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Best podcasts about chief marketing officers

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Latest podcast episodes about chief marketing officers

Making After-School Cool Podcast
Preview of EP 74: Teaching Youth The Importance of Etiquette

Making After-School Cool Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 14:50


This is a preview of episode 74, where we discussed the benefits of teaching  kids the rules of etiquette. Etiquette provides youth with skills to improve their social networking, provides them with a range of phrases and behaviors which they can use in whatever social situation they find themselves in. To discuss the benefits of teaching youth etiquette is my guest Darian Lewis. Darian is the Chief Marketing Officer and Chief Operations Officer for the Monica Lewis School of Etiquette. Darian's ability to command an audience has allowed him to share his thoughts, experiences, and wisdom with audiences across the country.

Connected & Ready
Making retail experiences more intelligent, with Augusto Modigliani

Connected & Ready

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 25:25


Gemma Milne talks with Augusto Modigliani, Chief Marketing Officer at digital signage, analytics, and marketing automation company Beabloo. They discuss expectations for the impact of technology on online and offline shopping; how companies are using AI, automation, and bot technologies to shape the customer experience in stores and online; leveraging technology to drive customer service improvement; and where these solutions may be taking the world of marketing in the future.Topics of discussionHow technology has, and hasn't, affected the world's shopping habits (02:10)Making retail spaces more intelligent (07:13)Using customer intelligence to improve marketing team performance (08:44)The intersection of customer-facing workers and AI: keeping the technology human (12:30)Protecting privacy for in-person and online customer experiences (15:20)The statistical approaches behind personalization (17:49)Expectations for the future of marketing technology (19:34) About Augusto Modigliani:Augusto is currently the Chief Marketing Officer at Beabloo where he is responsible for the strategic development and tactical execution of the marketing, sales, and partner strategy across the organization and alignment with the overall Beabloo Group strategy. A creative, strategic thinker with a successful track record of rapidly driving initiatives from concept to implementation, Augusto has a strong entrepreneurial spirit with solid marketing and business development expertise. He has exceptional product intuition and is an engaging team builder, problem solver, and savvy go-to-market strategist.Learn more:https://www.beabloo.com/ Sponsor linkLearn how Microsoft Dynamics 365 Commerce can help you personalize customer engagement, increase employee productivity, and optimize operations. Request a live demo today:https://aka.ms/AA8ku82 Contact usEmail: connectedandready@microsoft.com Follow us on social mediaTwitter: https://twitter.com/msftdynamics365LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/microsoft-dynamicsYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJGCg4rB3QSs8y_1FquelBQ

Screaming in the Cloud
Handling Time-Series Data with Brian Mullen

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 31:40


About BrianBrian is an accomplished dealmaker with experience ranging from developer platforms to mobile services. Before InfluxData, Brian led business development at Twilio. Joining at just thirty-five employees, he built over 150 partnerships globally from the company's infancy through its IPO in 2016. He led the company's international expansion, hiring its first teams in Europe, Asia, and Latin America. Prior to Twilio Brian was VP of Business Development at Clearwire and held management roles at Amp'd Mobile, Kivera, and PlaceWare.Links:InfluxData: https://www.influxdata.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at ThinkstCanary. Most companies find out way too late that they've been breached. ThinksCanary changes this and I love how they do it. Deploy canaries and canary tokens in minutes and then forget about them. What's great is the attackers tip their hand by touching them, giving you one alert, when it matters. I use it myself and I only remember this when I get the weekly update with a “we're still here, so you're aware” from them. It's glorious! There is zero admin overhead  to this, there are effectively no false positives unless I do something foolish. Canaries are deployed and loved on all seven continents. You can check out what people are saying at canary.love. And, their Kub config canary token is new and completely free as well. You can do an awful lot without paying them a dime, which is one of the things I love about them. It is useful stuff and not an, “ohh, I wish I had money.” It is speculator! Take a look; that's canary.love because it's genuinely rare to find a security product that people talk about in terms of love. It really is a unique thing to see. Canary.love. Thank you to ThinkstCanary for their support of my ridiculous, ridiculous nonsense.   Corey: Writing ad copy to fit into a 30 second slot is hard, but if anyone can do it the folks at Quali can. Just like their Torque infrastructure automation platform can deliver complex application environments anytime, anywhere, in just seconds instead of hours, days or weeks. Visit Qtorque.io today and learn how you can spin up application environments in about the same amount of time it took you to listen to this ad.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This promoted guest episode is brought to us by our friends at InfluxData. And my guest is titled as the Chief Marketing Officer at InfluxData, and I don't even care because his bio has something absolutely fascinating that I want to address instead. Brian Mullen is an accomplished dealmaker is how the bio starts. And so many of us spend time negotiating deals, but so few people describe ourselves in that way. First, Brian, thank you for joining us. And secondly, what's up with that?Brian: [laugh]. Well, thanks, Corey, very excited to be here. And yes, dealmaker; I guess that would be apropos. How did I get into marketing? Well, a lot of my career is spent in business development, and so I think that's where the dealmaker part comes from.Several different roles, including my first role at Influx—when I joined Influx—was in business development and partnerships. And so, prior to coming to Influx, I spent many years building out the business development team at Twilio, growing that up, and we did a lot of deals with carriers, with Cloud partners, with all kinds of different partners; you name it, we worked with them. And then moving into Influx, joined in an BD capacity here and had a couple different roles that eventually evolved to Chief Marketing Officer. But  that's where the dealmaker comes from. I like to do deals, it's always nice to have one on the side   in whatever capacity you're working in, it's nice to have a deal or two working on the side. It kind of keeps you fresh.Corey: It's fun because people think, “Oh, a deal. You're thinking of mergers and acquisitions, and how hard could that be? You just show up with a bag of money and give it to people and then you have a deal closed.” And oh, if only it were that simple. Every client engagement we have on the consulting side has been a negotiation back and forth, and the idea is to ideally get everyone to the point where they're happy, but honestly, if everyone's slightly unhappy but can live with the result, we'll take that too.And as people go through their own careers it's, you're always trying to make a deal in some form: when you try to get a project approved, or you're trying to get resources thrown at something—by which I generally mean money, not people, though people, too—it's something that isn't necessarily clearly understood or discussed very often, despite the fact that half of what I do is negotiating with AWS on behalf of clients for better contractual terms. The thing that I think takes people by surprise the most is that dealmaking is almost never about pounding the table, being angry, and walking out, like you read the world's worst guide to buying a car or something. It's about finding the win for everyone. At least that's the way I've always approached it.Brian: That's a good point. And actually that wording that you described of finding a win for everybody, that's how I always thought about it. I think about it as first of all, you're trying to understand what the other party—and it could be an individual, it could be a company, it could be a group of companies, sometimes—you're trying to understand what their goals are, what their agenda is and see how that matches with your own; sometimes they're opposing, sometimes they're overlapping. And then everyone has to have some perceived win  in a deal. And it's not competitively; it's more like you just have to have value, that is kind of what the win is – having value in that deal.And so that's the way I always approached it. And doing deals, whether you're in BD or sales, or if you're working with vendors and you're in a different functional role, sometimes it's not even commercial, it's just about aligning resources, perhaps. Our deal might be that you and I are both going to put a collective effort into building something or taking something to market. In another scenario might be like, I'm going to pay for this service that you're delivering, or vice versa. Or we're going to go and bring two revenue-generating products together and take them to market. Whatever it might be, it doesn't matter so much what the mechanics are of the deal, but it's usually about aligning those agendas and in having someone get utility, get value on the other side.Corey: I think that people lose sight of the fact as well, that when you're talking about a service provider—and let's be clear, InfluxData has launched a cloud platform that we'll talk about in a minute—this is not the one-off transactional relationship; once the deal is signed, you've got to work with these people. When they host parts of your production infrastructure, whether you want to admit it or not they're your partner more so than they are your vendor. It has to be an ongoing relationship that people are, if they at least aren't thrilled with it, can at least be happy enough to live with, otherwise it just winds up with this growing sense of resentment and it just sort of leads nowhere.Brian: Yeah, there really is no deal moment. Yes, people sign agreements with companies, but that's just the very beginning. Your relationship evolves from there. We're delivering a product, we're delivering this platform that handles time-series data to our customers, and we're asking them to trust us with their product that they're taking out to market. They're asking us to handle their data and to deliver service to them that they're turning into their production applications. And so it's a big responsibility. And so we care about the relationship with our customers to continue that.Corey: So, I first really became aware of time-series data a few years back during a re:Invent keynote when they pre-announced Timestream, which took entirely too long to come to market. Okay, great. So, you're talking about time-series data. Can you explain what that means in simple terms? And I learned over the next eight minutes that they were talking about it, that no, no, they couldn't. I wound up more confused by the end of the announcement than I was at the beginning.So, assuming that I have the same respect for databases as you would expect for someone whose favorite data store is Route 53—because you can misuse it as a beautiful database—what is time-series data and why does it matter in 2021?Brian: Sure, it's a good question. And I was there in that audience as well that day. So, we think of time-series data as really any type of data that's stamped in time, in some way. It could be every hour, every minute, every second, every half second, whatever. But more specifically, it's any type of data that is generated by some source—and that could be a sensor sources within systems or an actual application—and these things change over time, and then therefore, stamped in time in some way.They can come at different frequencies, like I said, from nanoseconds to seconds, or minutes and hours, but the most important thing is that they usually trigger a workflow, trigger some sort of action. And so that's really what our platform is about. It allows people to handle this type of data and then work with it from there in their applications, trigger new workflows, et cetera. Because the historical context of what happens is super important.And when we talk about sources, it could be really many things. It could be in physical spaces, and we have a lot of IoT types of customers and use cases. And those are things like devices and sensors on the factory floor, out in the field, it's on a vehicle. It's even in space, believe it or not. There are customers that are using us on satellites.And then it can also be sources from within software, applications, and infrastructure, things like VMs, and containers, and microservices, all emitting time-series data. And it could be applications like crypto, or financial, or stock market, agricultural type of applications that are themselves as applications emitting data. So, you think about all these sources that are out there from the physical world to the virtual world, and they're all generating time-series data, and our platform is really specially designed to handle that kind of data. And we can get into some details of what exactly that means, but that's really why we're here. That's what time-series is all about.Corey: And this is the inherent challenge I think we're seeing across the entire industry slash ecosystem. I mean, this is airing during re:Invent week, but at the time we are recording this, we have not yet seen the Tuesday keynote that Adam Selipsky will take to the stage, and no doubt, render the stat I'm about to throw at you completely obsolete. But depending on how you count them, there's somewhere between 13 and 15 managed database or database-like services today that AWS offers. And they never turn things off and they're always releasing new things, supposedly on behalf of customers; in practice because someone somewhere wants to get promoted by launching a new service; good for them. Godspeed.If we look into the uncertain future, at some point, someone's job is going to be disambiguating between the 40 different managed database services that AWS offers and picking the one that works. What differentiates time-series from—let's just start with an easy one—something like MySQL or Postgres—or ‘Postgres-squeal' is how I insist on pronouncing that one. Let's stay away from things like Neptune because no one knows what a social graph database is and I assure you, you almost certainly don't need one. Where does something like Influx work in a way that, “Huh. Running this on MySQL is really starting to suck.”Brian: When and why is it time to consider a specialized tool. And in fact, that's actually what we see a lot with our customers is coming to us around that time when a time-series is a problem to solve for them is reaching the point where they really need a specialized tool that's kind of built for that. And so one way to look at that is really just to think about time-series in general as a type of data. It's rapidly rising. It's the fastest growing data category out there right now.And the reason for that is it's being driven by two big macro trends. One is the explosion of all these applications and services running in the cloud. They're expanding horizontally, they're running in more regions, they're in many cases running on multiple clouds, and so it's just getting big—the workloads are getting bigger and bigger. And those are emitting time-series data. And then simultaneously, you have this  growth of all these devices and sensors that are coming online out in the real world: batteries, and temperature gauges, and all kinds of stuff, both new and old, that is coming online, and those sources are generating a lot of time-series data.So typically, we're in a moment now, where a lot of developers are faced with this massive growth of time-series data. And if you think about some data set that you have, that you're putting into some kind of traditional database, now add the component of time as a multiplier by all the data you have. Instead of that one data, that one metric, you're now looking at doing that every one second in perpetuity. And so it's just an order of magnitude more data that you're dealing with. And then you also have this notion of—when you have that magnitude of data, you have fidelity, you're taking a lot of it in at the same time, I mean, very quickly, so you have  batch or stream data coming in at super high volume, and you may need that for a few minutes or a few hours or days, but maybe you don't need it for months and years.And so you'd maybe dropped down to kind of a lower fidelity for the longer-term. But you really have this  toggling back and forth of the high fidelity and low fidelity, all coming at you at pretty high volume. And so typically what happens is, is when the workloads get big enough, the legacy tools, they're just not equipped to do it. And a developer—if they have a small set of time-series they're dealing with, what is the first thing they're going to do? They're going to look around and be like, “Hey, what do I have here? Oh, I've got Mongo over here. I've got Splunk, or I've got this old relational database, I can put it in.”And that's typically what they'll do, and that works fine until it doesn't. And then that's when they come around looking for a specialized tool. So, we really sit in Influx and, frankly, other time-series products really do sit at that point where people are considering a specialized tool just because the workload has gotten such that it requires that.Corey: Yeah. Taking a look at most of the offerings in the space; anything that winds up charging anything more than a very tiny fraction of a penny—from what you're describing—is going to quickly become non-economical, where it's, “Oh, we're going to charge you”—like using S3: every, I think, 1000 writes cost a penny—“Oh, we're just going to use S3 for this.” Well, at some of these data volumes, that means that your request charge on S3 is very quickly going to become the largest single line item in your bill, which is nothing short of impressive in a lot of cases, but it also probably means that you've taken a very specific tool—like an iPad—and tried to use it as something else—like a hammer—and no one's particularly happy with that outcome.Brian: Yeah. First of all, having usage-based pricing is really important. We think about it as allowing people to have the full version of the product without a major commitment, and be using it in test scenarios and then later in the very early production scenarios. But as a principle, it's important for people that just signed up two hours ago using your product are basically using the same full product that the biggest customers that you have are using that are paying many, many thousands or tens of thousands per month. And so the way to do that is to offer usage-based pricing and not force people to commit to something before they're ready to do it.And so there's ways to unlock lower pricing, and we, like a lot of companies, offer annual pricing and we have a sales team that worked with folks to basically draw down their unit costs on the use of the platform once they kind of get comfortable with their workload. So, there's definitely avenues to get lower price, and we're believers in that. And we also want to, from a product development perspective, try to make the product more efficient. And so we basically are trying to drive down the costs through efficiencies in the product: make it run faster, make queries take less time, and also ship products on top of it that require developers to write less code themselves, kind of, do more of the work for them.Corey: One of the things I find particularly compelling about what you've done is it is an open-source project. If I want to go ahead and run some time-series experiments myself, I can spin it up anywhere I want and run it however I see fit. Now, at some point, if I'm doing this for anything more than, “Oh, let's see how I can misuse this today,” I probably want to at least consider letting someone who's better at running these things than I am take it over. And as I'm looking through your customer list, the thing that strikes me is how none of these things are quite like the other. We're talking about companies like Hulu is probably not using it the same way as Capital One is, at least I certainly hope not. You have Texas Instruments; you also have Adobe. And it sort of runs an entire gamut of none of these companies quite look alike; I have to imagine their use cases are also somewhat varied, too.Brian: Yeah, that's right. And we really do see as a platform, and with time-series being the common problem that people are looking to solve, we see this pretty broad set of use cases and customer types. And we have some more traditional customers like the Cisco's and the IBM's of the world, and then some  relatively new folks like Tesla and Hulu and others that are a little bit more recent. But they're all trying to solve the same fundamental problem with time-series, which is “How can I handle it in an efficient way and make use of it meaningfully in my applications and services?”And we were talking earlier about having some sources of time-series data being in, kind of a virtual space, like in infrastructure and software, and then some being in physical space, like in devices and sensors out in the real world. So, we have breadth in that way, too. We have folks who are building big software observability infrastructure solutions on us, and we also have people that are pulling data off of the devices on a solar panel that's sitting on a house in the emerging world, right? So, you have basically these two far ends of the spectrum, but all using this specialized tool to handle the time-series data that they're generating.Corey: It seems to me that for most of these use cases and the way you describe it, it's more about the overall shape of the data when we're talking about time-series more so than it is any particular data point in isolation. Is that accurate, or are there cases where that is very much not the case?Brian: I think that's accurate. What people are mostly trying to understand is context for what's happening. And so it's not necessarily—to your point—not searching for one specific data point or moment, but it's really understanding context for some general state that has changed or some trend that has emerged, whatever that might be, and then making sense of that, and then taking action on that. And taking an action could mean a couple of different things, too. It could be in an observability sense, where somebody in  an operator type of mode where they're looking at dashboards and paying attention to  infrastructure that's running and then need to take some sort of action based on that. It also, in many cases, is automated in some way: it's either some series of automated responses to some state that is reached that is visible in the data, or is actually kicking off some new series of tasks or actions inside of an application based on what is occurring and shown by the time-series data.Corey: You know what doesn't add to your AWS bill? Free developer security from Snyk. Snyk is a frictionless security platform that meets developers where they are, finding and fixing vulnerabilities right from the CLI, IDEs, repos, and pipelines. And Snyk integrates seamlessly with AWS offerings like CodePipeline, EKS, ECR, and oh so much more.Secure with Snyk and save some loot. Learn more at snyk.io/scream. That's S-N-Y-K-dot-I-O/screamCorey: So, we've talked about, you have an open-source product, which is the sort of thing that most people listening to this should have a vague idea of, “Oh, that means I can go on GitHub and download it and start using it, if it's not already in my package manager.” Great. You also have the enterprise offering, which is more or less, I presume, a supported distribution of this—for lack of a better term—that you then wind up providing blessed configurations thereof and helping run support for that—for companies that want to run it on-prem. Is that directionally accurate, or am I grossly mischaracterizing [laugh] what your enterprise offering is?Brian: Directionally accurate, of course. You could have a great job in marketing. I really think you could.Corey: Oh, you know, I would argue, on some level, I probably do. The challenge I have is that I keep conflating marketing with spectacle and that leads down to really unfortunate, weird places. But one additional area, which is relatively recent since the last time I spoke with Paul—one of the cofounders of your company—on this show is InfluxDB Cloud, which is one of those, “Oh, let me see if I look—if I'm right.” And sure enough, yeah, you wind up managing the infrastructure for us and it becomes a pay-per consumption model the way that most cloud service providers do, without the really obnoxious hidden 15 levels of billing dimensions.Brian: Yes, we are trying to bring the transparency back. But yes, you're correct. We have open-source and we have—it's very popular—we have over 500,000-plus instances of that deployed globally today in the community. And that's typically very common for developers to get started using the open-source, easily recognizable, it's been out for a long time, and so many people start the journey there.And then we have InfluxDB Enterprise, which it's actually a clustered version of InfluxDB open-source. So, it allows you to basically handle in an environment that you want to manage yourself, you manage a cluster and scale it out and handle ever-increasing workloads and have things like redundancy and replication, et cetera. But that's really specifically for people who want to deploy and operate the software themselves, which is a good set of people; we have a lot of folks who have done that. But one of the areas that's a little bit more recent is InfluxDB Cloud, which is really, for folks who don't want to have anything to do with the management; they really just want to use it as a service, send their data in—Corey: Yeah, give me an API endpoint, and I want you to worry about the care, and the feeding, and the waking up at two in the morning when a disk starts filling up. Yeah, that is the best kind of problem from my perspective: someone else's.Brian: Exactly. That's our job. And increasingly, we've seen folks gravitate to that. We've got a lot of folks have signed up on this product since it launched in 2019, and it's really increasingly where they begin their journey, maybe not even going to the open-source just going directly to this because it's relatively simple to get started.It's priced based on usage. People pay for three vectors: they have the amount of data in; they have number of queries made against the platform; and then storage, how much data you have and for how long. And depending on the use case, some people keep it around for relatively short time, like a few days or a couple of weeks. Other folks have it for many, many months and potentially years in some places. So, you really have that option.But I would say the three products are really about how you want to run it. Do you care about running the, kind of, underlying infrastructure and managing it or do you just want to hit an endpoint, as you said.Corey: You launched this, I want to say in 2019, which feels about directionally right. And I know it was after Timestream was announced, so I just want to say first, how kind and selfless it was of you to validate AWS's market, which is, you know how they always like to clarify and define what they're doing when they decide to enter every single market anywhere to compete with everyone. It turns out, I don't get the sense that they like it quite [laugh] as much being on the other side of that particular divide, but that's the best kind of problem, too: again, someone else's.Brian: Yeah, I think that's really true.Corey: The challenge that I have is that it seems like a weird direction to go in as a company, though it is clearly based upon a number of press