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Greater Than Code
267: Handling Consulting Businesses and Client Loads

Greater Than Code

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 62:06


00:36 - Panelist Consulting Experience and Backgrounds * Debugging Your Brain by Casey Watts (https://www.debuggingyourbrain.com/) * Happy and Effective (https://www.happyandeffective.com/) 10:00 - Marketing, Charging, and Setting Prices * Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/) * Chelsea's Blog (https://chelseatroy.com/) * Self-Worth by Salary 28:34 - GeePawHill Twitter Thread (https://twitter.com/GeePawHill/status/1478950180904972293) - Impact Consulting * Casey's Spreadsheet - “Matrix-Based Prioritization For Choosing a Job” (https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1qVrWOKPe3ElXJhOBS8egGIyGqpm6Fk9kjrFWvB92Fpk/edit#gid=1724142346) * Interdependence (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/interdependence) 38:43 - Management & Mentorship * Detangling the Manager: Supervisor, Team Lead, Mentor (https://dev.to/endangeredmassa/detangling-the-manager-supervisor-team-lead-mentor-gha) * Adrienne Maree Brown (https://adriennemareebrown.net/) 52:15 - Explaining Value and Offerings * The Pumpkin Plan: A Simple Strategy to Grow a Remarkable Business in Any Field by Mike Michalowicz (https://www.amazon.com/Pumpkin-Plan-Strategy-Remarkable-Business/dp/1591844886) * User Research * SPIN Selling: Situation Problem Implication Need-payoff by Neil Rackham (https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/833015.SPIN_Selling) 55:08 - Ideal Clients Reflections: Mae: The phrase “indie”. Casey: Having a Patreon to help inspire yourself. Chelsea: Tallying up all of the different things that a given position contributes to in terms of a person's needs. This episode was brought to you by @therubyrep (https://twitter.com/therubyrep) of DevReps, LLC (http://www.devreps.com/). To pledge your support and to join our awesome Slack community, visit patreon.com/greaterthancode (https://www.patreon.com/greaterthancode) To make a one-time donation so that we can continue to bring you more content and transcripts like this, please do so at paypal.me/devreps (https://www.paypal.me/devreps). You will also get an invitation to our Slack community this way as well. Transcript: CHELSEA: Welcome to Greater Than Code, Episode 267. I'm Chelsea Troy, and I'm here with my co-host, Mae. MAE: And also with us is Casey. CASEY: Hi, I'm Casey. And today's episode, we are our own guests. We're going to be talking to you about our experiences in consulting. To get this one started, how about we share what got us into consulting and what we like, don't like about it, just high-level? Chelsea, would you mind going first? CHELSEA: Sure. So I started in consulting, really in a full-time job. So for early in my programming career, I worked for several years for a company called Pivotal Labs and Pivotal Labs is chiefly, or was chiefly at the time, a software engineering consulting organization. My job was to pair program with folks from client teams, various types of clients, a lot of health insurance companies. At the time, there was a restaurant loyalty app that we did some work for. We did some work for General Motors, various clients, a major airline was also a client, and I would switch projects every three to six months. During that time employed by Labs, I would work for this client, pair programming with other pivots, and also with client developers. So that was my introduction to consulting and I think that it made the transition to consulting later, a little bit easier because I already had some consulting experience from under the Labs' umbrella. After I worked for Labs, I moved on to working at a product company for about 2 years and my experience at that product company burned me out on full-time programming for a little while. So in my last couple of months at that job, I realized that I was either going to have to take some time off, or I was going to have to find an arrangement that worked better for me for work, at least for the next little while. And for that next little while, what I decided I wanted to try to do was work part-time because I was uncomfortable with the idea of taking time off from programming completely. I felt that I was too early in my career and the skill loss would be too great if I took time off completely, but I knew I needed some space and so, I quit my full-time job. After I quit the full time—I probably should have done this before I quit the job, but I didn't—I called an organization that I had previously done some volunteer work with, with whom I discussed a job a couple of years prior, but for a couple of different reasons, it didn't work out. I said to them, “I know that you're a grant-funded organization and you rarely have the funding and capacity to bring somebody on, but just so you're aware, I like working with you. I love your product. I love the stuff that you work on. All our time working together, I've really enjoyed. So if you have an opening, I'm going to have some time available.” The director there emailed me that same day and said, “Our mobile developer put in his two weeks' notice this morning. So if you have time this afternoon, I'd really like to talk to you,” [chuckles] and that was my first client and they were a part-time client. I still work with them. I love working with them. I would consider them kind of my flagship client. But then from there, I started to kind of pick up more clients and it took off from there after that summer. I spent that summer generally working 3 days a week for that client and then spending 4 days a week lying face down in a park in the sun. That helped me recover a little bit from burnout. And then after that, I consulted full-time for about 2 years and I still consult on the side of a full-time job. So that's my story. Is anyone feeling a penchant for going next? MAE: I can go. I've been trying to think how am I going to say this succinctly. I've had at least two jobs and several club, or organization memberships, or founding, or positions since I was 16. So wherever I go, I've always been saying, “Well, I've done it these 47 ways already [laughs] even since I was a teenager.” So I've sort of always had a consulting orientation to take a broader view and figure out ways in which we can systematize whatever it is that's happening around me. Specifically for programming, I had been an administrator, like an executive leader, for many years. I just got tired of trying to explain what we as administrators needed and I just wanted to be able to build the things. I was already a really big Microsoft access person and anybody who just got a little [laughs] snarky in there knows I love Microsoft Access. It really allowed me to be able to offer all kinds of things to, for example, I was on the board of directors of my Kiwanis Club and I made a member directory and attendance tracker and all these things. Anyway, when I quit my executive job and went to code school in 2014, I did it because I knew that I could build something a lot better than this crazy Access database [laughs] that I had, this very involved ETL things going on in. I had a nonprofit that I had been involved with for 15 years at that point and I had also taken a database class where I modeled this large database that I was envisioning. So I had a bunch of things in order. I quit my full-time job and went to an income of $6,500 my first year and I hung with that flagship customer for a while and tailored my software. So I sort of have this straddling of a SaaS situation and a consulting situation. I embed into whoever I'm working with and help them in many ways. Often, people need lots of different levels of coaching, training, and skills development mixed with just a place to put things that makes sense to them. I think that's the brief version [laughs] that I can come up with and that is how I got where I am and I've gone in and out of also having a full-time job. Before I quit that I referenced the first year I worked a full-time job plus at least 40 to a 100 hours on my software to get it ready for prime time. So a lot of, a lot of work. CASEY: Good story. I don't think I ever heard these fuller stories from either of you, even though I know roughly the shape of your past. It's so cool to hear it. Thanks for sharing them. All right, I'll share about me now. So I've been a developer, a PM, and I've done a lot of design work. I've done all the roles over my time in tech. I started doing programming 10, 15 years ago, and I'm always getting burnt out everywhere I go because I care so much and we get asked to do things that seem dumb. I'm sure anyone listening can relate to this in some organization and when I say dumb, I don't use that word myself directly. I'm quoting a lot of people who would use that word, but I say either we're being asked to do things that don't make sense, aren't good ideas, or there are things that are we're being asked to do that would make sense if we knew why and it's not being communicated really well. It's poor communication. Either one, the other, or both. So after a lot of jobs, I end up taking a 3-month sabbatical and I'm like, “Whatever, I got to go. I can't deal with caring so much anymore, and I'm not willing to care less either.” So most recently, I took a sabbatical and I finished my book, Debugging Your Brain, which takes together psychology ideas, like cognitive behavioral therapy and programming ideas and that, I'm so proud of. If you haven't read it yet, please check it out. Then I went back to my job and I gave them another month where I was like, “All right, look, these are things need to change for me to be happy to work here.” Nothing changed, then I left. Maybe it's changing very slowly, but too slowly for me to be happy there, or most of these past companies. [laughs] After I left, this last sabbatical, I spent three to six months working on a board game version of my book. That's a lot of fun. And then I decided I needed more income, I needed to pay the bills, and I can totally be a tech consultant if I just deal with learning marketing and sales. That's been my… probably six months now, I've been working on the marketing in sales part, thinking a lot about it. I have a lot of support from a lot of friends. Now I consult on ways to make teams happier and more effective and that's my company name, Happy and Effective. I found it really easy to sell workshops, like diversity, equity, and inclusion workshops to HR departments. They're pretty hungry for those kinds of workshops and it's hard to find good, effective facilitators. It's a little bit harder to get companies to pay for coaching for their employees, even though a new EM would love coaching and how to be a good leader. Companies don't always have the budget for that set aside and I wish they would. I'm working with a lot of companies. I have a couple, but not as many as I'd like. And then the hardest, my favorite kind of client is when I get to embed with the team and really work on seeing what's going on me on the ground with them, and help understand what's going on to tell the executives what's happening and what needs to change and really make a big change. I've done that once, or twice and I'd love to do that more, but it's the hardest. So I'm thinking about easy, medium, hard difficulty of selling things to clients. I would actually make plenty of money is doing workshops, honestly, but I want the impact of embedding. That's my bigger goal is the impact. MAE: Yeah. I basically have used my software as a Trojan horse for [laughs] offering the consulting and change management services to help them get there because that is something that people already expect to spend some money on. That, though has been a little problematic because a few years in, they start to think that the line item in the budget is only for software and then it looks very expensive to them. Whereas, if they were looking at it as a consultant gig, it's incredibly inexpensive to them. CASEY: Yeah. It's maybe so inexpensive that it must not be a quality product that they're buying. MAE: Yes. CASEY: Put it that way implicitly. MAE: Definitely, there's also that. CASEY: When setting prices, this is a good general rule of thumb. It could be too low it looks like it'll be junk, like a dollar store purchase, or it can be too high and they just can't afford it, and then there's the middle sweet spot where it seems very valuable. They barely can afford it, but they know it'll be worth it, and that's a really good range to be in. MAE: Yeah. Honestly, for the work that I do, it's more of a passion project. I would do it totally for free, but that doesn't work for this reason you're talking about. CASEY: Yeah. MAE: Like, it needs to hurt a little bit because it's definitely going to be lots and lots of my time and it's going to be some of their time and it needs to be an investment that not hurt bad [laughs] but just be noticeable as opposed to here's a Kenny's Candy, or something. CASEY: I found that works on another scale, on another level. I do career coaching for friends, and friends of friends, and I'm willing to career coach my friends anyway. I've always been. For 10 years, I've reviewed hundreds, thousands of resumes. I've done so many interviews. I'm down to be a career coach, but no one was taking me up on it until I started charging and now friends are coming to me to pay me money to coach them. I think on their side, it feels more equitable. They're more willing to do it now that I'm willing to take money in exchange for it. I felt really bad charging friends until I had the sliding skill. So people who make less, I charge less for, for this personal service. It's kind of weird having a personal service like that, but it works out really well. I'm so happy for so many friends that have gotten jobs they're happy with now from the support. So even charging friends, like charging them nothing means they're not going to sign up for it. MAE: Yes, and often, there is a bias of like, “Oh, well, that's my friend.” [laughs] so they must not be a BFD.” CASEY: Yeah. But we are all BFDs. MAE: Exactly! How about you Chelsea? How did you start to get to the do the pricing thing? CHELSEA: Yeah, I think it's interesting to hear y'all's approaches to the marketing and the pricing because mine has been pretty different from that. But before I get off on that, one thing I do want to mention around getting started with offering personal services at price is that if it seems too large a step to offer a personal service to one person for an amount of money, one thing that I have witnessed folks have success with in starting out in this vein is to set up a Patreon and then have office hours for patrons wherein they spend 2 hours on a Sunday afternoon, or something like that and anyone who is a patron is welcome to join. What often ends up happening for folks in that situation is that people who are friends of theirs support their Patreon and then the friends can show up. So effectively, folks are paying a monthly fee for access to this office hours, which they might attend, or they might not attend. But there are two nice things about it. The first thing about it is that you're not – from a psychological perspective, it doesn't feel like charging your friends for your time with them. It feels more indirect than that in a way that can be helpful for folks who are very new to charging for things and uncomfortable with the idea. The second thing is that the friends are often much more willing to pay than somebody who's new to charging is willing to charge. So the friends are putting this money into this Patreon, usually not because they're trying to get access to your office hours, but because they want to support you and one of the nice things about Patreon is that it is a monthly amount. So having a monthly email from Patreon that's like, “Hey, you we're sending you—” it doesn't even have to be a lot. “We're sending you 40 bucks this month.” It is a helpful conditioning exercise for folks who are not used to charging because they are getting this regular monthly income and the amount is not as important as receiving the regular income, which is helpful psychological preparation for charging for things on your own, I think. That's not the way that I did it, but I have seen people be effective that way. So there's that. For me, marketing was something that I was very worried about having to do when I started my business. In fact, it was one of those things where my conviction, when I started my consulting business, was I do not want to have to sell my services. I will coast on what clients I can find and when it is no longer easy, I will just get a full-time job because selling traditionally conceptualized is not something that I enjoyed. I had a head start on the marketing element of things, that is sort of the brand awareness element of things, my reputation and the reason for that is that first of all, I had consulted at Labs for several years, which meant that every client team that I had ever worked with there, the director remembered me, the product owner remember me. So a lot of people who had been clients of Labs – I didn't actually get anybody to be a client of mine who was a client of Labs, but the individuals I had worked with on those projects who had then changed jobs to go to different companies, reached out to me on some occasions. So that was one place that I got clients from. The other place that I gotten clients from has been my blog. Before I started my business, I had already been writing a tech blog for like 4, or 5 years and my goal with the tech blog has never actually been to get clientele, or make money. My goals for the blog when I started it were to write down what I was learning so that I would remember it and then after that, it was to figure out how to communicate my ideas so that I would have an easier time communicating them in the workplace. After that, it became an external validation source so that I would no longer depend on my individual manager's opinion of me to decide how good I was at programming. Only very recently has it changed to something like, okay, now I'm good enough at communicating and good enough at tech that I actually have something to teach anybody else. So honestly, for many years, I would see the viewership on my blog and I would be like, “Who are all these people? Why are they in my house?” Like, this is weird, but I would get some credibility from that. CASEY: They don't expect any tea from me. CHELSEA: Yeah. I really hope. I don't have enough to go around, [laughs] but it did help and that's where a lot of folks have kind of come from. Such that when I posted on my blog a post about how I'm going to be going indie. I've quit my job. I didn't really expect that to go anywhere, but a few people did reach out from that and I've been lucky insofar is that that has helped me sustain a client load in a way that I didn't really expect to. There's also, I would be remiss not to mention that what I do is I sling code for money for the majority of my consulting business, at least historically and especially in the beginning was exclusively that, and there's enough of a demand to have somebody come in and write code that that helped. It also helped that as I was taking on clients, I started to niche down specifically what I wanted to work on to a specific type of client and to a specific type problem. So I quickly got to the point where I had enough of a client load that I was going to have to make a choice about which clients to accept, or I was going to have to work over time. Now, the conventional wisdom in this circumstance is to raise your rates. Vast majority of business development resources will tell you that that's what you're supposed to do in this situation. But part of my goal in creating my consulting business had been to get out of burnout and part of the reason for the burnout was that I did not feel that the work that I was doing was contributing to a cause that made me feel good about what I was doing. It wasn't morally reprehensible, but I just didn't feel like I was contributing to a better future in the way that my self-identity sort of mandated that I did. It was making me irritable and all these kinds of things. MAE: I had the same thing, yeah. CHELSEA: Yeah. So it's interesting to hear that that's a common experience, but if I were to raise my rates, the companies that were still going to be able to afford me were going to be companies whose products were not morally reprehensible, but not things that coincided with what I was trying to get out of my consulting business. So what I did instead was I said, “I'm specifically looking to work with organizations that are contributing to basic scientific research, improving access for underserved communities, and combating the effects of climate change,” and kept my rates effectively the same, but niche down the clientele to that. That ended up being kind of how I did it. I find that rates vary from client to client in part, because of what you were talking about, Casey, wherein you have to hit the right price in order to even get clients board in certain circumstances. CASEY: Right. CHELSEA: I don't know a good way to guess it. My technique for this, which I don't know if this is kosher to say, but my technique for this has been whoever reached out to me, interested in bringing me on as a consultant for that organization, I ask that person to do some research and figure out what rate I'm supposed to pitch. That has helped a lot because a lot of times my expectations have been wildly off in those circumstances. One time I had somebody say to me, this was for a custom workshop they wanted. I was like, “What should I charge?” And they were like, “I don't know, a few thousand.” I was like, “Is that $1,200? Is that $9,000? I don't know how much money that is,” and so they went back and then they came back and they were able to tell me more specifically a band. There was absolutely no way I would've hit that number accurately without that information. CASEY: Yeah, and different clients have different numbers. You setting your price standard flat across all customers is not a good strategy either. That's why prices aren't on websites so often. CHELSEA: Yeah. I find that it does depend a lot. There's similarly, like I said, a lot of my clients are clients who are contributing to basic scientific research are very often grant funded and grants funding is a very particular kind of funding. It can be intermittent. There has to be a skillset on the team for getting the grant funding. A lot of times, to be frank, it doesn't support the kinds of rates that somebody could charge hourly in a for-profit institution. So for me, it was worth it to make the choice that this is who I want to work with. I know that my rate is effectively capped at this, if I'm going to do that and that was fine by me. Although, I'm lying to say it was completely fine by me. I had to take a long, hard look in the mirror, while I was still in that last full-time job, and realize that I had become a person who gauged her self-worth by the salary that she commanded more than I was comfortable with. More than I wanted to. I had to figure out how to weaken that dependency before I was really able to go off and do my own thing. That was my experience with it. I'm curious whether y'all, well, in particular, Casey, did you find the same thing? CASEY: The self-worth by salary? CHELSEA: Yeah. CASEY: I felt that over time, yeah. Like I went from private sector big tech to government and I got a pay cut and I was like, “Ugh.” It kind of hurt a little and it wasn't even as much as I was promised. Once I got through the hiring process, it was lower than that and now I'm making way less. When I do my favorite impact thing, the board game, like if I made a board game about mental health for middle schoolers, which is something I really want to do, that makes less than anything else I could with my time. I'll be lucky to make money on that at all. So it's actually inverse. My salary is inversely proportional to how much impact I can have if I'm working anyway. So my dream is to have enough corporate clients that I can do half-time, or game impact, whatever other impact things I'm thinking about doing. I think of my impact a lot. Impact is my biggest goal, but the thing is salary hurts. If I don't have the salary and I want to live where I'm living and the lifestyle I have, I don't want to cut back on that and I don't need to, hopefully. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: I'm hoping eventually, I'll have a steady stream of clients, I don't need to do the marketing and sales outreach as much and all those hours I kind of recoup. I can invest those in the impact things. I've heard people can do that. I think I'll get there. CHELSEA: No, I think you absolutely will. Mae, I'm curious as to your experience, because I know that you have a lot of experience with a similar calculation of determining which things are going to provide more income, which things are probably going to provide less income, and then balancing across a bunch of factors like money, but also impact, time spent, emotional drain, and all that stuff. MAE: Well, Chelsea. [laughter] I am a real merry go round in this arena. So before I became a programmer, I had a state job, I was well paid, and I was pretty set. Then I was a programmer and I took huge pay cut because I quit. I became a programmer when I was 37 years old. So I already had a whole career and to start at the beginning and be parallel with 20-year-old so it's not just like my salary, but also my level and my level of impact on my – and level of the amount of people who wanted to ask me for my advice [laughs] was significantly different. So like the ego's joking stopped and so when you mentioned the thing about identity. Doing any kind of consulting in your own deal is a major identity reorganization and having the money, the title, the clout, and the engagement. Like a couple years, I have spent largely alone and that is very different than working at a place where I have colleagues, or when I live somewhere and have roommates. But I have found signing up for lots and lots of different social justice and passion project things, and supporting nonprofits that I believe in. So from my perspective, I'm really offering a capacity building grant out of my own pocket, my own time, and my own heart and that has been deeply rewarding and maybe not feel much about my identity around salary. Except it does make me question myself as an adult. Like these aren't the best financial decisions to be making, [chuckles] but I get enough out of having made them that it's worth it to me. One of the things probably you were thinking of, Chelsea, we worked together a little bit on this mutual aid project that I took on when the pandemic started and I didn't get paid any dollars for that and I was working 18 hours a day on it, [chuckles] or something. So I like to really jump in a wholeheartedly and then once I really, really do need some dollars, then I figure something else out. That is kind of how I've ebbed and flowed with it. But mostly, I've done it by reducing my personal overhead so that I'm not wigged about the money and lowering whatever my quality-of-life spending goals [chuckles] are. But that also has had to happen because I have not wanted to and I couldn't get myself to get excited about marketing of myself and my whole deal. Like I legit still don't have a website and I've been in operation now since 2014 so that's a while. I meet people and I can demonstrate what it is and I get clients and for me, having only a few clients, there's dozens of people that work for each one. So it's more of an organization client than a bunch of individuals and I can't actually handle a ton. I was in a YCombinator thing that wanted me to really be reporting on income, growth rates, and all of these number of new acquisition things, and it just wasn't for me. Those are not my goals. I want to make sure that this nonprofit can help more people this year and that they can get more grant money because they know how many people they helped and that those people are more efficient at their job every day. So those are harder to measure. It's not quite an answer to your question, [laughs] but I took it and ran a little. CHELSEA: No, I appreciate that. There is a software engineer and a teacher that I follow on Twitter. His name is GeePawHill. Are y'all familiar with GeePawHill? MAE: No. CHELSEA: And he did a thread a couple of days ago that this conversation reminds me of and I found it. Is that all right if I read like a piece of it and paraphrase part of it? MAE: Yes, please. CHELSEA: Okay. So this is what he says. He says, “The weirdest thing about being a teacher for young geek minds: I am teaching them things…that their actual first jobs will most likely forbid them to do. The young'uns I work with are actually nearly all hire-able as is, after 18 months of instruction, without any intervention from me. The problem they're going to face when they get to The Show isn't technical, or intellectual at all. No language, or framework, or OS, or library, or algorithm is going to daunt them, not for long. No, the problem they're going to face is how to sustain their connection to the well of geek joy, in a trade that is systematically bent on simultaneously exploiting that connection while denying it exists and refusing any and all access to it. It is possible, to stick it out, to acquire enough space and power, to re-assert one's path to the well. Many have done it; many are doing it today. But it is very hard. Very hard. Far harder than learning the Visitor pattern, or docker, or, dart, or SQL, or even Haskell. How do you tell people you've watched “become” as they bathed in the cool clear water that, for some long time, 5 years or more, they must…navigate the horrors of extractive capitalist software development? The best answer I have, so far, is to try and teach them how and where to find water outside of work. It is a lousy answer. I feel horrible giving it. But I'd feel even more horrible if I didn't tell them the truth.” CASEY: I just saw this thread and I really liked it, too. I'm glad you found it. MAE: Oh, yeah. I find it honestly pretty inspiring, like people generally who get involved in the kinds of consulting gigs that we three are talking about, which is a little different than just any random consulting, or any random freelancing. CASEY: Like impact consulting, I might call that. MAE: Yeah. It's awesome if the money comes, but it's almost irrelevant [chuckles] provided that basic needs are meant. So that's kind of been my angle. We'll see how – talk to me in 20 more years when I'm [chuckles] trying to retire and made a lot of choices that I was happy with at the time. CASEY: This reminds me of a conversation I had with a friend who's an executive director of an orchestra in the nonprofit space and he was telling me that so many nonprofits shoot themselves in the foot by not doing enough fundraising, by not raising money, and that comes from not wanting to make money in a way because they're a nonprofit, money is not a motive, and everybody's very clear about that. That's noble and all, but it ends up hurting them because they don't have the money to do the impactful things they would as a nonprofit. Money is a necessary evil here and a lot of people are uncomfortable with it. Including me a lot of the time. Honestly, I have to tell myself not to. What would I tell a friend? “No, charge more money.” Okay, I guess I'll tell myself to do that now. I have this conversation with myself a lot. MAE: Yeah. I've been very aware that when I become anti-money, the well dries up. The money well. [laughs] CASEY: Yeah. MAE: And when I am respectful of and appreciative of money in the world, more comes my way. There is an internal dousing, I think that happens that one needs to be very careful about for sure. CASEY: One of the techniques I use with myself and with clients is a matrix where I write out for this approach, this thing that I'm thinking about how much money will it make, how much impact will it have on this goal, and all the different heuristics I would use to make the decision, or columns and all the options arose. I put numbers in it and I might weight my columns because money is less important than impact, but it's still important. It's there. I do all this math. In the end, the summary column with the averages roughly matches what's in my head, which is the things that are similar in my head are similar on paper, but I can see why and that's very clarifying for me. I really like being able to see it in this matrix form and being able to see that you have to focus on the money some amount. If you just did the high impact one, it wouldn't be on the top of the list. It's like, it's hard to think about so many variables at once, but seeing it helps me. CHELSEA: It is. GeePaw speaks to that some later in the thread. He says, “You've got to feed your family. You've got to. That's not negotiable. But you don't got to forget the well. To be any good at all, you have to keep finding the well, keep reaching it, keep noticing it. Doesn't matter whether it's office hours, or after hours. Matters whether you get to it. The thing you've got to watch, when you become a professional geek, isn't the newest tech, and it sure as hell isn't the org's process. You've got to watch whether, or how you're getting to the well. If you're getting to the well, in whatever way, you'll stay alive and change the world.” I think I'm curious as to y'all's thoughts on this, but like I mentioned earlier, I have a full-time job and I also do this consulting on the side. I also teach. I teach at the Master's program in computer science at University of Chicago. I do some mentoring with an organization called Emergent Works, which trains formerly incarcerated technologists. The work situation that I have pieced together for myself, I think manages to get me the income I need and also, the impact that I'm looking for and the ability to work with people and those kinds of things. I think my perspective at this point is that it's probably difficult, if it's realistic at all, to expect any one position to be able to meet all of those needs simultaneously. Maybe they exist, but I suspect that they're relatively few and far between and I think that we probably do ourselves a disservice by propagating this idea that what you need to do is just make yourself so supremely interview-able that everybody wants to hire you and then you get to pick the one position where you get to do that because there's only one in the entirety of tech, it's that rare. Sure, maybe that's an individualist way to look at it. But when we step back and look more closely, or when we step back and look more broadly at that, it's like, all right, so we have to become hypercompetitive in order to be able to get the position where we can make enough while helping people. Like, the means there seem kind of cutthroat for the ends, right? [laughs] CASEY: This reminds me of relationships, too and I think there's a lot of great parallels here. Like you shouldn't expect your partner to meet all of your needs, all of them. MAE: I was thinking the same thing! CASEY: Uh huh. Social, emotional, spiritual, physical, all your needs cannot possibly by one person and that is so much pressure to put on that person, CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: It's like not healthy. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: You can choose some to prioritize over others for your partner, but you're not going to get a 100% of it and you shouldn't. CHELSEA: Well, and I find that being a conversation fairly regularly in monogamous versus polyamorous circles as well. Like, how much is it appropriate to expect of a partner? But I think it is a valid conversation to have in those circles. But I think that even in the context of a monogamous relationship, a person has other relationships—familial relationships, friend relationships—outside of that single romantic relationship. CASEY: Co-workers, community people, yeah. CHELSEA: Right. But even within that monogamous context, it's most realistic and I would argue, the most healthy to not expect any one person to provide for all of your needs and rather to rely on a community. That's what we're supposed to be able to do. CASEY: Yeah. MAE: Interdependence, not independence. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: It's more resilient in the face of catastrophe, or change in general, mild, more mild change and you want to be that kind of resilient person for yourself, too. Just like you would do a computer system, or an organization. They should be resilient, too. MAE: Yes. CASEY: Your relationship with your job is another one. MAE: Totally. CHELSEA: Right. And I think that part of the reason the burnout is so quick – like the amount of time, the median amount of time that somebody spends at a company in tech is 2.2 years. MAE: I know, it's so weird. CHELSEA: Very few companies in tech have a large number of lifers, for example, or something like that. There are a number of reasons for that. We don't necessarily have to get into all of them, although, we can if you want. But I think one of them is definitely that we expect to get so much out of a full-time position. Tech is prone. due to circumstances of its origin, to an amount of idealism. We are saving the world. We, as technologists, are saving the world and also, we, as technologists, can expect this salary and we, as technologists, are a family and we play ping pong, and all of these things – [laughter] That contribute to an unrealistic expectation of a work environment, which if that is the only place that we are getting fulfillment as programmers, then people become unsatisfied very quickly because how could an organization that's simultaneously trying to accomplish a goal, meet all of these expect for everybody? I think it's rare at best. CASEY: I want to bring up another example of this kind of thing. Imagine you're an engineer and you have an engineering manager. What's their main job? Is it to get the organization's priorities to be done by the team, like top-down kind of thing? We do need that to happen. Or is it to mentor each individual and coach them and help them grow as an engineer? We need that somewhere, too, yeah. Or is it to make the team – like the team to come together as a team and be very effective together and to represent their needs to the org? That, too, but we don't need one person to do all three of those necessarily. If the person's not technical, you can get someone else in the company to do technical mentorship, like an architect, or just a more senior person on, or off the team somewhere else. But we put a lot of pressure on the engineering managers to do that and this applies to so many roles. That's just one I know that I can define pretty well. There's an article that explains that pretty well. We'll put in the show notes. MAE: Yes! So what I am currently doing is I have a not 40 hours a week job as an engineering manager and especially when I took the gig, I was still doing all of these pandemic charity things and I'm like, “These are more important to me right now and I only have so many hours in the day. So do you need me to code at this place? I can, but do you need me to because all those hours are hours I can go code for all these other things that I'm doing,” and [laughs] it worked. I have been able to do all three of the things that you're talking about, Casey, but certainly able to defer in different places and it's made me – this whole thing of not working full-time makes you optimize in very different ways. So I sprinkle my Slack check-ins all day, but I didn't have to work all day to be present all day. There's a lot that has been awesome. It's not for everyone, but I also have leaned heavily on technical mentorship happening from tech leads as well. CASEY: Sounds good. MAE: But I'm still involved. But this thing about management, especially in tech being whichever programmer seems like the most dominant programmer is probably going to be a good needs to be promoted into management. Just P.S. management is its own discipline, has its own trajectory and when I talk to hiring managers and they only care about my management experience in tech, which is 6 years, right? 