Podcasts about Navajo

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Native American people of the United States

  • 1,334PODCASTS
  • 2,106EPISODES
  • 45mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 14, 2022LATEST
Navajo

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Best podcasts about Navajo

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Latest podcast episodes about Navajo

P-DAY
Einmal die Nr.5 für indigene Schotten (14. August)

P-DAY

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 54:07


P-Day Live in Rahlstedt - Tickets 29.09.2022 Patrice und Alex sind im Sommermodus. Alex hat es endlich ins Land der Götter geschafft und Patrice hat sich in München mit der Staatsgealt angelegt.    Rezept Erdbeer Frosé Zutaten 1 Flasche Roséwein (0,75 l), trocken (z. B. Pinot Noir oder Merlot Rosé) 150 g Wasser 150 g Zucker 300 g Erdbeeren, geviertelt 30 - 40 g Zitronensaft 100 g Eiswürfel Roséwein über Nacht in einer Tuppaform einfrieren. Dann in Stücken in den Mixer geben und nacheinander alle anderern Zutaten dazu geben und im Mixer crushen. Tadaa! The great chinese firewall - Podcast

National Day Calendar
August 14, 2022 - National Creamsicle Day | National Code Talkers Day

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 3:30


Welcome to August 14th, 2022 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate a frozen success and a code that changed the game. You may have heard that the Popsicle was invented by a kid. That kid was 11 year old Frank Epperson, who kept right on dreaming after the huge success of his first frozen treat. At an age when most of us are trying out a paper route, young Frank experimented with vanilla ice cream covered in a shell of orange sherbert that he eventually called the Epsicle. Ok, so naming his inventions wasn't his strong suit, but the creamsicle made with vanilla ice cream and the dreamsicle, its ice milk cousin are now a frosty phenomenon. This kid certainly got something right when he set up a patent in 1923. Today over two billion popsicles are sold every year. On National Creamsicle Day, celebrate the entrepreneurial spirit of a kid who knew how to keep on dreaming.   During World War II, the United States military became frustrated as the Japanese cracked every code used by the Allies. The solution to this problem came from an unlikely source, Native American tribes. Because many native languages such as Navajo and Comanche were unwritten and spoken only by tribespeople, they became the perfect basis for a new secret code. Native speakers were sent with army divisions to transmit and decode messages from the field of battle. The code they created could not be broken and helped change the course of history. On National Code Talkers Day, we celebrate these unsung heroes of World War II and the top secret role they played.  I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson. Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Da Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
What's Driving Your IBS And Gut Issues?

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 66:49 Very Popular


This episode is brought to you by ButcherBox and Athletic Greens. Our gut is a powerful control center, due to its bidirectional communication with the brain, which we call the gut-brain axis. This links the emotional and cognitive centers of the brain with intestinal function. Certain conditions, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), are tied to imbalances in the gut-brain axis and can benefit from taking a systems approach in healing, which includes looking at diet, the microbiome, stress management, and more. In today's episode, I talk with Dr. Todd LePine, Dr. Emeran Mayer, and Dr. George Papanicolaou about various root causes of irritable bowel syndrome, including microbiome imbalance, parasites, and stress. Dr. Todd LePine graduated from Dartmouth Medical School and is board certified in Internal Medicine, specializing in Integrative Functional Medicine. He is an Institute for Functional Medicine certified practitioner. Prior to joining The UltraWellness Center, he worked as a physician at Canyon Ranch in Lenox, MA, for 10 years. Dr. LePine's focus at The UltraWellness Center is to help his patients achieve optimal health and vitality by restoring the natural balance to both the mind and the body. His areas of interest include optimal aging, bio-detoxification, functional gastrointestinal health, systemic inflammation, autoimmune disorders, and the neurobiology of mood and cognitive disorders. Dr. Emeran Mayer is the author of The Gut-Immune Connection as well as The Mind-Gut Connection. He has studied brain-body interactions for the last 40 years, is the executive director of the G. Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress and Resilience, and is the founding director of the UCLA Brain Gut Microbiome Center at the University of California at Los Angeles. His research has been supported by the National Institutes of Health for the past 25 years, and he is considered a pioneer and world leader in the area of brain-gut microbiome interactions and its clinical implications.⁣ Dr. George Papanicolaou is a graduate of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and is board certified in Family Medicine from Abington Memorial Hospital. He is also an Institute for Functional Medicine practitioner. He worked on the Navajo reservation for four years at the Chinle Comprehensive Medical Facility, where he served as the Outpatient Department Coordinator. In 2000, he founded Cornerstone Family Practice in Rowley, MA. In 2015, he established Cornerstone Personal Health, a practice dedicated entirely to Functional Medicine. Dr. Papanicolaou joined The UltraWellness Center in 2017. This episode is brought to you by ButcherBox and Athletic Greens. If you sign up today, ButcherBox will give you two ribeye steaks for free in your first box. Just go to butcherbox.com/farmacy to claim this deal. Right now, when you purchase AG1 from Athletic Greens, you will receive 10 FREE travel packs with your first purchase by visiting athleticgreens.com/hyman. Full-length episodes of these interviews can be found here:Dr. Todd LePineDr. Emeran MayerDr. George Papanicolaou Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

KZMU News
Tuesday August 9, 2022

KZMU News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 9:13


The Canyonlands Research Center offers a paid summer internship to Native American students interested in conservation. Today on the news, we visit students as they tour Dugout Ranch on the border of Canyonlands National Park. Used by the Ute and Navajo tribes and later by white ranchers, the land now helps educate and train the next generation of conservationists. Plus, a county in Southwest Colorado is working with an unusual partner to tackle the area's noxious weeds – goats. And later, a group of tribes in the Colorado River basin is asking for more of a voice in negotiations about conserving the river's water amid historic drought.  // Show Notes: // Photo: Students from Canyonlands Research Center's NATURE (Native American Tribes Upholding Restoration and Education) program at Dugout Ranch near Moab. KZMU/Justin Higginbottom // Canyonlands Research Center: Native American Tribes Upholding Restoration & Education https://canyonlandsresearchcenter.org/programs/nature // KSUT Tribal Radio: Ecological land management and preventing fires with goats https://tribalradio.org/ecological-land-management-and-preventing-fires-with-goats/ // KUNC: Tribes in the Colorado River basin say they're ‘in the dark' as states discuss water conservation https://www.kunc.org/environment/2022-08-05/tribes-in-the-colorado-river-basin-say-theyre-in-the-dark-as-states-discuss-water-conservation

IN SICKNESS AND IN HEALTH with Dr. Celine Gounder
S4E10 / Stewardship Over Biodata Rebuilds Trust / Dakotah Lane & Krystal Tsosie

IN SICKNESS AND IN HEALTH with Dr. Celine Gounder

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 19:31


Mending broken trust may be a first step for investigators who want to increase the participation of Native people in medical research. “There's such a history of extractive research in Indigenous communities, such that ‘research' and ‘science' are sometimes dirty words,” said Navajo geneticist and bioethicist Krystal Tsosie.Poor communication and a lack of transparency are among the missteps that have eroded the trust Indigenous communities have in medical research. And that mistrust has contributed to the underrepresentation of Native people in clinical trials. In 2018, Tsosie co-founded the Native BioData Consortium, a research institute led by Indigenous scientists. The consortium is working to improve health equity by actively engaging community members in the research process. When the group collects biological samples from Native tribes, they are stored on sovereign Native American land and made accessible only to researchers who are prioritizing Indigenous health needs. “The benefits are directly rolled back into the people and their communities without a profit to outside entities,” Tsosie said.Episode 10 explores the history of exploitation of Indigenous communities by outside researchers and some of the health consequences of being left out of medical trials.Click here for a transcript of the episode.Voices from the Episode: Dr. Dakotah Lane – Executive medical director of the Lummi Tribal Health ClinicKrystal Tsosie — Twitter – Co-founder and ethics and policy director for the Native BioData ConsortiumSeason 4 of “American Diagnosis” is a co-production of KHN and Just Human Productions.Our Editorial Advisory Board includes Jourdan Bennett-Begaye, Alastair Bitsóí, and Bryan Pollard.To hear all KHN podcasts, click here.

MPR News with Angela Davis
Standing in Two Worlds: Native American College Diaries

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 51:34


Native American students are just a tiny fraction of all the college students in the United States. And each student comes with different histories, confronting an education system once used to erase their languages and cultures. MPR News with Angela Davis is sharing a new documentary from American Public Media, “Standing in Two Worlds: Native American College Diaries.” Meet three Indigenous college students with Minnesota ties. They are using a college education to support their communities, and themselves, without losing sight of who they are. Archie Yellow: Archie is a member of the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa and studies Ojibwe at Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College. Nevaeh Nez: Nevaeh is a Hopi and Navajo student at the University of Minnesota-Rochester who's planning to go to medical school. Reuben Kitto Stately: Reuben is Dakhóta from the Santee Sioux Nation and a tribal member of Red Lake Nation who majored in American Indian Studies at Augsburg University. Use the audio player above to listen to the show that aired on MPR stations. See portraits of the students, read their words and listen to an unedited version of the documentary here. Subscribe to the MPR News with Angela Davis podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or RSS.

The Water Zone
Water Issues in the Navajo Nation

The Water Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 54:57


Emma Robbins of the Navajo Water Project and Crystal Tulley-Cordova, Ph.D. of the Navajo Nation Department of Water Resources, describe their journey; earning technical degrees in hydrology, climatology, and environmental science to give back to the Navajo tribe. They help solve lingering water problems that still affect tribal life such as a lack of water, water contamination, and agriculture. They also share their desire for greater attention from the federal government to their day-to-day struggles in an effort to help maintain and receive clean water to survive. Podcast Recorded on August 4, 2022

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
Daily Steps To Heal The Most Common Autoimmune Disease

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 52:40 Very Popular


This episode is brought to you by Rupa Health and Athletic Greens. Every day, 80 million Americans are dealing with some form of autoimmune disease, including Hashimoto's. Hashimoto's is the leading cause of hypothyroidism (i.e., an underactive thyroid) in the US, and roughly 14 million people are struggling with this diagnosis. The conventional approach to treating it is based almost entirely on suppressing symptoms with drugs. However, with a Functional Medicine approach, there are so many other steps for treating the thyroid. I talk with Dr. George Papanicolaou, Dr. Elizabeth Boham, and Dhru Purohit about why thorough testing is necessary for identifying Hashimoto's and how lifestyle changes, such as removing gluten, could help to treat this condition. Dr. George Papanicolaou is a graduate of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and is board certified in Family Medicine from Abington Memorial Hospital. He is also an Institute for Functional Medicine practitioner. Upon graduation from his residency he joined the Indian Health Service. He worked on the Navajo reservation for four years at the Chinle Comprehensive Medical Facility, where he served as the Outpatient Department Coordinator. Dr. Papanicolaou joined The UltraWellness Center in 2017. Dr. Elizabeth Boham is a physician and nutritionist who practices Functional Medicine at The UltraWellness Center in Lenox, MA. Through her practice and lecturing she has helped thousands of people achieve their goals of optimum health and wellness. She witnesses the power of nutrition every day in her practice and is committed to training other physicians to utilize nutrition in healing. Dhru Purohit is a podcast host, serial entrepreneur, and investor in the health and wellness industry. His podcast, The Dhru Purohit Podcast, is a top 50 global health podcast with over 30 million unique downloads. His interviews focus on the inner workings of the brain and the body and feature the brightest minds in wellness, medicine, and mindset. This episode is brought to you by Rupa Health and Athletic Greens. Rupa Health is a place where Functional Medicine practitioners can access more than 2,000 specialty lab tests from over 20 labs like DUTCH, Vibrant America, Genova, and Great Plains. You can check out a free, live demo with a Q&A or create an account at RupaHealth.com. Right now when you purchase AG1 from Athletic Greens, you will receive 10 FREE travel packs with your first purchase by visiting athleticgreens.com/hyman. Full-length episodes of these interviews can be found here:Dr. George PapanicolaouDr. Elizabeth BohamDhru Purohit See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network
11:11 Talk Radio with Simran Singh

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 55:23


Belief, being and BEYOND: Granddaughter Crow A radical new cognitive framework for under- standing the mysteries of the complex Universe in which we live. Encompass the views and perspectives of seemingly disparate belief systems to create a foundational new paradigm for understanding cultural perspectives. What does Christianity have in common with the tarot? What does Paganism have in common with Navajo creation stories? What does Jesus have in common with the Hindu deity Manu? Granddaughter Crow will enlighten you to the fact that there is far more that unites our varied human systems of belief than we may have ever considered. Granddaughter Crow (Dr. Joy Gray) holds a doctorate in leadership. Internationally recognized as a medicine person, she comes from a long line of spiritual leaders as a member of the Navajo Nation. She is an award-winning author. Her three titles are The Journey of the Soul, Wisdom of the Natural World (Llewellyn 2021), and Belief, Being, and Beyond (Llewellyn, June 2022.) Founding CEO of The Eagle Heart Foundation, a non-profit organization. She dedicates her life to inspiring, encouraging, and empowering individuals to be their authenticity. Learn more about Simran here: www.iamsimran.com www.1111mag.com/

Living UBC
087: Navajo Trip update w/ Butch Peters

Living UBC

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 27:53


Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
Thursday, August 4, 2022 – Standing In Two Worlds: Native college students tell their stories

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 55:37


For these four students, attending college is more than just their own personal achievement. It's a way to honor their people and give a part of themselves to their communities. It's also a way to represent their cultures within a system that often struggles to adequately understand where they come from. Thursday on Native America Calling, Shawn Spruce talks with four students who share their struggles and triumphs working toward their educational dreams in the audio documentary from American Public Media, Standing In Two Worlds: Native American College Diaries: Nevaeh Nez (Hopi and Navajo), graduate student at the University of North Carolina; Reuben Kitto Stately (Red Lake Nation citizen and Santee Sioux), graduate from Augsburg University; Archie Yellow (Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa), Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College student; and Camille Leihulu Slagle (Native Hawaiian), a Stanford University student.

Never a straight answer
185# Return to Skinwalker | Magnetic anomalies

Never a straight answer

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 113:56


185# Return to Skinwalker | Magnetic anomalies This week we return to the Skinwalker Ranch, also known as Sherman Ranch, located southeast of Ballard, Utah, that has a reputation for paranormal and UFO-related activities.[1] Its name is taken from the skin-walker of Navajo legend concerning vengeful shamans. UFO reports in the Uintah Basin were publicized as early as the 1960s.[1] UFO and paranormal Claims about the ranch first appeared in 1996 in the Salt Lake City, Utah, Deseret News,[2] and later in the alternative weekly Las Vegas Mercury as a series of articles by investigative journalist George Knapp. These early stories detailed by family who occupied the property. We're going to look at what's new on the ranch as new information, paranormal events and UFO sightings ramp up on skin walker. HelloFreshUK are extending their flash sale, Details are as follows: Offer: 50% off 1st box & 20% off next 3 boxes Code: HFAFF60 https://hellofresh-uk.648q.net/Qmq5M MERCH STORE Our new merch is available on tee public! stickers, buttons, mugs and masks all with our sweet new design! #MERCH #Sales #NASAScience #PodernFamily #teepublic https://teepublic.com/en-gb/t-shirt/21303964-nasa-beam-me-up… GET YOURS TODAY! CONTACT US!! Get in touch! Have a question for us or a comment or suggestion you can email us Website Neverastraightanswer.co.uk Email Neverstraightanswer@gmail.com NEVERASTRAIGHTANSWER.CO.UK #NASA #theadamproject #timetravel #BTTF #Spacetime Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/0noBaIL4CkiSrjESHAY3lk https://linktr.ee/Neverastraightanswer --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/neverastraightanswer/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/neverastraightanswer/support

The Long Thread Podcast
Nikyle Begay, Rainbow Fiber Co-op

The Long Thread Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 48:32 Very Popular


Navajo-Churro sheep have a centuries-old history and an even greater meaning to the Diné, but the commercial market set a low price for their wool. A group of shepherds have come together to find strength—and value—in solidarity. "Take care of the sheep, and the sheep will take care of you." Nikyle Begay remembers their grandmother saying those words as they watched her flock. Nikyle grew up to raise Navajo-Churro sheep of their own, loving the lustrous fleece and beautiful sheep along with the connection to their ancestors. Despite the breed's cultural and spiritual value, Navajo shepherds received a very low price and even less respect for their wool. Shepherds were encouraged to breed with finewool sheep to make the fleece more commercially saleable. But doing that would breed out the strength, luster, and color variation that make Navajo-Churro sheep the perfect wool for weaving traditional weft-faced tapestries. Remembering their grandmother's advice, Nikyle and a fellow Navajo-Churro shepherd, Kelli Dunaj, developed a plan for a wool co-op that would support shepherds with shearing, buy their wool at a fair price, process it into yarn, and sell it—then devote the proceeds to repeating the process next year. The project's first year was 2021, when they took wool to the mill and saw their online shop sold out within days. In 2022, word of mouth brought even more shepherds to sell to the co-op, and the group has plans to grow again next year. This episode is brought to you by: Handweaving.net Handweaving.net (https://handweaving.net/) is the comprehensive weaving website with more than 75,000 historic and modern weaving drafts, documents, and powerful digital tools that put creativity in your hands. Now it's simple to design, color, update, and save your drafts. Our mission is to preserve the rich heritage of hand weaving and pass it down to you. Visit Handweaving.net and sign up for a subscription today! Treenway Silks You'll find the largest variety of silk spinning fibers, silk yarn and silk threads & ribbons at TreenwaySilks.com (https://www.treenwaysilks.com/). Choose from a rainbow of hand-dyed colors. Love natural? Their array of wild silk and silk-blends provide choices beyond white. Treenway Silks—where superior quality and customer service are guaranteed.

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
Friday, July 29, 2022 – The Menu

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 56:27


A Yurok-owned craft brewery in California. A Navajo restaurateur's new coffee venture. And a blanket that honors traditional food of the Great Lakes. Today on Native America Calling, Andi Murphy hosts our regular Indigenous food show The Menu with Linda Cooley (Yurok), CEO of the Mad River Brewing Company, Sarah Agaton Howes (Anishinaabe Ojibwe), CEO and artist of Heart Berry, and Bleu Adams (Mandan, Hidatsa and Diné), chef, entrepreneur, and director of Indigehub.

Left Hand Right Brain Podcast
LHRB 273: A Force for Good w/ Josh Emerson

Left Hand Right Brain Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 68:06


This week JD chats with guest Josh Emerson. Josh is a standup comedian and founding member of Deadroom Comedy. Topics discussed include, but are not limited to: urban camping, growing up on a Navajo reservation, and Juniper Trees. Please remember to like, subscribe, rate, review, and tell a friend! Follow LHRB on Facebook, Instagram @lefthandrightbrain, Twitter @LHRBpodcast, or just hit us up old school on the website lefthandrightboainpod.com

Beyond The Horizon
The FBI Releases A List Of 170 Missing Native American Women From New Mexico (7/27/22)

Beyond The Horizon

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 16:22


The FBI announced that they have compiled a list of names of missing Native Americans in New Mexico and the Navajo nation and that list contains 170 names. The FBI has also said that they are going to continually update it as new information becomes available. In what seems to be a long time coming, hopefully the people who have lost loved ones will be provided answers. (commercial at 10:18)to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/fbi-releases-list-of-170-missing-native-americans/ar-AAZZL94?ocid=anaheim-ntp-feeds&cvid=bb702e0f2edb442fb70be1c4a3ae5ebd

The Epstein Chronicles
The FBI Releases A List Of 170 Missing Native American Women From New Mexico (7/27/22)

The Epstein Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 16:22


The FBI announced that they have compiled a list of names of missing Native Americans in New Mexico and the Navajo nation and that list contains 170 names. The FBI has also said that they are going to continually update it as new information becomes available. In what seems to be a long time coming, hopefully the people who have lost loved ones will be provided answers. (commercial at 10:18)to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/fbi-releases-list-of-170-missing-native-americans/ar-AAZZL94?ocid=anaheim-ntp-feeds&cvid=bb702e0f2edb442fb70be1c4a3ae5ebd

Klagetoh Veterans Podcast
Klagetoh Veterans Podcast S4 E2 (6 of 7) Impact Radio Interview

Klagetoh Veterans Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 14:09


Impact Radio Interview Special- This segment is about the last segment of the interview where the Commander and Secretary translate what they want to talk about in Navajo. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

1A
Best Of: Native Americans Are The Highlight Of This Summer's TV Slate

1A

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 31:11


It took 30 years for "Dark Winds" to be adapted for television. The Tony Hillerman series revolves around the Navajo Nation and two tribal policemen trying to solve the murder of a Navajo woman.The show has already made history for its predominant Native cast and crew, already cinching up a second season. All episodes of the first season are available for streaming on AMC+.But this series isn't alone this summer in presenting Native Americans in a more authentic way. "Rutherford Falls" and "Reservation Dogs" are both returning for second seasons.Last year, UCLA's Hollywood Diversity Report found that indigenous people made up less than one percent of acting roles. They were virtually nonexistent in creative roles behind the camera.We talk about the evolution of the representation of Native people in movies and TV. We also discuss what the future of Native stories on screen looks like.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.

HLTH Matters
S2 Ep13: The Future of Retail & Virtual Health—featuring Dr. Patrick Carroll

HLTH Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 22:29


Millennials are acquiring chronic diseases at a younger age than any prior generation. But the way they access healthcare is fundamentally different from other demographics. Millennials prefer virtual visits with providers and prescription delivery to visiting a clinic or pharmacy—and that's why the consumer retail health company hims & hers is on an upward trajectory.Dr. Patrick Carroll is the Chief Medical Officer at hims & hers, a telehealth platform that offers a modern approach to health and wellness, providing customers with easy-to-access virtual primary care. In his role as CMO, Dr. Carroll oversees clinical programs, quality assurance and healthcare collaborations. Prior to joining hims & hers in 2019, Dr. Carroll served as CMO at Walgreens, and he is Board Certified in both family practice and adolescent medicine.On this episode of HLTH Matters, Dr.  Carroll joins hosts Dr. Gautam Gulati and Dr. Jordan Shlain to discuss his transition from primary care physician to consumer-facing health and explain what inspired him to join the team at hims & hers. Dr. Carroll describes how millennials access care in a fundamentally different way from their parents, offering insight into how hims & hers' customers benefit from the company's subscription model and commitment to virtual primary care. Listen in to understand the regulatory and medical licensing challenges they face at hims & hers and get Dr. Carroll's take on the future of consumer retail and virtual health.Topics CoveredHow Dr. Carroll's work on a Navajo reservation informed the rest of his careerDr. Carroll's transition from traditional primary care to retail and consumer-facing healthWhat inspired Dr. Carroll to take on the role of CMO at hims & hersHow customers benefit from the hims & hers' subscription business modelThe trend toward virtual primary care and why hims & hers has no plans for brick-and-mortar locationsWhy Dr. Carroll sees millennials as an underserved demographicWhat constraints hims & hers faces in terms of regulatory and medical licensing challengesHow the hims & hers team works with states to advocate for asynchronous communicationHow Dr. Carroll defines healthcare as any entity, technology or individual that helps a customer optimize their wellbeingHow millennials access healthcare in a fundamentally different way from their parents (and how that contributes to the success of hims & hers) Connect with Dr. Patrick CarrollhimshersDr. Carroll on LinkedIn Connect with Dr. Gautam Gulati & Dr. Jordan ShlainHLTHDr. Gulati on TwitterDr. Gulati on LinkedInDr. Shlain on TwitterDr. Shlain on LinkedIn ResourcesIndian Health ServiceVillageMDForward HealthAmerican Telemedicine AssociationRo Introductory Quote[6:05] “Really what fascinated me about what hims & hers was doing—they reach a millennial and younger demographic that none of the health systems, the medical groups or even Walgreens ever reached, so I saw the opportunity as working in a space that was actually the front door to healthcare for millennials and younger.”

Restored Gospel Podcast
187 Stories of the Saints E28 - Garland Schnack

Restored Gospel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 53:41


Garland shares his testimony of Jesus, including the amazing meeting of his bride, his service in Vietnam, and to the Navajo people in Arizona.   Enjoy!A message from Garland“I send e-mails that may be of interest to over 1,200 Restoration families in the Independence MO area and another 300+ Restoration families world wide.If you would like to be added to my list, send a request to: gdschnack@hotmail.com

11:11 Talk Radio
Belief, being and BEYOND: Granddaughter Crow

11:11 Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 54:39


A radical new cognitive framework for under- standing the mysteries of the complex Universe in which we live. Encompass the views and perspectives of seemingly disparate belief systems to create a foundational new paradigm for understanding cultural perspectives. What does Christianity have in common with the tarot? What does Paganism have in common with Navajo creation stories? What does Jesus have in common with the Hindu deity Manu? Granddaughter Crow will enlighten you to the fact that there is far more that unites our varied human systems of belief than we may have ever considered.

Indigenous Earth Community Podcast
A fun and upbeat talk about good environmental news with Taylor Cheíí Begay.

Indigenous Earth Community Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 25:30


Do feel drained by the endless negative news ?  Do you want a break from dromscrolling news of ecological disasters, pollution of our waterways, and killer record high temperatures? Then I have a great show for you.  On this episode I will be talking to Taylor Cheíí Begay, who is going to bring a lot of joy wisdom, and energy into our podcast!  Taylor will introduce himself on his Navajo language, and shares about his super popular talk show “the Taylor Cheii” where he uplifts and promotes Native American voices.   We find out the origin of his nickname “Cheii” and if hot dog is a sandwich, but more importantly , we will talk about rights of nature.  Right of nature laws are passing all over the world,  recognizing  how Indigenous cultures that always have shared on how nature is not meant to be like a fridge that we just take things from—but that we humans must live in harmony with nature, giving as much as we are taking.  You going to love this episode! Connect with Taylor Cheíí Begay, and catch every episode of “The Cheíí Show” on the link below: www.facebook.com/taylor.begay.102  

Walking the Shadowlands
Skinwalkers – A Personal Experience

Walking the Shadowlands

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 136:03


Skinwalkers, are they real? How did they come into existence? Join my guests Meo and Isaiah as they discuss their fairly recent experience with a Skinwalker at their Aunt's home, on the Navajo reservation. What happened to Isaiah as Meo listened and watched helplessly on the phone as events unfolded? Don't listen to this one in the dark. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/walking-the-shadowlands/message

Don't Touch My Sasquatch
Ep 08: Don't Touch My... Skinwalkers Navajo Legend

Don't Touch My Sasquatch

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 70:03


This week, we delve into the world of the Navajo Skinwalker and discuss Skinwalkers, popular baby names, Skinwalker ranch, the Navajo witch purge and Anakin's turn to the dark side. Listen this week to find out how to become or to destroy a Skinwalker on Don't Touch My Sasquatch. www.patreon.com/DontTouchMySasquatch www.Instagram.com/donttouchmysasquatchpod www.Donttouchmypodcast.com www.Donttouchmypodcast.com/affiliates https://the-line-up.com/14-facts-about-skinwalkers-that-will-freak-you-out https://allthatsinteresting.com/skinwalker https://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:kyGIQA6UqqUJ:https://www.deseret.com/1996/6/30/19251541/frequent-fliers+&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us https://www.legendsofamerica.com/navajo-skinwalkers/ https://www.britannica.com/topic/Navajo-people https://americanindian.si.edu/nk360/navajo/long-walk/long-walk.cshtml https://www.youtube.com/shorts/pKtQ5FF9Ti0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4yD0WZ1GwCY Stock Media provided by TheDoctorCaptain / Pond5

The Poetry Magazine Podcast
Esther Belin in Conversation with Manny Loley

The Poetry Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 35:11


This week, Esther Belin speaks with Manny Loley, a Diné poet and storyteller who writes in both the Navajo and English languages. Belin and Loley talk about stories as medicine, the unique poetics of the Navajo language and the meanings and musicality that don't translate into English, and the importance and industriousness of queer people in Diné creation stories and in the Navajo Nation today. Loley also shares why his most important readers and listeners are his grandma, his mom, and the land. Loley is ‘Áshįįhi born for Tó Baazhní'ázhí; his maternal grandparents are the Tódích'íi'nii, and his paternal grandparents are the Kinyaa'áanii. He is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in English and Literary Arts at the University of Denver, and he serves as the director of the Emerging Diné Writers' Institute. You can read two of Loley's poems in Navajo and English in the July/August 2022 issue of Poetry, in print and online.

Blurry Creatures
EP: 115 Skinwalkers & Shapeshifters with Navaho Ranger Jon Dover

Blurry Creatures

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 118:36 Very Popular


The most desolate and wild places often become ground zero for encounters with the unexplained. In this episode we uncover the secrets of a creature so taboo that many Native Americans do not even speak its name in fear it will draw one to them. The Skinwalker. Jon Redbird Dover joins Blurry Creatures for the first time to unpack a 30-year career as a Navajo Ranger. Over his tenure, Jon and his partner Stan Milford Jr. officially investigated UFO sightings and encounters, hauntings, Bigfoot encounters and incidents and homicides involving the infamous Navajo shapeshifter—the Skinwalker. Jon's job as a Ranger was to respond to emergency calls on the expansive Navajo reservation and investigate the unexplained. He has tracked Bigfoot, investigated attempted UFO abductions and tracked down and identified Skinwalkers. Guest: Navaho Rangers Intro song: Juno Dreams "Paradise" contact: blurrycreaturespodcast@gmail.com blurrycreatures.com Socials instagram.com/blurrycreatures facebook.com/blurrycreatures twitter.com/blurrycreatures Music Kyle Monroe: tinytaperoom.com Aaron Green: https://www.instagram.com/aaronkgreen/ Mastering: ironwingstudios.com Outro Song: TimeCop1983: timecop1983.com

Art Dealer Diaries Podcast
Fred W. King: Native Arts Dealer - Epi. 202, Host Dr. Mark Sublette

Art Dealer Diaries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 76:19


Fred King is an interesting guy. I've known him since 1990 but he started dealing in Native American material back in 1967.  He's one of the earliest individuals to have had a Native American art gallery in San Francisco. It's interesting to hear about the early days and what it was like to be in the bay area back then participating in both the music and art scenes.When it comes to music and movies specifically, Fred is quite erudite - plus, he loves early British motorcycles. It shows you the type of people that go into our business. People that have a wide array of interests.Even though Fred could have done a lot of things in his life professionally, whether it was the music industry or showbiz in general, he chose to stick with Native American art. He knows a lot about the art and the industry, especially Navajo textiles. So very interesting interview with one of the earliest players in our business, Fred King.

Disrupted
After a landmark court ruling, major sportsbooks are hitting the jackpot

Disrupted

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 49:00


For decades, the American sports betting industry was only accessible via seedy back rooms and offshore banking accounts. But after a 2018 supreme court ruling, betting on your favorite team is as easy as pressing a button on your phone. This hour, an exploration of the bustling legal world of sports betting. We'll speak to a gambling researcher on the impact of sport betting on problem gaming. And later, Indian casinos are major players in the gambling market. How are tribes responding to the introduction of sports betting? GUESTS: Doug Kezirian: Sports Betting Analyst for ESPN, and host of the sports betting show “Daily Wager” Lia Nower: Professor and Director of the Center for Gambling Studies at Rutgers University. She's also a co-director of the University's Addiction Counselor Training Program Derrick Beetso: Director of Indian Gaming and Tribal Self-Governance Programs at Arizona State University's Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law. He is also a member of the Navajo nation. This program was also produced by James Szkobel-Wolff, J. Carlisle Larsen, and Catie Talarski. Our interns  are Anya Grondalski and Mira Raju. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Toasted Sister Podcast
E78: “Food Sovereignty is Economic Sovereignty”

Toasted Sister Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 38:41


In this episode, I take you to the National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development's Reservation Economic Summit in Las Vegas, Nevada. It's the largest annual conference focusing on Native economics. This year's event included, for the first time, a panel series called “Food Sovereignty is Economic Sovereignty.” I went to every one of them and heard from economists, entrepreneurs and some of the heavy hitters in Native food. In this show, you'll hear from Alisha Murphy, Navajo economist, Lance Morgan, lawyer and economist who is the president and CEO of Ho-Chunk Inc., Aaron LaPointe, agribusiness manager for Ho-Chunk Farms, Heather Dawn Thompson, director of the office of tribal relations for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and Tomie Peterson, regenerative economies specialist with the Intertribal Agriculture Council. Mentioned in the show: 2022 4th annual New Mexico Prickly Pear Festival: https://navajoeconomy.org/

The Takeaway
Deep Dive: Water (Rebroadcast)

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 45:56


In this week's Deep Dive with Dorian Warren, Melissa and Dorian take an in-depth look at water insecurity, access and cleanliness. They start off with Sera Young, associate professor anthropology and global health at northwestern University. Then Josina Morita, Commissioner of the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District in Cook County about how the infrastructure bill will aid in improving water systems.  Jonathan Nez, president of the Navajo Nation and Bidtah Becker, Associate attorney with the Navajo tribal utility authority join for a discussion of water issues in Indian Country, with a specific focus on Navajo Nation. Reverend Roslyn Bouier, executive director of the Brightmoor Connection Client Choice Food Pantry explains how water shut offs affect the citizens of Brightmoor in Detroit, Michigan.  And finally Tom Mueller, research assistant professor of geography and environmental sustainability at the University of Oklahoma will discuss how water insecurity and plumbing poverty affects rural area.  Some music from this episode by: I Think Like Midnight (http://www.ithinklikemidnight.com/) & The Sometime Boys (https://www.thesometimeboys.com/)

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
Friday, July 8, 2022 — Summer at the Native Museum

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 56:08


Museums are offering unique Native exhibitions this summer as people are feeling more comfortable traveling and attending public events. In New Mexico, the Museum of Indian Arts & Culture is reimagining its permanent exhibit, “Here Now and Always.” And the Albuquerque Museum opened its “Traitor, Survivor, Icon: The Legacy of La Malinche” exhibit, which examines the life and influence of an Indigenous woman caught in the conflict between Spanish and Indigenous people of Mexico. The National Museum of the American Indian is featuring Black-Indigenous artists in the new exhibit “Ancestors Know Who We Are.” Shawn Spruce previews some of the brand-new Native museum exhibits with Anya Montiel (Mexican and Tohono O'odham), curator at the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian; Terezita Romo, independent curator and an affiliate faculty at University of California-Davis; Manuelito Wheeler Jr. (Navajo), director of the Navajo Nation Museum; Aaron Roth, historic site staff manager for Bosque Redondo Memorial at Fort Sumner Historic Site; and Tony Chavarria (Santa Clara Pueblo), curator at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture.

