Podcasts about red wing

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Best podcasts about red wing

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Latest podcast episodes about red wing

Midwest Bias
This Is Where I Die

Midwest Bias

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 57:29


Episode 44: Kj opens this episode with a few housekeeping items, followed by “The Best Thing I Saw All Week” (1:15). Then, she welcomes back the HOFer in Taste Test with the Hall of Famer (5:07)! They test beers sent in by Patrick Smith and Ed Butt. Thanks, gentlemen! Later, Kj welcomes back Kim Willson (@kimwills33 on Twitter) Midwest Guest Co-host of the day (20:23)! They discuss glamping, cheesecake, Kj asks Kim a “Does this makes sense?” question, and more…plus, they end with another installment of Kim’s Crockpot! A good (central standard) time was had by all! Music: All music by Kj Ohnstad with the exception of the Intro music which is by Kj Ohnstad and Jason Fuse). Graphics by Jenni Ohnstad (lumineacreative.com) Twitter: @MidwestBiasPod, @buffalo_alice (Kj) Email: midwestbiaspod@gmail.com Sponsored by: Best Rubber Stamp (bestrubberstamp.net, stamps@bestrubberstamp.net, 901-278-4500) Podcast Mailing address: Kj Ohnstad PO Box 538 Red Wing, MN 55066 Rate and review us on Apple Podcasts and anywhere else ratings and reviews are accepted. Subscribe now and never miss an episode! Thank you!

Post Bulletin Minute
Today's Headlines: 'The Nostalgia Awakens': Vintage Star Wars toys exhibit opens in Red Wing

Post Bulletin Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 5:32


Stories in this episode: Day in History: 1972: Interstate 35 between Mason City and Twin Cities to soon open 'The Nostalgia Awakens': Vintage Star Wars toys exhibit opens in Red Wing Giving and keeping: Yammy Bear donates stem cells to studies, and himself Has Rochester passed Winona as an arts hub? 5 reasons why the Austin Bruins are in first place at the one-third mark of the season

Shoe-In
#346 The Ultimate Shoe Fit Experience With Red Wing and Volumental

Shoe-In

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 26:47


Footwear retail execs extraordinaire Marisa Kinney of Red Wing and Alper Aydemir of Volumental stop by Shoe-In to explore Red Wing's wholistic approach to the ultimate fit experience. With a hyper focus on the customer experience, reducing returns, and driving more sustainability, Marisa and Alper have partnered to provide Volumental's FitTech solution to Red Wing shoppers across the country. Learn all about it on this episode. With special guests: Marisa Kinney, Sr. Director, Global Retail, Red Wing Brands of America, Inc. and Alper Aydemir, CEO & Co-Founder, Volumental

La Crosse Local
E.332: Sam Brown | Big Turn Music Fest

La Crosse Local

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 18:06


We talk with Sam Brown, music enthusiast and founder of both the Big Turn Music Fest and Mid West Music Fest, we chat about early beginnings, and the history of the Minnesota based music festivals. We also get into his own music moniker, “Bomonro” and what people can anticipate for the Big Turn Music Fest happening February 17-18 in Red Wing, MN. https://www.bigturnmusicfest.comhttps://www.midwestmusicfest.orgYou can find more conversations, food reviews, live music and events on our website https://lacrosselocal.com.

Agweek Podcast
Full show audio: Red Wing Grain deals with low water levels and high rates

Agweek Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 18:32


This week on AgweekTV, we look at how low water levels and rising barge costs have had an impact on Red Wing Grain, one of five Mississippi River ports in Minnesota providing access to river ports to the south. We also talk to an NDSU economist to hear how this and other factors around the world are affecting grain prices. We also hear about some new pests and diseases in our region and visit a meat processing program, one of many in the region, looking to fill a need for trained meat cutters.

Midwest Bias
Cholesterol City!

Midwest Bias

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 56:51


Episode 43: Kj opens this episode with a few plugs for her pals followed by the Most Midwestern Moment of the Week (2:54)! Next, it's time for the return of Rachel Reports (4:00)! Kj and Rachel discuss how they may have been sucked back in by their Minnesota Twins’ season ticket representative. Rachel reports on her latest camping trip and guesses where Mr. Reports will take her for a surprise weekend getaway. Then, Kj welcomes back the HOFer as the Midwest Guest Co-host of the day (22:45)! They discuss their recent fall break trip, review Twitter Talk in response to last week’s episode, and bring in Steve Ozbolt (@EmrldCityCater on Twitter) of Emerald City Catering in Milwaukee, WI to settle a family kitchen tool debate in Midwest Mediator (32:48)! Steve then stays on to review the Twitter Talk about crabs, they lament their baseball teams’ sad seasons, and Steve picks a World Series winner. A good (central standard) time was had by all! Music: All music by Kj Ohnstad with the exception of the Intro music which is by Kj Ohnstad and Jason Fuse). Graphics by Jenni Ohnstad (lumineacreative.com) Twitter: @MidwestBiasPod, @buffalo_alice (Kj) Email: midwestbiaspod@gmail.com Sponsored by: Best Rubber Stamp (bestrubberstamp.net, stamps@bestrubberstamp.net, 901-278-4500) Podcast Mailing address: Kj Ohnstad PO Box 538 Red Wing, MN 55066 Rate and review us on Apple Podcasts and anywhere else ratings and reviews are accepted. Subscribe now and never miss an episode! Thank you! Check out Amy Martin’s music here: amymartinmusic.com Inquire about purchasing Steve’s Sauces here: info@emeraldcitycatering.com Pre-order Open Air Press book here:https://openairpress.com/home/shop/ Purchase Two Chicks Jerky here: twochicksjerky.com

Midwest Bias
Thank You For Your Insight!

Midwest Bias

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 76:31


Episode 42: Kj opens the show with a brief update before welcoming in Karen Mittelstadt as the Midwest Guest Co-host of the day (1:54)! They review Twitter Talk in response to last week’s episode, which, surprise surprise, revolves entirely around food. Then they discuss 3 situations they’ve been in recently that have them questioning American civility. Later, the HOFer and not one, but two very special guests join Kj in another edition of Taste Test with the HOFer (47:31)! They revisit the laundry issue and taste two beers donated by Patrick Smith and Ed Butt! A good (central standard) time was had by all! Music: All music by Kj Ohnstad with the exception of the Intro music which is by Kj Ohnstad and Jason Fuse). Graphics by Jenni Ohnstad (lumineacreative.com) Twitter: @MidwestBiasPod, @buffalo_alice (Kj) Email: midwestbiaspod@gmail.com Sponsored by: Best Rubber Stamp (bestrubberstamp.net, stamps@bestrubberstamp.net, 901-278-4500) Podcast Mailing address: Kj Ohnstad PO Box 538 Red Wing, MN 55066 Rate and review us on Apple Podcasts and anywhere else ratings and reviews are accepted. Subscribe now and never miss an episode! Thank you!

Song of the Day
The Foxgloves - Speed Queen

Song of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 5:17 Very Popular


Today's Song of the Day is "Speed Queen" from The Foxgloves' album, Mama Was A Bandit, out now.The Foxgloves will be performing at The Caravan du Nord at The Sheldon Theatre in Red Wing, MN on Saturday, October 22nd.

Locked On Red Wings - Daily Podcast On The Detroit Red Wings
Detroit Red Wings Start the Season 2-0 with a Flurry of Firsts

Locked On Red Wings - Daily Podcast On The Detroit Red Wings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 39:10 Very Popular


The Detroit Red Wings start the season 2-0 after beating the Montreal Canadiens 3-0 and New Jersey Devils 5-2. Elmer Soderblom scored the game winning goal, his first in the NHL, against the Canadiens, Olli Maatta scroed an EN for his first as a Red Wings, while Villie Husso earned his 1st win and shutout as a Red Wing in the game, followed by head coach Derek Lalonde's first win as an NHL head coach. In the game against New Jersey the Wings were heavily outplayed but took advantage of bad goaltending, Dominik Kubalik, Ben Chiarot, and David Perron all got their first goals as Red Wings. #lgrw Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKEDON15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! SimpliSafe With Fast Protect™️ Technology, exclusively from SimpliSafe, 24/7 monitoring agents capture evidence to accurately verify a threat for faster police response. There's No Safe Like SimpliSafe. Visit SimpliSafe.com/LockedOnNHL to learn more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Midwest Bias
It's Time to Knock

Midwest Bias

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 64:32


Episode 41: Kj kicks off this episode with a brief update followed by the Most Midwestern Moment of the Week (1:38) before welcoming in the Hall of Famer as the Midwest Guest Co-host of the day (4:22)! They review Twitter Talk, including a discussion about the most popular grocery stores in the Midwest and beyond, the return of the Curder Burger (?), and more. Later, singer/songwriter Amy Martin joins them (@amymartinmusic on Twitter and Instagram) as the token Non-Midwestern/Expert Guest of the Week - from Denver, CO (15:27)! Amy answers the 3 requisite guest questions: 1) Where have you been? 2) Where are you now? and 3) Why should we visit your town? They then discuss her career as a musician including when she first became interested in music, her musical influences, her history fronting a bluegrass band, her journey to becoming a solo artist, her songwriting process and upcoming album, and much more…including, yes, food! A good (central standard) time was had by all! Music: All music by Kj Ohnstad with the exception of the Intro music which is by Kj Ohnstad and Jason Fuse). Graphics by Jenni Ohnstad (lumineacreative.com) Twitter: @MidwestBiasPod, @buffalo_alice (Kj) Email: midwestbiaspod@gmail.com Sponsored by: Best Rubber Stamp (bestrubberstamp.net, stamps@bestrubberstamp.net, 901-278-4500) Podcast Mailing address: Kj Ohnstad PO Box 538 Red Wing, MN 55066 Rate and review us on Apple Podcasts and anywhere else ratings and reviews are accepted. Subscribe now and never miss an episode! Thank you! Amy Martin Music can be found at the following links. Check it out and support her if you can! Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amymartinmusic/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/amymartinmusic/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/AmyMartinMusic Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/AmyMartinMusic Website: https://amymartinmusic.com/

Art Hounds
Art Hounds: Art that explores the sea, prairie and spiritual realms

Art Hounds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 5:30


Karen Mary Davalos, professor of Chicano and Latino Studies at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, suggests a visit to see Dougie Padilla and Xavier Tavera's new work at Anderson Center at Tower View in Red Wing. Titled “Frontera Liminal,” the show investigates borders both physical and spiritual. Padilla's series of screen prints forge a connection with his great-grandmother, whom he never met. Among his images are ghost prints, the second, third, or more pulls on the same inked plate of a printing press, that produce ethereal remnants of the original image. Even the hanging of the images is ghostly, said Davalos. The images hang free from the ceiling, allowing them to move in the breeze and adding a sculptural element to 2-D images. Tavera is a photographer who has been traveling to the Mexican border for more than six years. He's interested in the intersection of Catholic and Indigenous spiritual practices, creating images that Davalos calls “charged and emotionally compelling.” The exhibit runs through Nov 5. and is capped with an artist talk and closing reception at 1 p.m. that afternoon. Beverly Roberts of Homewood Studios appreciates the intricate felted creations of Susan J. Sperl. Sperl's latest exhibit, entitled “Voices from the Water,” showcases her detailed, colorful sea creatures with such enticing names as warty frogfish, leafy sea dragon, wolf eel, Tasmanian sawshark. Many of these creatures face challenges due to plastics and pollution in their ocean environments. Courtesy of ABSPhoto Susan J. Sperl's "Leafy Sea Dragon" is one of the intricate felted sea creatures on display in her show "Voices from the Water" at Westminster Gallery in Minneapolis. Bringing these ideas closer to home are the cartoons about local water conservation and clean-up efforts, created by Winter Crenshaw and Donte Beck, students at Plymouth Youth Center's Arts and Tech High School. Together, the exhibit is part inspiration and wonder, part encouragement to protect our water, from Minneapolis storm drains to ocean depths. The show runs through Nov. 20 at the Westminster Gallery, located within Westminster Presbyterian Church in Minneapolis.  There's an artist reception Sunday from 2 - 4:30 p.m. Ilene Krug Mojsilov has long admired the work of sculptor and painter Dodie Logue and she highly recommends a visit to see her show “Color Thoughts” on display at One Division Art in Buffalo, Minn. Mojsilov recalled visiting Logue's studio this summer and looking out through the open barn doors at the restored prairie in full bloom. The prairie's color and texture infuses Logue's abstract paintings, whose grids and dots always deserve a closer look. Mojsilov explains Logue's work celebrates “the unexpected poetry of hard and soft…the interactions between color and texture.” The exhibit runs through Oct. 22. The gallery is open Friday 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturdays 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Courtesy photo "Lullaby" on canvas by Dodie Logue.

Q Media's Podcast
Red Wing Chamber Chat 10.10.2022

Q Media's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 5:48


“Red Wing Chamber Chat” Jack Colwell speaks with Red Wing Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Michelle Larson with a review of this past weekend Fall Arts Festival, Ribbon Cutting Events scheduled for this week, an award for the Red Wing Care Clinic with an event today and Manufacturing Month tours at two businesses this week.

Art Hounds
Art Hounds: Art that explores the sea, prairie and spiritual realms

Art Hounds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 5:30


Karen Mary Davalos, professor of Chicano and Latino Studies at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, suggests a visit to see Dougie Padilla and Xavier Tavera's new work at Anderson Center at Tower View in Red Wing. Titled “Frontera Liminal,” the show investigates borders both physical and spiritual. Padilla's series of screen prints forge a connection with his great-grandmother, whom he never met. Among his images are ghost prints, the second, third, or more pulls on the same inked plate of a printing press, that produce ethereal remnants of the original image. Even the hanging of the images is ghostly, said Davalos. The images hang free from the ceiling, allowing them to move in the breeze and adding a sculptural element to 2-D images. Tavera is a photographer who has been traveling to the Mexican border for more than six years. He's interested in the intersection of Catholic and Indigenous spiritual practices, creating images that Davalos calls “charged and emotionally compelling.” The exhibit runs through Nov 5. and is capped with an artist talk and closing reception at 1 p.m. that afternoon. Beverly Roberts of Homewood Studios appreciates the intricate felted creations of Susan J. Sperl. Sperl's latest exhibit, entitled “Voices from the Water,” showcases her detailed, colorful sea creatures with such enticing names as warty frogfish, leafy sea dragon, wolf eel, Tasmanian sawshark. Many of these creatures face challenges due to plastics and pollution in their ocean environments. Courtesy of ABSPhoto Susan J. Sperl's "Leafy Sea Dragon" is one of the intricate felted sea creatures on display in her show "Voices from the Water" at Westminster Gallery in Minneapolis. Bringing these ideas closer to home are the cartoons about local water conservation and clean-up efforts, created by Winter Crenshaw and Donte Beck, students at Plymouth Youth Center's Arts and Tech High School. Together, the exhibit is part inspiration and wonder, part encouragement to protect our water, from Minneapolis storm drains to ocean depths. The show runs through Nov. 20 at the Westminster Gallery, located within Westminster Presbyterian Church in Minneapolis.  There's an artist reception Sunday from 2 - 4:30 p.m. Ilene Krug Mojsilov has long admired the work of sculptor and painter Dodie Logue and she highly recommends a visit to see her show “Color Thoughts” on display at One Division Art in Buffalo, Minn. Mojsilov recalled visiting Logue's studio this summer and looking out through the open barn doors at the restored prairie in full bloom. The prairie's color and texture infuses Logue's abstract paintings, whose grids and dots always deserve a closer look. Mojsilov explains Logue's work celebrates “the unexpected poetry of hard and soft…the interactions between color and texture.” The exhibit runs through Oct. 22. The gallery is open Friday 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturdays 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Courtesy photo "Lullaby" on canvas by Dodie Logue.

Post Bulletin Minute
Today's Headlines: MSC-SE launches tuition coverage program for Red Wing high school graduates

Post Bulletin Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 5:43


Stories in this episode: Day in History: 1922: Moonshine and jazz dancing contributing to youth downfall Minnesota State College Southeast launches tuition coverage program for Red Wing high school graduates Olmsted County's Mayowood Road senior housing project won't see state funding this year Triplets rule the day at Rochester's Mayo High School homecoming Mayo surgeon carves out time for his soccer dream in Argentina

The Junior Hockey Podcast
#StallTalk EP056 | Rainer's Incredibly Rude Comment About Gresko

The Junior Hockey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 40:53


#StallTalk EP056 – This week's episode of #StallTalk, Rainer & Pauly sit down and talk about a bunch of things ranging from golf to there recent outing to Red Wing, MN. The boys discuss there recent round, share there overall thoughts and the shenanigans that took place. No Rainer's Rankings this week, but a fun episode fulled of discussions so make sure to share and as always, thanks for listening! Follow Us on Twitter: Gresko: @greskoTJHP Pauly: @paulyson24 Rainer: @RLGIII We hope that you guys enjoy this episode. If you guys have any questions, comments, or concerns feel free to DM us on twitter @StallTalkPod or Email us: StallTalkPod@gmail.com.

The Dark Swamp: Horror Stories | Swamp Dweller Podcast
659: The National Park Service FAILED Paul Fugate | Missing Park Ranger Cold Case

The Dark Swamp: Horror Stories | Swamp Dweller Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 41:31


Paul Fugate was a Park Ranger for the Chiricahua National Monument Park in Arizona when he went missing on January 13, 1980. Paul reportedly told a seasonal aid that he was “going on a hike” and made his way towards one of the park trails. Paul was last seen wearing his official uniform, complete with the NPS Trademark logo, a gold-colored badge worn over his heart, Red Wing hiking boots, and carrying a green jacket.  Paul would not return to his scheduled post; over 42 years later, he is still missing. This is the longest-running missing person case in Arizona state history. It is the oldest open case for a missing staff member in National Park Service History, and - at the time of this upload- Paul remains the only Park Service ranger ever to go missing and stay unaccounted for. To help further the search for Paul Fugate, you can donate directly to the family via their gofundme. https://www.gofundme.com/f/help-us-find-paul-fugate-and-bring-him-home Download Swamp Dweller Scary Stories: Apple: https://apple.co/2L7znZp Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2WUFDG8 Check out the Swamp Dweller Merch store! http://bit.ly/32u2eh5

Tiger Nation and Beyond
Tuesdays with Mueller - Week 5 vs Red Wing

Tiger Nation and Beyond

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 47:41


Head football coach Garrett Mueller joins Tiger Nation and Beyond to break down the big 70 - 13 Week 5 win over Red Wing.  We also chat about a tough matchup in Week 6 vs KM and Saturday night's Football Fun Night!

Midwest Bias
Uinta Stouts?...UBEtcha!

Midwest Bias

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 57:23


Episode 40: Kj kicks off this episode with The Best Thing I Saw All Week (0:29) before welcoming in the Hall of Famer for another edition of Taste Test with the Hall of Famer (7:30). They test 2 beers donated by Kim Willson and Patrick Smith. Later, Kim Willson (@KimWills33 on Twitter), joins the show as Kj’s Midwest Guest Co-host of the Day (20:23)! They lament the disappointing baseball seasons of the Detroit Tigers and Minnesota Twins and review "Twitter Talk", including a breakdown of the long Midwestern goodbye and Kim shares her favorite thing about any public event such as a Renaissance festival. Kj also has a special announcement and introduces “Kim’s Crockpot; what’s in the pot tonight?" A good (central standard) time was had by all! Music: All music by Kj Ohnstad with the exception of the Intro music which is by Kj Ohnstad and Jason Fuse). Graphics by Jenni Ohnstad (lumineacreative.com) Twitter: @MidwestBiasPod, @buffalo_alice (Kj) Email: midwestbiaspod@gmail.com Sponsored by: Best Rubber Stamp (bestrubberstamp.net, stamps@bestrubberstamp.net, 901-278-4500) Podcast Mailing address: Kj Ohnstad PO Box 538 Red Wing, MN 55066 Rate and review us on Apple Podcasts and anywhere else ratings and reviews are accepted. Subscribe now and never miss an episode! Thank you!

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast
Preserving Your Reputation [THA 295]

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 27:42


Honesty is always the best policy, but sometimes is it better to omit certain information to a customer? What if you make a mistake but make it right and eat the cost? Are there situations where you don't divulge all that information to a customer? Let's have an open discussion on ethics and your shop's reputation. Watch the Episode on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_yXBkv5KgEc (YouTube) Matt Fanslow, lead diagnostician and shop manager, Riverside Automotive, Red Wing, MN. Matt's previous episodes https://remarkableresults.biz/?s=%22fanslow%22 (HERE) https://mattfanslow.captivate.fm/ (Matt Fanslow Podcast: Diagnosing the Aftermarket A to Z) Al Wright, https://johnsautomotiveservice.com/ (John's Automotive), Cedar Rapids, IA Key Talking Points  There are times when being completely open is endearing, but other times where it simply hurts the shop's reputation, and the client learning about it changes nothing. They aren't paying more for the service, they aren't leaving with an improperly repaired vehicle.  The issue/mistake/mishap can be kept in-house and learned from. It's not uncommon for us to "lie" by omission, namely when mistakes are made.  We don't call out the specific tech that erred.  That is to be frowned upon.  Unfortunately, we also seem to lie by omission by not calling out the specific tech when there's a victory or a job well done. Another situation MAY be just thinking out loud, which may not always be a good thing, or misdiagnosing a vehicle. What is the best way to fire a customer without damaging the shop's reputation?   In a small community, you have to be careful in your explanation to the customer to prevent the ripple effect.  Comebacks - every shop has them, and it's the first interaction when they return that makes all the difference in defusing a bad situation. Let the customers speak first.  Reputation isn't just a business transaction, reputation is just as important as community involvement. Shop culture can also affect your reputation. It's your employee for 40 hours of the week; what do they say about you and their peers the 80 hours a week? Connect with the Podcast http://aftermarketradionetwork.com (Aftermarket Radio Network) http://youtube.com/carmcapriotto (Subscribe on YouTube) https://remarkableresults.biz/episodes (Visit us on the Web) https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsPodcast (Follow on Facebook) https://remarkableresults.biz/insider/ (Become an Insider) https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm (Buy me a coffee) https://remarkableresults.biz/books/ (Important Books) Check out today's partners: Shop-Ware: More Time. More Profit. Shop-Ware Shop Management https://getshopware.com/ (getshopware.com)       Delphi Technologies: Keeping current on the latest vehicle systems and how to repair them is a must for today's technicians. http://DelphiAftermarket.com (DelphiAftermarket.com) https://remarkableresultsradio.captivate.fm/listen ()

Tiger Nation and Beyond
Tuesdays With Mueller - Week 4 vs. Byron Recap

Tiger Nation and Beyond

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 53:57


Head coach Garrett Mueller joins TNAB to talk about the big win over the Byron Bears, looking ahead to Homecoming week vs. Red Wing, and also more details on the Football Fun Night Oct 8th!

End Goals: LCMS Youth Ministry Podcast
#097. Difficult Conversations: Anxiety and Depression

End Goals: LCMS Youth Ministry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 34:51


This Fall we are taking on some important, but difficult topics for teens that might be tough for youth leaders to approach. In this episode, we talk with Jayme Nichols about how we can prepare to care and support youth who are impacted by depression and anxiety. Bio: DCE Jayme Nichols is a Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in the Austin, TX area. Before becoming a counselor, she served in youth ministry for 18 years. Jayme and her husband, Kobi, grew up in Saginaw, MI and met at Valley Lutheran High School. They have been married 13 years and have three children: Isaac (10), Carrington (9), and Jeremiah (5). In their down time, the Nichols' enjoy watching Michigan football, Tigers baseball, and Red Wing hockey.  Find the LCMS Youth Ministry resource website at youthesource.com.

The Because Fiction Podcast
Episode 173: Four Bookish Books for Fall 2022

The Because Fiction Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 37:30


I've read a lot of bookish books in the past couple of years, but I think the fall of 2022 is going to go down as an epic season of bookish delight. With authors like Mollie Rushmeyer, Pepper Basham, and Amy Lynn Green, how could it not?  Listen in to find out what bookish books I'm most looking forward to plus some super-cool bookish news!   Note: links may be affiliate links that provide me with a small commission at no extra expense to you. Why These Delightful Bookish Books Are Perfect For Your Autumn TBR Oh, boy!  Do you know what happens the moment you realize that the bookish book you're reading is the SECOND one releasing this fall, there's a third one out there, and... you're releasing one, too? I'll tell you.  You throw your podcast plan out the window and record a "you've gotta see this" episode.  So I did.  And here you go. Four bookish books you will not want to miss this autumn (even if one of them is mine!). First up... The Bookshop of Secrets by Mollie Rushmeyer (Oct 25, 2022) Look, here's the deal I'm in the middle of this book, and it has me coming back for "just one chapter" when I should be writing "just one more" of my own!  I LOVE the characters, the setting, and all the secrets.  I love that this is one of those delightfully bookish books that doesn't just happen to take place in a bookstore or library. No, the essence of books permeates every page. They're the answers to secrets. They're lost treasure and potentially the map to other treasure. But more than those, they're solace to the hurting and joy to everyone. Can you see that I love this book? I'm only halfway through, but it's five stars all the way. A collection of lost books holds the clues to her family's legacy…and her future. Hope Sparrow has mastered the art of outrunning her tragic past, learning never to stay anywhere too long and never to allow anyone control over her life again. Coming to Wanishin Falls in search of her family's history already feels too risky. But somewhere in the towering stacks of this dusty old bookshop are the books that hold Hope's last ties to her late mother—and to a rumored family treasure that could help her start over. Only, the bookshop is in shambles, and the elderly owner is in the beginning stages of dementia and can't remember where the books lie. To find the last links to the loved ones she's lost, Hope must stay and accept help from the townsfolk to locate the treasured volumes. Each secret she uncovers brings her closer to understanding where she came from. But the longer she stays in the quaint town, the more people find their way into the cracks in her heart. And letting them in may be the greatest risk of all… And then we have... The Blackout Book Club by Amy Lynn Green (November 15, 2022) I LOVED Amy Lynn Greene's first book, Things We Didn't Say, and really liked her second, but this one... I mean, who can resist bookish books? Like I said, I haven't read this yet, but look at the synopsis!!! In 1942, an impulsive promise to her brother before he goes off to the European front puts Avis Montgomery in the unlikely position of head librarian in small-town Maine. Though she has never been much of a reader, when wartime needs threaten to close the library, she invents a book club to keep its doors open. The women she convinces to attend the first meeting couldn't be more different--a wealthy spinster determined to aid the war effort, an exhausted mother looking for a fresh start, and a determined young war worker. At first, the struggles of the home front are all the club members have in common, but over time, the books they choose become more than an escape from the hardships of life and the fear of the U-boat battles that rage just past their shores. As the women face personal challenges and band together in the face of danger, they find they have more in common than they think. But when their growing friendships are tested by secrets of the past and present, they must decide whether depending on each other is worth the cost. Also: It's available as preorder at 40% off and free shipping from Baker Book House (I was wrong about it not being one of theirs!). You can learn more about Amy Lynn Green on her WEBSITE. Next up: Authentically, Izzy by Pepper Basham (November 15, 2022) As I said, this bookish book is an instant five-star read for me. I loved the characters, the relationships, and something I didn't say in the episode but in my review... I LOVED that when one person does something wrong, the other person doesn't feel obligated to assume part of the blame. Instead, acceptance and forgiveness are allowed to shine beautifully without muddying the "whose right/wrong here" thing. Trust me... it's important. Dear Reader, My name is Isabelle Louisa Edgewood—Izzy, for short. I live by blue-tinted mountains, where I find contentment in fresh air and books. Oh, and coffee and tea, of course. And occasionally in being accosted by the love of my family. (You'll understand my verb choice in the phrase later.) I dream of opening my own bookstore, but my life, particularly my romantic history, has not been the stuff of fairy tales. Which is probably why my pregnant, misled, matchmaking cousin—who, really, is more like my sister—signed me up for an online dating community. The trouble is . . . it worked. I've met my book-quoting Mr. Right, and our correspondence has been almost too good to be true. But Brodie lives across an ocean. And just the other day, a perfectly nice author and professor named Eli came into the library where I work and asked me out for a coffee. I feel a rom-com movie with a foreboding disaster nipping at my heels. But I've played it safe for a long time. Maybe it's time for me to be as brave as my favorite literary heroines. Maybe it's time to take the adventures from the page to real life. Wish me luck. Authentically, Izzy Witty, hilarious, and heartwarming contemporary romance about book lovers A sweet, kisses-only romance An epistolary novel written mostly in emails and texts Stand-alone novel Book length: approximately 105,000 words Includes discussion questions for book clubs You can find out more about Pepper Basham on her WEBSITE.  Furthermore, you can preorder her book from Baker Book House at 20% off AND if you order The Blackout Book Club at the same time, you'll get free shipping. And finally... Twice Sold Tales by Chautona Havig (hey... I've heard of her!) on November 2, 2022! If only owning a bookstore didn't mean dealing with people. No one was more surprised than Harper Brevig when Great Aunt Lorene (not “Lori,” thank-you-very-much) died and left her least favorite niece her bookstore–including a prime piece of real estate in downtown Red Wing, Minnesota. Making a go of the place shouldn't be too hard. With her library science degree, she should be set. Then again, the website describing library degrees had said it would teach her excellent communication skills. It had not. Could she get a partial refund? Still, owning the building should mean crazy-low overhead to offset her less than optimal “book-side” manner.  Ahem. So when yet another huge bill arrives, and she starts getting twitchy about the low bank balance, Harper does the only thing she can think of. Enter Milton Coleridge. He'd been excited about the possibilities of the store last year, but Harper had sent him packing before he could talk to her about them.  Now he has a chance to make a difference. But she's right. She's bleeding money, and it doesn't make sense! Milton's job is to figure out what's going on, plug the financial leak, and maybe… do a little matchmaking. That dad with the adorable little boy would be good for her… and she'd be good for him. Probably. Twice Sold Tales: the first full-length novel in the Bookstrings series releasing with The Mosaic Collection And, stay tuned for bookish merch. Here's a sneak peek at one of the T-shirt designs... I hope you'll love Harper Brevig and her bookstore, Twice Sold Tales, as much as I do! Like to listen on the go? You can find Because Fiction Podcast at: Apple  Castbox  Google Play Libsyn  RSS Spotify Stitcher Amazon and more!

Post Bulletin Minute
Today's Headlines: $10 million Soldiers Field pool upgrade; park holding off on most golf course changes

Post Bulletin Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 5:51


Stories in this episode: Day in History: 1922: Henry Ford is the wealthiest man in the world Soldiers Field update calls for $10 million pool upgrade while holding off on most golf course changes Chef tip: It's all about the knives Rochester's newest clothing store continues mission of giving back to community Pro baseball career in doubt for Red Wing's Boldt after being released The Post Bulletin is proud to be a part of the Trust Project. Learn more at thetrustproject.org.

Man Overseas Podcast
You're Going to "The Show?" with Chase Lambin

Man Overseas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 122:16


Chase Lambin played professional baseball until he was 35 years old. During that span, he played a stint for Bobby Valentine in the Japanese Big Leagues with the Chiba Lotte Marines.He is a man who's had the sort of career for which movies are made. But he walks around like the beauty who doesn't know it. Could explain our long-term friendship (I like to think I'm pretty too). I kid. But for certain we married the type (that doesn't know she's beautiful).First time I met Chase in 9th grade, humility would've been the last word I'd use to describe him. Not only was he the most cocksure fella in the club on this particular Friday night—sporting a blonde mullet, yellow Polo, khaki pants & Red Wing boots, dude was gettin' after it on the dancefloor. He took no songs off.Finally, he took a break and I walked over to introduce myself. He was sweating like a woman who sells her body for money, yet still attends mass on Sunday.One thing you've gotta understand about 'high school Chase.' It didn't matter if he was in the on-deck circle talking at a pitcher, walking up to the plate talking at the pitcher (and catcher), or chirping as he passed the pitcher after the play, he was going to talk throughout the whole game.I can't say it turned me on or off. It's who he was. I thought it was his way of firing himself up, and since it mostly worked, who was I to say anything?In all my years playing (and watching) baseball, I've yet to see a more excited and animated shortstop who brung it everyday to the ballpark the way Chase did.Yet ask him today what he's most proud of during his reign in baseball—he'll tell you this: "Being a great teammate, no question."That's not a full-180, but I've forgotten most skateboard terminology. And if I called the way he changed throughout his career an "about-face," it'd be my first time using that word too.Let's just say the game changes you. Competition changes you. Camaraderie changes you. Deep slumps...I could go on.Unlike so many other guys who left the game disgruntled because they didn't get their shot in the Big Leagues, Chase has insisted it was about the journey. He expounds on his journey during his first appearance on the podcast: Becoming a Human Catalyst with Chase Lambin.Naturally, you'd think the "bestie" was a shoe-in for my first guest-spot. But no. "Alf" and the older brother from The Wonder Years, Wayne, had publicists who both wanted to know how many listeners I had.When I asked them if relatives count, twice I said "bye" to a dial-tone.Lesson learned. Bring on "the bestie."Of course he 'killed.' His passion for storytelling—rivaled by few—wouldn't have been topped by Alf or Wayne from The Wonder Years.But I had this idea I'd go for the nostalgic play right out of the gate. Same way wifey is antique shopping for the home where we plan to live a little (it's our first). Same concept.Chase's interview game is lit. Just an example, he's never wanted to prepare. Never had notes or index cards in front of him.Why?He believes speaking contemporaneously is speaking from the heart—which is the way he coaches young ballplayers. No wonder they love & respect him so much.Chase is now Bench Coach for AAA Round Rock Express in the MLB Texas Rangers organization. He has a beautiful family—wife is Sara, son Champ, daughter's name is Stella. I'm sure Champ is two years older than I think he is, so let's say 11. Stella, maybe 8? Who knows.You will never in your life meet someone who is genuinely happier for another man's success than his own.That's Chase.

Post Bulletin Minute
Today's Headlines: Producing legacy: Rochester program continues to see students find successful career paths

Post Bulletin Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 6:03


Stories in this episode: Day in History: 1997: Gordie Howe laces up his skates one more time Producing legacy: Rochester program continues to see students find successful career paths Creating a Sanctuary: former teacher beautifies the entrance to Century High School with a flower garden From Rochester to Capri and beyond, Patricia Pattison saw the world Red Wing's Toivonen grateful for opportunity with Vikings The Post Bulletin is proud to be a part of the Trust Project. Learn more at thetrustproject.org.

The Angry Designer
When Sh#t Gets Real: A Conversation with Aaron Draplin

The Angry Designer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 55:40 Very Popular


While we're not your typical "interview" podcast, Aaron Draplin is not your typical 'celebrity' graphic designer - which is why we felt there was no one else better suited to be our first guest.  In this episode, we go deep - past the typical interview or industry questions and learn about what makes Aaron Tic, what keeps him up at night, and what the future holds. From personal to professional and everything in between, we learn about the man behind the larger-than-life legend.  Founder of the iconic @fieldnotesbrand and graphic designer extraordinaire whose portfolio includes some of the biggest brands on the planet like Nike, Burton Snowboards, Esquire, Red Wing and the Ford Motor Company, Aaron Draplin is what we aspire to be. We are honored to present this first part of a 2 episode Conversation with Aaron Draplin.

The Morning News with Vineeta Sawkar
Minnesota native trying bounce back after being a final cut on an NFL Team.

The Morning News with Vineeta Sawkar

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 5:02


Could Travis Toivonen be the next Adam Thelen?   The Red Wing native just got cut yesterday from The Giants final roster and talked with Vineeta about the setback and his mindset 

Chris Cotton Weekly Blitz
Numbers Don't Lie, They Also Don't Tell the Truth [THA 290] - Remarkable Results Radio Podcast

Chris Cotton Weekly Blitz

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 60:42


The gang's all here; we have the entire Aftermarket Radio Network together for an important episode inspired by the movie Moneyball. We all have experience with people who are not our top performers, but are we better to have them on the team than not? You know them; they are consistent, reliable, steady, and contributors. Are they worth replacing? Will they become the best or top performers, or do they help strengthen our overall performance? A great discussion among your peers. Watch the Episode on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oUON1qeEp4Y (YouTube) Hunt Demarest, CPA, https://paarmelis.com/ (Paar Mellis and Associates), https://huntdemarest.captivate.fm/ (Business by the Numbers Podcast) Matt Fanslow, https://www.riverside-automotive.com/ (Riverside Automotive), Red Wing, MN, https://mattfanslow.captivate.fm/ (Diagnosing the Aftermarket A to Z Podcast) Kim and Brian Walker, https://shopmarketingpros.com/ (Shop Marketing Pros), https://autorepairmarketing.captivate.fm/ (Auto Repair Marketing Podcast) Chris Cotton, https://autoshopcoaching.com/ (AutoFix Auto Shop Coaching), https://chriscotton.captivate.fm/ (Chris Cotton Weekly Blitz Podcast) Key Talking Points What REALLY contributes to production? Simpson Paradox Simon Sinec points out that Navy Seal teams value Trustworthiness far, far more than Performance.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kJdXjtSnZTI (VIDEO HERE)  Tech productivity is one of the most important aspects of business, but how can these numbers skew what that employee is really doing (helping others, sharing duties outside of production, etc.) Are there some numbers or metrics that actually can look too good, which could cause an issue for growth or retention Numbers don't lie, but sometimes can be misleading. Do your numbers match up with what you are trying to do with the business? You have to have your head up and eyes wide open to make sure you can identify the "doers" in your group.  Do you have a scorecard for success for your technicians? Pay plans; incentive greatness Who are your ‘support people' to contribute and make the whole picture better Culture is contagious Training when hiring- Weaknesses- be honest with eachother Fine balance- profitability aspect, you can't have a shop full of unicorns Removing obstacles Connect with the Podcast http://aftermarketradionetwork.com (Aftermarket Radio Network) http://youtube.com/carmcapriotto (Subscribe on YouTube) https://remarkableresults.biz/episodes (Visit us on the Web) https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsPodcast (Follow on Facebook) https://remarkableresults.biz/insider/ (Become an Insider) https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm (Buy me a coffee) https://remarkableresults.biz/books/ (Important Books) Check out today's partners: Shop-Ware: More Time. More Profit. Shop-Ware Shop Management https://getshopware.com/ (getshopware.com)       Delphi Technologies: Keeping current on the latest vehicle systems and how to repair them is a must for today's technicians. http://DelphiAftermarket.com (DelphiAftermarket.com)

Business By The Numbers
Numbers Don't Lie, They Also Don't Tell the Truth [THA 290] - Remarkable Results Radio Podcast

Business By The Numbers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 60:42


The gang's all here; we have the entire Aftermarket Radio Network together for an important episode inspired by the movie Moneyball. We all have experience with people who are not our top performers, but are we better to have them on the team than not? You know them; they are consistent, reliable, steady, and contributors. Are they worth replacing? Will they become the best or top performers, or do they help strengthen our overall performance? A great discussion among your peers. Watch the Episode on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oUON1qeEp4Y (YouTube) Hunt Demarest, CPA, https://paarmelis.com/ (Paar Mellis and Associates), https://huntdemarest.captivate.fm/ (Business by the Numbers Podcast) Matt Fanslow, https://www.riverside-automotive.com/ (Riverside Automotive), Red Wing, MN, https://mattfanslow.captivate.fm/ (Diagnosing the Aftermarket A to Z Podcast) Kim and Brian Walker, https://shopmarketingpros.com/ (Shop Marketing Pros), https://autorepairmarketing.captivate.fm/ (Auto Repair Marketing Podcast) Chris Cotton, https://autoshopcoaching.com/ (AutoFix Auto Shop Coaching), https://chriscotton.captivate.fm/ (Chris Cotton Weekly Blitz Podcast) Key Talking Points What REALLY contributes to production? Simpson Paradox Simon Sinec points out that Navy Seal teams value Trustworthiness far, far more than Performance.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kJdXjtSnZTI (VIDEO HERE)  Tech productivity is one of the most important aspects of business, but how can these numbers skew what that employee is really doing (helping others, sharing duties outside of production, etc.) Are there some numbers or metrics that actually can look too good, which could cause an issue for growth or retention Numbers don't lie, but sometimes can be misleading. Do your numbers match up with what you are trying to do with the business? You have to have your head up and eyes wide open to make sure you can identify the "doers" in your group.  Do you have a scorecard for success for your technicians? Pay plans; incentive greatness Who are your ‘support people' to contribute and make the whole picture better Culture is contagious Training when hiring- Weaknesses- be honest with eachother Fine balance- profitability aspect, you can't have a shop full of unicorns Removing obstacles Connect with the Podcast http://aftermarketradionetwork.com (Aftermarket Radio Network) http://youtube.com/carmcapriotto (Subscribe on YouTube) https://remarkableresults.biz/episodes (Visit us on the Web) https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsPodcast (Follow on Facebook) https://remarkableresults.biz/insider/ (Become an Insider) https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm (Buy me a coffee) https://remarkableresults.biz/books/ (Important Books) Check out today's partners: Shop-Ware: More Time. More Profit. Shop-Ware Shop Management https://getshopware.com/ (getshopware.com)       Delphi Technologies: Keeping current on the latest vehicle systems and how to repair them is a must for today's technicians. http://DelphiAftermarket.com (DelphiAftermarket.com) https://remarkableresultsradio.captivate.fm/listen ()

Matt Fanslow - Diagnosing the Aftermarket A to Z
Numbers Don't Lie, They Also Don't Tell the Truth [THA 290] - Remarkable Results Radio Podcast

Matt Fanslow - Diagnosing the Aftermarket A to Z

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 60:42


The gang's all here; we have the entire Aftermarket Radio Network together for an important episode inspired by the movie Moneyball. We all have experience with people who are not our top performers, but are we better to have them on the team than not? You know them; they are consistent, reliable, steady, and contributors. Are they worth replacing? Will they become the best or top performers, or do they help strengthen our overall performance? A great discussion among your peers. Watch the Episode on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oUON1qeEp4Y (YouTube) Hunt Demarest, CPA, https://paarmelis.com/ (Paar Mellis and Associates), https://huntdemarest.captivate.fm/ (Business by the Numbers Podcast) Matt Fanslow, https://www.riverside-automotive.com/ (Riverside Automotive), Red Wing, MN, https://mattfanslow.captivate.fm/ (Diagnosing the Aftermarket A to Z Podcast) Kim and Brian Walker, https://shopmarketingpros.com/ (Shop Marketing Pros), https://autorepairmarketing.captivate.fm/ (Auto Repair Marketing Podcast) Chris Cotton, https://autoshopcoaching.com/ (AutoFix Auto Shop Coaching), https://chriscotton.captivate.fm/ (Chris Cotton Weekly Blitz Podcast) Key Talking Points What REALLY contributes to production? Simpson Paradox Simon Sinec points out that Navy Seal teams value Trustworthiness far, far more than Performance.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kJdXjtSnZTI (VIDEO HERE)  Tech productivity is one of the most important aspects of business, but how can these numbers skew what that employee is really doing (helping others, sharing duties outside of production, etc.) Are there some numbers or metrics that actually can look too good, which could cause an issue for growth or retention Numbers don't lie, but sometimes can be misleading. Do your numbers match up with what you are trying to do with the business? You have to have your head up and eyes wide open to make sure you can identify the "doers" in your group.  Do you have a scorecard for success for your technicians? Pay plans; incentive greatness Who are your ‘support people' to contribute and make the whole picture better Culture is contagious Training when hiring- Weaknesses- be honest with eachother Fine balance- profitability aspect, you can't have a shop full of unicorns Removing obstacles Connect with the Podcast http://aftermarketradionetwork.com (Aftermarket Radio Network) http://youtube.com/carmcapriotto (Subscribe on YouTube) https://remarkableresults.biz/episodes (Visit us on the Web) https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsPodcast (Follow on Facebook) https://remarkableresults.biz/insider/ (Become an Insider) https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm (Buy me a coffee) https://remarkableresults.biz/books/ (Important Books) Check out today's partners: Shop-Ware: More Time. More Profit. Shop-Ware Shop Management https://getshopware.com/ (getshopware.com)       Delphi Technologies: Keeping current on the latest vehicle systems and how to repair them is a must for today's technicians. http://DelphiAftermarket.com (DelphiAftermarket.com) https://remarkableresultsradio.captivate.fm/listen ()

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast
Numbers Don't Lie, They Also Don't Tell the Truth [THA 290]

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 60:42


The gang's all here; we have the entire Aftermarket Radio Network together for an important episode inspired by the movie Moneyball. We all have experience with people who are not our top performers, but are we better to have them on the team than not? You know them; they are consistent, reliable, steady, and contributors. Are they worth replacing? Will they become the best or top performers, or do they help strengthen our overall performance? A great discussion among your peers. Watch the Episode on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oUON1qeEp4Y (YouTube) Hunt Demarest, CPA, https://paarmelis.com/ (Paar Mellis and Associates), https://huntdemarest.captivate.fm/ (Business by the Numbers Podcast) Matt Fanslow, https://www.riverside-automotive.com/ (Riverside Automotive), Red Wing, MN, https://mattfanslow.captivate.fm/ (Diagnosing the Aftermarket A to Z Podcast) Kim and Brian Walker, https://shopmarketingpros.com/ (Shop Marketing Pros), https://autorepairmarketing.captivate.fm/ (Auto Repair Marketing Podcast) Chris Cotton, https://autoshopcoaching.com/ (AutoFix Auto Shop Coaching), https://chriscotton.captivate.fm/ (Chris Cotton Weekly Blitz Podcast) Key Talking Points What REALLY contributes to production? Simpson Paradox Simon Sinec points out that Navy Seal teams value Trustworthiness far, far more than Performance.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kJdXjtSnZTI (VIDEO HERE)  Tech productivity is one of the most important aspects of business, but how can these numbers skew what that employee is really doing (helping others, sharing duties outside of production, etc.) Are there some numbers or metrics that actually can look too good, which could cause an issue for growth or retention Numbers don't lie, but sometimes can be misleading. Do your numbers match up with what you are trying to do with the business? You have to have your head up and eyes wide open to make sure you can identify the "doers" in your group.  Do you have a scorecard for success for your technicians? Pay plans; incentive greatness Who are your ‘support people' to contribute and make the whole picture better Culture is contagious Training when hiring- Weaknesses- be honest with eachother Fine balance- profitability aspect, you can't have a shop full of unicorns Removing obstacles Connect with the Podcast http://aftermarketradionetwork.com (Aftermarket Radio Network) http://youtube.com/carmcapriotto (Subscribe on YouTube) https://remarkableresults.biz/episodes (Visit us on the Web) https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsPodcast (Follow on Facebook) https://remarkableresults.biz/insider/ (Become an Insider) https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm (Buy me a coffee) https://remarkableresults.biz/books/ (Important Books) Check out today's partners: Shop-Ware: More Time. More Profit. Shop-Ware Shop Management https://getshopware.com/ (getshopware.com)       Delphi Technologies: Keeping current on the latest vehicle systems and how to repair them is a must for today's technicians. http://DelphiAftermarket.com (DelphiAftermarket.com)

A Pinch and a Poke
Redwing Blackbird

A Pinch and a Poke

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 7:10


Redwing Blackbird 1.25oz (Rye) Whiskey .25oz Oregon Black Bird Simple syrup .75oz Campari 1oz sweet vermouth The Polio vaccine was delivered orally by dropping the liquid on a sugar cube starting in 1961. Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4 --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

StickInRink Podcast
Red Wings Rant - Episode 248 Season 3

StickInRink Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 82:08


Hi everybody, and welcome to  Red Wings Rant: Where tirades and impassioned pleas about your Detroit Red Wings, finally, have a home.  The Detroit Red WIngs news and random hot takes will get us one week close to the start of the preseason. In the meantime, let's look at the newly announced Detroit Red WIngs roster numbers. A few standout bits of Red Wings News came from this as Tomas Holmstrom's number 96 has been issued to Jake Walman. Also, of note, the Detroit Red Wings announced Pontus Andreasson was given number 26. How much does this mean? Probably not a lot, but let's have fun! We also look at the IIHF World Juniors and update everyone on the performances thus far! Carter Mazur has looked great, and each Red WIng has had a chance to stand out thus far, including: Simon Edvinsson, William Wallinder, Theodor Niederbach, Sebastian Cossa, Donovan Sebrango, Jan Bednar,  Red Savage, Eemil Viro. Let's play a fun game of random hot takes. We love playing this game, but give us your practical, your weird, your impossible Detroit Red Wings hot takes. Will Dominik Kubalik hit the 30-goal mark? Will Kasper debut this season? Which Red Wings are on the move? Tell us in the chat and let's discuss! Episode sponsored by Draft Kings. Use promo code 'THPN' to unlock exclusive offers when you sign up! Click here to sign up: https://tinyurl.com/DKAMAZE If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis counseling and referral services can be accessed by calling 1-800-GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537) (IL/IN/MI/NJ/PA/WV/WY), 1-800-NEXT STEP (AZ), 1-800-522-4700 (CO/NH), 888-789-7777/visit http://ccpg.org/chat  (CT), 1-800-BETS OFF (IA), 1-877-770-STOP (7867) (LA), 877-8-HOPENY/text HOPENY (467369) (NY), visit OPGR.org (OR), call/text TN REDLINE 1-800-889-9789 (TN), or 1-888-532-3500 (VA). 21+ (18+ WY). Physically present in AZ/CO/CT/IL/IN/IA/LA/MI/ /NJ/NY/ PA/TN/VA/WV/WY only. New customers only. Min. $5 deposit required. Eligibility restrictions apply. See http://draftkings.com/sportsbook for details. Follow along with all of our interviews and content by subscribing to our YouTube Channel. Please Subscribe, Rate and Review us on Apple Podcasts, and follow us on Twitter (@BODHockey) and Instagram (@brothers_of_discussion)! Red Wings Rant is hosted by the Brothers of Discussion and brought to you by the Hockey Podcast Network. Find us on your favorite Podcast App by clicking here: https://link.chtbl.com/redwingsrant Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Red Wings Rant Podcast
Red Wings Rant - Episode 248 Season 3

Red Wings Rant Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 82:23


Hi everybody, and welcome to  Red Wings Rant: Where tirades and impassioned pleas about your Detroit Red Wings, finally, have a home.  The Detroit Red Wings news and random hot takes will get us one week close to the start of the preseason. In the meantime, let's look at the newly announced Detroit Red WIngs roster numbers. A few standout bits of Red Wings News came from this as Tomas Holmstrom's number 96 has been issued to Jake Walman. Also, of note, the Detroit Red Wings announced Pontus Andreasson was given number 26. How much does this mean? Probably not a lot, but let's have fun! We also look at the IIHF World Juniors and update everyone on the performances thus far! Carter Mazur has looked great, and each Red WIng has had a chance to stand out thus far, including: Simon Edvinsson, William Wallinder, Theodor Niederbach, Sebastian Cossa, Donovan Sebrango, Jan Bednar,  Red Savage, Eemil Viro. Let's play a fun game of random hot takes. We love playing this game, but give us your practical, your weird, your impossible Detroit Red Wings hot takes. Will Dominik Kubalik hit the 30-goal mark? Will Kasper debut this season? Which Red Wings are on the move? Tell us in the chat and let's discuss! Episode sponsored by Draft Kings. Use promo code 'THPN' to unlock exclusive offers when you sign up! Click here to sign up: https://tinyurl.com/DKAMAZE If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis counseling and referral services can be accessed by calling 1-800-GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537) (IL/IN/MI/NJ/PA/WV/WY), 1-800-NEXT STEP (AZ), 1-800-522-4700 (CO/NH), 888-789-7777/visit http://ccpg.org/chat  (CT), 1-800-BETS OFF (IA), 1-877-770-STOP (7867) (LA), 877-8-HOPENY/text HOPENY (467369) (NY), visit OPGR.org (OR), call/text TN REDLINE 1-800-889-9789 (TN), or 1-888-532-3500 (VA). 21+ (18+ WY). Physically present in AZ/CO/CT/IL/IN/IA/LA/MI/ /NJ/NY/ PA/TN/VA/WV/WY only. New customers only. Min. $5 deposit required. Eligibility restrictions apply. See http://draftkings.com/sportsbook for details. Follow along with all of our interviews and content by subscribing to our YouTube Channel. Please Subscribe, Rate and Review us on Apple Podcasts, and follow us on Twitter (@BODHockey) and Instagram (@brothers_of_discussion)! Red Wings Rant is hosted by the Brothers of Discussion and brought to you by the Hockey Podcast Network. Find us on your favorite Podcast App by clicking here: https://link.chtbl.com/redwingsrant Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Marketing With Empathy® Podcast
77. Embrace Positive Side of Cultural Tension Moments– Aaron Seymour-Anderson, Red Wing Shoe Co.

Marketing With Empathy® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 39:54


Episode 77- How Red Wing Shoe Co. Embraces its roots and customers by finding cultural tension moments and embracing the positive side of things. Aaron Seymour-Anderson explains how 3 storytelling campaigns came to light: Out of Fashion since 1905, Wall of Honor, and #LaborDayOn.     VIEW SHOW NOTES: https://blog.kindredspeak.com/Red-Wing-Shoe-Co-Aaron-Seymour-Anderson-ep-77      LEARN ABOUT BRAND STORYTELLING ACADEMY® group training program: https://sarah-panus.mykajabi.com/brand-storytelling-academy     SUBSCRIBE TO BRAND STORYTELLING NEWSLETTER: https://view.flodesk.com/pages/6161f93cc71e8685f183c63e    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast
Hypocrisy: Check Yourself, Before You Wreck Yourself – Matt Fanslow [RR 770]

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 32:33


It seems like the hot topic of late is customer service. Businesses are short-staffed… and everyone is asking for customers to be patient. But what happens when something goes wrong? How does that business handle that situation? How does the customer react? I'm joined by another network show host, Matt Fanslow. We discuss the hypocrisy that exists when a business owner is now the customer. Matt Fanslow, lead diagnostician and shop manager, Riverside Automotive, Red Wing, MN. Matt's previous episodes https://remarkableresults.biz/?s=%22fanslow%22 (HERE)https://mattfanslow.captivate.fm/ (Matt Fanslow Podcast: Diagnosing the Aftermarket A to Z)Key Talking Points As a business owner, can you put the shoe on the other foot when you are the customer? The efficiency of motion- moving with purpose Matt's daughter as a waitress- looking at every table as an opportunity to make money on tips Be transparent and observant Coming soon: Godfather Episode! Connect with the Podcast: https://aftermarketradionetwork.com/ (Aftermarket Radio Network)http://youtube.com/carmcapriotto (Subscribe on YouTube) https://remarkableresults.biz/episodes (Visit us on the Web) https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsPodcast (Follow on Facebook) https://remarkableresults.biz/insider/ (Become an Insider) https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm (Buy me a coffee) https://remarkableresults.biz/books/ (Important Books) Check out today's partners: Set your sights on Las Vegas in 2022. Mark your calendar now … November 1-3, 2022, https://www.aapexshow.com/ (AAPEX) - Now more than ever. And don't miss the next free AAPEX webinar. Register now at http://AAPEXSHOW.COM/WEBINAR (AAPEXSHOW.COM/WEBINAR). More Time. More Profit. Transform your shop at https://getshopware.com/carm (getshopware.com/carm)

Matt Fanslow - Diagnosing the Aftermarket A to Z
Hypocrisy: Check Yourself, Before You Wreck Yourself – Matt Fanslow [RR 770] - Remarkable Results Radio Podcast

Matt Fanslow - Diagnosing the Aftermarket A to Z

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 32:33


It seems like the hot topic of late is customer service. Businesses are short-staffed… and everyone is asking for customers to be patient. But what happens when something goes wrong? How does that business handle that situation? How does the customer react? I'm joined by another network show host, Matt Fanslow. We discuss the hypocrisy that exists when a business owner is now the customer. Matt Fanslow, lead diagnostician and shop manager, Riverside Automotive, Red Wing, MN. Matt's previous episodes https://remarkableresults.biz/?s=%22fanslow%22 (HERE)https://mattfanslow.captivate.fm/ (Matt Fanslow Podcast: Diagnosing the Aftermarket A to Z)Key Talking Points As a business owner, can you put the shoe on the other foot when you are the customer? The efficiency of motion- moving with purpose Matt's daughter as a waitress- looking at every table as an opportunity to make money on tips Be transparent and observant Coming soon: Godfather Episode! Connect with the Podcast: https://aftermarketradionetwork.com/ (Aftermarket Radio Network)http://youtube.com/carmcapriotto (Subscribe on YouTube) https://remarkableresults.biz/episodes (Visit us on the Web) https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsPodcast (Follow on Facebook) https://remarkableresults.biz/insider/ (Become an Insider) https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm (Buy me a coffee) https://remarkableresults.biz/books/ (Important Books) Check out today's partners: Set your sights on Las Vegas in 2022. Mark your calendar now … November 1-3, 2022, https://www.aapexshow.com/ (AAPEX) - Now more than ever. And don't miss the next free AAPEX webinar. Register now at http://AAPEXSHOW.COM/WEBINAR (AAPEXSHOW.COM/WEBINAR). More Time. More Profit. Transform your shop at https://getshopware.com/carm (getshopware.com/carm)

The Hockey Writers Podcast Network
The Hockey Writers Grind Line - Extending Larkin & Bertuzzi, Make It or Break It Seasons, Blocking Prospects & More

The Hockey Writers Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 44:32


The Hockey Writer's Grind Line is back for another grind, and this week we're discussing the contract status of Dylan Larkin and Tyler Bertuzzi, as well as determining whether or not the Detroit Red Wings' offseason moves have blocked their top prospects from arriving in the NHL. Pour yourself some coffee, sit back, relax, and enjoy our latest grind! Time Stamps 1:50 1 Good, 1 Bad From the Past Two Weeks 6:01 Red Wings Free Agent Frenzy: Did It Block the Top Rookies From Making the Lineup? 11:08 Red Wings Entering "Make It or Break It" Seasons 16:57 Is Pius Suter entering a "make it or break it" season? 19:23 Is Filip Hronek entering a "make it or break it" season? 24:56 How many rookies will make their NHL debut for the Red Wings this season? 25:34 Yes or No: Filip Zadina will still be a Red Wing when the 2022-23 season is over 27:09 Is extending Dylan Larkin the right move? / What should a deal look like? 35:43 Why isn't there a lot of chatter about extending Tyler Bertuzzi? 43:13 How many points will Larkin record this season? 43:46 True or False: Tyler Bertuzzi will have another 30-goal season this year ============================================== Our Grind Line crew are great writers, too: Devin Little - Kyle Knopp - Logan Horn And, make sure to check out all of our great Red Wings content Follow The Hockey Writers: Twitter - Instagram - Facebook Sign up for the "Morning Skate" newsletter Join us in the Hockey Lounge on Discord to talk Red Wings and all things hockey Graphics by Vince Richard

The Gentleman Medium™ Paranormal Podcast
Lillian Bailey Famous Trance Medium First Trance Sitting - Redwing Spirit Guide - William Henry Grace

The Gentleman Medium™ Paranormal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 48:04


In 1953, at her home in Wembley, Middx, a stranger telephoned Lilian to say that he wished to hold a sitting at a Kensington address. Could she be present at a certain time and date? It was a condition of the appointment that the medium should not be told who the participants would be. Arriving at the address, Lilian was blind-folded and taken to another house, where she was led to a chair and went into trance. She gave evidence through her guide, William Wootton, a former captain in the Grenadier Guards, who had been killed during the first world war. When Lilian emerged from trance, her blindfold was removed – and she was amazed to see that the other people in the room were the Queen Mother, the Queen, Prince Philip, the Duchess of Kent and her daughter Princess Alexandra Several years ago a gentleman got in touch with me through an article in Psychic News & The Daily Mail, "Mr Douglas" had many hours of reel to reel tape recordings of his father having private sittings with Lilian Bailey and transcripts of these private sittings. We arranged to meet up over a coffee and he told me of his family's acquaintance with Lilian over the years and her guide Bill Wootton and Father Hafed. We stayed in touch and Mr Douglas very kindly gave me permission to publish the private recordings of Lilian (copyright Mr Douglas) for all to hear an outstanding trance medium. Lilian never sat in a cabinet or a dark room, her clients visited her at her house where she simply sat down, went into trance and her guide Bill Wootton spoke through her in an unmistakable mans voice which was so different from her own which was quite refined. Notes: 1. Dr Thomas Adamson lived in Perth Scotland. Died 1802 at the age of 79. (He speaks many times on the recordings). 2. Father Hafed talks about negative thoughts which are a very bad thing. Fear nothing, be happy, be positive and enjoy life knowing that those in spirit are keeping watch over you at all times and every step of the way 3. In the book Hafed and Hermes Father Hafed mentions King Xerxes 1519-465. BC . Hafed said he knew Xerxes and describes showing him the light whist he languished in a lower region of spirit. His description of this region is very much the ivy thick and clinging around Xerxes. 4. In the book' Death is Her Life' by W F Neech Lilian tells of having to have a totally dark room to enable a manifestation as she experienced when Bill Wootton first appeared to her and held her hand 5. When Father Hafed spoke it was directly through Lilian in a mans voice with a foreign accent. Every person speaking through Lilian had their own individual voice. Reading the book 'Death is her life' I have learnt that Poppet, one of her Guides, was an outcast cripple in Ceylon, poor child. She did not live very long but she is very happy in Spirit and is surrounded by much love. She is a very willing child and always great fun to talk too. She took great pride in clearing Lilian's Aura quickly before the next person spoke through Lilian 6. Hafed was Persian Prince and one of the Magi, one of the 3 wise men who attended Jesus in the stable who became the mentor to Jesus as you know. Father Hafed also spoke at great length, many years ago, through the gifted medium David Duguid over a long period of time. His words about life at the time of Jesus on this earth and in the Spirit life are contained in the book "Hafed Prince of Persia". An abridged version is available through Amazon.co.uk although the drawing on the front of the book bears no resemblance to Father Hafed. I have a Spirit Drawing of Father Hafed and I may have sent you a copy some time ago. I also have a Spirit drawing of dear Poppet. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-gentleman-medium/message

North Star Journey
Prairie Island Indian Community nuclear concern powers net zero carbon emissions plan

North Star Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 6:39


Growing up on the Prairie Island Indian Community reservation, Calais Lone Elk had a plan — a set of steps burned in her mind and logged with her school to help her find her family in the event of an explosion at the nearby nuclear power plant. Tom Baker for MPR News Xcel Energy's Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant is seen from Wakonade Drive in Prairie Island Indian Community in Welch, Minn., on Thursday. “If you went to school and something happened out here, where do you meet your parents? Where do you reconnect with your family? Because you can't come back here,” she said. “Those are things that I don't think are normal.” Lone Elk is 37 now, and still constantly reviewing her escape plan for an emergency at the nearby power plant.   It sits just 700 yards away from her community of 100 homes, its powerlines lining backyards and main thoroughfares.  For Lone Elk and others living in Prairie Island, concerns about the nuclear power plant's safety are a source of low-grade daily stress. Despite official assurances, many people believe it's bad for their health to be living so close. “We all have a plan, whether we voice it or not. We all have an idea of what we have to do or what we need to do. And we all know that we have to go up-wind of that nuclear plant,” Lone Elk said. Related Stories 2019 Environmental nuclear worries force Prairie Island tribe to seek new lands 2001 Prairie Island faces another battle over nuclear waste 2003 A brief history of the Prairie Island plant But it's also a physical reminder of the environmental injustices endured by Native people for generations, said tribal council vice president Shelley Buck. “Since this plant was created, our energy history here has been focused on the power plant and the nuclear waste that is stored right next door to us,” she said. Tom Baker for MPR News Shelley Buck, vice president of Prairie Island Indian Community in Welch, Minn., stands at a potential solar site for the community's net-zero carbon project on June 30. Today, the Prairie Island Community is seeking to disentangle itself from a power plant it never wanted. It's created a $46 million plan to produce net zero carbon emissions within the next decade.  Buck said it's an ambitious step toward being a sovereign nation that's energy sovereign, too.  “To do a big project like net zero really helps us change that narrative into something positive showing how energy can be used as a positive force,” she said. “By offsetting or eliminating the carbon that we produce, it's a positive for everybody.” ‘Why not go big?' Prairie Island members are descendants of the Mdewakanton Band of Eastern Dakota. They made their home in southern Minnesota, but lost that land in 1851 in the Treaty of Traverse des Sioux.  It wasn't until 1934 that the land on the banks of the Mississippi just north of Red Wing became a federally recognized reservation. The Prairie Island power plant was issued its first operating license in 1974, and it was renewed in 2011. Initially, tribal members say the plant was described to them as a steam power plant. It's one of two nuclear power plants, the second in Monticello, that Xcel says are critical to its plans of producing carbon-free electricity by 2050, and is considered safe by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Tom Baker for MPR News A sign outside Xcel Energy's Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant along Wakonade Drive gives directions for visitors at the plant, located within Prairie Island Indian Community in Welch, Minn., seen on June 30. In the early 1990s, Xcel Energy asked the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency permission to store nuclear waste there — at least temporarily until a permanent repository at Yucca Mountain opened, a plan that has since stalled due to local opposition. As a child, Mikhail Childs remembers his father protesting the prospect of storing nuclear waste so close to the reservation.  “Some of the earliest memories I have are of protestors standing in the road, blocking semi-trucks hauling nuclear waste,” he said. “The way [my dad] explained it to me was that all this land we reside on is sacred … We believe that in our creation story, the creation took place just miles down the river.”  Catharine Richert | MPR News Mikhail Childs, Prairie Island Indian Community member, stands on tribal land near the Prairie Island Nuclear Power Plant in southeast Minnesota on July 20. But here's the twist, and it's an important one: Through all these years of living with a nuclear power plant next door, Prairie Island hasn't been powered by the energy generated there, said Buck. The community just recently started getting natural gas from Xcel. It's a logistical detail that she said prevented the tribal community from being eligible for the Renewable Development Fund, a pot of state money financed by Xcel customers for renewable energy projects for Xcel service areas, she said.  Then in 2020, a legislative change allowed Prairie Island to tap $46 million from the fund for the project.  While the tribe had toyed with doing wind power and other renewable projects in the past, a large amount of funding created the opportunity to do more. “Why not go big?” said Buck. One goal, different solutions And by big, Buck is referring to a plan that aims to eliminate 20 million pounds of carbon annually through a raft of renewable energy and efficiency upgrades. Prairie Island's Treasure Island Resort and Casino is the largest energy user on the reservation.  The plan involves multiple ways of achieving that goal, said Andrea Thompson, who has been hired by the tribe as the project's energy program manager.  “Any community that sets a net zero goal gets to decide the pathway to get there. And for many different reasons, some communities choose to purchase carbon credits or find a financial path to achieve net zero while the actual carbon reduction isn't necessarily happening on site,” said Thompson. “What Prairie Island is doing is different,” she said.  Tom Baker for MPR News Andrea Thompson, energy program manager for Prairie Island Indian Community's net-zero carbon project, stands at one of the project's potential solar sites in Welch, Minn., on June 30. Their plan involves constructing a 10-to-15 acre solar array that aims to reduce carbon emissions by more than 550,000 pounds annually, phasing out natural gas in favor of geothermal energy and electrification, and promoting zero-emission and energy efficiency residential upgrades. “One of the reasons why this project is so exciting is because [the tribal council] is not just saying, ‘Let's go gangbusters on solar, and we're gonna call it a day,'” said Shoshana Pena, director of program services for NV5, an technical engineering company hired to work on the project.  It's unlike other municipal or tribal projects she's seeing in the industry because “They're not trying to just do whatever is just meeting the minimum requirements. They're looking at all of these different solutions,” she said.  Tom Baker for MPR News Treasure Island Resort & Casino, owned and operated by Prairie Island Indian Community in Welch, Minn. Net zero in a few years The project is also on a fast-track, said Thompson.  “A lot of communities, when they set net zero goals, they often give themselves 10, 20, 30 years to achieve net zero. And Prairie Island is under a totally different timeline, we're trying to do net zero in a few years, a handful of years,” she said. That ambitious timeline has been setback by COVID-related supply-chain and labor issues, Thompson said. Last year, the tribe asked the Legislature for an extension on phase two of the project, which involves finding the right contractors to build out the plan — a phase that's expected to wrap up early 2023.  Details of the plan continue to be in flux — for instance, where the solar array will be located, and the design of the geothermal wells. Meanwhile, tribal leaders continue to make their case for the plan to residents. By and large, it's been met with support from members, but some are skeptical of how it will be implemented. That includes Selena Childs. She's concerned that the plan focuses too much on technologies that won't stand the test of time. She has questions, for instance, about how long the solar array will last before it needs to be replaced.  Catharine Richert | MPR News Selena Childs, a member of the Prairie Island Indian Community, stands on tribal land near the Prairie Island Nuclear Power Plant in southeast Minnesota on July 20. “Instead we could start building houses that are green, that are economically effective,” said Childs. “We can build our house out of local resources that are still going to be more efficient than these trailer houses that we see put up here … And yet, they want to fill up our fields with solar panels.” And, Childs points out, the plan doesn't change the fact that the community is next door to a nuclear power plant and the nuclear waste stored there. “We don't get our power from the nuclear panel down here. We get it from somewhere else,” she said. Tribal member Nicky Buck said that may be true. But to her, it's about reclaiming the narrative of her community and of their land.  “We want to turn it into a more positive, resilient story, that we, the people, are in control of our lives,” she said. Catharine Richert | MPR News Nicky Buck, a member of the Prairie Island Indian Community, stands on tribal land near the Prairie Island Nuclear Power Plant in southeast Minnesota on July 20.

The Fretboard Journal Guitar Podcast
Podcast 374: Luthier Judson Riviere (Riviere Guitars)

The Fretboard Journal Guitar Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 63:54 Very Popular


On today's Fretboard Journal Podcast, we introduce you to a young guitarmaker at the very beginning of his career, Asheville, North Carolina-based luthier Judson Riviere. Fresh out of high school, Judson enrolled himself in the Minnesota State College Southeast's Guitar Repair and Building program (aka simply as Red Wing). He then dove deep into guitar repair work for Steve Mason in Kansas and, for the last two years, has apprenticed under acoustic guitarmaker Jason Kostal in Arizona. Judson is finally ready to start building guitars under his name. We talk about the skills he's learned along this journey, how Red Wing turned him into an acoustic guitar fanatic, what the apprenticeship for Jason Kostal looked like, his own guitars, and much more. The Fretboard Summit, our three-day gathering for guitar fanatics, takes place in Chicago August 25-27, 2022. fretboardsummit.org Get our 50th issue of the Fretboard Journal by subscribing here. This episode is sponsored by Peghead Nation (use the promo code FRETBOARD and get your first month free or $20 off any annual subscription); Izotope (use the coupon code FRET10 to save 10% off their plug-ins); Retrofret Vintage Guitars; Izotope (use the discount code FRET10 to save 10% off your Izotope purchase); and Calton Cases.

North Star Journey
The power of Black male educators

North Star Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 47:48


Do you remember a teacher who really made a difference in your life as a child? A teacher who really saw you and encouraged you? Minnesota schools have a persistent opportunity gap, with Native American children, Black children and other children of color less likely to graduate high school than their white peers. Research has shown that having teachers and school staff of color can help students of color succeed. But nationally only seven percent of teachers are Black, and only two percent are Black men.  American Public Media special correspondent Lee Hawkins spoke about identity, curriculum, recruitment and more with four Black men who are educators. Guests: Michael Walker, the Director of Black student achievement for Minneapolis Public Schools Michael Thomas, superintendent of Prior Lake-Savage Area Schools Eric Robinson, a retired teacher Derek Francis, Executive Director of Equity and School Climate for Minneapolis Public Schools. He previously managed the district's counseling services.  The following is a partial transcript of the conversation, edited for clarity and brevity. Listen to the full conversation using the audio player above. Lee Hawkins: Thank you all for being here. I'm really excited about the opportunity to bring you brothers together into this discussion. So thank you. Only two percent of the nation's teachers are Black males. That's a tough number to swallow. But here's something that's mind blowing for you all to digest: across the state of Minnesota, there are only 1.45 percent Black teachers, male or female. So that's even less than the percentage of Black male teachers across the nation. Only 1.45 percent Black teachers in a state where Black people make up seven percent of the population. What does this mean for Black children for Minnesota, particularly boys? And what will their educational experience be like as a result? Michael Walker: Well, we already know that representation matters if we got to make sure that we have people that look like them in front of the classrooms, right? And when we think about how that impacts the growth and development of young people, is that when we see folks that look like us, it gives us the ability to see that we have that possibility to be an educator as well. The school system is not designed for them to feel valued, to feel welcomed. The cultural aspects of our schools are a little different than what our Black students are experiencing. So it's not designed for them. And so we have to really think about how do we address that piece? The other components of why the experience is different: what about our curriculum? Like how is the curriculum set up? We have a Eurocentric curriculum, again, that is not centering the experiences of our Black people. And so how do we change? That is some of the things that we have to address. Hawkins: Michael Thomas, what does this mean for the kids who are in these classrooms? Without people who look like them? Michael Thomas: Yeah, I take it right back to the psychology of one's health and in Maslow's hierarchy of needs. When a young person doesn't have a sense of belonging, they're going to struggle no matter what that gap might be. In this case, a lot of our young Black students, specifically young Black boys to your question, they don't see themselves in the curriculum, they don't see themselves in terms of adult authority in the school systems. And so it becomes very psychologically isolating, and with no outlet or sense of support. That's where you begin to see a young, immature mind trying to make decisions for themselves that are well beyond their comprehension. So that's where we might see some kids falling off. Because they don't have the ability to make some of the best decisions without, you know, the struggles that they're going through, and not being able to have somebody that they can trust to go to, to help kind of process and support them through some of the challenges. I would just center there first, and you can fast forward 30 years as adults. Many of us sitting in this room, were oftentimes maybe the only one — only teacher, only administrator in a system — where we also had that level of isolation and had to navigate very carefully our own existence to kind of stay alive in that system. So, I think that's where I would say first, how do we address Is that social — psychological need of our kids. Hawkins: Derek [Francis], you're counseling kids. When kids come into your office and you're doing the counseling, do you ever get the feeling “wow, this person could really use some diversity in terms of the people who are educating them?” Derek Francis: Oh, man, that is, I think the thing that comes to mind, especially when you're thinking about career development, especially for our youth, the exposure to seeing someone who looks like you. So many times when students, they have just the what they see on TV, so I show up as a Black person in the school, and then I start to teach lesson around. “Well, guess what, let me show you pictures of people who look like you. And they're doctors, they're lawyers, they're educators.” And it opens the mind. I think that's so neat, because it's really exposing them to their hope and future. I start to share students, “you have so many different career opportunities. Here's some schools where You see students that look like you.” And that makes a difference. If you have a counselor that hasn't been around or seen Black people or Black students do some of these successful things, you might limit them from your own views. So at some point for someone to say, “Oh, I see you, I've seen people who have looked like you do some of these things. And that's going to be you.” Hawkins: It's so interesting that you say that because people of all races have stories of being counseled out of going into certain careers by their counselor because their counselor didn't believe in them. I particularly remember a story of a woman who is very, very prominent in the science field, a Black woman that I went to school with who talking about being counseled away from STEM… and right now, she's one of the top people at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. So many people have these “Hi, how you like me now?” stories, and it's sad because you shouldn't have to hear those stories. You should be able to say, “I have the support from my village from the beginning.” Before we get too deep into this, it's really important that we frame the problem that we're addressing right now: Boys collectively, of course of all races, are not performing academically, and socially, as strong as girls. We know that. In the case of Black boys, they're not an exception. And as the effort to close the racial opportunity gap continues, it's important to look at how our educational system can do a better job with Black boys. And if we're going to discuss the issue, we need to be transparent and candid. From what you see right now, from what you see statistically and in the classroom, are Black boys underperforming? Eric, you want to take that? Eric Robinson: Right now students are looking at this as a Eurocentric type of system. And, you know, maybe when you're younger, elementary age, there's a little bit of hope. But then as they get more toward high school or middle school, then that starts to dwindle as far as improving their reading or math goals. So that follows them. I mean, working with high school students in a charter school and knowing that they can't get anything… any higher than a fourth-grade reading level. It comes back to having that presence of a Black teacher in the classroom. To, you know, just say that you can do this, you have value you're worthy of careers that you think you don't think you're capable of doing. Hawkins: I wanted to shift this over to you, Michael [Walker], because … you're the director of Black student achievement for Minneapolis Public Schools, are Black boys underperforming? Walker: I know you start off by saying there's an opportunity gap. And what I tend to believe and the kind of research that I've done, it's really a belief gap, right? It's about what do our adults believe about our Black males? Do we believe that they are able to accomplish success? Do we believe that they're able to achieve whatever goal there is that they're trying to achieve? If we don't have that belief as adults, then we're going to treat them or have expectations that are lower, right? Because I don't believe that you can be a doctor, I don't believe that you can be a lawyer. I don't believe that you can be a scientist, right? And so it really starts with the adults. And so that's kind of the focus of our work. And then some of the work that we do, it's really how do we change the beliefs of the educators so that they can see value in our Black students, specifically our Black males. And so I don't believe in an achievement gap. I don't believe that the young people are Black males are underperforming. I believe that the system has been designed and created and the belief of them in that system has created the outcomes that we see. Hawkins: In talking about improving outcomes, it's important to introduce some data that I think is just mind-blowing. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University studied about 100,000 Black students who entered third grade at North Carolina public schools between 2001 and 2005. About 13 percent of the students ended up dropping out of high school, while about half graduated, but with no plans to pursue college, OK? However, low-income Black students who were assigned to at least one Black teacher in third, fourth or fifth grade, were not only less likely to drop out of school, but 18 percent more likely to express interest in college when they graduated. And persistently low-income Black boys who had at least one Black teacher, in third, fourth or fifth grade, were 29 percent more likely to say that they were considering college. And I spoke to Nicholas Papageorge, who was the lead researcher on this study at Johns Hopkins. And he told me that the big difference is that Black teachers tend to have higher expectations for Black students. Michael, when we were in the green room you were talking about when you were working in Osseo. “I'm Dr. Thomas, I believe in you. And you're going to come in here, and you're going to perform up to your potential.” Tell me about that experience. Thomas: I'll say, it stems back to when I was in sixth grade. I actually had a sixth-grade teacher who called me the n-word, and said I wasn't going to amount to anything. Now don't get me wrong. I'm sure I was a handful, and maybe wasn't always making the best choices. But to have an adult teacher who had power and influence over me, kind of cut me down at that level. I'm 50 years old, I've never forgotten what that felt like, right. So fast forward to myself being an educator, I knew very well, I was never going to let a young Black kid — basically a mini-me — experience what I experienced. I had a lot of positive Black men in my life, who countered that. And that was part of my job when I was a principal. Yes, I'm here to serve all kids. And that was a non-negotiable. I also knew I had to bring a point of emphasis for my kids of color. And that was very clear based upon my data. And if you were Black, and you live in a certain zip code and you're coming to my school, I can predict outcomes, unfortunately. So for me, it was to have a tough conversation, I remember I got criticized for pulling a lot of the Black students together and essentially letting them know, “You're not on track to graduate. And if you continue on this path, you're not going to find success in life.” And there was a lot of backlash to “why would you break confidentiality?” and, you know, having families know each other's business. I'm like, this is a small community. If we don't talk about this and put truth out there, I need the families to come and join me in helping these young men and young girls find a better path in life. And so we were successful in my junior high, closing that achievement gap by almost 45 percent in a period of three years. Because the intentionality was data driven. I could see it, no one can deny it, the numbers are here. But going back to what Dr. Walker was just saying, it was about a mindset shift. Kids don't come to our schools. They're not dumb, right? These kids are looking to become successful, whatever that means for them. And it's our jobs as adults to be that bridge to that. But if I don't believe as an adult, if I don't believe that this young kid can ever achieve something, you know, subconsciously, it's going to come out in my practice. I'm not gonna call on Eric, you know, call on everybody else in the classroom. I'm not gonna call on Eric. I'm gonna be, you know, writing discipline referrals for young Mr. Francis. if he was my kid. That comes out. Because you can't necessarily change beliefs. Although there's a belief gap. I totally believe that. But I can manage the behaviors that are manifestations of what you believe. And that's what my job was as a principal, as an administrator, to look at the adult behaviors that were derived from their belief sets of what kids are going to do well, and who's not going to do well. And then those were the tough conversations that allowed us to really kind of peel that onion back and get to the core of what we needed to get to. Hawkins: I'll tell you, it must be hard. Years later, when you're seeing that Black kid that was in your class and he's on TV now or he's, he's the superintendent of schools. Are you reading about kids? You taught and then in the school system and you didn't believe in them. It's an educational journey for a lot of educators in this country. There's one critical thing growing up in Minnesota taught me. And that's that it's not always about malice or racial animus. A lot of times it's about people not having experience with Black people. You haven't been around Black people in your life. And that means you're bringing a lot of this bias and prejudice into the classroom, to the point that you're still you're nervous around the kid. Am I right about it? … [Cross talk in agreement.] Francis: The thing is too, the way it comes out, even the way… you hear it in the language… it's always in opposition. So the students who are doing well, “that's such a good kid, they're great family, they're their siblings were smart.” Or if it's a student who is a Black student, “they're in the hall again.” The way it's around, not giving the same amount of grace when an assignment is missing, or a student might be a minute late walking in the room. It's a different tone. The students I know, see it too. They'll notice with Black students, the staff is more short with or doesn't call on as much. And I think also too, as a Black staff at a school, I've had times where I can tell staff will kind of dance around saying certain things to me, because they know I'll pick up on what they're really trying to say about that student or their family. And so I do think it's a lack of exposure. You can just tell. Maybe their friendship group might not be as diverse. I think, as educators, being aware of that. Because if you're going to work for Black students, and say that you're working in that neighborhood, or working in an inner city, you have to be cautious and aware of the experiences and have that humility to say, “hey, I don't know what that's like." Let me listen and glean some knowledge from my Black colleagues that are here.” I think that's so important to have that kind of humility. Robinson: I think that bias… has a lot to do with it, because the white teachers they would have in mind, well, this is how they would behave. I remember when I started early in education, there was just one teacher, and I was working with the Black students to Black boys. And it was always every day, the same two or three would like a revolving door, you know, instead of this person, this male person giving grace or, you know, understanding, “Well, why are these students doing this?” or, you know, trying to work with that student. But the teachers would have this in mind that they all behave the same way. And, you know, what I've noticed — just to switch gears here — what I've noticed, as far as administrators, right? Principals, you like the assistant principal, was working always with behavior, you know, and that was the role of Black male working in behavior, well, they can take care of these students because they know how to handle them. But it goes beyond that, you know. Literally it goes beyond that, because if there were Black male teachers in the classroom, then those things wouldn't occur. There wouldn't be suspensions, and, you know, with over-suspending students, students of color males. And I know… about this individual that actually, he graduated this June, and he was in my ethnic studies class a couple of quarters ago. And he never passed. Never, never, in fact, he would disrespect me by calling me Eric by my first name. And toward the middle of the summer. He came in, he owed certain assignments and everything. The teachers were working with them, and they had compassion on him and they knew he had to get graduated. And he graduated, he got everything done. And when he was seeing me, he would call me Mr. Eric, you know, because he was succeeding. You know, years ago, certain behaviors would come out and everything. And teachers would overlook that day. They gave him time they gave him a rope, you know, just “Hey, you can do this.” And he did it, you know, But in some schools, right, some classrooms, they're not given that chance, if a student is gifted, maybe their behavior is helter-skelter. However, there's something beneath that. Teachers don't always see that. They don't, they look at the behavior first, instead of getting to know their student. Hawkins: You mentioned, people expecting the same behavior from all of the Black students. And it reminded me of my cousin who went to my high school, North St. Paul, Senior High School, who actually receipt was called to the office, about a matter that pertained to another Black student, where they actually thought he was the black student that they were talking to. And, you know, I've experienced this in corporate America, where I've been called the name of another Black reporter. Whereas you know, and so, that's how deep the issue is. This whole idea of people not knowing how to deal with black people, sometimes not even knowing the difference between Black label. Thomas: Well, and also, you know, to your question earlier — and Eric, you as well just brought up — they bring one of the four of us in to handle these Black kids. Right? And again, we're all passionate Black men who care deeply about our communities and cared deeply about, you know, Black kids, no doubt. But we're more than that. Right? And we, even as professional men have with degrees, we get relegated, and trapped, right? Just like Hollywood, right? You can act this part. I'll never forget my very first year as a principal. That was the narrative, you know, and one of the staff came up to me and said, “Hey, just want to let you know, staff are all really happy that you're coming here. And finally, me on the handle a lot of the behaviors is behavior issues of, you know, these students of color.” And I thought to myself, wow… and my very first staff meeting, you know, August workshop week comes up. And one of the statements I said to my staff — which was all white minus one person — was, “just because you're white, doesn't mean you're not right.” And don't think that's going to exonerate you from accountability for all kids in the school. Right? It gets to that fear piece, Lee, that you were speaking to, like, they don't want to say something, because either they're afraid of being called racist, or whatever it might be, or they just don't know. But at the end of the day, your expectations that you have for some kids need to apply to all kids. And you can't lead from a place of fear. And you can't expect me as a Black person to own your issue. Right? So that was my push to really get my staff to embrace that this is about you, not so much about the student. Hawkins: Dr. Michael Thomas, we had a conversation and I asked you to send me a copy of your dissertation. The reason I asked for him is because it studies African American male school leaders in predominantly white school systems, and how they negotiate their racial identity without committing cultural sacrifice. And I want to read this sentence that you wrote, you said, and I quote: “It is said that being a school administrator is a very lonely and challenging position to have, one must continually negotiate who they authentically are, in an effort to remain in the position,” you wrote. It was 1996, when you wrote this, now that you're a superintendent, and you're actually living this, do you think that you were way ahead of things? I mean, because it seems like that's what we're talking about now is that as educators trying to influence the Black male achievement equation, you're going through your own sort of identity issues with people projecting things on you? Thomas: That's a deep question, Lee. And yeah, there, you know, when I was the only in a system, it was a real lonely place. On top of that, when you're in higher levels of leadership, there aren't a lot of people you can go to and talk to, because you might feel as though you can't do the job. And you don't ask those kinds of questions, right? And I've had colleagues, they go, “oh, here goes Michael, he's on that Black stuff again.” Right? I mean, colleagues! And I'm sitting here thinking, “if you're saying this to me as an adult, what are you doing with kids when you close your classroom door?” Right? At the same time, because my deep commitment to ensuring that young Black students didn't experience what I went through, and I could still continue to blaze a trail for them to have a much better-beaten path to go down. I could only say and do so much before the system then would squeeze me out. Right? And so, oftentimes, I felt caught. Because my heart is committed to doing the right thing, and I know me, I know exactly who I am and what I'm about. And thus the name of my title of my dissertation, which is a play off of Sidney Poitier movie, Guess Who's Coming to Dinner? Right? How how much of my authentic Blackness can I be, before my plate is pulled from the table? Right. And it's a real delicate dance. And this is a negotiation, beyond education that people of color in this country do every single day. Hawkins: What I hear you talking about is that identity continues to be an issue, the expectations, what people project on you certain stereotypes, certain expectations, and that this is something that you must carry with you everywhere, as you navigate through the professional world. So if we are experiencing this as grown, Black men, let's talk about identity, and the challenge of identity that Black boys are facing every day. And how did they work through that or not? Francis: Oh, man, there's so much when you talk about identity, I think about it. The first part is, how it shows up as the academic system. So when you're looking at the schoolwork, how often are you seeing yourself mirrored in that work, seeing people that look like you that you're learning about. This past month, Juneteenth, how many students sit and hear about Juneteenth or learn about the history of it. And so just imagine the liberation that comes with being a Black person hearing someone teach you about the true freedom that people who look like you had to fight for and how delayed it was. But also, I think, especially in Minnesota, our schools have this unspoken toxic culture of attacking students who are marginalized, and it shows up in schools through social media, it shows up in things that are said to students about their identity. So many students talk about how schools don't do anything to speak up when they're attacked as a Black student. Would that bother you? I'm here to learn, I'm here to get an education. I'm hearing these things on an ongoing basis, or I'm seeing other people being called these negative things, either on social media, or in real life. And I have to absorb that day in and day out. And then if I don't have someone at school protecting me to understand what that feels like, that's hard. So I think that's one of the ways we really need to step up as educators to say, hey, we're gonna call out when we hear at sporting events, people making monkey sounds to the Black athletes, that should not be happening in schools, students posting on social media, calling other kids downward, we got wouldn't, because how would I feel safe going to school if I know that there are seeing that happen? And no one's speaking up? Hawkins: There's that problem of the external pressure that Black kids are feeling. But there's also the internalization of some of these stereotypes. And I know Dr. Roland Fryer, at Yale talked about a while back, the acting white phenomenon. Where there was actually a social penalty put on kids, the higher their grades, the less socially acceptable they were. And now we're starting to see that sort of shift, which is nice to see that there's that Black male achievement or Black student achievement is not as stigmatized as it once was, but working as the director of Black student achievement in Minneapolis. What do you see along the lines of identity that these kids are dealing with, that our kids are dealing with every day? Walker: I think it goes back to kind of what Derek mentioned earlier about the curriculum, right? So when we're looking at the curriculum that we have in our schools, we are sharing identity, right? But we're sharing a Eurocentric identity. So in those classrooms, students our white students are getting taught about how they have discovered this, how they have created and invented this, all these great things that they have done, right? Which, okay, fine. Where's that for the other groups in our school system, right? How are we not uplifting those narratives and those stories? So in our program in Minneapolis public schools, we have a class called BLACK — it stands for Building Lives, Acquiring Cultural Knowledge — where it is designed to teach some Afro-centric curriculum and to show them the benefits that they have created and what they have done for this society in this country, but also goes back to before we came to this country where things were better and things were invented on the continent of Africa. So they understand the foundation of that. So it's not just what happened here on the states, right? And that is important, right? Because when we think about schooling, and I'll just experience from myself, I learned about being enslaved. That was the foundation of what they told me about myself, right? So if that's the foundation that you are sharing with these young people, well, we are intentionally creating a thought and an idea in these kids minds of who they can be and where they came from. So we have to undo that and show that there is a much better place. Yeah, enslavement was a portion of our history, but it's not all of our history, right? Hawkins: If you're going to teach enslavement, then teach enslaver, right? and what the role of Thomas Jefferson was, right with his biracial children, some who are buried right here in Madison, Wisconsin. Let's go to that cemetery. Let's bring the classroom to the cemetery to see the kids that Thomas Jefferson had with Sally Hemings. It's important to teach all of that, but the complexity and the nuance of it all. Eric, you taught ethnic studies, right? Robinson: Yeah.. and if I could piggyback on you, doctor, the same thing, you know identity. When students first come into that classroom, I say, “Well, what is your story? Know your story.” However, it may be in your, in your family, but it still goes back to slavery. You know, none of us have color, or Indigenous Natives, have not had a certain history, you know, through the colonists. So, I know the boy talks about a double consciousness. Right. And we experienced that as adults, as a Black man. But the students they need to know who they are, and where they've come from, and where they're heading. Hawkins: I mean, you taught ethnic studies, at a time in which there is a national backlash against teaching of ethnic studies, right? People calling it critical race theory — which it isn't. It's American history. So tell me about ethnic studies in teaching it and, and the effect that that has on not only students of color, but students in general of all races. Robinson: I think the point where I come from, when I'm teaching that class, I want to co taught that class is not just African Americans, but Indigenous Natives, Asian Americans, you know our whole global society has been affected by colonialists. And not just England, but Portuguese and Spaniards. So this is an area that our kids, our Black kids, our students, they come from communities where, you know, they're not exposed to it in education. I've learned some of this while I was teaching, you know, research, because I hadn't had this in elementary, middle, even in undergraduate, master's. I had none of this and I had to learn it on my own, so I can teach it. So if this can happen to me, can you imagine what our students are dealing with? You know, they're not exposed to it. Hawkins: I want to shift the conversation. Let's talk a little bit about the school to prison pipeline. Growing up, there were two places in Minnesota that you had to avoid if you were a young Black boy, it was Totem Town and Red Wing. Those were juvenile detention centers that people went to, and many came back and they were never the same. In fact, I can remember the precise days that some people were literally placed by a teacher on the school to prison pipeline. It was: You got in a fight. You had marijuana. You had a knife. You'll never amount to anything, get out of my class right now. You're out of here. And that's just enough to ruin a kid's life. And you're sending them into a community, unfortunately, where they do feel accepted. And that begins the school to prison pipeline. I know people who are still in prison right now that I went to school with. Is that something that you see and how do you make the schools more sensitive to the trauma that leads kids to make the mistakes that lead them into juvenile detention? Walker: Yeah. And you talked about the ones that are like front and center that we see all the time. Right? Right. So whatever, those are the ones that we see, but there's other school to prison pipeline that may be invisible to, to the outside world. Hawkins: Like what? Walker: Like, directing our kids into special education programs and labeling them as EBD. Because now you get on this transition, and now you're in a “level four” setting. And now you're in an enclosed school… that's another, maybe less direct way that we may not see on the outside. So do those things happen? Yes, of course, they happen. What we have to start to do is really, again, center, what are we talking about? Are we really looking at behavior from a Eurocentric lens? Right? We talked about student not being able to fill the full range of emotions, our Black students with the social and emotional learning? Well, if I get angry, my anger may show up differently. That doesn't mean that I am a threat. That doesn't mean that I should be sent down to the SRO office or whatever, I'm just upset right now. And give me time to go through my emotions and go through that. But I don't get an opportunity to do that. And so now I am put into this category that I am violent, that I am a threat. And now, anything that I do, gets heightened. So, what we're talking about here is confirmation bias. Right? So now we have educators who are looking to confirm their bias that they already have about these Black students by when they make one act. Thomas: And they'll push the button until the trigger pops. Now that student is… like Dr. Walker just said. And in the thing is, it's those both macro and micro… acts that are committed particularly on young kids of color, and a lot of the prevention work that Michael has done with the BLACK program. I remember years ago, when I was doing project COFI, in St. Paul Public Schools, same thing. It was doing a lot of co-teaching with my colleagues, giving them an additional lens to look through that they just weren't… They didn't get trained in their teacher prep programs, right? Or they weren't comfortable. They weren't, you know, fill in the blank, as we've just talked about earlier. But we've all seen our colleagues, particularly our white colleagues who, who may have that light turn on for themselves, like, “Oh, I see that now.” So I don't want to, you know, be in this doomsday conversation, right? That nothing is going well. There's a lot of improvement, no doubt. But there are — I'll speak for myself, I know these brothers, and probably validate too, but we've all seen opportunities where, where teachers get it, and they lean into that space. And they take that and now, they are part of that conversation of helping this young kid. But that goes back to us just not being the ones relegated to that space. It's way bigger than the four of us. We can do a lot. But you know, we don't have “S”s on our chests or wear red capes to work. Hawkins: We're gonna wrap up in a minute. But I just have two more questions. Why aren't there more Black men teaching in the classroom? And what can be done to recruit and retain more? Robinson: Yeah, this thing about recruitment. I went through a program through St. Thomas. And I already had my BA in another area. But I was recruited by an individual who saw something in me and said, “Well, yeah, you know, you'd be a great teacher.” Two men: first Dr. Terrell, and this man that was a recruiter. I think our universities — we have quite a few within the Twin Cities — need to send out those recruiters to our schools. Because, like we mentioned earlier, your gift is gifted students in the classrooms, Black boys and girls in the classrooms already. Those that might be in high schools, junior seniors, and recruiters from these universities or these, you know, these schools, these colleges, need to go into these high schools and have some type of programs, with incentives, to get these young men or women out, and say “Hey, this is for the community. You can do this.” It might be me, but it has to be somebody from these colleges that knows what's going on in the schools and collaborate with these schools and have them go in and recruit. Or communities, whatever community access, organizations, nonprofits that are out there, as well. I mean, you have, I can't think of it off the top of my head, but that's what needs to be done. Francis: As I'm hearing this, because I'm from Minnesota. Minneapolis, Twin Cities area born and raised. I went to Champlin Park High School, Anoka-Hennepin area. And I had one Black teacher my entire K-12 career. And then, when I was in high school, I had a white teacher who saw me working with elementary kids through the child care occupation course. And she started saying, “Whoa! You're talented, you're good.” And I share this because it was something that I carried with me. When I went to get my licensure to be a school counselor, I originally wanted to be a news anchor. And I started volunteering after I didn't get a gig as a news anchor. And then my teacher, I saw her again, she was like “You know have you ever think about going into counseling.” And then when I got to the University of Minnesota, I met a professor there that would speak into me, it was like you're talented. And mind you, I was the only black man in my course in high school and in my program for school counseling. And so the importance of that belief, that encouragement. And so that's something I carry with me. And I say this also to white listeners out there, don't think you can't do the work. Don't think for a second that it's only… it because there's not enough Black people in education for us to wait for just us to do it. So white educators, we need you. We're in this all together. And so speak into... have that belief in your heart about Black boys. See the potential and the skills, we see it speak into it, because who knows where that seed will land. And so I think it's so important. That's what we really need to do. And I do that. That's why I want to be a school counselor, because I know the power of not just having that belief, but it's speaking that word for people. Hawkins: Dr. Walker, I know one thing that you said that was powerful — of the many things you've said — was: If we're not creating an environment where Black men or Black boys feel comfortable in the educational setting, what makes them want to come back? Walker: I say it all the time. We're probably the only profession that has students for 13 years to recruit. So if our Black boys are getting a horrible experience going through the school system, why would they choose to come back and work in it? So the first thing we have to do is give them a better experience. Meaning: Do we value them while they're in the school system? Do we see that they're great and their genius, is what Derek is speaking about. If we can do that, then we may have more of them interested in this profession. The second thing is what Derek said is, who is being directly speaking that into students? Hey, you know what, Michael Thomas, as a second grader, you would be a really good teacher one day you ever thought about that profession? Hawkins: Is that what happened [to you] Mike? Walker: It didn't happen with me. But I'll tell you, it happened with my daughter. So my daughter, who's going to be a senior at Hampton University next year, is an elementary education major. And it was that intentionality from my mother-in-law. She was a first grade teacher. And long ago when my daughter was a little girl said, “you'd be a great teacher, you know?” and she's never forgotten that and so she will be graduating and anybody looking to hire a dynamic teacher? *laughter* Hawkins: In the Green Room, you said, “Are you sure you want to do that?" Walker: I did! You know, I had to have that conversation. I mean, given what's going on in education these days, I mean, it can be a scary space. But my daughter, she's committed to kids, you know, and she's been working at that youth program and champion, you know, she graduate from Champlain Park High School as well. Derek was her counselor and, you know, again, I mean, I credit you know, people like Mr. Francis, who really helped, you know, stay in touch with her to keep her inspired to be great. Me and Mr. Bridgeman How a teacher transformed a student's life Listen to the full conversation with the audio player above.

100% Sports
Episode #50: Red Wing free agency, Pistons draft, and soccer talk

100% Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 44:05


We talk about the moves the red wings and pistons have made this off-season and how the soccer season ended --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Birding By Ear
Icterides: Noise Markers featuring Blackbirds, Meadowlarks, Orioles, Cowbirds and Grackles

Birding By Ear

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 24:52


I struggled with this episode.  It took a lot of time and effort to get it to come together. I wasn't going to work on it until later in the fall but did anyway. Its still not perfect but nothing in life is so I'm sending it out there anyway. I hope you find it helpful, and please forgive any mistakes, mishaps, and oopsies. Today we talk about Western Meadowlark (2:11) Bullocks Oriole (7:30) Brown Headed Cowbird (10:30) Brewers Blackbird (14:05) and Great-Tailed Grackle (16:40). There is also a comparison of all the birds in this family including Red-Wing and Yellow-Headed blackbirds starting at (19:15).    Podcast website: https://birdingbyearpodcast.podbean.com/ Facebook pages: https://www.facebook.com/BirdingByEarPodcast   Other useful sites: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/ https://www.audubon.org/ https://ebird.org/home   Thanks for listening.   

InEx: a show about inclusive design
Sadie Red Wing Part 1

InEx: a show about inclusive design

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 52:12


Sadie Red Wing is a Lakota graphic designer and advocate from the Spirit Lake Nation of Fort Totten, North Dakota. Red Wing earned her BFA in New Media Arts and Interactive Design at the Institute of American Indian Arts. She received her Masters of Graphic Design from North Carolina State University. Her research on cultural revitalization through design tools and strategies created a new demand for tribal competence in graphic design research. Red Wing urges Native American graphic designers to express visual sovereignty in their design work, as well as encourages academia to include an indigenous perspective in design curricula. https://drive.google.com/file/d/1kp1DXsIBmXr2cX7tPqNOJd08dsnsjPj_/view?usp=sharing (Transcript (PDF)) https://share.descript.com/view/y8A4aH2oS4t (Transcript (Interactive))

InEx: a show about inclusive design
Sadie Red Wing Part 2

InEx: a show about inclusive design

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 56:34


This is a continuation of episode 5, a conversation with Sadie Red Wing. https://drive.google.com/file/d/1aIYoC_3kVWoPrS668-9bmPGSlnGznJW_/view?usp=sharing (Transcript (PDF)) https://share.descript.com/view/auqN0GcyVQ4 (Transcript (Interactive))

StickInRink Podcast
The Grind Line Podcast | Episode 178 - Seider Takes Home the Calder!

StickInRink Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 64:30


This week we we talk about Seider's huge Calder win, conspiracy theories started by the Red Wing's social media team, and a couple of trade scenarios! Remember to follow us on Twitter & Instagram @GrindLinePod and join our Discord at discord.gg/mQ6KP6ePGX Rate, review, subscribe, and check out our merch on Redbubble! https://www.redbubble.com/people/TheGrindLine/shop EPISODE NOTES: If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis counseling and referral services can be accessed by calling 1-800-GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537) (IL/IN/MI/NJ/PA/WV/WY), 1-800-NEXT STEP (AZ), 1-800-522-4700 (CO/NH), 888-789-7777/visit http://ccpg.org/chat (CT), 1-800-BETS OFF (IA), 1-877-770-STOP (7867) (LA), 877-8-HOPENY/text HOPENY (467369) (NY), visit OPGR.org (OR), call/text TN REDLINE 1-800-889-9789 (TN), or 1-888-532-3500 (VA). 21+ (18+ NH/WY). Physically present in AZ/CO/CT/IL/IN/IA/LA/MI/NH/NJ/NY/OR/ PA/TN/VA/WV/WY only. Min. $5 deposit required. Eligibility restrictions apply. See http://draftkings.com/sportsbook for details. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast
ABC Technician: What Does It Mean? [THA 280]

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 44:02


Are A,B, and C technician levels outdated? Or do we need to take into account specialized skills that can be required in certain areas? Is there room for A, B and C levels within categories? As our industry continues to change, maybe our perspectives on technician labels change too. Watch the Episode on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJpFO5n2Zrg (YouTube) Tim Iezzi, Iezzi's Auto Service, Reading, PA Ryan Kooiman, Director of Training, Standard Motor Products. Ryan's previous episodes https://remarkableresults.biz/?s=ryan+kooiman (HERE). Matt Fanslow, lead diagnostician and shop manager, https://www.riverside-automotive.com/ (Riverside Automotive), Red Wing, MN. Matt's previous episodes https://remarkableresults.biz/?s=%22fanslow%22 (HERE) https://mattfanslow.captivate.fm/ (Matt Fanslow Podcast: Diagnosing the Aftermarket A to Z) Key Talking Points After Covid, techs were a bit burnt out on webinars and sitting behind computer screens-they appreciated being able to be hands-on again and in person without having to drive and take up their personal time after hours. Pick an area to focus on- like a business coach for your technicians. Start from the ground floor  Similar to case studies- using cars to teach and diagnose at the same time Training- collective education on a subject matter Trainer and technician bond when you're in the shop Logistically easier having in house than traveling for training Assessments of every technician with 1 trainer Fosters open and receptive culture The relationship between techs and Scott and owners and Scott is valued and appreciated.  He gets to know them and can determine strengths and areas for growth.  The collaboration as a team is increased as well.  Documenting/journaling for technicians to reference past jobs Connect with the Podcast http://aftermarketradionetwork.com (Aftermarket Radio Network) http://youtube.com/carmcapriotto (Subscribe on YouTube) https://remarkableresults.biz/episodes (Visit us on the Web) https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsPodcast (Follow on Facebook) https://remarkableresults.biz/insider/ (Become an Insider) https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm (Buy me a coffee) https://remarkableresults.biz/books/ (Important Books) Check out today's partners: More Time. More Profit. Shop-Ware Shop Management https://getshopware.com/ (getshopware.com) https://aftermarketradionetwork.com/ () https://remarkableresultsradio.captivate.fm/listen ()

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast
The Value of Exit Interviews [THA 278]

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 43:11


We're talking Exit interviews. Some shop owners do them religiously. Some don't want to face the music. Some don't know what to do in an exit interview.  Is it a smart time not to burn a bridge? Is there a format to follow? We are going to attempt to answer these questions and more in today's Town Hall Academy. You can learn a lot about yourself and your company in exit interviews. Watch the Episode on https://youtu.be/tZwOTqHFKTA (YouTube) Matt Fanslow, lead diagnostician and shop manager, Riverside Automotive, Red Wing, MN. Matt's previous episodes https://remarkableresults.biz/?s=%22fanslow%22 (HERE) https://mattfanslow.captivate.fm/ (Matt Fanslow Podcast: Diagnosing the Aftermarket A to Z) Chris Cotton, https://autoshopcoaching.com/ (AutoFix Auto Shop Coaching) and the https://chriscotton.captivate.fm/ (Chris Cotton Weekly Blitz Podcast) Key Talking Points Think of it as information gathering.  We think nothing of gathering information to go about repairing a vehicle, be it a customer interview, service information search, or data collection via a scan tool or scope, or meter.  It's getting more and more common to ask clients for reviews.  We want good reviews on our sites, or on Google or Facebook and we want bad reviews to go to us immediately so they can be rectified and hopefully earn a "good" review. People leave people, not companies Winning sports team- winning is a salve for everything If a soon-to-be or former employee just doesn't want to talk to you about their time with you, it may be a sign that your "open door policy" isn't nearly as open as you thought. Your role in an exit interview, as the owner or manager, is to shut up and listen.  Ask questions.  The only statements you really should be making is maybe clearing up real misunderstandings, earnestly asking questions, and thanking them for their time with you working AND talking to you.  Take the information and try very hard to look at it purely at face value, and then after a day or two or a week, come back to it and try to put yourself in their shoes/boots and read between the lines.  Don't let your imagination get too crazy, but with those two perspectives, you should be able to extract information that is true and applicable to improving your business and work environment. There are not enough exit interviews done We value customer reviews why not employees on an exit interview The company should have a formal policy regarding exit interviewing. Must have a policy and or procedure. The same list of questions for all departing employees etc.... Not emotional.....hard part about smaller businesses is that the direct report usually does the interview, if at all possible have a neutral party conduct the interview, you can even outsource it if it fits in your budget to do so  if you think of this in marketing terms this is a retention tool, not an acquisition tool. You need to listen to the employees as they leave and then think about your current employees, how can you use the information gathered in order to keep the employees you have top 2 reasons for leaving repair shops is lack of accountability and employee not knowing what their future holds/training plan or lack of one. Connect with the Podcast http://aftermarketradionetwork.com (Aftermarket Radio Network) http://youtube.com/carmcapriotto (Subscribe on YouTube) https://remarkableresults.biz/episodes (Visit us on the Web) https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsPodcast (Follow on Facebook) https://remarkableresults.biz/insider/ (Become an Insider) https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm (Buy me a coffee) https://remarkableresults.biz/books/ (Important Books) Check out today's partners: More Time. More Profit. Shop-Ware Shop Management https://getshopware.com/ (getshopware.com) https://aftermarketradionetwork.com/ () https://remarkableresultsradio.captivate.fm/listen ()

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting
Ohio Outdoors - Building The Perfect Arrow

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 70:35


This week on the O2 Podcast, Ohio's Outdoor podcast, the guys sit down with Seth and Tyler of Sirius Archery. The guys at Sirius were extremely gracious with their time and expertise. We discuss may different topics from the beginning of Sirius, to the current state, and what to look forward too. Seth talks about the ins and outs of arrow construction, product selection, and all things arrows. Check out more info about Sirius on their website, www.siriusarchery.com Andrew is got a good dose of dumb birds making him look even dumber this week. More details on that hunt next week, and Neander-Paul is out traveling again. Paul also has some stories to report back about some of his recent hunts but we wanted to get that all together in one show. Be on the look out of that one next week. The weather has broken, Redwing black birds are out and about, Spring is Here (FINALLY)!!! Get out and enjoy the great state of Ohio and all it has to offer! Enjoy! Check out timetogowild.com to find out more about Send it Slam on July 9 th ! www.theo2podcast.com  GoWild Profile  Tethrd First Lite Instagram: @the.o2.podcast Twitter: @Ohiohunt Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices