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Boot Nerds Podcast
All major football boots from 2021: the verdict

Boot Nerds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 38:47


2021 rewind for football boots - in today's Episode 128 of the Boot Nerds Podcast, JayMike from Unisport and Josh from SR4U review and rate the year in football boots by looking at all the main releases from Nike, adidas, PUMA and New Balance - and, the two Boot Nerds also take a look at the very best limited edition football boots from 2021 as they give the verdict on the year in football boots. Get Your Boots HERE - http://bit.ly/38wF5wMSupport Josh and buy the Pure Grip Socks here: https://puregripsocks.com/The Boot Nerds Website - http://bit.ly/2WvEEx0Audio Only Boot Nerds Podcasts Below.Spotify - https://spoti.fi/2BewEYiiTunes - https://apple.co/2Tlv8KMSoundCloud - http://bit.ly/2GhTIIGGoogle Play - http://bit.ly/2UpcUIqGo See More of Josh's Videos at http://bit.ly/2DK1CcbGo See More of Jay Mike's of Unisport Videos at http://bit.ly/2Rw8P3zFollow Josh on Instagram http://bit.ly/2G179O7Follow Jay Mike on Instagram http://bit.ly/2CWWzn7For advertising opportunities on The Boot Nerds Podcast contact footballbootnerds@gmail.com

Tobin, Beast & Leroy
01-18-22 Tobin and Leroy Part 1 - Are those High Heel Boots?!?!

Tobin, Beast & Leroy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 50:06


After briefly reflecting on yet another underwhelming NFL Playoff game, Leroy kidnaps the first segment to call Udonis Haslem old. Now that Leroy got that out of the way, we finally begin discussing last nights HEAT game as Bam returned to play and Caleb Martin continues to impress us. Although for Tobin, what was most impressive was Floyd Mayweather's boots. You be the judge...Are those High Heel boots? or just standard mens boots?

MoneyBall Medicine
What Exponential Change Really Means in Healthcare, with Azeem Azhar

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 57:25


As we say here on The Harry Glorikian Show, technology is changing everything about healthcare works—and the reason we keep talking about it month after month is that the changes are coming much faster than they ever did in the past. Each leap in innovation enables an even bigger leap just one step down the road. Another way of saying this is that technological change today feels exponential. And there's nobody who can explain exponential change better than today's guest, Azeem Azhar.Azeem produces a widely followed newsletter about technology called Exponential View. And last year he published a book called The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics, and Society. He has spent his whole career as an entrepreneur, investor, and writer trying to help people understand what's driving the acceleration of technology — and how we can get better at adapting to it. Azeem argues that most of our social, business, and political institutions evolved for a period of much slower change—so we need to think about how to adapt these institutions to be more nimble. If we do that right, then maybe we can apply the enormous potential of all these new technologies, from computing to genomics, in ways that improve life for everyone.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.So, when you step back and think about it, why is it that people like me write books or make podcasts about technology and healthcare?Well, like I just said, it's because tech is changing everything about healthcare works—and the changes are coming much faster than they ever did in the past.In fact, the change feels like it's accelerating. Each leap in innovation enables an even bigger leap just one step down the road.Another way of saying this is that technological change today feels exponential.And there's nobody who can explain exponential change better than today's guest, Azeem Azhar.Azeem produces a widely followed newsletter about technology called Exponential View.And last year he published a book called The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics, and Society.He has spent his whole career as an entrepreneur, investor, and writer trying to help people understand what's driving the acceleration of technology — and how we can get better at adapting to it.Azeem argues that most of our social, business, and political institutions evolved for a period of much slower change. So we need to think about how to adapt these institutions to be more nimble.If we do that right, then maybe we can apply the enormous potential of all these new technologies, from computing to genomics, in ways that improve life for everyone.Azeem and I focus on different corners of the innovation world. But our ideas about things like the power of data are very much in sync. So this was a really fun conversation. Here's Azeem Azhar.Harry Glorikian: Azeem, welcome to the show.Azeem Azhar: Harry, what a pleasure to be here.Harry Glorikian: I definitely want to give you a chance to sort of talk about your work and your background, so we really get a sense of who you are. But I'd first like to ask a couple of, you know, big picture questions to set the stage for everybody who's listening. You like this, your word and you use it, "exponential," in your branding and almost everything you're doing across your platform, which is what we're going to talk about. But just for people who don't, aren't maybe familiar with that word exponential. What does that word mean to you? Why do you think that that's the right word, word to explain how technology and markets are evolving today?Azeem Azhar: Such a great question. I love the way you started with the easy questions. I'm just kidding because it's it's hard. It's hard to summarize short, but in a brief brief statement. So, you know, exponential is this idea that comes out of math. It is the idea that something grows by a fixed proportion in any given time period. An interest-bearing savings account, 3 percent growth or in the old days, we'd get 3 percent per annum, three percent compounded. And compound interest is really powerful. It's what your mom and your dad told you. Start saving early so that when you're a bit older, you'll have a huge nest egg, and it never made sense to us. And the idea behind an exponential is that these are processes which, you know, grow by that certain fixed percentage every year. And so the amount they grow grows every time. It's not like going from the age of 12 to 13 to 14 to 15 were actually proportionately—you get less older every year because when you go from 15 to 16, you get older by one fifteenth of your previous age. And when you go from 50 to fifty one, it's by one 50th, which is a smaller proportion. Someone who is growing in age exponentially would be growing by, say, 10 percent every year. So you go from 10 to 11 and that's by one year. From 20, you go to 22, two years. From 30 to 33. So that's the idea of an exponential process. It's kind of compound interest. But why I use the phrase today to describe what's going on in the economy and in the technologies that drive the economy, is that many of the key technologies that we currently rely on and will rely on as they replace old industrial processes are improving at exponential rates on a price-performance basis.Azeem Azhar: That means that every year you get more of them for less, or every year what you got for the the same dollar you get much more. And I specifically use a threshold, and that threshold is to say essentially it's an exponential technology if it's improving by double digits, 10 percent or more every year on a compounding basis for decades. And many of the technologies that I look at increased by improve by 30, 40, 50, 60 percent or more every year, which is pretty remarkable. The reverse of that, of course, is deflation, right? These capabilities are getting much cheaper. And I think the reason that's important and the reason it describes the heartbeat of our economies is that we're at a point in development of, you know, sort of economic and technological development where these improvements can be felt. They're viscerally felt across a business cycle. Across a few years, in fact. And that isn't something that we have reliably and regularly seen in any previous point in history. The idea that this pace of change can be as fast as it as it is. And on the cover of my book The Exponential Age, which I'm holding up to you, Harry. The thing about the curve is is that it starts off really flat and a little bit boring, and you would trade that curve for a nice, straight, sharp line at 45 degrees. And then there's an inflection point when it goes suddenly goes kind of crazy and out of control. And my argument is that we are now past that inflection point and we are in that that sort of vertical moment and we're going to have to contend with it.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, we are mentally aligned. And I try to talk to people about this. I mean, when we were doing the genome project that Applied Biosystems, you know, when we had finished, I think it was 2 percent or 4 percent of the genome, everybody's like, Oh, you have like ninety something [to go], and they couldn't see the exponential curve. And then we were done like five years later. And so it's it's this inability of the human mind. You know, it's really not designed to do that, but we're not designed to see exponential shift. We're sort of looking around that corner from an evolutionary perspective to see what's happening. But, you know? Exponential growth is not a new concept, if you think about, you know, really, I think the person that brought it to the forefront was Gordon Moore, right? With, you know, how semiconductor chips were going to keep doubling every two years and cost was going to stay flat. And you know, how do you see it playing out? Today, what is so different right now, or say, in the past two, three, four, five years. What you can see going forward that. May not have been as obvious 10 or 15 years ago.Azeem Azhar: I mean, it is an idea that's been around with us for a long time. You know, arguably Thomas Malthus, the British scholar in the 18th century who worried about the exponential growth of the population destroying the land's carrying capacity and ability to produce crops. And of course, we have the sort of ancient Persian and Hindu stories about the vizier and the chessboard, who, you know, puts a grain of rice and doubles on each square and doubles at each time. So it's an idea that's been around for a while. The thing that I think has happened is that it's back to its back to that point, the kink, the inflection in the curve. The point at which in the story of the chess, the king gets so angry with his vizier that he chops off his head. The point with the semiconductors, where the chips get so powerful and so cheap that computing is everything, and then every way in which we live our lives is mediated through these devices. And that wasn't always the way. I mean, you and I, Harry, are men of a certain age, and we remember posting letters and receiving mail through the letterbox in the morning. And there was then, some 15 years later, there were, or 20 years later, there was a fax, right? I mean, that's what it looked like.Azeem Azhar: And the thing that's different now from the time of Gordon Moore is that that what he predicted and sort of saw out as his clock speed, turns out to be a process that occurs in many, many different technology fields, not just in computing. And the one that you talked about as well, genome sequencing. And in other areas like renewable energy. And so it becomes a little bit like...the clock speed of this modern economy. But the second thing that is really important is to ask that question: Where is the bend in the curve? And the math purists amongst your listeners will know that an exponential curve has no bend. It depends on where you zoom in. Whatever however you zoom, when you're really close up, you're really far away. You'll always see a band and it will always be in a different place. But the bend that we see today is the moment where we feel there is a new world now. Not an old world. There are things that generally behave differently, that what happens to these things that are connected to exponential processes are not kind of geeks and computer enthusiasts are in Silicon Valley building. They're happening all over the world. And for me, that turning point happens some point between 2011, 2012 and 2015, 2016. Because in 2009, America's largest companies wereAzeem Azhar: not in this order, Exxon, Phillips, Wal-Mart, Conoco... Sorry, Exxon Mobil, Wal-Mart, ConocoPhillips, Chevron, General Motors, General Electric, Ford, AT&T, Valero. What do all of them have in common? They are all old companies are all built on three technologies that emerged in the late 19th century. The car or the internal combustion engine, the telephone and electricity. And with the exception of Wal-Mart, every one of those big companies was founded between about 1870 and sort of 1915. And Wal-Mart is dependent on the car because you needed suburbs and you needed large cars with big trunks to haul away 40 rolls of toilet paper. So, so and that was a century long shift. And then if you look out four years after 2009, America's largest firms, in fact, the world's largest firms are all Exponential Age firms like the Tencent and the Facebooks of this world. But it's not just that at that period of time. That's the moment where solar power became for generating electricity became cheaper than generating electricity from oil or gas in in most of the world. It's the point at which the price to sequence the human genome, which you know is so much better than I do, diminished below $1000 per sequence. So all these things came together and they presented a new way of doing things, which I call the Exponential Age.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, in my last book. I, you know, I do state that the difference between evolution and revolution is time, right? If you wait long enough, things happen evolutionarily, but at the speed that things are changing, it feels revolutionary and in how it's affecting everybody. So let's rewind and talk about your background. You've been active as a business columnist, as a journalist, a startup founder, a CEO, a leader of corporate innovation, incubators at Reuters and a venture capital partner. Lately you've built what eems like a very busy career around books and talks and podcasts and all around this theme of accelerating technologies, I'd love to hear how you how you first got interested in all these themes about technological change. You know, how society can manage this change? I know you were in Oxford. You got your master's degree in the famous PPE program. The politics, philosophy and economics. You know, was it soon after that that you went down this road? Or is Oxford where it all started?Azeem Azhar: It started well before then in, in a weird way. So, so you know, my interest really is between sits between technology and an economic institutions and society. And I, I was born, like most of us are, to two parents, and my parents were working in in Zambia in the early 70s, and my dad was working on helping this newly independent country develop economic institutions. It didn't have them and it needed them to go through that sort of good institutions, make for healthy economies, make for social welfare and sort of civil politics. That's the argument. So he was out there doing all of that. And I was born the year after Intel released its 4004 chip, which is widely regarded as the sort of the chip that kicked off the personal computing revolution. And so, so in the backdrop of people talking about development and development economics and being curious about my own personal story, I was exposed to these ideas. I mean, you don't understand them when you're eight or 10 and you know, but you're exposed to them and you have an affiliation to them and so on. And at the same time, computers were entering into the popular consciousness.Azeem Azhar: You know, you had C-3PO, the robot and computers in Star Trek, and I saw a computer in 1979 and I had one from 1981. And so my interest in these things, these two tracks was start set off quite early on and I really, really loved the computing. And I did, you did notice, but you don't necessarily understand that, why computers are getting more and more powerful. My first computer only had one color. Well, it had two, white and black. And my second could manage 16 at some time, probably not 16. Eight out of a palette of 16 at any given time. And they get better and better. And so alongside my life were computers getting faster. I'm learning to program them and discovering the internet and that, I think, has always sat alongside me against this kind of family curiosity. I suspect if my parents had been, I don't know, doctors, I would have been in your field in the field of bioinformatics and applying exponential technologies to health care. And if my parents had been engineers, I would have been doing something that intersected engineering and computing.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, no, it's you know, it's interesting, I remember when we got our first chip, when I was first learning about, you know, computers like it was, you know, eight bits, right? And then 16 bits and oh my god, what can we do with them? And we were building them, and I actually have to get you a copy of my new book because I think if you read the first chapter and what you just said, you'll be like, Oh my God, we have more in common than we may think, even though you know you're where you are and I'm in the health care field to. But you were co-founder and CEO of a company, I believe that was called PeerIndex, which was a startup in the late 2000s. And even back then, you were trying to quantify people's influence on different social media platforms. And I'm trying to remember like, do I even know what the social media platform was back in 2000? It seems like so long ago, and you successfully sold it to Brandwatch in, like, 2014. What did that experience sort of teach you about, you know, the bigger issues and how technology impacts society and vice versa? Because I have to believe that you know your hands on experience and what you were seeing has to have changed the way that you thought about how fast this was going and what it was going to do.Azeem Azhar: Oh, that is an absolutely fantastic, fantastic question. And. You know, you really get to the heart of all of the different things that you learn as a founder. When we when I started PeerIndex, the idea was really that people were going on to the internet with profiles that they maintained for themselves. So up until that point, apart from people who had been really early on the internet, like you and I who used Usenet and then early web pages for ourselves, no one really had a presence. And these social apps like MySpace and Twitter and LinkedIn and Facebook show up and they start to give people a presence. And we felt that initially there would be a clear problem around trying to discover people because at the time the internet was an open network. You could look at anyone's page on Facebook. There weren't these walled gardens. And we looked down on them. So we thought initially that there would be a an opportunity to build some kind of expertise system where I could say, "Listen, find me something that someone who knows something about, you know, sushi restaurants in Berlin." And it would help me find that person. I could connect their profile and talk to them because it was the really early, naive days before Facebook or LinkedIn had advertising on them. And we could we kind of got the technology to work, but actually the market was moving and we couldn't land that.Azeem Azhar: And so we had to kind of pivot, as you do several times, ultimately, until we became this kind of influence analytics for marketers. But the few things that I learned. So the first one was how quickly new players in a market will go from being open to being closed. So it was 2011 when Facebook started to put the shutters down on its data and become a closed garden. And they realized that the network effect and data is what drove them forward. And the second thing was the speed with which what we did changed. So when we were getting going and doing all of this kind of analytics on Twitter and Facebook. They didn't really have data science teams. In fact, Twitter's first data scientists couldn't get a US visa and ended up helping, working with us for several months. And I think back to the fact that we used five or six different core technologies for our data stores in a seven-year period. And in that time, what we did became so much more powerful. So when we started, we had maybe like 50,000 people in this thing, it was really hard to get it to work. The entire company's resources went on it. At one point we were we had about 100 million people in the data in our dataset, or 100 million profiles in the data.Azeem Azhar: They were all public, by the way. I should say this is all public data and it was just like a search engine in a way. And in order to update the index, we would need to run processes on thousands of computers and it would take a big, big, big servers, right? And it would take a day. Yeah. By the time we sold the company, a couple more iterations of Moore's Law, some improvements in software architecture, we were updating 400 million user profiles in real time on a couple of computers. Yep, so not only do we quadrupled the dataset, we had increased its, sort of decreased its latency. It was pretty much real time and we had reduced the amount of computers we needed by a factor of about 400. And it was a really remarkable evolution. And that gets me to the third lesson. So the second lesson is really all about that pace of change in the power of Moore's law. And then the third lesson was really that my engineers learned by doing. They figured out how to do this themselves. And whereas I was sort of roughly involved in the first design, by the time we got to the fifth iteration this was something of a process that was entirely run by some brilliant young members of the team.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, you've got to actually cook something to understand how to do it and taste it and understand how it's going to come out. So your new book, The Exponential Age, came out this fall. You know, in the first chapter, you sort of identify two main problems, right? One is how do we perceive technology and then or the way we relate to technology and. Can you describe the two problems as you see them and maybe, maybe even hint a little? I don't want I don't want if people want to buy the book, I want them to buy it, but maybe hint that the solution?Azeem Azhar: Yeah. Well, I mean, there are there are a couple of issues here, right, in the Exponential Age. The first is that technology creates all sorts of new potentials and we live them. We're doing this over Zoom, for example. Right. And there are. But the arrival of new potentials always means that there's an old system that is going to be partially or entirely replaced. And so I describe that process as the exponential gap. It is the gap between the potentials of the new and the way in which most of us live our lives. And the thing is, the reason I say "the way most of us live our lives" is because our lives, even in America, which doesn't like its sort of government, are governed by institutions and by regulations. You know, when you when you start to cook, you wash your hands, right? There's no law. That's just an institution, its common habit. If you have teenage kids like I do, you're battling with the fact that people are meant to talk over dinner, not stare at their phones. In the UK there is an institution that says on a red light traffic signal, you never turn. You wait. It's not like the US where you can do that. Now some of these institutions are codified like our traffic laws, and some are not.Azeem Azhar: There are then more formal institutions of different types like, you know, the Fed or NATO or the Supreme Court. And the purpose of institutions, social, formal, legal, informal is to make life easier to live, right? Right, you don't have to remember to put our pants on. I will read a rule that says, put your pants on before you leave the house. It's like you just put them on and everybody kind of knows it. And there's no law that says you should or shouldn't, right. So they become very valuable. But the thing is that the institutions in general, by their nature, don't adapt to at the speed with which these new technologies do adapt. And even slower moving technologies like the printing press really upended institutions. I mean, Europe went into centuries of war just after the printing press emerged. So, so the central heart of the challenge is, on the one hand, we have these slightly magical technologies that do amazing things, but they somewhat break our institutions and we have to figure out how we get our institutions to adapt better. But there's a second complication to all of this, which is that which is, I think, more one that's about historical context. And that complication is that the way we have talked about technology, especially in the West in the last 40 or 50 years, has been to suggest that technology is deterministic.Azeem Azhar: We're a bit like people in a pre-med, pre-science era who just say the child got the pox and the child died. We say the technology arrived and now we must use it. The iPhone arrived and we must use it. TheFacebook arrived, and we must use it. We've gotten into this worldview that technology is this sort of unceasing deterministic force that arrives from nowhere and that a few men and women in Silicon Valley control, can harness it. We've lost sight of the fact that technology is something that we as members of society, as business people, as innovators, as academics, as parents get to shape because it is something that we build ourselves. And that for me was a second challenge. And what I sought to do in the book, as I was describing, the Exponential Age is not only persuade people that we are in the Exponential Age, but also describe how it confuses our institutions broadly defined and also explain why our response has sometimes been a bit poor. Some a large part of which I think is connected to putting technology on a particular pedestal where we don't ask questions of it. And then hopefully at the end of this, I do give some suggestions.Harry Glorikian: Well, it's interesting, right, I've had the pleasure of giving talks to different policy makers, and I always tell them like, you need to move faster, you need to implement policy. It's good to be a little wrong and then fix it. But don't be so far behind the curve that you, you know, some of these things need corralling otherwise, they do get a lot of, you know, get out of hand. Now in health care, we have almost the opposite. We're trying to break the silos of data so that we can improve health care, improve diagnosis, improve outcomes for patients, find new drugs. Harry Glorikian: So I'm going to, I'm going to pivot there a little bit and sort of dive a little deeper into life sciences and health care, right, which is the focus of the show, right? And in the book, you you say that our age is defined by the emergence of several general-purpose technologies, which I'm totally aligned with, and that they are all advancing exponentially. And you actually say biology is one of them. So first, what are the most dramatic examples in your mind of exponential change in life sciences? And how do you believe they're affecting people's health?Azeem Azhar: Well, I mean, if you got the Moderna or BioNTech vaccination, you're a lucky recipient of that technology and it's affecting people's health because it's putting a little nanobots controlled by Bill Gates in your bloodstream to get you to hand over all your bitcoin to him, is the other side of the problem. But I mean, you know, I mean, more seriously, the Moderna vaccine is an example that I give at the at the end of the book comes about so remarkably quickly by a combination of these exponential technologies. I'm just going to look up the dates. So on the 6th of January 2020, there's a release of the sequence of a coronavirus genome from from a respiratory disease in Wuhan. Yeah, and the the genome is just a string of letters, and it's put on GenBank, which is a bit like an open-source story storage for gene sequences. People started to download it, and synthetic genes were rapidly led to more than 200 different vaccines being developed. Moderna, by February the 7th, had its first vials of its vaccine. That was 31 days after the initial release of the sequence and another six days they finalized the sequence of the vaccine and 25 more days to manufacture it. And within a year of the virus sequence being made public, 24 million people had had one dose of it.Azeem Azhar: Now that's really remarkable because in the old days, by which I mean February 2020, experts were telling us it would take at least 18 months to figure out what a vaccine might even look like, let alone tested and in place. So you see this dramatic time compression. Now what were the aspects at play? So one aspect at play was a declining cost of genome sequencing, which the machines are much cheaper. It's much cheaper to sequence these samples. That means that the entire supply chain of RNA amplifiers and so on a more widely available. This then gets shared on a website that can be run at very few dollars. It can get access to millions of people. The companies who are doing the work are using synthetic genes, which means basically writing out new bases, which is another core technology that's going through an exponential cost decline. And they're using a lot of machine learning and big data in order to explore the phenomenally complex biological space to zero in on potential candidates. So that the whole thing knits together a set of these different technologies in a very, very powerful and quite distributed combination.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer. It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in Kindle format. Just go to Amazon and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's step back here for just a minute. So I wonder if you have a thesis—from a fundamental technology perspective, what's really driving the exponential technological change, right? Do you think that that, is there a force maybe outside of semiconductors that are driving biology forward? What's your view? I mean, if you took the computational tools away from life sciences and drug developers, would we still see the same rapid advances in that area, and the answer could be no, because I can tell you my thoughts after you tell me yours.Azeem Azhar: Well, we wouldn't see the same advances, but we would still see significant advances and it's hard to unpack one from another. But if you look at the I mean, you worked on the genome sequencing stuff. So you know that there's a lot of interesting aspects to do with the reagents that are used the electrochemistry, the arrays and making little ongoing improvements in those areas. There are also key improvements in the actual kind of automation of the processes between each to each step, and some of those automations are not, they're not kind of generalized robots, soft robots, they are trays that are being moved at the right time from one spot to another, stop on a kind of lab bench. So you'd still see the improvements, but you wouldn't see the same pace that we have seen from computing. And for two reasons. So one is that kind of the core ability to store lots of this data, which runs into the exabytes and then sift through it, is closely connected to storage capacity and computation capability. But also even the CAD package that the person used to redraw the designs for the new laboratory bench to handle the new vials of reagents required a computer. But yes, but you know, so what? What's your understanding as someone who is on the inside and, note to listener, that was a bit cruel because Harry is the expert on this one!Harry Glorikian: And oh no, no, no, no. I, you know, it's interesting, right… I believe that now that information is more readily available, which again drives back to sensors, technology, computation, speed as well as storage is changing what we do. Because the information feeds our ability to generate that next idea. And most of this was really hard to get. I mean, back in the day, I mean, if you know, now I wear a medical device on my on my wrist. I mean, you know this, I look as a as a data storage device, right? Data aggregation device. And this I look at it more as a coach, right? And but the information that it's getting, you know, from me on a momentary basis is, I mean, one of the companies I helped start, I mean, we have trillions of heartbeats, trillions. Can you imagine the analytics from a machine learning and, you know, A.I. perspective that I can do on that to look for? Is there a signal of a disease? Can I see sleep apnea or one of the I could never have done that 10 years ago.Azeem Azhar: I mean, even 10, how about I mean, five maybe, right? I mean, the thing that I find remarkable about about all of this is what it's told me. So I went from I used to check my bloods every year and so I would get a glucose reading or an insulin reading every year. I then put a CGM on continuous glucose monitor and I wore it for 16 to 18 weeks and it gave me a reading every 15 months minutes. So I literally went from once a year, which is 365 times 96, 15 minute intervals. So it's like a 40,000-fold improvement. I went to from to that every 15 minutes, and it was incredible and amazing and changed my life in so many good ways, which I'm happy to go into later. But the moment I put the 15 minute on, I kid you not, within an hour I was looking for the streaming cGMPs that give you real time feed. No 15-minute delay. And there is one that Abbott makes through a company, sells through a company called Super Sapiens. But because suddenly I was like a pilot whose altimeter doesn't just tell them you're in the air or you've hit the ground, which is what happened when I used to go once a year, I've gone to getting an altitude reading every minute, which is great, but still not brilliant for landing the plane to where I could get this every second. And this would be incredible. And I find that really amazing. I just I just and what we can then do with that across longitudinal data is just something else.Harry Glorikian: We're totally aligned. And, you know, jumping back to the deflationary force of all this. Is. What we can do near-patient, what we can do at home, what we can do at, you know, I'll call it CVS, I think by you, it would be Boots. But what these technologies bring to us and how it helps a person manage themselves more accurately or, you know, more insightfully, I think, brings us not to chronic health, but we will be able to keep people healthier, longer and at a much, much lower cost than we did before because. As you know, every time we go to the hospital, it's usually big machines, very expensive, somebody to do the interpretation. And now if we can get that information to the patient themselves and AI and machine learning can make that information easier for them to interpret. They can actually do something actionable that that that makes a difference.Azeem Azhar: I mean, I think it's a really remarkable opportunity with a big caveat that where we can look at look historically, so you know, we're big fans of the Hamilton musical in my household. And if you go back to that time, which is only a couple of hundred years ago and you said to them, this is the kind of magic medicine they'll have in the US by 2020. I mean, it's space tech. It's alien space tech. You know, you can go in and we measure things they didn't even know could be measured, right, like the level of antibodies in the bloodstream. And you can get that done in an hour almost anywhere, right? Yeah. And it's really quite cheap because GDP per capita in the per head in the US is like $60,000 a year. And I can go and get my blood run. A full panel run for $300 in London, one of the most expensive cities in the world. 60 grand a year. $300. Well, surely everybody's getting that done. And yet and you know this better than me. Right. You know this better than me that despite that, we don't have everyone getting their bloods done because it's just so cheap, right, there are other structural things that go on about who gets access, and I think America is a great example of this because for all the people who read, we are aware of Whoop, and have, you know, biological ages that are 10 years younger than their chronological age, you've also got like a much, much larger incidence of deaths by drug overdose and chronic obesity and sort of diseases of inflammation and so on. And that's despite having magical the magical space technology of the 2020s. So the question I think we have to have is why would we feel that next year's optoelectronic sensors from Rockly or the Series 7 or Series 8 Apple Watch will make the blindest bit of difference to health outcomes for the average American.Harry Glorikian: Now, I totally agree with you, I mean, I think half of it is education, communication. You know, there's a lot of social and political and policy and communication issues that exist, and actually that was going to be my next, one of my next questions for you, which is: What are some of the ways that exponential change challenges our existing social and political structures? And you know, do you see any—based on all the people that you've talked to, you know, writing the book, et cetera—insights of how we're going, what those are and maybe some ideas about how we can move beyond them.Azeem Azhar: Hmm. Well, I mean, on the health care side, I think one of the most important issues is and this is I mean, look, you've got an American audience and your health system is very different to, let's just say everyone.Harry Glorikian: Actually, the audience is global. So everybody, I have people that all over the world that listen to this.Azeem Azhar: Fair enough. Okay. Even better, so the rest of the world will understand this point, perhaps more, which is that, you know, in many place parts of the world, health care is treated as not, you know, it's treated differently to I take a vacation or a mutual bond that you buy, right or a car, it's not seen purely as a kind of profit vehicle. It's seen as something that serves the individual and serves a community and public health and so on matters. And I think one of the opportunities that we have is to think out for it, look out for is how do we get the benefits of aggregated health data, which is what you need. You need aggregate population wide data that connects a genotype to a phenotype. In other words, what the gene says to how it gets expressed to me physically to my biomarkers, you know, my, what's in my microbiota, what my blood pressure is on a minute by minute basis and my glucose levels and so on. And to whatever illnesses and diseases and conditions I seem to have, right, the more of that that we have, the more we can build predictive models that allow for the right kind of interventions and pre-habilitation right rather than rehabilitation. But in order to do that at the heart of that, yes, there's some technology. But at the heart of that is how do we get people's data in such a way that they are willing to provide that in a way that is not forced on them through the duress of the state or the duress of our sort of financial servitude? And so that, I think, is something that we really, really need to think about the trouble that we've had as the companies have done really well out of consumer data recently.Azeem Azhar: And I don't just mean Google and Facebook, but even all the marketing companies before that did so through a kind of abusive use of that data where it wasn't really done for our benefit. You know, I used to get a lot of spam letters through my front door. Physical ones. I was never delighted for it, ever. And so I think that one of the things we have to think, think about is how are we going to be able to build common structures that protect our data but still create the opportunities to develop new and novel therapeutic diagnosis, early warning systems? And that's not to say there shouldn't be profit making companies on there that absolutely should be. But the trouble is, the moment that you allow the data resource to be impinged upon, then you either head down this way of kind of the sort of dominance that Facebook has, or you head down away the root of that kind of abuse of spam, junk email and so on, and junk physical mail.Azeem Azhar: So I think there is this one idea that that emerges as an answer, which is the idea of the data commons or the data collective. Yeah. We actually have a couple of them working in health care in in the U.K., roughly. So there's one around CT scans of COVID patients. So there's lots and lots of CT scans and other kind of lung imaging of COVID patients. And that's maintained in a repository, the sort of national COVID lung imaging databank or something. And if you're if you're an approved researcher, you can get access to that and it's done on a non-commercial basis, but you could build something commercially over the top of it. Now the question is why would I give that scan over? Well, I gave give it over because I've been given a cast-iron guarantee about how it's going to be used and how my personal data will be, may or may not be used within that. I would never consider giving that kind of data to a company run by Mark Zuckerberg or, you know, anyone else. And that, I think, is the the cross-over point, which is in order to access this, the benefits of this aggregate data from all these sensors, we need to have a sort of human-centric approach to ensure that the exploitation can happen profitably, but for our benefit in the long run.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I'm looking at some interesting encryption technologies where nothing is ever unencrypted, but you can, you know, the algorithm can learn from the data, right? And you're not opening it up. And so there, I believe that there are some solutions that can make give the side that needs the data what they need, but protect the other side. I still think we need to policymakers and regulators to step up. That would cause that shift to happen faster. But you know, I think some of those people that are making those policies don't even understand the phone they're holding in their hands most of the time and the power that they're holding. So. You know, last set of questions is. Do you think it's possible for society to adapt to exponential change and learn how to manage it productively?Azeem Azhar: It's a really hard question. I'm sure we will muddle through. We will muddle through because we're good at muddling through, you know? But the question is, does that muddling through look more like the depression years. Or does that muddling through look like a kind of directed Marshall Plan. Because they both get through. One comes through with sort of more productive, generative vigor? What I hoped to do in the book was to be able to express to a wider audience some underlying understanding about how the technologies work, so they can identify the right questions to to ask. And what I wanted to do for people to work in the technology field is draw some threads together because a lot of this will be familiar to them, but take those threads to their consequences. And in a way, you know, if I if I tell you, Harry, don't think of an elephant. What are you thinking about right  now?Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Yeah, of course it's not, you know, suggestive.Azeem Azhar: And by laying out these things for these different audiences in different ways, I'm hoping that they will remember them and bear those in mind when they go out and think about how they influence the world, whether it's decisions they make from a product they might buy or not buy, or how they talk influence their elected officials or how they steer their corporate strategy or the products they choose to build. I mean, that's what you would you would hope to do. And then hopefully you create a more streamlined approach to it to the change that needs to happen. Now here's the sort of fascinating thing here, is that over the summer of 2021, the Chinese authorities across a wide range of areas went in using a number of different regulators and stamped on a whole set of Exponential Age companies, whether it was online gaming or online education. The big, multi sided social networks, a lot of fintech, a lot of crypto. And they essentially had been observing the experiment to learn, and they had figured out what things didn't align with their perceived obligations as a government to the state and to the people. Now, you know, I'm using that language because I don't want this to become a kind of polarized sort of argument.Azeem Azhar: I'm just saying, here's a state where you may not agree with its objectives and the way it's accountable, but in its own conception, it's accountable to its people and has to look out for their benefit. And it took action on these companies in really, really abrupt ways. And. If you assume that their actions were rational and they were smart people and I've met some of them and they're super smart people, it tells you something about what one group of clever people think is needed at these times. This sort of time. And I'm not I'm not advocating for that kind of response in the US or in Western Europe, but rather than to say, you know, when your next-door neighbor, and you live in an apartment block and your next-door neighbor you don't like much runs out and says the whole building is on fire. The fact that you don't like him shouldn't mean that you should ignore the fact that there's a fire. And I think that some sometimes there is some real value in looking at how other countries are contending with this and trying to understand the rationale for it, because the Chinese were for all the strength of their state, were really struggling with the power of the exponential hedge funds in their in their domain within Europe.Azeem Azhar: The European Union has recognized that these companies, the technologies provide a lot of benefit. But the way the companies are structured has a really challenging impact on the way in which European citizens lives operate, and they are making taking their own moves. And I'll give you a simple example, that the right to repair movement has been a very important one, and there's been a lot of legislative pressure in the in Europe that is that we should be have the right to repair our iPhones and smartphones. And having told us for years it wasn't possible suddenly, Apple in the last few days has announced all these repair kits self-repair kits. So it turns out that what is impossible means may mean what's politically expedient rather than anything else. And so my sense is that that by engaging in the conversation and being more active, we can get ultimately get better outcomes. And we don't have to go the route of China in order to achieve those, which is an incredibly sort of…Harry Glorikian: A draconian way. Yes.Azeem Azhar: Yeah. Very, very draconian. But equally, you can't you know where that where I hear the U.S. debate running around, which is an ultimately about Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, and not much beyond that, I think is problematic because it's missing a lot of opportunities to sort of write the stuff and foster some amazing innovation and some amazing new businesses in this space.Harry Glorikian: Oh yeah, that's, again, that's why, whenever I get a chance to talk to policymakers, I'm like, “You guys need to get ahead of this because you just don't understand how quickly it's moving and how much it's going to impact what's there, and what's going to happen next.” And if you think about the business model shifts by some of these... I mean, what I always tell people is like, okay, if you can now sequence a whole genome for $50 think about all the new business models and all the new opportunities that will open up versus when it was $1000. It sort of changes the paradigm, but most people don't think that we're going to see that stepwise change. Or, you know, Google was, DeepMind was doing the optical analysis, and they announced, you know, they could do one analysis and everybody was like, Oh, that's great, but it's just one. And a year later, they announced we could do 50. Right? And I'm like, you're not seeing how quickly this is changing, right? One to 50 in 12 months is, that's a huge shift, and if you consider what the next one is going to be, it changes the whole field. It could change the entire field of ophthalmology, especially when you combine it with something like telemedicine. So we could talk for hours about this. I look forward to continuing this conversation. I think that we would, you know, there's a lot of common ground, although you're I'm in health care and you're almost everywhere else.Azeem Azhar: I mean, I have to say that the opportunity in in health care is so global as well because, you know, if you think about how long and how much it costs to train a doctor and you think about the kind of margin that live that sits on current medical devices and how fragile, they might be in certain operating environments and the thought that you could start to do more and more of this with a $40 sensor inside a $250 smartwatch is a really, really appealing and exciting, exciting one. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Well, thank you so much for the time and look forward to staying in touch and I wish you great success with the book and everything else.Azeem Azhar: Thank you so much, Harry. Appreciate it.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and the MoneyBall Medicine show at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show. You can also find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

Ogletree Deakins Podcasts
Dirty Steel Toe Boots, Episode 7: The Supreme Court's Decision on OSHA's ETS

Ogletree Deakins Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 26:08


In this episode of Dirty Steel-Toe Boots, host Phillip Russell is joined by Eric Hobbs, the chair of Ogletree Deakins' Workplace Safety and Health Practice Group. Phillip and Eric take a first look at the Supreme Court's decision staying the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) enforcement of the Emergency Temporary Standard (ETS) until the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals (and, ultimately, the Supreme Court) has an opportunity to weigh in on the merits. Phillip and Eric explore the implications of the Court's stay on future court decisions, OSHA's potential actions with regard to the ETS and the National Emphasis Program (NEP), and employer's next steps in light of these judicial and agency actions.

Radio Giga
Call of Duty Vanguard: Alle Waffen - Liste, Bilder & Infos

Radio Giga

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022


Call of Duty: Vanguard versetzt euch in den Zweiten Weltkrieg und möchte dabei das bekannte „Boots on the Ground“-Feeling im Multiplayer erzeugen. Natürlich spielen dabei ebenfalls die Waffen eine große Rolle. Im Folgenden zeigen wir euch alle Waffen mit ihren Stats und ihrer Freischaltbedingung.

Men in the Arena Podcast
What Michelangelo's 'David' Can Teach You About Becoming Your Best Version of a Man w/ Chris Widener EP 508

Men in the Arena Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 43:36


God wants to help you rid yourself of the things that slow you down. He wants to chisel and hone you into the creation he has intended you to be. Jim Ramos interview Chris Widener on his book, The Angel Inside. Chris Widener has been named one of the top 50 speakers in the world and is a member of the motivational speakers Hall of Fame. From his childhood filled with drama, 28 homes in 11 different schools being shipped afterward with relatives twice, to becoming one of the most well-known motivational speakers, Chris Widener will inspire you. He is the author of 22 books that have been translated into 14 languages. Boots on the Ground: Pray and ask God to show you who he wants you to become in 2022. When he reveals this to you, pick up the hammer and chisel and start chipping away at your life until you become that man.  Get Your Copy Now! of Tell Them, What Great Fathers Tell Their Sons and Daughters www.meninthearena.org Men in the Arena Books and Swag Support the Podcast

Boots In The Field Report
Episode 260: Boots In The Field Report January 11, 2022

Boots In The Field Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 9:25


In this week's Boots in The Field Report Ken Ferrie breaks down planting conditions for beans in an ideal situation and how that changes when you are trying to plant early beans. The focus, when planting early beans, changes from soil temperatures to soil conditions in order to attempt to get the beans to the unifoliate stage quick enough to pressure the bean to flower before the solstice. Ken also walks through how to adjust the timing window for different maturity groups.

Voices in Japan
Winter Survival in Japan

Voices in Japan

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 50:29


Japan has been getting slammed with winter weather across the country since the beginning of the new year, and over two hundred people in Tokyo went to the hospital last week with injuries related to the snow and ice. Ben and Burke take a look at what it takes to survive the winter weather in Japan, with a particular focus on clothing. They also start off the show with a look back at singe-life in Japan and review a recent survey that was conducted with Japanese people about the things they miss most about being single. Enjoy the show!Sponsors:Bearfoot BarLocated in downtown Sapporo, walking distance from the subway station. There are  variety of Japanese made craft bottled beers. A range of whiskeys and basic cocktails also available. Burgers and pub style snacks. Friendly English and Japanese speaking staff.  https://www.facebook.com/bearfootbarThe Red House Located in the heart of Rusutsu Ski Resort, just cross the main road and it's behind the Seicomart Convenience store. The restaurant features a mix of Japanese, Asian fusion, and western Style dishes, including shabu-shabu with wagyu beef and Hokkaido wagyu beef steak. Open winter and summer, 12-3pm for lunch, 5-9pm for dinner, with prices ranging from under Yen 1000 to about Yen 5000. https://theredhouse.jp/ Rusutsu LodgesOpen all year round. Located 5 minutes walk to the main Rusutsu Ski Resort Gondola. There are Japanese, Western, and apartment style rooms with breakfast packages available. There's a Japanese sento (public bath), two convenience stores less than a minute walk, ski room and tune up tables, plenty of free parking space, and summer BBQ packages available. Check out the website for more information and availability. http://rusutsulodges.comHokkaido GuideEstablished over 10 years ago, written by locals for locals and international tourists. The guide contains information on all types of businesses and locations around Hokkaido. There's information regarding all things Hokkaido such as sightseeing, nightlife, events, services, food and restaurants, entertainment, outdoor activities, and more. Currently offered in English and Thai, advertising space available. Check out website for everything you need to know about this beautiful prefecture. https://hokkaidoguide.comUse our Buzzsprout affiliate link to start your podcast today! Website:https://www.voicesinjapan.com/Follow us and check out our other content:https://twitter.com/voicesinjapanhttps://www.facebook.com/voicesinjapan/https://www.instagram.com/voicesinjapan/Get in touch: voicesinjapan@gmail.comSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/voicesinjapan)

Heritage Clothing - Der Podcast für Slow Fashion
Folge 6: Meine Red Wings - Ranking der Modelle (Top 5), Kombinationsmöglichkeiten, Bezugsquellen

Heritage Clothing - Der Podcast für Slow Fashion

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 33:13


Die kommende Folge ist etwas aufwändiger zu recherchieren, deswegen gibt es in dieser Folge etwas leichtere Kost. Werft einen Blick auf meine persönliche Red-Wing-Kollektion. Ich ranke die Boots von Platz 5 bis 1, erläutere, wie ich sie am liebsten kombiniere und wo ich sie vorzugsweise kaufen würde. Viel Spaß.

Talk of the Devils - A show about Manchester United
FA Cup: Scraping Through & Snide Boots

Talk of the Devils - A show about Manchester United

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 49:42


Ian Irving hosts The Athletic's podcast dedicated to Manchester United with regular pundits, club correspondent Laurie Whitwell and United We Stand Editor Andy Mitten. There was a strong sense that United "got away with one" after the narrow FA Cup third round win over Aston Villa. Despite a promising start and some positive aspects, Villa were the better side for long periods and Marcus Rashford's form is a major cause for concern. Ten years ago this week Paul Scholes sprang a huge surprise on almost everyone involved with the club when he reversed his retirement to be named as a substitute against Manchester City. Ian tells us why one of his friends was particularly bemused when the news broke.

Finding Frequency
#637 Ski boots?

Finding Frequency

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 5:35


#637 Getting ready for the next (small) adventure.You can find me, Werner Puchert, on LinkedIn and Twitter.

(EA) Eternal Affairs TRUTH Radio
Arizona Border Update w/ Veterans On Patrol's Lewis Arthur ~ EA Truth Radio (01/04/2022)

(EA) Eternal Affairs TRUTH Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 42:50


Arizona Border Update w/ Veterans On Patrol's Lewis Arthur ~ EA Truth Radio (01/04/2022) We were honored and privileged to WELCOME Lewis back on EA Truth Radio after it has been a few years since he was our guest! Lewis Arthur,  the Founder of VOP = Veterans On Patrol joins our Host, Andrew "Andy" Shecktor for this SPECIAL BORDER UPDATE SHOW. A couple of his Fellow Volunteers joined him on this call as well! Thank you! Please join us chatting on social media about our shows using hashtag #EATruthRadioThank you for tuning in and supporting both EA Truth Media and Veterans On Patrol ... Veterans On Patrol accepts material donations however no cash donations: Current Urgent Requests:Spanish Bibles for ChildrenBlankets/Hand WarmersFuel Cards (Visa/Chevron)

Boots & Saddle
Boots & Saddle | Episode 222: January 4, 2022

Boots & Saddle

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 120:00


BOOTS & SADDLE - January 4, 2022 1. The Cold Hard Facts of Life - Porter Wagoner (The Cold Hard Facts of Life - 1967) 2. Hair in My Eyes Like A Highland Steer - Corb Lund (Hair In My Eyes Like A Highland Steer - 2005) 3. Seasons Of My Heart - George Jones (King Of Broken Hearts - 1965) 4. He's Gone Gone Gone - Norma Jean (Pretty Miss Norma Jean - 1965) 5. I Guess I'm Crazy - Tommy Collins (Single - 1955) 6. Werris Creek Devil - Ezra Lee (Single - 2021) 7. When I Climb Back Up to Living - Rodger Wilhoit (The “Social World” of Rodger Wilhoit - 1974) 8. Lonesome Old River Blues - Kayla Hotte (Single - 2019) 9. 'Cause I Love You - Webb Pierce (Single - 1956) 10. One For You and One For Me - The Weber Family (The Webers Together) 11. Before This Dream Becomes Reality - The Weber Family (The Webers Together) 12. Mind Your Own Business - Bill Long (My Favorite Songs) 13. One Has My Name - Bill Long (My Favorite Songs) 14. This Must Be The Bottom - Mickey McGivern & The Mustangs featuring Billy Adams (Hard Times - 1967) 15. My Heart Skips A Beat - Johnny Burke (Johnny Burke Sings Buck Owens' Big Hits)  16. Blackboard of My Heart [instrumental] - The Weber Family (The Webers Together) 17. That Don't Mean I Love You Less - Harold MacIntryre (The Horse and The Rider - 1983) 18. Book of Broken Hearts - Warren Smith (Single - 1962) 19. 'Til Death Do Us Part - Dolly Parton (My Blue Ridge Mountain Boy - 1969) 20. Border Radio - The Blasters (The Blasters - 1981) 21. Walk Hard - Robbie Fulks (50-Vc. Doberman - 2009) 22. That Kind of Girl - Conway Twitty (Conway Twitty Sings - 1966) 23. Leavin' 101 (Single) - Geoffrey Miller (Leavin' 101 - 2022) 24. Pay to Fish - Lester Slade (Burnt Out Lightning - 2022) 25. Train Ticket - Jenny Don't And The Spurs (Fire On The Ridge - 2021) 26. Trapper's Attic - Connor Jay Liess (Trappers Attic - 2021) 27. The Scarecrow's Got It Good - Connor Jay Liess (Trappers Attic - 2021) 28. Mountaintop - Esther Rose (How Many Times - 2021) 29. Cathy's Clown - The Everly Brothers (A Date With The Everly Brothers - 1960) 30. Knock Off Your Naggin' - Stonewall Jackson (Single - 1957) 31. Faster Horses (The Cowboy and the Poet) - Tom T. Hall (Single - 1975) 32. I Won't Stand In Your Way - Rose Lee Maphis (Rose Lee Maphis - 1961) 33. Lookin' For The Time (Workin' Girl) - Nanci Griffith (The Last Of The True Believers - 1986) 34. Bye, Bye, Bye (Alternate Version) - Michael Nesmith & The First National Band (Loose Salute (Expanded Edition) - 1970) 35. Don't Fence Me In [instrumental] - Jeff Bradshaw & Dave Hamilton (Swingin' Country Dance Toons - 2003) 36. Martha - Tom Waits (Closing Time - 1973)

Vortex Nation Podcast
#10MinuteTalk - Cold-Weather Footwear

Vortex Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 17:49


Cold feet can ruin a hunt faster than you can say numb toes. Mark and Erik chat footwear options and techniques you can use to keep feet comfortable - and you on stand. Boot styles, to auxiliary warmers, and few things we're considering experimenting with, tune in for simple tips to keep your feet in the game.As always, we want to hear your feedback! Let us know if there are any topics you'd like covered on the Vortex Nation™ podcast by asking us on Instagram @vortexnationpodcast

Pivot with Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway
Twitter Boots Marjorie Taylor Greene, Russia's Demands for Netflix, and Omicron Ruined the Holidays

Pivot with Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 54:19


Kara and Scott are back! On the agenda? Twitter's decision to ban Marjorie Taylor Greene's personal account, Russia forcing Netflix to stream state-owned channels, and Apple's plan to keep their engineers from leaving. Plus, the many ways Omicron ruined the holidays. Send us your Listener Mail questions, via Yappa, at nymag.com/pivot. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Crain's Daily Gist
01/04/22: Will Walgreens sell Boots?

Crain's Daily Gist

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 16:24


Private-equity firm Bain Capital has reportedly approached Walgreens Boots Alliance about buying its U.K. drugstore chain. Crain's reporter Ally Marotti talks with host Amy Guth about the potential deal and the future of the Deerfield-based company. Plus: ComEd turning former CME trading pit into power facility, Governor Pritzker and the Hospital Association urge non-emergency treatment delays to avoid overwhelming health care systems in anticipation of post-holiday COVID-surge, Wacker Drive tower valued at $1 billion in deal and Green Thumb buys Minnesota medical cannabis retailer.

Spieltach – der Bundesligapodcast
Interview mit Samuel Burgfeld von ftbl.boots

Spieltach – der Bundesligapodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 42:36


Während sich die Bundesligisten noch auf die Rückrunde vorbereiten, starten wir das neue Jahr mit einem spannenden Interviewgast: Samuel Burgfeld, Geschäftsführer von ftbl.boots, sammelt und verkauft mit seinem Unternehmen alte, ungetragene Fußballschuhmodelle und ist damit unter anderem für das Schuhwerk von Lukas Nmecha und anderen Bundesligaprofis verantwortlich. Uns erzählt er, welche Treter am gefragtesten sind, wie schwer es ist, Fußballprofis zufrieden zu stellen und wie er an die seltenen Modelle kommt, die gar nicht mehr produziert werden. Zusammen mit ftbl.boots verlosen wir auf unserem Instagramkanal @derSpieltach ein Paar Fußballschuhe in der Größe deiner Wahl! Check it out! Shownotes: https://linktr.ee/spieltach https://ftblboots.com/ 

Hindsightless
275: On Gum Boots and Beer

Hindsightless

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 40:02


... and Chuck Norris. This fun little episode features amazing calls from Rob the Tim'rous Bushi, Colin "Spike Pit" Green, Julz "Mistress of the Saltmarshes" Burgisser, Jason "Master of Movies" Conerly, Cleric Taylor of the Mailed Fist, and Karl "the Acapella Fella" Rodriguez. This will most likely be my last episode of 2021, so I wish all of you the happiest of New Year's and may 2022 bring us all lots of good things! 

Boots & Saddle
Boots & Saddle | Episode 221: December 28, 2021 [Favourites of 2021 / Year-in-Review]

Boots & Saddle

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 120:00


BOOTS & SADDLE - December 28, 2021 - Favourites of 2021 / Year-in-Review -   1. I Want Her Just As Lonesome As Me - Junior & Tanya Rae Brown (His & Hers) 2. Dalynn Grace [instrumental] - Dale Watson (Dale Watson Presents: The Memphians) 3. Back When - Melissa Carper (Daddy's Country Gold) 4. Mighty Lonesome Man - Charley Crockett (10 for Slim: Charley Crockett Sings James Hand) 5. If You Were In My Shoes - West of Texas (Heartache, Hangovers & Honky Tonks) 6. In Dreams - Sierra Ferrell (Long Time Coming) 7. Lovers Lane [instrumental] - Wolf Willow (Old Guitars and Shooting Stars) 8. Hot Lunch Special [instrumental] - Wolf Willow (Old Guitars and Shooting Stars) 9. I Like Austin, But I Love San Antone - Garrett T. Capps (I Love San Antone) 10. Tehachapi - Margo Cilker (Pohorylle)  11. Real Cowboy - Noel McKay (Blue Blue Blue) 12. Retro Man - Jake Vaadeland (Retro Man) 13. New Tattoos - South Texas Tweek (Single) 14. Door Number Three [instrumental] - The Royal Hounds (A Whole Lot of Nothin') 15. Early Morning Funeral - Bobby Dove (Hopeless Romantic) 16. 300 Roses - Hank Topless (Single) 17. Heard It Through The Red Wine - Charlie Marie (Ramble On) 18. The Wheel Boogie [instrumental] - Asleep At The Wheel (Half A Hundred Years) 19. I Don't Know Where Your Heart's Been - Katie Jo (Pawn Shop Queen) 20. Excuse Yourself - Olivia Ellen Lloyd (Loose Cannon) 21. Must Be Nice - The Divorcees (Drop of Blood) 22. Girl In The Crowd - Jr. Gone Wild (Still Got The Jacket) 23. I Only Do It Cause I Have To - Dennis J. Leise (The World That You Grew Up In Is No More) 24. The World Just Broke My Heart - Charley Crockett (Music City USA) 25. Okie Dokie Stomp [instrumental] - Sue Foley (Pinky's Blues) 26. Love Like Yours - Hannah Juanita (Hardliner) 27. Punk Rock Retirement Plan 1 - Legendary Shack Shakers (Cockadoodledeux) 28. Keep All My Roses - Mick Mullin (Mullin It Over) 29. Heaven Didn't Seem So Far - Wolf Willow (Old Guitars and Shooting Stars) 30. I'll Never Get Over You - Theo Lawrence (Single) 31. Bullseye [instrumental] - The Shootouts [instrumental] (Bullseye) 32. Remembering Gary [instrumental] - Dale Watson (Dale Watson Presents: The Memphians) 33. I Don't Want Your Love - Shaela Miller (Big Hair Small City) 34. Coal Miner's Daughter (Recitation) - Loretta Lynn (Still Woman Enough) 35. Down By The Waterline - Hank & Ella with The Fine Country Band (Good at Being Lonely) 36. When She's Sleepin' She's Cheatin' - Scott MacKay (Stupid Cupid) 37. Ready to Fight - Croy And The Boys (Of Course They Do) 38. Serene Lee [instrumental]  - Dale Watson (Dale Watson Presents: The Memphians) 39. This Old Jukebox - Mike T. Kerr (People, Places, & Other Issues)

Federal Drive with Tom Temin
How Homeland Security plans to put boots on science and get it out the door

Federal Drive with Tom Temin

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 11:02


The Science and Technology Directorate at the Homeland Security Department has two names for a reason. It funds science, but the goal is to transfer science into deployable technology. Now the directorate has awarded grants to two universities -- one on each side of the country -- to improve how research and development activities transition to products. The project is called S-and-T Analysis and Management of Innovation Activity, or STAMINA. Federal Drive host Tom Temin spoke with Directorate's acting director for technology scouting and transition, Michel Kareis.

K92 Mornin' Thang
The Most Shady Boots Moments of 2021

K92 Mornin' Thang

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 6:49


All the times we threw shade at each other (and others) in 2021

The CoverUp
209 - These Boots are Made For Walkin' - The CoverUp

The CoverUp

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 16:18


We close out 2021 with a song that defined the sound for its genre, and gets taken to a polar opposite place. These Boots are Made for Walkin', originally by Nancy Sinatra, covered by KMFDM. Outro music is I Don't Mind The Thorns (If You're the Rose), by Lee Greenwood.

Random Soundchecks
"Die With Your Boots On" 2021-12-26 Random Soundcheck

Random Soundchecks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 9:06


Iron Maiden and a friendly message for you fuckwits.

Samantics
Samantics-Ep.228-These Boots are Made for Leggin

Samantics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 120:27


Merry Christmas, Samelliotts!  Sam and Trav reflect on the season over a few brewskies on this episode.  Sam, unfortunately, contracted Covid; but, she is doing well.  We chat about best/worst gifts of Christmases past and we also check in on your voicemail and emails - as is tradition.

No Need For Apologies The Podcast
Episode #184 - Natalie Cuomo: New Snow Boots

No Need For Apologies The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 62:22


This week the boys welcome Natalie Cuomo to the studio to discuss walking in on divorces, Natalie's mom sleeping on her dad's couch, making drug dealers cry, wearing black forces to school like snow boots, Wesley Snipes smearing the narrative, Dave giving a thotsgiving promise. apartment hunting as a side chick, yapping during sex, creating the back pussy campaign, Elon's minions, how Natalie is like a squirrel, the lure of Fosters home for imaginary friends, Natalies dad having the only AC and TV in the house, doing the Derek impression, how Natalie got away with cheating, cucking a therapist's wife, rejection video gone wrong, and the board game don't wake daddy applying you her life. I know we say this every week, but this a WILD ONE you don't wanna miss! “NNFA” is a GAS DIGITAL PRODUCTION watch in HD and FIRST @ https://gasdigitalnetwork.com/NNFAComedians Dave Temple and Derek Gaines are two Opinionated, Argumentative, Best Friends who love getting their points across; even if they're entirely wrong. Listen to these two goofballs discuss various topics ranging from Pop Culture to what's going on in their personal life and break them down in an unapologetic fashion. Follow the Squad:Dave TempleInstagram- https://www.instagram.com/imdavetemple/Website- https://www.davetemplecomedy.com/Derek GainesInstagram- https://rb.gy/3okmfe Twitter- https://rb.gy/ovoex8 (Producer)Dylan NegriInstagram- https://rb.gy/cxqtac Twitter- https://rb.gy/rg4jj9 Don't forget to subscribe to our channel and to GaS Digital. The newest 15 episodes are always free, but if you want access to all the archives, watch live, chat live, access to the forums, and get the show five (5!) days before it comes out everywhere else—you can subscribe now at https://gasdigitalnetwork.com and use the code NNFA to save 15% on the entire network.#noneedforapologies #NNFA #derekgaines #davetempleDave Temple and Derek Gaines Are both Rising comedy stars who call NEW YORK home. You may have seen Derek on THE LAST OG or MTV”S “BROKE ASS GAME SHOW” or as Theodore in WILL & GRACE. The pair have both respectively been featured on COMEDY CENTRAL, TBS, NETFLIX, CBS, FOX, MTV, LAST COMIC STANDING and THE TONIGHT SHOW WITH JIMMY FALLON. Also Catch Derek Gaines in the New PETE DAVIDSON movie “THE KING OF STATEN ISLAND” Out Now!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Friends with Friends
S8 Ep.10 The One with Monica's Boots

Friends with Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 12:16


In this recap episode, Monica buys expensive boots but they end up being uncomfortable. Phoebe wants to get free tickets to Stings concert and uses Ben and Ross to get them. Joey's little sister visits and has big news to share.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Coast Mornings Podcasts with Blake and Eva
12 - 22 - 21 SPIDERS IN BOOTS AND HANDS IN THE TOILET

Coast Mornings Podcasts with Blake and Eva

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 5:44


12 - 22 - 21 SPIDERS IN BOOTS AND HANDS IN THE TOILET by Maine's Coast 93.1

Boots In The Field Report
Episode 259: Boots In The Field Report December 17, 2021

Boots In The Field Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 8:21


In this week's Boots In The Field Report Ken covers some of the swings seen in the Hybrid Plot hand shelling day and warns about some of the hurdles growers new to applying fall anhydrous need to be aware of. Fall gas does NOT do well in paying the carbon penalty and Ken walks through options to help get over that hurdle.

Coast Mornings Podcasts with Blake and Eva
12 - 22 - 21 SPIDERS IN BOOTS AND HANDS IN THE TOILET

Coast Mornings Podcasts with Blake and Eva

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 5:44


12 - 22 - 21 SPIDERS IN BOOTS AND HANDS IN THE TOILET by Maine's Coast 93.1

Rod in Flagon
Episode 30: Colleges & Traditions

Rod in Flagon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 53:28


Highlights:- Question-palooza!- How to write an entry essay to your Bard College- Your party member may be a serial killer- Monastic traditions leave a lot of unanswered questions- Feather Fall etiquette- Where-wolves?- Revisiting sky daddies

1517 Blogcast
Christmas in Isaiah: Dog Soldiers, Army Boots, and Baby Jesus

1517 Blogcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 10:19


Gideon's “foolish” weaponry of clay jars and shofars will give way to the Messiah's “foolish” ways of doing things, for his weapons will be humility, fidelity, and, above all, the word of his Father.

Everyday Mulemanship
142. Life Is Good In December Here In Utah!

Everyday Mulemanship

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 74:49


Ty talks about a recent Private Clinic he had in Utah and answers a bunch of great questions. 1. Brushing A Mule That Doesn't Want To Be Brushed. 2. Leading Troubles. 3. Bit Recommendations. 4. Boots on Mules. 5. The Process of Ground-tying. 6. Scared of Cows and Trucks.

The Jordy Culotta Show
Will Wade Boots All The Way Up On A Monday, Brian Kelly Has The Iron Throne For LSU Football, But At What Cost in Recruiting, & The Saints Defense Anaconda Squeezed Tom Brady Into Oblivion.

The Jordy Culotta Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 121:58


Boot Boy Ska Show
Episode 1615: Boots N Braces With DJ Moldie On www.bootboyradio.net

Boot Boy Ska Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 117:13


Boots N Braces With DJ Moldie On www.bootboyradio.net Please Like Comment Follow Download & Share

The CyberWire
Log4j updates, with a side of Fancy Bear. Roots of Huawei's career as a security risk. Tropic Trooper is back. Meta boots “cyber mercenaries.” Other cyberespionage incidents.

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 25:26


It seems that Fancy Bear may be interested in Log4shell after all. CISA issues Emergency Directive 22-02, which addressed Log4j. Huawei's reputation as a security risk may be traceable to a 2012 incident in an Australian telco's networks. Tropic Trooper is back, and interested in transportation. Meta kicks out seven “cyber mercenary” surveillance outfits. PseudoManusrypt looks curiously indiscriminate. Johannes Ullrich from SANS Technology Institute on making the great Chinese firewall work for you. Our guest is Terry Halvorsen from IBM on next-gen cybersecurity efforts to fix the cybersecurity inequity. And the US Commission on International Religious Freedom is reportedly hacked. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/241

The Word's Worth
Of Parasites, Felt Boots, and Garbage Words

The Word's Worth

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 9:38


There is a newish filler word going around that driving the older generation crazy.

Men in the Arena Podcast
Porn: Overcoming Sexual Temptation w/ Sathiya Sam EP 504

Men in the Arena Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 63:09


Sathiya Sam helps men overcome sexual temptations with his 5 principles. Sathiya Sam is a coach and speaker that helps men live with confidence and integrity. A recovered addict himself, Sathiya is the creator of DeepClean™ – a research-based and Bible-backed system for overcoming porn addiction. DeepClean™ has helped everyone from college students to medical doctors regain control of their lives and walk in greater levels of freedom. He is married to his lovely wife Shaloma and based out of Toronto, Canada. Website - www.sathiyasam.com  Free Recovery Guide - www.ultimaterecoveryguide.com  The Last Relapse (Book) - www.sathiyasam.com/books  Unleash The Man Within Podcast - www.sathiyasam.com/podcast  Facebook - www.facebook.com/sathiyamesam  Instagram - www.instagram.com/sathiyamesam  Boots on the Ground Get Covenant Eyes on all your devices. Get Your Copy Now! of Tell Them, What Great Fathers Tell Their Sons and Daughters www.meninthearena.org Men in the Arena Books and Swag Support the Podcast

Of Record | A Guide to Digital Marketing
An Ol' Western Hallmark Movie Straight to the Hub | Weekly Digital Marketing Update 12/16

Of Record | A Guide to Digital Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 50:42


Digital Ad Market Update 12/11 - 12/16Joe brings in Helen and Producer Kiersten to review the latest marketing, tech, and culture news, all in 51 minutes or less.Top Stories:P*rnHub yearly search stats are coming in hot and we're going over a bunch. (Skip to 12:00 for the next topic)Western clothing is having a revival this past year and we have some ideas why. Hallmark movies follow a specific pattern and abide by a couple of rules. We're going over them and then making a rough sketch of our own. If you are Hallmark, reach out and we'll write your next script.Articles Mentioned:P*rnHub Stats: https://bit.ly/32a8LRHWestern Wear Trend: https://bit.ly/3q58yYiHallmark Plot Structure: https://bit.ly/3q59LyU