Dreaming in Color
Raymond Foxworth, Ph.D.: Innovation & Indigenous Resistance

Dreaming in Color

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 33:56


Show description Welcome to Dreaming in Color, a show that provides a platform for BIPOC social change leaders to candidly share how their lived experiences (personal and professional) have prepared them to lead their work and drive the impact we all seek.  In this episode, Raymond Foxworth joins the show to talk about his experience growing up in a matrilineal society, land preservation as part of his family heritage and the struggles of dealing with white dominant institutions. We address the current state of indigenous land rights and the pressure of representation to honor the legacy and sacrifice of past generations. Raymond shares his view on innovation and we question the general understanding of community development. Listen and connect with Ray's philosophy of believing and sharing! Jump straight into: (01:23) - Raymond reads Apologies, a poem by Haunani Kay Trask (and shares the breathtaking story behind it). (03:10) - Being a Navajo citizen in 2022: Matrilineal society roots, ethics, values, decisive moments to acquire critical analysis. (09:18) - Addressing colonialism struggles, sovereignty, liberation and Indigenous land rights. (12:50) - Acknowledging representation, role models and implications when navigating white dominant institutions. (20:03) - Innovation as a product of survival, problems within society's general understanding of community development and redefining what we conceive as assets. (27:32) - Believing and caring: The experiences that bring hope to Ray, a protective optimist. Episode resources Connect with Raymond Foxworth through https://www.linkedin.com/in/raymond-foxworth/ (LinkedIn) Learn more about https://www.rayfoxworth.com/ (Ray Foxword, Ph.D.) Learn more about https://www.linkedin.com/company/first-nations-development-institute/ (First Nations Development Institute)  Thank you for listening to Dreaming in Color a https://www.bridgespan.org/ (Bridgespan) supported https://www.studiopodsf.com/ (StudioPod) production. Nicole Genova is the Show Coordinator and Teresa Buchanan is the Show Producer. The production team from The Bridgespan Group includes Cora Daniels, Michael Borger, Christina Pistorius, and Britt Savage. Additional music and editing provided by https://nodalab.com/ (nodalab).

The Good News Podcast
Navajo Words on Mars, Repeat

The Good News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 4:06


From the archive, an interesting and good news-y story about the ways things the Perseverance rover is naming what it finds on Mars. More than year later, Perseverance has had some bumps and bruises, but is still going strong!

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 161 Part 2: Modern Marvels: Why Collectors Are Connecting with Modernist Jewelry

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 26:42


What you'll learn in this episode: Why the best modernist pieces are fetching record prices at auction today How “Messengers of Modernism” helped legitimize modernist jewelry as an art form The difference between modern jewelry and modernist jewelry Who the most influential modernist jewelers were and where they drew their inspiration from Why modernist jewelry was a source of empowerment for women About Toni Greenbaum Toni Greenbaum is a New York-based art historian specializing in twentieth and twenty-first century jewelry and metalwork. She wrote Messengers of Modernism: American Studio Jewelry 1940-1960 (Montréal: Musée des Arts Décoratifs and Flammarion, 1996), Sam Kramer: Jeweler on the Edge (Stuttgart: Arnoldsche Art Publishers, 2019) and “Jewelers in Wonderland,” an essay on Sam Kramer and Karl Fritsch for Jewelry Stories: Highlights from the Collection 1947-2019 (New York: Museum of Arts and Design and Arnoldsche, 2021), along with numerous book chapters, exhibition catalogues, and essays for arts publications. Greenbaum has lectured internationally at institutions such as the Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich; Academy of Arts, Architecture and Design in Prague; Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven; Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum and Museum of Arts and Design, New York; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and Savannah College of Art and Design Museum of Art, Savannah. She has worked on exhibitions for several museums, including the Victoria and Albert in London, Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal, and Bard Graduate Center Gallery, New York. Additional Resources: Link to Purchase Books Toni's Instagram The Jewelry Library  Photos Available on TheJewelryJourney.com Transcript: Once misunderstood as an illegitimate art form, modernist jewelry has come into its own, now fetching five and six-figure prices at auction. Modernist jewelry likely wouldn't have come this far without the work of Toni Greenbaum, an art historian, professor and author of “Messengers of Modernism: American Studio Jewelry, 1940 to 1960.” She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about the history of modernist jewelry; why it sets the women who wear it apart; and where collectors should start if they want to add modernist pieces to their collections. Read the episode transcript here.   Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. This is a two-part Jewelry Journey Podcast. Please make sure you subscribe so you can hear part two as soon as it comes out later this week.    Today my guest is art historian, professor and author Toni Greenbaum. She is the author of the iconic tome, “Messengers of Modernism: American Studio Jewelry, 1940 to 1960,” which analyzes the output of America's modernist jewelers. Most recently, she authored “Sam Kramer: Jeweler on the Edge,” a biography of the jeweler Sam Kramer. Every time I say jeweler I think I'm using the world a little loosely, but we're so glad to have you here today. Thank you so much.   Toni: I am so glad to be here, Sharon. Thank you so much for inviting me. It's been many years coming.   Sharon: I'm glad we connected. Tell me about your jewelry journey. It sounds very interesting.   Toni: Well, there's a lot you don't know about my jewelry journey. My jewelry journey began when I was a preteen. I just became fascinated with Native American, particularly Navajo, jewelry that I would see in museum gift shops. I started to buy it when I was a teenager, what I could afford. In those days, I have to say museum gift shops were fabulous, particularly the Museum of Natural History gift shop, the Brooklyn Museum gift shop. They had a lot of ethnographic material of very high quality. So, I continued to buy Native American jewelry. My mother used to love handcrafted jewelry, and she would buy it in whatever craft shops or galleries she could find.    Then eventually in my 20s and 30s, I got outpriced. Native American jewelry was becoming very, very fashionable, particularly in the late 60s, 1970s. I started to see something that looked, to me, very much like Native American jewelry, but it was signed. It had names on it, and some of them sounded kind of Mexican—in fact, they were Mexican. So, I started to buy Mexican jewelry because I could afford it. Then that became very popular when names like William Spratling and Los Castillo and Hector Aguilar became known. I saw something that looked like Mexican jewelry and Navajo jewelry, but it wasn't; it was made by Americans. In fact, it would come to be known as modernist jewelry. Then I got outpriced with that, but that's the start of my jewelry journey.   Sharon: So, you liked jewelry from when you were a youth.    Toni: Oh, from when I was a child. I was one of these little three, four-year-olds that was all decked out. My mother loved jewelry. I was an only child, and I was, at that time, the only grandchild. My grandparents spoiled me, and my parents spoiled me, and I loved jewelry, so I got a lot of jewelry. That and Frankie Avalon records.   Sharon: Do you still collect modernist? You said you were getting outpriced. You write about it. Do you still collect it?   Toni: Not really. The best of the modernist jewelry is extraordinarily expensive, and unfortunately, I want the best. If I see something when my husband and I are antiquing or at a flea market or at a show that has style and that's affordable, occasionally I'll buy it, but I would not say that I can buy the kind of jewelry I want in the modernist category any longer. I did buy several pieces in the early 1980s from Fifty/50 Gallery, when they were first putting modernist jewelry on the map in the commercial aspect. I was writing about it; they were selling it. They were always and still are. Mark McDonald still is so generous with me as far as getting images and aiding my research immeasurably. Back then, the modernist jewelry was affordable, and luckily I did buy some major pieces for a tenth of what they would get today.   Sharon: Wow! When you say the best of modernist jewelry today, Calder was just astronomical. We'll put that aside.   Toni: Even more astronomical: there's a Harry Bertoia necklace that somebody called my attention to that is coming up at an auction at Christie's. If they don't put that in their jewelry auctions, they'll put it in their design auctions. I think it's coming up at the end of June; I forget the exact day. The estimate on the Harry Bertoia necklace is $200,000 to $300,000—and this is a Harry Bertoia necklace. I'm just chomping at the bit to find out what it, in fact, is going to bring, but that's the estimate they put, at $200,000 to $300,000.   Sharon: That's a lot of money. What holds your interest in modernist jewelry?   Toni: The incredible but very subtle design aspect of it. Actually, tomorrow I'm going to be giving a talk on Art Smith for GemEx. Because my background is art history, one of the things I always do when I talk about these objects is to show how they were inspired by the modern art movements. This is, I think, what sets modernist jewelry apart from other categories of modern and contemporary jewelry. There are many inspirations, but it is that they are very much inspired by Cubism, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Biomorphism, etc., depending on the artist. Some are influenced by all of the above, and I think I saw that. I saw it implicitly before I began to analyze it in the jewelry.    This jewelry is extraordinarily well-conceived. A lot of the craftsmanship is not pristine, but I have never been one for pristine craftsmanship. I love rough surfaces, and I love the process to show in the jewelry. Much of the modernist jewelry is irreverent—I use the word irreverent instead of sloppy—as far as the process is concerned. It was that hands-on, very direct approach, in addition to this wonderful design sense, which, again, came from the modern art movements. Most of the jewelers—not all of them, but most of them—lived either in New York or in Northern or Southern California and had access to museums, and these people were aesthetes. They would go to museums. They would see Miro's work; they would see Picasso's work, and they would definitely infuse their designs with that sensibility.   Sharon: Do you think that jumped out at you, the fact that they were inspired by different art movements, because you studied art history? You teach it, or you did teach it at one time?    Toni: No, just history of jewelry. I majored in art history, but I've never taught art history. I've taught history of jewelry. We can argue about whether jewelry is art or not, but history of jewelry is what I've taught.   Sharon: I've taken basic art history, but I couldn't tell you some of the movements you're talking about. I can't identify the different movements. Do you think it jumped out at you because you're knowledgeable?   Toni: Yes, definitely, because I would look at Art Smith and I would say, “That's Biomorphism.” I would see it. It was obvious. I would look at Sam Kramer and I would say, “This is Surrealism.” He was called a surrealist jeweler back in his day, when he was practicing and when he had his shop on 8th Street. I would look at Rebajes and I would see Cubism. Of course, it was because I was well-versed in those movements, because what I was always most interested in when I was studying art history were the more modern movements.   Sharon: Did you think you would segue to jewelry in general? Was that something on your radar?   Toni: That's a very interesting question because when I was in college, I had a nucleus of professors who happened to have come from Cranbrook.   Sharon: I'm sorry, from where?   Toni: Cranbrook School of Art.   Sharon: O.K., Cranbrook.   Toni: I actually took a metalsmithing class as an elective, just to see what it was because I was so interested in jewelry, although I was studying what I call legitimate art history. I was so interested in jewelry that I wanted to see what the process was. I probably was the worst jeweler that ever tried to make jewelry, but I learned what it is to make. I will tell you something else, Sharon, it is what has given me such respect for the jewelers, because when you try to do it yourself and you see how challenging it is, you really respect the people who do it miraculously even more.    So, I took this class just to see what it was, and the teacher—I still remember his name. His name was Cunningham; I don't remember his first name. He was from Cranbrook, and he sent the class to a retail store in New York on 53rd Street, right opposite MOMA, called America House.   Sharon: Called American House?   Toni: America House. America House was the retail enterprise of the American Craft Council. They had the museum, which was then called the Museum of Contemporary Crafts; now it's called MAD, Museum of Arts and Design. They had the museum, and they had a magazine, Craft Horizons, which then became American Craft, and then they had this retail store. I went into America House—and this was the late 1960s—and I knew I had found my calling. I looked at this jewelry, which was really fine studio jewelry. It was done by Ronald Pearson; it was done by Jack Kripp. These were the people that America House carried. I couldn't afford to buy it. I did buy some of the jewelry when they went out of business and had a big sale in the early 1970s. At that time I couldn't, but I looked at the jewelry and the holloware, and I had never seen anything like it. Yes, I had seen Native American that I loved, and I had seen Mexican that I loved. I hadn't yet seen modernist; that wasn't going to come until the early 1980s. But here I saw this second generation of studio jewelers, and I said, “I don't know what I'm going to do with this professionally, but I know I've got to do something with it because this is who I am. This is what I love.”    Back in the late 1960s, it was called applied arts. Anything that was not painting and sculpture was applied art. Ceramics was applied art; furniture was applied art; textiles, jewelry, any kind of metalwork was applied art. Nobody took it seriously as an academic discipline in America, here in this country. Then I went on to graduate school, still in art history. I was specializing in what was then contemporary art, particularly color field painting, but I just loved what was called the crafts, particularly the metalwork. I started to go to the library and research books on jewelry. I found books on jewelry, but they were all published in Europe, mostly England. There were things in other languages other than French, which I could read with a dictionary. There were books on jewelry history, but they were not written in America; everything was in Europe. So, I started to read voraciously about the history of jewelry, mostly the books that came out of the Victoria & Albert Museum. I read all about ancient jewelry and medieval jewelry and Renaissance jewelry. Graham Hughes, who was then the director of the V&A, had written a book, “Modern Jewelry,” and it had jewelry by artists, designed by Picasso and Max Ernst and Brach, including things that were handmade in England and all over Europe. I think even some of the early jewelers in our discipline were in that book. If I remember correctly, I think Friedrich Becker, for example, might have been in Graham Hughes' “Modern Jewelry,” because that was published, I believe, in the late 1960s.    So, I saw there was a literature in studio jewelry; it just wasn't in America. Then I found a book on William Spratling, this Mexican jeweler whose work I had collected. It was not a book about his jewelry; it was an autobiography about himself that obviously he had written, but it was so rich in talking about the metalsmithing community in Taxco, Mexico, which is where he, as an American, went to study the colonial architecture. He wound up staying and renovating the silver mines that had been dormant since the 18th century. It was such a great story, and I said, “There's something here,” but no graduate advisor at that time, in the early 70s, was going to support you in wanting to do a thesis on applied art, no matter what the medium. But in the back of my mind, I always said, “I'm going to do something with this at some point.”    Honestly, Sharon, I never thought I would live to see the day that this discipline is as rich as it is, with so much literature, with our publishers publishing all of these fantastic jewelry books, and other publishers, like Flammarion in Paris, which published “Messengers of Modernism.” Then there's the interest in Montreal at the Museum of Fine Arts, which is the museum that has the “Messengers of Modernism” collection. It has filtered into the Houston Museum of Fine Arts, Dallas, obviously MAD. So many museums are welcoming. I never thought I would live to see the day. It really is so heartening. I don't have words to express how important this is, but I just started to do it. In the early 1970s or mid-1970s—I don't think my daughter was born yet. My son was a toddler. I would sit in my free moments and write an article about William Spratling, because he was American. He went to Mexico, but he was American. He was the only American I knew of that I could write about. Not that that article was published at that time, but I was doing the research and I was writing it.   Sharon: That's interesting. If there had been a discipline of jewelry history or something in the applied arts, if an advisor had said, “Yes, I'll support you,” or “Why don't you go ahead and get your doctorate or your master's,” that's something you would have done?   Toni: Totally, without even a thought, yes. Because when I was studying art history, I would look at Hans Holbein's paintings of Henry VIII and Sir Thomas More, and all I would do was look at the jewelry they were wearing, the chains and the badges on their berets. I said, “Oh my god, that is so spectacular.” Then I learned that Holbein actually designed the jewelry, which a lot of people don't know. I said, “There is something to this.” I would look at 18th century paintings with women, with their pearls and rings and bracelets, and all I would do was look at the jewelry. I would have in a heartbeat. If I could have had a graduate advisor, I would have definitely pursued that.   Sharon: When you say you never thought you'd live to see the day when modernist jewelry is so popular—not that it's so surprising, but you are one of the leaders of the movement. When I mentioned to somebody, “Oh, I like modernist jewelry,” the first thing they said was, “Well, have you read ‘Messengers of Modernism?'” As soon as I came home—I was on a trip—I got it. So, you are one of the leaders.   Toni: Well, it is interesting. It is sort of the standard text, but people will say, “Well, why isn't Claire Falkenstein in the book? She's so important,” and I say, “It's looked upon as a standard text, but the fact is it's a catalogue to an exhibition. That was the collection.” Fifty/50 Gallery had a private collection. As I said before, they were at the forefront of promoting and selling modernist jewelry, but they did have a private collection. That collection went to Montreal in the 1990s because at that time, there wasn't an American museum that was interested in taking that collection. That book is the catalogue of that finite collection. So, there are people who are major modernist jewelers—Claire Falkenstein is one that comes to mind—that are not in that collection, so they're not in the book. There's a lot more to be said and written about that movement.   Sharon: I'm sure you've been asked this a million times: What's the difference between modern and modernist jewelry?   Toni: Modern is something that's up to date at a point in time, but modernist jewelry is—this is a word we adopted. The word existed, but we adopted it to define the mid-20th century studio jewelry, the post-war jewelry. It really goes from 1940 to the 1960s. That's it; that's the time limit of modernist jewelry. Again, it's a word we appropriated. We took that word and said, “We're going to call this category modernist jewelry because we have to call it something, so that's the term.” Modern means up to date. That's just a general word.   Sharon: When you go to a show and see things that are in the modernist style, it's not truly modernist if it was done today, it wasn't done before 1960.   Toni: Right, no. Modernist jewelry is work that's done in that particular timeframe and that also subscribes to what I was saying, this appropriation of motifs from the modern art movement. There was plenty of costume jewelry and fine jewelry being done post-war, and that is jewelry that is mid-20th century. You can call it mid-20th century modern, which confuses the issue even more, but it's not modernist jewelry. Modernist jewelry is jewelry that was done in the studio by a silversmith and was inspired by the great movements in modern art and some other inspirations. Art Smith was extremely motivated by African motifs, but also by Calder and by Biomorphism. It's not religious. There are certainly gray areas, but in general, that's modernist jewelry.    Sharon: I feel envious when you talk about everything that was going in on New York. I have a passion, but there's no place on the West Coast that I would go to look at some of this stuff.   Toni: I'll tell you one of the ironies, Sharon. Post-war, definitely through the 1950s and early 1960s, there must have been 13 to 15 studio shops by modernist jewelers. You had Sam Kramer on 8th Street and Art Smith on 4th Street and Polo Bell, who was on 4th Street and then he was on 8th Street, and Bill Tendler, and you had Jules Brenner, and Henry Steig was Uptown. Ed Wiener was all over the place. There were so many jewelers in New York, and I never knew about them. I never went to any of their shops. I used to hang out in the Village when I was a young teenager, walked on 4th Street; never saw Art Smith's shop. He was there from 1949 until 1977. I used to walk on 8th Street, and Sam Kramer was on the second floor. I never looked up, and I didn't know this kind of jewelry existed. In those days, like I said, I was still collecting Navajo.

