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Latest podcast episodes about Patagonia

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #65: Wachusett Mountain President Jeff Crowley

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 102:27


The Storm Skiing Podcast is sponsored by Mountain Gazette - Listen to the podcast for discount codes on subscriptions and merch.WhoJeff Crowley, President of Wachusett Mountain, MassachusettsRecorded onNovember 29, 2021Why I interviewed himWhen the Crowleys showed up at “Mt. Wachusett Ski Area” in 1969, the place looked like any of the hundred-plus rinky-dink operations dotting the state at the time:Like subsistence farmers coaxing shoots from cracked earth in some pre-industrial past, Wachusett and its kin eked out a seasonal living. Simple operations powered by simple machines and whatever fell from the sky. Most failed. Wachusett thrived. Today, it looks like this:As I’ve written about other regionally beloved ski areas that persisted as their neighbors disappeared into the wilderness - Plattekill, Jiminy Peak - there was nothing inevitable about this. The Crowleys made it happen. Wachusett is not merely a survivor. It is one of the most successful ski areas in the country. Beloved and profitable, it hosts more than 400,000 annual skier visits on 130-ish acres. That’s only 50,000 fewer than 3,000-acre Whitefish. And yet, it works. The place is an absolute machine, every part of the experience optimized and streamlined, the relentless focus on one thing: to get as many people as possible skiing as much as possible.What we talked aboutWachusett ranked ahead of Stowe on Ski’s reader poll; opening weekend 2021; how a Massachusetts ski area beats so many larger, farther-north ski areas to open year after year; “we’re all crazy” at Wachusett; what the mountain looked like when the Crowleys showed up in 1969; the ski area’s Civilian Conservation Corps legacy; the oldest trail on the mountain; how Wachusett thrived as so many other Massachusetts ski areas failed; how a day skiing at Mount Snow inspired Ralph Crowley to buy Wachusett; how it feels when your dad buys a ski area; a cross-country adventure in lift installation; why Wachusett is likely to be a family-run operation for the foreseeable future; the Wachusett diaspora; the origins of Wa-Wa-Wachusett:…400,000-plus skier visits on a 130-acre ski area and the Wachusett MACHINE; climate-proofing the ski area; the irrepressible Worcester ski culture; the Wachusett you encounter will depend upon the time of day you show up; the importance of local ski journalism and what we lose when it fades; the vertical-drop and French fry battles between Berkshire East and Wachusett; how turmoil over old-growth forest near the mountain’s summit set the ski area’s modern footprint; why Wachusett doesn’t have marked glades; whether the ski area could ever lose its lease; what the ski area is considering as a replacement for its summit lift; sponsored chairlifts; why Wachusett installed a 300-vertical-foot high-speed quad; where the old Monadnock lift went; the Vickery Bowl expansion; whether the ski area could ever expand again; how Wachusett helps preserve land all over the state; why the mountain grooms twice per day; why the ski area will continue making snow into the end of March; beating Killington to open in 2020; that one time you could ski in May in Massachusetts; why the mountain continued to limit season pass sales and cut the ski day into sessions for 2021-22, and whether those changes will persist; keeping lift-ticket prices low; reciprocal season-pass partners; why Wachusett didn’t migrate from the MAX Pass to the Ikon Pass; whether the mountain could ever join another multi-mountain pass; reaction to the advent of the Epkon passes in New England; why Wachusett pass sales persist in this environment; you won’t believe the ski area that Wachusett bid on last year; and why Crowley thinks I should buy a ski area and why I probably never will.Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewBecause from my seat, it doesn’t make sense: the Epkon passes keep getting more affordable, their kingdoms spreading like videogame emperors, and Wachusett doesn’t flinch. It was on a megapass and the megapass disappeared and the mountain didn’t join another one. They’re just like, “nah we’re good.” But in an accent impossible to imitate and designed to make me look ridiculous if I tried. Wachusett just keeps going. A third-grade bubblegum-wrapper detective could figure out why: great location, good managers, rabid local skiers. Fine. It’s still surrounded by abandoned ski areas. What makes this place special, a true independent independent in an era of consolidation and backed-into-a-corner coalition building? Listen to Crowley and you’ll get it pretty quick. I sure did.What I got wrongI said on the podcast that Jiminy Peak and Pats Peak had lift-ticket prices exceeding $100. This is incorrect. Jiminy Peak’s top rate for the 2021-22 ski season is $99. Pats Peak tops out at $89. I also referred to Connecticut’s Woodbury ski area as “Middlebury,” making my second ridiculous yeah-I’m-not-from-New-England mistake in as many weeks.Why you should ski WachusettWell, if you live in eastern Massachusetts, the answer is pretty straightforward: because it’s right there, a thousand-footer parked in your backyard. High-speed lifts and twice-a-day grooming and ticket/pass prices that are entirely reasonable. No well-I-guess-I-don’t-really-need-my-kidney-medication sticker-shock here. Even the cafeteria is affordable. It’s the same reason I ski Mountain Creek from my perch in New York City – there’s no reason not to.If you’re anyone else, from anywhere else, there are infinite other reasons why Wachusett may appeal to you: to support a family-owned business, to be part of the mania, to witness The MACHINE. I don’t know. I figured out a while ago that I could spend the rest of my lift skiing the same six ski areas in Vermont that everyone else did, or I could explore a little. I’m having a lot more fun since I decided on the latter path. Five Star Recommend. Just go.Additional reading/videosLift Blog’s inventory of Wachusett’s lift fleetHistoric Wachusett trailmaps on skimap.orgWachusett perennially appears among the top 20 resorts on Ski magazine’s Eastern resort rankings - it nabbed the No. 15 spot this yearLongtime Worcester Telegram & Gazette snowsports columnist Shaun Sutner appeared on the podcast last week, and we discussed Wachusett and Worcester at length. His first column this season focuses on the next-generation of family managers set to guide the ski area into the future.Crowley and I discussed: what is the real vertical drop of Berkshire East (1,180 feet advertised), and Wachusett (1,000 feet advertised)?Support The Storm by shopping at our partners: Patagonia | Helly Hansen | Rossignol | Salomon | Utah Skis | Berg’s Ski and Snowboard Shop | Peter Glenn | Kemper Snowboards | Gravity Coalition | Darn Tough | Skier's Peak | Hagan Ski Mountaineering | Moosejaw | Skis.com |The House | Telos Snowboards | Christy Sports | Evo | Hotels Combined | Black Diamond | Eastern Mountain Sports Subscribe at www.stormskiing.com

For the Love of Climbing
34: Dreamers Only

For the Love of Climbing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 45:47


Dreams don't just fall into our heads out of nowhere. They're cultivated and built from passionate ideas. Big dreamers know that they don't happen immediately—they require patience, self-compassion, and above all, the courage to pursue them, regardless of the odds.Debbie credits her resilience to her childhood struggles in Catalonia and learned that sometimes, you have to travel to the other side of the world to discover what moves you the most.For the Love of Climbing is brought to you by Deuter USA, Gnarly Nutrition, Allez Outdoors, and presented by Patagonia.Music by: Kakurenbo and Chad Crouch. A HUGE thank you to Chad Crouch for creating absolute magic, and to Peter Darmi for mixing this episode.Cover photo by Kika MacFarlane.Read the transcript here.Follow us on Instagram for podcast (pod-Kath?) updates and general life things.Support us on Patreon in exchange for a warm, fuzzy feeling.

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #64: Worcester Telegram & Gazette Snowsports Columnist Shaun Sutner

