like the Elevate Construction podcast, I'd appreciate you telling a friend (Maybe even two 

Arc Junkies
206. The Dirty Little Secret in Our Industry

Arc Junkies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 79:37


In today's episode, I'm chatting with Mike Miller about one of the deepest, darkest secrets in the blue collar workforce that nobody wants to talk about. It's a topic that needs to be discussed and the young up and comers need to be made aware of it. This is a topic that I've wanted to cover for a long time but needed to find someone with first hand experience. Not too many people are willing to discuss their past out of fear they'll be shamed, or lose their current job, or that people will treat them different if they find out. I'm really appreciative that Mike reached out and asked me if he could share his stories to not only help those currently battling alcoholism, but also to help others from falling into the same cycle. The construction trades are tough, they're physically and mentally demanding and oftentimes can be overwhelming due to the high stress level caused by tight budgets and time restraints. Many people don't know how to cope with the stress and they turn to drugs or alcohol as a coping mechanism to escape from their reality. And the biggest problem is, we glorify drugs and alcohol… we make jokes about it… but in reality, there's nothing funny about drug and alcohol addiction. Don't get me wrong, I'm not anti-alcohol or against having a few drinks once in a while, but it's something that needs to be done in moderation. Mike and I cover a lot of great topics during the episode, and provide some insight to help those who may be struggling with alcoholism and drug addiction. I hope this episode helps those that need it, and brings awareness to the topic. You can reach out to a live rep 24/7 by going to alcohol.org or by calling 1-800-685-5770 for alcohol addiction. If you need assistance with drug addiction, you can go to drughelpline.org or call 1-844-289-0879 If you or someone you know is struggling with thoughts of suicide you can go to preventconstructionsuicide.com or call 1-800-662-4357 Find local AA meetings in your area with this handy app: https://www.aa.org/meeting-guide-app Arc Junkies Website: https://arc-junkies.podsite.io Arc junkies Merch: https://shop.threadmob.com/arcjunkie/shop/home Arc Junkies Website: arc-junkies.podsite.io Friends of the Show: Lincoln Electric Instagram: @lincolnelectric Online Store: store.lincolnelectric.com Save 20% on all Gear and Accessories use ARCJUNKIES20 in the discount box at checkout Save 10% on Welding Machines and Fume Extractors use ARCJUNKIES10 in the discount box at checkout      Everlast Welders Instagram: @everlastwelders  YouTube: Everlast Welders         Online: https://bit.ly/37xJstI Use Codeword ARCJUNKIES at checkout to get upgraded to a free Nova Foot Pedal and TIG Torch with the purchase of any machine that comes with a stock foot pedal and TIG Torch.  Rockmount Research and Alloys, Inc. Rockmountwelding.com Instagram: @Rockmountwelding   Strong Hand Tools Stronghandtool.com/arcjunkies Instagram @Strong_hand_tools   AHP Welders Ahpwelders.com https://ahpwelds.com/arcjunkies   ISOTUNES: Instagram: @isotunesaudio Online: https://bit.ly/36s7aFj  Use ARCJUNKIES10 at checkout and save $10 on your purchase   SUM DUM Welders: Instagram: @sumdumwelderapparel  Online: www.sumdumwelder.com  Use ARCJUNKIES at checkout and save 15% off your entire order.   Outlaw Leather Instagram: @outlawleatherusa Online: www.outlawleatherusa.com  Use Codeword ARCJUNKIES at checkout and save 15% on your entire order.   Arc Junkies Podcast: Instagram: @Arcjunkiespodcast TIKTOK: @Arcjunkiespod Email: Show@arcjunkies.com

The Modern Craftsman Podcast
#198 Mass Construction

The Modern Craftsman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 145:37


Joe Kelly former superintendent, building inspector, building commissioner turned building consultant. Host of the Mass Construction Podcast.  Follow our guest: https://www.instagram.com/mass.construction/ Episode brought to you by: https://www.durationmillwork.com/ https://podcast.renorun.com/moderncraftsman Where to find our hosts: Nick Schiffer  https://www.instagram.com/nsbuilders/ https://bit.ly/nsbuildersyoutube Tyler Grace  https://www.instagram.com/trghomeconcepts/   The Modern Craftsman https://www.instagram.com/the.moderncraftsman/ Music: "Dessert" by Nate Gusakov https://www.instagram.com/nategusakovmusic/

Fantasy Baseball Today Podcast
NFBC Roster Construction & Draft Strategy w/ Jenny Butler! (12/30 Fantasy Baseball Podcast)

Fantasy Baseball Today Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 67:40


Welcome to the show... Jenny Butler (1:10)! ... What are the first things to look at when it comes to roster construction (8:55)? ... How do you find positional targets and then backup plans (13:36)? How does Jenny create her roadmap when it comes to draft strategy (20:20)? ... Let's try and create a balanced roster with an early pick in the first round (31:30). ... What is our draft strategy with a mid-first round pick (40:43)? ... How do we build a team from the back of the first round (51:32)? ... We wrap up by using Steamer600 projections to find undervalued and overvalued players (58:12). 'Fantasy Baseball Today' is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Castbox and wherever else you listen to podcasts.  Follow our FBT team on Twitter: @FBTPod, @CTowersCBS, @CBSScottWhite, @Roto_Frank Join our Facebook group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/fantasybaseballtoday Sign up for the FBT Newsletter at https://www.cbssports.com/newsletters/fantasy-baseball-today/ For more fantasy baseball coverage from CBS Sports, visit https://www.cbssports.com/fantasy/baseball/ To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/ Subscribe to our YouTube channel: youtube.com/FantasyBaseballToday You can listen to Fantasy Baseball Today on your smart speakers! Simply say "Alexa, play the latest episode of the Fantasy Baseball Today podcast" or "Hey Google, play the latest episode of the Fantasy Baseball Today podcast." Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices