Podcasts about Navajo

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Native American people of the United States

  • 1,069PODCASTS
  • 1,659EPISODES
  • 45mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 13, 2021LATEST
Navajo

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Best podcasts about Navajo

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Latest podcast episodes about Navajo

Grounded with Dinée Dorame
Episode 35 - Life Updates + My Running Story

Grounded with Dinée Dorame

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 45:27


Solo episode time! Join Grounded Pod creator/host, Dinée Dorame, for some stories around running, life, body and health, social media, and Navajo culture and traditions.   In This Episode: SHEFIT Sports Bras   Follow Grounded Pod: Instagram: @groundedpod Twitter: @groundedpod Facebook: facebook.com/groundedpodwithdinee   Subscribe, Listen, & Review on: Spotify | Apple Podcasts | Soundcloud | Stitcher   Music by Jacob Shije (Santa Clara Pueblo, NM). This podcast was made possible through the Tracksmith Fellowship Program.

Material Culture: A Weaving Podcast
Gratitude, Tradition and Navajo Churro Wool with Nikyle Begay

Material Culture: A Weaving Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 38:54


Have you ever thought about where wool first starts off - the sheep itself? In this episode of Material Culture, we talk to Navajo shepherd and weaver Nikyle Begay to hear all about not only the process of raising sheep and processing wool - but also the deep spiritual connotations that that has within Navajo culture. This episode is complete with beautiful stories of family, tradition and what it means to live in connection with your materials. Topics discussed include: the origin of sheep, yarn and roving production, connection to our ancestors and our traditions, and living in gratitude and appreciation for all parts of the process.The Material Culture podcast explores narratives of weaving, (text)iles, art, manufacturing, history, and the people, workers and artists whose stories create the framework and understanding of living with cloth. Material Culture is produced by the yarn shop, textile studio and weaving school, Weaver House. If you have a question, comment or other feedback - you can leave a message for the podcast at weaverhouseco.com/podcast.This week's episode is sponsored by Portland Textile Month - the first of three episodes in partnership with their celebration.Nikyle Begay (they/them) is a Diné shepherd, fiber artist, as well as the Director of Rainbow Fiber Co-Op. You can find them on Instagram @navajoshepherd, or at the Rainbow Fiber Co-Op website: rainbowfibercoop.org .Thanks to Philadelphia-based musician Michael Myers for the use of his song, Weave off the album This is Only Light. You can find more information on Portland Textile Month at https://www.portlandtextilemonth.com, and look out for our next episodes with them later this month. You can submit voice memos on this months' question to media@weaverhouseco.com.

Two Mamas and a Mustard Seed
Unsettling Truths & the Doctrine of Discovery with Mark Charles

Two Mamas and a Mustard Seed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 58:26


https://wirelesshogan.com/ - Mark Charles & Unsettling Truth'shttps://store.tonyevans.org/purchase/oneness-embraced Oneness Embraced - Tony Evanshttps://www.christianbook.com/prophetic-lament-challenge-the-western-church/soong-chan-rah/9780830836949/pd/836941 

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
Diverticulitis: A Functional Medicine Approach with Dr. George Papanicolaou

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 35:34


Diverticulitis: A Functional Medicine Approach | This episode is brought to you by Rupa Health and Athletic GreensOver 200,000 people per year are treated for diverticulitis, a painful condition in which small pouches in the colon, called diverticula, become infected. Symptoms of diverticulitis include nausea, fever, chills, loss of appetite, and constipation. While conventional medicine treatments for diverticulitis usually consist of antibiotics and surgery, Functional Medicine looks at a wide variety of things like microbiome diversity, dietary fiber consumption, gut health, inflammation, and more, to both prevent and treat this condition. In this episode, Dr. Hyman discusses diverticulitis with Dr. George Papanicolaou. They talk about how lifestyle habits, such as a low fiber diet and elevated stress, can contribute to diverticulitis. They also share certain foods and supplements that are supportive and healing to the body.George Papanicolaou is a graduate of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and is Board Certified in Family Medicine from Abington Memorial Hospital. He is also an Institute for Functional Medicine Practitioner. Upon graduation from his residency, he joined the Indian Health Service. He worked on the Navajo reservation for 4 years at the Chinle Comprehensive Medical Facility where he served as the Outpatient Department Coordinator. In 2000, he founded Cornerstone Family Practice in Rowley, MA. He practiced with a philosophy centered on personal relationships and treating the whole person, not just not the disease. He called that philosophy “Whole Life Wellness.” Over time as the healthcare system made it harder for patients to receive this kind of personal care Dr. Papanicolaou decided a change was needed. He began training in Functional Medicine through the Institute of Functional Medicine. In 2015, he established Cornerstone Personal Health—a practice dedicated entirely to Functional Medicine. Dr. Papanicolaou joined The UltraWellness Center in 2017.This episode is brought to you by Rupa Health and Athletic Greens.Rupa Health is a place for Functional Medicine practitioners to access more than 2,000 specialty lab tests from over 20 labs like DUTCH, Vibrant America, Genova, Great Plains, and more. You can check out a free live demo with a Q&A or create an account at RupaHealth.com. Right now, Athletic Greens is offering my listeners 10 free travel packs of AG1 when you make your first purchase. Just go to athleticgreens.com/hyman to take advantage of this great offer.In this conversation, Dr. Hyman and Dr. Papanicolaou discuss:How overall fiber consumption has reduced over timeWhat diverticula are and how they can progress to diverticulitisThe symptoms of diverticulitisRisk factors for developing diverticulitisThe difference between conventional medicine and Functional Medicine treatments for diverticulitisUsing bone broth and clove tea to heal a flare upWhy it's a myth that you shouldn't eat nuts and seeds if you have diverticulitisSuggestions for how to add fiber to your dietSupplements to support the bodyCase study of a 50-year-old woman with diverticulitis See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Poetry Unbound
Jake Skeets — Daybreak

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 17:53


In a slight change to the normal format, host Pádraig Ó Tuama speaks with the poet Jake Skeets who reads his poem “Daybreak,” a poem combining Diné language with English, a poem rich with observation: of land, of growth, of memory, of place. Land is not just a tool to use for food, nor is it a blank space for human projection. In this poem, Jake Skeets reflects on an ethical engagement with land: an engagement that sees land as itself, not just for its uses.Jake Skeets is the author of Eyes Bottle Dark with a Mouthful of Flowers, winner of the National Poetry Series. He is the recipient of a 92Y Discovery Prize, a Mellon Projecting All Voices Fellowship, an American Book Award, and a Whiting Award. He is from the Navajo Nation and teaches at Diné College.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

Forefront Brooklyn
Forefront Conversations with Mark Charles

Forefront Brooklyn

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 75:09


Yá' át' ééh. Mark Charles yinishyé. Tsin bikee dine'é nishłí. Dóó tó'aheedlíinii bá shíshchíín. Tsin bikee' dine'é dashicheii. Dóó tódích' íi' nii dashinálí. In the Navajo culture, that is how Mark Charles - pastor, author, 2020 Presidential candidate - would introduce himself to you. Mark grew up believing the same narrative that we all believed: that America and the Church stood for justice and equality. But after moving his family from Denver, CO to a Navajo reservation and learning more about the history of his people and his culture, he began to break down the myth of a just America and an affirming Church when the two have been so intertwined throughout the centuries of genocide committed against indigenous peoples. In this episode, Mark discusses the journey that led him to co-author "Unsettling Truths: The Ongoing, Dehumanizing Legacy of the Doctrine of Discovery" and what it truly means for a country and a religion to lament and work towards racial conciliation. ABOUT MARK Mark is a dual citizen of the United States and the Navajo Nation who currently resides in Washington DC with his family to help build a nation where "we the people" truly means all people. He began writing on his blog, Wireless Hogan, and has given a TED Talk explaining his plan for the Truth & Conciliation Commission and ran for President as an Independent candidate in 2020. He livestreams the sunrise every week and invites people to join in an effort to sit with Creator. For more information, visit: https://www.markcharles2020.com/ To purchase "Unsettling Truths: The Ongoing, Dehumanizing Legacy of the Doctrine of Discovery," visit InterVarsity press: https://www.ivpress.com/unsettling-truths

STEM Southwest Podcast
076 Bridging the Digital Divide for Tribes, with Catherine Nicolaou

STEM Southwest Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 47:26


Today's guest is working to ensure that the gap in the digital divide for Indian tribes is closing!  Catherine Nicolaou and Sacred Wind Communications are leveraging all of the resources that they can reach and then some as they try to solve this daunting issue.  Hear from her today about how organizations are partnering to make a difference and bridge the gap and what we can all do to make a difference!  Nicolaou is an expert in state regulatory and marketing, a member of the New Mexico Technology Council, and a registered lobbyist. Show Notes Watch episode here Catherine Nicolaou is the External Affairs and Marketing Manager for Sacred Wind Communications, the state's newest rural telecom carrier, which provides voice and internet service to rural and tribal areas in Northwest New Mexico on Navajo land.  As such, she interfaces with state regulatory officials and government officials to promote the company's public image and business agenda.  She also manages the coordination, review, compilation, assembly, filing and tracking of reports, tariffs, audits, applications, and petitions to state, tribal, local, and federal authorities, including state PRC, FCC, RUS, or any other governmental authority, while promoting brand recognition through the company's marketing initiatives. Catherine is a member of the New Mexico Technology Council and the New Mexico Chamber of Commerce policy committees.  She is a registered lobbyist for Sacred Wind and sits on the board of the Cibola Arts Council.  Sacred Wind Communications Sacred Wind Communications - Careers; send resumes to hr@sacredwindnm.com Dinehnet Lifeline Program Sierra Electric Cooperative   Be Greater Than Average Gift of Learning Be Greater Than Average Courses Be Greater Than Average Family Fun! Be Greater Than Average A Semester of STEM Activities E-Book Battling Bots League (Partnership between Be Greater Than Average and Electric Playhouse)   Contact: Catherine Nicolaou Sacred Wind Communications External Affairs and Marketing Manager 7801 Academy Rd NE Building 2, Suite 103 Albuquerque, NM  87109 (505) 908-2668 cnicolaou@sacredwindnm.com Linkedin   Sacred Wind Communications Linkedin Facebook YouTube

Jeff Caplan's Afternoon News
Navajo Photographer Supports Bears Ears Monument Restoration

Jeff Caplan's Afternoon News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 11:39


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dear Bob and Sue: A National Parks Podcast

Starting at the shore of Lake Powell in northern Arizona, Antelope Canyon stretches for over twenty miles as it snakes its way south through pristine Navajo land. Over millions of years, water and wind carved several incredibly beautiful sections of the canyon. In this episode, we discuss four of the areas that you can visit to experience these wonders of nature up close.   Links to where you can find more information about the tours we talk about: Ken's Lower Antelope Canyon Tour Dixie's Lower Antelope Canyon Tour Upper Antelope Canyon Tour Antelope Canyon X Tour   Please subscribe to The Dear Bob and Sue Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you like to listen, and if you've enjoyed our show, please leave us a review or rating on Apple Podcasts. Five-star ratings help other listeners find our show.   Follow us on Instagram at @mattandkarensmith, on Twitter at @mattandkaren, on Facebook at dearbobands, or check out our blog at www.mattandkaren.com.   To advertise on The Dear Bob and Sue Podcast, email us at mattandkarensmith@gmail.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

KZMU News
Wednesday October 6, 2021

KZMU News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 9:39


There's a noticeable lack of Native-owned outfitters in this corner of Utah. But that's now changing. Today on the news, we hit the trail with a new Navajo owned company to hear their take on outdoor recreation. Plus, Utah organizations are working together to find affordable housing for Afghan refugees. And, one mammal in our region is making its way toward an exciting recovery. Show Notes: Photo: Louis Williams is the guide and owner behind Ancient Wayves River and Hiking Adventures, a Navajo-led outfitter in San Juan County. Justin Higginbottom/KZMU Ancient Wayves River and Hiking Adventures https://www.tourancientwayves.com Heat Diné Homes https://www.gofundme.com/f/heat-dine-homes https://www.facebook.com/heatdinehomes/ UPR: Organizations work together to find affordable housing for refugees https://www.upr.org/post/organizations-work-together-find-affordable-housing-refugees#stream/0

Your Brain on Facts
Shapeshifters (encore and personal update)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 40:23


From Irish selkies to Japanese kitsune, from Navajo skin-walkers to Ethiopian werehyenas, there doesn't seem to be a culture in the world that doesn't have at least one shape-shifter in its folklore or mythology. Personal update: Hey, so can we talk for a minute? Come sit by the fire while I dump out my purse. You might have noticed (you really couldn't have missed it), there hasn't been a lot of YBOF happening lately. The reason for that, as some of my longtime listeners know –I can't believe people have been listening this long– I have a chronic, idiopathic pulmonary condition. Idiopathic means we don't know what the hell it is. We being myself, three pulmonologists, two cardiologists, endocrinology, a full GI workup, even saw a Johns Hopkins doctor who had no idea what I was dealing with and stumping a Johns Hopkins doctor isn't as cool as it sounds. So it's kicked up again. It does this. It could last for an hour, a day, a week, or 6 weeks, like now. The trouble is, I do voice-overs for a living. The irony is not lost on me. And I got into voiceover after the onset of this mystery condition because it's what I want to do. And when covid hit it was goddamn jolly well time to get out of retail. So doing voiceover requires my lungs and then there's no lungs leftover for the podcast, and VO pays the bills. For those who like things quantified, as I dom for the past week, for example, I've been able to record for about 2 minutes andt hen I need to stop for 5. I can repeat that cycle for up to 30 minutes, but then I have to lie down for 30 minutes at least. So work gets done really, really, really slowly. It's especially complicating because I just took on the largest job by word count that I've ever done. I'm not saying this to pity whore, get sympathy, get attention, fish for compliments or anything like that –I always feel so awkward when that reaction comes in. I just wanted you to know what's going on with the show, which means what's going on with my lungs. Because what's going on with my lungs is what's going on with the show. What's the bottom line here for the podcast going forward?I'm not giving up on it – 160+ episodes in, I'm not going to bail now. I just can't always do it. I've also become increasingly reluctant to rerun the old episodes because I go back and listen,and I just can't stand the way they sound. It's probably much worse for me than normal people because my ears have become increasingly attuned to vocal and sound qualities. So I will do my utmost to get new episodes made, but if there isn't one that week, it's not because I didn't want to. And I appreciate everyone sticking with me through this inconsistent schedule. I know it's not good for the algorithms and stuff like that, but I don't care about algorithms. I care about you enjoying the show. I am doing my best to take care of myself, but it's hard when you have these mercurial changing shifting symptoms and no continuity of care. I don't even know who to see at this point. So please be patient, stick with me spread the word on social media, whether you see me post or not. And hey, if you know a good diagnostician within say 3 hour drive of Richmond, Virginia to shoot me their number. We now return you to your regularly scheduled program already in progress. Special guests: Worst Foot Forward Pink river dolphins Linfamy Need some light reading in a heavy world?  Good thing there's the YBOF book! Read the full script. Reach out and touch Moxie on FB, Twit, the 'Gram or email.  

Behind the Mic with AudioFile Magazine
WE ARE STILL HERE! by Traci Sorell, read by Garrett Abel, Jacob Cummings, Mary Kay Henderson, et al.

Behind the Mic with AudioFile Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 8:33


A full cast of Cherokee, Navajo, Choctaw, and Chickasaw narrators deliver a moving audiobook companion to Traci Sorell's informative picture book. Host Jo Reed and AudioFile's Emily Connelly discuss this audiobook that takes young listeners from the history of treaty-making between Native nations and the U.S. Government up to the present. Twelve students recite brief presentations in youthful voices on topics including Assimilation and Tribal Activism as sound effects and music evoke the bright illustrations. Each presentation ends with a chorus of voices proudly declaring: “We are still here.” An excellent resource for classrooms, and for family listening. Read the full review of the audiobook on AudioFile's website. Published by Live Oak Media. Listeners can enjoy Homer's THE ILIAD, translated by Ian Johnston, and narrated by Anton Lesser, on AudioFile's Audiobook Break podcast. Find more audiobook recommendations at audiofilemagazine.com Support for AudioFile's Behind the Mic Podcast comes from Blackstone Publishing, publisher of bestselling and award-winning books and audiobooks by fantastic writers and narrators. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
Treating OCD From A Functional Medicine Perspective with Dr. George Papanicolaou

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 35:13


Treating OCD From A Functional Medicine Perspective | This episode is brought to you by Rupa Health and Athletic GreensObsessive Compulsive Disorder, or OCD, affects approximately 2.2 million adults and 500,000 children in the US. Individuals with OCD often experience impulsive and intrusive thoughts that replay in the mind, in addition to behaviors such as excessive cleaning and repetitive counting. While conventional medicine approaches OCD as a chemical issue, Functional Medicine looks at genetic components, inflammation, gut health, and other lifestyle influences in its treatment of OCD. In this episode, Dr. Hyman discusses OCD with Dr. George Papanicolaou. They discuss just how debilitating this condition can be and share case studies of how they have treated patients with this condition.George Papanicolaou is a graduate of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and is Board Certified in Family Medicine from Abington Memorial Hospital. He is also an Institute for Functional Medicine Practitioner. Upon graduation from his residency he joined the Indian Health Service. He worked on the Navajo reservation for 4 years at the Chinle Comprehensive Medical Facility where he served as the Outpatient Department Coordinator. In 2000, he founded Cornerstone Family Practice in Rowley, MA. He practiced with a philosophy centered on personal relationships and treating the whole person, not just not the disease. He called that philosophy “Whole Life Wellness”. Over time as the healthcare system made it harder for patients to receive this kind of personal care Dr. Papanicolaou decided a change was needed. He began training in Functional Medicine through the Institute of Functional Medicine. In 2015, he established Cornerstone Personal Health—a practice dedicated entirely to Functional Medicine. Dr. Papanicolaou joined The UltraWellness Center in 2017.This episode is brought to you by Rupa Health and Athletic Greens.Rupa Health is a place for Functional Medicine practitioners to access more than 2,000 specialty lab tests from over 20 labs like DUTCH, Vibrant America, Genova, Great Plains, and more. You can check out a free live demo with a Q&A or create an account at RupaHealth.com. Athletic Greens is offering Doctor's Farmacy listeners a full year supply of their Vitamin D3/K2 Liquid Formula free with your first purchase, plus 5 free travel packs. Just go to athleticgreens.com/hyman to take advantage of this great offer.In this conversation, Dr. Hyman and Dr. Papanicolaou discuss:What is OCD and who does it affect?Common behaviors of someone with OCDConventional diagnosis and treatment of OCDThe genetic component to OCDHow the gut microbiome and lack of diversity may contribute to OCDIdentifying inflammation as a root cause A case study of someone who has OCDFunctional Medicine approach to treatment of OCDAdditional Resources:How Eliminating Gluten May Improve Anxiety and DepressionUnderstanding How the Microbiome Affects Every Aspect of Your HealthThe Science of Mood and Your MicrobiomeHow Leaky Gut is Making Us Sick and Driving Chronic Inflammation with Dr. Emeran Mayer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Inquisikids Daily
Who Were the Navajo Code Talkers?

Inquisikids Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 5:23


Who Were the Navajo Code Talkers? Join us today as we learn about the brave Navajo men who used their secret code and helped the United States during World War II. Sources: https://kids.britannica.com/kids/article/Navajo-code-talkers/601078 http://www.american-historama.org/1929-1945-depression-ww2-era/navajo-code-talkers.htm https://kids.britannica.com/students/article/code-talker/624639 Lykosh, Amy. “The Code Talkers.” Heros and Happenings Volume 2, Avyx, Inc, 2020, pp. 86–90. Send us listener mail! Send an audio message: anchor.fm/inquisikids-daily/message Send an email: podcast@inquisikids.com

Nick Schenkel Book Reviews
Book Review: Send a Runner: A Navajo Honors the Long Walk

Nick Schenkel Book Reviews

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 14:10


Over 150 years ago, the United States government forced the Navajo people to undergo a series of marches from what is now Arizona to eastern New Mexico. "Send a Runner: A Navajo Honors the Long Walk," by Edison Eskeets, tells the story of the ceremonial run organized by the author and his family to honor their ancestors, the survivors of that ordeal. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has the review.

Run Hard Mom Hard
64 | Verna Volker and Native Women Running

Run Hard Mom Hard

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 109:21


This week we have the privilege of talking with Verna Volker - a Navajo ultra runner, mom of four and the founder of Native Women Running which is a community geared towards celebrating and bringing visibility to native runners by sharing their stories. This platform was born when Verna realized that she didn't see herself in the running world. “There's some type of image that's always portrayed in running…It's the mom who's a white mom, blonde, beautiful, thin, who just ran Boston and is back to her pre-pregnancy weight holding a baby.” Seeing primarily those posts on instagram and thinking “that is just not me” made Verna create a space on the internet where native women could find belonging, encouragement and sisterhood. Running is a way for Verna to heal. She's been on her own journey from generational trauma and loss to forgiveness. She runs because many people can't and she dedicates her races to lost family members or people on her mind. She also puts on virtual runs that are a call to action, bringing awareness to travesties like Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and the recent children who have been found on residential school properties. For too long native people have felt silenced - these runs are a way to use their voice and say, (in regards to missing women) ”These women are important to us. They're mothers and wives and sisters and aunties and they need to be found or they need to get justice.” We talk about the barriers native runners face, what some race directors are doing to diversify their start lines, the sponsorships NWR provides to support runners in their community, and how women can be proactive and protect themselves while running. Verna left us with reminders that each of us can use our unique gifts for activism and to be an ally. Do what you can wherever you are! Verna is a true joy and she shared so many important things with us, we are so grateful to have had this conversation! Give this episode a listen by clicking the link below or searching “Run Hard Mom Hard” on any podcast platform! Enjoy and please share this with your people! Thank you! Show Notes: Verna on Instagram Native Women Running Instagram Native Women Running Website Hoka Global Ambassador Moun10 Ultra MMIW Wings of America National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition Red Earth Running Co. Self Defense Products: Go Guarded Red House Series Podcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/run-hard-mom-hard/message

Antonia Gonzales
09-20-21 National Native News

Antonia Gonzales

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 5:13


Corvallis School District changes school names Indigenous people present at Emmy Awards Women's advocates march to Navajo capitol

365 Stories I Want To Tell You Before We Both Die
Stuart Rockefeller's Navajo Blanket

365 Stories I Want To Tell You Before We Both Die

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 3:27


See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Unfound
Episode 268: Laverda Sorrell: In Defiance

Unfound

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 121:53


Laverda Sorrell was a 44 year old from Navajo, NM. She was the mother of 3 and loved sports. On July 4, 2002, Laverda and her husband celebrated their 15th wedding anniversary in Gallup, NM. He claims he then dropped Laverda off at her work. She was never seen again.Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/Missing.LaverdaSorrellCharley Project:https://charleyproject.org/case/laverda-sorrellNAMUS:https://www.namus.gov/MissingPersons/Case#/59460?navMap Analysis:https://youtu.be/elTvBNyhNs0Article:https://www.kgun9.com/news/local-news/a-familys-20-year-search-for-answersAdvocacy Website:https://www.nativewomenswilderness.org/mmiwIf you have any information regarding the disappearance of Laverda Sorrell, please contact the Federal Bureau of Investigation - Albuquerque Field Office at (505) 889-1300.Unfound supports accounts on Audible, Podomatic, iTunes, Spotify, iHeart, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Deezer, and YouTube.--speaking of YouTube, on Wednesday nights at 9pm ET, please join us for the Unfound Live Show. All of you can talk with me and I can answer your questions.--Contribute to Unfound at Patreon.com/unfounpodcast.--You can also contribute at Paypal: paypal.me/unfoundpodcast--I also need to give a shout out to all the people who have monetarily contributed usingSuperChat during the Live Show on Wednesday nights.--thank you for watching and thank you for donating.--the email address: unfoundpodcast@gmail.com.--Merchandise:--The books at Amazon.com in both ebook and print form.--do not forget the reviews.--shirts at unfound-podcast.myshopify.com--or you can track down my assistant Heather in the Facebook Group.--playing cards at makeplayingcards.com/sell/unfoundpodcast--the website: the unfoundpodcast.com--And please mention Unfound at all true crime websites and forums. Thank you

Freedom Foil
Skinwalkers

Freedom Foil

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 61:23


This goes a little deeper than your average Big Foot sighting. Grab your night light and join us as we dive into this terrifying Navajo legend. Check out the links below to learn more: Pheonix Enigma: https://thephoenixenigma.com/skinwalkers/ Legends of America: https://www.legendsofamerica.com/navajo-skinwalkers/ New Mexico Explorer: https://www.newmexicoexplorer.com/native-american-skinwalkers/ Skinwalker Wiki: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skin-walker Positive Negative Impact: https://positivenegativeimpact.com/navajo-skinwalker Skinwalker Ranch Website: https://www.skinwalker-ranch.com/ Skinwalker Ranch Wiki: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skinwalker_Ranch Check out more content from FirearmFreedom: YouTube: www.youtube.com/c/FirearmFreedom Instagram: www.instagram.com/firearm_freedom/?hl=en Facebook: www.facebook.com/FirearmFreedom/ Twitter: www.twitter.com/firearm_freedom

El Washington Post
Abimael Guzmán y el Perú. Kamala Harris y las encuestas. Los navajos y la pandemia

El Washington Post

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 20:44


Sobre la polémica de los restos de Guzmán hablamos con el escritor peruano Santiago Roncagliolo. De la caída de Harris en las encuestas, con el periodista mexicano José Díaz Briseño. Y de los navajos, con Hailey Sadler y Darian Woehr

My Bigfoot Sighting
MBS Episode 1 - A Bigfoot Came into the Tent with Her!

My Bigfoot Sighting

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 35:58


Thanks for tuning in for the premiere episode of My Bigfoot Sighting. It's a different kind of Bigfoot show. What makes MBS different from other Bigfoot shows is the fact that there's no host. That means no questions, no chatter, and no small-talk. The only thing you'll hear is eyewitness after eyewitness sharing the details of their Bigfoot sightings and encounters. That's how we like it. We think you'll like that too. To make sure you don't miss any future episodes, please don't forget to click the bell and subscribe.Michele had her first Bigfoot sighting when she was 12. Back then, she lived with her grandmother, in Arizona, on the Navajo reservation, about 17 miles east of Kayenta, AZ. Little did she know, that sighting was just the first of many that were yet to follow, unfortunately.If you've had a Bigfoot sighting and would like to be a guest, on the show, please go to https://MyBigfootSighting.com and let us know!If you'd like to report a Bigfoot sighting to the U.S. Bigfoot Patrol, please go to https://linktr.ee/usbigfootpatrol and fill out a report.Show's theme song, "Banjo Music," courtesy Nathan Brumley

Antonia Gonzales
09-08-21 National Native News

Antonia Gonzales

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 5:13


Deal reached to bring dozens of Navajo homes electricity Fort Lewis College removes boarding school panels Labor Secretary says tribes included in federal support

Bioneers: Revolution From the Heart of Nature | Bioneers Radio Series
Leading From the Feminine: Keepers of the Cradle of Life

Bioneers: Revolution From the Heart of Nature | Bioneers Radio Series

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 55:51


What does it mean to bring the “feminine” forward in leadership from diverse cultural and ethnic perspectives? How might a spectrum of views help us to integrate relational intelligence into all our leadership? This hour long special features poet Noris Binet; Nikki Silvestri, former Executive Director of Green for All and The People's Grocery and Pat McCabe, or Woman Stands Shining, a Navajo teacher working on Indigenous frameworks for gender and all of life.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
The Functional Medicine Approach To Gallbladder Disease with Dr. George Papanicolaou

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 31:04


The Functional Medicine Approach To Gallbladder Disease | This episode is brought to you by Essentia and PaleovalleyThe gallbladder is an organ we don't often pay much attention to, but if you or a loved one has had gallstones, you know they can be very painful. About 6-9% of adults experience gallstones and their associated symptoms which can include nausea and vomiting. The gallbladder plays a vital role in our digestive process by storing bile which helps us break down fats. If your bile is imbalanced, gallstones may form. The conventional approach to relieving gallbladder pain and discomfort is through the use of medication or surgery to remove the gallbladder, whereas the Functional Medicine approach seeks to uncover the root cause of the problem and approaches treatment from that place.In this episode, Dr. Hyman discusses gallbladder disease with Dr. George Papanicolaou. They talk about how they work with patients to determine what is causing the disease, and how an imbalance in the composition of bile can also result in gut problems like dysbiosis and SIBO. They also provide tips on supporting your body to optimize digesting fats if you've had your gallbladder removed.George Papanicolaou is a graduate of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and is Board Certified in Family Medicine from Abington Memorial Hospital. He is also an Institute for Functional Medicine Practitioner. Upon graduation from his residency he joined the Indian Health Service. He worked on the Navajo reservation for 4 years at the Chinle Comprehensive Medical Facility where he served as the Outpatient Department Coordinator. In 2000, he founded Cornerstone Family Practice in Rowley, MA. He practiced with a philosophy centered on personal relationships and treating the whole person, not just not the disease. He called that philosophy “Whole Life Wellness”. Over time as the healthcare system made it harder for patients to receive this kind of personal care Dr. Papanicolaou decided a change was needed. He began training in Functional Medicine through the Institute of Functional Medicine. In 2015, he established Cornerstone Personal Health—a practice dedicated entirely to Functional Medicine. Dr. Papanicolaou joined The UltraWellness Center in 2017.This episode is brought to you by Essentia and Paleovalley.Right now, you can take advantage of Essentia's incredible Labor Day offer of 25% off with 2 free pillows (normally a $300 value) by going to learn.myessentia.com/DrMarkHyman. Paleovalley is offering 15% off your entire first order. Just go to paleovalley.com/hyman to check out all their clean Paleo products and take advantage of this deal.In this conversation, Dr. Hyman and Dr. Papanicolaou discuss:The root cause of gallbladder disease, including gallstonesWhat healthy bile is and why it's so important in the role of digesting fatsThe difference between the conventional medicine and Functional Medicine approach to treating gallbladder diseaseHow bile imbalances can lead to gut imbalances such as dysbiosis and SIBOThe tie between Hashimoto's thyroiditis and gallbladder disease and the role of glutenConsequences of surgery to remove the gallbladderSupporting the body if you don't have a gallbladderAdditional Resources:Digesting Fat, Optimizing Your Health, and My Daily Supplementshttps://drhyman.com/blog/2017/04/28/digesting-fat-optimizing-health-daily-supplements/A New Roadmap for Treating Diseasehttps://drhyman.com/blog/2018/05/16/a-new-roadmap-for-treating-disease/Healing Psoriasis from the Inside Out with Dr. Todd LePinehttps://drhyman.com/blog/2020/10/16/podcast-hc27/How to Prevent and Reverse Fatty Liver Disease with Functional Medicinehttps://drhyman.com/blog/2021/08/02/podcast-hc67/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Two Ewes Fiber Adventures
Ep 169: Adding Pens to Our Venn Diagram