Boot Boy Ska Show
Episode 1601: Boots N Braces With DJ Moldie On www.bootboyradio.net

Boot Boy Ska Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 118:58


Boots N Braces With DJ Moldie On www.bootboyradio.net Please Like Comment Follow Download & Share

The Living Word With Chuck Davis
Matthew 2:13-18 – Herod Shakes in his Boots

The Living Word With Chuck Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 5:36


Matthew 2:13-18 – Herod Shakes in his Boots

You Might Know Her From
Constance Marie

You Might Know Her From

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 60:24


We are just filled with love on this one. Today Constance Marie joins us on the mic. You Might Know Her From Selena, George Lopez, Undone, My Family/Mi Familia, American Family, Switched at Birth, Law & Order True Crime: The Menendez Murders, Puss in Boots, and the new Amazon series With Love. We just had a ball with Constance talking about her charming new series With Love, which features a predominantly Latinx cast and queer storylines. Plus we get into her beginnings as a break dancer on tour with David Bowie (and in films like Breakin' 2), and donning the now iconic wig to play Marcella Quintanilla in the Selena biopic...despite being Jennifer Lopez's peer. We also got to talk about being part of landmark projects for Latinx folks, learning American Sign Language for her role in Switched at Birth, and being animated in Undone. This one was a total delight. Be careful spinning on your heads on cardboard, babes!  Follow us on social media @damianbellino || @rodemanne  Discussed this week:  The Gossip Girl reboot is deranged (Todd Almond is maybe playing Jordan Roth?) Broadwayworld Message boards: Mandy Patikin and Toni Colette in The Wild Party Michael Schulman's profile of Jeremy Strong in the New Yorker  Jessica Chastain tweeting on behalf of Aaron Sorkin (eyeroll) / Anne Hathaway on Instagram We WILL defend Faye Dunaway til the day we die (change the best picture winner) New Amazon series, With Love created by Gloria Calderón Kellett Danced with David Bowie and Peter Frampton in Glass Spider Tour (choreographed by Toni Basil) Dance nickname was “Speedy”  Danced in music videos for Cher, Prince, Belinda Carlisle HOLY SHIT Constance in the Toni Basil skis while Bowie sings  La La La Human Steps: Canadian dance troupe  Played Marcella Quintanilla Selena's mom in the biopic Selena (1997) Constance in the wig and glasses as Marcella “Washing Machine” scene in Selena  Gregory Nava directed My Family/Mi Familia (1995), Selena (1996), American Family (2002) 6 seasons as Angie on the ABC sitcom George Lopez 5 seasons as Regina on  Switched at Birth, a show that required she learn ASL (had to stop at a certain point because she had permanent nerve damage) New Amazon series, Undone uses rotoscope animation (as seen in Scanner Darkly) Back to the Beach with Frankie and Annette / Breakin 2 Electric Boogaloo Went out with Michael J. Fox in Spin City and he said YES wear your heels Voiced a human in Puss & Boots You played a cop and a bartender on the soap Santa Barbera Punk'd (he remained calm unlike Frankie Muniz or Hilary Duff) You played paternal aunt to the Menendez brothers in the NBC anthology, Law & Order: True Crime. Lyle was the hot one. Raquel Welch played Constance's mom in the 2001 dramedy, Tortilla Soup. Jenny Gago played her mom in My Family/Mi Familia Union Square which suffered from “The Single Guy curse”  Her real name is Constance Marie Lopez but she dropped the Lopez because it's been “hogged up”

Dave & Mahoney
Missed Connection Inspection: Men In Shorty Shorts and Boots

Dave & Mahoney

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 6:18


Helping people find love on the internet Socials: @DaveandMahoney Voice Mail: 833-Yo-Dummy https://www.twitch.tv/daveandmahoney Additional Content: daveandmahoney.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Women in the Arena
Wine glasses and work boots with Sierra Zeiter

Women in the Arena

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 30:02


Sierra Zeiter has always wanted to be a winemaker.  She appreciated the science of winemaking, but more importantly, she enjoyed the experience of enjoying wine with friends and family.  For her, it means that time slows down and is savored.  Today we talk about the process of winemaking and that it's less glamorous than it seems.  During the harvest season, you can find Sierra cleaning out barrels, hauling 50 lb bags  of cleaning solution and pulling hoses.  It's hard work, long hours and very physically demanding.  She wouldn't have it any other way.  https://www.oakfarmvineyards.com/

Blood Red: The Liverpool FC Podcast
The European Show: Nabil Fekir: Filling Messi's La Liga boots & the Liverpool Signing that got away?

Blood Red: The Liverpool FC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 29:00


Hello and welcome to a brand new podcast on the Blood Red Channel - The European Show! We will be taking you around the continent on this new series, with Europe's title races beginning to hot up there's plenty of action to talk about.Each week we will connect Europe's hot talking points to Liverpool, and joining Mo Stewart this week for the pilot pod is Squawka's Muhammad Butt.We begin with La Liga, where Real Madrid are storming towards another La Liga crown through the firepower of Karim Benzema and Vinicius Jr.The pair discuss all of the 5 La Liga title contenders (sorry Real Sociedad!) as following Barcelona's recent demise, it has swung the competition wide open.But one of the stars of the La Liga season is 'The Liverpool signing that got away' - Nabil Fekir. The Frenchman has been in scintillating form, and Real Betis are described as the best team to watch in the league this season. Can Nabil fill Messi's La Liga boots?Find out this and much more, on the Blood Red European Show podcast.Get exclusive podcasts and video content direct to your inbox every week for FREE by joining the Blood Red Club. Sign up at http://www.bloodredpodcast.co.ukListen to our Blood Red podcasts: https://podfollow.com/1109064476/viewJoin our Blood Red podcast group on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1656599847979758/Visit the Liverpool ECHO website: https://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/all-about/liverpool-fcDownload our Liverpool FC app for free:Apple - https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/lfc-echo/id1255495425Android - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.mirror.liverpoolfcFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LivEchoLFCFollow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LiverpoolEchoLFC/Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bloodred_lfc/Follow us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@bloodred_lfcSubscribe to us on Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/bloodredliverpoolfc

Inside Indiana Sports Breakfast with Kent Sterling
Indianapolis Colts - Patriots matchup strength vs strength! Pacers lose winnable game! MIC boots Carmel & Center Grove!

Inside Indiana Sports Breakfast with Kent Sterling

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 15:32


Colts running game against the Patriots defense is a fascinating matchup that will determine Saturday's winner! Pacers blew late lead to lose to Warriors as Myles Turner struggle after complaining about use. The MIC gave Carmel and Center Grove the boot yesterday, although both schools were leaving the conference anyway, it seems. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-kent-sterling-show/support

THE GRAIL with Dean Delray
#55 : Nick Horween / VP - Owner of Horween Leather Company

THE GRAIL with Dean Delray

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 60:11


 Since 1905 the best leather in the world has come out of Chicago handmade at the Horween Leather Company. Most of my Boots,Belts, Jackets and Wallets are made of Horween Leather. These guys supply leather for some of the greatest handmade products in the world including Schott Leather Jackets, Wesco Boots, Vibram and so much more. Since the 1940's Horween has also supplied the leather to Wilson to make all the footballs for the NFL. This company has been Family owned for 5 generations and they still do everything the same way since they did the day they opened. Horween is the Holy Grail of Leather. Enjoy this and visit there Instagram at www.instagram.com/horweenleather/

Men in the Arena Podcast
How to Keep Christ in Christmas: Practical Ideas for Leading Your Family's Celebration w/ Jim Ramos EP 502

Men in the Arena Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 19:54


Jim gives you some practical things you can do this Christmas to keep Christ in Christmas. You can also find some great ideas from past Christmas episodes. Check out Episodes 304, 306, and 405. The Bethlehem Star on Youtube. Boots on the Ground:  What do you do to bring your family closer to Jesus on Christmas?  Get Your Copy Now! of Tell Them, What Great Fathers Tell Their Sons and Daughters www.meninthearena.org Men in the Arena Books and Swag Support the Podcast

Fantasy Football Delivery Men
Week 14 Fantasy Football Preview (These Italian Boots Are Made For Walking Episode)

Fantasy Football Delivery Men

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 76:21


Story time - KDYKFFA - HEATING UP! - Starts of the Week for Week 14 - Week 14 preview --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Completely Unnecessary Podcast
#CUPodcast 293 - Game Awards Controversy, Wata Breaking the Law, AtariAge Boots Intellivision Amico

Completely Unnecessary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 98:49


Controversy with the upcoming Game Awards, AtariAge boots Intellivision Amico discussion, examining if Wata broke the law, and much more! Check out our sponsors: Nord VPN - Save 73% on internet privacy & protection using code CUPOD Manscaped - Save 20% and free shipping with code CUPodcast Magic Spoon - Save $5 on yummy, healthy cereal! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thecupodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thecupodcast/support

The Alan Cox Show
Infamous/ Senses Fail/ Toilet Booty/ Pyromania/ Hot Tub Hygiene Machine/ Hot Slot/ Therapist Off/ CLE-vil Deeds/ Put-In-Boots

The Alan Cox Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 169:59