Podcasts about Navajo

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Native American people of the United States

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  • Jan 19, 2022LATEST
Navajo

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Best podcasts about Navajo

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Latest podcast episodes about Navajo

Nopeville
055 - The Winchester Bestiary Tour - Skinwalkers pt.1

Nopeville

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 55:35


It's time to dive back in to the Winchester Bestiary! This week, we see what the bestiary has to say about Skinwalkers and how the boys of Supernatural deal with them. Then, Tour Guide Jen dives into the Navajo legend of Skinwalkers through lore, experiences, and their portrayal in various pop culture media. Stay tuned for our next tour as well when Tour Guide Christine takes us to Skinwalker Ranch!Find us on our social media!Twitter: @NopevillecastInstagram: @nopevillepodcastFacebook: Nopeville PodcastWebsite: nopevillepodcast.comSupport us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/nopevillepodcastBuy us a coffee! : buymeacoffee.com/nopevilleVisit our Gift Shop: shop.spreadshirt.com/nopeville

The Best of Coast to Coast AM
Navajo Wisdom - Best of Coast to Coast AM - 01/06-22

The Best of Coast to Coast AM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 20:51


George Noory and Erica Elliot discuss her life on the Navajo reservation. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Tent Theology
Mark Charles: you cannot discover what was not lost

Tent Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 79:22


Mark Charles is the son of a Navajo father and a Dutch-American mother. He is an activist, speaker, and author on Native American issues. In 2019, Mark published "Unsettling Truths: The Ongoing, Dehumanizing Legacy of the Doctrine of Discovery" with co-author Prof. Soong-Chan Rah. In 2020 he was an independent candidate for President of the United States. If everyone in America who called themselves a Christian was actually a follower of the Way of Jesus, Mark would be the President right now.All about Mark and his books HERE.More about Mark's campaign HERE.Has anything we make been interesting, useful or fruitful for you? You can support us by becoming a Fellow Traveller on our Patreon page HERE.

ProspectiveDoctor | Helping you achieve your medical school dreams | AMCAS | MCAT

Erkeda DeRouen welcomes back Dr. Qiratulanne “Annie” Khan, who is a board certified and globally trained family physician. She also holds a master's degree in public health. Today Erkeda chats with Dr. Khan about end of life care, her experience working with Navajo patients, and her preference for palliative care outside of the hospital. [00:31] Dr. Khan's Medical Journey and Background [03:55] Memorable Experiences with End of Life Patients [09:23] Diverse Cultural Meanings of Death and Quality of Life [13:58] Communication of Prognosis [21:19] Palliative Care at Home [26:30] How to Gain Experience with End of Life Care [31:35] Dr. Khan's Advice to Pre-meds and Medical Students Full show notes

Once and Future Authors
Once and Future Authors presents Dorothy Oger

Once and Future Authors

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 29:26


The Navajo have songs to recover lost souls. I have poems. When I write poems, I am the magician of my life and of the world around me. I uncover deeper meanings and I resonate with the Universe. Here are 35 poems for you to resonate with and to bring healing to your soul. Perfect as a gift and for bedside table reading. The A5 format makes it easy to have with you at all times. A French version is also available. What readers say about this collection of poems: “I love the way you capture so much with so few words.”

3AM
3PM: Leah Hardy on Skinwalkers Part 2

3AM

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 118:30


A very Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to you all! We're excited to have back one of our favorite guests, Leah Hardy. She, along with her sister Lynne, brings new stories and dives into the culture revealing new information on skinwalkers and the Navajo. Once again, it was an honor to host Leah and hope you love it as much as we did. Want an extra story every week? Click here! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

ChatChat - Claudia Cragg
Hey, Joe Manchin Grinch! How's your Christmas going..... (Well, you're not Broke In America.)

ChatChat - Claudia Cragg

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 54:37


(That Senator may have made damn sure they'll be NO Child Tax Credits for you coming up, Kiddos!) The authors, Joanne Samuel Goldblum, (@jgoldblum), founder of the National Diaper Bank Network, and journalist Colleen Shaddox argue that the systems that should protect our citizens are broken and that poverty results from flawed policies—compounded by racism, sexism, and other ills—rather than people's “bad choices.” Federal programs for the poor often fall far short of their aims: The U.S. has only 36 affordable housing units available for every 100 extremely low-income families; roughly 1 in 3 households on Navajo reservations lack plumbing; and inadequate counsel by public defenders can lead to harsher penalties for crimes or time in “debtors' prisons” for those unable to pay fines or court fees. An overarching problem is that the U.S. determines eligibility for government benefits with an outdated and “irrationally low” federal poverty level of $21,720 for a family of three, which doesn't take into account necessities such as child care when women work outside the home. The authors credibly assert that it makes more sense to define poverty as an inability to afford basic needs in seven areas—“water, food, housing, energy, transportation, hygiene, and health”—each of which gets a chapter that draws on academic or other studies and interviews with people like a Baltimore resident who had to flush his toilet with bottled water after the city shut it off due to an unpaid bill. This plainspoken primer in the spirit of recent books like Anne Kim's Abandoned and Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn's Tightrope, Goldblum and Shaddox interweave macro analyses with examples of micro interventions that might work in any community. A Head Start teacher in Lytle, Texas, says her program saw benefits just from giving toothbrushes (and a chance to use them at a classroom sink) to children who had none at home: “They come here, and they scrub like there's no tomorrow.”

Tell Me Your Story
Erica Elliot - Medicine And Miracles In The High Desert

Tell Me Your Story

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 60:04


https://www.musingsmemoirandmedicine.com/ Medicine and Miracles in the High Desert: My Life Among the Navajo People by Erica M. Elliott An intimate look at the mystical world of the Navajo people * Details the author's time living with the Navajo people as a teacher, sheepherder, and doctor and her profound experiences with the people, animals, and spirits * Shows how she learned the Navajo language to bridge the cultural divide * Reveals the miracles she witnessed, including her own miracle when the elders prayed for healing of a tumor on her neck * Shares her fearsome encounters with a mountain lion and a shape-shifting "skin walker" and how she fulfilled a prophecy by returning as a doctor In 1971, Erica Elliott arrived on the Navajo Reservation as a newly minted schoolteacher, knowing nothing about her students or their culture. After a discouraging first week, she almost leaves in despair, unable to communicate with the children or understand cultural cues. But once she starts learning the language, the people begin to trust her, welcoming her into their homes and their hearts. As she is drawn into the mystical world of Navajo life, she has a series of profound experiences with the people, animals, and spirits of Canyon de Chelly that change her life forever. In this compelling memoir, the author details her time living with the Navajo, the Din? people, and her experiences with their enchanting land, healing ceremonies, and rich traditions. She shares how her love for her students transformed her life as well as the lives of the children. She reveals the miracles she witnessed during this time, including her own miracle when the elders prayed for healing of a tumor on her neck. She survives fearsome encounters with a mountain lion and a shape-shifting "skin walker." She learns how to herd sheep, make fry bread, and weave traditional rugs, experiencing for herself the life of a traditional Navajo woman. Fulfilling a Navajo grandmother's prophecy, the author returns years later to serve the Navajo people as a medical doctor in an underfunded clinic, delivering numerous babies and treating sick people day and night. She also reveals how, when a medicine man offers to thank her with a ceremony, more miracles unfold. Sharing her life-changing deep dive into Navajo culture, Erica Elliott's inspiring story reveals the transformation possible from immersion in a spiritually rich culture as well as the power of reaching out to others with joy, respect, and an open heart. Read Less Erica takes a break while herding sheep. Red Rock, Arizona. July 1973. Erica Elliott's memoir is about her colorful journey far off the beaten path in pursuit of the true purpose and meaning of her life. Her life begins as an exciting adventure, a general's daughter stationed in Europe, with Swiss roots on her mother's side. She was at home early on in foreign cultures, so returning to the US for college presented its own culture shock. By chance, Erica ended up at a radically experimental college and came face to face with the 1960s in America. Swept away by the times, Erica lost her footing and, in the process found the guide she had always longed for to help her explore her complex inner world. From her awakening and self-understanding came the first seeds of compassion that became one of the hallmarks of her life.

AJ Daily
12-22-21 Calf crop; Environmental Stewardship Award Program; Navajo nation's support of mCOOL; Wildland Fire Mitigation and Management Commission

AJ Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 5:14


Today's update includes data about the 2021 calf crop (https://www.angusjournal.net/post/active-sire-use-2021-calf-crop-data-released); updates on the Environmental Stewardship Award Program (https://www.ncba.org/ncba-news/news-releases/news/details/28682/environmental-stewardship-award-program-seeks-nominees-for-2022); information about the Navajo nation's support of mCOOL (https://www.r-calfusa.com/ranch-group-applauds-navajo-nations-support-of-mcool/); and an update about the new Wildland Fire Mitigation and Management Commission (https://www.usda.gov/media/press-releases/2021/12/17/usda-doi-and-fema-jointly-establish-new-wildland-fire-mitigation).

The Passionistas Project Podcast
Melissa Bird is Harnessing the Power of Rebellion

The Passionistas Project Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 35:51