Two Ewes Fiber Adventures

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 68:56


Wow! The San Francisco International Pen Show! After hearing about all the beautiful pens Kelly saw, we may all want to start collecting a few ourselves. We also learn that pens join knitting, dogs, chickens, and teaching on our Venn Diagram. Show notes with full transcript, photos, and links can be found in the podcast section of our shop website: TwoEwesFiberAdventures.com. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Subscribe on Android or Subscribe on Google Podcasts Three Green Sisters prizes: Grand prize is an 18 by 18 pillow using fabric designed by Cheri Magnusson. A fabric designer who is the shepherd of an Icelandic flock in Maine.  In addition to the pillow, they are generously providing their Patty style bag as a prize. One will be used for the Summer Spin-In and one will be drawn from a thread we'll post in the Ravelry group.  They are offering Fiber Adventurers a coupon code EWES2 for 15% off until the end of the year. They also make custom loom totes, spinning wheel carriers and spindle and heddle bags, along with one of a kind styles. Take a look at what Suzanne and other 3 Green Sisters are offering in their 3 Green Sisters Etsy shop. SF International Pen Show Kelly saw lots of great pens and stationery supplies. Bailey got to attend , too. Some favorite vendors were Peyton Street Pens, and Curnow Bookbinding. Marsha's Projects Atlas (Ravelry link) by Jared Flood using Navia Tradition. The pattern is also available at his website. I finished the colorwork yoke and the neckband and washed and blocked the sweater before finishing the bottom and sleeve ribbing. My brother tried on the sweater and we confirmed it was too small. I need to frog it and start over. I'm waiting for Kelly to get here to help me unravel it over a glass of wine. I finished the picot bind off of my Simple Shawl by Jane Hunter. I still need to wash and block it. I cast on the tea cozy pattern, Nanny Meier's Tea Cozy by Amelia Carlsen. I am using Cascade 220 Heather in Red Wine Heather (9489) and green Irelande (2429). Finished my Summer Spin In spinning project. Want to make a sweater for Ben and I am considering these patterns: Thun The Blue Mouse Poche Caitlen Shepherd Phrancko  Frank Jernigan Kelly's Projects Dark Green Forest by Christina Korber-Reith. I am using a terra cotta yarn that is a dark red overdyed over the light brown color of the CVM yarn. Working on the first sleeve but I'm almost done. More dishcloths--I'm now using two shades of variegated green from the cotton that we dyed back in 2015 (I think) Patreon Pattern Giveaway! Patrons get a pattern of their choice up to $8.00. Contact Kelly with your pattern selection!  Patterns people have requested (Ravelry links) OMG Heel Socks by Just Run Knit Designs Beautiful Together by Romi Hill Georgetown by Hannah Fettig Girlang by Linnea Ornstein Friday Tee by PetiteKnit Mosaic Musings by Steven West Avion by Katrin Schneider Stripes! by Andrea Mowry Edie by Isabell Kraemer Songbird Shawl by VeryShannon Derecho by Alison Green Nydia by Vanessa Smith Morning Rituals by Andrea Mowry Riddari by Védís Jónsdóttir for Ístex Sleepy Polar Bear by Susan B Anderson Summer Spin In - Ending September 6th! Get your projects posted this weekend. We'll draw prizes in the next episode. Prizes from Three Green Sisters Full Transcript Marsha 0:03 Hi, this is Marsha Kelly 0:04 and this is Kelly. Marsha 0:05 We are the Two Ewes of Two Ewes Fiber Adventures. Thanks for stopping by. Kelly 0:10 You'll hear about knitting, spinning, dyeing, crocheting, and just about anything else we can think of as a way to play with string. Marsha 0:17 We blog and post show notes at Two Ewes Fiber Adventures dot com. Kelly 0:22 And we invite you to join our Two Ewes Fiber Adventures group on Ravelry. I'm 1hundredprojects, Marsha 0:29 and I am betterinmotion. We are both on Instagram and Ravelry. And we look forward to meeting you there. Both 0:36 Enjoy the episode. Marsha 0:42 Hi, Kelly. Kelly 0:43 Hi, Marsha. How are you? Unknown Speaker 0:45 I'm doing well. Kelly 0:46 Good, me too! School has started. Yay! Marsha 0:54 Yay! It's your favorite time of the year. Kelly 0:55 It is it really is. And actually, it's been a lot of fun. The last couple of days I've gotten to meet-- I had, I had some activities that I didn't do in previous semesters. And so I've gotten a chance to meet students online. A little bit, a little bit better than what I've done in previous semester. So yeah, I'm learning. I'm getting better. It's getting to be a little more interesting and fun. And all that training pays off. Marsha 1:25 Yeah. Really. Kelly 1:25 Yeah, really? Ask me again, though in November. Marsha 1:33 Yeah. Yeah. Kelly 1:35 But right now, day three, right. This is Wednesday? Yeah, no, this is Thursday, day, four of the semester, it's going great. Marsha 1:46 It's going so great you don't even know what day of the week. Kelly 1:47 I know, really, this is a good sign. I feel like I'm attached to the hip with my computer between doing all the school stuff. You know, I mean, I don't have zoom class meetings, but jumping on zoom to help students with questions, emailing back and forth to students, putting up assignments to students, grading assignments to students--with-- you know--of students. Checking in to make sure they've done all the things that they needed to do. It has data analytics, so I can see what pages they've been looking at. And, you know, figure out what I need to do like, oh, they're missing this. Students don't seem to be looking at this page. They're missing this information, I need to make sure I put out a notice, you know, all this stuff on my computer. And then when I'm done for the night, well, and then then the morning before I start, you know, I'm looking at the news on the computer, I'm looking at Ravelry on the computer, and then when I done at night, I take the computer to bed and I watch TV, watch Netflix Like this computer is like attached to my-- practically attached to my body. Hmm, I'm going to really be in need of a digital detox at some point. Marsha 3:00 Well. Yeah, maybe someday. Maybe. Kelly 3:05 Yeah, I don't know. It's funny, because I don't, I don't really, I don't really mind. You know, most of the stuff on the computer is, is it's enjoyable, you know, looking at Ravelry and talking to students and all that, watching Netflix or Amazon Prime. You know, it's it's not terrible. It's just-- It's so funny. This one device is doing everything for me Marsha 3:31 That's a lot of time. That's a lot of time looking at that blue screen or whatever it is. Kelly 3:35 Yeah, yeah. That's true. Marsha 3:39 Well, what have you been up to? Kelly 3:41 Since we last talked? Well, I went to the San Francisco International Pen Show! Yay! Marsha 3:50 I saw your pictures. It looks very cool. Kelly 3:53 Who knew? First of all, that there even was such a thing, although I should know that. You know, if there's a yarn conference, of course, there should be a pen conference. I mean, every hobby's got to have their you know, their their get togethers. I saw on Instagram, the like mascot for the pen show was a white German Shepherd. And so on their Instagram feed they were posting pictures, you know, Odin says wear a mask and have you gotten your you know, do you know what pens you're going to be looking at? A picture of the dog with the pen in his paws and, you know, all these different pictures with pens. And then I saw there was a hashtag dogs of the San Francisco pen show. And then somebody said something about, oh, and then one of the posts was, is your pooch coming or something like that? And I thought, Wait a minute, what? Wait, what? Because we were trying to figure out what to do with the dogs, you know, they don't really have a lot of experience being home alone. And that's a you know, that's a distance away for for us so it's going to be all day. And the two together is a lot for Aunt Betty to, to have to deal with. So we were trying to manage what we're going to do and we had thought we would bring them both in the truck, but then it was going to be like almost 90 degrees. And there was covered parking but Robert's truck is tall and so there's always a worry what if it doesn't fit in the covered parking? The old truck didn't fit in covered parking. This one the shell is a little bit lower. He didn't get the, the taller shell. So anyway, there was all this like angst about what we're going to do. And and I had, you know, thought, Oh, I need to call the hotel and get information about their parking structure. Anyway, when I saw that, it's like, oh, she can come to the pen show. So Bailey came to the pen show. It was so fun. Marsha 5:48 Did she by a-- Did she buy a pen? Kelly 5:50 No, I didn't let her have any money. But she was really good. And there were other dogs there. We didn't get to see the white German Shepherd. I guess they were busy running the show. And not you know, didn't have the dog. But But yeah, he was there at the party-- the after party that evening. But we had already gone by then. So Marsha 6:17 The pen show has an after party? Kelly 6:18 Yeah. It's called a pen show after dark. It looks like a lot of fun. Marsha 6:27 It's so clever. Kelly 6:28 Yeah. Yeah. Kind of like, you know, kind of like the lobby at stitches. Marsha 6:33 Mm hmm. Kelly 6:34 So after, you know, after hours, so yeah. I also found out that there's an intersection. Quite the intersection between pen lovers, and knitters. Okay, so I wanted to give a few shout outs to some people that I talked to at the pen show. One of them, her name is Rena. I don't remember her last name. But her Ravelry name is sewwhatsports and sew is an s-e-w. And she actually was telling me that she had written an article for ply magazine. And I don't have this issue, but it's in the electric issue. I was gonna try to get it because I'd love to see her article. It's in the electric issue of ply magazine, which I think was in May or April. And she wrote an article about being a nomad spinner. So she's sold everything and she's just living on the road. And one of the things that she that she's doing as she lives on the road is these pen shows. She was at a booth for a guy, a shop called Toys in the Attic. And so yeah, I bought a pen case from them. Little travel case that fits in the pocket of my briefcase, and she showed me all about it, how it's--you could step on it and it won't crush and and so it won't, you know, my pens won't get smashed in my briefcase, and has a magnet clip that is super strong so that it won't pop open. And but anyway, her article was about how she spins on the road with an electric spinner. Marsha 8:20 Mm hmm. Kelly 8:21 So that was really cool. So shout out to Rena, Ravelry name is sewwhatsports. And then I was at the Peyton Street Pens booth. And Peyton Street Pens is the one that's local to me. It's an online shop, but they are in Santa Cruz. All the pens I've bought, have been from there. Marsha 8:43 Except, except the one from college, right? Kelly 8:47 Yes, the one the one that I bought in college I bought, I did not clearly did not buy from them. But then that inspired me to get-- make a small collection of Sheaffer Targas from that same era, which I bought from them. And then I got the older Sheaffers for Christmas and my birthday. And those were also from them. So anyway, I wanted to meet Teri and introduce myself and say hello and have her put a face to an order blank, you know. Marsha 9:20 yeah. Kelly 9:21 So I went over there to talk with her and helping in her shop is a woman named Elizabeth. And she's like, did you knit your sweater? So I think this actually is what what created my knowledge about this intersection because I wore the Edie my Edie Tee that's that variegated yarn, the turquoise variegated. And so she said, Did you knit your sweater? And I said yes. And then I said, Are you a knitter and she said, Oh yeah. And so she goes to her bag and she pulls out her shawl and, and she was making a beautiful or she had in her in her bag it was finished. It was what she was wearing. She had in her bag, a beautiful, multicolor shawl. So that was really fun to get to meet somebody who--and she's on Ravelry. But I don't, I didn't get her Ravelry name. And then there was another booth where I actually bought a little leather cover for a field notes-- for my field notes notebooks. Marsha 10:26 Yeah, Kelly 10:26 It's what they call a traveler's style notebook where it's a cover with elastics and then you just, you just insert almost as many of these little Field Notes notebooks as you want inside by using these elastics to attach them. So I bought the cover from them and it's Curnow Bookbinding. Marsha 10:49 Okay, Kelly 10:49 And the woman there was also a knitter and I did not get her name, unfortunately. But yeah, she she, she told me her Ravelry name, and I didn't write it down. So I don't remember. But But yeah, that was really fun to meet her too. And I was able to buy the little, the little book and they have-- Curnow bookbinding it's C U R N O W. They have an Etsy shop. And they sell the cutest notebook thing. I didn't buy one at this shop, but I think I might have to at some point go on their Etsy shop. But they take old books. And then they use the covers of the old books. Marsha 11:34 Mm hmm. Kelly 11:35 And they put hand sewn notebooks inside. Okay, so they had Hardy Boys and some other titles that I didn't recognize. But I was just thinking I should go back and look at their site because what a fun gift for someone. You know, if you know that they really loved a certain book when they were young. Like let's say they love Nancy Drew or Hardy Boys and you go on Marsha 12:01 Yeah, Kelly 12:01 and see, you know, that notebook So, so I thought that was very clever. And then they also had wooden notebook covers that were like laser engraved. And there's one with a really cool octopus. Oh, I almost I almost bought the octopus one. And then there was also a woman who made felt art notebook covers and had bowls for your paint brushes. Marsha 12:34 Okay, Kelly 12:34 And and she was like, No, they're not knitting bowls. They're not yarn bowls. Like okay, she knows about yarn bowls? Kelly 12:43 Yeah, really? Kelly 12:44 I guess if you if you craft with felts maybe you do know about yarn bowls. So but they have little lips on them. So you could put your, you know, your watercolor brush on Marsha 12:56 Okay, Kelly 12:56 the bowl edge. So yeah, it's very cool. I so I bought the cover to the note-- the notebook cover. I bought a pen, a really darling little, small, like four-- under four and a half inches. A little orange and black, a 1920s or 1930s pen that fits into my little notebook. So that's really cool. Yeah, I had a great time. It was a lot of fun. I didn't spend all my money. Marsha 13:30 Oh, good. Kelly 13:31 Yeah. Well, Marsha 13:31 I guess that's good. Is that good? Kelly? Kelly 13:33 Yeah, it was fine. I wasn't sure you know, what I was going to see or what I was going to want. And there was there was a lot of interesting stuff there. But a lot of the things I don't feel like I know enough. Marsha 13:46 Mm hmm. Kelly 13:47 You know, so it was mostly, it was more of a learning, was more of a learning experience to go. And yeah, there are a couple things I wanted. I wanted the case, the pen case that I could put in my briefcase to protect my pens. Marsha 14:01 Mm hmm. Kelly 14:02 If I ever get back on campus, if I ever go anywhere. And then I wanted the cover to the field notes notebooks. So, huh. So yeah, but lots of intersection between knitting and this whole pen, pen and stationery world. Marsha 14:23 I remember having this whole discussion about the intersection of knitting and chickens. Kelly 14:27 Yes. Now we can add knitting and pens, knitting and pens, knitting and chickens. knitting and dogs. Marsha 14:34 Yeah, Kelly 14:35 There are a lot of intersections. Yeah. knitting and teachers, pens and teachers. Anyway, yeah, we could go, we could go on. Marsha 14:46 The list goes on. Yeah, Kelly 14:47 yeah. You know, all the cool. All the cool people do all the cool crafts, right. Marsha 14:54 Yeah, that's true. So yeah, well, that sounds like it was really fun and I think you sent me some pictures. Yeah. And the pens, some of the pens are just beautiful. Kelly 15:05 Oh my gosh, yeah, just Yeah, really, really, really beautiful. And some are really, really, really expensive. Yeah. You know, there's a pen price for everyone. That was another thing that was pretty cool to see, you know, really wide variety. Marsha 15:23 Well, and I was gonna say, you know, if you had those really expensive pens, you probably wouldn't want to take it out of your house and bring it to class because it'd be easy to lose something like that, you know. Which it's nice now that you have the case too, because you it's that'll be harder to lose, than a pen, you know, Kelly 15:39 yeah right. And then the case, I've been using the case. I have a bag that I pack in the morning when I go out to the trailer just because it's easier to carry all my stuff. And so I've been using the case in there. And it's really nice, because it just fits exactly in the pocket of my felted bag. And then the flap. The flap closes, because it's magnetic, it closes over the edge of the pocket. So it's really easy to just flip that flap up and grab the pen out and then close it back up. It's not like I have to take something out, take the pen out of that. I could just reach in like, it's become like a... it's not permanent, but it's almost like a permanent pocket. Or, well, yeah, a permanent hard sided pocket in my, in my bag. And that was kind of what I wanted was something that I could just put into my bag. It'll stay in my bag, and then I could just flip up the top and get the pen out. Marsha 16:36 Yeah. Kelly 16:38 So yeah, it was nice. I also saw Marianne, our friend Marianne. Kelly 16:42 Oh, yeah, Kelly 16:43 Arunningstitcher or Mariknitstoo on Ravelry. I think is her her Ravelry name there anyway. Yeah, so that was fun. She was-- she said she was gonna come for the end of the pen show. So we stood around and talked, probably a good 30 to 40 minutes. So I hope she had enough time to do damage after we got done talking. So we were headed out and she was headed to take a loop around and see what she could find So, huh. So yeah, I was really fun to see someone in person. Marsha 17:20 Yeah. Yeah, cuz it's been years. Well, year and a half when we're getting up on it. Kelly 17:28 Yeah, I mean, I haven't.. The last time I saw her it was in February of 2020. At tSitches. Yeah. So it would...that was really fun. To have a chance to meet somebody in person. It was, it was just a fun, fun day all around. Marsha 17:47 Yeah. Good. Yeah. Well, um, yeah. So it's very cool. Next year, maybe I'll come down for it. I'm not, maybe I need, maybe I need to get into these pens. I'm not into the pens. Maybe Maybe there's, maybe I shouldn't be into these pens. I don't know. Kelly 18:01 Oh, it's pretty fun. Yeah, pretty fun. Well, and I've got, okay, we won't to talk a whole lot about this. But I've now got a little system with my notebooks, to help me remember what I have to do for my classes and stuff. And that's been kind of fun to to...You know, we've talked about our lists. And I still have the steno pad that I use to keep lists. But now with that little small notebook cover, I have a couple of notebooks in there and one's for each class. And so I just take and jot little things or have like, I need to make a list of students that I need to contact, you know, like, I can actually write their names down on it. It's all in the computer. But sometimes you just need to write it down, have a list, and then go back to your email and create the email, you know. So I'm using it for all that kind of stuff, just like little scratch notes that I have for my class. So it's kind of fun to have a new little notebook system that I'm developing here. Marsha 19:00 Yeah, yeah. Oh, very cool. Yeah. And what else? Kelly 19:05 Well, I have some knitting. Okay. Marsha 19:07 You want to talk to me-- talk projects, then? Kelly 19:10 Yeah, I do have some knitting. I'm working right now on my sweater. And I'm almost finished with the first sleeve. I have probably 18 to 20 more rows of the cabling, and then the ribbing at the bottom. Marsha 19:30 Wow, good progress. Kelly 19:32 Yeah, it's it's going. It seems like it's going slowly. But that's just because I haven't had a chance to pick it up recently. Or the other thing is, when I've had the chance to pick it up. I've had to then rip back because my problem is that the rows are you know, the rounds on a sleeve are so short. Yeah, I forget to mark them off. Marsha 19:58 Oh, okay. Kelly 19:59 And so I'm going... You know, if it's a longer one and you get finished with it, it's like more momentous, I think. And so you remember to mark it off. I still forget, but I have an easier time remembering in that case. But with this, I'll get to the end of the row and just keep, you know, just keep plowing on. And yeah, keep going. Yeah. And every fourth row, I think it's every, Yeah, every fourth row, I have to do cable crossings. And so I was like, oh, shoot, have I gone three rows? Is this the time for the cable crossing? Or was it only two and I'm trying to count. And then I make the cable crossing and like, oh, shoot. No, that's too small. I needed to go one more or Oh, no, that's too big. Oops, gotta go backwards. So I've done quite a bit of, of unknitting the whole round or going back and just undoing the section of the cable crossing and fixing it. It's, it's a little irritating that I can't count. Marsha 20:58 [laughing] Kelly 21:03 I find it to be annoying. Not so annoying that I've learned to do it. But Marsha 21:10 to do it. Yeah funny! Kelly 21:12 But yeah, it's annoying, I get really irritated with myself. But it's it's well pattern I am I'm enjoying this pattern. I'm really enjoying the yarn. This is my handspun CVM three ply that I overdyed. And the natural color is a light tan. I think when I originally named the the the yarn, you know, in my project page, I called it "have a little coffee with your cream." Because the color of the yarn is if you... we used to have as a kid, I don't know if you guys did this, but my grandma would make us coffee milk. Marsha 21:57 What is that? Kelly 21:58 Well, it's like an inch of coffee. And then the rest of its milk in your cup. Oh, and so it's like you're having coffee with your adult family members. It's like you're doing this thing of having coffee, but you're really just having a glass of milk. So anyway, we used to have coffee milk, not all the time. Special, you know, special treat to have coffee milk. So it reminded me of that coffee milk where you're really just having milk and you're having a little coffee with your milk. And that's the color of the yarn. And then I dyed it with a color, I think it's called dark red dye. And so I've gotten this terra-- kind of orangey rusty terracotta color. So that's the the yarn I'm using, which of course you already know. But I'm letting people people know who might not have listened to before because I don't know if you noticed Marsha, but we have quite a few new listeners. Marsha 22:55 We do. Kelly 22:56 Yeah. Yeah, over the last few months. Marsha 22:59 Welcome. Kelly 23:00 Yeah, Marsha 23:01 all that talking is paying off. [laughing] Kelly 23:07 Well, and I think, I think some of them have come from... I can, you know, I can kind of look at the statistics, the analytics on our on the lips inside, but some of it has come from Spotify. So now that the our podcast has been on Spotify for a while, it's starting to get more more listeners there. And then there's another one called Gaana, which is I think it's in I want to say it's in India, is where that podcast app is used more. Okay, so we have we have some listeners on that app anyway. So yeah, welcome everyone who's new. Nice to see you and I wanted to just make sure you know about my sweater. And the pattern that I'm using. I think I forgot to say that the pattern that I'm using is called dark green forest. And it's by Christina Korber Reith. Or Rieth. Marsha 24:07 and I have a question about your sweater because where are you with the sleeve issue? Because remember, we were talking about this the last time that you think it's going to be okay? That because the color is slightly different but you think the last time we talked, we recorded I think you said we thought was going to be okay. Kelly 24:23 oh yeah, cuz I was only like an inch or so past and I now I'm now I'm quite a ways down and this sleeve is looking fine. Marsha 24:32 Okay, Kelly 24:33 There's a there's a slight change in the in the variation, you know, because then kettle dyed yarn is varied. Anyway, there's a slight change in the variation about the place where I started the sleeve, but there's also a slight change in the variation a little higher where it was within within a single skein. And then there's slight changes in the variation as it goes down the sleeve too. So I think I think it looks pretty seamless. Marsha 25:07 Good. That's nice to hear. Kelly 25:08 Yeah. Yeah, that was, I think that's what kept me from actually putting the sleeves on for so long. I was kind of worried about that. But this one's going well, hopefully the second one will go will go just as well. But I think it's going to be fine. Yeah. Yeah, I'm pleased to say. Marsha 25:29 Very nice it is really pretty. Kelly 25:31 Thank you. Yeah, I'm really enjoying this pattern. I'm glad I found it. It's not a very-- it's not a very well used pattern. I think there were only like, maybe 20 projects. Let me see. There are 25 projects. Okay, so yeah, only only a very few people, two dozen people have made this pattern. So, but I'm having a good time with it. And I think it's really well written. It's very detailed, a little bit daunting when I first opened it up, but once I started actually reading... Kinda like my students and my online class. Once they actually read the directions, Marsha 26:16 yes. It's not daunting at all. Kelly 26:19 It's not so daunting. So yeah, no, it's, it's, it's, it's been really a good pattern, I would, I would highly recommend it. So and then the only other thing that I've been doing is, I've now I finished with the pinkish purple yarn that I was using for those dish cloths. And I cracked open as a couple of skeins of green. So I've got a dark green and a light green variegated. They're really pretty. And I was thinking back to when it was that we did this. I think we dyed this yarn in, like 2015 Marsha. Marsha 26:58 Well, it was... Yes. It was a while ago. Kelly 27:01 Yes. So I'm really glad to be finally getting some use out of it. Yeah. Marsha 27:09 Nice. Nice. Is that it for projects for you? Kelly 27:14 That's all I got. I haven't done any spinning. I haven't touched Faye's blanket. But her birthday is in October, so I'm thinking I'm gonna finish it for her birthday. Kelly 27:24 Okay, Kelly 27:25 That just seemed like a good, A good milestone. Once I passed a certain point, it was like, Okay, now it's just gonna be a birthday present. Marsha 27:34 And it's an achievable goal, right? Kelly 27:36 Oh, yeah. I yeah, I have just the edging to do so it should. The crochet goes pretty fast in October's a month, away. Marsha 27:45 Thinking of October, I was thinking the other day at you know, I think I texted you a picture that I threw out a bunch of yarn, God gave it back to the goodwill... to the universe. And then I organized all my yarn and I also got these little plastic boxes to put the yarn in. And I had extra boxes. So I decided to put my unfinished projects in these clear plastic boxes so that I would see them. Kelly 28:09 Oh, I think I know where this is going. [laughing] Marsha 28:13 And one of my clear plastic boxes that contains my unfinished skull. And I was thinking I think this the third October, but I I yeah, I'm pretty sure it's the third October, Kelly 28:28 I think you're right. Marsha 28:30 Hmm. And I'm not getting... I'm not... well, I don't know. Maybe I'll maybe something will happen and I'll get it done by the 31st. You know, by Halloween. unlikely but I could do it. Kelly 28:42 Didn't you start on the teeth? Marsha 28:44 I finished the teeth on the ...now I can't remember. Kelly 28:51 You finished all the teeth? Marsha 28:53 No, no, no, no, I finished the teeth on the lower jaw. Kelly 28:56 Oh, okay. Marsha 28:57 And now I think I have... And there's how many teeth? Do we have? 32? . I don't know. It has accurate... an accurate number of teeth. So yeah, how many teeth is that? I've done half of them. That's 16 teeth. Kelly is that 16 teeth? Yeah, here's math. Can you divide 32? Kelly 29:17 I can do that math. I just can't count. Marsha 29:21 Anyway, um, and then I need to... so I, so I can... I was looking at it. And I've actually knit all the parts except I have to finish the teeth. And then sew it together. And I have to knit I have to get some dark gray yarn, or black or some dark color to knit like the the, the eye sockets. Yes, if I recall and I never... as I say I didn't get to that part in the pattern yet. But I think what you do is you knit basically like it's a ball kind of, like that's not as... like some like a half circle, kind of that you then push it back into the skull, kind of, to make like the eye So okay, Kelly 30:01 I'm remembering the one I did. I did the mask, The Day of the Dead mask. And it had it had the eye sockets too. And I think it was just kind of like a, it had some short rows in it. But yeah, it was kind of just like making a circle. And then that gets sewed on the back. I should bring you... do you need dark yarn? Kelly 30:23 Yeah. Kelly 30:23 Okay, I should bring you--that's another thing. We haven't talked about that. I'm coming up to see you. Marsha 30:28 Yeah, we'll talk about that in a second. Yeah, I have something to say about that, too. Kelly 30:31 I'll, I'll try to remember to pack... I have some of the that Rambouillet that, you know, the replenish Rambouillet that we have in our shop and I have some samples of that from from Lani. One of them is a dark color, I'll bring that and that might work. Marsha 30:49 Well, the other thing I have, I will get to my projects. But the other thing I have is just I have a lot of fleece, dark brown, black fleece, that I could just spin some and spin a little bit, knir with and... Kelly 31:05 that's, that's another obstacle though, to make it not get knit. Marsha 31:09 I know. I know. So Kelly 31:11 I'll try to remember to pack it, because Marsha 31:14 I will just remind people, because you, Kelly, you said we have a lot of new listeners. But I bought this pattern. So it'll be it was not last Stitches, but it was the Stitches before the Stitches we went to before the pandemic started. Because I can't even remember Kelly, when did the pandemic start? Is that 20 2020 Kelly 31:35 Yeah, it was 2019 when we got crazy about the skulls. Marsha 31:39 Yes. And we went crazy with the skulls and you bought like the Day of the Dead and they're kind of flat? Where mine is actually like, like round three dimensional sculpture. Yeah, that you felt and then you stuff and Kelly 31:51 I have that pattern too, I just never... I just didn't start that one. I got excited about starting the day that the Day of the Dead mask skulls. Marsha 32:00 So But anyway, it's in a clear box, so I can see it now when I go down there. Yeah. into the cellar.... Kelly 32:08 The room under your house? [laughing] Marsha 32:10 Yes. Um, so anyway, and I'm trying to think to remember who the pattern maker was? It's Wooley. Kelly 32:20 Wooley. Wooley Wonders or something. Marsha 32:23 Yeah. Wooley Wonders. Yeah, right. Kelly 32:25 I think so. But you talk and I'll look. Marsha 32:29 Oh, well, anyway, so that's it with that. So anyway, I just I'm bringing that up, because I found that skull down there. And it's, it's October so it just kind of made me laugh again about it. Okay. While you're looking I'm... we'll go back to it. But I'm going to talk about my next project. So Kelly, the last time two weeks ago, we talked about the Atlas, the Jared Flood pullover that I'm making for my brother. And remember I said I was...had some concerns. Kelly 32:54 Yes, about size. Marsha 32:57 I know. So it's too small. I mean, like he can get it on. But he said it's just like it's not there's not enough room through the shoulders. It's like, let me back up. It fits through the body, like the torso, then when you get up onto the the yoke through the the shoulders. It's... he said it just feels tight. Like he can put it on and it looks okay. But he said it's not super comfortable. And he said to me, Well, maybe if you wash and block it, and I said it is washed and blocked. So I think what I just... it's just sitting in the guest bedroom. And I'm thinking about it. And I thought I'm not going to rip it out yet. Kelly 33:38 Yeah. Marsha 33:38 But I think it needs to be frogged. And I and I but what I'm... You mentioned that you're coming up and so I will, I'm going to speak about that now. So you're coming up. You're driving up from California. Kelly 33:49 Yay. Marsha 33:50 Yay. And we're.. we are beyond excited. Kelly 33:52 Yeah. Yes. Yeah. That is definitely fair to say. Yeah. So I, I decided that since I had to endure the pain of teaching 100% online for three semesters now. That well, actually three and a half semesters. This is my, the start of my fourth semester. Let's see spring, fall, spring? fall? Yes. Marsha 34:22 Again. Kelly, again, the counting. [laughing] Kelly 34:26 This is the start of the fourth semester with 100% online. And so I thought if I have to endure the pain of this, I'm also going to get some of the benefit of this. And one of the benefits of teaching 100% online... Which in the... in the before times not very many people at the college had the opportunity to do that. It was not something that was routinely done. And in fact, there were moves towards making it so that people couldn't teach 100% of their load online. So there were just very few people who could do it. But one of the advantages of doing it is that you can teach from anywhere. And so I thought, okay, I could teach from Seattle. And then I could work during the day, and then I could play in the evening. And actually, with online classes, you can play in the day and work at night, you know, you can rearrange your schedule, however you need to. So I thought, I'm going to take advantage of this once in a lifetime, for me, because I don't intend to teach 100% online, ever again, if I can help it, right, Marsha 35:38 right. Kelly 35:39 But I'm going to take advantage of this opportunity to teach really remotely, so I'm going to be teaching from Seattle. It's just gonna be so fun. Marsha 35:48 I know. So you're, I'm very excited. So and we have our, we have everything planned, well sort of planned out what we're going to do. Basically, when we're in Seattle at my house, we're just going to sit on the deck and spin and knit. Kelly 36:00 Yep. Marsha 36:01 When you're when you're not working, we're going to be spinning and knitting on the deck, and walking dogs and just playing with dogs. And because you're bringing Bailey, you're not bringing Beary though he's gonna stay home. Kelly 36:13 No he's staying home. In fact, he's having afternoons with Aunt Betty, because because he needs to get practice in staying with her. And he's, you know, for months, he, this pair of dogs are the only dogs I've ever raised where I haven't practiced having them be by themselves. Marsha 36:32 Mm hmm. Kelly 36:33 You know, all the other dogs I raised from puppyhood. And that was just a part of the routine was that they had to get used to being alone. And, of course, Bailey came with her own issues about being alone. And with Beary, it's just, you know, it's harder now because there's two dogs and we're always home. So he really hasn't had a lot of opportunity to to learn to just be the stay at home dog and not have me around not have Robert around. So he's been practicing. Practicing afternoons with Aunt Betty. She gives him cookies. And he's learning to be happy down there. Marsha 37:14 Well, he's a pretty easy going dog. I mean Kelly 37:17 Well, it's funny, because he does seem like that. But he has fears that you just don't notice because of the way he acts. Like he was really afraid to go in the door to her room from outside. I don't know why. There was just something really strange about it. Maybe it felt like going into the basement? I don't know. Yeah, he just had a real fear of it. And so we've had to really work on work on that. And then once he got in, he immediately wanted to go out. And so but you know what? He likes food. And yeah, and so she's been giving him cookies. And he's been, he's been learning that it's a happy place. Marsha 37:59 Mmmhmm. Well, and aunt Aunt Betty is fun. And she loves dogs. And you know, all the dogs love Aunt Betty so he'll be fine Kelly 38:08 Yeah, it'll be, it'll be fine. He'll, he'll be okay. while I'm gone. Yeah, it'll be different for him. But he'll be okay. But anyway. Yeah, I'm really excited to be bringing Bailey on a road trip. Marsha 38:19 Yes. So we're gonna have a week in Seattle. And then we're going to go down for about a week to the Washington coast and do the whole beach thing. Kelly 38:28 Yeah. Marsha 38:28 And so we're excited about that, too. And let Bailey and Enzo run on the beach because Bailey's been to the beach a couple times with you and Robert, right down in California? Kelly 38:38 Once Yeah, we went once. Marsha 38:40 Oh, just once. And so I'm excited about that. Just to the beach... Well, you know, it's my favorite place. A side note, I'm going more and more side notes that we're going down. I will get back to my project. Because we're going to that community called Seabrook where we always go and I've talked about String Theory Yarns, that's owned by Jean. And I noticed that she posted on Instagram that she and her husband bought an Airstream trailer. Marsha 38:43 Oh, wow, Marsha 39:13 For traveling, which is super cool and super exciting. And my first thought was, how are they going to go anywhere? Because she was telling me in the summer, she usually she works like 120 days straight because she has... she's open seven days a week, and she's the only person in there. She doesn't have an employee. And so I thought when's she gonna use that trailer, and I thought I have a bad feeling about this. That she's retiring and she's closing the shop. Kelly 39:42 Oh no, Marsha 39:45 Well, I assume she's closing the shop. They just, she... Seabrook then posted that she's retiring. So I don't know. Honestly, I don't know if somebody has purchased the business from her or what's going to go on with the yarn shop but I'm a little heartbroken. I have to say. Because we love, We love Seabrook, but it was really nice having the yarn shop like we go in there and check in you know, before you go to the beach and say hi and then stop by afterwards and she always had knit nights on Thursday nights and it was really fun just to go there and you met a lot of the people who lived in Seabrook or in the surrounding communities. So I'm a little heartbroken. But she still lives in Seabrook, so I'll see her and that's good. So I'm Kelly 40:29 Maybe someone will buy the shop, and it will continue. Marsha 40:32 Yeah. I don't know. It's, Kelly 40:35 well, it's a difficult I mean, yarn shops are a difficult endeavor At any point Marsha 40:42 Yeah. Kelly 40:42 and then Seabrook is a little place, kind of out of the way, and then the pandemic can't have helped. So I can, I can certainly understand. Marsha 40:53 And I suspect part of it, too, probably is, it's just a lot. You know, your... she has a dog Cooper and she said, it's hard too when she works in the summer, he doesn't get down to the beach at all, because she's working. Yeah. So anyway. But back to projects back to this my Atlas. You're coming up. And I... See everyone probably thought I'd lost my train of thought, thank goodness. [laughing] I went so far off track. No, but you're coming up, and I decide I'm going to wait till you get here to look at the sweater. And look at it on Mark, because I don't know. And I know you've done color work before. I also I need to have Kim come and look at it too. Because as I've talked about in other episodes, this is the first color work sweater I've done in 20 years. And it looks nice, but I'm wondering if maybe my tension is too tight or something? I don't? Because it doesn't seem like it has a lot of give. Kelly 42:02 Yeah. Marsha 42:02 Now I realize it's not going to have this... It's not gonna be the same type of fabric that is on the body because it's color work, right? But I wonder if maybe that might I need to go up a needle size. So the body is worked on sevens, and the yoke is worked on a size up so on eight, and I want to talk to you about it. And maybe Kim. Do I need to maybe go up two sizes on the yoke? Kelly 42:28 Yeah, maybe. Marsha 42:29 I don't know. And listeners can weigh in on this if they want. I you know I bought a color work sweater in Iceland, where it's a it's a cardigan, zippered cardigan and has the same type of concept of like the... at the yolk. And when you feel that, it doesn't feel much different than the body that is not color work. And I'm wondering, is it... if it's I'm getting too tight or something? Kelly 42:56 Maybe the yarn isn't a good match for the pattern. Yeah, it's...Yeah, I'll be happy to look at it and see. It could be any number of things. It could be that the fabric is stiff, because of all the layers and the type of yarn that it is. Or it could just be a tension issue. Yeah, well, and Kim's done quite a bit of color work too. So she... Marsha 43:19 She's done a lot of color work. And then and the other person I thought I should contact too is momdiggity, Joanne. Because she lives just a few blocks from me. And she does a lot of color work too. She might be able to... Kelly 43:34 Yeah, that would be good. Marsha 43:35 Maybe I'll reach out to her and see if she could take a look at it and see because it it. Yeah. Anyway, I need a little bit of help on that. But it does, it needs to be ripped out. And I'm just gonna wait till you get here. And that can be one of our projects as we sit on the deck over a bottle of red wine is rip out that sweater. Kelly 43:55 Oh my gosh. Yeah. Yeah. You need you need companionship for for something like that. Marsha 44:00 Yeah. Well, and you know, the thing is like, it's like it takes... Well, I knit it pretty fast, because I worked on it exclusively. Pretty much. And it's, you know, bigger needles and whatnot, but I don't know, two months. Maybe. I know that it'll take literally 10 minutes to rip that thing out. You know? Anyway. So that's what's going on with that sweater. And then do you remember I've been...? I looked it up. I cast on Simple Shawl back in 2018. Kelly 44:29 Oh, right. Marsha 44:31 And it's been to Scotland twice. I think it has been to Iceland. Anyway. It's a pattern by Jane Hunter. And I finished the Picot bind off. So that's bound off. I've not washed or blocked it yet. Let's see. I cast on a new project. I we have a friend Brian, who likes the tea cozy that I made for my other friend Gary. So I said I would make him a tea cozy. So it's that Nanny Meyers tea cozy by Amelia Carlsen. I've made, I made one for Gary. And I've made two for myself. And it's that one where you alternate, it's all garter stitch, but you alternate, like, six of your main of one color, and then the second color and keep alternating that across. And so and you pull tight, so it it keeps, oh, yeah, these stripes create like ridges, Kelly 45:26 kind of like corrugated right? Marsha 45:28 Yeah. Okay. Yeah, it's like corrugated metal kind of. And so I, he looked at all of my spirit yarn, there wasn't any colors that he liked. So I said, let's just go down to acorn street here in Seattle. And what it is is just buy cascade 220. Because it's, it's a good all purpose workhorse yarn, and a really nice colors and stuff. So he went down there, and he couldn't decide what he wanted. He was really attracted to a red and green. And then he also was attracted to a blue and yellow. And you know where this is going, Kelly. I can, as I'm saying it out loud. I'm thinking, don't say it. And then I said it. I said, Oh, just buy all four colors, and I'll make you two tea cozies. So so he's getting... I know... so he's getting two. I've cast on the red and green one and they're there. The cascade... Both... All of these are cascade 220 heather's, and there's one called, the one I cast on is red wine heather. And that's a pretty one, and a green called Ireland with an extra e at the end. So I don't know how you pronounce that. But they're really soft colors. Kelly 46:48 Yeah, I think that red wine heather is the one that I used for my heroine jacket. Okay, a long time ago, this I might even have been kind of pre pre Ravelry. Marsha 47:03 Heroine as in a woman who's Kelly 47:05 Yeah, Marsha 47:07 Not the drug. Okay. All right. Yes. Kelly 47:10 Yes. I can't remember who the pattern designer for that was. But it's a felted, it's a felted coat that you knit with two strands, held double. And then you put it in the washer and felt it and it's double breasted. Anyway, I think that's the color. It's a really pretty color... has some blue, some little blue strands through it. Marsha 47:34 Yeah. Yeah. A really nice, they're really nice together because, yeah, super nice together, the two colors so... But I just thought it, just kind of funny going down there to Acorn Street. You know, of course, any yarn shop, people are super friendly. Right? And, and so we go in there and to figure out colors. And of course, you're you're you're confronted with a wall of cascade 220. And where do you kind of start, you know, and I said, Well, let's, let's just narrow down. We want to do heathers. He was pretty sure he wanted that. And so we were picking out the colors. But this is the part I think is so funny is, you know, everybody gets involved in the project. Righ? What are you making and both the the, the people working there, the shop owners or the clerks but then also customers. So I think it was actually kind of fun, you know, that everybody got involved with picking colors. You know, that's, I think he was surprised. But I also thought it was a really enjoyable process, you know. Everybody has a say. So anyway, I'm working on that. And you knit, sort of the two halves and then sew them together. And I have done, I would say, three inches of the first side. So that's coming along. And then I finished my summer spin-in spinning project. Kelly 48:58 oh yay! Marsha 48:59 Yes, I know I'm very excited. I just dedicated myself to and I have a couple things to say. The first thing I'm going to say about plying is the the lazy Kate that comes with the little Herby spinning wheel, the bobbins are vertical on it. Right? And then there was like a spring and then you screw down a knob to hold it on there. But then that spring provides makes, puts some tension on the bobbin right. So that is just not free spinning off the single is not just free spinning off the bobbin, right? Kelly 49:37 Yeah, because if it if that happens and it gets spinning too fast, then it stops and it starts turning around the other direction and then you have a mess. Marsha 49:45 And then it starts plying on itself kind of the single, right? So do you remember when I bought the that Ashford spinning wheel from was it the 80s and it had never been assembled? Well, it came with a lazy Kate, but the bobbins are on there horizontally. Okay, Kelly, so much better! Kelly 50:11 Oh, good, Marsha 50:12 Because what I found and I think it was when the, when the bobbins are horizontal, the, the single sometimes like the, what I would... what am I trying to say? It's like the, you're putting pressure on it like because you have to tension it right, those springs, but some tension so it's just not free spinning, but it also then sort of pulls the single into the layers of singles that are wound on to the bobbin. Kelly 50:43 Yeah, and then the other thing that happens too is if you're pulling just up and you know it's like it's below you and so on on the wheel attached to the wheel and you're pulling on so what you have to do is you kind of have to put your hand down there and pull out and so it's a real, it's a real technique. And then also when you're pulling up it can catch on the edge of the bobbin which is rough and that will break. There's lots of ways for the yarn to breakwhen you're plying with it. Marsha 51:14 What I found is it was the the single would break but then I couldn't find the end because it got buried into the other yarn wrapped around it. So for this I had the the green and brown that I had made. I use the lazy Kate from the little Herbie and then I think when when the podcast we were talking about this and so I got out the other one from the Ashford where the bobbins are horizontal and so all the brown I... well three skeins of brown I plied with that on the horizontal lazy Kate Totally different experience! My yarn didn't break once. Kelly 51:57 Nice. Marsha 51:58 And so I yeah, I don't it's it's... I love the little Herbie. But that design is not very good. I think it's good if you-- but you're right, you have to keep your hand. Yeah, so it's coming up and then this one you don't have to worry about Kelly 52:12 and I'm not as tall as you know, I'm closer. Marsha 52:17 That's true. Kelly 52:18 I'm closer to those bobbins you know, and and so I just kind of got used to a technique but yeah, it is true. spinning off of a horizontal-- plying jof a horizontal bobbin is very different. Marsha 52:32 Yeah. And then I also remember too, when you were first showing me how to ply the yarn You had me put the the lazy Kate quite a ways away from you know, like several feet away and and I noticed like when I was spinning I just had it you know on the side of my chair blocked by the table leg because it doesn't sit flat either. That's everything that's that Kelly 52:54 yeah, it's designed to attach to the wheel Marsha 52:56 Yeah, the wheel and yeah, anyway, so that was just a cool thing. I just, it's making it much better for me, much easier. And anyway, I've got the two tone one I'm calling it the barber pole is the green and brown together. I have about 950 yards. And I think because it's already in skeins I didn't think of doing the wraps per inch. So it's somewhere between a DK and a worsted. Okay. It might be DK I don't know. And then the the solid Brown. I have 661 yards. That is a three ply plied off of three bobbins and then I had you remember when I first the first time I plied I didn't have three bobbins of the brown so I thought oh well just do the chain ply or Navajo ply, but it's a little bit different. And so if you count that skein in, I have Oh, I'm sorry I have that other way around. I have 536 yards. If you add in that odd skein, I have 661 yards of the brown. Okay. So adding that all up it's about 1600 yards or about 1500 yards you know, so I get... I think I have enough for a sweater for Ben. And so I've been looking at sweaters and I need to do a striped sweater so I have couple-- three options. The first one is a pattern from... it's called Thun T h u n by the blue mouse. And I don't know if you've looked at that Kelly it's Kelly 54:39 I'm looking at it right now.And I'm I'm looking, well I'm trying to look at it, here we go. That's cute. Marsha 54:47 So so it's cute. It shows it's a... it shows on a woman but it's a unisex sweater. What I and it's a striped quite big, so the the yoke is one color, a solid--no stripes, I should say. And then like the the body. And the sleeves, partway down are big, thick stripes. Kelly 55:08 Yeah, I like those stripes better than I like the little stripes in the other pattern that you showed me. Marsha 55:13 Okay. So the only thing I would change about this is it has a split. The ribbing at the bottom is split. And the back is longer, twice as long as the front. The ribbing is twice as long as and I think I would make... that for a man, I would make that without the split. And then the same, you know, Kelly 55:35 right. Consistent ribbing all the way around. Yeah, yeah. Marsha 55:41 Yeah. And then the other one I'm looking at is let me go back. It's called poach pooch, p O, ch, E. And that is by Caitlin Shepard. And it's sort of the same idea. It's saddle shoulders. So the same idea, but you're--You're right, Kelly. It's thinner stripes. And but I thought that was a pretty good. It seems like I have enough yarn for that. And the only other thing I would change too is you...after you've knit the sweater you apply over the left breast a patch, like a leather patch or a fabric patch. Do you see that? I don't think I'd put that on Kelly 56:30 Yeah, I don't like that. No. Marsha 56:31 Yeah. And then the other thing I'm considering, as you remember, the I think it was the last time we went to Stitches. And we were having lunch with a bunch of people friends that we know. And there was a man there named Frank Jernigan, and he has a website. It's Phrancko Ph. r a n k. I'm sorry. That's wrong. ph RANCKO, and he does custom fit sweaters. That's not what it's called but it's that same thing where you put all your measurements in and your gauge and it will create a sweater for you. And so I was thinking I might do that. And he has saddle shoulders. So I was the... I might do his sweater. And then add stripes to it. A basic sweater, because Ben is is very tall, but he's very slender. And so if you just do one of these sweaters is actually designed for your body would fit really well. I would think. Kelly 57:32 Yeah, that might be a good idea. Marsha 57:35 Yeah, so those that's what I'm considering. Kelly 57:39 That sounds good. So you got some choices there. Marsha 57:42 Yes. Kelly 57:44 Well, before you make your your segue Marsha, I just wanted to say while you were talking about your spinning, I went and looked up the skull designer, pattern designer and her name is Ellen T. Sebelius. S i b E L I u s. And yeah, give her patterns I look, you may never want to knit something that fiddle that fiddly. But there may be something that you fall in love with on her yarn pages. Because she has some very cool patterns. So yeah, so yeah. But yeah, with your spinning finished Marsha. I didn't, I didn't finish my summer spin-in yet. Maybe I'll finish it while I'm up visiting you. I'll bring up... bring it with me. I just-- I mostly have plying to do so. So we'll see. Marsha 58:35 We'll just remind people that summer spin-in ends Monday at midnight on Monday, September 6, that's right. Kelly 58:45 So get your new projects into the pages, your your finished spins and also if you made anything using your handspun. And I didn't finish this sweater that I'm that I'm knitting out of my handspun either So this time I was a I was a spin along fail, Marsha? Marsha 59:04 Yeah. Kelly 59:06 There's no failure in spinning. I have a beautiful sweater mostly finished and I have quite a bit of singles on my bobbins so I'm happy with with what I was able to accomplish Marsha 59:17 well, that then, uhhh... Kelly 59:22 Oh, I should say about prizes. And we have prizes for this spin-in that we'll draw on our next episode when I'm up in Seattle. And the grand prize is going to be a pillow-- fabric designed by Cheri Magnussen who is a shepherd of an Icelandic flock in Maine. And then we also have project bags donated by three green sisters. And then we also, for people who aren't spinners who might want to enter, or spinners who want two chances to win one of these bags. We have a thread up in the Ravelry group that you can win, we're going to do a giveaway in that thread for a project bag as well. So and then, if you don't want to wait to see if you won, you can just go and look at her bags. And if you use the coupon code EWES2 e-w-e-s -2, you'll get 15% off all the way till the end of the year. Hmm. So take a look. She has some very pretty bags. . Marsha 1:00:28 Really! Yeah Yeah, really cute stuff. So. Alright. Well, we have one more thing we need to talk about. We want to talk about Kelly 1:00:36 Yes. So we're still having the pattern giveaway for our Patreon sponsors. People have been messaging me about the patterns. You get a pattern of your choice up to $8 and just message me on Ravelry or email. I have one email that I have to get to that I haven't haven't sent out the pattern yet. I'll have to do that tonight after we get finished here. But the patterns that people have selected, so fun to see. It's fun to be able to give a prize to our patrons. It's fun to be able to support designers. But I'll tell you, Marsha, it has also been fun to see all these patterns that people are selecting. Marsha 1:01:21 Yes, a few have gone into my... well....a lot have gone into my favorites. Yeah. Kelly 1:01:27 Yeah. So I've done similar. I've done a similar thing. I have a queue. I keep them in my queue. But yeah. Marsha 1:01:34 Like oh, yeah. So we'll have we have a list of them in the show notes. So you can... so anything that really stands out? Kelly 1:01:40 Well, the the beautiful together shawl, I think is really nice. And I haven't done a lace Shawl in a while. It's a Romi Hill pattern. And I have not done a lace Shawl in a while. And so that was kind of like, Oh, I kind of... I'm now at a point where I kind of miss shawl knitting. I think I need to, I think I need to think about casting on a shawl. So that was one of them. And then of course, I'm just gonna say Edie is a great pattern. Unknown Speaker 1:02:08 Mm hmm. Kelly 1:02:09 I was happy to buy that for someone. Because it's just a great pattern. I love my Edie. I have two of them and I love them both. They get a lot of wear. And I just was happy to see that pattern on the list. What about you? Marsha 1:02:25 Well, there was another cuz I love the Edie as well too. That's a great pattern. I but there's I know somebody else picked a tee Derecho. How is it pronounced. Derecho. By Alison green. That's a really cute t shirt too. Kelly 1:02:40 Yeah, that is. That's cute. Marsha 1:02:45 What else do we have here? There was the well Stripes. I've been looking at this Stripes by Andrea Mowry. That's cute. Kelly 1:02:56 I like the the cropped pullover the Nydia by Vanessa Smith. I I don't really wear clothes that it would work with. But I really like how it has the sweater and the cowl. And so when you wear that, you know... I... growing up in the late 70s I guess it was the late 70s cowl neck sweaters became a big thing. And I've always liked them. And so this you can have a cowl neck if you wear the cowl and then if you take the cowl off, you just have a scoop neck. And it's really I think it's a really clever design. Marsha 1:03:40 There's another cute t shirt the Friday tee by petite needs, no petite knits. Do you see that one's a striped sweater. It's very cute too. Kelly 1:03:50 Let me look. Oh, yeah, yeah, I remember seeing that one. Yeah, Marsha 1:03:55 and did you see the sleepy polar bear? Kelly 1:03:58 Oh my god. That's that. I think I'm gonna make that one when that one went on my list of things to make. I had heard of that pattern. I had no idea he was so big. He's big. Marsha 1:04:14 Yeah, it says here about 17 inches in length. Yeah, so yeah, he's he's a big boy. Kelly 1:04:19 Yeah, Marsha 1:04:20 I'm assuming it's a boy Kelly 1:04:21 A chunky boy. Well, it wouldn't have to be you know, not all polar bears are boys. Marsha 1:04:26 Did you? Did you look at the picture of its rear end. That's adorable. Kelly 1:04:31 It's cute. Yeah. Marsha 1:04:33 And little tail and the little paw is adorable. Kelly 1:04:36 Yeah, it's a cute cute pattern. Susan B. Anderson has some darling, darling patterns. But like you could make it a little color work sweater. You know, it has a sweater on but yeah, it's a plain, kind of a plain sweater. With a marled, looks like the marled yarn. I love the little toe pads on the bottom of its feet. Mm hmm. So but it would be fun to make that and also make it a little color work sweater. Marsha 1:05:06 Yeah, look. Yeah. Well, and then speaking of color work sweaters, there's a beautiful Ridari? Kelly 1:05:15 Yes. Marsha 1:05:16 The Icelandic, the Icelandic one and look at I'm not pronouncing this correctly. But it looks like it's Vetis Jonsdotter. Kelly 1:05:25 That's beautiful. Yeah, that is. So Marsha 1:05:29 anyway, everyone should just take a look at them. Because there's... really they'll end up in your in your queue. Kelly 1:05:35 Yes. Yeah. There's danger there but... Marsha 1:05:38 or not queue, but in your favorites. Or you might even just click the buy button. That's right. Kelly 1:05:43 Yeah, there's danger there. But it's the good kind of danger. [laughing] Marsha 1:05:48 Yeah. Yeah. Kelly 1:05:50 Yeah. Very nice. Yeah. Very cool. So yeah, it's, and this is still going on. So if you haven't contacted me yet, and you're one of our Patreon patrons, just get in touch with the pattern that you'd like, for your special gift. Marsha 1:06:06 So I think that's everything. Do we have anything else we need to talk about? Are we want to talk... any more rabbit holes we want to go down or deep dive? Kelly 1:06:14 We'd better not because I have office hours in about 20 minutes Marsha 1:06:18 Okay. Kelly 1:06:19 I can't think well, I can't think of any real big rabbit holes. I stopped myself from going further into Spoonflower after the last episode. But there's quite a discussion going on about--there was quite a discussion going on about Spoonflower in the Ravelry group. So yes, Marsha 1:06:39 I know. I saw that. So. Kelly 1:06:43 So speaking of the Ravelry group, if you are a new listener, come join us. On the Ravelry group. We have discussions about spinning and weaving the the big discussions going on now are the spinning discussion that's been going since the summer spinning started. We have a winter weave along discussion that's been going on since last October. We're almost ready to start our next winter weave along. And then we have morning coffee, where you can talk about anything. Recent conversation has been about dogs and how chaotic the start of the school year has been for all the different teachers that are there in the session. But yeah, it's fun. I go there every morning while I have coffee. That's why I called it morning coffee. But you don't have to drop in in the morning and you don't have to drink coffee. Marsha 1:07:34 No. Kelly 1:07:35 Yeah. Just a fun way to keep in touch with some fiber friends. Marsha 1:07:39 Yeah, Kelly 1:07:40 yeah. Yeah. So feel free to join us on Ravelry and the discussion and the Two Ewes Fiber Adventures group is where you'll find it. Marsha 1:07:48 Okay, any? I guess that's it, though. Yeah. I'm gonna-- I'm gonna let you go so you can get to your office hour. Okay. All right. And then I will... well, I will talk to you in person because you will be here in just a few days. Marsha 1:08:02 Next week, in a few days well, not a few days, but a week. Kelly 1:08:04 Well, less than a week. Marsha 1:08:06 Less than a week. Yeah. Kelly 1:08:07 It's less than a week. You'll be ... very close. Tuesday, I leave. Marsha 1:08:13 So as soon as you finish your office hours, go pack. Kelly 1:08:15 I know. I really, and I'll remember that dark yarn. Marsha 1:08:20 Yeah, yeah.Put it on your list right now. Okay. Use your finest fountain pen and put it on your list. [laughing] Kelly 1:08:28 Okay. Marsha 1:08:30 All righty. All right. Bye. Kelly 1:08:32 Thank you so much for listening. To subscribe to the podcast visit Two Ewes Fiber Adventures dot com. Marsha 1:08:39 Join us on our adventures on Ravelry and Instagram. I am betterinmotion and Kelly is 1hundredprojects. Kelly 1:08:47 Until next time, we're the Two Eews Marsha 1:08:49 doing our part for world fleece! Transcribed by https://otter.ai

Skincare Anarchy
Ahsaki Báá LaFrance-Chachere , Founder and CEO of Ah-Shi Beauty

Skincare Anarchy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 42:15


Ahsaki Baa LaFrance-Chachere, Founder/CEO of Ah-Shi Beauty, the first native American owned and operated luxury skincare and cosmetics brand in the united states. I am a proud dine (Navajo) tribal member and African American woman. The odds were against me as I faced social and economic challenges as a dark-skinned Native American. This gave me the fuel I needed to build Ah-Shi Beauty. I get to showcase that we as Native Americans/Indigenous people are diverse. We are not the pervasive image the media continue to perpetuate. In Navajo, Ah-Shi means: "This is me, This is mine." Ah-Shi Beauty - This is my Beauty! My customers set their own beauty standards. It is my responsibility that when my customers look in the mirror, they see themselves, feel empowered and continue to love the skin they are in. Ah-Shi Beauty has the opportunity to help the 500+ recognized reservations that are ignored. For the first time in history, we have a beauty brand with two locations that proudly operates both on and off a tribal reservation. I am in the position to expand and scale to exponential heights. All tribes across the country can relate to Ah-Shi Beauty. As the face of the brand, I am always pushing the narrative to show the world that we are here and our indigenous beauty will be recognized and respected. Ah-Shi Beauty is going to bring positive change to the beauty industry. We are a part of the movement that is resetting and reshaping beauty standards. The beauty industry can now include a member from the reservation at the table. I represent hope to my people. I am ready to work, learn and be the next Timeless Ionic Beauty Brand. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/skincareanarchy/message

Your Aunties Favorite Podcast
"Ugggglllyyy" (Ft. Saltyconvos)

Your Aunties Favorite Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 70:50


The ladies from Saltyconvos join Hersh and Delmar to discuss body count and holding your mans down. Is there a "Navajo" section at Fat Tuesdays?Follow Saltyconvos on IG and give their podcast a listen on Spotify.

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times
How Native Americans became a vaccine success story

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 23:31


Fewer ethnic groups in the U.S. have been harder hit by COVID-19 than Native Americans. It's killed them at more than twice the rate of whites. The pandemic has exacerbated longstanding health inequities, and a deep-rooted distrust in the federal government made tribal leaders fearful that members would reject the government-endorsed vaccines.But the opposite happened. Native Americans now have the highest vaccination rates of any major racial or ethnic group in the United States. L.A. Times Seattle bureau chief Richard Read and Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez explain why.More reading:Despite obstacles, Native Americans have the nation's highest COVID-19 vaccination rateCOVID-19 is crushing Native American reservations. But distrust of the government makes vaccines a hard sellThey know the sick. On Navajo Nation, contact tracers work to control coronavirus on vast lands

Snap Judgment
“Solomon's Sword” from This Land

Snap Judgment

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 42:47


ALM – as referred to in court documents – is a Navajo and Cherokee toddler. When he was a baby, a white couple from the suburbs of Dallas wanted to adopt him, but a federal law said they couldn't. So they sued. Today, the lawsuit doesn't just impact the future of one child, or even the future of one law. It threatens the entire legal structure defending Native American rights. Today, from Crooked Media, we're sharing the first episode of This Land Season 2. This episode touches on different kinds of trauma. Please take care of yourself while you listen. To hear the full series, subscribe now to This Land wherever you get your podcasts. Snap Spotlight - Season 12 - Episode 35

Your Aunties Favorite Podcast

Ya'll ever thing about tribal sovereignty? Do indigenous people suffer from victimhood?

Wisdom of the Body
051. Kevin Martin on Regenerating our Native Identity

Wisdom of the Body

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 51:27


Listen to Kevin Martin discuss the Native American culture with Heather, and the various ways in which native tradition is being passed down to future generations. Reflect on the vast differences between a society that values individualism and that of a tribal and community-focused culture. Get a deeper understanding of the native perspective on the environment and medicine, and how one becomes a “Medicine Man”. Learn how Native Americans face cultural appropriation, identity challenges and poverty, all while possibly being the sacred torch bearers for the soul of America. Feel inspired to hold reverence, give back and educate yourself on those who lived on this land before we did.  In this episode, Heather and Kevin discuss: Learning about Native plant medicines from the elders in the tribe Education on a reservation Individualism v.s. tribal community Ceremonies Matriarchy Peyote ceremonies in the Native American Church The story of the White Buffalo Calf Woman Cultural appropriation outside of Native communities How many parts of many Native rituals are being borrowed by modern-day spiritual groups, especially those promoting the use of mushrooms (psilocybin) and Ayahuasca Mental health Cultural identity Family identity Personal identity Environmental identity Kevin Martin is the founder of StarLife Foundation, an organization to restore indigenous livelihoods through the intersection of tech and native culture. Kevin is a Sioux and Assiniboine Tribal Member from the Fort Peck Reservation in Montana. He is the Father of the known Navajo entertainers, the Martin Sisterz, and is a Traditional Counselor at Rock Point High School in Arizona. Kevin has a Masters in School Counseling and is CACREP (multicultural counseling) accredited. https://starlife.earth  Heather Grzych is the author of The Ayurvedic Guide to Fertility and the host of the Wisdom of the Body podcast. A board-certified Ayurvedic practitioner, she bridges the worlds of conventional and alternative medicine to help women and men heal their physical and emotional lives. Heather is on the board of directors for the National Ayurvedic Medical Association (NAMA) and has consulted with doctors, governments, and insurance companies. She offers virtual consultations and programs worldwide. www.heathergrzych.com   Connect with Heather: Instagram.com/heathergrzych Facebook.com/grzychheather   Book an Ayurvedic consultation or connection call with Heather:  https://www.heathergrzych.com/book-online   Join the Wisdom of the Body club on Clubhouse: https://www.joinclubhouse.com/club/wisdom-of-the-body   This podcast is for educational and entertainment purposes only.

KZMU News
Wednesday August 25, 2021

KZMU News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 10:18


In a press conference outside the Grand County Sheriff's Office yesterday, law enforcement said they have not yet identified a suspect in the double homicide of two local women. Agents from the State Bureau of Investigation and Federal Bureau of Investigation are assisting Grand County with the case. Sheriff Steve White says they have stepped up patrols in the La Sal Mountains in response to community safety concerns. Plus, Moab City will not institute a property tax increase after elected officials say they failed to adequately communicate what projects that revenue could fund. And, a report on mining clean-up on Navajo and Hopi lands from our radio partners. Show Notes: Photo: Captain Shan Hackwell reads a statement regarding the double homicide in the La Sal Mountains, standing outside the Grand County Sheriff's Office on August 24th. Visible behind him (from left) are Sheriff Steve White, FBI special agent Rachel Butler, and Grand County Attorney Christina Sloan. Anthony Militano/KZMU News If you have information relevant to the recent double homicide, please call the Grand County Sheriff's Office at 435-259-8115 8/24/21 Grand County Sheriff's Office Press Conference (video) https://www.facebook.com/utahgrandcountysheriff/videos/269801227998223 8/24/21 Grand County Sheriff's Office Press Conference (transcript) https://www.kzmu.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/8-24-21-GCSO-Press-Conference-Transcript.pdf Moab Property Tax Info https://moabcity.org/582/Property-Taxes KJZZ: Years After Coal Mines Close On Navajo And Hopi Land, Some Are Concerned About Cleanup https://fronterasdesk.org/content/1706997/years-after-coal-mines-close-navajo-and-hopi-land-some-are-concerned-about-cleanup?_ga=2.9001653.1615904818.1628797415-384238978.1615335712

On Point
First Person: How Western Droughts Impact Navajo Farmers

On Point

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 4:18


Native Americans communities have been dealing with loss of water since a drought began 20 years ago. One of those communities is Many Farms, Arizona, where Roland Tso lives. Roland Tso is a grazing official on the Navajo reservation. Historically, Many Farms has been an agricultural community, but drought is changing that: "We've been conserving for so long. But at this point, this drought is just going to make it harder to survive out here."

Genre Junkies | Book Reviews
112 | Horror | “The Navajo Nightmare” by David Sodergren and Steve Stred

Genre Junkies | Book Reviews

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 42:24


Scott and Sandra travel to the old west for this historical horror dripped in blood.

What A Day
Uncovering The Foes Of The Indian Child Welfare Act with Rebecca Nagle

What A Day

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 23:51


In the new season of “This Land,” journalist Rebecca Nagle investigates who is attempting to take down a federal law that aims to keep Native American foster and adoptive children with Native American communities, and why. Nagle joins WAD to explain how all is not what it seems in a court case where a white couple claims that they cannot adopt their foster child, who is of Navajo and Cherokee descent, because of that law. And in headlines: California's Prop 22 is ruled unconstitutional, powerful storms deluge Tennessee and the Northeast, and school districts face a bus driver shortage. Show Notes: “This Land: Season 2” – https://crooked.com/podcast-series/this-land/ For a transcript of this episode, please visit crooked.com/whataday Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

St. Louis on the Air
Navajo Chef Explores Indigenous Midwestern Cuisine With Bulrush

St. Louis on the Air

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 20:03


Chef Freddie Bitsoie is partnering with St. Louis restaurant Bulrush on two meals celebrating the cuisine of the Hopewell tradition, which flourished in the Midwest before Europeans colonized the continent. He discusses the cuisine with Bulrush chef/owner Rob Connoley.

Here And There with Dave Marash
Here And There 18 August, 2021 Elizabeth Miller

Here And There with Dave Marash

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 51:19


What will it take to solve the water shortage on the Navajo reservation?  The coronavirus pandemic was a cruel reminder of the consequences when you live unable to follow the simplest survival suggestion -- wash your hands.  That takes water to do that.  Without access to clean, reliable sources of water, hundreds of Native Americans have died.  And still progress is slow. Elizabeth Miller has been covering the story for NM in depth.

Aww Shift
James Beck - Give It All

Aww Shift

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 23:57


In today's episode, our guest is James Beck, a structural integration therapist and author who teaches corporate environments and culture services about healing pain. This person is passionate about helping other individuals remove pain physically, like helping high-performance athletes, chiropractors, personal trainers, and physical therapists.  [4:41] Why should we listen to you?  I came from a foster home called "Last Chance," where street kids who were physically abused are placed. I realized that I could help other people, just like how my father had helped me when I almost gave up on myself.   [5:51] Moving to Los Angeles  When I moved to Los Angeles, I learned how to write and knew that massage therapy could damage a person's psyche. I wanted to explore how far good touch can remove pain and do the opposite. I was also the therapist for American gladiators and the biggest loser. [7:11] Feeling Empty and Resetting Life  This was the time where I felt empty. It felt like my life was about me. I feel like I climbed the wrong mountain even though I have many opportunities around me. On April 1st, 2011, I invited all my friends over, and I said, take it all. By giving everything away, all my things, my mind was rewired to a survival level.  [8:49] I went around the United States, and I served one family and every state of the country. I did not ask a dime for my time. I wanted to go around my country and make someone in every state feel priceless like I did. [10:04] I did a coat drive a couple of years ago where we brought like 3000 coats and where I also realized how much pain the white people have caused them. I understood and served them, not only individually, different relationships. And there are simple principles that you can use to transform the dynamic of any relationship. [11:45] Moving back to California  I met my wife in California, who is a Lieutenant Colonel back then. I became a structural person and learned how to do high-level therapy. I would serve the soldiers under my wife's leadership, where every soldier had the same problem repeatedly, which was sacred iliac dysfunction. I also developed this level one certification to where any athlete or chiropractor, PT, massage therapists can balance. [14:00] Impactful Situation  I met some in Ohio, where she asked me to take her kids on a fishing trip. At first, I didn't know what I can teach them, but then instead of having it be about me again, learning to turn my mind off as how I can help you not be a part of the interchange at all, but just let the other person dictate everything. Then she started to pay forward to the community. [16:45] Betrayal  When I was in the Navajo nation, I thought it was tremendous and committed by that other person. I thought they were committed to me, but they were not, and I realize that I committed to the wrong person. You did not spend the time to figure out if this person was worthy of your word. You give your word before you did your due diligence. [20:00] National News  When I rolled out my stories, the national news agency picked them up. When you realize when you have the work and are just doing the work consistently and have your heart in the right spot, the magic happens. And that maybe if you are trying to scheme and strategize and everything, you could not have gotten that just by doing the work; it all turns into something. [22:00] Communication  Communicate on an absolute level, what you are going to, is it just as a human being, having it just be human and my pain connected with their pain, and since it was authentic and genuine, we were able to bond and grow through that. People do not realize that how you get into a flow state, enhance consciousness, and enhance performance is through service. [24:09] What promise did God make to the world when He created you?  It is to be reckoned with. I wanted to be a reckoning to myself. It is both a country reference and a spiritual reference.

National Day Calendar
August 14, 2021 – National Bowling Day | National Code Talkers Day

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 2:30


It Took An Extra Bowling Pin To Beat This Loophole! Welcome to August 14th, 2021 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate a game with a checkered past and a code that changed the game. In the 1830s and 40s, officials in Connecticut passed a law to ban bowling.  Apparently, the excessive gambling associated with the sport made it a threat to public welfare.  Bowling at the time consisted of 9 pins, which is what the state outlawed.  As a way to get around this, bowlers added an extra pin, creating the 10-pin game we know today.  This new version of the game caught on inNew England, though it took a few innovations before bowling caught on with the rest of the country.  First, the material used for bowling balls was changed from wood to rubber.  Then in the 50s the automatic pinsetter changed the game forever.  On National Bowling Day get out and celebrate this family sport that's still on a roll. During World War II, the United States military became frustrated as the Japanese cracked every code used by the Allies. The solution to this problem came from an unlikely source, Native American tribes. Because many native languages such as Navajo and Comanche were unwritten and spoken only by tribespeople, they became the perfect basis for a new secret code. Native speakers were sent with army divisions to transmit and decode messages from the field of battle.  The code they created could not be broken and helped change the course of history. On National Code Talkers Day, we celebrate these unsung heroes of World War II and the top secret role they played.  I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson.  Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day.

Living Myth
Episode 241 - The Sacred Fifth

Living Myth

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 25:46


On this replay of a popular episode, Michael Meade takes up the issue of healing from the ancient idea of the Sacred Fifth, or Secret Fifth, that represents the hidden center of the world, the original source of wholeness and renewal. Following the Navajo myth of the Fifth World, Meade describes how a small reed can become the connective link to the axis of the world that then leads to the hidden center that remains the living source of life.  The ancient myth becomes a way of recovering from, and shifting the burden of the otherwise overwhelming dilemmas of the modern world.   Thank you for listening to and supporting this podcast.  You can hear Michael Meade live by joining his free online event “Mythic Imagination and Climate Change” next Thursday, August 26. Register at mosaicvoices.org/events.   You can further support this podcast by becoming a member of Living Myth Premium.  Members have access to the full archives of over 345 episodes, receive a 30% discount on all online events, courses and products and receive 3 bonus episodes each month. Learn more and join this community of listeners at patreon.com/livingmyth.   As always, we appreciate you leaving a review on iTunes and sharing it with your friends. On behalf of Michael Meade and the whole Mosaic staff, we wish you continued well-being and deep community connection during this period of great uncertainty and transformation.

Art Dealer Diaries Podcast
Art Dealer Diaries: Podcast Highlights (Part 7) Epi. 160 - Host Dr. Mark Sublette

Art Dealer Diaries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 69:12


Three years and  150+ podcasts later I figured it was time for a small break. Until new episodes return this Fall, I'll be posting compilations of some of my favorite Art Dealer Diaries moments.Part seven features (in order) Western plein air painter Bill Gallen, Associate Director of the BYU Museum of Art Ed Lind, master San Ildefonso potter Russell Sanchez, Western sculptor Susan Kliewer, contemporary Navajo weaver Marlowe Katoney, and art critic and museum curator Elaine A. King.

Sinister Sisters: Women In Horror
The Mandela Effect and Skin-Walkers

Sinister Sisters: Women In Horror

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 48:42


This week, Felicia discusses the Mandela Effect and even quizzes Lauren on her knowledge of some classic ones. Lauren covers the Skin-Walker from Navajo culture, a creepy version of a shapeshifting witch that will surely to keep you up at night.  If you have requests for future episodes or just want to hang out follow us on Instagram @sinistersisterspodcast

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
A Functional Medicine Approach To Curing Crohn's And Colitis with Dr. George Papanicolaou

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 41:08


A Functional Medicine Approach To Curing Crohn's And Colitis | This episode is sponsored by Thrive Market and Primal KitchenInflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an umbrella term for a variety of symptoms and diagnoses, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Approximately 3 million Americans are impacted by this inflammatory condition that affects the digestive tract and can greatly impact quality of life, disrupt daily routines, and carry very real emotional burdens. Symptoms of IBD include bloating, constipation, diarrhea, urgency, painful cramping, rectal bleeding, and more.In this episode, Dr. Hyman talks to his UltraWellness Center colleague Dr. George Papanicolaou about the Functional Medicine approach to treating inflammatory bowel disease. They identify root causes and discuss why the health of your microbiome is vital when it comes to treating IBD. IBD is autoimmune in nature and may be helped by following autoimmune protocols also covered in this episode.George Papanicolaou is a graduate of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and is Board Certified in Family Medicine from Abington Memorial Hospital. He is also an Institute for Functional Medicine Practitioner. Upon graduation from his residency he joined the Indian Health Service. He worked on the Navajo reservation for 4 years at the Chinle Comprehensive Medical Facility where he served as the Outpatient Department Coordinator. In 2000, he founded Cornerstone Family Practice in Rowley, MA. He practiced with a philosophy centered on personal relationships and treating the whole person, not just not the disease. He called that philosophy “Whole Life Wellness”. Over time as the healthcare system made it harder for patients to receive this kind of personal care Dr. Papanicolaou decided a change was needed. He began training in Functional Medicine through the Institute of Functional Medicine. In 2015, he established Cornerstone Personal Health, a practice dedicated entirely to Functional Medicine. Dr. Papanicolaou joined The UltraWellness Center in 2017. This episode is sponsored by Thrive Market and Primal Kitchen.Thrive Market is offering all Doctor's Farmacy listeners an extra 25% off your first purchase and a free gift when you sign up for Thrive Market. Just head over to thrivemarket.com/Hyman. Right now, Primal Kitchen is offering my community 20% off. Just go to primalkitchen.com and use the code DRHYMAN20 at checkout.In this conversation, Dr. Hyman and Dr. Papanicolaou discuss:How highly-processed foods affect the gutCauses of IBD, including a disordered microbiome, stress, and lack of exerciseWhy toxins contribute to dis-ease in the bodyWhat to investigate when treating inflammatory bowel diseaseThe importance of akkermansia in your gut microbiomeThe use of the Autoimmune Protocol (AIP) diet to treat Crohn's and colitisTools to modulate the immune systemAdditional ResourcesIntegrating Functional Medicine into Cleveland Clinic's Inflammatory Bowel Programhttps://drhyman.com/blog/2019/01/16/podcast-ep36/A Functional Medicine Approach to Treating Crohn's and Colitis with Nishtha Patelhttps://drhyman.com/blog/2021/06/10/dp-ep221/A Collaborative Approach to Heal Inflammatory Bowel Diseasehttps://drhyman.com/blog/2019/01/18/a-collaborative-approach-to-heal-ibd/What Really Causes AutoImmune Disease with Dr. Todd LePinehttps://drhyman.com/blog/2020/07/10/podcast-hc18/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Innovative Mindset
Publishing Expert Angela Engel, Founder and CEO of the Collective Book Studio