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 110:02


The Storm Skiing Podcast is sponsored by Mountain Gazette - Listen to the podcast for discount codes on subscriptions and merch.WhoShaun Sutner, snowsports columnist for the Worcester Telegram & Gazette and Telegram.comRecorded onNovember 22, 2021Why I interviewed himBecause for skiing to thrive, it needs ski media to help tell its story. And I mean actual reporting-based journalism. Yes, it needs the hype – the cliff drops, the pow shots, the flippidy-doodle park brahs, this:But it also needs writers who can tell the story of the more approachable lift-served skiing world in which most of us dwell. Writers who know the local markets and local owners and local skiers and local idiosyncrasies. In the great ski media wipeout that swept away the bulk of our U.S. magazines, we also lost a lot of local ski beats. This matters. Good journalism, grounded in relationships and research, can counterbalance the noisy and atrocious swirl of social-media garbage that has become many skier’s primary information source about the sport.Sutner provides this corrective. In a snowsports column he has written for nearly two decades, he explores the world of New England skiing from his Worcester, Massachusetts base. He knows the people who run the ski areas, understands the market dynamics driving the sport’s evolution, and skis 80 days a year on the mountains he writes about. He knows the uphill and the downhill, the groomers and the backcountry, the people who can show him the stashes in all of them. There is nobody better equipped to help us understand what New England skiing is, how it became that, and what it might be in the future.What we talked aboutI can’t pronounce “Worcester”; the appeal of New England skiing; Southeast and Mid-Atlantic ski culture; Sutner’s long-running Telegram snowsports column; it’s beef time, snowshoers; what skiing loses when local journalism shrivels; the amazing snowy ski town that is Worcester; the slick operation at Wachusett; journalism’s rough transition to digital; newspaper paywalls; how to ski 80 days a year with a full-time job; surveying the Massachusetts ski landscape; the rise of Berkshire East; the renaissance at Catamount; the art of dodging large crowds at Stowe, Mount Snow, Loon, Cannon, and other busy mountains; regional ski passes; the Berkshire East-Wachusett French fry beef; you won’t believe which Massachusetts ski area has the highest base elevation in the state; thoughts on the state’s lost ski areas – Mount Tom, Pine Ridge, Brodie, Blandford, Mt. Watatic; the most endangered ski area in Massachusetts; the resilience of the Connecticut ski scene; Worcester’s cross-country ski park; the fate of Worcester’s once-thriving network of ropetow bumps; how Ski Ward endures; the distinct ski areas of North Conway; the explosion of the Mount Washington backcountry ski scene; the North Conway-Worcester connection; the appeal and frustrations of Attitash; brainstorming solutions for the atrocious summit triple; Vail Resorts’ evolving uphill policies; the odds that currently proposed expansions at Gunstock, Ragged, Sunapee, and Waterville Valley succeed; the buzz around Ragged; thoughts on Loon’s new eight-pack; the right balance between uphill and downhill capacity; Loon’s undersized gondola; the twisted history and fate of Tenney; whether Les Otten’s huge ski area development at The Balsams could succeed; the secret behind Magic’s comeback; beef with Mad River Glen; thoughts on the evolution of Stowe under Vail; how the Indy, Epic, and Ikon passes have changed New England skiing for the better; whether Vail’s crowd-management efforts will be enough to offset exploding Epic Pass sales; why the success of Hermitage Club matters to the average skier; whether the club will succeed this time; Boyne’s purchase of Shawnee Peak; the revitalizations of Saddleback and Bosquet under socially conscious investment groups; and Vail Mountain versus Beaver CreekWhy I thought that now was a good time for this interviewBecause Sutner’s column begins every year on Thanksgiving week, just as the Northeast ski season (typically) ramps up in earnest. It seemed like a good time to survey the happenings of New England skiing, from the concussive impacts of the Epic and Ikon Passes to New Hampshire resort expansions to the diligent multi-generational families running Massachusetts ski areas. And I wanted to help promote his column, a fine piece of weekly journalism that will make your ski season better.What I got wrongDuring the interview, I estimated the number of ski areas in New England to be “80 or 90 or maybe more.” The correct number is 90, according to the National Ski Areas Association.Why you should read Sutner’s columnBecause it’s focused, intelligent, researched, fact-checked, spell-checked, and generally just the sort of professional-level writing that is increasingly subsumed by the LOLing babble of the emojisphere. That’s fine – everyone is lost in the scroll. But as the pillars of ski journalism burn and topple around us, it’s worth supporting whatever’s left. Gannett, the parent company of the Worcester Telegram & Gazette, has imposed fairly stringent paywalls on his work. While I think these local papers are best served by offering a handful of free articles per month, the paper is worth supporting if it’s your local – in the same way you might buy a local ski pass to complement your Epkon Pass. Good, consistent writing is not so easy to find. Sutner delivers. Support his craft.Where you can read Sutner’s columnSutner’s column kicks off Thanksgiving week each year and runs until April. This season’s inaugural edition, released yesterday, starts, as usual, close to his home base of Worcester. A preview:The last time I checked in with Chris Stimpson in this column he was a University of Vermont student on a barnstorming van tour of Western ski areas with a band of fellow collegiate free skiers.Stimpson, now 28, is the new media spokesman and public relations manager for Wachusett Mountain Ski Area as of this season, and also serves as the ski area’s terrain park manager. He’s part of a group of third-generation Crowley family members who occupy key roles at the thriving family business founded by their grandfather, Ralph Crowley, in 1969.Stimpson’s cousin David Crowley Jr. is the operations manager, and cousin Courtney Crowley is the new head of group sales. …What this generational shift in the making means for Wachusett customers is that the independent ski area is in solid, experienced family hands for the future and is not likely to ever be sold off to a big corporate chain.Read more…A few of Sutner’s past columns:Earliest Ski-Area Opening in Northeast Goes to Wachusett (Nov. 27, 2020)Winchester a Fresh Voice on Northeast Ski Scene (Dec. 9, 2020)New Hampshire’s Black Mountain ‘Is Like a Trip into the Past’ (Feb. 17, 2021)Ski Industry Makes Strides Toward Inclusion (March 31, 2021)Follow up on stuff we talked about in the interviewFollow Shaun on Twitter, Instagram, and FacebookShaun and I discussed this lost ski area in Van Cortland Park in The Bronx. A ropetow operation may have also briefly existed in Queens.We also talked about the story I had yet to write about a new owner buying Woodbury ski area in Connecticut – that story is here.Shaun talked about the lost Mt. Atatic Ski area - it looks like a cool little operation. Here’s a great write-up about the backcountry scene there on Lift Line Blog.Shaun references the Wa-Wa-Wachusett theme song in our interview. Here you go:Support The Storm by shopping at our partners:Patagonia | Helly Hansen | Rossignol | Salomon | Utah Skis | Berg’s Ski and Snowboard Shop | Peter Glenn | Kemper Snowboards | Gravity Coalition | Darn Tough | Skier's Peak | Hagan Ski Mountaineering | Moosejaw | Skis.com |The House | Telos Snowboards | Christy Sports | Evo | Hotels Combined | Black Diamond | Eastern Mountain Sports Subscribe at www.stormskiing.com

Wet Fly Swing Fly Fishing Podcast
WFS 266 - The Boundary Waters in Minnesota with Riverhorse Nakadate

Wet Fly Swing Fly Fishing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 54:34


Show Notes: https://wetflyswing.com/266 The purpose of this episode is to raise your awareness of the Boundary Waters status and encourage you to help preserve the great wilderness area in the country. Riverhorse Nakadate shares some insight into what he's been up to lately with Patagonia helping save the Boundary Waters movement. Click here to help protect the Boundary Waters: https://www.savetheboundarywaters.org/ Boundary Waters Show Notes with Riverhorse Nakadate 03:10 - Riverhorse is working on a new Patagonia film with Tony Czech 07:17 - The Darkest Web - Protecting the Gulf of Mexico from illegal fishing 09:30 - Riverhorse talks Paddling in the back country - read more in detail here 24:01 - The Punch Project - is a project that celebrates food, culture, music, and art 25:45 - Riverhorse was on the Fretboard Journal Podcast 26:05 - Riverhorse's reading in The Bent - MeatEater's Podcast (at 47:50) 37:45 - Trout Unlimited is doing some great stuff throughout the country 40:14 - Patagonia Action Works is where you can learn how to help your local community 40:53 - Riverhorse's fishing love story - Love and Water  41:21 - Tom Skerritt the actor from 'River Runs Through It' movie has a foundation for wounded soldiers called The Red Badge Project 45:56 - Riverhorse is writing a book and plans to publish it a year from now 49:13 - We'll bring Riverhose back in for a bonus episode with one of his poetry readings in the coming WFS episodes You can find Riverhorse on Instagram @riverhorse_nakadate Boundary Waters Conclusion with Riverhorse Nakadate The country's greatest wilderness area - is threatened by human interference. Riverhorse explained on the podcast how we can help save it. How can you start making a difference within your local community? Let me know in the comments or send me a DM on Instagram. Show Notes: https://wetflyswing.com/266

Noah Kagan Presents
Start ANY Business With Less Than $100

Noah Kagan Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 14:20


The #1 excuse that wantrepreneurs make for not starting a business is that they don't have the resources: They don't have the money, they don't know how to code, they don't know the right people, etc. In this episode, I show you how to start ANY business with less than $100. I'm going to show you how I would start a tech startup like Uber, a fast-food business like Chipotle, or a clothing company like Patagonia. Show notes: https://okdork.com/podcast/226 Use this link to get 10% off at checkout on AppSumo: https://appsumo.com/?coupon=noah10&code=noah10  

Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders
James Joaquin (Obvious Ventures) - World Positive Investing

Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 54:28


James Joaquin is the co-founder and managing director of Obvious Ventures, leading the team's investments focused on plant-forward approaches to food (like Beyond Meat), “good for you” consumer goods (like Olly), and companies at the forefront of how people find and do their best work (like Incredible Health). Joaquin has been working in venture capital since 2007. Prior to investing, he served as president and CEO of Xoom.com and president and CEO of Ofoto, and co-founded When.com. In this conversation with Stanford adjunct lecturer and STVP director of principled entrepreneurship Jack Fuchs, Joaquin discusses his commitment to “world positive investing” and his belief that many highly successful 21st century businesses will be devoted to solving the world's biggest problems.

Profit From the Inside with Joel Block
145: Outmaneuvering: The Inside Track on the Best Branding

Profit From the Inside with Joel Block

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 34:07


Contact info: Marc Gutman WILDSTORY 303-818-6533 https://www.WildStory.com Marc@Wildstory.com Bio: Marc Gutman is a storyteller, entrepreneur, adventurer, and idealist. But most importantly, Marc loves brands and their stories. Marc held several positions in the story business. He served as Story Editor for Oliver Stone's Illusion Entertainment, and wrote stories and screenplays for Oliver Stone, Warner Bros., and 20th Century Fox. In addition to his time in Hollywood, Marc itched the entrepreneurial scratch by founding a multimillion dollar tech company in Boulder, Colorado. Today, Marc focuses his energy on Wildstory, the brand strategy studio for brands that want to outmaneuver their competition. Wildstory has worked with brands like Thor Industries, Airstream, El Cap, Planet Granite, Earth Treks, Movement, Inboard, Outward Bound School, and First Descents. Marc is on a mission to help the world après… one brand at a time. He is also the host of the Baby Got Backstory podcast; delving into the story behind great brands such as Priceline.com, Patagonia, Ugg, Build-A-Bear Workshop and Kswiss. Marc lives outside of Boulder, CO with his saintly wife and three dirty kids Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Locales Unknown
Exploring Chile with Francisca Arancibia Duran

Locales Unknown

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 66:57


In this episode, Francisca starts us off with an overview of Chile's various regions, climates and local cultures. While Patagonia garners a lot of attention for its spectacular scenery, fjords and trekking opportunities, the Atacama desert, central Chile and Easter Island are all covered and prospective itineraries are proposed for travelers with different time frames. We also discuss budgets, food and wine options, accommodations and the best way to travel between sights. Get ready to take a trip to the end of the world to discover a hidden corner of South America. Helpful Links:Explore the Torres del Paine CircuitExplore Viña del MarVisit SantiagoExplore Bahia InglesaFun Fact: Chile is home to the 2nd largest swimming pool in the world, San Alfonso del Mar

BLISTER Podcast
A Life Lived Wild: Rick Ridgeway

BLISTER Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 54:24


Rick Ridgeway has lived right at the center of the modern outdoor recreation movement. He was a part of the first American ascent of K2; he has gone on numerous adventures with his friends, Patagonia founder, Yvon Chouinard and The North Face founder, Doug Tompkins, and filmmaker, Jimmy Chin; and he has been right there working to protect wild places with them, Kristine Tompkins, and others. We talk to Rick about all of the above and his exceptional new book, Life Lived Wild: Adventures at the Edge of the Map.TOPICS & TIMES:How would you describe your new book? (3:07)When did you first get into writing (12:10)Prison & Candice (17:22)The road not taken (19:24)Entrepreneurship (22:12)Your relationship with Patagonia (32:20)Three Questions (45:02)Your legacy (48:13)What's the best question I haven't asked you? (50:01)RELATED LINKSRick's book: Life Lived WildGetting Here: Gunnison & Crested ButteRegister for the 2022 Blister SummitThis Week's Gear GiveawayGear Giveaway / Newsletter SignupBecome a Blister Member / Get our new Buyer's GuideBlister YouTube Channel See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Raising Wildlings
Nutritious Movement with Katy Bowman

Raising Wildlings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 46:30


We know that as a society we are living an increasingly sedentary lifestyle and children have never moved as little as they do today. That's why people like Katy Bowman, author of Move your DNA and now her latest book Grow Wild, are so important in helping us to recognise why we need to move more. Katy joins us today from the US to chat to us about movement and to give us some simple actionable changes that aim to combat our super sedentary culture.

DealMakers
Petri Alava On Raising $56 Million To Revolutionize The Fashion Industry With Recycling Technology

DealMakers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 30:40


Petri Alava went from corporate CEO to founding his first startup at 50 years old. They've already raised tens of millions of dollars in funding while securing global partners like H&M, Patagonia, and Wrangler. His venture, Infinited Fiber has acquired investment from top-tier investors like Nidoco, H&M CO:LAB, Adidas, and Bestseller.

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
479 Rick Ridgeway and Listener Ryan in KS

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 150:22


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more This Week's Sponsors are The Quip Electric Toothbrush GetQuip.com/Standup and Indeed.com/StandUp I have a great news recap for you today and then we get to a very special interview with Rick Ridgeway at 37 mins By the time he was thirty, Rick Ridgeway had gone on more adventures than most people do in an entire lifetime. Called “the real Indiana Jones” by Rolling Stone magazine, Ridgeway doesn't shy away from unknown territory. In fact, he seeks it. Ridgeway is recognized as one of the world's foremost mountaineers. He was part of the 1978 team that were the first Americans to summit K2, the world's second-highest mountain, and he has climbed new routes and explored little-known regions on six continents.Ridgeway is also an environmentalist, writer, photographer, filmmaker, and businessman. For fifteen years beginning in 2005 he oversaw environmental affairs at the outdoor clothing company Patagonia. Before joining Patagonia, he was owner/president of Adventure Photo & Film, a leading stock photo and film agency. He has authored six books and dozens of magazine articles and produced or directed many documentary films. He was honored by National Geographic with their Lifetime Achievement in Adventure Award and was awarded the Lowell Thomas Award by the Explorers' Club. Ridgeway serves on the boards of Tompkins Conservation and the Turtle Conservancy. He lives in Ojai, California. At the beginning of his memoir Life Lived Wild, Adventures at the Edge of the Map, Rick Ridgeway tells us that if you add up all his many expeditions, he's spent over five years of his life sleeping in tents: “And most of that in small tents pitched in the world's most remote regions.” It's not a boast so much as an explanation. Whether at elevation or raising a family back at sea level, those years taught him, he writes, “to distinguish matters of consequence from matters of inconsequence.” He leaves it to his readers, though, to do the final sort of which is which. Some of his travels made, and remain, news: the first American ascent of K2; the first direct coast-to-coast traverse of Borneo; the first crossing on foot of a 300-mile corner of Tibet so remote no outsider had ever seen it. Big as these trips were, Rick keeps an eye out for the quiet surprises, like the butterflies he encounters at 23,000 feet on K2 or the furtive silhouettes of wild-eared pheasants in Tibet. What really comes through best in Life Lived Wild, though, are his fellow travelers. There's Patagonia founder Yvon Chouinard, and Doug Tompkins, best known for cofounding The North Face but better remembered for his conservation throughout South America. Some companions don't make the return journey. Rick treats them all with candor and straightforward tenderness. And through their commitments to protecting the wild places they shared, he discovers his own. A master storyteller, this long-awaited memoir is the book end to Ridgeway's impressive list of publications, including Seven Summits (Grand Central Publishing, 1988), The Shadow of Kilmanjaro (Holt, 1999), and The Big Open(National Geographic, 2005). -------------------------- 1:22 Next I have a conversation with Ryan in KS who I last spoke to back in August on Episode 420 Ryan is a farmer in Kansas who is married and has 4 kids. We had another productive conversation and I think you will like it Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page  

Making Marketing
‘It's not a blank canvas': Teva's Anders Bergstrom on how the sandals brand capitalized on recent fashion trends

Making Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 32:44


It's a good time to be an outdoor apparel brand. According to NPD Group, outdoorwear sales are up 45% this year, and some brands have been able to dominate this growing fervor. Teva, the shoe brand known for its velcro strapped sandal, has seen sales grow. In the '80s, when the sandals first hit the market, Teva was the leader in the space. Then, after a couple decades of dominance, fervor died down, as other competitors like Chacos and Keens began to encroach on its territory. But over the last three years the company has been focused on reemerging as a footwear leader. “In short order,” said Anders Bergstrom, Teva's global general manager, “we've retaken the number one position in sport sandals.” Bergstrom joined the Modern Retail Podcast and spoke about how he's been handling all the curveballs thrown over the last few years. Teva -- which is pronounced ‘teh-vah,' not ‘tee-vah' -- has been around since 1985. “The idea -- the notion -- of a sport sandal did not exist until 1985,” said Bergstrom. Teva, he explained, was the first of its kind. “What Teva did was introduce an active component to the sandal category in a way that had not been done before,” he said. That has been the North Star for the brand -- and it's long been associated with its well-known classic style. But the brand has been staying relevant with new styles and even brand collaborations. Some partnerships include the singer Jhené Like, Outdoor Voices and Cotpaxi. “The sport sandal itself is so iconic -- it's so unusual -- that, for lack of a better term, collab partners just have a field day tweaking it,” said Bergstrom. “It's not a blank canvas -- it is just a number of straps that are attached to a midsole.” What also has kept Teva relevant of late is the fact that a certain type of outdoor apparel has become quite fashionable. What some describe gorpcore -- which includes outdoor classics like Patagonia vests and hiking boots -- has become all the rage in New York fashion circles. Said Bergstrom, the way to know a fashion trend is on the horizon is to look at what's going on in Japan. “What we call gorpcore is really just the way people in Tokyo dress, said Bergstrom. “It's really fascinating.” He went on to explain how this has led to a new apparel adage. “If we ever have a question about whether a product is going to work or not, [ask] can you see it on the streets of Tokyo?”

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #62: Jackson Hole Mountain Resort President Mary Kate Buckley

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021


The Storm Skiing Podcast is sponsored by Mountain Gazette - Listen to the podcast for discount codes on subscriptions and merch.WhoMary Kate Buckley, President of Jackson Hole Mountain ResortRecorded onNovember 15, 2021Why I interviewed herIn a nation machine-stamped with endless copies of Burger Kings and Sunoco stations and cut-out-of-a-cornfield housing developments, very few things truly stand out. Your buddy gives you a house tour and you’re like, “Wow Seth five bathrooms that’s so many more bathrooms than I expected you would ever have when we used to throw stale donuts at backyard racoons for sport.” But really do you care about Seth’s bathroom inventory? You don’t care.I don’t know how many bathrooms Jackson Hole has. And neither do you. And neither does anyone else, because no one has ever counted them. Because the point of Jackson is not boujee American materialism but the tram blowing 4,000-plus feet up the mountain and the rowdy endless kingdom of snowy lines beneath it. This is a place that stands out. In any context. It is the peak of U.S. skiing. It has biggers but no betters. A few peers, maybe. Alta-Snowbird. Palisades Tahoe. Big Sky. What else? For raw terrain, no one. Not in this country. It may be – it probably is – our greatest ski resort. If the aliens arrived and said “Hey you’ve got 24 hours to evacuate before we blow up your planet and I’m sorry but you’re only allowed to bring one ski area per country,” I have little doubt that U.S. Americans would choose Jackson Hole to load aboard the space ark. Lines are gonna be long though because I heard the aliens floated by Costco and picked up a few crates of Ikon Passes on their way off the planet. Sorry bros.What we talked aboutMary Kate’s globe-trotting decades with Disney and Nike at the dawn of ecommerce; running a vineyard in Tuscany and how that connected back to skiing; settling down in Jackson Hole after living and skiing all over the world; why she joined the ski area’s board of directors and eventually accepted an offer to become the resort’s president; how much the head of Jackson Hole gets to ski; taming the beast to open pieces of Jackson’s vast terrain to beginners and families; the mountain’s fierce terrain; how to prepare to drop into Corbet’s Couloir; whether Jackson Hole could ever expand its managed footprint out onto the gated terrain that surrounds it; where the ski area thinned glades over the summer; why the Jackson Hole Tram is the true alpha lift of American skiing; whether the mountain would ever install a redundant lift to the summit; the benefits of limiting uphill capacity; details on coming replacements for Thunder and Sublette; where the mountain could install an all-new lift; whether we could ever see a lift on the Hobacks; whether we could see a six- or eight-pack on Jackson Hole; how and why the resort limits the number of skiers on the mountain; where the mountain widened trails over the summer; why Jackson Hole closes down in early April despite a healthy snowbase remaining on the mountain; the mountain’s growing reliance on and commitment to renewable energy; the Ikon Pass lands like an asteroid; the persistence of anti-Ikon sentiment; why the resort can’t share Ikon Pass visit numbers and why it wishes it could; why Jackson Hole moved off of the Ikon Base Pass and how that decision turned out; how Jackson Hole season passholders reacted to the inclusion of an Ikon Base Pass with their JHMR season pass; whether the ski area would ever leave the Ikon Pass; how JHMR locals and tourists can get along; why Jackson Hole has stayed on the Mountain Collective Pass even as the Ikon has taken root; the impossible puzzle of mountain-town housing amid the short-term rental phenomenon and Covid-era remote-worker relocations; staffing challenges as ski season closes in; thoughts on diversifying Jackson Hole’s workforce and clientele; developing more opportunities for women to run a ski resort; reflections on the 2020-21 ski season versus expectations over the uncertain summer of 2020; looking forward to fully loading lifts this season; Covid-era adaptations that will stick and those that will fade; and thoughts on Jackson Hole owner Jay Kemmerer’s political activities and their fallout.Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewBecause there seems to be few issues inside or outside of skiing that Jackson Hole is not sitting dead in the middle of. It is a ski area too grand not to visit, irresistible to the resort-hopping megapass set who blow into town on the ever-improving transit routes, which have transformed a once-semi-hidden ski-bum paradise into skiing’s Times Square. It’s the archetype of the broken mountain town, its housing model shattered by short-term rentals and cityfolk Covid refugees, a place struggling to keep its sense of place. On the hill, it’s a living experiment in skiing’s ongoing calibration between uphill capacity and overall capacity. It’s the flagship resort for a white-majority sport in an increasingly diversifying nation; an enormous, energy-intensive operation reliant on historical weather patterns to survive; and a woman-led institution in a sport whose gender-diversity efforts have been, historically, poor. It’s seated in a state determined to have it out with the federal government over mask mandates, owned by a rich benefactor to Qanon conspiracists, turned upside down by the Covid disruption that’s undone us all to some degree. Name a modern controversy, and it’s unfolding in some form or another beneath this amazing mountain, a place as complex and labyrinthian and nuanced as the nation it’s stationed in.Why you should ski Jackson HoleI mean do I really need to include this section? For Jackson Hole?OK fine. First, some historical perspective, from the 1966 edition of America’s Ski Book:Just below the Aspen-Vail-Sun Valley quality are a series of resorts of more specialized appeal. At Jackson Hole, Wyoming, a massive complex is taking shape offering the longest vertical drop in the United States – 4,135 vertical feet. It is too early to tell what role Jackson will play in the Rocky Mountain scheme of things, but it is bound to loom large.Then this, from Jeremy Evans’ In Search of Powder:…Jackson Hole opened in 1965 with minimal success, totaling about 19,000 skier visits that season. … Jackson Hole had some built-in disadvantages in its quest to become a major player in American skiing. It had a visionary owner, sure, but Paul [McCollister] wasn’t very realistic. Jackson was more isolated than Aspen and Vail, which were within five hours of Denver, and to a lesser degree Sun Valley. All three were considered the finest places to ski in the country. … After numerous complications involving funding, weather, and construction, the Jackson Hole Aerial Tram opened in 1966, and the resort experienced low visits that season as well. … [But] regardless of who owned the resort or how many hotels, shops, and restaurants were in Teton Village, Jackson Hole had a problem no amount of infrastructure could solve: nobody was good enough to ski it.Well I am happy to report from the future that Jackson Hole turned out just fine. Gear got better, skiers got better, access got easier, and here we are. Jackson Hole is it. For U.S. Americans, it’s the closest thing we have to a skier’s pilgrimage. You have to do it. Lap the tram, peer over the edge of Corbet’s, go for it or don’t. Meander back down or race the tram. Repeat as long as you can take it.What I got wrongSeveral times, I referred to Mary Kate’s job as resort “CEO,” when she is in fact resort president. More Jackson HoleLift Blog’s inventory of Jackson Hole’s lift fleetHistoric Jackson Hole trailmaps on skimap.orgMary Kate is a cofounder and co-owner of Urlari wines.A note on my claim in the intro that Jackson Hole has the largest contiguous lift-served vertical drop in America: yes, Timberline now claims more vert, at 4,540 feet. But it’s a convoluted route available only when the upper mountain is open and roads between the core Timberline ski area and tiny Summit Pass are snow-covered. The return trip to the top takes a shuttle, a chairlift, a hot-air balloon ride, a rope bridge across a chasm, a swim through an alligator-infested swamp, an the A-Team-style assembly of a combat vehicle from a barn full of old parts near the summit. So yeah not the same thing as just taking a tram to the top.More on Big Red:Some basic stoke:Support The Storm by shopping at our partners: Patagonia | Helly Hansen | Rossignol | Salomon | Utah Skis | Berg’s Ski and Snowboard Shop | Peter Glenn | Kemper Snowboards | Gravity Coalition | Darn Tough | Skier's Peak | Hagan Ski Mountaineering | Moosejaw | Skis.com |The House | Telos Snowboards | Christy Sports | Evo | Black Diamond Subscribe at www.stormskiing.com

The Brave Marketer
Challenger Brands That Pick Fights and Exhibit Brand Courage

The Brave Marketer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 26:09


Chris Kneeland, CEO of Cult, discusses what marketers can learn from brands that have a cult-like following. He shares how his agency clients are challenging the status quo and exhibiting massive brand courage. Chris also points out the philosophy around competition, for example Southwest Airlines isn't competing against other airlines; they're competing against the road trip.    In this episode we also discuss: How big brands like Gatorade, Red Bull and Patagonia take risks and exhibit bravery in their marketing campaigns Why demographic segregation can actually hurt more than it can help when buying media The actual insights that cause customers to buy, and how to elevate the customer experience Ways employer branding and HR can impact your brand's success in the marketplace Applications of crypto in third world countries   Guest Bio: Chris Kneeland is the CEO of Cult and one of the veteran marketers out there - he is the senior advisor to CMOs at Zappos, Harley Davidson, Best Buy, Godaddy, and dozens of other brands.  Brave Pick: This week's Brave Pick of the Week is Avalanche. Check out their website here. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- About this Show: Brave is at the forefront of a new online privacy frontier and has unique insight into the future of marketing and advertising in a cookieless world. If you're an agency, brand marketer or entrepreneur challenged by the changes in ethical advertising, consumer privacy and buyer expectations, this podcast will provide a backstage view of how influential marketers at top brands and agencies are responding to what's next.   Music by: Ari Dvorin Hosted by: Donny Dvorin

Confessions of a Working Mom
Fighting for Breastfeeding Education in the Workplace and Beyond, with Amy VanHaren

Confessions of a Working Mom

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 43:46


As a mom, do you feel comfortable when you breastfeed in public places, especially in the workplace? Have you received a negative comment or side glance or been asked to stop? Amy VanHaren is on the Moms With a Purpose podcast this week. She's the CEO and founder of pumpspotting, a digital platform and employer benefit software helping parents feed both family and career. Amy faced deep isolation while working and breastfeeding and the experience led her on a quest to solve the pain points of feeding—at work and everywhere else in the world—and to unite nursing, pumping women. She has 24 years experience in marketing and digital community building at companies like Patagonia and Amy's Kitchen and Vistaprint. Since launching Pumpspotting Amy has supported over 40,000 postpartum parents to date, pitched on a moving escalator on Apple's reality TV show, spent five months traveling cross-country to meet thousands of mothers in her Breast Express RV, and been named one of Forbes Next 1000 entrepreneurs. Though it feels scary, exhausting and uncomfortable, with the help of Amy's Pumpspotting, a lot of moms were able to feel the support they needed. Amy also discusses how having an open conversation with your employer can help you in getting the right mindset to advocate your family needs upon returning to work. Let's dive in!   We also chatted about:    01:23 How Amy started Pumpspotting 09:59 How moms or dads advocate their family needs after returning to work   14:32  What would be her tip/s to a mom in a male-dominated workplace  16:51  How Amy helps company or employers to support breastfeeding moms 20:40  How Breastfeeding education helps and supports business 22:07  What drives her forward 24:15  What was her experiences traveling cross-country with their Express RV 28:28  How does she balance her time between family and business   32:58  Her thoughts to give to moms 33:56  What's her favorite part of being a Mom 34:18  What's her non-negotiable practice every day 35:52  Who are her favorite podcasters and authors At the end of the day, Amy always makes sure to balance her time between her family and work. She also involves her kids on her mission with the support of her husband.  Quotes “Prepare your mindset, you need to be gentle with yourself. You need to tell yourself you can do this whatever it looks like, you need to know you're not alone.”   “There is so much willingness among us parents who have been through to pay it forward. I wanna open doors, I wanna  ”   “Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.” - Fred Rogers   “Healthy moms and babies mean healthy business so win-win for everyone.”   “The power of that nurturing and how could we replicate that again and again on the app within the workplace support and carry that with us when we think about the work we do and how every parent can live lighter after a touch point with us.”   “You are amazing, no matter where you are in the journey, what you are doing is remarkable. The amount of dedication and love, commitment, effort you put into your family and work day to day, you are not alone!”   “Quit on your hardest day, just keep going!”   Check out Amy VanHaren:   Website: https://www.pumpspotting.com Twitter: @avanharen Instagram: @avanharen LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/amyvanharen Join Kelli Femrite in the Moms With a Purpose Community:  Instagram Facebook Group: Moms With a Purpose Facebook Community Join the Free 5-Day Purposeful Mom Challenge to beat the stress, overcome the overwhelm + create your own version of a successful week, by finally doing things that light you up and move you forward! Join the Challenge!

60-Second Science
Flocking Together May Have Helped Dinosaurs Dominate the Earth

60-Second Science

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 2:31


A fossil bed in Patagonia provides evidence of complex social structure in dinosaurs as early as 193 million years ago. And scientists say that herding behavior could have been key to the beasts’ success.

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
CLIMATE ONE: Climbing, Conservation and Capitalism

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 55:34


Rick Ridgeway estimates he's spent about five years of his life sleeping in tents, often in the world's most remote places alongside fellow outdoor adventure luminaries. Ridgeway worked for Patagonia for 15 years and was behind the company's infamous “Don't Buy This Jacket” ad campaign, which paradoxically advocated sustainability and increased sales.  Outdoor companies like Patagonia may push for sustainability, but they largely still present a mostly white, wealthy experience with nature, which can be off-putting for people of color. “You know if you can't see yourself in those spaces then it's hard to feel invited or welcome in that movement,” says writer and social justice facilitator Amanda Machado.   What is the role of corporations in conservation? And how can the outdoor industry help make nature more safe, accessible and welcoming for all? For transcripts and other information, visit: https://www.climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts  Guests: Rick Ridgeway, former Vice President of Public Engagement, Patagonia Amanda Machado, writer and social justice facilitator Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Climate One
Climbing, Conservation and Capitalism

Climate One

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 55:34


Rick Ridgeway estimates he's spent about five years of his life sleeping in tents, often in the world's most remote places alongside fellow outdoor adventure luminaries. Ridgeway worked for Patagonia for 15 years and was behind the company's infamous “Don't Buy This Jacket” ad campaign, which paradoxically advocated sustainability and increased sales.  Outdoor companies like Patagonia may push for sustainability, but they largely still present a mostly white, wealthy experience with nature, which can be off-putting for people of color. “You know if you can't see yourself in those spaces then it's hard to feel invited or welcome in that movement,” says writer and social justice facilitator Amanda Machado.   What is the role of corporations in conservation? And how can the outdoor industry help make nature more safe, accessible and welcoming for all? For transcripts and other information, visit: https://www.climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts  Guests: Rick Ridgeway, former Vice President of Public Engagement, Patagonia Amanda Machado, writer and social justice facilitator Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
CLIMATE ONE: Climbing, Conservation and Capitalism

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 55:34


Rick Ridgeway estimates he's spent about five years of his life sleeping in tents, often in the world's most remote places alongside fellow outdoor adventure luminaries. Ridgeway worked for Patagonia for 15 years and was behind the company's infamous “Don't Buy This Jacket” ad campaign, which paradoxically advocated sustainability and increased sales.  Outdoor companies like Patagonia may push for sustainability, but they largely still present a mostly white, wealthy experience with nature, which can be off-putting for people of color. “You know if you can't see yourself in those spaces then it's hard to feel invited or welcome in that movement,” says writer and social justice facilitator Amanda Machado.   What is the role of corporations in conservation? And how can the outdoor industry help make nature more safe, accessible and welcoming for all? For transcripts and other information, visit: https://www.climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts  Guests: Rick Ridgeway, former Vice President of Public Engagement, Patagonia Amanda Machado, writer and social justice facilitator Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Wake Up to Money
Good Cop, Bad Cop?

Wake Up to Money

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 48:31


As the UN COP 26 climate change conference in Glasgow comes to an end, Felicity looks at what it's achieved over the last 12 days. The boss of clothing chain Patagonia discusses the company's values and eco credentials. And the veteran investor Guy Hands has been chatting to Felicity about how he still gets anxious, even now, about his dyslexia. He says in some ways the world is a better place, but there are still many barriers in the workplace for people with the condition. So have companies got better at supporting dyslexic staff? Listeners tell us what they think. With Felicity Hannah Join in the conversation: #WakeUpToMoney

Talking Dirty
Great Grasses, Asters and Unusual Plants with Tim Fuller of Plantsman's Preference

Talking Dirty

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 73:30


This week on Talking Dirty get ready for an awe-inspiring array of grasses. Tim Fuller - National Collection holder of Molinia and owner of Plantsman's Preference Nursery - shares some of his favourites varieties, not only of Molinia, but Pennisetum, Elymus and Panicum with Alan Gray (East Ruston Old Vicarage) and Thordis. And that's not all - from awesome Asters to zingy variegation and some of his signature choice plants, this is a riot of seasonal treasures for your garden. PLANT LIST Molinia caerulea subsp. arundinacea 'Transparent' Molinia caerulea subsp. arundinacea 'Tears of Joy' Molinia caerulea subsp. arundinacea 'Les Ponts de Cé' Molinia caerulea ssp. caerulea 'Moorflamme' Panicum virgatum 'Cheyenne Sky' Panicum virgatum 'Diwali' Miscanthus sinensis 'Kaskade' Miscanthus sinensis 'Flamingo' Cortaderia selloana 'Patagonia' Cortaderia selloana 'Sunningdale Silver' Cortaderia selloana 'Icalma' Pennisetum orientale 'Shogun' Pennisetum alopecuroides Pennisetum 'Fairy Tails' Pennisetum orientale 'Tall Tails' Lantana camara Rosa 'Zéphirine Drouhin' Tripsacum dactyloides Elymus canadensis 'Icy Blue' Symphyotrichum × amethystinum 'Freiburg' Symphyotrichum 'Little Carlow' Rudbeckia subtomentosa 'Henry Eilers' Symphyotrichum turbinellum 'El Fin' Symphyotrichum 'Speyerer Herbstwoge' Symphyotrichum laeve 'Les Moutiers' Symphyotrichum 'Vasterival' Salvia atrocyanea Glycyrrhiza uralensis Persicaria 'Indian Summer'  Begonia grandis 'Sapporo' Begonia grandis ssp. sinensis 'Snowpop' Begonia grandis 'Bells and Whistles' Zingiber mioga 'Dancing Crane' Pilea matsudai 'Taiwan Silver' Alstroemeria brasiliensis 'Cally Star' Alstroemeria psittacina Alstroemeria psittacina 'Royal Star' Hesperantha coccinea 'Major'  Hesperantha huttonii Hesperantha falcata Hedera helix 'Pink 'n' Curly'  Gladiolus 'Thunder' Gladiolus 'Ruby'

Eunoia: Beautiful Thinkers
Kourtney Morgan

Eunoia: Beautiful Thinkers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 30:11


Kourtney Morgan is a Senior Designer at Patagonia— and one of Fast Company's Most Creative People In Business in 2020. Kourtney, a nature lover herself, has taken up the company's mantle to find unique solutions for minimizing waste in Patagonia's clothing design, from championing the brand's Worn Wear program for selling gently used out-of-season clothes to designing the ReCrafted collection from used and damaged clothing. According to Kourtney, the brand isn't looking to just own these sustainable practices, but to pave the way for others: “There's a huge movement, not just within Patagonia, but across a lot of brands to repair and resell their garments. It's not happening fast enough, just like our reaction to climate change isn't happening fast enough.”Kourtney helps Patagonia execute its vision for a better cared-for planet and set a precedent for other brands to do the same.

Care More Be Better: Social Impact, Sustainability + Regeneration Now
The Impact Of Purpose-Driven Design + Branding With Eric Ressler

Care More Be Better: Social Impact, Sustainability + Regeneration Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 48:36


When you're striving to create an impact with your venture, you need to have consistency in presenting your business. Having purpose-driven design and branding is key to effectively communicating what you're doing and how your customers can lend a hand. So how do you do that? Today's guest has the answers you need! Eric Ressler is the Founder and Creative Director at Cosmic, a Social Impact Creative Agency. He joins Corinna Bellizzi to discuss the importance of having a clarity of purpose in the social impact space. Eric shares tips on how you should go about building your brand and constructing your website to optimize your reach. Tune in and get great insight to help you care better!   About Eric Ressler Eric Ressler is the Founder and Creative Director at Cosmic, a Social Impact Creative Agency. Cosmic empowers social impact organizations to catalyze real world change by helping them nail their impact story, build brand awareness, and inspire action.   Guest LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/cosmiceric/ Guest Website: https://designbycosmic.com/   Timestamps:  0:00 - Introduction 2:16 - How Cosmic started and its mission on social impact 4:53 - Social impact organizations 8:29 - Separating genuine companies from greenwashing and purpose-washing organizations 11:21 - Fairtrade certification 15:28 - Snickers, TOMS Shoes, Bombas socks, and Patagonia 24:35 - Optimizing marketing dollars 28:07 - Investing money on digital media 31:17 - Building a coherent resonant brand in the modern age 38:52 - Maintaining a real legacy 41:29 - Avoiding a state of apathy 43:38 - Cosmic's mission on creating a healthy working environment 47:32 - Conclusion   Join the Care More. Be Better. Community! (Social Links Below) Website: https://www.caremorebebetter.com YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCveJg5mSfeTf0l4otrxgUfg Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/CareMore.BeBetter/   Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/CareMoreBeBetter  LinkedIn:  https://www.linkedin.com/company/care-more-be-better   Twitter: https://twitter.com/caremorebebettr   Clubhouse: https://www.clubhouse.com/club/care-more-be-better   ~Join us live each week for open conversations on Clubhouse!~   Support Care More. Be Better: A Social Impact + Sustainability Podcast Care More. Be Better. is not backed by any company. We answer only to our collective conscience. As a listener, reader, and subscriber you are part of this pod and this community and we are honored to have your support. If you can, please help finance the show (https://www.caremorebebetter.com/donate). Thank you, now and always, for your support as we get this thing started!

Founders
The General and the Genius: Groves and Oppenheimer—The Unlikely Partnership that Built the Atom Bomb

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 32:36


What I learned from reading The General and the Genius: Groves and Oppenheimer—The Unlikely Partnership that Built the Atom Bomb by James Kunetka. Sign up to listen to the rest of this episode and get lifetime access to every full episode. You will: Immediately unlock 223 full length episodes that are available no where else.Get access to every future episode for free.Learn from history's greatest entrepreneurs and apply their ideas to your work.Tap this link on a mobile device so you can install your private podcast feed into your favorite podcast player. It takes less than 29 seconds to set up. You will learn the key insights from biographies on Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, John D. Rockefeller, Coco Chanel, Andrew Carnegie, Enzo Ferrari, Estee Lauder, Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, Phil Knight, Joseph Pulitzer, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alexander Graham Bell, Bill Gates, P.T. Barnum, Edwin Land, Henry Ford, Walter Chrysler, Thomas Edison, David Ogilvy, Ben Franklin, Howard Hughes, George Lucas, Levi Strauss, Walt Disney and so many more. You will learn from the founders of Nike, Patagonia, Apple, Microsoft, Hershey, General Motors, Ford, Standard Oil, Polaroid, Home Depot, MGM, Intel, Federal Express, Wal Mart, JP Morgan, Chrysler, Cadillac, Oracle, Hyundai, Seagram, Berkshire Hathaway, Teledyne, Adidas, Les Schwab, Renaissance Technologies, IKEA, Sony, Ferrari, and so many more. WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey.“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."GET LIFETIME ACCESS TO FOUNDERS

Snapshots
Swedish Climate Smorgasbord

Snapshots

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 45:49


Sweden plans on rapidly expanding offshore wind projects, but not everyone is a fan; At COP26, Rwandan minister hits back at Greta Thunberg; Vietnamese upset over video of Salt Bae gold-leaf steak to security minister; Kimberley mother-of-pearl could become synthetic bone in world-first medical collaboration; In Patagonia, the early bird gets the truffle; Chinese officials backpedal from notice asking families to stockpile necessities amid 'crazy panic buying'; & The flamingo is in the running to replace the mockingbird as Florida's state bird. __ Subscribe, share, and rate the Blaine DeSantis Show if you enjoyed today's episode! About Views on the News: Shining a spotlight on underreported or unreported news from the US, China, Russia, the EU, Australia, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Want to know what's going on in the world that the media isn't telling you? Then Views on the News is your podcast. Get all the knowledge of current events, top news, and even my opinions on these matters every week.

Investing in Impact
Allocating Capital Into Regenerative Natural Resource Investments - Adrian Rodrigues // Co-Founder of Provenance Capital Group

Investing in Impact

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 45:54


In episode 35 of the Investing in Impact podcast, I speak with Adrian Rodrigues, Co-Founder of Provenance Capital Group, on allocating capital into regenerative natural resource investments through blended capital structures.Adrian is a Co-Founder and a Managing Director of Provenance Capital Group where he helps develop blended capital structures that catalyze resilient biological systems and businesses. Before Provenance, Adrian co-founded the boutique consulting firm Hyphae Partners where he helped companies finance and build regenerative business models. Additionally, he worked at Patagonia within its Venture Capital arm Tin Shed Ventures, helping author a standard for Regenerative Organic Agriculture and exploring Regenerative Organic Land Funds. He is an experienced asset allocator, fundraiser, and business model innovator.Adrian spent six years at Morgan Stanley helping long time horizon investors manage their asset allocations and diligence investment opportunities across asset classes and sectors. He has also lectured on food innovation at the University of California Berkeley Haas School of Business and designed and taught an entrepreneurship intensive for farmers at the Stone Barns Center for Food & Agriculture.Adrian is a graduate of Berkeley Haas' full-time MBA program. At Haas, Adrian was a Portfolio Manager of the Haas Socially Responsible Investment Fund and a Member of the Center for Responsible Business' Student Advisory Board. He also serves as an inaugural advisor for the Investor Resource Council of J.E.D.I. Collaborative, which aims to frame the business case for embedding equity, justice, diversity and inclusion into our entire food ecosystem. He received a B.A. in English from Williams College, studied English literature at Exeter College, Oxford University, and holds the Chartered Financial Analyst designation.Also mentioned in the podcast:Soil Wealth Report - Croatan InstituteSponsors for Educational OpportunityManagement Leadership for Tomorrow (MLT)About Provenance Capital GroupPCG is a financial services firm focused on allocating capital into regenerative natural resource investments. We offer our clients deep expertise, superior guidance,  bespoke access, and trusted partnership in the transition to an economy that is focused on people, planet, and profit.Listen to more Causeartist podcasts here.Check out the Impact Investor platform here - Discover Impact Investors from around the world.Partner with us - Learn moreWe are powered by:Podcast Made with TransistorPodcast cover design Made with CanvaBuild amazing web platforms with Webflow

Por fin no es lunes
La asombrosa aventura de un padre y su hijo que viajan por el mundo fotografiando felinos

Por fin no es lunes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 17:17


De la Patagonia al Tíbet o de la sabana africana a Sierra Morena, el viaje de Andoni Canela y su hijo Unai comenzó hace cuatro años y ahora se ha convertido en la película 'Panteras: viviendo entre felinos'.

The Adventure Stache
Joe Cruz, bikepacker and Professor of Philosophy at Williams College

The Adventure Stache

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 103:10


Joe Cruz has been bikepacking since the 80s, when a college trip introduced him to the excitement and challenge of multi-day cycling adventures. Since then, he's raced and bikepacked his way across the world, including in Ethiopia, Patagonia, Pakistan, and Tibet. When he's not riding his bike, he is Professor of Philosophy at Williams College in Massachusetts, where he also chairs the Cognitive Science Program. In this interview, Joe talks about how the physicality and adventure of bikepacking complements his academic work, why the pace of cycling invites a unique form of philosophical thinking, and how he works to avoid entitlement or expectation when encountering new cultures on his bikepacking trips. He also talks about being held captive for almost an hour in a village in Ethiopia, and growing up in Brooklyn as the child of Puerto Rican immigrants. 

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Friday, November 5, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021


Petersburg deals with a significant COVID-19 outbreak. Also, an Anchorage artist is making her mark on the city, quite literally. And a musher from Patagonia finds a temporary home in Alaska.

Contemplify
Gary Nabhan (aka Brother Coyote) on Wisdom Gleaned from Fishers & Farmers

Contemplify

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 66:01


Gary Nabhan (aka Brother Coyote) is an Ecumenical Franciscan Brother, a first generation Lebanese-American, seed saver, agro-ecologist, ethnobotanist, agrarian activist, and author. A former MacArthur Fellow, he has been called the "father of the local food movement" by Time. He currently holds the W.K. Kellogg Chair in Food & Water Security for the Borderlands. Gary has engaged with farmers and refugee farmworkers in Lebanon, Egypt, Palestine, and Oman. Nabhan keeps orchards, gardens and greenhouses at his home in Patagonia, Arizona, then fishes and forages from an old adobe house on the shores of the Sea of Cortez in Mexico. The focus of our conversation today is Gary's book, Jesus for Farmers and Fishers: Justice for All Those Marginalized by Our Food System. Check out Gary Nabhan's work at garynabhan.com. Visit Contemplify at contemplify.com

Looking Sideways Action Sports Podcast
TYPE 2: Episode 020 - Shannon Galpin

Looking Sideways Action Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 76:43


Type 2 is a podcast from Looking Sideways in association with Patagonia that explores the intersection between the outdoors, action sports and activism. My guest for this episode of Type 2 is Shannon Galpin an explorer, writer, journalist, artist and global activist known primarily for her work on climate action and women's rights. I first became aware of Shannon through her long-running work in Afghanistan, where she has been involved with womens' rights projects for over a decade now. She first visited the country in 2009, eventually helping to establish the first Afghan Women's National cycling team, and continuing to advocate for the right of women in the country to ride bikes in safety. Shannon wrote two books about this experience, as well producing the documentary Afghan Cycles. Today, with social and political change sweeping the country once again, she has been working to help evacuate the women she worked with and their families from the country, as well as setting up post-evacuation programmes for them around Europe, the US and Canada. In addition to this important, emotionally involving work, Shannon is also collaborating with her daughter Devon on a project called Endangered Activism, through which she focuses “on field research and the use of street art as a way of …inspiring youth activism for wildlife conservation and climate justice” As you're going to discover from our conversation, Shannon has a truly remarkable range of interests and is creating important, transformative work across a number of different creative fronts, something she sums up by saying ‘my curiosity outweighs my fear'. I found her empathetic, inquisitive approach to activism to be hugely inspiring - I hope you do too. New episodes of Type 2 are released every four weeks through my Looking Sideways channel. Hear it by subscribing to Looking Sideways via ApplePodcasts, Spotify or any of the usual other podcast providers. Thanks to Ewan Wallace for the theme tune, and to my editor Fina Charleson.

Snail Trail 4x4
242: 40″ Milestar Patagonia 4×4 Review

Snail Trail 4x4

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 65:06


Milestar Patagonia tire review, rock crawling, snow wheeling, and street tires!! Join Jimmy and Tyler, on today's episode of the SnailTrail4x4 Podcast, as they talk about wheeling on the Patagonias! Street driving, rocks, and snow, do you really need anything else?? How do they match up to Iroks? Find out now! WE ARE GIVING AWAY A WINCH! All you have to do to enter is leave us a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts! Once we reach 500 reviews, we will do the drawing from those 500 reviews! At 300, 350, 400, and 450 reviews, we will do give aways for some fun swag packs! So get your reviews in! Congrats to PEDDY1111 for winning the 300 swag-away! CALL US AND LEAVE US A VOICEMAIL!!!! We want to hear from you even more!!! You can call and say whatever you like! Ask a question, leave feedback, correct some information about welding, say how much you hate your jeep and wish you had a Toyota! We will air them all, live, on the podcast! +01-916-345-4744. If you have any negative feedback, you can call our negative feedback hotline, 408-800-5169. Episode 242 is brought to you by all of our peeps over at patreon.com! Make sure to stop by and see all of the great perks you get for supporting SnailTrail4x4! Discount Codes, Monthly Give-Aways, Gift Boxes, the SnailTrail4x4 Community, and the ST4x4 Treasure Hunt! Thank you to all of those that support us! We wouldn't be able to do it without you guys (and gals!)! Congratulations to Ben Hayward for winning the DeltaVS HD Tool Carrier! from September's give away! October's Patreon Giveaway is with us! Snail Trail 4x4! We are giving away 2 Patron Gift Boxes! Every April and October we turn $60 into $100 of goodies. This October is Jimmy's box and has a fun theme to it! Make sure you get signed up on the Patreon Gift Box Tier if you want to be included for April 2022's box. The gift box tier will only be open Oct1 through Oct31 to get in! Listener Discount Codes: MORRFlate - snailtrail to get 15% off MORRFlate Multi Tire Inflation Deflation™ KitsSidetracked Offroad - snailtrail4x4 (lowercase)to get 15% off lights and recovery gearLasfit - SnailTrail4x4&lasfit (Cap "S" and "T") to get 10% custom LEDs Laminx Protective Films - Use Link to get 20% off all productsExplorationReady.com - SNAILTRAILPOD (uppercase) to get 20% off 4x4 First Aid Kits!Freedom Ropes - SNAILTRAIL (uppercase) to get 10% offMobArmor - Snailtrail4x4 for 15% offKhordz Mugz - Snailtrail4x4 for 15% off Find us over on YouTube, Instagram, and Facebook! If you enjoy the SnailTrail4x4 Off Road Podcast, then check out these other awesome off-roading podcasts too! Wheeling Wine and WhiskeyMike and Max's Off Road PodcastThe Total Off Road PodcastThe 4x4 Podcast Show Music: Divider and Outtro Meizong - Kumban

For the Love of Climbing
33: From the Inside, Out (Part 2)

For the Love of Climbing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 31:53


This is one transgender climber's story. And it's hard to sum up in just a few sentences not just Lor's identity, but the human being that they are. The impact that they're having on our community in a meaningful way, and how it's growing because of it. Just by simply existing.This is part two of a two-part story.For the Love of Climbing is brought to you by Deuter USA, Gnarly Nutrition, Allez Outdoors, and presented by Patagonia.Music by: Kakurenbo and Chad Crouch. A HUGE thank you to Chad Crouch for creating absolute magic, and to Peter Darmi for mixing this episode.Cover photo by Kika MacFarlane.Read the transcript here.Follow us on Instagram for podcast (pod-Kath?) updates and general life things.Support us on Patreon in exchange for a warm, fuzzy feeling.

For the Love of Climbing
32: From the Inside, Out (Part 1)

For the Love of Climbing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 39:23


Lor had to decide. They could go on hating themself, or could be a part of making the world a place that was more healed—and that started with healing themself.This is one transgender climber's story. And it's hard to sum up in just a few sentences not just Lor's identity, but the human being that they are. The impact that they're having on our community in a meaningful way, and how it's growing because of it. Just by simply existing.This is part one of a two-part story.For the Love of Climbing is brought to you by Deuter USA, Gnarly Nutrition, Allez Outdoors, and presented by Patagonia.Music by: Kakurenbo and Chad Crouch. A HUGE thank you to Chad Crouch for creating absolute magic, and to Peter Darmi for mixing this episode.Cover photo by Kika MacFarlane.Read the transcript here.Follow us on Instagram for podcast (pod-Kath?) updates and general life things.Support us on Patreon in exchange for a warm, fuzzy feeling.

Chrissie Mayr Podcast
BONUS CMP EPISODE: David Avocado Wolfe

Chrissie Mayr Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 79:26


Growing up the son of two medical doctors who made house calls, and now author of half-a-dozen best-selling books on natural health and nutrition, David “Avocado” Wolfe delivers an intriguing synthesis of his research on natural and healthy living at his seminars worldwide, and he consults some of the world's top CEOs, celebrities, athletes, and even ambassadors. Author of “Amazing Grace,” “Superfoods–Medicine of the Future” and “Naked Chocolate,” among others, Wolfe is a master of revealing root causes of diseases and addressing them with superfoods, herbal remedies and holistic medicines. He studied at Oxford University and has received a Juris Doctor in Law from the University of San Diego. Wolfe's favorite montra, “Today is the best day ever,” has resounded at his three-day-seminars that sell out around the world, of which he has hosted over 3,000. He is well-versed in natural detoxification and using nutrients for healing and rejuvenation. Wolfe leads the charge for building eco-communities through organic living–a lifestyle of longevity maintained with clean, raw foods, herbs, and spring water. The stated mission of his non-profit tree planting foundation is that “Our goal is straightforward: to collectively plant 18 billion fruit trees for a healthy planet,” – that's approximately three trees for every person alive. David Wolfe is a professor at the Living-Food Nutrition Masters Program based in Patagonia, Arizona and he has appeared on hundreds of broadcast programs and in print media around the world, including CNN's Anderson Cooper 360º, Men's Health, Woman's Day, and Vegetarian Times. Wolfe is also one of the lead educators at the annual Longevity Conference, the Institute of Integrative Nutrition, and the Body-Mind Institute.  David Wolfe joins Chrissie Mayr at The Truth About Cancer Live convention in Nashville, TN to discuss the importance of detoxing, specifically with charcoal. Thank you to our sponsors! Feeling Anxious? Smoke your CBD! Go to Kushy Dreams and use the code CMP to get 20% off your order plus free shipping! https://kushydreams.com/ Dating Sites SUCK! So go check out the brand new and FREE Drom.Date/CMP Use Log In Code CMP and you choose the dealmakers and dealbreakers! Treat yo self! Go to AdamandEve.com and use promo code CMP to get 20% off plus free shipping! Do you enjoy my video content? I use Streamyard and it's made the BIGGEST impact on my livestreams, videos, and clips! FREE 14 Day Trial if you use my referral code! https://streamyard.com?fpr=chrissie

FOCO
¿Cuáles son los justificativos y los límites del reclamo territorial indígena?

FOCO

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 12:23


Durante las últimas semanas, el conflicto por el reclamo territorial de los mapuches en la Patagonia entró en un pico de tensión. Numerosos ataques en El Bolsón y Bariloche, y la ocupación de territorios en Villa Mascardi, recrudecieron el conflicto entre esta comunidad originaria y las autoridades provinciales, que calificaron de ‘‘terroristas‘‘ estos actos y pidieron refuerzos de seguridad al Estado Nacional. ¿Cuán legítimos son los reclamos territoriales de los pueblos originarios? ¿En qué se basan? ¿Y qué salidas posibles hay a este conflicto, para que se garantice la paz social y el cumplimiento de los derechos de estos pueblos?Durante las últimas semanas, el conflicto por el reclamo territorial de los mapuches en la Patagonia entró en un pico de tensión. Numerosos ataques en El Bolsón y Bariloche, y la ocupación de territorios en Villa Mascardi, recrudecieron el conflicto entre esta comunidad originaria y las autoridades provinciales, que calificaron de ‘‘terroristas‘‘ estos actos y pidieron refuerzos de seguridad al Estado Nacional. ¿Cuán legítimos son los reclamos territoriales de los pueblos originarios? ¿En qué se basan? ¿Y qué salidas posibles hay a este conflicto, para que se garantice la paz social y el cumplimiento de los derechos de estos pueblos?

Marketplace All-in-One
VCs are getting into crypto. Here’s why that should worry you.

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 21:25


Even if you don’t know the name Marc Andreessen, you’ve probably interacted with one of his companies. He’s the man behind some of the very first web browsers, Mosaic and Netscape, a Facebook board member and a venture capitalist with investments Twitter, Lyft, Roblox, Airbnb, Stripe and more. He’s also getting into crypto, and that makes us nervous. On today’s show, Kai talks about it with guest co-host Marielle Segarra. Plus: the Starbucks’ unions, new vaccine approvals and another round of our favorite game, Half Full/Half Empty. Here’s everything we talked about today: “FDA Clears Pfizer Coronavirus Vaccine for Young Children” from The New York Times “Starbucks workers will vote on union at 3 Buffalo stores” from ABC News “Big Hires, Big Money and a D.C. Blitz: A Bold Plan to Dominate Crypto” from The New York Times “Pandemic Cigarette-Smoking Boom Appears to Be Over” from The Wall Street Journal And our Half Full/Half Empty topics: SPACs in the dictionary, Patagonia’s Facebook boycott, Hertz’s green pledge, the McRib NFT and Marielle’s new fridge. “Jumping the shark” Thanks to everyone who joined us live on YouTube for this episode! We’re live Fridays at 3:30 p.m. Pacific/6:30 p.m. Eastern for happy hour! Subscribe to our channel and sign up for notifications so you don't miss it.

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
VCs are getting into crypto. Here’s why that should worry you.

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 21:25


Even if you don’t know the name Marc Andreessen, you’ve probably interacted with one of his companies. He’s the man behind some of the very first web browsers, Mosaic and Netscape, a Facebook board member and a venture capitalist with investments Twitter, Lyft, Roblox, Airbnb, Stripe and more. He’s also getting into crypto, and that makes us nervous. On today’s show, Kai talks about it with guest co-host Marielle Segarra. Plus: the Starbucks’ unions, new vaccine approvals and another round of our favorite game, Half Full/Half Empty. Here’s everything we talked about today: “FDA Clears Pfizer Coronavirus Vaccine for Young Children” from The New York Times “Starbucks workers will vote on union at 3 Buffalo stores” from ABC News “Big Hires, Big Money and a D.C. Blitz: A Bold Plan to Dominate Crypto” from The New York Times “Pandemic Cigarette-Smoking Boom Appears to Be Over” from The Wall Street Journal And our Half Full/Half Empty topics: SPACs in the dictionary, Patagonia’s Facebook boycott, Hertz’s green pledge, the McRib NFT and Marielle’s new fridge. “Jumping the shark” Thanks to everyone who joined us live on YouTube for this episode! We’re live Fridays at 3:30 p.m. Pacific/6:30 p.m. Eastern for happy hour! Subscribe to our channel and sign up for notifications so you don't miss it.

Adventures in Luxury Travel
27. Chile | Adventures in Patagonia, Atacama and Easter Island, wine tasting and bohemian neighborhoods in Santiago and learning about the culture while horseback riding with gauchos

Adventures in Luxury Travel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 45:06


Join Sarah and me as we talk about Chile, an amazing destination to explore, immerse yourself in the culture, enjoy incredible food and taste delicious Chilean wines.   Visiting Chile gives you access to wild and remote places like Patagonia, Atacama, Chiloe, and Easter Island, where you can hike, bike, white water raft, fish, and surf. The capital of Santiago is also a must-visit. We touch on our favorite luxury hotels including Tierra, Explora, Awasi, and &Beyond. Sarah shares one of her favorite bohemian neighborhoods in Santiago and her favorite local restaurant and bakery.   Visit truvaytravel.com/27 for a video of today's show and additional resources.

skucast
Episode 201: Impacting the World Through Product with Davis Smith, Founder and CEO of Cotopaxi

skucast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 27:07


Davis Smith is the Founder and CEO of Cotapaxi. Cotapaxi is on track to becoming one of the biggest outdoor brands in the world challenging brands like Patagonia and North Face but there are more differences in Cotapaxi than similarities plus, Davis prefers the idea of collaboration over competition.

Hot Drinks - Stories From The Field
Michel Raab: NOLS - Adventures in Kenya, Patagonia and Greenland

Hot Drinks - Stories From The Field

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 48:53


Our guest today, Michel Raab, was born in Santiago, Chile. He has always been fond of nature since childhood. Swimming, sailing, mountain biking, hiking, and slowly venturing in the Andes as a teenager – these things were what grew Michel into all that he is today. He currently lives in Coyhaique, Chili's Patagonia region, with his wife, Betsy, and their two children. Michel joined the outdoor education industry in 2002, working for NOLS, instructing mountaineering, hiking, and climbing courses in Patagonia and North America. He has also worked for several seasons at NOLS Patagonia as a Spanish Programs Coordinator and Operations Manager. He is now the Director of the Chilean Programs for Alzer School.