Dr. Melissa Bird is a clairvoyant coach, author and fiery public speaker. Melissa has traveled around the world, talking to audiences at universities, conferences and churches. Her combination of education, real life experience and practical advice, makes her a powerful force of change in the lives of the people she speaks to. Past audience members have described her as fierce, revelatory, life-changing, enthusiastic and inspirational.   Learn more about Melissa. Learn more about The Passionistas Project.   Full Transcript: Passionistas: Hi, and welcome to The Passionistas Project Podcast, where we talk with women who are following their passions to inspire you to do the same. We're Amy and Nancy Harrington, and today we're talking with Dr. Melissa Bird. As a clairvoyant coach, author and fiery public speaker, Melissa has traveled around the world, talking to audiences at universities, conferences, and churches. Her combination of education, real life experience, and practical advice, makes her a powerful force of change in the lives of the people she speaks to. Past audience members have described her as fierce, revelatory, life-changing, enthusiastic and inspirational. So please welcome to the show Dr. Melissa Bird. Hi Melissa, we're so glad you're here. What's the one thing you're most passionate about? Melissa: It's evolved over time. Right? So it used to be that I was the most passionate about helping women and girls use their voice. Right? Like that was sort of the foundation from which I operated for a long time. And lately, like in the last two years, I think it's really turned into helping people really learn how to harness the power of their rebellion for good. And really healing the shame and wounding we have around rebellious, honest, and helping people really identify what it is that they feel deeply passionate about so that they can go out and do that thing. And usually it is an act of rebellion to be able to go out and do that thing. Why is that so important and what exactly do you mean by. Well, I think we get sent this very powerful message from internalized misogyny and externalized patriarchy that says, you know, if you speak out, if you, if you have an opinion that is different than what we think is appropriate, which is often steeped in white supremacy and racism, by the way, like if you speak against anything that is outside of that normal. Then you are a rebel. And for so long, we have been taught that we're not allowed to say what's on our mind. And yet we all have a different opinion and we all have feelings and we all have things that are on our minds. And I think that it is time for us to judge. Screw it like, forget about it. I just say it and I can easily say that from my little, you know, beautiful corner of the world. And sometimes it's, it's deadly for people to say that. And in fact, right before this, I was in a mastermind group with a bunch of other people that I'm participating in and I was sobbing and I was like, I am terrified. To peel off this next layer of who I am and speak this truth about dismantling empire Christianity. And here, I'm just going to come out on the podcast right now about dismantling empire Christianity as someone who believes deeply in God, like, and I preach it, my Episcopal church and thinking about how do we heal the pain of years of patriarchal. You know, internalized messaging and how do we start to engage in absolute rebellion around those things so that it's no longer dangerous for everybody to speak because we're all speaking. Passionistas: Why does that scare you so much? Melissa: I'm just really afraid of being killed for it. Like honestly, like whether I get eviscerated, you know, trolled taken down, shut down, literally killed, you know, When I was doing LGBT activism in Utah, before I went to get my PhD, I was born and raised in Utah. Like I'd grown up there. And I remember I had been with my wife, my ex-wife and, um, you know, we never held hands in public cause we couldn't, it was dangerous to do that. And I remember when. She left. And I ended up dating men again because I'm bisexual. And I remember when my now husband held my hand for the first time in public and I pulled my hand away and he's like, what's wrong? And I was like, we can't, that's dangerous. And he's like, looking at me like, what is wrong with you? And I was like, I had that, I started crying and I was like, I had this moment where I realized I haven't touched in the human being in public and. Because when you do you get attacked and physically and emotionally abused, right? So here I am on this edge of this next expansion in my life. And like, this is what I love about the work that you all are doing is the stories you highlight and the work that you all are doing brings us to the next level. You're showing how we evolve over time. The woman I was when I was in my twenties is not the woman that I am now. Like my whole. The things I focus on, the things I'm passionate about has evolved over time and we have to allow for that as women supporting other women. And I think oftentimes we think we're only allowed to be passionate about that thing. We were still passionate about 15, 20 years ago. No. And really honing in on what does light us up and what does make us feel passionate and being willing to honor that and in each other.   Instead of trying to destroy that in each other. I think that's why I'm afraid. I think that the point that it all evolves and that we need to keep evolving. Somehow we expect ourselves to like, be fully evolved by the time we're like 27. Like I see it in my daughter, who's 19. She's like, she's like, I feel like I'm totally behind. And I'm like, what are you behind? Like behind what Jesus did. And she's like, and she always refers back to. Instagram and Snapchat. And you know, these, these people that she's watching who have made it by like 23 and I'm out, but that's not real. And, and how to help her still be excited and ambitious and support her and like, I don't want to say that young people are diluted because I think they can do whatever they want, but sometimes these delusions of being behind and somehow they're supposed to be catching up to something that's not that doesn't exist. I think it's just, we're in such a fascinating time. I think I really do believe we're on the precipice of really major change. I mean, if there's anything we've learned from COVID-19 at this. Everything is different. And, and so I love how people keep trying to tell us we're going to get back to normal. I'm like, no, we're not because your normal, my normal are not the same. And what you thought was normal was actually called white supremacy and racism and heteronormativity and sexism. And that's not, you know, that's falling. Passionistas: Let's take a step back. You mentioned that you grew up in Utah. Tell us a little bit about your childhood, your family background, your heritage, and what impact that has on your life today. Melissa: I did grow up in Utah, but I'm okay. I'm just kidding. I grew up in park city, Utah before Sundance became a thing. So we lived in salt lake and then we moved to park city. I did not grow up in a traditional LDS household. So, um, part of that was because my dad committed suicide when I was. And my mother was basically forcibly pushed out of, um, our local ward by our Bishop. And so she lost her faith. I don't know that my mom, my mom was funny. Cause I don't know that she'd ever say she had a strong faith, but you know, she did what she was supposed to be doing. So this was 1980, which even though we like to pretend that Utah's like, you know, this goody two-shoes state, it was also the height of the cocaine epidemic. Right. So mama started partying and she started. Her heart was broken. Like my dad broke her heart. And, um, I didn't realize that at the time, of course, cause I was a kid, I was six years old and we ended up in a lot of chaos growing up. My dad is Southern Paiute and so I was also cut off from my indigenous native American heritage. And that was a very complicated relationship anyway, because. My grandparents are not the kindest people on the planet, on his side of the family. And so what happened was I ended up being mostly raised by my aunts, my aunt Nancy, and my grandma Mary. So my grandma and my aunt basically raised me and my sister. And they were both very involved in the junior league and the league of women voters. And so I learned that it wasn't rude to talk about politics at the time. And I learned how to volunteer, because say what you will about you. I actually feel like the, the strong service component of the LDS church is really beautiful. And I learned a lot about serving others and talking about politics. And so, as I was growing up, I always just assumed that women were involved in. Because of my aunt and my, my grandma. And so I staged my first protest when I was 17. I was a senior in high school and I found Ms. Magazine. And I could not believe that there were all these atrocities happening in the world. And so I staged my first, it was a one-woman protest cause no one else would go with me, but you know, they didn't want to get in trouble, but I liked discovered that there's this whole world out there. And really started getting involved in action and activism. Then I think that was really the birth of it. And it was not a very good student. The only reason I have a PhD was to just prove myself, I'm really smart, but like I was in and out of college and just really struggled and really struggled with my sexual orientation and really, really struggled with religion because I was told my whole life through messaging that I was not worthy of. God. And love. And at the same time I was hearing from my grandma, my aunt, how fabulous and wonderful and beautiful and worthy I was of all these things. And so it's been a hell of a ride. I've always wanted Angelina Jolie to play me for my made for television movie on lifetime television networks. I really like, that's always Angelina Jolie is going to play me in my movie, but, you know, I, I like to say I've been married almost as much as Liz Taylor. I've been through a lot of marriages to men and. And, you know, here I am living in Corvallis, Oregon with three kids and this husband and running three businesses actually, cause you know, one just wasn't enough and I'm coaching these women to like heal their rebel, shame and wounding and, and really like engaging in tapping into their intuition and their magic to make a difference in their lives and their community. It's really awesome. So had this really chaotic bananas childhood, and it was partially homeless, like technically like couch surfing and didn't know what I was doing. And now here I am, who knew. Passionistas: At what point, if at all, did you reconnect with the indigenous side of your family? Melissa: Because I was cut off from that part of my family. I actually was trying to figure out more about my dad, but I couldn't really ask my mom because it's too painful for her and I didn't want to bug her with it. So back in 2006, I Google searched my dad, his name, cause I wanted to find his obituary. Cause I didn't, I don't think I'd ever seen it. And so in 2006, I Google search my dad and my uncle Arval popped up because my uncle Arval is a music. And I remember my uncle Arville because he used to play, the devil goes down to Georgia on the fiddle for me when I was little kid by before I was six. And I remembered that and he played the fiddle for Alabama back in the day. And he had become this, you know, native American musical award-winning artist with his flute and his fiddle. And I had no idea, like I had no idea. And so he had a phone number on his website and so. And I thought I was going to die. Like I was like, why am I even doing this? It's so scary. And his wife, Kimberly picked up the phone and I said, hi, you know, is our hole there? And she said, who's this? And I said, this is his niece, Melissa Bird, Vern's oldest daughter. And she just started crying in any way. And we ended up talking and he actually reconnected me with the Vernon, my grandmother, and we talked and wrote letters back and forth. She was very disappointed. I wasn't a member of the LDS church because she was a very staunch LDS woman. And so there was a lot of pretty hurtful rhetoric there. But through her, I connected with actually through our role. I think I connected with my cousin, Vanessa and my cousin, Steven, and my cousin Steven lives on the Navajo nation. And then my cousin Vanessa lives here in Oregon. And so it was through them that I started really putting the pieces of our lives back together and learning more about, you know, our native American, who we are and our client that should what clan and, and really learning about that indigenous identity. And it's been a really fascinating process because we complicate it so much. You know, I started learning about what it would mean to enroll and I can't enroll because my great grandmother. Opted not to in 1936, she started the process, but she opted not to because they wanted her to move to live on the reservation and she didn't want to. And so there's a lot of complication when it comes to that identification and it wasn't until I met one of my really good friends here in Oregon. And she looked at me and she's like, you know that this is in your blood. Like your ancestry is in your blood. It's who you are. And it doesn't matter if you are enrolled or not. You are a Shivwit Paiute. And yet at the same time, there was all of the stuff coming out about pretending there's this horrible term. So often. And there's this list that's been put out of academics who are supposedly not really quote unquote Indians, like they're not native American, except for they all totally are. And there is this idea of what it means to be an indigenous native American person in the United States. That varies depending on who people are. And it's because of colonialization and it's because of white supremacy. And it's because of. And this is something I like to tell, like really explain to people historically, when you think about the one drop rule for blood, the one drop rule for Africans was to create a workforce, right? Of people, the One Drop Rule for native Americans for indigenous people on this land was to annihilate them completely and eliminate them from the face of. So we're doing that pretty effectively here, you know, in the, in north America and in other parts of the world. And it's so complicated. And yet we, we drill it down to enrollment, which by the way, is a very separatists construct that people don't understand. And so reconnecting with my cousins and the people who understand. Language and our history and who want to reconnect me to those things has been a really emotional journey. It's a lot, it's a lot. And finding those letters from my great grandma, like my cousin, send them to me and just reading that story of her, trying to figure out who our great, great grandparents were and confirming who our great-great-grandparents were and when they died and how they died is really it's amazing. And it's also that until I think those are the stories we don't talk about. Passionistas: You're listening to The Passionistas ProjectProject Podcast in our interview with Dr. Melissa Bird. To learn more about her Misfit Magic Hour one-on-one coaching and masterclass series, visit NaturalBornRebel.com. If you're enjoying this interview and would like to help us continue to create inspiring, please consider becoming a patron by visiting ThePassionistasProject.com/podcast and clicking on the patron button. Even $1 a month can help us continue our mission of inspiring women to follow their passions. Now here's more of our interview with Melissa. In 2017, you found it Natural Born Rebel. So what is the mission of Natural Born Rebel and how did you get started? Melissa: I didn't want to go into academia. I mean, let's be real. I will not go work for a research, one institution on a tenure track position. Like I was like, I was not having it. I just wrapped all the things. So I did not want to do that. And I happened to go on a retreat with the coach. Susan Hyatt was my. And I went on this retreat and she's like, we need to get you up on stages and you need to be talking to people and you know, you've got this vision and this mission of helping women really find their voice. And we've got to figure that out. I was like, okay, whatever. Like I'm just in Scotland, like peeling apart, all the layers of what the heck am I doing next? And two things happened on that trip. One was that I decided that I was going to become a coach and really start to create programs where I could. Take, I taught social justice and advocacy and schools of social work for like 15 years. And I wanted to bring all that to the masses. Like I wanted to really help people learn how they can engage in advocacy on their own terms. And so I did that. And then the other thing that happened was that I had the vision for the Mermaid's Garden, which we'll get to in a second. I'm sure. But I met a woman named Susie while I was there and we didn't talk after. After we left Scotland, basically. Like we talk every once in a while, but you know, we lost touch and then randomly, she called me a couple of years later and she's like, I just got this divine download for you. And you're supposed to start this thing called Natural Born Rebel. And I just bought you the URL and you need to teach this thing called Rebel School. And these are all the components you need to put into Rebel School. And we need you to write a book. And in that book, we want you to talk about these things. And so I'll send you the URL. And did you take notes because I've got to go back into a meeting and I just want to make sure you're going to follow through with this. And I was in a Lyft going to the airport cause I'd been flown to San Bernardino to teach a class on social justice. Right. Does this happen to you often? And I was like, well kind of, not that directly. So I get on the plane and I've got all this stuff from Susie. And I just started writing and I outlined and wrote like half the book on the plane from San Bernardino to Portland, Oregon. Right. And then I get home and I just start, like, all this stuff just starts flooding out of me. I called the person who did my original website for Bird Girl Industries. And I said, I'm transitioning to Natural Born Rebel and I need you to build me a website. And these are the things that have to be on it. Here's the lesson like when you get the messages that seem totally random and out there, they're not because what has happened is that rebel school has evolved into this. I can't even explain. It's so old school. It is so beautiful. And it's gone from being the 16 week. I don't know what the hell I'm doing here. Have a couple of one-on-one coaching sessions to this 18 week program. Is the most gorgeous, amazing thing that I have ever had the privilege of facilitating. And the book is free on my website, Natural Born Rebel, and there's journal prompts in it that are amazing. And I'm actually just getting ready to do the second edition of it, because now that I've been doing Rebel School for so long, I just say there's so much, that's not in there that I want people to know. And I would not be here teaching, doing this work coaching because I do one-on-one coaching. And then I do clairvoyant reading, where someone comes and brings me up a problem. They want clarity on what their business or their life. And we do a reading and it's amazing. And I just never thought that I'd be sitting here having this conversation with y'all about how, like I'm a lay preacher and a clairvoyant where to like, you know, I mean, no, this was, this was not the grand plan. When I got a PhD four years ago. I couldn't, I didn't know what would, how Natural Born Rebel would happen. Passionistas: Tell us about Misfit Magic Hour and how those sessions work.   Melissa: Oh, my gosh. They're so fun. I had no idea. Again, this is me listening. So my amazing virtual assist, assistant Emma. She was like, I told her, I was like, I, I finished clairvoyant training cause I did this huge year long clairvoyance training. That's what I did independent because I was like, I'm going to totally figure out how to channel dead people. Like he doesn't want to be able to do that. I was like, okay. So I finished my clairvoyance training and Emma was like, you need to start doing readings. And I was like, oh no, I know I do this and this and this. And it was like, no, we're going to call it Misfit Magic Hour. And you're going to just, you're going to give people clarity and confidence in one hour, and then people will learn what it's like to work with you. And I was like, oh no, no, no, I'm not going to publicly. Like, what are you talking about? She's like, don't worry. I've got all the copy done. We're just going to make it happen. And we're launching in two weeks. And I was like, oh no. Now I have to start telling people that I want to do, like channeling and clairvoyance and coaching with them. And Emma was like, yeah. And I was like, oh my God. She's like, it's, you're going to be flying. And I'm like, I don't know what if people hate me. It's like, what if I say something stupid? What is the ghost? Don't come in. Like, what if I can come in with spirit and I've made this promise. So the coolest part about magic hour, it's so good. So it's like 20 minutes of coaching. So people come in, I tell people, come in with two or three things that you really want clarity on, whether it's in your life. And then the last, like 25 minutes or a card reading where I either use Oracle cards or tarot cards, depending on my mood and the person. And we do a reading to talk about their current situation, what they need to know, and then their, their future situate. Like if you do these things, this is what could happen. Never in a million years. Y'all did I think I was going to have so much fun doing this? Cause I was like all serious. I was like, well now. So incredible. The things that I see visually like amazing what spirit can do to get the message across the ad. Because I leaned, my teacher gave me all these tools and, and so now I have this framework to go on, but I've turned it into my own, which is the point. Cause we can't all do things the same. And I'm like, oh my gosh. And everyone who does them, it's like, oh my God, I feel so clear. I'm going to sign up again. You know, like it's just, it's, it's so hard to explain it, but all I can say is that I get the best visuals. I had one client whose heritage is all Russian and I spirit ended up giving me all of her grandma's as these Russian nesting dolls. And they kept pulling out messages. And like I had one rating where everyone was in a spiral moving out and it was just like hundreds and hundreds. Of just spirit, just there to hold her. Cause she was in a crisis and they were like, we're right here. And we're holding you. Like, I see like spirit doing this. Like we're holding you, like, we're rocking you. Like we are holding you. And like, I have like this whole reading where, um, people were like frolicking naked through a field and they were like, just be free, just be free. And I was like, all of a sudden your spirit guides are a bunch of hippies. I don't know. I get these visual. That are never the same. And they're so unique to the person that I'm reading for. And if I'm like, what is happening, you don't have to carry this for me to even admit this because I'm like, you know, I got the whole witch wound getting burned at the stake thing. Like, you know, I literally in a dream the other night I was talking to my friend, Stephanie, I need to call her and tell her about this. She picked me up in a limit. And she's like telling me this message that was being given to me in my dream. And I was like, people are gonna think I'm mad because this is what we do to women who are healers and prophets and preachers. There's that beautiful song. The High Women sing "The High Women's Song," it's an archetype from throughout history of like a witch and a preacher and a freedom writer and somewhat. It's beautiful, but the context of the song is that we come back over and over and over again, and that you will never eliminate us, even when you try, it's a beautiful song. And it's the fact that I'm able to even have this conversation with you, Amy and Nancy, you would have, you could have knocked me over with a feather. If you would've told me, this is my last five years ago. I would've been like, uh, no. Did you always have an ability to see things? What triggered you going to take these lessons? I've always been magic, always. Like I've always been able to like the first dead person I actually saw was my dad. He came and told me to take care of my mom and, and I very distinctly remember. And so I've always had the feeling or the vision that I could, I used to make little magic birds nest out of grass in the backyard, like all over the place. And then all of a sudden birds would just come and nest in them. Like, you know, I was like, I didn't think that was actually going to work, you know, and the quail would come and get him. My nest was awesome. Not my expectation, but there was so I've always felt magic. I have my. I can connect people. Like I, when I listened to people speak, I go, oh, okay, you need this person and this person and this person and this person. And that is one of the magical things that I do is I connect people to that, to other people I'm a web Weaver. But what spurred me to go work with Eileen and, and be taught was that I had some very large intuitive hits about some really big things that happens. And it scared me. And I had had a friend of mine say, you know, you really, you need to understand this more and you, what you're what's happening is you're being called into. Understanding your own particular brand of magic and what you do and listening to your intuition because you see things very differently. And the other thing she said to me is that back in the early days of Christianity like tenth, we're talking 10th, 11th century days, there were groups of women that would navigate between the pagans and the Christians. So they were the bridge between the two. There wasn't such a separation. And she said, that's just, you, you are the bridge builder. You go back and forth and that's who you are. And that's who you're meant to be. And stop thinking. You have to be one thing or the other. And that was actually a huge part of my coaching with Susan was I was like, if people find out that I am both a Christian, I love Jesus. Social Justice Jesus is my favorite Jesus. And like that I love Jesus. That I do magic and I read taro and I channeled dead people. Either the witches are going to hate me because I love Jesus. And I believe deeply in the. Or they're going to kick me off the pulpit at church, and I'm not going to be able to preach anymore because I'm a woman. And in fact, my priest, at one point, he's like, can you stop with the witchcraft thing? And I was like, no, not really. And then I started telling him about how the pagans used to be bridge builders and all this stuff. And he found a paper like a booklet that he had from a researcher in Scotland who had researched those with. Yeah, thank you Jesus. Right after I told them about this and he's like, you're not, I was like, see, I told you, like, there's nothing wrong with me. And I thought, for sure, no, one's gonna hire me. No, one's gonna want to learn from me. And all of a sudden y'all like, these women are coming to me and they're like, I love Jesus too. And on totally. Which I'm like. Here. I thought I was coming up with this innovative hashtag Christian, which no, I was not, no, you can follow hashtag Krisha, which on Instagram. And I was like, oh my gosh, we're everywhere. I was like, whoa. Cause you know, trained by misogyny and patriarchy that you have to pick a thing. And actually when I did my dissertation, my dissertation was about how women in rural California navigate religious stigma to get contracept. And it's, uh, you know, I did all these interviews with women to ask them how they navigated religious stigma and slut-shaming to get contraception. And it was all based on the Madonna-Whore binary that you are supposed to be a Virgin until you are married and then you are supposed to be a whore. We have a psychotomy that we live with that Virgin whore dichotomy that of course started in the Bible with Eve. And that binary is what keeps us in our place as women. And so it's that same binary that says you can be this, or you can be this, but you can never be both of those things. It's why there's this huge joke in the gay community by now gay later. Right? It's why it was so hard for me to sit. I had to pick, right? Like, oh, if I'm with women, I'm a lesbian. But if I men with men, I'm straight, which I'm not. And you know, like we put people in these boxes and we categorize everyone. It's the thing I was talking about with being Native American. Like either you're native, you got to know what percentage you are of Native American. And I'm sitting here going, but I know these things. That I have found out only in the last six months or prep spiritual practices that were handed down by my tribe, that I just know that I didn't know that I knew until like I read a paper on it. Like we put ourselves in these categories and say, this is who you are and you have to be this way, your whole life. And we're not, I mean, look at all this work you all are doing with Passionistas. Yeah. The stories you all are telling and the diversity of thinking that you are tapping it. It's amazing. Passionistas: Talk about the importance of leading with intuition and just following your feelings. Melissa: I think it goes beyond knowing what you want. Cause most of my clients actually don't have a clue what they want, right? Like they're like, I don't know what I'm doing, but here I am. Most people who join rebel sport are like, I don't know what this is exactly, but I just. Like, I don't know what I'm doing here, but here I just felt compelled and I was like, oh, good. You fit. Perfect. So I think some of it is thinking about we all this externalized information about who we're supposed to be. I remember when I was getting divorced from my ex-wife and I kept calling my psychic, like I, like, I was text messenger. I was like, what's going to happen next. What's going to happen next. What's next. And she's like, you already know. And I'm like, I don't like that, man. I need you to tell me, right? So we go to other people to get information. And what I do when I'm working with my clients is I'm like, here's the information. Now you have to take it and decide what resonates with you and what you're going to leave behind, because we could go to other people all day long to try and get more information. But if we don't listen to our hearts and we don't listen, not just our intuition, but our hearts that say, Hey, How about, we just love ourselves more today. If we don't have more self-compassion for ourselves and the things we want to do, then we're not going to go out and do the things we are here to do. I was listening to Meghan Waterson is an author. She wrote a really great book called Mary Magdalen revealed about the gospels. If Mary Magdalen, the lost gospels of Mary Magdalene. It's so amazing, y'all. She talks about how the body is the soul's reason for being here. So without the body, the soul can't come in. Right. And if each one of us in these bodies, as I'm looking at my little kiddos, they're two completely different souls, right? Three, actually, because I have an older one, but I'm not looking at her right now because she's in college. Thank God. As I look at my kids, as I look at the kids, when I used to teach preschool, as I look at each one of these little individual humans and us as adults. We are each here with a purpose. We are each here with a purpose on purpose and we have to listen to that purpose, no matter how bananas, it sounds, no matter how uncomfortable it makes us feel. No matter how mundane we think it is, it's still our purpose. And that's why we're here. And we can avoid it, which makes us sick a lot of the time. Right? Whether it makes us this buyer, body, mind, spirit, this concept of reconnecting to ourselves because we get disconnected after we're about six and we start going to public school, we start going to school, we get disconnected from our intuition. Cause you know, we gotta, you gotta sit in that chair. You gotta listen to the teacher who knows everything. And that's when we stopped. To everything around us. And so if we get back to this idea that we know what it is, it was me when I was six and building bird's nest in the backyard and just laying there and just humming along and singing and, you know, just whatever come on in little birds. Cause I really loved the birds. I mean, I'm Dr. Melissa Bird who doesn't love the birds. So really thinking about those things that before they were yelled out of us, beaten out of us, taken away from us. Patriarchal you were removed from us. What was that thing? We all have it and it's still there. Sometimes it's just a little more distant than we'd like it to be. Passionistas: Thanks for listening to The Passionistas Project Project Podcast and our interview with Dr. Melissa Bird. To learn more about her Misfit Magic Hour, one-on-one coaching and masterclass series, visit NaturalBornRebel.com. Please visit ThePassionistasProject.com to learn more about our podcast and subscription box filled with products made by women-owned businesses and female artisans to inspire you to follow your passions. Get $45 worth of free goodies with a one-year subscription using the code WINTERGOODIES. And be sure to subscribe to The Passionistas Project Podcast. So you don't miss any of our upcoming inspiring guests. Until next time, stay well and stay passionate.  