8, but I have 25 years of experience in managing. So there's a preciousness of what it is that we are asking for the employees and what the employees are asking of the employer, like you were talking about Chelsea, that is very interesting. It's very privileged, and does lead a lot of people to burnout and disappointment because their ideas got so lofty. I just want to tie this back a little bit too, something you read in that quote about – I forget the last quote, but it was something about having enough to be able to change the world and it reminded me of Adrienne Maree Brown, pleasure activism, emergent strategy, and all of her work, and largely, generations of Black women have been saying, “Yo, you've got to take care [chuckles] of yourself to be able to affect change.” Those people have been the most effective and powerful change makers. So definitely, if you're curious about this topic, I urge you to go listen to some brilliant Black women about it. CASEY: We'll link that in the show notes, too. I think a lot about engineering managers and one way that doesn't come up a lot is you can get training for engineering managers to be stronger managers and for some reason, that is not usually an option people reach for. It could happen through HR, or it could happen if you have a training budget and you're a new EM, you could use your training budget to hire coaching from someone. I'm an example. But there's a ton of people out there that offer this kind of thing. If you don't learn the leadership skills when you switch roles, if you don't take time to learn those skills that are totally learnable, you're not going to have them and it's hard to apply them. There's a lot of pressure to magically know them now that you've switched hats. MAE: And how I don't understand why everyone in life doesn't have a therapist, [laughs] I don't understand why everyone in life doesn't have multiple job coaches at any time. Like why are we not sourcing more ideas and problem-solving strategies, and thinking we need to be the repository of how to handle X, Y, Z situation? CASEY: For some reason, a lot of people I've talked to think their manager is supposed to do that for them. Their manager is supposed to be their everything; their boss. They think the boss that if they're bad, you quit your job. If they're good, you'll stay. That boss ends up being their career coach for people, unless they're a bad career coach and then you're just stuck. Because we expect it so strongly and that is an assumption I want everyone listening to question. Do you need your manager at work to be that person for you? If they are, that's great. You're very fortunate. If not, how can you find someone? Someone in the community, a friend, family member, a professional coach, there's other options, other mentors in the company. You don't have to depend on that manager who doesn't have time for you to give you that kind of support. CHELSEA: So to that end, my thinking around management and mentorship changed about the time I hit – hmm. It was a while ago now, I don't know, maybe 6 years as a programmer, or something like that. Because before that, I was very bought into this idea that your manager is your mentor and all these types of things. There was something that I realized. There were two things that I realized. The first one was that, for me, most of my managers were not well set up to be mentors to me and this is why. Well, the truth is I level up quickly and for many people who are managers in a tech organization, they were technologists for 3 to 5 years before they became managers. They were often early enough in their career that they didn't necessarily know what management entailed, or whether they should say no based on what they were interested in. Many managers in tech figure out what the job is and then try to find as many surreptitious ways as possible to get back into the code. MAE: Yeah. CHELSEA: Additionally, many of those managers feel somewhat insecure about their weakening connection to the code base of the company that they manage. MAE: Yeah. CHELSEA: And so it can be an emotionally fraught experience for them to be mentor to someone whose knowledge of the code base that they are no longer in makes them feel insecure. So I learned that the most effective mentors for me – well, I learned something about the most effective mentors for me and I learned something of the most effective managers for me. I learned that the most effective managers for me either got way out ahead of me experience wise before they became managers, I mean 10 years, 15 years, 20 years, because those are not people who got promoted to management because they didn't know to say no. Those are people who got promoted to management after they got tired of writing code and they no longer staked their self-image on whether they're better coders than the people that they manage. That's very, very important. The other type of person who was a good manager for me was somebody who had never been a software engineer and there are two reasons for that. First of all, they trended higher on raw management experience. Second of all, they were not comparing their technical skillset to my technical skillset in a competitive capacity and that made them better managers for me, honestly. It made things much, much easier. And then in terms of mentors, I found that I had a lot more luck going outside of the organization I was working for mentors and that's again, for two reasons. The first one is that a lot of people, as they gain experience, go indie. Just a lot of people, like all kinds. Some of my sort of most trusted mentors. Avdi Grimm is somebody I've learned a lot from, indie effectively at this point. GeePawHill, like I mentioned, indie effectively at this point. Kenneth Mayer, indie effectively at this point. And these are all people who had decades of experience and the particular style of programming that I was doing very early in my career for many years. So that's the first reason. And then the second reason is that at your job, it is in your interest to succeed at everything you try—at most jobs. And jobs will tell you it's okay to fail. Jobs will tell you it's okay to like whatever, not be good at things and to be learning. But because if I'm drawing a paycheck from an organization, I do not feel comfortable not being good at the thing that I am drawing the paycheck for. MAE: Same. CHELSEA: And honestly, even if they say that that's the case, when the push comes to shove and there's a deadline, they don't actually want you to be bad at things. Come on! That doesn't make any sense. But I've been able to find ambitious projects that I can contribute to not for pay and in those situations, I'm much more comfortable failing because I can be like, “You know what, if they don't like my work, they can have all their money back.” And I work on a couple projects like that right now where I get to work with very experienced programmers on projects that are interesting and challenging, and a lot of times, I just absolutely eat dirt. My first PR doesn't work and I don't know what's wrong and the whole description is like somebody please help and I don't feel comfortable doing that on – if I had to do it at work, I would do it, but I'm not comfortable doing it. I firmly believe that for people to accelerate their learning to their full capacity for accelerating their learning, they must place themselves in situations where they not only might fail, but it's pretty likely. Because that's what's stretching your capacity to the degree that you need to get better and that's just not a comfortable situation for somewhere that you depend on to make a living. And that ended up being, I ended up approaching my management and my mentorship as effectively mutually exclusive things and it ended up working out really well for me. At this particular point in time, I happened to have a manager who happened to get way out ahead of me technically, and is willing to review PRs and so, that's very nice. But it's a nice-to-have. It's not something that I expect of a manager and it's ended up making me much more happy and manage relationships. MAE: I agree with all of that. So well said, Chelsea. CHELSEA: I try, I try. [laughs] Casey, are there things that you look for specifically in a manager? CASEY: Hmm. I guess for that question, I want to take the perspective inward, into myself. What do I need support on and who can I get that from? And this is true as also an independent worker as a consultant freelancer, too. I need support for when things are hard and I can be validated from people who have similar experiences, that kind of like emotional support. I need technical support and skills, like the sales I don't have yet and I have support for that, thank goodness. Individuals, I need ideally communities and individuals, both. They're both really important to me and some of these could be in a manager, but lately, I'm my own manager and I can be none of those things, really. I'm myself. I can't do this external support for myself. Even when I'm typing into a spreadsheet and the computer's trying to be a mirror, it's not as good as talking to another person. Another perspective that I need support on is how do I know what I'm doing is important and so, I do use spreadsheets as a mirror for that a lot of the time for myself. Like this impact is having this kind of magnitude of impact on this many people and then that calculates to this thing, maybe. Does that match my gut? That's literally what I want to know, too. The numbers aren't telling me, but talking to other people about impact on their projects really kind of solidifies that for me. And it's not always the client directly. It could be someone else who sees the impact I'm having on a client. Kind of like the manager, I don't want to expect clients to tell me the impact I'm having. In fact, for business reasons, I should know what the impact is myself, to tell them, to upsell them and continue it going anyway. So it really helps me to have peers to talk through about impact. Like that, too types of support. What other kinds of support do you need as consultants that I didn't just cover? MAE: I still need – and I have [laughs] hired Casey to help me. I still need a way to explain what it is that I am offering and what the value of that really is in a way that is clear and succinct. Every time I've gone to make a website, or a list of what it is that I offer, I end up in the hundreds of bullet points [laughs] and I just don't – [overtalk] CASEY: Yeah, yeah. MAE: Have a way to capture it yet. So often when people go indie, they do have a unique idea, a unique offering so finding a way to summarize what that is can be really challenging. I loved hearing you two when you were talking about knowing what kinds of work you want to do and who your ideal customer is. Those are things I have a clearer sense of, but how to make that connection is still a little bit of a gap for me. But you reminded me in that and I just want to mention here this book, The Pumpkin Plan, like a very bro business book situation, [chuckles] but what is in there is so good. I don't want to give it away and also, open up another topic [laughs] that I'll talk too long about. So I won't go into it right now, but definitely recommend it. One of the things is how to call your client list and figure out what is the most optimal situation that's going to lead toward the most impact for everybody. CASEY: One of the things I think back to a lot is user research and how can we apply that this business discovery process. I basically used the same techniques that were in my human computer interaction class I took 10, or 15 years ago. Like asking open ended questions, trying to get them to say what their problems are, remembering how they said it in their own words and saying it back to them—that's a big, big step. But then there's a whole lot of techniques I didn't learn from human computer interaction, that are sales techniques, and my favorite resource for that so far is called SPIN selling where SPIN is an acronym and it sounds like a wonky technique that wouldn't work because it's just like a random technique to pull out. I don't know, but it's not. This book is based on studies and it shows what you need to do to make big ticket sales go through, which is very different than selling those plastic things with the poppy bubbles in the mall stand in the middle of the hallway. Those low-key things they can manipulate people into buying and people aren't going to return it probably. But big-ticket things need a different approach than traditional sales and marketing knowledge and I really like the ideas in SPIN selling. I don't want to go into them today. We'll talk about it later. But those are two of the perspectives I bring to this kind of problem, user research and the SPIN selling techniques. I want to share what my ideal client would be. I think that's interesting, too. So I really want to help companies be happier and more effective. I want to help the employees be happier and more effective, and that has the impact on the users of the company, or whoever their clients are. It definitely impacts that, which makes it a thing I can sell, thankfully. So an organization usually knows when they're not the most happy, or the most effective. They know it, but my ideal client isn't just one that knows that, but they also have leadership buy-in; they have some leader who really cares and can advocate for making it better and they just don't know how. They don't have enough resources to make it happen in their org. Maybe they have, or don't have experience with it, but they need support. That's where I come in and then my impact really is on the employees. I want to help the employees be happier and more effective. That's the direct impact I want, and then it has the really strong, indirect impact on the business outcomes. So in that vein, I'm willing to help even large tech companies because if I can help their employees be happier, that is a positive impact. Even if I don't care about large tech companies' [chuckles] business outcomes, I'm okay with that because my focus is specifically on the employees. That's different than a lot of people I talk to; they really just want to support like nonprofit type, stronger impact of the mission and that totally makes sense to me, too. MAE: Also, it is possible to have a large and ever growing equitably run company. It is possible. I do want to contribute toward that existing in the world and as much as there's focus on what the ultimate looking out impact is, I care about the experience of employees and individuals on the way to get there. I'm not a utilitarian thinker. CASEY: Yeah, but we can even frame it in a utilitarian way if we need to. If we're like a stakeholder presentation, if someone leaves the company and it takes six months to replace them and their work is in the meantime off board to other people, what's the financial impact of all that. I saw a paper about it. Maybe I can dig it up and I'll link to it. It's like to replace a person in tech it costs a $100K. So if they can hire a consultant for less than a $100K to save one person from leaving, it pays for itself. If that number is right, or whatever. Maybe it was ten employees for that number. The paper will say much better than I will. CHELSEA: I think that in mentioning that Casey, you bring up something that businesses I think sometimes don't think about, which is some of the hidden costs that can easily be difficult to predict, or difficult to measure those kinds of things. One of the hidden costs is the turnover costs is the churn cost because there's how much it takes to hire another person and then there's the amount of ramp time before that person gets to where the person who left was. CASEY: Right, right, right. CHELSEA: And that's also a thing. There's all the time that developers are spending on forensic software analysis in order to find out all of the context that got dropped when a person left. CASEY: Yeah. The one person who knew that part of the code base, the last one is gone, uh oh. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: It's a huge trust. And then engineering team is often really interested in conveying that risk. But if they're not empowered enough and don't have enough bandwidth time and energy to make the case, the executive team, or whoever will never hear it and they won't be able to safeguard against it. MAE: Or using the right language to communicate it. CASEY: Right, right. And that's its own skill. That's trainable, too thankfully. But we don't usually train engineers in that, traditionally. Engineers don't receive that training unless they go out of their way for it. PMs and designers, too, honestly. Like the stakeholder communication, everybody can work on. MAE: Yeah. CASEY: That's true. MAE: Communication. Everyone can, or not. Yes. [laughs] I learned the phrase indie today. I have never heard it and I really like it! It makes me feel cool inside and so love and – [overtalk] CASEY: Yeah, I have no record label, or I am my own record label, perhaps. MAE: Yo! CASEY: I've got one. I like the idea of having a Patreon, not to make money, but to have to help inspire yourself and I know a lot of friends have had Patreons with low income from it and they were actually upset about it. So I want to go back to those friends and say, “Look, this prove some people find value in what you're doing.” Like the social impact. I might make my own even. Thank you. MAE: I know I might do it too. It's good. That's good. CHELSEA: Absolutely. Highly recommended. One thing that I want to take away is the exercise, Casey, that you were talking about of tallying up all of the different things that a given position contributes in terms of a person's needs. Because I think that an exercise like that would be extremely helpful for, for example, some of my students who are getting their very first tech jobs. Students receive a very one-dimensional message about the way that tech employment goes. It tends to put set of five companies that show remain unnamed front and center, which whatever, but I would like them to be aware of the other options. And there is a very particular way of gauging the value of a tech position that I believe includes fewer dimensions than people should probably consider for the health of their career long-term and not only the health of their career, but also their health in their career. CASEY: One more parting thought I want to share for anyone is you need support for your career growth, for your happiness. If you're going to be a consultant, you need support for that. Find support in individuals and communities, you deserve that support and you can be that support for the people who are supporting you! It can be mutual. They need that, too.

In The Conversation
Two Minutes of Fisticuffs

In The Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 75:57


Two Minutes of Fisticuffs by Damien Lemon, Ali Muhammad

GEAR:30
Introducing: Blister Labs

GEAR:30

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 52:30


Today we are excited to introduce you to a very big new initiative at Blister: Blister Labs. Blister Labs is a new partnership between Blister, the University of Colorado Boulder, and the brand-new, state-of-the-art engineering facility at Western Colorado University in Gunnison, Colorado. Joining me to talk about why we believe that Blister Labs represents a significant new development in the outdoor industry is Dr. Jeni Blacklock, who is the director of the Rady Partnership Program between CU Boulder and Western Colorado University.TOPICS & TIMES:What is Blister Labs? (2:17)The Rady Engineering Facility at Western (6:21)CU Boulder's involvement (8:04)New standards? (11:29)Key faculty: Greg Vanderbeek & Sean Humbert (14:16)Jeni's current position & background (22:38)Working at a bike shop and the NIST (31:37)Some of Jeni's recent work (41:05)Blister Labs & the new “Outdoor Industry Engineering” program (43:23)RELATED LINKS:Video: Blister LabsBlister Summit RegistrationSubscribe to our Newsletter & Gear GiveawaysBecome a Blister Member / Get our Buyer's Guide See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Proof to Product
232 | Working with Sales Reps with Carina Murray, Crow & Canary

Proof to Product

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 27:14


In an industry and business where your time is valuable and your products are essential for creating a successful and sustainable business, sales reps have your best interest in mind and serve a greater purpose than simply selling your products. A valuable sales rep is someone you can build a trusted relationship with who can navigate catalogs, inventories, deliveries, and even curate products just for you. In today's episode, I'm joined by Carina Murray, founder of Crow and Canary, a sales rep group that works with a diverse line up of stationery and gift brands to sell their products and support their customers with top-notch customer service. Listen in as we discuss how sales reps were affected by Covid, how wholesalers and sales reps can work with Faire and other third party wholesale platforms, plus we're highlighting unique benefits that sales reps bring to the sales process!   For full show notes, resources and a transcription, please head to prooftoproduct.com/232 For more support with your marketing & sales strategies, check out LABS at http://www.prooftoproduct.com/labs

Thrival Nutrition Podcast
288 - Weight Loss Labs

Thrival Nutrition Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 19:06


Wondering what labs should be on your radar and get ordered if you're struggling with weight? You'll want to listen into this episode! Ready to work with us 1:1? You know, stop the guess work? Let's go! Request a free phone call HERE with me to see how we can help you! Want to join a community where you can ask questions (uncensored, unlike Facebook?) Join our community here! Connect with us on Facebook, Instagram, + YouTube!

The Michael Labs Show
The Michael Labs Show #249 - Masks Kill Turtles

The Michael Labs Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 41:24


In this episode I talk about my insane last three months and all the studying I am dong, I also talk about how all of these mask are murdering turtles... - The Michael Labs Show is a long sit down talk formatted Podcast from myself and friends and guests. The subjects and topics are random and it is designed to be a conversation and free flowing based Podcast. Hope you enjoy! Thank You!  

NASJAQ FVTRISM
How Brain Cells in a Dish Learned to Play Pong (w/ the Founder of Cortical Labs - Hon Weng Chong) - Ep17

NASJAQ FVTRISM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 57:47


Cortical Labs is a startup building brain cells to perform machine learning, instead of just using conventional silicon chips. When both the in vivo and in silico were trained at the same rate, the in vivo brain cells learned to play pong faster than the in silico silicon chips. This means the brain cells were more efficient at learning that pure silicon neural nets. What is the future of this startup? What are the applications? This is a great conversation with the founder of Cortical Labs, Hon Weng Chong. Hon's Twitter: https://twitter.com/dr1337 Cortical Labs Twitter: https://twitter.com/CorticalLabs Their site: https://corticallabs.com/ My twitter: https://twitter.com/nasjaq__ Video on youtube: https://youtu.be/Y1R5k5QWPsY FIND ME: Twitter: https://twitter.com/nasjaq__ Instagram: https://instagram.com/nasjaq_/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/nasjaq Subscribe: https://youtube.com/c/nasjaq/?sub_confirmation=1 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nasjaq/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nasjaq/support

Ace Of Spada:
184: My Bloodwork Review

Ace Of Spada:

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 33:24


On today's episode, I look over my own bloodwork and what my coach and I are doing to address some of the issues. Not everything is fixable with a supplement and I make that an emphasis in the episode. If you liked this episode, take a screenshot and share it on your story and tag AnthonyIf you are interested in coaching and joining the Distryct, fill out the application with this link: https://www.honeybook.com/widget/ryanblakeley_157615/cf_id/60e366e627efd8002f575d27To find Anthony, his instagram is @spadafitness. If you have any questions or inquire about coaching, you can email him at spadafitness@gmail.comIf you want 10% off Morphogen Nutrition supplements, go to https://www.morphogennutrition.com/ and use code "SPADA"

Turn Your Soul On! Radio
Is Your Food Sensitivity Test Enough & Why You Need One with Kris Ball & Susan Drake from Infinite Allergy Labs

Turn Your Soul On! Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 46:11


Wondering if you need a food sensitivity test? Or maybe you did one but aren't getting the results you anticipated? There's a reason why! In this episode Kris Ball and Susan Drake (with Infinite Allergy Labs) explain the difference between a food sensitivity and an allergy.  Infinite Allergy Labs offers the most comprehensive food sensitivity test on the market to date and has been incredibly helpful for many of my patients that couldn't breakthrough their weight and health ceiling no matter how hard they tried. Thank you Infinite Allergy Labs! Ultimate Lifestyle Transformation - use gift card code "drbrandy" to get $50 off! www.DrBrandyVictory.com

In The Conversation
Tuxedo On A Tuesday

In The Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 124:52


Tuxedo On A Tuesday by Damien Lemon, Ali Muhammad

Squawk on the Street
White House CEA Chair Reacts to December Jobs Data, GameStop Surges on NFT/Crypto Report and Abbott Labs CEO Looks to Boost COVID Test Production as Omicron Spreads

Squawk on the Street

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 43:14


Carl Quintanilla and Jim Cramer focused on market reaction to the big news of the morning: The December employment report showed non-farm payrolls up 199,000 -- about half of what Wall Street had been expecting -- but the unemployment rate fell to 3.9%. Cecelia Rouse -- Chair of President Biden's Council of Economic Advisers -- joined the program to discuss the jobs report, inflation, the COVID-19 omicron variant outbreak and what's at stake for the economy. GameStop shares soared on a report that the videogame retailer is launching a division to develop a marketplace for NFTs and establish cryptocurrency partnerships. The anchors did a "Squawk on the Street" flashback to April 2021 when Cramer said that GameStop has to "go crypto." Also in focus: Abbott Labs' CEO said the company plans to boost production of its COVID-19 test kits to 100 million a month, Cramer on companies that should have gone public via IPO instead of striking SPAC deals, plus an upbeat week for the banking sector and cruise line stocks.

HR Data Labs podcast
HR Data Labs - Season 3 - Episode 4 - Pam Jeffords, Susan Richards, Danielle White - HR Tech 2021 Series - Diversity, Equity, Inclusion & Belonging: Past, Present, & Future

HR Data Labs podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 43:46


Summary:Pam Jeffords is a Senior Partner at Sapient Insights Group who leads the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Practice. She has over 25 years of experience in the industry and is a member of the Global Leadership Council for Colorado State University College of Business, an advisory board member for University of Denver Colorado Women's College, and a Limited Partner in The JumpFund whose mission is to invest in women-led startups. Pam has also served as Chair of Women United for the Mile-High United Way where she received the prestigious Frances Wisebart Jacobs award for philanthropy. We're also joined by Susan Richards and Danielle White!Susan Richards is the Founder and CEO of Sapient Insights Group. For more than 25 years, Susan has been consulting in areas of change management, organizational effectiveness, M&A, HR strategy, technology, and operations. Her focus is on helping clients improve business performance by aligning their human capital programs and practices with business strategy. Danielle White is Collaborative Solutions' EVP of Global Business Strategy. She brings over 20 years of HR transformation experience from commercial and public sector industries. She uses her subject matter expertise to lead corporate thought leadership, go-to-market strategy, and engagement strategy. In this episode, Pam, Susan, and Danielle talk about how diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging has changed over the years and how it might change in the years to come. Chapters:[0:00 - 3:12] IntroductionWelcome, Pam Jeffords!Today's Topic: Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Belonging[3:13 - 13:27] How People Approached DE&I in the PastAttempts at devising “tomorrow solutions” and long-term solutionsHow DE&I outside the workplace affected DE&I in the workplace[13:28 - 32:16] What does DE&I Look Like Today?How differences in employee feedback creates DE&I gapsWhy job architecture informs DE&I successes and pitfalls[32:17 - 41:52] The Future of DE&IDeveloping true data-driven strategiesThe importance of helping HR practitioners become better business people[41:53 - 43:45] Final Thoughts & ClosingThank you for listening!Quotes:"I did an exercise with a group of people who were very angry with their leadership and asking, ‘Where's the diversity?' I asked, ‘How many of you in this room were hired by way of employee referrals?' Almost all of them raised their hand. I said, ‘That's why we don't have diversity.' Because we're reling heavily on employee referrals and we're referring people that look like us. So, if we want to do this differently, go outside of your network. Seek out people, refer them in, and that's the only way we're going to have diversity.” “When you talk about equity and opportunity, it's giving everybody equal access. And what we find is that feedback is probably the number one thing where we see the biggest gaps in who's getting it—[and the same can be said about] career guidance.”Contact:Pam Jeffords LinkedInSusan Richards LinkedInDanielle White LinkedIn Production by Affogato Media

Entelechy Leadership Stories
Troy Carter and Patrick Leung, Earthshot Labs

Entelechy Leadership Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 21:56


Today we talk about technology for planetary-scale ecological restoration. Troy Carter and Patrick Leung are founders and co-executives of Earthshot Labs. They are bringing the audacious scale and vision of startup methodology to the planet's ecological and climate crisis.  Troy graduated from Stanford University with a degree in economics, was an early employee at Airbnb and E la Carte, then founded and scaled Troy Cider and exited after a successful acquisition in 2015. He has focused on carbon finance and renewable energy and agriculture projects for the last six years. Patrick has partnered with ambitious, visionary companies that seek to transform their industries and positively impact the world. He says, "I help clients reimagine company strategy, product vision, and world impact. I can help conceive groundbreaking products and technologies, then assemble and guide world-class technology teams to deliver them. I also provide the mentoring and practices to make conscious technical innovation a permanent part of an organization." Some of the questions we explore include: What does Earthshot Labs do to help the planet? How can we solve climate change? What can listeners do to make a difference for the planet and climate? What does the future of work look like? How can organizations meet the need of employees, the planet, and all stakeholders? What is the application of decentralized finance and stakeholder capitalism? How do we bridge spirituality and business? Learn more at Website https://www.earthshot.eco/ (https://www.earthshot.eco/) LinkedIn URLs https://www.linkedin.com/in/troybear/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/troybear/) https://www.linkedin.com/in/puiwah/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/puiwah/)

The Michael Labs Show
The Michael Labs Show #248 - CDC Is Trash

The Michael Labs Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 41:14


In this episode I talk about the absolute embarrassment of the CDC within the last month. - The Michael Labs Show is a long sit down talk formatted Podcast from myself and friends and guests. The subjects and topics are random and it is designed to be a conversation and free flowing based Podcast. Hope you enjoy! Thank You!

In The Conversation
Low-key Larry

In The Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 87:22


Damien and Ali get In The Conversation about post-Covid reflections, Betty White, and bad movies. Twitter.com/dlemoncomedy // Twitter.com/mrmuhammad
Keep up with the conversation on Facebook:
Facebook.com/InTheConversation

Between Two COO's with Michael Koenig
Part 1: Grafana Labs COO, Doug Hanna On Building a $3B Company with Open Source, Scaling Culture and Going From 70 to 500 People

Between Two COO's with Michael Koenig

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 22:24


Doug Hanna, COO at Grafana Labs, joins us to discuss scaling a company to $3B in valuation after raising $330M in funding. As a former Zendesk VP of Ops, Doug has had front seats at both companies, during hyper-growth. This episode, Part 1, focuses on people and culture: what goes into scaling from 70 to 400 net new employees in a mere 18 months. Grafan Labs is the company behind the lead open source observability platform, Grafana, used by the likes of Salesforce, Paypal, Verizon, Ebay, and 750K other instances.Part 2 of Doug's episode will air in a few weeks and focuses on scaling the go-to-market.Grafana Labs - https://grafana.comDoug Hanna on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/douglashanna1Episode Website: https://betweentwocoos.com/part-1-grafana-labs-coo-doug-hannaEpisode Transcript: https://betweentwocoos.com/part-1-grafana-labs-coo-doug-hanna/#transcriptMichael Koenig on LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/in/mkoenig514Michael Koenig on Twitter: https://twitter.com/mkoenig

#WorkBold Podcast
How Company Culture Drives Real Estate Decisions at Sensei Labs

#WorkBold Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 37:13


Jay Goldman, Co-Founder & Chief Sensei at Sensei Labs and Mark Goh, Founder & CEO of Clearspace join Bold Founder Caleb Parker for the fifth episode of Season 6 to discuss how company culture drives real estate decisions at Sensei Labs. They discuss both sides of a real estate deal with Clearspace as the flex partner and Sensei Labs as the office customer. Jay explains how Sensei Labs came to the decision to slash their space requirements by nearly half and move into a new 7,000 square foot office space in Toronto. He goes on to share how the company worked with Mark and the Clearspace team to rightsize for hybrid working. Jay is a New York Times Bestselling Author and shares his insights on how to nurture a strong company culture with teams who aren't in the office every day. Mark shares insights on how Clearspace pivoted to meet the needs in the market before the pandemic hit.  Connect with Jay Goldman on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/jaygoldman/ Connect with Mark Goh on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/gohmark/ Connect with Caleb Parker on LinkedIn  https://www.linkedin.com/in/calebparker/ If you have any questions or feedback on this episode, email podcast@workbold.co Value Bombs: If you have a fixed idea of company culture, you can't maintain it because that world doesn't exist anymore. - Jay Goldman On any given day we will have two or three teams in the office on a rotating schedule that we put out least a month in advance to give people an opportunity to plan childcare and all of those other pieces. - Jay Goldman People have been taking a very static approach to workspace...trying to jam the old paradigm into the new world and it doesn't work like that. - Mark Goh Building your space in the past was complex and cost prohibitive, which is why many companies turn to a flex face or coworking product. We offer this in-between option. - Mark Goh We use data and a level of precision that's not widely available in designing construction, and it's really taken the same methodology that Jay would use running Sensei. That type of startup data-driven approach, just isn't applied to our industry. - Mark Goh Reversible decisions should be made quickly. Irreversible decisions we need to really think through and be intentional about. - Jay Goldman The last thing I want to do is get stuck in a lease that's no longer serving the needs that we have. - Jay Goldman Resources: TSK Documentary TSK website Sensei Labs The Decoded Company  Clearspace Sensei Labs Cultural Values (Career Page) Medium  How I Built This Podcast (Apple) Shout Outs: Dave Cairns Guy Raz   About Our Guests: Jay Goldman https://www.linkedin.com/in/jaygoldman/  Jay is Co-Founder and Chief Sensei at Sensei Labs. His company supports Fortune 500 companies around the world with their collaborative work management platform, which is used to run business critical projects, including transformations, M&A, product launches and procurement operations. Jay co-authored the New York Times bestseller The Decoded Company and has written for publications like the Harvard Business Review. He speaks often with teams and companies across the globe about the future of work, including companies like TEDx, NASA, Harvard Business School, Google and Twitter. Mark Goh https://www.linkedin.com/in/gohmark/  Mark is a seasoned entrepreneur and has both raised venture capital and bootstrapped companies prior to launching his own start-ups. Mark worked for several years in private equity. Mark launched Clearspace to create awesome offices for growing companies. He's created a way to simplify the office interior construction process for landlords and tenants as a one-stop shop from design to move in. Through their technology driven approach they're able to deliver cost-effective beautiful office experience without compromising on speed and quality. These are typically smaller footprints for fast-growing companies. They're private and custom branded for the customer, and high in demand. About Our Host: Caleb Parker https://www.linkedin.com/in/calebparker/ Caleb Parker is an American entrepreneur in London, and Founder of Bold (acquired by Newable/NewFlex in 2019).He believes in "challenging the status quo" and is a champion for entrepreneurial and innovative thinking.Caleb has served as founder, Board member, advisor, investor and consultant to numerous startups and small businesses, and has a keen focus on innovation and technology, with interests in the MICE market, Space-as-a-Service, and the future of work.Caleb has been a guest lecturer, speaker, and moderator for topics such as entrepreneurship, the sharing economy, the future of work and commercial real estate at academic institutions and large corporations. He regularly takes the stage at numerous trade conferences as keynote speaker, MC, host or facilitator.Earlier in his career, Caleb was named one of Savannah, Georgia's “40 under 40” business leaders" in 2006 after launching two successful small businesses in the city's booming hospitality industry. A year later he moved to Washington, DC to join the The Regus Group DC management team. In 2009, Caleb co-founded a flexible workspace consulting firm where he brokered flexible workspace and advised businesses on agile working strategies.Caleb is one of the first licensed commercial real estate agents to speak on the flexible working trends and the rise of flexible workspace, and has been quoted in numerous publications. Timestamps [02:51] Interview starts [04:59] Jay Goldman explains why they moved into a Clearspace office and why they took a smaller office space than originally planned due to changes to working since COVID, and what technology they use for remote working. [10:18] Jay Goldman explains how Sensei Labs approach company culture as a fluid and ever changing concept. [13:05] Mark Goh talks about how they created the office space for Sensei Labs in Clearspace Toronto. Jay and Mark discuss their teams working patterns and the reason for having an office space. [18:28] Mark Goh talks about how Clearspace supports landlords through white label solutions as an in between flex space and individual built. Mark talks about why they pivoted their business model away from a leased arbitrage business to the new model. [25:23] Mark Goh talks about the technology behind Clearspace. [27:23] Jay Goldman talks about what Sensei wants from commercial real estate moving forward. [31:01] Caleb asks quickfire round questions Sponsors Headline Sponsor: TSK TSK creates inspiring workplaces for some of the world's biggest brands across the UK and Ireland, They've been working for 25 years to deliver the best employee experiences and the vision of their clients. Not only do they create great places to work, TSK share workplace content every week from the latest data to inspiring spaces they've designed and built. You can read their latest insights at www.tskgroup.co.uk or check out their LinkedIn and Instagram pages to become a follower, fan and friend. Fortune Favours the Bold Bold merges property management & Space-as-a-Service to drive asset value and help office customers grow faster. Now part of NewFlex (www.workbold.co)  Future Proof Your Portfolio with NewFlex NewFlex delivers and manages a range of branded solutions for every type of building, in every type of location, for every type of occupier. Including the flexibility to develop your own brand. All enabled by flexible management contracts where we are invested in making money for you. (www.newflex.com) Launch Your Own Podcast A Podcast Company is the leading podcast production company for brands, organizations, institutions, individuals, and entrepreneurs. Our team sets you up with the right equipment, training, and guidance to ensure you sound amazing. (https://www.apodcastcompany.com) Subscribe to the #WorkBold Podcast https://www.linkedin.com/newsletters/workbold-podcast-6868874680095277056 

Cabeça de Lab
Vazamento De Dados

Cabeça de Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 39:55


Estamos vivendo uma ciber pandemia? Os dados estão valendo mais do que o petróleo? Como podemos proteger nossas informações digitais? No episódio de hoje batemos um papo com três pessoas da área de segurança aqui do Labs, para aprofundarmos mais esse assunto! Bora ouvir esse episódio, que tá massa demais! --- Edição completa por Rádiofobia Podcast e Multimídia: https://radiofobia.com.br/ --- Nos siga no Twitter e no Instagram: @luizalabs @cabecadelab Dúvidas, cabeçadas e sugestões, mande e-mail para o cabecadelab@luizalabs.com Participantes: Milene Mancini Vasconcelos | instagram.com/m_mvasconcelos/ Claudia Miyuki | linkedin.com/in/claudia-miyuki-fukasawa-a8a88515/ Rafael Alves | linkedin.com/in/rafael-alves-lima-83968892/ Rodolfo Capelari | https://www.linkedin.com/in/rodolfocapelari/

World 1-1
Phazon Labs: Root Of Fear

World 1-1

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 17:54


This week, the lab rats are back and they have the seed of an idea and they're about to plant it and see what kind of crop it yields!!! Tune in to find out if you should fear the results!!!   Check out all the cool places you can find us!!!   Twitter: @PhazonLabs GoodPods Group: https://goodpods.app.link/ia9cImAbykb GoodPods: https://goodpods.app.link/TnbnXF19xkb Podbean: Worldoneone.podbean.com Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLBKMjIVAX1VKiuPADld3l8RXkqmBntOTB

Lock and Code
What angered us most about cybersecurity in 2021

Lock and Code

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 34:05


We are only days into 2022, which means what better time for a 2021 retrospective? But rather than looking at the biggest cyberattacks of last year—which we already did—or the most surprising—like we did a couple of years ago—we wanted to offer something different for readers and listeners.  On today's episode of Lock and Code, with host David Ruiz, we spoke with Malwarebytes Labs' editor-in-chief Anna Brading and Labs' writer Mark Stockley about what upset them the most about cybersecurity in 2021.

Pediatric Emergency Playbook
Focus On: Pyloric Stenosis

Pediatric Emergency Playbook

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 16:03


    Myth: “No olive, no problem”      Reality: Rare finding, since we diagnose earlier Pyloric stenosis occurs in young infants because the pyloric sphincter hypertrophies, causing near-complete obstruction of the gastric outlet. More common in boys, preterm babies, first-born. Less common in older mothers. Association with macrolide use.       Presentation Young infant arrives with forceful vomiting, but can't quite get enough to eat “the hungry, hungry, not-so-hippo”. Early presentation from 3 to 5 weeks of age: projectile vomiting Later presentation up to 12 weeks: dehydration, failure to thrive, possibly the elusive olive Labs may show hypOchloremic, hypOkalemic metabOlic acidosis: “all the Os” Watch out for hyperbilirubinemia, the “icteropyloric syndrome”: unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia from dehydration. Ultrasound shows a pylorus of greater than 3 mm wide and 14 mm long.  Memory aid: 3.14 is “pi”.  In pyloric stenosis, π-lorus > 3 x 14       Treatment Various options, may be deferred depending on age, availability, severity of illness, including: Pyloromyotomy — definitive.  The Ramstedt pyloromyotomy is an open procedure and involves a involves a longitudinal incision along the pylorus, and blunt dissection just to level of the submucosa.  The laparoscopic approach (umbilicus) is less invasive but may convey an increased risk of incomplete relief of the obstruction or perforation through the mucosa.  Also, this approach involves longer OR and anesthesia time.    Endoscopic balloon dilation – not as effective as pyloromyotomy; reserved for poor surgical candidates. Conservative management — an NG tube is passed by IR, and the infant slowly feeds and “grows out of it”.  Atropine is sometimes used to relax the pyloric sphincter.  Also usually reserved for poor surgical candidates. Selected references Aboagye J, Goldstein SD, Salazar JH, Papandria D, Okoye MT, Al-Omar K, Stewart D, Lukish J, Abdullah F. Age at presentation of common pediatric surgical conditions: Reexamining dogma. J Pediatr Surg. 2014 Jun;49(6):995-9. Bakal U, Sarac M, Aydin M, Tartar T, Kazez A. Recent changes in the features of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. Pediatr Int. 2016 May;58(5):369-71. Sharp WW, Chan W. Images in emergency medicine. Infant with projectile vomiting. Peristaltic abdominal waves associated with infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. Ann Emerg Med. 2014 Mar;63(3):289,308. Staerkle RF, Lunger F, Fink L, Sasse T, Lacher M, von Elm E, Marwan AI, Holland-Cunz S, Vuille-Dit-Bille RN. Open versus laparoscopic pyloromyotomy for pyloric stenosis. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2021 Mar 9;3(3):CD012827.  

The Cabral Concept
2156: New Year's Goals, Big 5 Labs, Mindset Book, Spiritual Fitness & Alzheimers Disease, Tea & Blood Pressure (FR)

The Cabral Concept

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 27:47


Welcome back to today's #FridayReview where I'll be breaking down the best of the week!   Today, I'll be sharing specifics on these topics: New Year's Goals EquiLife Big 5 Labs Psycho-Cybernetics by Maxwell Maltz (book review) Spiritual Fitness & Alzheimers Disease (research) Green Tea/Black Tea & Blood Pressure  (research) For all the details tune in to today's #CabralConcept 2156 – Enjoy the show and let me know what you thought! - - -   Show Notes & Resources: http://StephenCabral.com/2156 - - - Dr. Cabral's New Book, The Rain Barrel Effect https://amzn.to/2H0W7Ge - - - Join the Community & Get Your Questions Answered: http://CabralSupportGroup.com - - - Dr. Cabral's Most Popular At-Home Lab Tests: > Complete Minerals & Metals Test (Test for mineral imbalances & heavy metal toxicity) - - - > Complete Candida, Metabolic & Vitamins Test (Test for 75 biomarkers including yeast & bacterial gut overgrowth, as well as vitamin levels) - - - > Complete Stress, Mood & Metabolism Test (Discover your complete thyroid, adrenal, hormone, vitamin D & insulin levels) - - - > Complete Stress, Sleep & Hormones Test (Run your adrenal & hormone levels) - - - > Complete Food Sensitivity Test (Find out your hidden food sensitivities) - - - > Complete Omega-3 & Inflammation Test (Discover your levels of inflammation related to your omega-6 to omega-3 levels)

The Michael Labs Show
The Michael Labs Show #247 - Money Is Fuel

The Michael Labs Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 41:51


In this episode I talk about slight updates with my study, I also talk about money, I dive deep into it and talk about what it actually does for you and how it will help you. - The Michael Labs Show is a long sit down talk formatted Podcast from myself and friends and guests. The subjects and topics are random and it is designed to be a conversation and free flowing based Podcast. Hope you enjoy! Thank You!

Absolute Return Podcast
#191: Leadership Chat: NFTs with Chibi Labs Founder Mat Sposta

Absolute Return Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 41:35


On today's podcast we welcome special guest, Chibi Labs Founder Mat Sposta. Chibi Labs has created three futuristic NFT collections featuring cool 3D characters.   On the show, Mat discusses: His path from Wall Street to NFTs (or TradFi to DeFi) What is an NFT and why should people want to own them Chibi Labs roadmap in 2022 The future of the NFT market and the metaverse And more Buy bitcoin, save the planet! Learn more about our eco-friendly bitcoin ETF here: https://investabtc.com/ Learn more about the Accelerate Alternative Investment Solutions here: https://accelerateshares.com/investment-solutions-2/ Follow us on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/33316660/admin/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AccelerateFT

Onwrd
Ep. 44 - On Securing Our Virtual Lives with Shira Stember of Snickerdoodle Labs

Onwrd

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 24:29


The world is moving at breakneck speed, and as you've probably become aware….our lives are more and more relying on our data. We rely on this data, but have little ability to utilize them in the manner we use our physical possessions (loaning, renting, upgrading, etc.) Digital ownership is an important field to understand as more and more of our lives go online. In this episode, we talk with Shira Stember, the Chief Operating Officer of Snickerdoodle Labs. Snickerdoodle is developing core infrastructure to ensure all internet users can benefit from the amazing private, secure and transparent digital future we need to retain human rights and protect our sovereignty. As we spiral into a future that exists in more virtual spaces, digital ownership is fundamental to our individual and collective sovereignty. Learn More: - Website: https://www.snickerdoodlelabs.io/ - Snickerdoodle LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/snickerdoodlelabs/ / - Shira's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/shirastember/ - Shira's Twitter: https://twitter.com/Shira_LES Snickerdoodle's Twitter: https://twitter.com/YoSnickerdoodle

In The Conversation
The Sick and The Shut-in

In The Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 109:33


Damien and Ali get In The Conversation about the mid-Vid, review the year 2021, and the Insecure finale. Twitter.com/dlemoncomedy // Twitter.com/mrmuhammad Keep up with the conversation on Facebook: Facebook.com/InTheConversation

Local Leaders: The Podcast!
Affordable Labs Offers Convenient and Affordable Blood Draws. Local Leaders The Podcast #142

Local Leaders: The Podcast!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 73:22


From Affordable Labs website: Affordable Labs is the premier medical laboratory service in the Baton Rouge area. Since 2004, we have been the first company to offer direct access testing to the Baton Rouge community. That means you're able to visit our lab and request any lab test. Affordable Labs has also been the “go-to” for home bound patients as well as those who are typically a “hard stick”. Home Health companies as well as primary physicians have used our services to obtain much needed lab collections from patients who would otherwise go without services until able to have transportation services provided to them. Affordable Labs owner Missy Williams sits down with Local Leaders:The Podcast host Jim Chapman to discuss this amazing alternative to typical blood draw services and learns so much along the way! Affordable Lobs on the web: https://geaux4blood.com Affordable Labs on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/affordablelabsbr/ Filmed at Envision Podcast Studios: www.envisionpodcaststudio.com AMAZON LINKS TO OUR EQUIPMENT Shure SM7B Microphone: https://amzn.to/3cUjIJl LOCAL LEADERS THE PODCAST LINKS: Our Website: www.LocalLeadersThePodcast.com Our Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LocalLeadersPodcast Our Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/localleaderspodcast/ THANK YOU TO THESE LOCAL BUSINESSES FOR THE SUPPORT! Denham Springs Fit Body Boot Camp: https://getfitdenhamsprings.com/getfitdenhamsprings359108991589553470388 Tricia Johnston Realtor : Latter & Blum https://triciajohnston.latter-blum.com Fit Blendz Denham Springs: https://fitblendz.revelup.com/weborder/?establishment=12 BJ Pawn www.BJPawn.net Blaksheep Creative https://blaksheepcreative.com​​​​ SR Enterprise Painting https://www.facebook.com/SR-Enterprise-848358978571390 HomeKey Mortgage: Tiffany Sicard https://www.facebook.com/TiffanyGuehoSicardMortgageSr.LoanOfficer William Waldrep TWFG https://agentpages.twfg.com/williamwaldrep/ Aydell Lane Spa and Boutique Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Aydell-Lane-Spa-Boutique-LLC-101969087841519 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/localleadersthepodcast/support

The Michael Labs Show
The Michael Labs Show #246 - We Have Moved!

The Michael Labs Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 42:30


In this episode I talk about where I have been for the last month and where I will be going from here, the move, new job and much more, I also talk about about Omicron. - The Michael Labs Show is a long sit down talk formatted Podcast from myself and friends and guests. The subjects and topics are random and it is designed to be a conversation and free flowing based Podcast. Hope you enjoy! Thank You!

CEO Spotlight
Justin Simons, CEO, My Labs Direct

CEO Spotlight

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 11:20


KRLD CEO Spotlight with My Labs Direct CEO Justin Simons. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Naturally Nourished
Episode 272: Turmeric, Liquid Gold or Fool's Gold?

Naturally Nourished

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 57:57


Is turmeric really worth all the hype? What about the concerns for oxalates and anti-nutrients? Should we supplement with turmeric and does formulation matter? Tune in to hear us break down the benefits of curcumin in human studies and discuss the potential drawbacks of this amazing natural compound.    In this episode, we take a deep dive into inflammation as a whole, from labs to monitor to why anti-inflammatory drugs can be problematic. We discuss the myriad of benefits of curcumin in heart health, inflammation, pain, depression, antioxidant status and more while also discussing the controversy of turmeric in the world of oxalates and antinutrients. Learn what to look for in a turmeric supplement, how to pulse up dosage in time of need, and whether eating turmeric can stack up to high potency supplementation.    Also in this episode: Use code SUPER15 for 15% off Super Turmeric What is Inflammation? Labs to Monitor InflammationHigh Sensitivity C-reactive protein (HS-CRP) Ideally 1.5 Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) Ideally 25 Why are Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Problematic? What are Anti-Nutrients?Episode 127: In Defense of Vegetables Beat the Bloat Cleanse Digestaid GI Lining Support Episode 42: Transitioning from Vegan Is There Such a Thing as “Anti-Nutrients”? A Narrative Review of Perceived Problematic Plant Compounds Effect of cinnamon and turmeric on urinary oxalate excretion, plasma lipids, and plasma glucose in healthy subjects  Episode 195: Flatten the Fear and Cracking the Carnivore Code Does Turmeric Cause Kidney Stones and Gallstones? Benefits of Curcumin in the Human BodyCurcumin: A Review of Its' Effects on Human Health Efficacy of Turmeric Extracts and Curcumin for Alleviating the Symptoms of Joint Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials Curcumin inhibits formation of amyloid beta oligomers and fibrils, binds plaques, and reduces amyloid in vivo Modulation of Metabolic Detoxification Pathways Using Foods and Food-Derived Components: A Scientific Review with Clinical Application Episode 265: Uterine Health What Sets Super Turmeric ApartComparative absorption of curcumin formulations Food as Medicine Cutout Cookies Chicken Tikka Masala Turmeric Lemonade   Sponsors for this episode: This episode is also sponsored by FOND Bone Broth Tonics, Your Sous Chef in a Jar. FOND is slow simmered and lovingly tended from simmer to seal. They partner with organic farms and hand-pick and pair ingredients to optimize absorption and taste. Use code ALIMILLERRD to save at fondbonebroth.com.

The Sales Development Podcast
Tenbound Research Labs with Derrick Williams: Ep 2 - Zack Thompson - Zoominfo, Inc.

The Sales Development Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 45:18


Welcome to Episode 2 of Tenbound Research Labs hosted by Derrick Williams. A special series purely focused on researching the best technology tools out there that companies are using to drive Sales Development success.Zack Thompson, Senior Manager of Global Sales Development and Expansion at Zoominfo, Inc joins Derrick for Episode 2 and brings the value and insight with him!Derrick and Zack originally met at a Tenbound Sales Development Conference, and they share how far they've come since then. Zack details his journey from SDR to his current role at Zoominfo. Zack shares granular details about how Zoominfo sources their data and the type of quality assurance efforts that go into providing top notch intelligence. Fascinating stuff!Derrick and Zack wrap up this value packed episode by covering some of the technologies outside of Zoominfo that Zack and his team use to drive success. Tune in for an inspiring and informative interview with a true sales development professional and leader.NEW Research Report Sales Development Benchmarks 2021. Grab full report here: https://tenbound.com/downloads/the-sales-effectiveness-benchmark-report/NEW BOOK: The Sales Development Framework: by David Dulany and Kyle Vamvouris, we lay out a proven methodology for running a high performance Sales Development program, now available here in paperback Grab it here: https://www.amazon.com/Sales-Development-Framework-Productive-Program/dp/1736768905/#SDR #BDR #salesdevelopment #tenbound #podcast #sales #marketing #salesengagement #salesenablement #research #prospecting

The Bitcoin Podcast
The Bitcoin Podcast #379- Tascha of Tascha Labs

The Bitcoin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 48:32


Jessie and Dee interview Tascha of Tashca Labs a macroeconomics and her interest in cryptocurrency. Social Media Of Tascha LabsWebsite: https://taschalabs.com/Twitter:https://twitter.com/TaschaLabsNewsletter:https://taschalabs.com/newsletter/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzuQIjK_VdBFAFOsqILDYnANFT: https://opensea.io/assets/0x2a9e4045185c8d778b85610ca96d79bd8ecdc720/1The Bitcoin Podcast Social MediaJoin-Slack: https://launchpass.com/thebitcoinpodcastPatreon:https://www.patreon.com/TheBitcoinPodcastNetworkWebsite: http://thebitcoinpodcast.com/Twitter: https://twitter.com/thebtcpodcast

The Voicebot Podcast
Voice Year in Review 2021 The Enterprise Edition - Voicebot Podcast Ep 239

The Voicebot Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 90:06


This week we discuss voice year in review for 2021. All of the guests in this episode are based in Europe but operate globally so you will get both perspectives. Also, the conversation is heavily skewed toward enterprise voice applications because that drove so much of the important news in 2021. We start with an in-depth discussion of acquisitions and funding which were bigger in 2021 than in any previous year. Guests include: - Otto Soderlund is CEO and co-founder of Speechly which is pioneering a new full-duplex and super-fast voice interface for the web and mobile. - Dominik Meissner is a co-founder of 169 labs. The company has worked with Sony, Ikea, Lotto, Mercedes Benz, MINI, and Diageo. - Maarten Lens-Fitzgerald is the creator of Open Voice, one of the most popular newsletters in the industry, and founder of the Project Zilver consortium which seeks to make the lives of elder adults better through the use of voice assistants.

WeAreLATech LA Startups Podcast
Rachael McCrary of Gather Labs: WeAreLATech Startup Spotlight

WeAreLATech LA Startups Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 22:50


Don't miss out on the next WeAreLATech podcast episode, get notified by signing up here http://wearelatech.com/podcastWelcome to WeAreLATech's Los Angeles Tech Community Spotlight!   “Rachael McCrary of Gather Labs”WeAreLATech Podcast is a WeAreTech.fm production.To support our podcast go to http://wearelatech.com/believe To be featured on the podcast go to http://wearelatech.com/feature-your-la-startup/Want to be featured in the WeAreLATech Community? Create your profile here http://wearelatech.com/communityHost,Espree Devorahttps://twitter.com/espreedevorahttps://www.linkedin.com/in/espreeGuest,Rachael McCraryhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/rachaelmccrary/Listener Spotlight, Dave Whelanhttps://twitter.com/djwhelanFor a calendar of all LA Startup events go to, http://WeAreLATech.comTo further immerse yourself into the LA Tech community go to http://wearelatech.com/vipLinks Mentioned:Gather Labs, http://gatherlabs.la/contact/RX Bra, https://www.rxbra.comFounders Boost, https://www.foundersboost.comFounding Post, https://www.fundingpost.com/index.aspButton Wallet, https://buttonwallet.comCredits:Produced and Hosted by Espree Devora, http://espreedevora.comStory Produced, Edited and Mastered by Cory Jennings, https://www.coryjennings.com/Production and Voiceover by Adam Carroll, http://www.ariacreative.ca/Team support by Janice GeronimoMusic by Jay Huffman, https://soundcloud.com/jayhuffmanShort Title: Rachael McCrary 

Shane Barker's Marketing Madness Podcast
An Interview with the CEO & Co-Founder of Officium Labs

Shane Barker's Marketing Madness Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 22:21


Customer experience has become the major differentiator in the business world. We are bombarded with marketing messages trying to lure us to their products or services, but what if you could ensure that all your customers were satisfied? Officium Labs has recently launched a new service for businesses that allows them to gain insights about customer experience before they make an investment, and centralize support requests. On this episode, a customer experience expert and the CEO and Co-Founder of Officium Labs, Jonathan Shroyer talks about his company. Tune in to find out: What attracted him to the CX industry. How he came up with the idea to start Officium Labs. How the company is helping businesses serve their customers better. He also reveals his future plans for the company and for disrupting the CX industry. Listen to him talk about it all.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Cabeça de Lab
O que é Clean Architecture?

Cabeça de Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 38:57


Já se perguntou o que é e quais são as características de uma arquitetura limpa? No episódio de hoje batemos um papo uma galera muito fera aqui do Labs, para aprofundarmos mais esse assunto! Bora ouvir esse episódio, que tá massa demais! --- Edição completa por Rádiofobia Podcast e Multimídia: https://radiofobia.com.br/ --- Nos siga no Twitter e no Instagram: @luizalabs @cabecadelab Dúvidas, cabeçadas e sugestões, mande e-mail para o cabecadelab@luizalabs.com Participantes: Ariadyne Oliveira | @trescores Douglas Farinelli | @dougfarinelli Guilherme Zarelli | @gbzarelli Rafaela Sacconi | https://www.linkedin.com/in/rafaelassacconi/

Voices from The Bench
196: The Pink Mullet of Dental Labs: Vicki Thomas & Carolynn Capps

Voices from The Bench

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 53:42


So many great dental lab shows to look forward to in 2022: Vision 21: https://nadl.org/events/v21/2022/ Cal-Lab: https://cal-lab.org/ LMT Lab Day Chicago: https://lmtmag.com/lmtlabday DLAT Southwest Conference: https://members.dlat.org/membership/ FDLA Southern States Expo: https://www.fdla.net/symposium Ladies of the Mill: https://www.ladiesofthemill.com/ This week we are talking to two amazing ladies who came together during the pandemic to open the lab of their dreams. Vicki Thomas and Carolynn Capps come from different laboratory backgrounds but found a common ground with their unique skills they each bring. That's why they opened up She Designs Dental Studios (https://www.instagram.com/shedesignsdental/?hl=en) in Matthews, North Carolina. This all pink, female owned, and operated lab is different than the labs you usually see out there. Vicki and Carolyn talk about their backgrounds, how they met, and how they put together a different experience for their clients and patients, all under the light of a giant chandelier. Whip Mix (https://www.whipmix.com/) offers you the ultimate in ease, material flexibility and unattended production with the Roland DGA DWX-52DCi (https://www.whipmix.com/products/roland-dwx-52dci/) milling machine. The popular mill's automatic disc changer expands your lab production and profit, using a 6-slot Automatic Disc Changer, 15-station Automatic Tool Changer and several other automated features. The DWX-52DCi dental milling machine now comes with performance visualization software and other intelligent updates. The 5-axis mill even knows which tool to automatically swap out when tools have reached their designated lifespan. Just power it on, let it go, and automatically and accurately mill numerous dental restoration jobs with complete unattended confidence. If you want to save, and also grow, Gro3X (https://www.gro3x.com/) is, where you should go! Resins (https://www.gro3x.com/collections/print) to print night guards, for high-impact and flex, look no further, because we have them at Gro3X. Burs (https://www.gro3x.com/collections/mill) for your mills, Zirconia (https://www.gro3x.com/collections/aidite) for your crowns, with Gro3X you will be the hottest lab in town! And last but not least, if you seriously want to grow, add Gro3X Aligners (https://www.gro3x.com/pages/aligners), and your doctors will say Wowww! Special Guests: Carolynn Capps CDT and Vicki Thomas.

Is This Real?
What is in the Covid Vaccines?

Is This Real?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 95:16


on tonight's episode we explore the vaccines and the theories about the vaccine.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=51933422)

London Real
Deloitte & Ava Labs link up

London Real

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 5:57


Watch the Full Episode with John Wu at https://londonreal.tv/john-wu-the-blockchain-is-for-everyone-how-avalanche-is-winning-the-race-to-democratise-finance/

State of Demand Gen
229 - Starting a Marketing Movement | The Refine Labs Origin Story

State of Demand Gen

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 88:47


Refine Labs is widely known throughout the B2B SaaS space as being an innovator. At this point, most people know our views on current marketing "best practices". What people don't know (and what we get asked often) is about the origins of Refine Labs. How were the strategies we implement first discovered? How are we consistently attracting top talent? How did we go about building one of the best company cultures out there (if we don't say so ourselves)? In this episode, Megan sits down with Chris to talk about all of these things and more in the first-ever episode dedicated to answering questions about the origins of Refine Labs. Thanks to our friends at Hatch for producing this episode. Get unlimited podcast editing at usehatch.fm.

Core Conversations
Episode 47 (Sewing Labs)

Core Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 31:55


Bikes & Big Ideas
Hustle Labs' Category-Defying Magnetic Pedals

Bikes & Big Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 38:02


Clipless vs. flat pedals is a hotly debated topic in the mountain bike world, but now there's a third choice — Hustle Labs' Avery magnetic pedals. We were, frankly, a bit skeptical about this new in-between option, but we've had three reviewers spending time on the Avery, and they've wildly exceeded our expectations. So we sat down with Hustle's Design Engineer, Tripp Hurt, to talk about where the concept originated; how the pedals work; who they are (and aren't) for; what's next from Hustle; and a whole lot more.TOPICS & TIMES:Origin story & Craig's “ecliffany” (2:14)Avery pedal design (4:36)Weight & Who are they for? (12:31)Tripp's background & bike shoe ergonomics (16:57)What's next from Hustle? (28:31)Tripp's Big Ideas (30:12)RELATED LINKS:Hustle Avery REM Tech PedalsGetting Here: Gunnison & Crested ButteThis Week's Gear GiveawayGear Giveaway / Newsletter SignupBecome a Blister Member / Get our new Buyer's GuideRegister for the 2022 Blister SummitBlister Mountain Bike Buyer's Guide See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Blockcrunch: Crypto Deep Dives
Utopia Labs: "We Will Let Anyone, Anywhere to Participate in DAOs" - Kaito Cunningham, Alexander Wu, Ep. 177

Blockcrunch: Crypto Deep Dives

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 32:33


DAOs have grown 660% in the past 2 years, with ~1M DAO members globally controlling over $17B in treasury assets. Surprisingly, there isn't a a platform to manage DAOs financially...until now. Utopia Labs, fresh off a raise from Coinbase, is building the OS for DAOs. We discuss: Employees vs. contractors: what type of labor do DAOs need? Major players in the DAO infra space Why Web 2 incumbents (Gusto, Stripe) can't compete in Web 3 Secrets of onboarding DAOs Host: Jason Choi @mrjasonchoi . Not financial advice. ------------ Sponsors ------------- PARASWAP is the best place to trade your tokens and get the best price in DeFi today. Get started on paraswap.io/blockcrunch NOTIONAL: Borrow & lend at fixed rates for up to 1 year, or contribute liquidity to earn interest, fees, & NOTE token incentives with notional.finance HEDERA HASHGRAPH: Fund your project quickly and easily with the HBAR Foundation. Apply for a grant and be put on the fast track to success at https://www.hbarfoundation.org/apply ------------ Disclosures ------------- Disclaimer: Jason Choi is a General Partner at Spartan Capital, a subsidiary of The Spartan Group. All opinions expressed by Jason and podcast guests are solely their own opinions and do not reflect the opinion of The Spartan Group and any of its subsidiaries

In The Conversation
No Players In The Room

In The Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 99:58


Damien and Ali get In The Conversation about Christmas, Power, and Insecure. Twitter.com/dlemoncomedy // Twitter.com/mrmuhammad Keep up with the conversation on Facebook: Facebook.com/InTheConversation

The Modern Extractor
S4 E05 - Analytical Lab Testing Of Cannabinoids, With Ryan Bellone Of KCA Labs

The Modern Extractor

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 75:18


Ryan Bellone, Commercial Director of KCA Labs, joins us to discuss analytical lab testing of cannabinoids. We go deep into the instruments and methods used to accurately identify and quantify the compounds present in a sample. We also get into analytical standards, how they're produced, and the uphill battle the lab testing industry is fighting to create the standards needed to test all the new cannabinoids hitting the market.

Public Health Review Morning Edition
88: Labs Prepared for Winter

Public Health Review Morning Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 6:52


ASTHO CEO Mike Fraser hopes the new year signals a shift in the pandemic; Kelly Wroblewski, Director of Infectious Diseases for the Association of Public Health Laboratories, says labs are ready for whatever the pandemic brings this winter; ASTHO plans a webinar featuring it's disability and preparedness specialists; and ASTHO has a new blog article about viral hepatitis that includes four ideas jurisdictions might consider as they make plans to slow infections. Website: Association of Public Health Laboratories ASTHO Webinar: Stories of Inclusion One Year of Lessons Learned from Disability ASTHO Blog Article: Forward Focus – The Urgent Need to Address Rising Cases of Viral Hepatitis

Proof to Product
231 | 2021 Year-End Recap with Katie Hunt

Proof to Product

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 9:19


With the new year right around the corner, my team and I have been making time to really reflect on the past year. It's been a year of introspection–about our businesses, about the state of the world, and about how we balance our work and personal lives. But I'm proud to say that Proof to Product and our students have grown and accomplished more this year than ever before. In today's episode, I wanted to share all the milestones the Proof to Product team and our students have reached in the past year. Plus, I'm giving you a sneak peek at all the exciting things we're planning for 2022. You'll learn: How my team and I are reflecting on the year so far Our LABS and Paper Camp students' big wins What you can expect from us in the new year For full show notes, resources and a transcription, please head to bit.ly/PTPEp231 For more support with your marketing & sales strategies, check out LABS at http://www.prooftoproduct.com/labs

In The Conversation
Cooking Sushi

In The Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 99:01


Damien and Ali get In The Conversation about George Carlin, vibe checks, and finally Power. Twitter.com/dlemoncomedy // Twitter.com/mrmuhammad Keep up with the conversation on Facebook: Facebook.com/InTheConversation

Proof to Product
230 | You May Want to Turn Off Zip Code Protection on Faire with Genesis Duncan | Graphic Anthology

Proof to Product

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 37:38


For most designers and makers, our relationships with retailers can make a major difference in our businesses. And while I know it can be discouraging to watch your outreach emails go unanswered, this kind of slow, steady work is the path to a sustainable and successful business. The key is to keep showing up, put your best foot forward, and get yourself seen by the right people. In this episode, I'm talking to designer, illustrator, and store owner Genesis Duncan about her experience being both a retailer and a wholesaler. She's sharing the mindset shift that happened when she got to see the industry from the other side. Plus, she's explaining how zip code protection in Faire might actually be limiting your business. You'll learn: Making the mindset shift from “maker” to “business owner” How your Faire zip code settings might be limiting or excluding buyers Why it's so important to keep showing up, even if it doesn't feel like you're being heard For full show notes, resources and a transcription, please head to bit.ly/PTPEp230 For more support with your marketing & sales strategies, check out LABS at http://www.prooftoproduct.com/labs

The Michael Labs Show
The Michael Labs Show #245 - Government Is Garbage

The Michael Labs Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 22:42


In this episode I talk about why we as a country trust everything that the Government tells us, I also talk about the burning down of the Christmas Tree in NYC. - The Michael Labs Show is a long sit down talk formatted Podcast from myself and friends and guests. The subjects and topics are random and it is designed to be a conversation and free flowing based Podcast. Hope you enjoy! Thank You!