Thanks For Coming In
Bo Yokely

Thanks For Coming In

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 33:24


Bo Yokely talks understanding the business side of acting, sustaining a career outside of the big city, and a self-tape audition choice that went horribly wrong!About Bo:Bowman Trent Yokely was born September 21, 1987 in Winston Salem, North Carolina to Karen Yokely, a schoolteacher and Brent Yokely, a financial advisor. He has one older brother, Brady. He was raised In Kernersville, NC where he met his wife Olivia in High school. Bo holds a bachelors degree in Communications and a minor in theatre arts from University of North Carolina at Greensboro.Prior to his career in film Bo worked as a model and product representative for several high end clients such as: Tag Heuer, MAC cosmetics, Hanes, Belk, Peter Millar, Patagonia, Ralph Lauren, and many others. He is also a licensed financial advisor, beginning his career in insurance and investments prior to his acting career skyrocketing.Bo landed a small role as a sovereign fighter pilot in Guardians of the Galaxy 2 (2017) chiseled lifeguard in the action comedy Baywatch (2017) charismatic Jimmy in the psychological thriller Into The Forest (2018) and Ranger Clark in Ponysitters Club (2019). His first big break came as womanizing pro-basketball player Chris opposite Sanaa Lathan in the Netflix original film Nappily Ever After (2018). Bo landed his breakout role as male lead as rustic cowboy Collin Traub in the Harlequin romance novel-turned-film After the Storm (2019). Since then the lead roles haven't stopped. As hard working farmer Cole Tooley in Christmas at the Grey Horse Inn (2021), Music manager Ryan Avery in Country Roads Christmas (2022), and his most notable role to date, IVF father Brian Crawford fighting for his sons custody in Lifetime's Switched Before Birth (2021.) Bo is a bold, charming, All-American hero with a quick wit who never loses, and brings these qualities to every role he accepts.Outside of acting Bo also loves producing. He is currently in the production process for four feature films and two television series. He enjoys soccer, MMA, horseback riding and all things animals. He is married to Olivia Yokely and they welcomed their first daughter, Evie Grace in April of 2021. He also has two Yorkshire terriers that enjoy traveling with the family as well.Bo's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bo_yokely/Follow the show on social media!                 Instagram: https://instagram.com/thanksforcominginpodcast/                 Twitter: https://twitter.com/tfci_podcast                  Facebook: http://facebook.com/thanksforcominginpodcast/                   Theme Music by Andrew Skrabutenas

I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast
The origins of dinosaur cryptozoology

I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 57:30


For links to every news story, all of the details we shared about Fabrosaurus, links from Edward Guimont, and our fun fact check out https://iknowdino.com/Fabrosaurus-Episode-361/Join us at www.patreon.com/iknowdino for dinosaur requests, bonus content, ad-free episodes, and more.Dinosaur of the day Fabrosaurus, a very early ornithischian dinosaur that lived in what is now Lesotho.Interview with Edward Guimont, an assistant professor of world history at Bristol Community College who has studied how dinosaurs and other prehistoric animals are connected through myths, legends, colonialism, and cryptozoology. Follow his work on twitter @edward_guimontIn dinosaur news this week:A new site in Patagonia, Argentina includes the brand new sauropod MenucocelsiorPops the ceratopsian in Weld County, Colorado might not be a Triceratops after allDickinson Museum Center's Badlands Dinosaur Museum in North Dakota is getting a tyrannosaur skeletonThe North Dakota Heritage Center & State Museum has updated its juvenile mummified Edmontosaurus specimenPodokesaurus is one step closer to becoming the state dinosaur of MassachusettsThe Society of Vertebrate Paleontology annual conference is right around the corner. We'll be releasing premium content of some of the non-dinosaur stories for our patrons. Go to Patreon.com/iknowdino to get access and help us keep creating I Know Dino every week.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The John Batchelor Show
1801: #NewWorldReport: The Mapuche of Chile and Patagonia threaten Santiago. Latin American Research Professor Evan Ellis @revanellis, U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute. auu

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 13:20


Photo: #NewWorldReport: The Mapuche of Chile and Patagonia threaten Santiago.  Latin American Research Professor Evan Ellis  @revanellis, U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute. auu https://en.mercopress.com/2021/10/14/despite-the-state-of-emergency-in-southern-chile-mapuche-groups-continue-with-violent-actions

Jason & Alexis
10/27 WED HOUR 1: Nightmares, Busch Light dress, biscuits, Patagonia wine and Joan Rivers biopic scrapped

Jason & Alexis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 45:09


Alexis was up all night with kid and Dawn and Kenny had nightmares. In food news: Busch Light wedding dress, Patagonia wine and the key to delicious biscuits. The biopic about Joan Rivers has been scrapped by Showtime.

The Audio Long Read
From the archive: Patagonia and The North Face: saving the world – one puffer jacket at a time – podcast

The Audio Long Read

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 40:23


We are raiding the Audio Long Read archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2017: The retail giants are not only competing to sell outdoor gear – they are rivals in the contest to sell the thrill of the wilderness to the urban masses. By Marisa Meltzer. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

Un Mensaje a la Conciencia
La operación de la Real Expedición de la Vacuna

Un Mensaje a la Conciencia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 4:01


(Día Mundial de la Erradicación de la Viruela) En septiembre de 1803 el médico español Francisco Xavier Balmis llegó a la Coruña. Comisionado por el rey Carlos IV para llevar a América la vacuna contra la viruela, Balmis iba acompañado por su segundo José Salvany, dos cirujanos más, dos practicantes, tres enfermeros y seis niños. A los niños los había reclutado en el Colegio de Desamparados de Madrid y los había vacunado con el suero para que, en los brazos de ellos, pudiera transportarlo hasta la Coruña. Según el relato del escritor español Javier Moro en su novela histórica titulada A flor de piel, en el hospicio del Hospital de la Caridad, Balmis se encontró con la rectora, Isabel Zendal. —No os preocupéis [—le dijo—]; de estos niños que os traigo, sólo cuatro continúan el viaje en barco; el resto, los que ya han sido vacunados, vuelven a Madrid.... Lo que voy a hacer es llevarme a algunos niños que estén bajo amparo de la inclusa para la travesía... y quiero que me ayudéis a elegirlos.... »—¿Os vais a llevar niños expósitos a... a América? [—le preguntó Isabel—.] »—Con permiso de Su Majestad, para librar al mundo de la viruela [—le contestó Balmis]. »—Pero... para tan noble propósito, ¿tenéis que venir a una inclusa a buscar niños huérfanos? »—No hay otra posibilidad.... Nunca unos padres dejarían marchar a sus hijos tan lejos.... Por eso estamos aquí.... Necesito ir vacunando de dos en dos, por si algún caso no prende.... Para una travesía de cuatro semanas... necesitaré veintidós niños... [y] la quiero [también] a usted. »... Luego Balmis... la conminó a unirse a la noble tarea de salvar al mundo.... »—En la expedición sois irremplazable; esos niños os conocen y os respetan. »Al final, [Balmis] había conseguido... el permiso del rey para contratar a Isabel, sin la cual no hubiera sido posible reunir el necesario número de niños —concluye Javier Moro—. Juntos habían acudido al Hospicio de Santiago a reclutar a los que faltaban.... »El 30 de noviembre de 1803, zarpaba de La Coruña la corbeta María Pita.... Al poco tiempo, tenían la Torre de Hércules por el través.»1 Llegaron a las Islas Canarias en enero de 1804, donde vacunaron a la población y establecieron un centro de vacunación. A Puerto Rico llegaron en febrero y a las costas de la actual Venezuela en marzo. En Caracas se estableció la primera Junta de Vacuna del continente, que sirvió de modelo para las muchas que se instauraron a lo largo de toda la expedición, que de ahí en adelante se dividió en dos grupos. El primer grupo, encabezado por Balmis, recorrió Cuba y el Virreinato de la Nueva España (por el actual territorio de México), llegando después las vacunas a Norteamérica. El segundo grupo, a cargo de Salvany, recorrió los actuales territorios de Colombia, Ecuador, Bolivia, Perú y Argentina, ¡y cuando Salvany falleció en Cochabamba, donde está enterrado, su sucesor llevó la vacuna a Chile, hasta alcanzar la Patagonia en 1812! Quiera Dios que, así como los que se unieron a Balmis para librar al mundo de la viruela, también nosotros nos unamos a su Hijo Jesucristo para salvar al mundo del pecado. Es que sólo Cristo puede salvarlo, pero no Él solo, pues nos ha comisionado a nosotros para que lo acompañemos en esa noble tarea.2 Carlos ReyUn Mensaje a la Concienciawww.conciencia.net 1 Javier Moro, A flor de piel (Barcelona: Seix Barral, Editorial Planeta, 2015), pp. 138-88. 2 Mt 28:19; Mr 16:15; Lc 24:47-49; Jn 20:21; Hch 1:8

Wet Fly Swing Fly Fishing Podcast
WFS 259 - The Magic Behind the Orvis Fly Fishing Blog with Phil Monahan

Wet Fly Swing Fly Fishing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 62:02


Show Notes: https://wetflyswing.com/253 Sponsor: https://wetflyswing.com/stonefly Phil Monahan, the editor of the Orvis Fly Fishing Blog and the man who keeps the content flowing is here to give us an Orvis Fishing Summary that's not quite what you'd expect.  This podcast includes Phil's background before Orvis, some of the challenges to running a massive daily blog a little on Yellowstone. We find out why Phil's criteria for becoming the editor of the Orvis blog was that he would not be a salesman.  10,623 blog posts have been published on the Orvis Blog.  Let me say that again, ten thousand six hundred and twenty-three blogs posts. Click the play button to listen to the full podcast or scroll to the bottom to read the full transcript from this podcast! Show Notes with Phil Monahan - Perk Perkins (past CEO of Orvis) was on the podcast in episode 225 here.  Tom Rosenbauer was on the show back in episode #63 here. - Fly Rod and Reel and American Angler are both gone from the print magazine arena as magazines continue to be challenged by online influence. - My steelhead article on swinging vs. Nymphing flies that was submitted to Phil in 2015 was published soon there after. - E-log or the Orvis endorsed lodges and guides through their travel section. - Fly Fisherman magazine and examples like Pat Dorsey and others are still great resources. - I noted John Gierach who was on the podcast in episode 47 here.  Gierach is one of the great fly fishing writers of our time.  Phil noted Bill Tapley at American Angler who was one of the best of his time. - Simon Perkins guided at Pro Outfitters in Montana for 8 years. - Phil notes that Patagonia who is the gold standard for companies who focus on conservation. - We noted the 50/50 on the water and the Bristol Bay topics - Brown Folks Fishing is another great group helping to promote fishing! - Trout unlimmitted on the Keep Em Wet Movement You can find Phil at News.Orvis.com Orvis Fly Fishing Blog Conclusion with Phil Monahan Phil Monahan walks us through some behind the seens in running and editing the Orvis Fly Fishing Blog, a daily fly fishing blog with over 10,500 blog posts! What's your connection with Orvis?  Have you ever owned an Orvis product or used their resources?  Leave a comment below or send me a DM or comment on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wetflyswing/

The Dirtbag Diaries
Story Call Out

The Dirtbag Diaries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 9:06


The most memorable gifts often aren't purchased online. Sometimes, it's as simple as the time we give to one another. A favorite recipe. An old bike that needs a new set of legs to pedal it. The gifts can be grand or small.  For the upcoming holiday season, we're looking for stories about gifts that weren't purchased for a special mini series with our friends at Patagonia.