Podcast UFO
486. Navajo Ranger, Jonathan Dover

Podcast UFO

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 111:23


Guest, Jonathan Dover talks about Navajo oral history of Sky People, and his 11 years of officially investigating Bigfoot, Hauntings, Navajo Witchcraft, and UFO's. This includes some fascinating UFO encounters including his own.Show Notes

KZMU News
Tuesday December 21, 2021

KZMU News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 9:23


Over the weekend, Davina Smith rode on horseback to a spot in Monument Valley where her family buried her umbilical cord, a Navajo tradition tying her to the area. It's that area she hopes to serve in Utah's House of Representatives. Smith recently announced her candidacy for Utah's newly redrawn House District 69, which includes all of San Juan and Grand Counties. Plus, Moab City recently updated their water conservation plan, outlining action items to achieve regional water goals. The plan encourages water preservation to steady against an ‘uncertain future.' And later, discussions on the future of the Colorado River have wrapped up in Las Vegas, and the BLM's National Headquarters is shifting back East. Show Notes: Photo: Davina Smith announced her candidacy for Utah's newly redrawn House District 69. She is the first Diné woman to run for Utah state legislature. Courtesy KUER/Kate Groetzinger. Moab City Water Conservation Plan Update 2021 https://moabcity.org/AgendaCenter/ViewFile/Item/4371?fileID=5513

Important, Not Important
129. Indigenous DNA

Important, Not Important

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 79:39


In Episode 129, Quinn tries to better understand data privacy, data stewardship, and what it means for Indigenous cultures in the future of biotech, how we design equity into genetic research, and who gets to make those decisions. His guest is Krystal Tsosie, a geneticist, bioethicist, and—first and foremost to her—a person Indigenous to the southwestern United States, specifically the Navajo nation. She is the co-founder and Ethics and Policy Director at the Native BioData Consortium, the first Indigenous-led biological data repository for tribes in the US. “Representation” is just the first step (and so much more than who shows up on screen in the latest Disney movie (though even things there are still embarrassingly bland).  Next up is inclusivity: It's about who's in the room writing and building the future of technology, it's about asking who makes the rules, and who benefits from them?  But the real goal is equity, and benefit. And biotech in particular is one sector that could get out of hand real fast unless we approach it in a more inclusive and cooperative way. Krystal started her career with one question: Why don't Indigenous people generally participate in genetic studies? And the dominoes fell from there. Representation, inclusivity, equity, benefit – we can achieve these, and also uncouple DNA from identity. Have feedback or questions?http://www.twitter.com/importantnotimp ( Tweet us), or send a message to questions@importantnotimportant.com New here? Get started with our fan favorite episodes athttp://podcast.importantnotimportant.com ( podcast.importantnotimportant.com). Important, Not Important Book Club: https://bookshop.org/a/8952/9780816665860 (Native American DNA) by Kim TallBear https://bookshop.org/a/8952/9780262044004 (Data Feminism) by Catherine D'Ignazio and Lauren F. Klein https://bookshop.org/shop/importantnotimportant (https://bookshop.org/shop/importantnotimportant) Links: https://nativebio.org/ (nativebio.org) Twitter: https://twitter.com/kstsosie (@kstsosie) Connect with us: Subscribe to our newsletter at http://importantnotimportant.com/ (ImportantNotImportant.com)! Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/ImportantNotImp (twitter.com/ImportantNotImp) Follow Quinn: http://twitter.com/quinnemmett (twitter.com/quinnemmett) Follow Brian: https://twitter.com/beansaight (twitter.com/beansaight) Like and share us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/ImportantNotImportant (facebook.com/ImportantNotImportant) Intro/outro by Tim Blane: http://timblane.com/ (timblane.com) Important, Not Important is produced by http://crate.media/ (Crate Media) Support this podcast

New Mexico in Focus (A Production of NMPBS)
Redistricting Decisions, Hospitals at the Brink, and Cake and Culture with Baker Liz Howdy | 12.17.21

New Mexico in Focus (A Production of NMPBS)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 55:41


With redistricting decisions very much in flux, the Line Opinion Panel explores the issues standing in the way of New Mexico lawmakers. Will legislators truly consider the input of Tribal Nations, and if not, what could the legal ramifications be? Panelists give their take on that, and the possibility of Albuquerque being split into three separate congressional districts. Correspondent Gwyneth Doland also updates the tension over redistricting in a conversation with two people deeply invested in the process. Kathleen Burke from Fair Districts New Mexico and Casey Douma from the All Pueblo Council of Governors share their perspectives, and concerns, about the recent developments at the Capitol. They explain what they think is being overlooked, and how lawmakers should reframe their approach to properly serve underrepresented populations. The state legislature is working through another major undertaking – allocating more than $1B in federal COVID-19 relief funding. The Line Opinion Panelists explain the priorities lawmakers are considering, and the impact the virus is still having on the decision-making process. With hospitalization rates climbing higher, is there more that can be done to support medical professionals? Correspondent Antonia Gonzales introduces us to Navajo baker Liz Howdy. Find out how her culture frames her outlook as an artist and entrepreneur, and the passion that fuels her work. Plus, an easy holiday recipe everyone will love around the holidays! Line Opinion Panelists: Dede Feldman, former state senator Laura Sanchez, attorney Merritt Allen, Vox Optima Public Relations Guests: Kathleen Burke, project coordinator, Fair Districts for New Mexico Casey Douma, All Pueblo Council of Governors; Ad Hoc Redistricting Committee Liz Howdy, baker, Howdy Cakes More information: New Congressional Map - Signed on Friday by Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham Native Americans Wield Influence in New Mexico Redistricting – Associated Press All Pueblo Council of Governors – Official Website Native Americans Wield Influence in New Mexico Redistricting – Associated Press New Mexico Senate Passes Broadband, Highway Spending Bill – Associated Press Howdy Cakes Instagram Page - Instagram --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nmif/message

Starve the Ego Feed the Soul
The Ruins Within Us with Landis Bahe

Starve the Ego Feed the Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 85:13


Interested in working with me one on one? Head over to https://www.nicobarraza.com/ to learn more and book a session.Today's guest is my good friend and nationally renowned painter and tattoo artist Landis Bahe.  Landis and I have spent hours together over the past year as he's worked on the sleeve I have on my left arm.Landis is Diné (Navajo) and opens the episode with some of his music. Landis and I discuss so many things. From seeing and understanding your childhood trauma to building self-awareness in relationships.  Landis open's up about how he wants to raise awareness amongst Navajo people around healing generational trauma and relationship dynamics. I've been inspired by Landis' own healing journey. Since we first started working together in June of 2020 we've been able to share deeply with each other about our own experiences and I am proud to call Landis a friend.If you're interested in learning more, purchasing some of Landis' artwork, or working with him on a tattoo find him on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/landisbahe/?hl=enBe well,Nico

Everything Imaginable
Erica M Elliott M.D. - Medicine and Miracles in the High Desert: My Life Among the Navajo People

Everything Imaginable

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 100:53


Websites: www.ericaelliottmd.comwww.musingsmemoirandmedicine.com Dr. Elliott blogs about cutting-edge topics in medicine, along with excerpts from her life experiences.Twitter: https://twitter.com/ericamelliottFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedicineAndMiracles

Another Testament of Jesus Christ Podcast

King Benjamin teaches his sons about the Language of their ancestors. King Benjamin realizes his earthly time is coming to an end so he asks his sons to prepare and gather all his people. We will also talk with one of my Navajo sisters.....April SunShine Sanchez about Native American Culture and the Gospel of Jesus Christ. 

Your Aunties Favorite Podcast
The Way I See It

Your Aunties Favorite Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 58:31


The Uncs discuss the former Navajo Nation Controller, regionalizing the Navajo land and talk about Hersh's love for Justin Bieber.  

Only in OK Show
Festival of Light - Chickasha Oklahoma

Only in OK Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 25:48


The Chickasha Festival of Light has over 3.5 MILLION LIGHTS, and we are shining  one more light on all there is to do at this event.   The Chickasha Festival of Light has been recognized as one of the top ten holiday light shows in the nation and features over 3.5 million twinkling lights. The Festival of Light is an admission free event so that everyone may experience the magic and spirit of Christmas.   Chickasha is the perfect place. Located less than 40 minutes from Oklahoma City and Norman, this beautiful historic town offers an exclusive array of unique attractions, shopping and dining experiences. The locals of Chickasha take great pride in preserving their heritage and enriching the community through art and events highlighting the unique town.   Opening the bakery doors in 2016, Shollie's Sweets has created an abundance of sweets ranging from delicious chocolate chip cookies to hand-painted dragons and castles. http://onlyinokshow.com/shollies-sweets   Chickasha Wings, Inc. was founded in 2003 by Mitch Williams to provide safe, efficient and affordable aircraft rental and instruction from Chickasha Airport in Chickasha, Oklahoma. You can train for any certificate, starting at the Sport Pilot License and going all the way through to Commercial, Multi-Engine, Instrument Rating.   The Rock Island Train Depot is located at the East end of Historic Downtown Chickasha. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1985, the Rock Island Train Depot is the oldest remaining piece of monumental architecture in the community. When the rail line crossed the Washita River in 1892, the city of Chickasha was founded to serve as a passenger and rail freight station. The railroad was vital to Chickasha becoming an important trade and transportation center in south central Oklahoma.   The Chickasha Community Theatre works to enhance the Fine Arts education of the local youth, advance the cultural life of the area and they maintain a professionally equipped theatre for performing artists and shows.   Reba Nell McEntire, also known as Reba, is an country music singer, actress and businesswoman. She is often referred to as "the Queen of Country," having sold more than 75 million records worldwide. Since the 1970s, Reba has placed over 100 singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart, 25 of which reached the number one spot.   Matt Pinnell is an American politician serving as the 17th lieutenant governor of Oklahoma, since 2019. Pinnell is also serving as the first Oklahoma Secretary of Tourism & Branding. http://onlyinokshow.com/lt-governor-matt-pinnell   Opening late 2022: Reba's Place in Atoka, OK is a combination restaurant, bar, live music venue and retail store brought to life by country music superstar Reba McEntire. https://www.koco.com/article/reba-mcentire-bringing-dining-and-entertainment-venue-to-oklahoma/38367087   Atoka, Oklahoma was settled by the Choctaw and named in 1867 by a Baptist missionary for Chief Atoka, whose name means "ball ground" in English.   The Choctaw Nation is a Native American territory covering about 6,952,960 acres, occupying portions of southeastern Oklahoma in the United States. The Choctaw Nation is the third-largest federally recognized tribe in the United States and the second-largest Indian reservation in area after the Navajo.   Check out our sponsor: Holliday Tax Group   #TravelOK #onlyinokshow #Oklahoma #MadeinOklahoma #oklaproud #podcast #okherewego #traveloklahoma #Attraction #events  #December #Christmas #reba #historic #carriage #plays #festival #choctaw #chickasha #atoka

Everything Co-op with Vernon Oakes
Bijiibah Begaye, discusses Development of a Cooperative Ecosystem in the Navajo Nation

Everything Co-op with Vernon Oakes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 50:12


Bijiibah Begaye, co-director of Cooperative Catalyst of New Mexico, discusses development of Cooperative Ecosystem in the Navajo Nation, and how the Cooperative Catalyst of New Mexico serves as a resource for individuals, groups, companies, and other organizations in New Mexico that are interested in forming, converting to, or growing cooperatives. Bijiibah Begaye is a true believer in supporting the Navajo community at every stage of development. She has previously served as Program Director for the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension, and as Executive Director of Tse Ko Community Development Corporation. In addition to her work experience, her biggest influences come from being raised in Coalmine Mesa on the Navajo Nation where her family has managed Staggered Hearts Ranch for over 40 years.

Native Film Talk
Grey's Anatomy S15E17 - Tradition

Native Film Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 58:05


This unfortunately came out in a year where we were graced with superior Native representation in television, Rutherford Falls and Reservation Dogs. Fortunately for us we know better now because of those shows. Grey's Anatomy having Natives, at face value sounds amazing. The actual product though, left much to be desired. I felt like I was watching someone's attempt at being respectful to Natives. It's obvious that this was non-natives writing about native people. The representation felt romanticized, generalized, on the nose, and performative.  Overall, I love this show as a whole. I was so excited when I heard that Robert Mesa was playing James Chee, a Navajo intern and recurring character. So I was MORE excited when I heard an episode about Natives was coming and man did it fail to deliver. I'm happy though, had this come out a year ago I would have enjoyed it. Thankfully I have a graduated taste, thanks to the shows mentioned above.  Thank you everyone who supports the show. Like, subscribe, leave a review, and let me know what you think! Have a good one! 

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes
Demystifying the Petrodollar Scheme with Alex Gladstein (WiM082)

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 130:54


The "What is Money?" Show ✓ Claim Podcast Notes Key Takeaways For the first time in history, a debtor nation controlled the world's reserve currency.On August 15, 1971, Richard Nixon “rug-pulled” the world by taking the dollar off of the gold standard. “Fiat incentivizes theft and rent-seeking” – Breedlove. History reveals the incentives for “helping” less prosperous countries were profit-related. Bitcoin provides a solution to monetary policy AND is the only way for humans to establish true sovereignty. Read the full notes @ podcastnotes.orgAlex Gladstein joins me for a deep-dive into the petrodollar system and its many hidden costs.Be sure to check out NYDIG, one of the most important companies in Bitcoin: https://nydig.com/GUESTAlex's twitter: https://twitter.com/gladsteinHuman Rights Foundation: https://hrf.org/PODCASTPodcast Website: https://whatismoneypodcast.com/Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-what-is-money-show/id1541404400Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/25LPvm8EewBGyfQQ1abIsE?si=wgVuY16XR0io4NLNo0A11A&nd=1RSS Feed: https://feeds.simplecast.com/MLdpYXYITranscript:OUTLINE00:00:00 “What is Money?” Intro00:00:08 The Dollars' Pursuit to Peg Itself to Energy00:06:14 Gold: The Base-Layer of Human Action Historically00:10:29 The Cost of War and the Suppression of the Gold Price00:24:47 Gresham's Law00:34:17 Golds' Shortcomings00:39:24 The Dollar in Search of a New Anchor & The Rise of OPEC00:48:14 Cementing the Power of the Dollar Abroad00:52:32 The Dark-Side of Imperialism & The T-Bill Standard01:01:28 Exacerbation of Wealth Disparity01:04:35 Fueling War01:10:21 Oil-Denominated Currency War01:16:54 Follow the Money!01:18:30 NYDIG01:19:37 Flawed Incentives and Rent-Seeking Behavior01:29:10 Raw Material Surplus and Inflating Food Prices by Design?01:34:34 Peace Theory and Satoshi's Appreciation for Gold01:42:20 Bitcoin: The Most Expensive Property to Violate01:47:22 Bitcoin Price Manipulation and Suppression?01:52:40 Theirs' Law: Bitcoin Driving out the Bad Money02:00:07 Bullish on America, the Navajo, El Salvador, and NigeriaSOCIALBreedlove Twitter: https://twitter.com/Breedlove22WiM? Twitter: https://twitter.com/WhatisMoneyShowLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/breedlove22/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/breedlove_22/TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@breedlove22?lang=enAll My Current Work: https://linktr.ee/breedlove22​WRITTEN WORKMedium: https://breedlove22.medium.com/Substack: https://breedlove22.substack.com/WAYS TO CONTRIBUTEBitcoin: 3D1gfxKZKMtfWaD1bkwiR6JsDzu6e9bZQ7Sats via Strike: https://strike.me/breedlove22Sats via Tippin.me: https://tippin.me/@Breedlove22Dollars via Paypal: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/RBreedloveDollars via Venmo: https://venmo.com/code?user_id=1784359925317632528The "What is Money?" Show Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=32843101&fan_landing=trueRECOMMENDED BUSINESSESWorldclass Bitcoin Financial Services: https://nydig.com/Join Me At Bitcoin 2022 (10% off if paying with fiat, or discount code BREEDLOVE for Bitcoin): https://www.tixr.com/groups/bitcoinconference/events/bitcoin-2022-26217Put your Bitcoin to work. Earn up to 6% interest back on Bitcoin with Tantra: https://bit.ly/3CFcOmgAutomatic Recurring Bitcoin Buying: https://www.swanbitcoin.com/breedlove/Buy Bitcoin in a Tax-Advantaged Account: https://www.daim.io/robert-breedlove/Home Delivered Organic Grass-Fed Beef (Spend $159+ for 4 lbs. free): https://truorganicbeef.com/discount/BREEDLOVE22

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times
There she is, Miss Navajo Nation...

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 19:00


The Miss Navajo Nation pageant has been going on almost every year since the 1950s. It's not about swimsuits or evening gowns, though. This tradition is all about making sure the culture of the largest Native American tribe in the United States remains alive — and vibrant.In this episode, you'll hear from this year's contestants, judges and the winner. And you'll get a sense of why the Diné — what Navajos call themselves — place such importance on something nonmembers, at first glance, might dismiss as a mere beauty contest or country fair frivolity.More reading: A pageant like no other: ‘Can you imagine Miss USA or Miss Universe butchering a sheep?' Navajo shepherds cling to centuries-old tradition in a land where it refuses to rainNavajo Nation surpasses Cherokee to become largest tribe in the U.S.

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
12-07-21 New opportunities and threats for Native voting power

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 57:00


Districts with predominantly Native voters are targets as states start redrawing boundaries. Large blocks of Navajo voters in Arizona were instrumental in putting that state in the ‘blue' column in the last presidential race. Now, Arizona, New Mexico, North Dakota and Montana are among the states where tribal leaders and voting rights advocates are urging officials not to weaken Native voting power as the legislative and congressional district lines are being drawn.

Moonlight Lore
Legends Of The Nahanni Valley Part 3: The White Queen & Her Lost Tribe

Moonlight Lore

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 54:15


Part 3 is here! This episode we look into the early history of the Nahanni Valley, and investigate a mysterious lost tribe who disappeared thousands of years ago. And we also talk about the White Queen. A powerful woman said to rule over the Nahanni tribe in the late 1800's.  Email: Moonlightlorepodcast@gmail.com Music by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) licensed under creative commons: by attribution 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/license/4.0/  

KZMU News
Friday December 3, 2021

KZMU News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 23:45


Utah State University recently celebrated the construction of a traditional Hogan at its Blanding campus, where nearly 70 percent of students are Native American. The Hogan will be used by students as a place to practice traditional ceremonies and find peace and meditation. Today on the news, a report on the structure's importance for the college and the community. Plus, a Home of the Brave artist shares some of their musical creations during their residency in Cisco. And, the Weekly News Reel, where we check in with reporters about their latest stories of the Moab area. Doug McMurdo of The Times-Independent (9:00) discusses Rally on the Rocks' plans to forgo a 2022 event and the county soon finalizing a new voting district map. Alison Harford of the Moab Sun News (16:00) has updates on some local events including Moab Pub Trivia, avalanche awareness, and Navajo hoop dancing. Photo: The newly completed Hogan on USU-Blanding's campus was recently celebrated by staff and students. Courtesy USU-Blanding. Show Notes: Utah State University: USU Blanding to Hold Blessing Ceremony for Completed Navajo Hogan https://statewide.usu.edu/news/2021/blanding/2021-11-22-hogan-ceremony Home of the Brave: Artist Residency https://www.eileenmuza.org/residency Weekly News Reel Mentions – The Times-Independent: No Rally on the Rocks in 2022 https://www.moabtimes.com/articles/no-rally-on-the-rocks-in-2022/ The Times-Independent: County commissioners narrow redistricting maps to two https://www.moabtimes.com/articles/county-commissioners-narrow-redistricting-maps-to-two/ *Moab Sun News articles will be added when available online*

Antonia Gonzales
12-03-21 National Native News

Antonia Gonzales

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 5:13


Navajo environmental advocate testifies about proposed EPA methane rules Haskell Indian Nations University women's basketball is back on the court California state lawmaker advocates for federal accreditation for tribal college

Topanga Moon
Be impeccable with your energy! New moon solar eclipse and Winter Solstice rituals

Topanga Moon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 37:39


As we near the end of this year and enter into the sacred Winter Solstice how can we be impeccable with our energy. On the podcast today I chat about staying in love vibration and how to co-create with the universe by being impeccable with your energy. I chat about being a clear channel for inspiration and intuition by focusing on the now moment, acknowledging what energetics are present but not being attached to them. I share examples of how I have subtly shifted in this vibrational way and how I am seeing it in my life. I also share the Navajo prayer as an example to rising above and finding the beauty all around. And it wouldn't be a Topanga Moon podcast without more cosmic chats and rituals for the New Moon in Sagittarius and final eclipse of the year. I share some insights on this new moon and how it is a portal as we move into the Scorpio/Taurus eclipse season and leave the Sagittarius/Gemini. What lessons have we cultivated in these energies?I also chat about the upcoming Winter Solstice, the meaning behind this beautiful time and what rituals we can create for the Winter Solstice. I share a special Yule ritual I found from one of my favourite mystic sites called mystic mamma. I also share the spices, herbs and ritual tools to use during the Yule rituals. I would love to hear about your Winter Solstice rituals and what you have planned for this holiday season. If you are looking for some holiday cosmic goods and presents I have ritual candles and mystic vintage clothing for sale on www.topangamoon.comYou can always send me a message on @topanga_moon and ana@topangamoon.comSending you all moon blessings and happy New Moon!! xo

Work. Shouldnt. Suck.
Liberating Workplaces (EP.50)