We Are Superman
#214 - WE ARE RYAN HAEBE GETTING BACK UP AND GETTING AFTER NEW CHALLENGES

We Are Superman

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 129:26


Imagine you are a young, rising star college runner who wins the extremely competitive Division 2 national cross country championship as a redshirt sophomore, helping lead the team to the national title as well. That year you also win the Division 2 national 3000-meter steeplechase title on the track. You then get to run in the Olympic Trials steeplechase. But next an unfortunate accident puts you in a coma, hospitalizes you for months, and erases all of that. That is what happened in 2012 to Ryan Haebe while he was building his running career at Western State University in Gunnison, Colorado. Ryan had to re-learn how to talk, walk, feed himself, etc. But he used that determination also to build a teaching career in one of the most difficult places possible, on the Navajo reservation in southwest Colorado. Not only is it challenging for him to teach as an outsider to the local culture, but the lack of resources possessed by both the schools and the residents there is staggering. Add on the pandemic. Parents, teachers, and students alike in this country complained about the uphill climb to teach and learn remotely. Imagine what it was like for Ryan and his colleagues to surmount the same challenges where most of the families didn't have computers, Internet service, or in some cases, even basic necessities like running water. Ryan has also returned to the running scene, but now as an ultramarathoner, overcoming some additional challenges to achieve success there. All the while, as you will hear, maintaining an unbridled enthusiasm for exploring the natural beauty and history of the Southwest and native culture. I hope you will enjoy Ryan's great comeback story and his appreciation for the Navajo people.Ryan HaebeInstagram @rhaebe04_Bill Stahlsilly_billy@msn.comFacebook Bill StahlInstagram @stahlor

The Poetry Magazine Podcast
Esther Belin in Conversation with Patricia Jabbeh Wesley

The Poetry Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 33:36


This week, guest editor Esther Belin speaks with poet and scholar Patricia Jabbeh Wesley. Although Belin's and Wesley's homelands are far from each other—Wesley's in Liberia and Belin's in Diné bikéyah of the Navajo people—they share a deep commitment to their roles as storytellers, and their writing bears witness to the effects of war and invasion in their homelands. Wesley, who now lives in Altoona, Pennsylvania, is a survivor of the civil war in Liberia. She explains how poetry allows her to tell the truth of that experience while leaving some details unwritten. We'll hear Wesley's poem, “Black Woman Selling Her Home in America,” from the June 2022 issue of Poetry, and we'll also hear her wonderful recipe for self-care (which includes teaching everyone to do their own laundry and sleeping in).  Content note: Wesley explicitly describes the effects of war including graphic violence against pregnant people.

Grow Ensemble Podcast
#231 - How to Make a Clean Energy Transition that Benefits All, with Brett Isaac of Navajo Power

Grow Ensemble Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 52:06


There are different ways to generate power and electricity, one being coal mining. But this method has a significant environmental impact, such as soil erosion, loss of natural habitat, and pollution.  After Brett came home from college, his community decided it was time to start a transition. They chose Brett to help build a company that provides clean energy, benefits the livelihood of the local community, and lessens the impact of climate change. Brett Isaac is a renewable energy entrepreneur, business strategist, and the Founder and Co-CEO at Navajo Power, a native-owned public benefit corporation that develops utility-scale clean energy projects on tribal lands and maximizes the benefits for the local communities.  Brett is a member of the Navajo Nation and a skilled communicator who has worked with and collaborated with the local community to have an equitable and sustainable clean energy transition. Navajo Power has the vision to bring clean energy to communities in a different way. They work intentionally to bring and maintain power to households with sustainable, clean energy. To date, they have deployed over 200 off-grid solar systems to serve households without grid electricity. In this episode, Cory and Brett talk about making a transition to clean and equitable energy. Brett shares his foundational interest in power, particularly in clean energy, the struggles making the transition, the issues of equity, power structure and system, and the impact of the transition on the livelihood and welfare of the local community.   ⭐ SPONSORED BY: The Greater Good & The Social Good Network   -- --

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
Friday June 24, 2022 — Native creation and use of color

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 56:14


From the rich colors used in Navajo weaving to all the colors of the rainbow beaded into medallions and regalia, Indigenous hues carry meaning, stories, and emotion. Some colors specific to tribes represent the available animals, plants, and minerals used to make them. Today on Native America Calling, Shawn Spruce talks with Native artists about traditional and contemporary meanings, sources, and uses of color: Anong Beam (M'Chigeeng), founder of Beam Paints; Michael Sheyahshe (Caddo), founder and technologist at alterNative Media; Zefren Anderson (Diné), experimental archaeological weaver and silversmith.

Dom Joseph Podcast
Your Aunties Favorite

Dom Joseph Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 71:33


YAF(Your Aunties Favorite Podcast) consists of three members, Adrian, Del and Hersh. They are three Native men talking about life, love politics, economics and rez culture with a pinch of toxicity. We go on to talk about the upcoming Navajo presidential election, sports in Arizona, Softball, IGA (Indian Gaming Association) and our thoughts on Nike N7. Please be sure to follow them on all social media platforms just type in "Yafpod" DJP Hotline - 425-320-3641

Art Dealer Diaries Podcast
Matt Fitzsimons: Author of 'The Counterfeiters of Bosque Redondo' - Epi. 199, Host Dr. Mark Sublette

Art Dealer Diaries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 77:42


I had Matt Fitzsims on the podcast today and he wrote a wonderful book called 'The Counterfeiters of Bosque Redondo: Slavery, Silver and the U.S. War Against the Navajo Nation. I read this book twice, actually. There's so much in-depth history. I feel like you can actually hear the voices of the people sharing their perspectives of these dark times. Truth is, it was a devastating time for the Navajo people from 1849 to their release from Bosque in 1868. The book not only tells the story of the tragedy but also dives into the actual origin of Navajo metalworking. The book really enlightened me on just how early the Navajo people started working with silver and other metals. This was a  great podcast and Matt is a wonderful human being. I enjoyed our conversation a great deal and I encourage everyone listening to buy the book. It's available July 25th, 2022 but you can preorder on Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Matt Fitzsimons on episode 199 of Art Dealer Diaries Podcast.https://www.arcadiapublishing.com/Products/9781467151429https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/counterfeiters-of-bosque-redondo-the-matt-fitzsimons/1141347192https://www.amazon.com/Counterfeiters-Bosque-Redondo-Slavery-Against/dp/1467151424/

Wild Ideas Worth Living Presented by REI
Photographing Home with Mylo Fowler

Wild Ideas Worth Living Presented by REI

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 30:44 Very Popular


Mylo Fowler is a landscape photographer who takes pictures of his homeland, the Navajo Nation. The images he captures are stunning - they feature the rock formations, plants, and skies of the southwestern United States. His photography holds layers of meaning that celebrate and preserve Navajo culture, and he's also figured out how to use his photography to bring electricity to people who live on Navajoland. Connect with Mylo:WebsiteFacebookTwitterInstagramResources:Learn more about Mylo's work with Goal ZeroEpisode sponsors:SonosTeva

The Poetry Magazine Podcast
Esther Belin in Conversation with Orlando White

The Poetry Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 28:23


This week, Esther Belin and Orlando White talk about Diné thought and poetics, sound and breath in Diné bizaad, the Navajo language, and what it means, as Indigenous writers, to use the English language as a vessel to integrate tribal concepts. They also discuss one of White's one-word poems, “Water.” Although the poem is only six letters long, there was barely enough time to unpack its complexity.  Orlando White is a citizen of the Navajo Nation and faculty member of Diné College, a tribal college on the Navajo reservation in Tsaile, Arizona. He is the author of LETTERRS (Nightboat Books, 2015) and Bone Light (Red Hen Press, 2009). You can read two poems by White in the June 2022 issue of Poetry.

Your Aunties Favorite Podcast

TRIGGER WARNING: The Uncs defend our sex against a TikTok that "respectfully" calls for the damnation of all Navajo men. 

Antonia Gonzales
Friday, June 3, 2022

Antonia Gonzales

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 4:58


Trudeau signs historic $1.3bn deal with Siksika First Nation FBI uses Navajo language ads to get new leads for cold cases NM tribal leaders meet with state officials during annual summit

Weird Darkness: Stories of the Paranormal, Supernatural, Legends, Lore, Mysterious, Macabre, Unsolved
“THE ARIZONA SKINWALKER” and 3 More True, Disturbing Stories! #WeirdDarkness

Weird Darkness: Stories of the Paranormal, Supernatural, Legends, Lore, Mysterious, Macabre, Unsolved

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 46:31


“THE ARIZONA SKINWALKER” and 3 More True, Disturbing Stories! #WeirdDarknessIN THIS EPISODE: In 1882 the Ma'amtrasna murders, the brutal killing of several members of the Joyce family in rural Galway, caused outrage in Irish society and remains one of the most notorious homicides in Irish history. However a few years later Cork was rocked by an equally heinous case which has largely been forgotten. We'll look at the brutal murders of four family members that took place in Castletownroche, Ireland. (The Castletownroche Murders) *** An Arizona family encounters a creature from the dark side of a Navajo legend. (The Arizona Skinwalker) *** John Blair liked to keep things “in the family”. But in his case, it wasn't just a saying. It was literal. Because John was infamous for being bigamous. (Bigamous Blair) *** Dozens of Korean War GI's claimed an unidentified flying object made them all sick. Theories range from high-tech Soviet death rays to extraterrestrials studying how we engage in battle to combat-stress-induced hallucinations. What actually happened? (The Korean War UFO)(Dark Archives episode from April 20, 2020)SOURCES AND ESSENTIAL WEB LINKS…“The Korean War UFO” by Natasha Frost for History.com: https://tinyurl.com/y765nsgm “The Castletownroche Murders” by Fin Dwyer for the Irish Examiner: https://tinyurl.com/y9fhagfb “The Arizona Skinwalker” by Stephen Wagner for Live About: https://tinyurl.com/yxkdh9vv “Bigamous Blair” from London Overlooked: https://tinyurl.com/y9qpo54x Subscribe to the podcast by searching for Weird Darkness wherever you listen to podcasts – or use this RSS feed link: https://www.spreaker.com/show/3655291/episodes/feed.Weird Darkness theme by Alibi Music Library. Background music provided by Alibi Music, EpidemicSound and/or AudioBlocks with paid license. Music from Shadows Symphony (https://tinyurl.com/yyrv987t), Midnight Syndicate (http://amzn.to/2BYCoXZ), Kevin MacLeod (https://tinyurl.com/y2v7fgbu), Tony Longworth (https://tinyurl.com/y2nhnbt7), and/or Nicolas Gasparini/Myuu (https://tinyurl.com/lnqpfs8) is used with permission. 

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =(Over time links seen above may become invalid, disappear, or have different content. I always make sure to give authors credit for the material I use whenever possible. If I somehow overlooked doing so for a story, or if a credit is incorrect, please let me know and I will rectify it in these show notes immediately. Some links included above may benefit me financially through qualifying purchases.)= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = ="I have come into the world as a light, so that no one who believes in me should stay in darkness." — John 12:46Visit the Church of the Undead: http://undead.church/ Find out how to escape eternal darkness at https://weirddarkness.com/eternaldarkness Trademark, Weird Darkness ®. Copyright, Weird Darkness ©.= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =00:12:43.477, 00:32:48.890,

Listen To Sassy
July 1989 Teen Life: Family Vacations, Fiction Winners & The Northern Lights

Listen To Sassy

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 54:14 Very Popular


You're not going to believe this, but the first feature of the July 1989 issue — about getting through vacations with your family — is not extremely depressing; it's merely somewhat worrisome if you read between the lines about maintaining harmony amongst everyone on the trip. In fact, there's hopefulness in all the features, which also include a visit to Navajo and Hopi girls on an Arizona reservation, and theories on why guys might say “no” to you. We also read the first- and second-place finishers in Sassy's first fiction contest; learn…very little about Las Vegas; find out how much importance Michael Stipe ascribes to every interaction Michael Stipe has ever had with every woman he's ever met; and lots more — makes perfect listening for gazing at the Grand Canyon with your dad!Visual Aids

On Point
The legacy of uranium mining on Navajo lands

On Point

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 45:17


For more than 40 years, millions of tons of Uranium ore were mined from Navajo lands to make nuclear weapons. Thousands of workers were exposed to deadly radiation. Those workers are about to lose funding to cover their health costs. Phil Harrison and Amber Crotty join Meghna Chakrabarti.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
How Men's Health Is Affected By Stress & Blood Sugar Imbalance

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 60:08 Very Popular


This episode is brought to you by Athletic Greens and Rupa Health. Many of us are living our lives out of balance and are stressed from the time we wake up until the time our heads hit the pillow. The problem is that chronic stress causes inflammation and is behind many of the health conditions that affect men specifically. Stress can drive low testosterone, for instance, which is a common problem for men that drives many other health issues. In today's episode, I talk with Dr. George Papanicolaou, Dr. Louis Ignarro, and Jessie Inchauspé about low testosterone and its effects on men, the heart-protective molecule nitric oxide, the importance of minimizing blood sugar spikes, and much more. Dr. George Papanicolaou is a graduate of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and is board certified in Family Medicine from Abington Memorial Hospital. He is also an Institute for Functional Medicine practitioner. Upon graduation from his residency he joined the Indian Health Service. He worked on the Navajo reservation for four years at the Chinle Comprehensive Medical Facility, where he served as the Outpatient Department Coordinator. In 2000, he founded Cornerstone Family Practice in Rowley, MA. He began training in Functional Medicine through the Institute of Functional Medicine. In 2015, he established Cornerstone Personal Health, a practice dedicated entirely to Functional Medicine. Dr. Papanicolaou joined The UltraWellness Center in 2017.Dr. Louis Ignarro is a medical research scientist who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine for his breakthrough discovery of how nitric oxide positively impacts health and longevity. His groundbreaking research on nitric oxide paved the way for—among other innovations—Viagra. He is an award-winning Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Molecular & Medical Pharmacology at the University of California, Los Angeles, and has his PhD in pharmacology, with over 35 years of experience teaching.Jessie Inchauspé holds a bachelor's degree in mathematics from King's College London and a master's degree in biochemistry from Georgetown University. Her work at a genetic analysis start-up in Silicon Valley made her realize that, as the key to good health, food habits beat genetics. In her first book, Glucose Revolution, Jessie shares her startling discovery about the essential role of blood sugar in every aspect of our lives, from cravings to fertility, and the surprising hacks to optimize it while still eating the foods we love. This episode is brought to you by Athletic Greens and Rupa Health.Right now, when you purchase AG1 from Athletic Greens, you will receive 10 FREE travel packs with your first purchase by visiting athleticgreens.com/hyman.Rupa Health is a place where Functional Medicine practitioners can access more than 2,000 specialty lab tests from over 20 labs like DUTCH, Vibrant America, Genova, and Great Plains. You can check out a free, live demo with a Q&A or create an account at RupaHealth.com.Full-length episodes of these interviews can be found here:Dr. George PapanicolaouDr. Louis IgnarroJessie Inchauspé See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sharon Says So
122. Arizona: The Navajo Code Talkers with Lindsay Sherbondy

Sharon Says So

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 33:16 Very Popular


In today's episode, Sharon is joined by artist, designer, and mom, Linsdsay Sherbondy. Together, they talk about the Navajo Nation's WWII Code Talkers. This elite group of men created and used a code used for relaying information between military units during World War II. The Navajo code is the only spoken military code never to have been deciphered, and the code talkers were instrumental in the victories of several battles during the war. They returned as unsung heroes because of the classified nature of their mission, living with their wartime secrets for more than 25 years before receiving official recognition by the U.S. government. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.