The Innovative Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 59:13


Book Publishing Expert, Angela Engel On How She's Innovating That Industry To Help Authors Get Their Books Out Into The World This episode is brought to you by Brain.fm. I love and use brain.fm every day! It combines music and neuroscience to help me focus, meditate, and even sleep! Because you listen to this show, you can get a free trial.* URL: https://brain.fm/innovativemindset If you love it as much as I do, you can get 20% off with this exclusive coupon code: innovativemindset   Angela Engel is an entrepreneur and book publishing expert with over twenty years of experience in the publishing industry. After working for 20 years in the publishing industry and with major publishing companies including Chronicle Books, Ten Speed Press, Cameron + Company, Dwell Studio, and Moleskine, Angela is on a mission to disrupt the publishing industry by giving budding authors more agency and authority in the publishing process. As founder of The Collective Book Studio, she provides authors the support they need to get a book out into the world. Founder and CEO of The Collective Book Studio, a partnership publisher working to pair authors' vision with quality book production in the areas of lifestyle, gift, and children's books. Here's a recent Publisher's Weekly article about the studio and how it's disrupting the publishing industry. Connect with Angela Website: https://thecollectivebook.studio/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thecollectivebookstudio/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/angela-engel-48b3a81b/ Episode Transcript Angela Engel [00:00:00] Angela Engel: [00:00:00] They have to, if they want trade distribution, the willing for this feedback, be willing for the work, be willing to say, Hey, you know what? All of sales, all of marketing, all of editorial is looking at this and the title and the cover really have to have this element. In order for it to work in the market. [00:00:25] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:00:25] Hello and welcome to the innovative mindset podcast. I'm your host Izolda Trakhtenberg on the show. I interview peak performing innovators in the creative social impact and earth conservation spaces or working to change the world. This episode is brought to you by brain FM brain FM combines the best of music and neuroscience to help you. [00:00:43] Focus meditate and even sleep. I love it. And I've been using it to write, create and do some of my deepest work because you're a listener of the show. You can get a free trial head over to brain.fm/innovative mindset. To check it out. If you decide to subscribe, you can get 20% off with the [00:01:00] coupon code, innovative mindset, all one word. [00:01:02] And now let's get to the show. [00:01:09] Hey there and welcome to the innovative mindset podcast. My name is Izolda Trakhtenberg. I am super happy that you're here. I'm thrilled and honored. And so, so, so happy to welcome this week's guest. She, and I've just been chatting before we started recording. And I know this is going to be a super fun conversation. [00:01:27] And you know what, Angela, I didn't ask you exactly how to say your last name. So I'm just going to try it. Angela Engel is an entrepreneur and book publisher expert with over 20 years of experience in the publishing industry. After working for 20 years in the publishing industry and with major publishing companies, including chronics. [00:01:44] 10 speed, press Cameron and company dwell studio. And Moleskine, Angela's on a mission to disrupt the publishing industry by giving budding authors more agency and authority in the publishing process. And you know how close that is to my heart was six books to my name and three more in the pipeline as [00:02:00] founder of the. [00:02:01] The book studio, she provides authors the support. They need to get a book out into the world. She's the founder and CEO of the collective book studio. And it's a partnership publisher working to pair author's vision with quality book production in the areas of lifestyle gift and children's books. [00:02:16] Angela, I am so glad that you are here. Welcome. [00:02:20] Angela Engel: [00:02:20] Thank you. I know you pronounce my name perfectly.  [00:02:22] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:02:22] Yay. I was, I was a little concerned and I was like, I normally ask and completely, completely forgot because we were, so I was so excited to be talking to him. We were having such a great conversation that everything went out of my head. [00:02:34] So first of all, Wow that you're doing this. We were just talking about the fact that there are authors so many authors like me, the DIY people who are self publishing, who've been crying for what you are offering your you're building a name for yourself and the studio in the collective book studio in publishing. [00:02:57] And you're doing it in a way that's really in many [00:03:00] ways disrupting the industry yet. Again, I would love if you would talk a little bit about what you are trying to do, what is the mission of the collective book studio? [00:03:11] Angela Engel: [00:03:11] That's a, that's a big question. I know, but, um, you know, I have, as you said, I've had a career of over 20 years in the space. [00:03:20] I'm, you know what? I was a young, young thing, right out of college, a comparative lit and creative writing. I loved books. I mean, who does it? Right? Especially in the, in the journalism field and the creative writing field and the English major, all of our stuff. And we, you know, our dream is to work in publishing and I got my dream. [00:03:40] I got really lucky. I was, you know, 20 what, one or two when I graduated and I drove down to San Francisco and I applied for this job at publishers group west, which is now bought by Ingram. We all know who Ingram is. It's a huge. Mega, um, whole wholesaler and obviously self publishing knows a lot about Ingram. [00:04:00] [00:04:00] And, and, um, I got my first job there and in that was like this champion of independent presses and small presses. And I actually had a great job. Great boss. Her name was trig McCloud and she came from Broadway books in New York. She had been Cindy Crawford's publicist, and I think she saw in me, honestly, that's he young? [00:04:21] That I could do what I wanted to do, but she sort of was like, I'm going to sort of mentor you and let you ride the wave. And I got to ride two campaigns with her. One was the four agreements, which was, as we all know, a New York times bestseller and continues to be an incredible book. Um, and then the other one was when nine 11 hit was Noam Chomsky's book by seven stories and watching, watching her champion, these small independent presses become New York times bestseller. [00:04:51] Um, was just magical, right? Cause, cause you brought in your editorial, your publisher, the writer, like all of, and then distribution and all the [00:05:00] ways to make this successful and honestly compete with the big five publishing houses. And then, um, at that same time, there's something called Amazon. Oh yes. And, uh, they were really just a book retailer, right? [00:05:15] Like it was like Amazon and Walden pond in the mall. Right? Like, like where did you go buy books? Right. Barnes and noble was like the big, big thing borders. And there was like some Walden bonds. And there was Amazon that was like starting to be a book retailer. Right. And at that same time, it was also like, Hmm, maybe urban Outfitters or anthropology or pirates should start selling books. [00:05:40] And I started just this sort of, uh, career path with, even in the publishing space, carving out for myself, becoming a specialist. And how do we sell books outside of the book trade. Right. And partly how you do that is packaging is the, is, is the way the book looks. Cause you don't, [00:06:00] you have to remember. [00:06:01] You're writing for someone else, right? In many ways you have to understand your audience and your audience and your end, the buyer. Sometimes the person who buys the book is completely different than your audience. And so understanding that package is really key. Um, so my mission was let's jump ahead. [00:06:22] Three years ago when I had been back, you know, I have, you know, my career was interesting partly because, you know, I'm a mom of three girls and you know, how are we going to, I'm pregnant with my third baby and I'm at a big trade show. And I'm like, God, I can't keep like, pumping like this. And I got two kids at home. [00:06:40] So, you know, I S I, I quit and I stopped consulting. And in this time of consulting, There was this boom of self publishing. And, um, and I understood, I understood why people were going that route, but I saw also an issue when it came to understanding the full, [00:07:00] um, reason for traditional publishing is so sacred. [00:07:04] One being, um, the craft as the book, the topography, the editorial, you know, everything, the illustrations and, and then also the distribution. So I wanted to find a company that could offer something completely different than Amazon can ever offer, which is people ask me this all the time. Do I have to sign an NDA? [00:07:26] I'm like, there's no NDA to sign it's people. Like, how do you can, I mean, you could, you can't really recreate Angela or Dean Burrell or Elizabeth Saki, like any of my staff. So you get to work with people who have been experts in this field for decades. Yeah. So that's sort of the mission is how did, how did like people, you know, I would welcome agent at work and we use agents for illustrators it's not necessary right these days. [00:07:57] And so how can we make [00:08:00] sure that people are being, having access to publishing and not having to wait three to four years to get on a list or develop a huge, huge pro. Profile and, you know, Instagram following and all the other hurdles that are, that are, that are existing. Now, my model is different, right? [00:08:19] And people do have to invest in their work. Our royalties are also much higher, so it's just a give and take why I call it partnership publishing. [00:08:31] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:08:31] I'm taking all of that in for a second. That was a lot, uh, I asked a big question. You gave a big answer. So here, here's the thing I love. I love the notion of partnership publishing and w w I, I hear what the collective book studio brings to the table. How much pushback do you get from the more traditional ways of publishing? [00:08:58] Like the big five. [00:09:00] What, what, what kind of reception or are you getting from the more traditional spaces? [00:09:07] Angela Engel: [00:09:07] Oh, They had just like cheered on my colleagues are awesome. I mean, they, like, we just signed Fran Hauser, incredible, incredible, uh, woman. Um, and she had a New York times bestseller myth of the nice girl. [00:09:25] It was just an, I just, my big win this week was there was an article in publishers, weekly in our trade magazine, in the print and digital. That, uh, the clinic of Brooke studio is trying a new approach and we were the keynote breakfast speaker, Pamela and Rocco, uh, for Columbia, which isn't an institution, right? [00:09:44] It's the California Alliance of booksellers. We were the keynote at their breakfast, her and Topeka up. And why is because I'm saying to the world, Hey, I'm not I'm, I'm just saying let's [00:10:00] figure out. How Amazon could not control. The distribution piece, because when you're self publishing, you're really kind of also, although you own your IP and you have all this control, you're actually giving many of it over to Amazon. [00:10:17] Right? If you think about it, because you know, there's definitely ways bookstores can sell you when you go through Ingram and income spark that said you don't have a massive team behind you selling your book into what I mean, you're in Brooklyn. So. Books are magic. Amazing. Right? The and amazing green apples. [00:10:38] So I'm such a huge champion. I think that goes back to by activism. Right. We kind of talked to them. I am such an activist that I'm like, I am not going to leave my small booksellers behind. Right. Like I personally only buy my books on bookshop.org. That's what I that's my purse. Now. I can't say we can't say [00:11:00] that to everybody, but for me, I believe that the small acts we choose to do change. [00:11:06] The trajectory of our lives because we're, we're teaching our community, we're teaching our kids. So for me, I just decided, oh, what is my small act? I sometimes can't run into every small little bookstore and busy with my three kids, but I can click a button and buy a, buy a book on bookshop.org. [00:11:26] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:11:26] I love that so much. [00:11:27] That makes me, so I know seriously, it's like, yay. Good, good for you. And, and I think that, that, that, that notion of small acts adding up to big changes is so it's key in, in, in many ways, in, in the ways so many authors have to do things. And it seems like it's key to the way the collective book studio is doing it. [00:11:48] And you're disrupting you're you're, you're a disruptor. Because you're providing more pathways for authors to get published. And, and yet like, as a, as a self-published author [00:12:00] myself, one of the things that has happened when I've tried to do it is stores and, and, you know, first of all, getting into libraries is very challenging. [00:12:09] The ALA is like, yeah, I don't think so. Uh, but, but at the same time, they often don't want to talk to you unless you have some sort of a company behind you. How does, how does the collective book studio. Maneuver in, in that space, like, because you have distribution, the smaller stores out there, more independent booksellers are willing to talk to you, or is there some other pathway that you can follow that just a single person might not be able. [00:12:39] Angela Engel: [00:12:39] Um, no we have full distribution is you've got you have to. So we're we partnered with, um, independent publishers group out of Chicago. They also own Chicago review press and triumph books to great companies. I personally am a huge fan of Chicago review, press. And I honestly, we started as a packager. I'm going to [00:13:00] backup like the collective book studio. [00:13:01] What is a packager is we will create books and then we will sell them to other publishing houses, less that have distribution. It's very common in the industry or we'll do proprietary work. Like we're doing these beautiful big custom board books for Costco. So we're, we're we're, this is very common, actually like a lot of publishers, 20 to plus percent of their list is, uh, is buy-ins or PA or pack from packagers. [00:13:31] Um, we also, we also create creative content. We have a whole series called the secrets thoughts of, and it's just us writing it. And it's like in cats and dogs, it's really cool. P w what I said in this article at PW is that we act actually very similar to a traditional house. When I, when I connected with Joe Matthews, I'm already saying, Hey, we are traditional publishing. [00:13:55] We are, we have content to fuel our trade list. Um, that you're going to [00:14:00] get revenue on. And in addition, I'm going to bring incredible clients with me that we vet that we have, uh, that they have a lot of say, but ultimately they're coming to us. So like, it's not like, okay, I want this cover. And it's this crazy cover with a bunch of purple volcanoes, you know, you know what I'm saying? [00:14:22] And like, we're like, okay, that will never work. Um, so they come to us with knowing it's in my contract that like, ultimately they have to, if they want trade distribution, be willing for this feedback, be willing for the work, be willing to say, Hey, you know what? All of sales, all of marketing, all of that, a trial is looking at this and the title and the cover really have to have this element in order for it to work the market. [00:14:50] And, um, all my clients are. Grateful for that. They're not, they understand that from the start. That's why I also say our [00:15:00] clients choose us as much as we choose that. Because again, in a partnership, I think we talked about this before the podcast. You're kind of all about collaborative, creative collaboration, which I really love, love that you said that because that is sort of my mission. [00:15:15] Is that in a partnership publishing. We have to agree and, and, and, and go together towards that end product. And I think that there are some people, um, who have been frustrated in the traditional space because they felt like, oh my God, I didn't even have any say. And then there's people, um, in the self-publishing base, like you say, you can't get into libraries where if you come through us, like I'm doing a TLA, a Texas library association, like big, huge getaway box, because I can't. [00:15:47] Because I have Matt major distribution  and they have booth space at those shows. Don't forget. They have actually, and I pay into that. So my, my company is listed in [00:16:00] trade shows too. The librarians know that they could easily buy us. And that we're, we're, we're a publishing house [00:16:07] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:16:07] accompany. And it's interesting because the what, what I kept, what I kept thinking to myself as, as I was listening to you talk was you're vetted. [00:16:16] Like they know that you will give them quality. Books too, to put in their libraries or to, you know, when you distribute them or all of that. That's some, that's something that, that a lot of sort of self-published authors don't have. They don't have that, that space of someone already knows me unless you're, you know, I don't know Scott sealer or something before he signed with whoever it is he signed with when he was putting his stuff out, people and people knew that he, that his. [00:16:43] We're good. And that they wanted them. Whereas for most authors, it doesn't seem like it's like that. So, so as I keep coming back to this word, disruptor, and you are, you are changing the industry because of this partnership model. I was wondering if you could talk a little [00:17:00] bit about what that actually means to you, what does being a disruptor mean? [00:17:05] And what is, what are you disrupting? Exactly. [00:17:10] Angela Engel: [00:17:10] Yeah. I mean, I'm going to go back to our friend house. Cause she said the best way better to publisher's weekly this week. Right? Then they quoted her, which is that sometimes it makes sense to go with traditional publishers who takes the financial risk and sometimes partnership publishing makes sense. [00:17:30] Especially when it's time sensitive, I'm open to both models. Why, what does that mean to me when she said that? And I read that and what that means to me is that I think we need to be open to both models because there's something called owning your IP, right. That we're all that people are. Uh, uh, sort of upset about in this [00:18:00] traditional space where, Hey, if I go with a traditional publisher and I own all this IP and I got to sign over my rights, but I want to create characters for Netflix or whatever else your dream is to do with the, with it. [00:18:12] Um, my model is disrupting the space because basically I'm licensing in some way for only, um, a certain amount of years, their IP. So you, so this is how we work. You create, we created. Fi and sometimes people don't want trade. Right. And it's just packaging. So we have definitely projects that are on our list that we just make books for for companies. [00:18:36] And they got a beautiful book and we're done. Then there are about 60% of our clients who really would like to be seen in the strand and at the library association. And so they signed a distribution deal with the collective book studio as part of our imprint, but I don't own their IP. I don't own that for life. [00:18:55] That is a huge, that's the disrupting piece, right? Is that I'm [00:19:00] actually saying to publishing houses, why are we so scared? Of saying of owning. For a lifetime. What is because Amazon has disrupted our industry. Let's be real. They have, people are going there way they want faster at eight. They don't want to have their IP owned. [00:19:20] So let's listen to what they're asking for. This is like, it's almost like we talked about movements. Look, I think enough people have spoken to say, I want to have a book. I really want to have a book and no one's listening to that. So I'm going to just do it online. And Amazon was saw that need. And now they have not only been able to do it successfully. [00:19:44] There are several, if not hundreds of cases, That are, that are hybrid services that offers certain kinds of editorial and great ways to make a really good book, which is important. You can get an editor and you can make a graphic designer through them, but they still don't [00:20:00] have the distribution piece. [00:20:01] Right. And so they're able to Le they're able to sort of utilize Amazon's ability for, for, uh, for sale. And, uh, still create some quality production in some way, but they still don't have the ability those services, because ultimately they hand it over to you and your left, right. As an author to do it all, to still do all the marketing, to do still all the PR and ultimately to print on demand or to do some offset. [00:20:34] Um, you're still left with that piece. And I sort of felt like, well, If I created an imprint at a trade imprint that people could, that was truly vetted. I could get the distribution because then librarians, booksellers. They trust what's on our list. Right. They know it's, it's been vetted through what I started this podcast with [00:21:00] really seasoned professionals for decades come from. [00:21:04] Don't forget places like random house Harper. Uh, Harper Collins, Chronicle books. I mean, that's where the staff, my staff come. [00:21:18] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:21:18] I keep having to take a second and take all of that in. We were chatting about earlier how this is just like having a cup of coffee together. So, so imagine that I'm taking a sip of my soy latte right now. Uh, so I love, I love, love, love that you're talking about the aspect of it, that, that, that you're giving this opportunity to people. [00:21:42] To not be holding the entire bag because there's this notion of playing to your strengths. You know, my strengths perhaps are the writing. They may not be the marketing and the PR and all this other stuff. And I feel like there are there for, for so many professions. [00:22:00] To wear a kajillion hats. You know, I have to be my accountant. [00:22:04] I have to be my marketing person, my PR person, my, this, my, that, my, the other. And sometimes I don't want to, sometimes I can't. And I'm talking about the general eye here. So, so you're offering. And you started it with the hope that you could write that, that I, that I think I can, that I'm going to partially because you have these seasoned professionals, but something in you seems like you're just, you're just like the eternal optimist, you know, like I'm going to be able to make this happen and go. [00:22:32] So can you talk a little bit about that? Like how. Your as the, as the CEO of this company, how does your state of mind affect the process, affect your collaborations with the people on your staff and also your collaborations with the authors that you take on? [00:22:48] Angela Engel: [00:22:48] Oh, I love this question. I mean, mindset is everything. [00:22:52] It's everything. Um, what a great question. I mean, look, entrepreneurship is hard [00:23:00] when you asked me how do my colleagues feel in my traditional. I want to go back when I first started the company, because now of course they're applauding, of course I'm getting this. Like, you know, and even in the very beginning I had really, I, I, in confidence, like I called a friend of mine who was high up at random house and I called a friend at Simon and Schuster and I called a friend at Chronicle and all of them were really, really supportive, but they were also like, Angela, we cannot offer you distribution. [00:23:28] Like you gotta go get like a million dollars in backlist sales. So. I had to say, okay, I, you know, it's not like I snapped my fingers. And I was like, cause when I first thought, okay, I'm going to snap my fingers and it's going to be pretty easy to get distribution with Ingram. No, and I'm an insider, right? [00:23:48] It was not easy. There were a lot of notes. There are a lot of like, honestly, I'm going to say. But it's really true. And I, I'm going to say it cause I'm a woman in my forties. Who's [00:24:00] climbed really high into my career. I taught before I was even 30 and there are a lot it's specially in the sales old boys clubs, they are just are in, in the, in the industry. [00:24:13] And it felt like I constantly was like, oh, that's, uh, that's, that's nice, but you're kind of young or you're kind of naive.  and then I'm in my forties. Right? And I'm like, wait a second. I have spent 20 years of my career and you're still treating me this way. I'm like, oh God. Now, so you know what I did? I just said, I'm just gonna, I'm just not going to listen anymore. [00:24:38] I'm going to internally. I actually have said this so many times to myself, to my friends on a popular podcast. I am going to just have this mantra change starts with you. And if I have this mantra for myself every morning or what I'm feeling stuck, and I think change starts with [00:25:00] you, I can do anything. [00:25:02] And so when you ask how I lead my team, It's I lead my team with that idea that like, okay, you're feeling frustrated or okay. A client is not doing right or, okay, this is not going on schedule. Oh, what can we change? What is it about you? What is it that we need to do? What is it that I need to do to move this forward on this project? [00:25:26] And I think my team and my clients. The one thing is even when I'm stuck, I use that as an optimism piece because I know that in my own 20 plus years, there has been people who had, do have not believed in me. And I just have to let that go, you know, like it just, and, and when you do you surround yourself? [00:25:52] Like, look, I'm here today on your podcast because I surround myself with people who do believe [00:26:00] in this power of lifting others up. [00:26:04] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:26:04] I yeah, absolutely. Again. Oh, I'm going to take it in for a second. No, because, because there, we were talking a little bit earlier about my, my mantra, which is creativity, compassion, and collaboration, and that, it seems like I can almost go well, Angela, that seems like it's kind of your mantra to that. [00:26:23] This notion that you're working in this very creative field. And you also have that analytical side too, that has to keep sort of the, the, all of the bowling pins in a row, if you will. But compassion is another word that I'm hearing from you, compassion for the authors, compassion for the process, compassion for the people on your staff. [00:26:44] That it's, that it's very sort of purpose driven, but also heart centered. If you see what I mean, and I'm, I'm just wondering a little bit about what, what that. Means to you. What now, w what leading from that space means to you both, [00:27:00] if you don't, if you don't mind sharing both in the business world and also in your personal life, because in many ways as the CEO, you sort of have to figure all of that out. [00:27:09] How are you going to divide the three girls that you have, you know, that you're a mom to your relationships, all of that. And how do you align that with the, the business that you're responsible for? [00:27:22] Angela Engel: [00:27:22] You asked some really good questions, you know, while you were talking, I'm thinking of this, this woman, um, her name is Susan Reich and she was president of like Avalon, which was this really cool publishing house. [00:27:36] They have like tons of imprints, one being seal, press one sources, great imprint. She ended up becoming president of, I believe publishers group west, which is part of Ingram. And. When I first, this is my biggest tip to any person find the really people who've all done it before you who've been able to, especially I [00:28:00] think women find a wa like I needed to find a woman in my life who had, who had already climbed such a ladder and had been in board rooms and was an exact, was such a boys' club. [00:28:14] That I could like sit down with. So when I first started this business and they have to be in your industry, so she was in my industry, she like understood my industry and I asked her to coffee. I didn't talk to her for years. And she took my coffee. Right. It's so excited. Like I'm 20 I'm 40 plus. And I felt like I was 22 and gap. [00:28:35] Right. She met me for coffee three years ago and she saw, she said to me, I love your idea. I think this is going to work. And it was like that moment for me. And I don't, I actually re emailed Susan, like about once I got like a lot of this once I got Fran Hauser and I told her, and we're going to re you know, it's been, we haven't seen each other with the [00:29:00] vaccines all now, rolling out. [00:29:01] Like we're going to, once everyone's fully vaccinated, we'll make a time to go get coffee again. But why I said this is you're asking me. Wait, remind me what my question is. I got on a little tangent, but I know I'm stringing it together. Um, do you [00:29:17] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:29:17] want me to remind you? Yes. Yes. So basically it's how do you align the compassionate heart-centered purpose-driven part of who you are with business and also your personal world and how you, how you figure all of [00:29:32] Angela Engel: [00:29:32] that out. [00:29:33] Okay. So this is my, my connection here. So Susan going out for that coffee, right? It's in some way, taking her time, I'm not paying her whatever she's showing compassion. She's like, I remember this young 22 year old sitting at the Xerox machine working hard for me. Right. Making sure my company succeeded, like really caring about my. [00:30:00] [00:29:59] And she now took that moment and had compassion when I said, I really need some advice. Right. And so I think that those things I lead with those things, cause I recognize. That those things about the human spirit, the human life, like what, when we show compassion to another human, right. When Susan's shows compassion to me, I, that it's almost like I'm a candle and it gets lit my combined fuel. [00:30:30] And then I have time to just give it to somebody else. The issue is when we it's, we need to keep passing that on to people. How, how I do it is I fi I have my little group of people. And when I'm feeling a little, like, Ooh, my flames out, it got as high as I needed to be. I go to the people that I know I need to refuel me so that I can refuel both my staff, my clients, my business. [00:30:57] And then in return [00:31:00] that that does create into my home life. Right? Like I, um, am not so good at RNR, to be honest. And either as my husband, he's a small business owner himself. He actually is a controller accountant for restaurants. So it is it's intense. I bet for my girls to have two small business owners in the time of COVID, but, um, my girls are alone. [00:31:27] There, there are the biggest champions of me, like my girls, for example, when my oldest who now is about to turn 13, she knows her mom from 14 weeks old. I mean, she doesn't remember, but she remembers if you won, you know, as, as she got older that I was always traveling, I was on the road every other month. [00:31:50] I mean, I mean every other, no twice a month, every other week, And, um, I was pumping, I mean, of course I was, I was selling to Costco. I was selling to target. I [00:32:00] was selling to buy, buy baby. I was selling to babies, RS at toys R us when that account existed. And so mom wasn't there in that same physical way. [00:32:08] So what I was Quinn was my kind of corporate lifestyle. She was already like eight or nine years old. Right. And I'm having a baby. My, my, my, my youngest and my oldest are eight years apart. There was a mom and I had a meltdown. I mean, this isn't about compassion and I just lost it. We were in the car and I was crying being out of the nine-year-old and I have a toddler and they want stuff. [00:32:37] They want to stop at the gap or something annoying. And I said, I turned around and the biggest cry I'd probably have to nurse. And my boobs are probably huge. And I just, I didn't have, for the first time in my life, I didn't have this like big. Job to like our nanny to pick them up or something. And I said, I turned around and I'm like, your dad makes all the money. [00:32:59] Why don't [00:33:00] you go ask him to take you? And, um, my oldest looks at me and she's like nine years old and she's like, mom, you can make money too. Oh yeah. And that compassion, that moment, that compassion, that realization. Oh, my God. I beat myself up. I've had mom guilt that I haven't, you know, wasn't able to go to her kindergarten, this or that. [00:33:27] My daughter actually sees me so differently that that's what motivated me to find the collective book studio. That's what motivates me every day. That kind of fueled that she was like, mom, you're a bad-ass. [00:33:44] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:33:44] Oh, that's amazing. I love that. And it's so it's so telling that sometimes we just can't see ourselves as well as the people who love us can see us. [00:33:55] There's there's a real powerful lesson right there. Wow. Incredible, [00:34:00] incredible. Thank you for sharing that, that, that's amazing that, that, and that you were aware enough. To take the lesson from that, you know, there are people out there probably would have gone. Yeah. Whatever, but you actually stopped and you actually took it in and that's, that's amazing. [00:34:13] Good for you. Wow. Oh, thank [00:34:16] Angela Engel: [00:34:16] you. You're the first to actually please set up that way. I, I appreciate that. I really do feel because I did ed take it in and I guess that's a tip. If people are listening, like take them smile. Moments in because you know what I realized my anger or what I said to my children. [00:34:37] That's not okay like that. Wasn't about my husband, like, you know, a partnership just like in my business, but in my marriage and in my relationship, which we've been together 15 years. Oh 16. It is a give and take, right? Like there are moments. Work work, got a share in the work. And so, and that's really what my daughter, who [00:35:00] I am. [00:35:01] She, I got to tell you these 13 year olds who could be an eighth grade next year, they're about when they taught. I don't know. I just want to say like, the way that they're intelligent about gender is just incredible. And I think in that moment, my daughter was really able to say, whoa, bomb, check yourself. [00:35:21] And she was only like nine years old. [00:35:24] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:35:24] And she said it an old in the way a nine-year-old would write she, and she'd write to the point. I love that. I love I'm so glad that you're raising such aware kids. Good for you. No, because, because honestly, I spent 20 years working. I worked at NASA for over 20 years and I was teaching, I was traveling and teaching kids how to save the planet. [00:35:44] That was my job. It was awesome. And, and, and you see, seven-year-olds teach. College professors because the college professors think they know everything, but the seven year old is the one who actually does it's really quite it's quite something. They were able to do it. They were able [00:36:00] to, to, to teach them these valuable, valuable lessons. [00:36:03] And that brings me to a question that I would love. Yeah. Chat with you about, um, this notion of teaching others of, of showing compassion and also just being giving back, I guess, you know, what, what is your thought on that? Because I know that your business and you personally, you're a philanthropist, right? [00:36:27] So. Role does giving back, does philanthropy play in, in your business model and also for you as the CEO of that business? [00:36:38] Angela Engel: [00:36:38] Okay. Yeah. Um, well, I, again, I mean, I think that if we wait around always to say, okay, um, who else was going to do this? Or I don't like it this way, or we have that kind of mindset. It nothing will change. [00:36:54] Right. It's like, so I, um, In the ho in the [00:37:00] start of the pandemic about, you know, now a little over a year ago, um, one of my closest friends was an ER ICU doc here in Oakland. And we all know there wasn't enough PP, um, E there was not enough medical face shields, uh, for, for our frontline workers. And instead of being sort of thinking about, well, gosh, you know, What am I going to do? [00:37:27] What can I do on a publisher house? I thought, you know what? I couldn't link up with one of my friends. Who's a small business owner, herself. Who's out of work a fabricator, and we're going to, because we're a business, we're going to be able to wire money over to DuPont and make medical face shields. And people would be like, what is a publishing house? [00:37:49] Why is she doing this? Right. So why my, why is that? My best friend was working nonstop in the, in the ER [00:38:00] ICU, ER, my home. Is very, very close to Highland hospital, which is, um, account, uh, you know, it's from the county hospital as a public hospital, which is a lot, so there's a lot of low income and, um, round and brown and black people and people of color and color and low income. [00:38:20] And it's literally down the street from me. There's. And I'm, uh, I'm an Oakland business. And so I felt it was my duty, my right, even though I might manufacture books as a community. Paying taxes and being part of Oakland and this hospital and my, my friend wasn't at that hospital was at a different one, but then I, I really, um, sort of networked myself to San Francisco labor and, and said, Hey, what do we need? [00:38:49] And the clinics around here from Santa Clara county low-income clinics to the Navajo nation, because it grew right. We're not just our new Keeler, small bids. [00:39:00] And our little area, you start small in your community. I guess that's my biggest advice. If you don't know where to start, start in your community and it will grow. [00:39:07] Like all of a sudden I was getting pinged by friends who had connections to the Navajo Navajo nation. And if you allow yourself to say, okay, I'm going to give myself this little time to be an activist in this particular school. And you open yourself up and you fought, like we're saying, we collaborate with other people who you can network with. [00:39:27] I ended up giving money over to a nonprofit to really maintain all of it because I have to go back to my real business. Right. But my work is not over in that moment. That's one side. So what's my next project. Like I'm working now on a book that, where we did a big, I fund women campaign and our goal is to. [00:39:48] And, and, and sell thousands and thousands and thousands of copies of this little tiny book, which is called eat cake for breakfast, which who doesn't want to eat cake for breakfast. And it's the, and it's [00:40:00] written by this incredible full, uh, entrepreneur and philanthropist, um, violas, um, soon Tonto. And she wants to be able to give back to UCS AF Oakland children's hospital. [00:40:12] And we connected, um, during the pandemic. We, we went on a walk and she, her daughter had a rare, um, a rare bone, um, bone condition, and she needed to get treatment at UCF and she wanted to be able to give back to this hospital. And so I said, well, I'm already manufacturing books. I already have staff. I already have people. [00:40:39] Um, and, and the mass distribution, if you want to run an I fund women campaign so that we have money to manufacture this book, I'm happy to provide, you know, my marketing team or PR team and, uh, and an operational team to get this book into the room. And [00:41:00] that's what I also would say. If you are a small business and you want to give back, sometimes you are able to just because you have a certain capability in manufacturing, if you think about all the places where they made masks to donate or other things. [00:41:14] It's finding those things. I also know that giving back it can be so easy. What did I say? I just buy my books now from bookshop.org. They've raised over $12 million to independent bookstores across the patient. Like that's also activism. If you just think about what your business or who you are, can do and give back. [00:41:37] I mean, for me, When, when black lives matter really was at the forefront of everybody, it was a fight. It was my duty for my kids to go out there into the streets to make signs, to see it. But it was also not enough. Like we ended up sending face shields to Minneapolis, to service, for example, children's Minnesota [00:42:00] hospital to help people during the riots. [00:42:02] Like, I just think, you know, what is, what is my take back? Like I think that if my company. Uh, you know, there's only so you can, you can there's money, but you can never, ever buy time and you can never buy humans. And like, I guess that's just my that's part of my philosophy in life. Like I, you could have all the money in the world, but that does not give you back your people and your time. [00:42:29] And that's what, that's what I want to see when I'm old and gray and maybe sitting on a beach. What I've been able to reflect who my, who I've touched. I mean, that means I have, that means the world to me. That's my personal thing. So my company, I mean, I, I do books. I do stories like I'm grateful every day, what I do, because I do think words changed Matt and words changed lives. [00:42:58] They create. [00:43:00] [00:43:00] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:43:00] For sure for sure they do. And I'm, you know, on behalf of authors everywhere, I'm so grateful that you are doing what you're doing. It's amazing. So I have, I have a. I got a [00:43:12] Angela Engel: [00:43:12] little, um, I got really passionate there. [00:43:14] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:43:14] I know. I love it. [00:43:16] Angela Engel: [00:43:16] I love it. What did I just talk about? [00:43:19] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:43:19] This is great. I think it's so important. [00:43:21] No, because, because we are not just what we do for a living. Right. And if you can, and if you can, to be the most successful person is the person who does what they love. And, and then, and then there's a wonderful quote by, um, In the book, givens decline and fall by Sheri Tepper. And it, I it's my favorite quote. [00:43:42] Like it's what I live by. And, and it it's a little bit of dialogue, but I have to tell it to you in case you've never read the book. Uh, it's about a woman who has since died, but she started a movement and somebody is talking about what she used to say, and this is the quote, find your sun warmed stone. [00:43:58] She used to say to [00:44:00] us, go there, build your house there and then lift others up. I love that quote so much because that, that notion of, yeah, you can do it, you can start your business, you can write your book, you can, and once you've gotten to that point, help someone else, you know, and it sounds to be like that. [00:44:18] Oh yeah. [00:44:20] Angela Engel: [00:44:20] Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, God. I'm doing a party dance over here in my chair. Like I love that quote. I know, that's [00:44:30] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:44:30] it. Once you've done it, pull others up. That's that's what we can do. We can help, we can help those coming after us. And so, so having said that. Brass tacks here, Angela, if somebody says, oh, I've got a book in me or I've written a book or whatever, and they want to find you, they want to, what are the steps to getting involved with collected collective book studios? [00:44:52] What would you say someone should do when they want to do that? When they want to reach out when they want to follow you? When they want to say, Hey, could [00:45:00] we work together? [00:45:01] Angela Engel: [00:45:01] Yeah, well, this would be my advice at any publishing house, whether it be mine or you were interested, you were a poet, you, I, and it was edgy. [00:45:09] And I would maybe recommend go looking at soft skull press, like, look at what we already do. That is really key. So read, like, what is lifestyle? What is children's? What are gifts? Titles? We have a titles page who are we publishing? Um, follow our authors and follow us. I think that will give you a good sense. [00:45:29] Do you think you're going to be a right fit for our last, um, I'm very education. I'm very into parenting and the career development. Um, I have a beautiful book coming out on labor and delivery, labor and delivery. Of course I am a mom of three, like, but how we even package this labor book is very gifty. [00:45:48] Like my goal is, bye. Bye baby. Here, like looking into, um, really, so kind of look at our books and think about. Are we the right fit as if you're writing a novel, like that's not [00:46:00] what we do, right. So it's not, it's necessarily not, I'm not going to be able to really help you there, but it's a memoir. We also don't do. [00:46:08] Now. I'm always willing to. Slide into my DMS, right. Which is at the collective book studio. And I'm happy to like give ideas on, uh, plates for a memoir or for a novel if I can, because I I'm very have been in the world for so long. So I have like 20 years and I might know a small, independent press that you're not thinking about. [00:46:29] And I think that, so, so for us, I love food and wine. I love Diane. I love, uh, anything travel full visual. Children's like, think about how that book is going to be structured. And if it's not full visual, then it should really be in like the self-help career motivating, uh, parenting space. But we would, but not, but the business it's not hardcore business. [00:46:56] Does that make sense? Some of that's not really my genre either. [00:47:00] It really is. We're really a trade house. We really trade publishing. We're not going to have. A big academic reach. And some people may prefer to go on it to an academic press, for example, like UC Berkeley or something like that. So I think it just, no, I think it's really about knowing what your why is and what your purpose is and what you're trying to achieve with your own book and then, and then approach us. [00:47:24] And I'm always, you know, willing to take a look there's, there's no cost for an author for us to look at it. It's a submission [00:47:31] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:47:31] process. Right. Absolutely. And, and I thank you for, for that. A lot of people don't know that very specific and very good advice that you just gave, look at the imprint, see what they're already doing and see if you would be a fit there before you even pitch them, which I think is so important. [00:47:51] And. I, I have just a couple more questions because honestly, Angela, I could keep you here for the next six hours and we could just [00:48:00] keep chatting and order more coffee. [00:48:02] Angela Engel: [00:48:02] Well, I do want to know more about your NASA days. I'm like, wow, that's a story. Can we come on? Aren't you going to write a children's book with me and we do need more women in stem for sure. [00:48:12] Okay. Well, [00:48:12] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:48:12] and that's exactly actually, that's what I did. I, it was environment earth, so. And, uh, my, my job was to go in and make dirt fun. That was, [00:48:22] Angela Engel: [00:48:22] oh my God. Well, we could talk for really, I mean, obviously we need more women in stem, so I applied there and, um, and I know I'm going on. I'm not told tangent need to pick it up, but I'm very curious about it. [00:48:38] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:48:38] Well, we'll have to have a virtual cup of coffee sometime. No, I mean, the thing about the thing about NASA and one of the. That what, what you do and what I do, where it intersects in some ways is because I was, I would go into places, either teaching kids or teaching scientists, how to speak to kids. A lot of it is they, they, they speak very eloquently, but [00:49:00] they speak at very high levels and eight year olds. [00:49:03] You said what you know, or they check out. And so my job was to help scientists learn how to speak to eight year olds in a way that the eight year olds would find fun. And so then I took that and I wrote a book all about a called speak from within. So seed. Now I've put it all back into the publishing realm about how we can communicate in a way that will be really, really. [00:49:24] Dave, particularly if we don't know how or if we're nervous about it. So, so when we're talking about that stuff, when we're talking about NASA or when we're talking about, you know, writing for kids, what, to me, what I'm talking about ultimately is communication. And so for you, with what you're trying to do with what you're already doing successfully, it seems like what are your goals? [00:49:51] 2030 years from now. What do you want to see in the publishing industry? From collective book studio and also perhaps the industry [00:50:00] itself? [00:50:01] Angela Engel: [00:50:01] Hmm, 20, 30 a year. Okay. So I'll be, what does that say? Over 70 and 30? Yeah. When you're, [00:50:08] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:50:08] when you're like, when you're on the beach and you're going, I have done all of this really cool stuff. [00:50:14] Angela Engel: [00:50:14] What are you thinking? [00:50:19] Well, I want a New York times. I want a New York times bestseller. I don't want to see, I want to see a time where independent publishing women own pub presses are back on those bestseller lists. Like it's 89.9% big houses at this point. And the big houses just aren't getting huge speaker. I mean, they're just all buying each other up. [00:50:41] They're buying. I guess, I, I guess I believe in the power of like community and words, I think I need my dream. I think I need to, some of the more famous writers that might not need the huge, huge advances and want to try something completely different. Like, I almost like need them in [00:51:00] partnership with me, but I think that's possible. [00:51:02] I think that people. Um, can work with us in a way where you can't get still a traditional deal. And there are still some books that bull make sense for your traditional house. I think I want to disrupt that industry idea that like, you have to stay all the time in traditional house. And if you don't, you're going to get like blacklisted, right? [00:51:23] Like. What or like I self published and I can't now get a publishing deal. What? That doesn't make sense. People like, let it go because of the end. Let it go. Because the media, like if you have something to stay in, you're a nonfiction author. They're going to, you have something to say and you deserve to say it. [00:51:46] Like, I don't think in 30 years someone's going to go, oh God, I had a, I had a self published book and God, I could never get a true D like no, like stop all of that kind of competitive attitude. And instead [00:52:00] let's figure out how we're going to still maintain. Right. This is really cool. For me, the reason I am still very picky about the submissions is I do have concerns with self publishing, for sure. [00:52:16] Um, there's things like, like blinders people have where you may put something that it could be offensive, racist, those types of things. And without a traditional guard, really looking at same with media, right? Like without traditional media really looking at it. There is room for hate speech. We saw that on Twitter. [00:52:39] All over. Right. We've saw that, um, across the board and what that kind of insinuates in our culture and in our communities. So if traditional publishing, we need to change, we still need to be guarded for things like that. And that's why I think if I look 30 years ago, I raised on the beach. Maybe with you. [00:53:00] [00:53:00] They're like having a beer. Champagne. And we're saying we're still, we're still saying to the country, like you can't have hate speech. You can't have to pictures of people in a certain light, right? Like that's what the Dr. Seuss enterprises did and shelves, six books and random house agreed with them. And like, there still needs to be that guy. [00:53:21] But why also does, um, that guard have to control all of distribution? I have no idea why and all of people's IP. And so maybe I'm hoping, you know, whether that be Simon and Schuster, all my colleagues were like, oh, laughing. Cause we've kind of decided. We're going to change that mindset, that access that snobbery, that sometimes does exist in my industry. [00:53:43] And I think the reason I'm talking to you today, or the reason sometimes I'm on clubhouses, that I want people to understand that there's people internally inside my industry that are, that are not so snappy that don't want to say, oh, only the elite have access to publishing. That's not, [00:54:00] that's not okay. [00:54:02] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:54:02] Once again, I love that. You said that [00:54:06] Angela Engel: [00:54:06] what's true, right? Like I, you don't have to be a celebrity to get, like, why are celebrities getting a cookbook and someone who's been a chef and going to culinary school and is a writer for, you know, even like top columnists in journals are not getting published. [00:54:21] Like that's not. [00:54:22] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:54:22] Okay. Well, and that's the thing is that you. With your company are offering the opportunity for people to do that. You know, I mean, that, that to me is sort of the key takeaway for me here is that it that's where you're disrupting, you know, that that's, that's where things are really changing and, and more power to you. [00:54:43] I think that's. That's incredible. And again, I have like 45 more questions that maybe you'll come back and do a part two of this interview, uh, because, because I'm having such a wonderful time chatting with you, but I recognize you have a life to get back to. So I would love [00:55:00] it if you wouldn't mind, uh, giving just I put it in the show notes, but people learn differently. [00:55:06] So. Where people can find the collective book studio as far as on Instagram or on LinkedIn, wherever you are and your website, so that I can also put it on the show notes. I would appreciate it very much. [00:55:18] Angela Engel: [00:55:18] Thank you. So our website is the collective. Dot studio. Very easy. It's just the collective book.studio. [00:55:28] And then on LinkedIn, you can just reach out to me, Angela angle, our companies on LinkedIn, as well as the collective books or, you know, so both places, but I, you know, feel free for people to DM me. I love LinkedIn. It's one of my favorite platforms. Um, we also are active on Instagram at the collective book studio. [00:55:47] We don't have Twitter, you know, there's only so many things we manage, but we're so visual that, um, Instagram or LinkedIn as a personal or our website, I would love people to [00:56:00] subscribe to our newsletter. Um, we have a newsletter that's growing that goes out twice a month and it's really great. We have. [00:56:06] This column called read with us, and we give all kinds of tips on what we're reading as a staff. And I don't believe that I have to only tote my books. I get, I really talk about the industry. We have, we have blogs that we write. So I just asked for people to build community with us and to engage with us. [00:56:24] And, um, Yeah, that's part of the fun. [00:56:27] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:56:27] Absolutely. And I can say as a subscriber to the newsletter, that it is a lot of fun and I've gotten some great reading recommendations out of it, so, yeah. Good. Thank you. So again, Angela, I'm super grateful to you for being here. Really? What a, what a joy to talk with you? [00:56:43] I have just one last question and I ask it of everyone who comes on the show and it's a silly question, but I find. The question often yields some pretty poignant answers. And the question is this. If you had an airplane that could sky write [00:57:00] anything for the whole world to see, what would you say [00:57:08] Angela Engel: [00:57:08] change starts with? [00:57:10] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:57:10] Ah, your mantra. Yes. Yes. That's fabulous. Thank you so much, Angela. I appreciate it. It's great. It's a great, beautiful. I can see it in the sky. [00:57:21] Angela Engel: [00:57:21] I've never been asked that question. Oh my God. If that actually happened. Oh, I would I'll remind house in Oakland. I would just be smiling. I am smiling ear to ear right now and looking out at my porch and my blue sky can imagine that. [00:57:35] Izolda Trakhtenberg: [00:57:35] I know. Right. Thank you so much for that, that this has been a fabulous chat with Angela angle, who is. The CEO of the collective book studio, you are going to obviously need to follow her and the studio on Instagram and on LinkedIn. See what they're doing. See how they're disrupting the entire publishing industry. [00:57:56] I am Izolda Trakhtenberg for the innovative mindset [00:58:00] podcast. If you're liking what you're hearing, please rate and review the show. I love it. I'd love to hear from you. I love your comments as you know, and if you're a writer, get in touch with me because I'm always, always thrilled to talk to other authors until next time. [00:58:13] This is Izolda Trakhtenberg again, reminding you to listen, learn, laugh, and love a whole lot. [00:58:25] Thanks so much for joining me today. I really appreciate you being here. Please subscribe to the podcast if you're new and if you like what you're hearing, please review it and rate it and let other people know. If you'd like to be a sponsor of the show. I'd love to meet you on patreon.com/innovative mindset. [00:58:43] I also have lots of exclusive goodies to share just with the show supporters. Today's episode was produced by Izolda Trakhtenberg and his copyright 2021 as always. Please remember, this is for educational and entertainment purposes. Only past performance does not guarantee future [00:59:00] results, although we can always hope until next time, keep living in your innovative minds.    

Potterless
Ep. 188 - Representation Shortcomings in Harry Potter (Part 2) w/ Delia Gallegos & Michael Harle

Potterless

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 87:37


Delia (@deliaistyping) and Michael (@Lupinpatronus) return to continue our discussion about elements of diversity that fell flat in Harry Potter! Topics include: being beautiful, white voice, Bart Simpson, Lupin, vampires, Fenrir, “You're welcome, GAYS.” queercoding, pink pants, queerbaiting, Wolfstar, Black Hermione, patting herself on the black, #OwnVoices, '97 Cinderella, other wizarding schools, Magic in North America, fictional colonialism, Navajo lore, and more! POTTERLESS LIVE: http://www.potterlesspodcast.com/live LINKS: Magic in North America Part 1. Ugh Native Americans to J.K. Rowling: We're Not Magical The Harry Potter Universe Still Can't Translate Its Gay Subtext to Text. It's a Problem Harry Potter and the Possible Queerbaiting: Why Fans Are Mad Over a Lack of Gay Romance How Harry Potter Fans Are Coping with J. K. Rowling J. K. Rowling (ContraPoints) Responding to J. K. Rowling's Essay | Is It Anti-Trans? Thanks to our sponsors: FUNCTION OF BEAUTY: Get 20% off your first order! BETTERHELP: Get 10% off your first month! — Thanks for listening to this episode of Potterless! Don't want the journey to stop? Check out the links below and as always, Wizard On! WEBSITE: PotterlessPodcast.com (LEARN ABOUT THE SHOW!) PATREON: patreon.com/potterless (SUPPORT THE SHOW!) TWITTER: twitter.com/potterlesspod (TWEET THE SHOW!) INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/potterlesspodcast (PICTURES OF THE SHOW!) FACEBOOK: facebook.com/potterless (HOME OF THE FANCY PRIVATE GROUP!) MERCH: potterlesspodcast.com/merch (REP THE SHOW!) DISCORD: (For $2+ patrons!) Created/Hosted/Produced by Mike Schubert, this ep edited by Sherry Guo, Music by Bettina Campomanes, Web Design/Art by Kelly Schubert Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Singletracks Mountain Bike News
Bike Tours and Bikerafting in the Navajo Nation with Dzil Ta'ah Adventures

Singletracks Mountain Bike News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 39:55


Jon Yazzie and Nadine Johnson own Dzil Ta'ah Adventures, an adventure travel company based in Arizona. A full-blooded Diné, Jon and his team run bike trips on Navajo land, and use the proceeds to help fund a local youth cycling program. What makes land in the Navajo Nation so special and unique? What is the riding like there? Why did it take so long to receive permits for conducting bike tours on Navajo land? How were you able to adapt your tour business in the time of Covid-19? What is bikerafting, and is it different from bikepacking? Do you combine the two on your trips? How are your trips set up? What is the cost? Do you provide history and context to the landscape as a part of your tours? In addition to yourself, do you employ others as bike guides? What role do you think tourism can play in terms of boosting the local economy? What is the goal for the Navajo-youth bike program you are supporting? Is there one thing you wish more people could understand or know about the Navajo culture? Learn more and get in touch at dziltaahadventures.com, and follow them on Instagram @dziltaahadventures. --Keep up with the latest in mountain biking at Singletracks.com and on Instagram @singletracks --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/singletracks/support

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
A Root Cause Approach to Hyperthyroidism and Grave's Disease

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 35:13


A Root Cause Approach to Hyperthyroidism and Grave's Disease | This episode is sponsored by Rupa Health and PaleovalleyThe thyroid gland is a small gland located in your neck that is part of your endocrine or hormonal system. It produces two major thyroid hormones, and the overproduction of these hormones is termed hyperthyroidism. Sixty to seventy percent of individuals with hyperthyroidism suffer from an autoimmune condition called Graves disease. So, what is driving these issues and how can that information be used to treat the root causes of hyperthyroidism and Grave's disease?In this episode, Dr. Hyman sits down with Dr. George Papanicolaou to discuss how they work with patients to treat the root causes of hyperthyroidism and Grave's disease. They discuss topics including environmental toxin exposure, the role of gut health in driving autoimmune disease, using thyroid hormone replacement therapy, and much more.George Papanicolaou is a graduate of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and is Board Certified in Family Medicine from Abington Memorial Hospital. He is also an Institute for Functional Medicine Practitioner. Upon graduation from his residency he joined the Indian Health Service. He worked on the Navajo reservation for 4 years at the Chinle Comprehensive Medical Facility where he served as the Outpatient Department Coordinator. In 2000, he founded Cornerstone Family Practice in Rowley, MA. He practiced with a philosophy centered on personal relationships and treating the whole person, not just not the disease. He called that philosophy “Whole Life Wellness”. Over time as the healthcare system made it harder for patients to receive this kind of personal care Dr. Papanicolaou decided a change was needed. He began training in Functional Medicine through the Institute of Functional Medicine. In 2015, he established Cornerstone Personal Health – a practice dedicated entirely to Functional Medicine. Dr. Papanicolaou joined The UltraWellness Center in 2017.This episode is sponsored by Rupa Health and Paleovalley.Rupa Health is a place for Functional Medicine practitioners to access more than 2,000 specialty lab tests from over 20 labs like DUTCH, Vibrant America, Genova, Great Plains, and more. You can check out a free live demo with a Q&A or create an account at RupaHealth.com. Paleovalley is offering 15% off your entire first order. Just go to paleovalley.com/hyman to check out all their clean Paleo products and take advantage of this deal.In this conversation, Dr. Hyman and Dr. Papanicolaou discuss:Characteristics and symptoms of hyperthyroidism and Grave's diseaseCommon autoimmune issues that cluster with hyperthyroidism and Grave's diseaseThyroid supporting nutrientsThe link between autoimmune disease, gut health, gluten sensitivity, and Celiac's diseaseTraditional vs Functional Medicine approaches to testing, diagnosing, and treating hyperthyroidism and Grave's diseaseHormone replacement therapy Patient cases they have treated with hyperthyroidism and Grave's diseaseAdditional Resources:The Functional Medicine Approach To Hypothyroidism And Hashimoto's Diseasehttps://drhyman.com/blog/2021/03/11/podcast-hc47/Is An Underactive Thyroid To Blame For Your Mysterious Symptoms? with Dr. Elizabeth Bohamhttps://drhyman.com/blog/2020/03/13/podcast-hc1-2/Is Your Environment Harming Your Thyroidhttps://drhyman.com/blog/2017/06/16/environment-harming-thyroid/House Call Highlight: Wired and Tired: Fixing Adrenal Burnouthttps://drhyman.com/blog/2021/05/28/podcast-hc58/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
Are Parasites Driving Your Autoimmune Or Gut Issues? with Dr. George Papanicolaou

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 40:15


Are Parasites Driving Your Autoimmune Or Gut Issues? | This episode is sponsored by Thrive Market and Rupa HealthYou may be surprised to learn that having a parasite, in and of itself, is not necessarily a bad thing. In fact, our gut microbiome is made up of more than 500 different species of microbes, including various types of bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses. Some of them help us, but others are harmful. Parasitic infection can result in an individual experiencing a range of symptoms from digestive issues to muscle ache, joint pain, skin rashes, and more; it can also signal issues with a weakened immune system. In this episode, Dr. Hyman sits down with Dr. George Papanicolaou to discuss how parasites can influence our overall health, and why they sometimes trigger autoimmune disease, gut imbalance, and much more.George Papanicolaou is a graduate of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and is Board Certified in Family Medicine from Abington Memorial Hospital. He is also an Institute for Functional Medicine Practitioner. Upon graduation from his residency he joined the Indian Health Service. He worked on the Navajo reservation for 4 years at the Chinle Comprehensive Medical Facility where he served as the Outpatient Department Coordinator. In 2000, he founded Cornerstone Family Practice in Rowley, MA. He practiced with a philosophy centered on personal relationships and treating the whole person, not just not the disease. He called that philosophy “Whole Life Wellness”. Over time as the healthcare system made it harder for patients to receive this kind of personal care Dr. Papanicolaou decided a change was needed. He began training in Functional Medicine through the Institute of Functional Medicine. In 2015, he established Cornerstone Personal Health – a practice dedicated entirely to Functional Medicine. Dr. Papanicolaou joined The UltraWellness Center in 2017.This episode is sponsored by Thrive Market and Rupa Health.Thrive Market is offering all Doctor's Farmacy listeners an extra 25% off your first purchase and a free gift when you sign up for Thrive Market. Just head over to thrivemarket.com/Hyman. Rupa Health is a place for Functional Medicine practitioners to access more than 2,000 specialty lab tests from over 20 labs like DUTCH, Vibrant America, Genova, Great Plains, and more. You can check out a free live demo with a Q&A or create an account at RupaHealth.com. In this conversation, Dr. Hyman and Dr. Papanicolaou discuss:The connection between the immune system and parasitic infectionThe most common parasites and how you get themPatient cases they have treatedWhen parasites can be helpfulCommon symptoms of having a parasiteTesting and diagnosing for parasitesTreating parasites with herbs and pharmaceuticals The possible role of over-sanitization and parasitic infection, autoimmune issues, and other chronic health issuesUsing parasitic worm therapy (i.e. helminth therapy) to treat autoimmune issues, asthma, allergies, and moreAdditional Resources:Missing Microbes: How the Overuse of Antibiotics Is Fueling Our Modern Plagueshttps://www.amazon.com/Missing-Microbes-Overuse-Antibiotics-Fueling/dp/0805098100An Epidemic of Absence: A New Way of Understanding Allergies and Autoimmune Diseaseshttps://www.amazon.com/Epidemic-Absence-Understanding-Allergies-Autoimmune/dp/1439199388Fixing The Root Cause of Irritable Bowel Syndromehttps://drhyman.com/blog/2020/08/10/podcast-hc22/The Power Of Food To Heal Everything From Autoimmune Disease To Traumatic Brain Injuryhttps://drhyman.com/blog/2019/12/18/podcast-ep85/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.