Work. Shouldnt. Suck.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 39:24


This conversation was recorded as part of Work Shouldn't Suck's https://www.workshouldntsuck.co/ethical-reopening-summit-2021 (Ethical Re-Opening Summit) that took place on April 27, 2021. Co-host Lauren Ruffin facilitates a discussion with Vanessa Roanhorse and Syrus Marcus Ware on how organizations can center those most vulnerable to craft workplaces where everyone can thrive. Their discussion explores recently announced changes at Basecamp, and also the workplace re-opening survey conducted by Work Shouldn't Suck in Spring 2021. Resources mentioned during this episode:https://www.akpress.org/beyond-survival.html (Beyond Survival: Strategies and Stories from the Transformative Justice Movement), Ejeris Dixon (Editor); Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha (Editor) “https://world.hey.com/jason/changes-at-basecamp-7f32afc5 (Changes at Basecamp)” by Jason Fried “https://world.hey.com/dhh/basecamp-s-new-etiquette-regarding-societal-politics-at-work-b44bef69 (Basecamp's new etiquette regarding societal politics at work)” by David Heinemeier Hansson VANESSA ROANHORSE got her management chops working for 7 years at a Chicago-based nonprofit, the Delta Institute, focused throughout the Great Lakes region to build a resilient environment and economy through creative, sustainable, market-driven solutions. Vanessa oversaw many of Delta's on-the-ground energy efficiency, green infrastructure, community engagement programs, and workforce development training. Vanessa is a 2019 Village Capital Money Matters Advisory Board Member, 2019 SXSW Pitch Advisor, sits on the local Living Cities leadership table, is a Startup Champions Network member, is an Advisor for emerging Navajo incubator, Change Labs, Advisor for Native Entrepreneurship in Residence Program, and is a board member for Native Community Capital, a native-led CDFI. She is a co-founder of Native Women Lead, an organization dedicated to growing native women into positions of leadership and business. Her academic education is in film from the University of Arizona but her professional education is from hands-on experience leading local, regional and national initiatives. Vanessa is Navajo living in Albuquerque, New Mexico. SYRUS MARCUS WARE uses painting, installation and performance to explore social justice frameworks and black activist culture. His work has been shown widely, including in a solo show at Grunt Gallery, Vancouver (2068:Touch Change) and new work commissioned for the 2019 Toronto Biennial of Art and the Ryerson Image Centre (Antarctica and Ancestors, Do You Read Us? (Dispatches from the Future)) and in group shows at the Art Gallery of Ontario, the University of Lethbridge Art Gallery, Art Gallery of York University, the Art Gallery of Windsor and as part of the curated content at Nuit Blanche 2017 (The Stolen People; Wont Back Down). His performance works have been part of festivals across Canada, including at Cripping The Stage (Harbourfront Centre, 2016, 2019), Complex Social Change (University of Lethbridge Art Gallery, 2015) and Decolonizing and Decriminalizing Trans Genres (University of Winnipeg, 2015). // He is part of the PDA (Performance Disability Art) Collective and co-programmed Crip Your World: An Intergalactic Queer/POC Sick and Disabled Extravaganza as part of Mayworks 2014. Syrus' recent curatorial projects include That's So Gay (Gladstone Hotel, 2016-2019), Re:Purpose (Robert McLaughlin Gallery, 2014) and The Church Street Mural Project (Church-Wellesley Village, 2013). Syrus is also co-curator of The Cycle, a two-year disability arts performance initiative of the National Arts Centre. // Syrus is a core-team member of Black Lives Matter-Toronto. Syrus is a co-curator of Blackness Yes!/Blockorama. Syrus has won several awards, including the TD Diversity Award in 2017. Syrus was voted “Best Queer Activist” by NOW Magazine (2005) and was awarded the Steinert and Ferreiro Award (2012). Syrus is a facilitator/designer at the Banff Centre. Syrus is

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes
Your Life Is Now: Mike Posner On Walking America, Summiting Everest & Crafting Hit Music

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 138:56


Rich Roll Podcast Podcast Notes Key Takeaways Walking across the US was Mike Posner's 5-year long dreamEveryone thought that he was crazy to walk across America He was struggling to keep up with the celebrity persona (going on the road, doing public appearances, etc.)The truth about trying to do anything hard; you can't foresee every obstacle, you can't know for sure until you tryAfter 1797 miles, Mike got attacked by a poisonous rattlesnakeReason and excuse are the same things; will you live according to your excuses or your commitments?White people warned him about Navajo; “bad things tend to happen,” they saidWhen he finally got to Navajo, he found only love and supportDiné (Navajo people) prayed for him and gave him gifts (arrowheads and eagle feathers)What started as a hippie-dippy experience became an exercise in extreme disciplineGetting up at 4 AM every morning and starting to walk by 5 AMEvery day the alarm went off, Mike didn't want to get up. He never wanted to get upAfter Everest, there is no next, he doesn't want to do anything more dangerous than thatThe key is to use the leverage of the experience to be more present in your daily life, to have more gratitudeOur thinking mind is good at keeping us alive and helping us do menial tasks, but it's not our friend with a lot of important thingsWe need to make a distinction between our higher consciousness and the looping negative thought patterns of the thinking brainWith the absence of stimuli and planning, Mike's life became a lot simplerIt gave him a chance to clear everything from the past and be in the presentWhen we quiet our minds, we can find that peace anywhereRead the full notes @ podcastnotes.orgThe core of every hero's journey is a desire to step into the unknown, seek adventure, and above all, embrace metamorphosis.For Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter Mike Posner, that meant trading the comforts of Hollywood for a Mount Everest base camp—and ditching the tour bus to instead walk across America.Let me explain.After skyrocketing to fame following the release of his debut song Cooler Than Me, Mike built a career writing infectious pop meditations (that have accrued billions of streams) for some of music's biggest stars—people like Justin Beiber, Pharrell, Maroon 5, Tom Morello, Snoop Dogg, Nick Jonas, and Avicii. As follows, he also built a life on womanizing, partying, money, and fame.In our last exchange back in 2019, Mike and I discussed his moment of awakening—the events that led him to give away all his possessions, buy a van, and live more simply. But much has changed for Mike since we last sat down. Over the last two-plus years, he's walked 2000+ miles across America and followed it up this past year by summiting Mt. Everest, racking up a depth of experience-based wisdom along the way.Mike moves through the world with such a beautiful, heart-centered perspective. I appreciate the way in which he wears his heart on his sleeve, his ability to lean into vulnerability, and the manner in which he confronts struggle with curiosity.Today's exchange is centered on his quest for meaning and authenticity. It's about channeling pain into art, grief into gratitude, and above all, redefining yourself and self-imposed limits.Note: Mike was kind enough to perform a few songs live in our studio, so please stick around to the very end, as he takes us out with a performance you will not want to miss.To read more click here. You can also watch listen to our exchange on YouTube.I'm proud to help share my friend's experience, wisdom, and infectious hope. It's truly magical, and my hope is that you find it as moving as I did.Peace + Plants, See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Your Brain on Facts
This Land is Our Land (ep 173)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 40:51


In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue, and it's been downhill for New World peoples ever since.  Today we look at residential schools, the occupation of Alcatraz by Indians of All Tribes, the Oka crisis (aka the Mohawk resistance), and Sacheen Littlefeather's Oscar speech. YBOF Book; Audiobook (basically everywhere but Audible); Merch! Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs  .Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. Support the show Music by Kevin MacLeod, Steve Oxen, David Fesliyan.   Links to all the research resources are on our website. Late summer, 1990.  The protest had been going on for two months; tensions were escalating.  Soldiers had been dispatched to enforce the government's will, but the Kahnawake Mohawk weren't going to give up another inch of their land.  14 year old Waneek and her 4 year old sister Kaniehtiio were there with their activist mother when the violence started.  Waneek tried to get little Tio to safety when she saw a soldier who had taken her school books from her weeks prior...and he stabbed her in the chest.  My name's...   One of my goals with this podcast is to tell the stories that don't get told, the stories of people of color and women.  It's not always easy.  Pick a topic to research and it's white men all the way down.  But, even when I haven't been struggling with my chronic idiopathic pulmonary conditions, as I've been for the past three acute months, I've dropped the ball.  Mea culpa.  So let me try to catch up a little bit here as we close out November and Native American Heritage month.  And since the lungs are still playing up a bit, I'm tagging past Moxie in to help, though I've done with I can to polish her audio, even though I lost more than 100 episodes worth of work files when I changed computers and deleted the hard drive on my right rather than the hard drive on my left.     Today's episode isn't going to be a knee-slapping snark fest, but the severity of the stories is the precise reason we need to tell them, especially the ones that happened relatively recently but are treated like a vague paragraph in an elementary school textbook.  Come with me now, to the 1960's and the edge of California, to a rocky island in San Francisco bay.  Yes, that one, Alcatraz, the Rock.     After the American Indian Center in San Francisco was destroyed in a fire in October 1969, an activist group called “Indians of All Tribes” turned its attention to Alcatraz island and the prison which had closed six years earlier.  I'm going to abbreviate Indians of All Tribes to IAT, rather than shorten it to Indians, just so you know.  A small party, led by Mohawk college student Richard Oakes, went out to the island on Nov 9, but were only there one night before the authorities removed them.  That didn't disappoint Oakes, who told the SF Chronicle, “If a one day occupation by white men on Indian land years ago established squatter's rights, then the one day occupation of Alcatraz should establish Indian rights to the island.”   11 days later, a much larger group of Indians of All Tribes members, a veritable occupation force of 89 men, women and children, sailed to the island in the dead of night and claimed Alcatraz for all North America natives.  Despite warnings from authorities, the IAT set up house in the old guards' quarters and began liberally, vibrantly redecorating, spray-painting the forboding gray walls with flowers and slogans like “Red Power” and “Custer Had It Coming.”  The water tower read “Peace and Freedom. Welcome. Home of the Free Indian Land.”  And of course I put pictures of that in the Vodacast app.  Have you checked it out?  I'm still getting the hang of it...  The IAT not only had a plan, they had a manifesto, addressed to “The Great White Father and All His People,” in which they declared their intentions to use the island for a school, cultural center and museum.  Alcatraz was theirs, they claimed, “by right of discovery,” though the manifesto did offer to buy the island for “$24 in glass beads and red cloth”—the price supposedly paid for the island of Manhattan.     Rather than risk a PR fall-out, the Nixon administration opted to leave the occupiers alone as long as things remained peaceful and just kinda wait the situation out.  The island didn't even have potable water; how long could the IAT stay there?  Jokes on you, politicians of 50 years ago, because many of the occupiers lived in conditions as bad on reservations.  They'd unknowingly been training for this their entire lives.  Native American college students and activists veritably swarmed the island and the population ballooned to more than 600 people, twice the official capacity of the prison.  They formed a governing body and set up school for the kids, a communal kitchen, clinic, and a security detail called “Bureau of Caucasian Affairs.”  Other activists helped move people and supplies to the island and supportive well-wishers send money, clothes and canned food.    Government officials would travel to the island repeatedly to try, and fail, to negotiate.  The IAT would settle for nothing less than the deed to Alcatraz Island, and the government maintained such a property transfer would be impossible.  The occupation was going better than anyone expected, at least for the first few months.  Then, many of the initial wave of residents had to go back to college and their places were taken by people more interested in no rent and free food than in any cause.  Drugs and alcohol, which were banned, were soon prevalent.  Oakes and his wife left Alcatraz after his stepdaughter died in a fall, and things began to unravel even more quickly.  By May, the sixth month of the occupation, the government dispensed with diplomatic efforts and cut all remaining power to Alcatraz.  Only a few weeks later, a fire tore across the island and destroyed several of Alcatraz's historic buildings.  Federal marshals removed the last occupiers in June of the second year, an impressive 19 months after they first arrived, six men, five women and four children.  This time, when laws were passed after an act of rebellion, they were *for the rebels, which many states enacting laws for tribal self rule.  When Alcatraz opened as a national park in 1973, not only had the graffiti from the occupation not been removed, it was preserved as part of the island's history.   People gather at Alcatraz every November for an “Un-Thanksgiving Day” celebrating Native culture and activism. RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL   The American government took tens of thousands of children from Native families and placed them in boarding schools with strict assimilation practices.  Their philosophy - kill the Indian to save the man.  That was the mindset under which the U.S. government Native children to attend boarding schools, beginning in the late 19th century, when the government was still fighting “Indian wars.”   There had been day and boarding schools on reservations prior to 1870, when U.S. cavalry captain, Richard Henry Pratt established the Carlisle Indian School in Pennsylvania.  This school was not on a reservation, so as to further remove indigenous influences.  The Carlisle school and other boarding schools were part of a long history of U.S. attempts to either kill, remove, or assimilate Native Americans.  “As white population grew in the United States and people settled further west towards the Mississippi in the late 1800s, there was increasing pressure on the recently removed groups to give up some of their new land,” according to the Minnesota Historical Society. Since there was no more Western territory to push them towards, the U.S. decided to remove Native Americans by assimilating them. In 1885, Commissioner of Indian Affairs Hiram Price explained the logic: “it is cheaper to give them education than to fight them.”   Off-reservation schools began their assault on Native cultural identity as soon as students arrived, by first doing away with all outward signs of tribal life that the children brought with them.  The long braids worn by boys were cut off.  Native clothes were replaced with uniforms.  The children were given new Anglicized names, including new surnames.  Traditional Native foods were abandoned, as were things like sharing from communal dishes,  forcing students to use the table manners of white society, complete with silverware, napkins and tablecloths.  The strictest prohibition arguably fell on their native languages.  Students were forbidden to speak their tribal language, even to each other.  Some school rewarded children who spoke only English, but most schools chose the stick over the carrot and relied on punishment to achieve this aim.  This is especially cruel when you consider that many of the words the children were being forced to learn and use had no equivalent in their mother tongue.   The Indian boarding schools taught history with a definite white bias.  Columbus Day was heralded as a banner day in history and a beneficial event for Native people, as it was only after discovery did Native Americans become part of history.  Thanksgiving was a holiday to celebrate “good” Indians having aided the brave Pilgrim Fathers.  On Memorial Day, some students at off-reservation schools were made to decorate the graves of soldiers sent to kill their fathers.   Half of each school day was spent on industrial training. Girls learned to cook, clean, sew, care for poultry and do laundry for the entire institution.  Boys learned industrial skills such as blacksmithing, shoemaking or performed manual labor such as farming.  Not receiving much funding from the government, the schools were required to be as self-sufficient as possible, so students did the majority of the work.  By 1900, school curriculums tilted even further toward industrial training while academics were neglected.   The Carlisle school developed a “placing out system,” which put Native students in the mainstream community for summer or a year at a time, with the official goal of exposing them to more job skills.  A number of these programs were out-right exploitive.  At the Phoenix Indian School, girls became the major source of domestic labor for white families in the area, while boys were placed in seasonal harvest or other jobs that no one else wanted.   Conversion to Christianity was also deemed essential to the cause.  Curriculums included heavy emphasis of religious instruction, such as the Ten Commandments, the Beatitudes and Psalms.  Sunday school meant lectures on sin and guilt.  Christianity governed gender relations at the schools and most schools invested their energy in keeping the sexes apart, in some cases endangering the lives of the students by locking girls in their dormitories at night.     Discipline within the Indian boarding schools was severe and generally consisted of confinement, corporal punishment, or restriction of food.  In addition to coping with the severe discipline, students were ravaged by disease exacerbated by crowded conditions at the boarding schools. Tuberculosis, influenza, and trachoma (“sore eyes”) were the greatest threats.  In December of 1899, measles broke out at the Phoenix Indian School, reaching epidemic proportions by January.  In its wake, 325 cases of measles, 60 cases of pneumonia, and 9 deaths were recorded in a 10-day period.  During Carlisle's operation, from 1879 and 1918, nearly 200 children died and were buried near the school.   Naturally, Indian people resisted the schools in various ways. Sometimes entire villages refused to enroll their children in white schools.  Native parents also banded together to withdraw their children en masse, encouraging runaways, and undermining the schools' influence during summer break.  In some cases, police were sent onto the reservations to seize children from their parents.  The police would continue to take children until the school was filled, so sometimes orphans were offered up or families would negotiate a family quota. Navajo police officers would take children assumed to be less intelligent, those not well cared for, or those physically impaired.  This was their attempt to protect the long-term survival of their tribe by keeping healthy, intelligent children at home.     It was not until 1978, within the lifetime of many of my gentle listeners. that the passing of the Indian Child Welfare Act that Native American parents gained the legal right to deny their children's placement in off-reservation schools.   Though the schools left a devastating legacy, they failed to eradicate Native American cultures as they'd hoped. Later, the Navajo Code Talkers who helped the U.S. win World War II would reflect on the strange irony this forced assimilation had played in their lives.  “As adults, [the Code Talkers] found it puzzling that the same government that had tried to take away their languages in schools later gave them a critical role speaking their languages in military service,” recounts the National Museum of the American Indian.   In addition to documentaries, I'd like to recommend the movie The Education of Little Tree, starring James Cromwell, Tantu Cardinal and Graham Green, about a part-Charokee boy who goes to live with his grandparents in the Tennessee mountains, but is then sent to an Indian school.   There are a number of off-reservation boarding schools in operation today.  Life in the schools is still quite strict, but now includes teaching Native culture and language rather than erasing it.  Though they cannot be separated from their legacy of oppression and cultural violence, for many modern children, they're a step to a better life.  Poverty is endemic to many reservations, which also see much higher than average rates of alcoholism, drug use, and suicide.    For the students, these schools are a chance to escape.   OKA   Some words are visceral reminders of collective historic trauma. “Selma” or “Kent State” recall the civil rights movement and the use of military force against U.S. citizens. “Bloody Sunday” evokes “the Troubles” of Northern Ireland. Within Indigenous communities in North America, the word is “Oka.”  That word reminds us of the overwhelming Canadian response to a small demonstration in a dispute over Mohawk land in Quebec, Canada, in 1990. Over the course of three months, the Canadian government sent 2,000 police and 4,500 soldiers (an entire brigade), backed by armored vehicles, helicopters, jet fighters and even the Navy, to subdue several small Mohawk communities.  What was at stake?  What was worth all this to the government?  A golf course and some condos.   The Kanesetake had been fighting for their land for centuries, trying to do it in accordance with the white man's laws, as far back as appeals to the British government in 1761. In 1851, the governor general of Canada refused to recognize their right to their land.  8 years later, the land was given to the Sulpicians, a Catholic diocese.  In 1868, the government of the nascent Dominion of Canada denied that the Mohawk's original land grant had even reserved land for them, so it wasn't covered under the Indian Act. In the 1910's, the he Mohawks of Kanesatake's appealed all the way to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council, Canada's highest appeals court at the time, who ruled that official title to the land was held by the Sulpicians.  By the end of the Second World War, the Sulpicians had sold all of their remaining land and had left the area. Surely the Mohawk could have their land back now!  Nope.  The Mohawk of Kanesatake were now confined to about 2.3mi sq/6 km sq, known as The Pines, less than 1/10th of the land they once held.  The Mohawk people of Kahnawake, Kanesetake and Akwesasne asserted Aboriginal title to their ancestral lands in 1975, but their claim was rejected on the most BS possible reason -- that they had not held the land continuously from time immemorial.  And on and on.   So you can understand why they'd be a little miffed when plans were announced to expand a golf course that had been built in 1961, expanding onto land that was used for sacred and ceremonial purposes and included a graveyard.  Again, the Mohawk tried to use the proper legal channels and again they got royally fucked over.  That March, their protests and petitions were ignored by the City Council in Oka.  They had to do something the city couldn't ignore.  They began a blockade of a small dirt road in The Pines and they maintained it for a few months.  The township of Oka tried to get a court injunction to order its removal.  On July 11, 1990, the Quebec provincial police sent in a large heavily armed force of tactical officers armed with m16s and tear gas and such-like to dismantle this blockade.  The Mohawks met this show of force with a show of their own.  Behind the peaceful protestors, warriors stood armed and ready.     Let me try to give this story some of the air time it deserves.  April 1, 1989, 300 Kanesatake Mohawks marched through Oka to protest against Mayor Jean Ouellette's plan to expand the town's golf course.  On March 10, 1990, --hey, that's my birthday!  the day, not the year-- After Oka's municipal council voted to proceed with the golf course expansion project, a small group of Mohawks barricades the access road.  With a building.  They drug a fishing shack into the Pines and topped it with a banner that read “Are you aware that this is Mohawk territory?” and the same again in French, because Quebec.  There's a picture on the Vodacast app, naturally, as well as a photo called Face to Face is a photograph of Canadian Pte. Patrick Cloutier and Anishinaabe warrior Brad Larocque staring each other down during the Oka Crisis. It was taken on September 1, 1990 by Shaney Komulainen, and has become one of Canada's most famous images.  It really should be more famous outside of Canada, like the lone protestor blocking tanks in Tiananmen Square or 1968 Summer Olympics, Tommie Smith and John Carlos staged a protest and displayed a symbol of Black power during their medal ceremony.  Check it out on Vodacast and let me know if you agree, soc. med.   during the summer of 1990 the Mohawk warrior society engaged in the 78 day armed standoff with the s.q Provincial Police and the Canadian Armed Forces in order to protect an area of their territory from development known as the pines near the town of oka.   This area was used as a tribal cemetery along with other tribal activities important to the Mohawks.  The oka crisis or also known as the Mohawk resistance was a defensive action that gained international attention,  taken by Mohawks of the Kanna Satake reserve along with other Mohawks from the nearby communities of Kanna waka as well as the Aquosasne on a reservation on the American side of the u.s. Canadian colonial border.  It was one of the most recent examples of Native armed resistance that was successful in stopping construction and development on to tribal lands.  So what was being developed that led to this armed confrontation leading to the death of an sq SWAT officer during that hot summer?  Golf.  The town of oka and investors wanted to expand a nine-hole golf course at the Open Golf Club into an 18-hole course as well as build around 60 condominiums into Mohawk territory.  Since 1989 the Mohawks had been protesting these plans for development by the town of oka and investors of the Golf Course expansion.  Seeing that the local courts were not of any help in recognizing Mohawk claims of the land under development, Mohawk protesters and community members held marches rallies and signed petitions.   Eventually the Mohawks set up a barricade blocking access to the development site on a gravel road.  Later on it was occupied mainly by Mohawk women and children OCA's mayor jean wallet one of the nine hole golf course expanded and filed the injunction against the Mohawks. He went into hiding during the oka crisis. [sfx clip] I will occupy this land for what it takes he has to prove it to me that it's his and I will prove it to him that's mine.  Oak is mayor had stated the land in question actually belonged to the town of oka and did not back down from the issue, but instead filed an injunction one of many that had been issued prior to remove the Mohawks from the area and take down the barricades by force if necessary.  if I have to die for Mohawk territory I will but I ain't going alone are you armed no the Creator will provide in anticipation of the raid by the sq mohawks of knesset Aki sent out a distress call to surrounding communiti.  In the Mohawk warrior society from the Aquos austenite reservation and the American side of the Mohawk reserve as well as kana waka have begun filtering into the barricade area with camping gear communications equipment food and weapons.  It's difficult to pin down just who makes up the Warriors society. the leaders an organization you each depending on the circumstances.  the member roles are  treated like a military secret, which is fitting since many or most of the Warriors were veterans, with a particular persistance of Vietnam Marines.   why the Warriors exist is easier to answer   mohawk have closed off the Mercier bridge sparking a traffic nightmare.  Provincial police arrived at dawn secure position in case of Mohawk until 8:00 to clear out.  The natives stood their ground the battle for the barricade started just before nine o'clock on one side heavily armed provincial police bob tear gas and stun grenade power [sfx reporter] a 20-minute gun battle ensued dozens of rounds of ammunition were shot off and then the inevitable someone was hit a police officer took a bullet in the face which proved fatal that seems to turn the tide the police has been advancing until then turned tail and fled leaving six of their vehicles behind.  The Mohawk celebrated when the police left celebrated what they called a victory over the qpm.  Most of the Mohawks each shot that the raid had taken place they said they were angry - angry that a dispute over a small piece of land had ended in violence.  [sfx this clip but earlier] I mean the non-indians that initiated this project of a golf course and then and then trying to take the land away because it's Mohawk clan it's our land there's a little bit left they're sucking the marrow out of our bones.  [sfx this clip, little earlier] we've kept talking in and saying you know what kind of people are you there's children here and you're shooting tear gas at us we're not we're on armed and you're aiming your weapons at us what kind of people are you.     The police retreated, abandoning squad cars and a front-end loader, basically a bulldozer.  They use the loader to crash the vehicles and they push them down the road, creating two new barricades, blocking highway 344.  The Mohawk braced for a counterattack and vowed to fire back with three bullets for every bullet fired at them.  due to the inability of the SQ to deal with the heavily armed Mohawks   The Canadian government called in the Royal Canadian Armed Forces to deal with the Mohawks. As the army pushed further into the Mohawk stronghold there was a lot of tension with Mohawk warriors staring down soldiers getting in their faces taunting them challenging them to put down their weapons and engage in hand-to-hand combat.   this is how the remainder of the siege would play out between the Warriors and Army as there were thankfully no more gun battles. [Music] as the seige wore on and came to an end most of the remaining Warriors as well as some women and children took refuge in a residential treatment center.   instead of an orderly surrender as the army anticipated warriors simply walked out of the area where they were assaulted by waiting soldiers and the police.  50 people taken away from the warrior camp including 23 warriors, but that means right over half the people taken into custody were non-combatants.   by 9:30 that night the army began to pull out, at the end of their two and a half months seige  a number of warriors were later charged by the sq.  5 warriors were convicted of crimes included assault and theft although only one served jail time.  during the standoff the Canadian federal government purchased the pines in order to prevent further development, officially canceling the expansion of the golf course and condominiums.  Although the government bought additional parcels of land for connoisseur taka there has been no organized transfer of the land to the Mohawk people. investigations were held after the crisis was over and revealed problems with the way in which the SQ handled the situation which involved command failures and racism among sq members.   Ronald (Lasagna) Cross and another high-profile warrior, Gordon (Noriega) Lazore of Akwesasne, are arraigned in Saint-Jérôme the day after the last Mohawks ended their standoff. In all, about 150 Mohawks and 15 non-Mohawks were charged with various crimes. Most were granted bail, and most were acquitted. Cross and Lazore were held for nearly six months before being released on $50,000 bail. They were later convicted of assault and other charges. After a community meeting, it was the women who decided that they would walk out peacefully, ending the siege. With military helicopters flying low, spotlights glaring down and soldiers pointing guns at them, Horn-Miller carried her young sister alongside other women and children as they walked to what they thought was the safety of the media barricades.  They didn't make it far before violence broke out. People started running, soldiers tackled warriors, fights broke out and everyone scrambled to get to safety. Up until that point Horn-Miller said she was able to keep her older sister calm by singing a traditional song to her.   LITTLEFEATHER on the night of 27 March 1973. This was when she took the stage at the 45th Academy Awards to speak on behalf of Marlon Brando, who had been awarded best actor for his performance in The Godfather. It is still a striking scene to watch.  Amid the gaudy 70s evening wear, 26-year-old Littlefeather's tasselled buckskin dress, moccasins, long, straight black hair and handsome face set in an expression of almost sorrowful composure, make a jarring contrast.  Such a contrast, that is beggered belief.   Liv Ullman read the name of the winner and Roger Moore made to hand Littlefeather Brando's Oscar, but she held out a politely forbidding hand.  She explained that Brando would not accept the award because of “the treatment of American Indians today by the film industry.”  Some people in the audience applauded; a lot of them booed her, but she kept her calm.  Here, you can listen for yourself.  [sfx clip]  At the time, Wounded Knee, in South Dakota, was the site of a month-long standoff between Native American activists and US authorities, sparked by the murder of a Lakota man.  We're used to this sort of thing now, but on the night, nobody knew what to make of a heartfelt plea in the middle of a night of movie industry mutual masturbation.  Was it art, a prank?  People said Littlefeather was a hired actress, that she was Mexican rather than Apache, or, because people suck on several levels at once, that she was a stripper.  How did this remarkable moment come to pass?   Littlefeather's life was no cake-walk.  Her father was Native American and her mother was white, but both struggled with mental health.  Littlefeather had to be removed from their care at age three, suffering from tuberculosis of the lungs that required her to be kept in an oxygen tent at the hospital.  She was raised by her maternal grandparents, but saw her parents regularly.  That may sound like a positive, but it exposed her to domestic violence.  She once tried to defend her mother from a beating by hitting her father with a broom.  He chased her out of the house and tried to run her down with his truck.  The young girl escaped into a grove of trees and spent the night up in the branches, crying herself to sleep. r   She did not fit in at the white, Catholic school her grandparents sent her to.  At age 12, she and her grandfather visited the historic Roman Catholic church Carmel Mission, where she was horrified to see the bones of a Native American person on display in the museum. “I said: ‘This is wrong. This is not an object; this is a human being.' So I went to the priest and I told him God would never approve of this, and he called me heretic. I had no idea what that was.”  An adolescence of depression and a struggle for identity followed.   Fortunately, in the late 1960s and early 70s Native Americans were beginning to reclaim their identities and reassert their rights.  After her father died, when she was 17, Littlefeather began visiting reservations and even visited Alcatraz during the Indians of all Tribes occupation.  She travelled around the country, learning traditions and dances, and meeting other what she called “urban Indian people” also reconnecting with your heritage.  “The old people who came from different reservations taught us young people how to be Indian again. It was wonderful.”  By her early 20s Littlefeather was head of the local affirmative action committee for Native Americans, studying representation in film, television and sports.  They successfully campaigned for Stanford University to remove their offensive “Indian” mascot, 50 years before pro sports teams like the Cleveland Indians got wise.  At the same time, white celebrities like Burt Lancaster began taking a public interest in Native American affairs.  Littlefeather lived near director Francis Ford Coppola, but she only knew him to say hello.  Nonetheless, after hearing Marlon Brando speaking about Native American rights, as she walked past Coppola's house to find him sitting on his porch, drinking ice tea.  She yelled up the walk, “Hey! You directed Marlon Brando in The Godfather” and she asked him for Brando's address so she could write him a letter.  It took some convincing, but Coppola gave up the address.   Then, nothing.  But months later, the phone rang at the radio station where Littlefeather worked.  He said: ‘I bet you don't know who this is.'  She said, “Sure I do.  It sure as hell took you long enough to call.”  They talked for about an hour, then called each other regularly.  Before long he was inviting her for the first of several visits and they became friends.  That was how Brando came to appoint her to carry his message to the Oscars, but it was hastily planned.  Half an hour before her speech, she had been at Brando's house on Mulholland Drive, waiting for him to finish typing an eight-page speech.  She arrived at the ceremony with Brando's assistant, just minutes before best actor was announced.  The producer of the awards show immediately informed her that she would be removed from the stage after 60 seconds.  “And then it all happened so fast when it was announced that he had won.  I had promised Marlon that I would not touch that statue if he won. And I had promised [the producer] that I would not go over 60 seconds. So there were two promises I had to keep.”  As a result, she had to improvise.   I don't have a lot of good things to say about Marlon Brando --he really could have had a place in the Mixed Bags of History chapter of the YBOF book; audiobook available most places now-- but he had Hollywood dead to rights on its Native Americans stereotypes and treatment, as savages and nameless canon fodder, often played by white people in red face.  This was a message not everyone was willing to hear.  John Wayne, who killed uncountable fictional Natives in his movies, was standing in the wings at that fateful moment, and had to be bodily restrained by security to stop him from charing Littlefeather.  For more on Wayne's views of people of color, google his 1971 Playboy interview.  Clint Eastwood, who presented the best picture Oscar, which also went to The Godfather, “I don't know if I should present this award on behalf of all the cowboys shot in all the John Ford westerns over the years.” In case you thought fussing out an empty chair was the worst we got from him.  When Littlefeather got backstage, people made stereotypical war cries and tomahawk motions at her.  After talking to the press --and I can't say I'm not surprised that event organizers didn't spirit her away immediately -- she went straight back to Brando's house where they sat together and watched the reactions to the event on television, the ‘compulsively refreshing your social media feed' of the 70's.   But Littlefeather is proud of the trail she blazed. She was the first woman of colour, and the first indigenous woman, to use the Academy Awards platform to make a political statement. “I didn't use my fist. I didn't use swear words. I didn't raise my voice. But I prayed that my ancestors would help me. I went up there like a warrior woman. I went up there with the grace and the beauty and the courage and the humility of my people. I spoke from my heart.”  Her speech drew international attention to Wounded Knee, where the US authorities had essentially imposed a media blackout.  Sachee Littlefeather went on to get a degree in holistic health and nutrition, became a health consultant to Native American communities across the country, worked with Mother Teresa caring for Aids patients in hospices, and led the San Francisco Kateri Circle, a Catholic group named after Kateri Tekakwitha, the first Native American saint, canonized in 2012.  Now she is one of the elders transmitting knowledge down generations, though sadly probably not for much longer.  She has breast cancer that metastasized to her lung.  “When I go to the spirit world, I'm going to take all these stories with me. But hopefully I can share some of these things while I'm here.  I'm going to the world of my ancestors. I'm saying goodbye to you … I've earned the right to be my true self.”   And that's...Rather than being taken to the hospital for the stab wound a centimeter from her heart, Waneek and the other protesters were taken into custody.  Thankfully, she would heal just fine and even went on to become an Olympic athlete and continued her activism.  And little Tio?  She grew up to be an award-winning actress, best known in our house for playing Tanis on Letterkenny.  Season 10 premier watch party at my house.  Remember….Thanks...       Sources: https://www.history.com/news/how-boarding-schools-tried-to-kill-the-indian-through-assimilation http://www.nativepartnership.org/site/PageServer?pagename=airc_hist_boardingschools https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=17645287 https://hairstylecamp.com/native-american-beard/ https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/jun/03/i-promised-brando-i-would-not-touch-his-oscar-secret-life-sacheen-littlefeather https://www.cbc.ca/radio/unreserved/reflections-of-oka-stories-of-the-mohawk-standoff-25-years-later-1.3232368/sisters-recall-the-brutal-last-day-of-oka-crisis-1.3234550 https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/oka-crisis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ArOIdwcj2w8 https://www.history.com/news/native-american-activists-occupy-alcatraz-island-45-years-ago  

western canada canadian playboy pr students california american music audible black indian god home world war ii freedom english oscars history french nope boys north america hollywood army city council british rock aids poverty san francisco peace girls land brainiac united states manhattan federal tennessee warriors government education drugs clint eastwood academy awards pennsylvania new world mississippi native americans native thanksgiving natives memorial day navajo alcatraz reach roger moore francis ford coppola hang jokes indians mexican soldiers aboriginal creator cross golf john wayne navy dominion quebec stanford university national museum pines columbus christianity catholic oak oca northern ireland bs olympic games brando south dakota apache godfather american indian psalms surely roman catholic bureau swat john ford marlon brando tio tribes john carlos naturally coppola troubles discipline mercier anishinaabe moxie carlisle summer olympics graham green judicial committee privy council mea mulholland drive conversion mother teresa columbus day cleveland indians beatitudes provincial lakota amid ten commandments storyid golf courses tanis tuberculosis mohawk burt lancaster wounded knee oka sq kanna letterkenny alcatraz island code talkers bloody sunday tiananmen square iat mohawks liv ullman american indian center james cromwell residential schools carlisle indian school commissioners aki little tree akwesasne oakes kent state canadian armed forces red power kahnawake oka crisis tommie smith sf chronicle saint j native american heritage pageserver anglicized indian act sacheen littlefeather pilgrim fathers minnesota historical society indian child welfare act curriculums navajo code talkers richard henry pratt kanesatake richard oakes
Antonia Gonzales
12-01-21 National Native News

Antonia Gonzales

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 5:14


Navajo officials monitor Omicron variant, urge citizens to continue COVID-19 precautions Parents share their painful experience of daughter's MMIW case on Dr. Phil television show

The
Demystifying the Petrodollar Scheme with Alex Gladstein (WiM082)

The "What is Money?" Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 130:54


Alex Gladstein joins me for a deep-dive into the petrodollar system and its many hidden costs.Be sure to check out NYDIG, one of the most important companies in Bitcoin: https://nydig.com/GUESTAlex's twitter: https://twitter.com/gladsteinHuman Rights Foundation: https://hrf.org/PODCASTPodcast Website: https://whatismoneypodcast.com/Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-what-is-money-show/id1541404400Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/25LPvm8EewBGyfQQ1abIsE?si=wgVuY16XR0io4NLNo0A11A&nd=1RSS Feed: https://feeds.simplecast.com/MLdpYXYITranscript:OUTLINE00:00:00 “What is Money?” Intro00:00:08 The Dollars' Pursuit to Peg Itself to Energy00:06:14 Gold: The Base-Layer of Human Action Historically00:10:29 The Cost of War and the Suppression of the Gold Price00:24:47 Gresham's Law00:34:17 Golds' Shortcomings00:39:24 The Dollar in Search of a New Anchor & The Rise of OPEC00:48:14 Cementing the Power of the Dollar Abroad00:52:32 The Dark-Side of Imperialism & The T-Bill Standard01:01:28 Exacerbation of Wealth Disparity01:04:35 Fueling War01:10:21 Oil-Denominated Currency War01:16:54 Follow the Money!01:18:30 NYDIG01:19:37 Flawed Incentives and Rent-Seeking Behavior01:29:10 Raw Material Surplus and Inflating Food Prices by Design?01:34:34 Peace Theory and Satoshi's Appreciation for Gold01:42:20 Bitcoin: The Most Expensive Property to Violate01:47:22 Bitcoin Price Manipulation and Suppression?01:52:40 Theirs' Law: Bitcoin Driving out the Bad Money02:00:07 Bullish on America, the Navajo, El Salvador, and NigeriaSOCIALBreedlove Twitter: https://twitter.com/Breedlove22WiM? Twitter: https://twitter.com/WhatisMoneyShowLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/breedlove22/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/breedlove_22/TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@breedlove22?lang=enAll My Current Work: https://linktr.ee/breedlove22​WRITTEN WORKMedium: https://breedlove22.medium.com/Substack: https://breedlove22.substack.com/WAYS TO CONTRIBUTEBitcoin: 3D1gfxKZKMtfWaD1bkwiR6JsDzu6e9bZQ7Sats via Strike: https://strike.me/breedlove22Sats via Tippin.me: https://tippin.me/@Breedlove22Dollars via Paypal: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/RBreedloveDollars via Venmo: https://venmo.com/code?user_id=1784359925317632528The "What is Money?" Show Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=32843101&fan_landing=trueRECOMMENDED BUSINESSESWorldclass Bitcoin Financial Services: https://nydig.com/Join Me At Bitcoin 2022 (10% off if paying with fiat, or discount code BREEDLOVE for Bitcoin): https://www.tixr.com/groups/bitcoinconference/events/bitcoin-2022-26217Put your Bitcoin to work. Earn up to 6% interest back on Bitcoin with Tantra: https://bit.ly/3CFcOmgAutomatic Recurring Bitcoin Buying: https://www.swanbitcoin.com/breedlove/Buy Bitcoin in a Tax-Advantaged Account: https://www.daim.io/robert-breedlove/Home Delivered Organic Grass-Fed Beef (Spend $159+ for 4 lbs. free): https://truorganicbeef.com/discount/BREEDLOVE22

New Dimensions
Beyond Informational Thinking To Connective Thinking - Glenn Aparicio Parry, Ph.D. - ND3555

New Dimensions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 57:20


Glenn Parry believes that the way to cure our planetary challenges begins with a return to original thought. The way we think and interact with nature and each other, he says, affects everything. He believes that the shift to linear thinking is not our natural way, and explains that our rational thought is different from the kind of thought that connects us to the universe. Glenn Aparicio Parry, Ph.D. is an educator, international speaker, entrepreneur, and visionary whose life-long passion is to re-form thinking and education into a coherent, cohesive whole. He's the founder and past president of the SEED Institute, and is currently the president of the think tank: The Circle for Original Thinking. Parry organized and participated in the groundbreaking Language of Spirit Conferences from 1999 – 2011 that brought together Indigenous Native Elders and Western scientists in dialogue. This series of conferences was moderated by Leroy Little Bear. Parry is an avid outdoorsman and makes his home in the foothills of the Sandia Mountains in Albuquerque, NM, with his wife, dog, and cat. He is the author of Original Thinking: A Radical ReVisioning of Time, Humanity, and Nature (North Atlantic Books 2015).Interview Date: 8/18/2015     Tags: Glenn Aparicio Parry, Original thought, conspiracy with nature, Native Americans, Language of Spirit Conference, brain, David Bohm, Leroy Little Bear, Dan Moonhawk Alfred, sacred ratio, golden mean, map story, rational thinking, rational thought, New Mexico, Navajo, Grandfather Leon, Orlando Secatero, campfire, spirit dialogues, Science, Self Help, psychology, Ecology/Nature/Environment

The New Dimensions Café
Even Our Thoughts Are Connected To Nature - Glenn Aparicio Parry, Ph.D. - C0351

The New Dimensions Café

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 17:46


Glenn Aparicio Parry, Ph.D. is an educator, international speaker, entrepreneur, and visionary whose life-long passion is to re-form thinking and education into a coherent, cohesive whole. He's the founder and past president of the SEED Institute, and is currently the president of the think tank: The Circle for Original Thinking. Parry organized and participated in the groundbreaking Language of Spirit Conferences from 1999 – 2011 that brought together Indigenous Native Elders and Western scientists in dialogue. This series of conferences was moderated by Leroy Little Bear. Parry is an avid outdoorsman and makes his home in the foothills of the Sandia Mountains in Albuquerque, NM, with his wife, dog, and cat. He is the author of Original Thinking: A Radical ReVisioning of Time, Humanity, and Nature (North Atlantic Books 2015). Interview Date: 8/18/2015   Tags: Glenn Aparicio Parry, Original thought, thoughts, intent, Hopis, hydraulic cycle, David Bohm, fragmented thinking, Grandfather Leon Secatero, The Circle for Original Thinking, assumptions, vision quest, conspiracy with nature, Native Americans, Language of Spirit Conference, brain, David Bohm, Leroy Little Bear, Dan Moonhawk Alfred, sacred ratio, golden mean, map story, rational thinking, rational thought, New Mexico, Navajo, Grandfather Leon, Orlando Secatero, campfire, spirit dialogues, Science, Self Help, psychology, Ecology/Nature/Environment

Digital Planet
PIX instant payment limits to reduce kidnappings

Digital Planet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 42:44


PIX instant payment limits to reduce kidnappings Last year the PIX instant payment system was introduced in Brazil. It currently has 112 million registered users – that's 62% of the population. It's proving incredibly popular and is allowing the 40 million unbanked people in the country access to electronic payments. Unfortunately its popularity has also led to significant issues – namely ransom demands by kidnappers that can be paid immediately. By lowering the payment limit and stopping night payments, it's hoped this will curb the problem. Silvia Bassi, who runs the tech website The Shift in Brazil, is on the show. Bitcoin mining in Navajo Nation – crypto-colonialism In the past traditional mining often took advantage of local people living near the mine, now something similar may be happening with cryptocurrencies. A bitcoin mine in the Four Corners region of New Mexico which belongs to the Navajo nation is causing controversy. It consumes enough to power 19,600 homes, yet many local residents lack water and electricity. The scheme was originally set up with the Navajo's support but there is opposition from some local people. Mining companies argue though that investing in their schemes will ultimately reap financial rewards for the local people. Reporter Luke Ottenhof is on the show to discuss this story and the rise of crypto-colonialism globally. AI training for top flight football Our gaming correspondent Chris Berrow reports on the latest tech to train footballers. Norwich City are the first UK Premiership club to use the Soccerbot360 simulator which claims to replicate real-life match scenarios - enabling players to work on their decision-making. We will soon see if it improves the Canaries' game. The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Angelica Mari. Studio Manager: Bob Nettles Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz (Image: Pix logo on smartphone with Brazilian currency Credit: Cris Faga/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Madam Athlete
Finding Healing with Native Women Running Founder Verna Volker

Madam Athlete

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 50:23


Today I'm talking to the founder of Native Women Running Verna Volker.  Verna is an ultra runner and member of the Navajo nation who created Native Women Running to share and celebrate the stories of Indigenous women runners. A mother of four and a second-grade teacher, Verna first began running over ten years ago as a way to get in shape after moving to a new city. When she started sharing her progress through social media, Verna saw an online running community that failed to look like her or the other women she knew.   Verna began amplifying the voices of other Indigenous women, and this grew into Native Women Running. Verna has kept building this platform, reaching recognition in the larger running community, and continues to push herself on the trail, recently completing her first 100k race this fall.We talk about: Stepping outside of your comfort zone Prioritizing restSurprising yourselfTo get the latest tools to help you build your own career right now, check out these FREE resources at Madam Athlete:Negotiation: Grab your worksheet to prepare yourself for your next negotiationGoal-Setting Mini Course:  Get started in the FREE Goal-Setting mini-course today!Managing Perfectionism:  Download my 3 favorite exercises to fight off perfectionismBook Club:  Sign up here to join the book clubKeep an eye out for new content or let us know what you'd like to see next by following us on social:Instagram:  @theMadamAthleteFacebook:  @MadamAthleteTwitter:  @MadamAthlete

Dr. History's Tales of the Old West
Native American Languages

Dr. History's Tales of the Old West

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 23:24


There may have been as many as 300 Native American languages with only 175 remaining. They were complex and there was a tremendous variety among tribes. Navajo is the most difficult to learn and the most commonly spoken in the U.S. and was used in World War II. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Encyclopedia Womannica
Indigenous Women: Annie Dodge Wauneka

Encyclopedia Womannica

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 4:40


Annie Dodge Wauneka (1910-1997) was a prominent leader in the Navajo community, and a voice for Navajo people in the US government. She worked to improve the health of people in her community, while respecting and preserving Navajo culture.History classes can get a bad wrap, and sometimes for good reason. When we were students, we couldn't help wondering... where were all the ladies at? Why were so many incredible stories missing from the typical curriculum? Enter, Womanica. On this Wonder Media Network podcast we explore the lives of inspiring women in history you may not know about, but definitely should.Every weekday, listeners explore the trials, tragedies, and triumphs of groundbreaking women throughout history who have dramatically shaped the world around us. In each 5 minute episode, we'll dive into the story behind one woman listeners may or may not know–but definitely should. These diverse women from across space and time are grouped into easily accessible and engaging monthly themes like Educators, Villains, Indigenous Storytellers, Activists, and many more.  Womanica is hosted by WMN co-founder and award-winning journalist Jenny Kaplan. The bite-sized episodes pack painstakingly researched content into fun, entertaining, and addictive daily adventures. Womanica was created by Liz Kaplan and Jenny Kaplan, executive produced by Jenny Kaplan, and produced by Liz Smith, Grace Lynch, Maddy Foley, Brittany Martinez, Edie Allard, Lindsey Kratochwill, Sundus Hassan, Adesuwa Agbonile, Carmen Borca-Carrillo, Taylor Williamson, and Ale Tejada. Special thanks to Shira Atkins.We are offering free ad space on Wonder Media Network shows to organizations working towards social justice. For more information, please email Jenny at pod@wondermedianetwork.com.Follow Wonder Media Network:WebsiteInstagramTwitter

The Turnbuckle Tavern
Navajo Warrior Visits The Tavern!

The Turnbuckle Tavern

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 50:48


In honor of Native American Heritage Day, we got to sit down and talk with Navajo Warrior! He has a storied career that spans from the 90's to today. We talk about his first matches in WWF in 1993, wrestling Yokozuna and learning from Fatu, the Reservation Tour that he did with a young John Cena, working with Championship Wrestling From Hollywood, what it means to bring a character to the ring that honors his heritage and so much more. We hope you enjoy our time with Navajo Warrior as much as we did!

TransLash Podcast with Imara Jones
Replay: Native Americans and Trans Rights

TransLash Podcast with Imara Jones

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 38:58


In this Native American History Month replay special from 2020, Imara discusses with Deb Haaland, now Secretary of the Interior and former Congresswoman, how her Navajo heritage inspires her to fight for trans rights. Geo Neptune, the first out Two-Spirit, non-binary and trans elected official in Maine, also discusses the importance of teaching indigenous culture in schools.You can connect with us on social media!Follow TransLash Media @translashmedia on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.Follow Imara Jones on Twitter (@imarajones) and Instagram (@imara_jones_)Follow our guests on social media!Deb Haaland: @DebHaalandNM (Instagram) @DabHaalandNM (Twitter)Geo Neptune: @niskapisuwin (Instagram) @passamahottie (Twitter)Melania Brown: @melania__brown (Instagram) @melaniabrown11 (Twitter)TransLash Podcast is produced by Translash Media. Translash Team: Imara Jones, Oliver-Ash Kleine, Jaye McAuliffe, Montana Thomas, and Yannick Eike Mirko. Our intern is Mirana Munson-Burke. Alexander Charles Adams does the sound editing for our show.Digital strategy by Daniela Capistrano. Music: Ben Draghi and also courtesy of ZZK records. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Art Dealer Diaries Podcast
Joan & David Wenger: Art Dealer & Biochemist - Epi. 169, Host Dr. Mark Sublette

Art Dealer Diaries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 73:32


I had Joan and David Wenger on today, and it was really it was a great time. In the first part of the podcast, I really go into detail with David about dye analysis of Cochineal, Indigo dyes in serapes.There's some technical information in there as well, which is great to know and we talk about serapes, early Navajo textiles, and the meaning of dating. We also talk about his life as a biochemist and what all he's done and how he ended up in the Native American area. Then we pivot to his wife, Joan and they've been together since they were 15. She talks about being a collector and then a dealer, and now she's been dealing with this material for over 50 years and really is one of the earliest dealers that we have in the profession.So it's fun. It's interesting to hear how they dedicated their lives not only to the profession but just to the arts in general.

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
11-19-21 Culture Connection: turkeys

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 56:30


Navajo, Hopi, Shawnee and Creek tribes are among the many Native nations that have turkey clans. Southwest tribes domesticated the bird long before settlers arrived and the animal is a character in many tribal stories. At a time of the year when the bird plays a big role on the dinner table, we'll look at the significance of turkeys from a Native perspective.

The CharacterStrong Podcast
Advocating Indigenous Ways Of Being That Can Be Supportive of Youth & Their Educational Institutions - Darrell Marks

The CharacterStrong Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 25:47


Darrell Marks is a single parent of two sons and a daughter, and is an indigenous Dine'/Navajo. Darrell is am White Corn Zuni Edgewater born for those going home, and his maternal grandparents are Red House and paternal grandparents are Salt. He is originally from the community of Tonalea which is northeast of Flagstaff, Arizona. Darrell serves as the academic advisor for Native American students here at Flagstaff High School. He is an advocate for the rights of Indigenous peoples and people of the global majority. Darrell works to meet the unmet needs of the Navajo and Hopi tribal communities, and also works to advocate for the environment and protection of sacred sites.

The Takeaway
Deep Dive with Dorian Warren: Water 2021-11-18

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 45:40


In this week's Deep Dive with Dorian Warren, Melissa and Dorian take an in-depth look at water insecurity, access and cleanliness. They start off with Sera Young, associate professor anthropology and global health at northwestern University. Then Josina Morita, Commissioner of the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District in Cook County about how the infrastructure bill will aid in improving water systems.  Jonathan Nez, president of the Navajo Nation and Bidtah Becker, Associate attorney with the Navajo tribal utility authority join for a discussion of water issues in Indian Country, with a specific focus on Navajo Nation. Reverend Roslyn Bouier, executive director of the Brightmoor Connection Client Choice Food Pantry explains how water shut offs affect the citizens of Brightmoor in Detroit, Michigan.  And finally Tom Mueller, research assistant professor of geography and environmental sustainability at the University of Oklahoma will discuss how water insecurity and plumbing poverty affects rural area.  Some music from this episode by: I Think Like Midnight (http://www.ithinklikemidnight.com/) & The Sometime Boys (https://www.thesometimeboys.com/)

Probably Cancelled Podcast
Seize the Means of Reproduction! w/ Nicolle L. Gonzales

Probably Cancelled Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 81:35


In this episode we interview Navajo nurse midwife & founder of the Changing Woman Initiative Nicolle L. Gonzales about birth as ceremony, the ins and outs of midwifery, and reclaiming our life-giving power as women. Subscribe to Probably Cancelled to get updated with new episodes! Follow Nicolle on IG: @n5gonzales Visit the Changing Woman Initiative Our sex trade exit fundraiser may be found here! Donate directly to AF3IRM here! Become a Probably Cancelled Patreon subscriber and join our international proletarian feminist Discord community at patreon.com/probablycancelledpod Follow the Probably Cancelled Podcast on twitter: @CancellledPod and IG: @probably.cancelled.pod

Deadtime Storiez
E182 It Doesn't Sound Happy...

Deadtime Storiez

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 54:47


We're back from Guestoberfest and back to our regularly scheduled programming. It's just the two of us, but we're bringing you some jam packed scary storiez, including some real-life real-time jump scares! (you'll know what I mean by that when you listen) Sarah starts us out with the spine-tingling tale of Navajo 'Skin Walkers'. Though the term 'skin walker' is exclusive to the Navajo tribe; Sarah will be covering all entities umbrella'd under the term. Get ready for some spooks including personal storiez, and some eerie TikToks (which will be posted on our insta for you to see...if you dare) Stephanie wraps up the episode with the beginning of a 2-part seriez!!! She's telling us all about the "Happy Face Killer" and don't let the name fool you....this story will do anything BUT give you a happy face.

All In
Andrea Hales: Gathering Tribes

All In

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 37:47


Andrea Hales felt inadequate to the task but she couldn't deny the prompting she was feeling to start a podcast. The podcast would tell the stories of Native American Latter-day Saints and provide a platform to share their testimonies as members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Hales knew she didn't grow up close to her Navajo side of the family but she felt her heart turning to her fathers and, as a result, a podcast called “Tribe of Testimonies” was born.  "It's not me, it's definitely the Lord." Show Notes 2:44- Native American Heritage 5:16- Indian Placement Program 10:00- A Part of the Book of Mormon Story 11:33- Tribe of Testimonies and Tribes in General 17:06- Hearing Him 22:15- Lessons Learned 25:47- Gathering Israel 30:16- The Lord's Preparations 32:51- Growing Into Identity 35:30- What Does It Mean To Be All In the Gospel of Jesus Christ? Find the full episode transcript at ldsliving.com/allin. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Experiment
What Does It Mean to Give Away Our DNA?

The Experiment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 31:22


Just as the Navajo researcher Rene Begay started to fall in love with the field of genetics, she learned that the Navajo Nation had banned all genetic testing on tribal land. Now she is struggling to figure out what the future of genetics might look like, and whether the Navajo and other Indigenous communities should be a part of it.  Further reading: “Race, Genetics, and Scientific Freedom,” “Return the National Parks to the Tribes,” “​​The Search for America's Atlantis,” “Elizabeth Warren's DNA Is Not Her Identity” A transcript of this episode will soon be made available. Please check back.  Be part of The Experiment. Use the hashtag #TheExperimentPodcast, or write to us at theexperiment@theatlantic.com. This episode was produced by Peter Bresnan and Julia Longoria, with help from Tracie Hunte and Alina Kulman. Editing by Jenny Lawton and Emily Botein. Fact-check by Michelle Ciarrocca. Sound design by David Herman, with additional engineering by Joe Plourde. Transcription by Caleb Codding. Special thanks to Pauly Denetclaw.  Music by Keyboard (“Ojima,” “Staying In,” and “Being There”), Naran Ratan (“Jam for Bwengo”), Parish Council (“It's Purple, Not Blue,” “Durdle Door,” and “Scented Letters”), R McCarthy (“Contemplation at Lon Lon”), and Column (“スキャン 「Scan」”), provided by Tasty Morsels. Additional audio from the National Institutes of Health's All of Us Research Program.

The Trail Went Cold
The Trail Went Cold – Episode 249 – Sarah Saganitso

The Trail Went Cold

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 55:34


June 12, 1987. Flagstaff, Arizona. After finishing her shift at the Flagstaff Medical Center, 40-year old Navajo woman Sarah Saganitso never returns home and her nude body is found in a nearby wooded area the following day. Her exact cause of death is asphyxiation via suffocation and there appear to be bite marks around her […]