releases you have made about the success and market traction that you found, it feels, on some level, like it is falling into an older version of an open-source trap of assuming that, “Well, we wrote the software therefore we are the best people you could pick to run it.” That was what a lot of companies did; it turns out that AWS has this operational excellence, as they call it, and what the rest of us call burning through people and making them wake up in the middle of the night to fix things before it becomes customer-visible. But from the outside, there's no difference. It seems, however, that you have built something that is clearly resonating, and in a big way, in a way that—I've got to be direct with you—the AWS time-series service that they are offering has not been finding success.Brian: Thank you for saying that, and we feel pretty excited about the success we've had even being in the same market as Amazon. And Amazon does a phenomenal job at running products at scale, and the breadth that they have in their product lineup is pretty impressive, especially when they roll out new stuff at AWS re:Invent every year. But we've been able to find some pretty good success with our approach, and it's based on a couple of things. So, one is being the company that actually develops and still deploys the open-source is really important. People gravitate to that.Our roots as a company are open-source, we've been a part of and fostered this community over many, many years, and there's a certain trust in the direction that we're taking the company. And Paul, our founder who you mentioned, he's been front and center with that community, pretty deeply engaged for many, many years. I think that carries a lot of weight. At least that's the way we think about it. But then as far as commercial products go, we really think about it as going to where our customers are, going to where developers are. And that could mean the language that they prefer, the language of preference for them. And that could [crosstalk 00:22:25]—Corey: Oh, and it's very clear; it seems that most database companies that I talk to—again, without naming names—tend to focus on the top-down sale, but I've never worked in an environment where the database that will be used was dictated by anyone other than the application developers who are the closest to the technical requirements for the workload. I've never understood this model of, “Oh, we're going to talk to the C suite because we believe that they're going to pick a database vendor based upon who has box seats this season.” I've never gotten that and that probably means I'm a terrible enterprise marketer, on some level. But unlike almost every other player in the database space, I've never struggled to understand what the hell your messaging has meant, other than the technical bits that I just don't have quite enough neurons to bang together to create sparks to fully understand. It is very clearly targeted at a builder rather than someone who's more or less spending their entire life in meetings. Which, oh, God, that's me.Brian: [laugh]. Yes, it's very much the case. We are focused on the developer. And that developer is a builder of an application or service that is seeing the light of day, it's going out and being used by their own end-users and end-customers.And so we care about going to where those developers are, and that could mean going and making your product easily used in the language and tool that customer cares about. So, if you're a Python developer, it's important for us to have tools and make it easy for Python developers. We have client libraries for Python, for example. It also means going to the cloud where your customers are. And this is something that differentiates us as well, when you start looking at what the other cloud providers are offering, in that data—like it or not—has gravity. And so somebody that has built their whole stack on AWS and sure they care about using a service that is going to receive their data, and that also being in AWS, but—Corey: It has to live where the customers are, especially with data egress charges being what they are, too.Brian: Exactly.Corey: And data gravity is real. The cloud provider people pick is the one where their data lives because of that particular inflection in the market.Brian: Absolutely true. And so that's great if you're only going after people who are on AWS, but what about Google Cloud and what about Microsoft Azure? There are a lot of developers that are building on those platforms as well, and that's one of the reasons we want to go there as well. So, InfluxDB Cloud is a multi-cloud offering, and it's equal experience and capability and pricing on each of the three major clouds. You can buy directly from us; you can put it on any of your cloud bills in one of those marketplaces, and to us that's like a really, really fundamental point is to bring your product and make it as easy to use on those platforms and in those languages, and in those realms and use cases where people are already working.Corey: I'm a big believer in multi-cloud for the use case you just defined. Because I know I'm going to get letters if I don't say this based upon my public multi-cloud is a dumb default worst practice for most folks—because it is, on a workload-by-workload basis—but you're building a service that has to be close to where your customers are and for that specific thing, yeah, it makes an awful lot of sense for you to have a presence across all the different providers. Now, here's the $64,000 question for you: is the experience as an InfluxDB Cloud customer meaningfully different between different providers?Brian: It's not. We actually pride ourselves on it being the same. Using InfluxDB, you sign up for InfluxDB Cloud, you come in, you set up your account, create your organization, and then you choose which underlying cloud provider you want your account to be provisioned in. And so it actually comes as a secondary choice; it's not something that is gated in the beginning, and that allows us to deliver a uniform experience across the board. And you may in a future use case, maybe somebody wants to have part of what they're building data living in AWS and maybe part of it living in Azure, I mean, that could be a scenario as well.However, typically what we've seen—and you've probably seen this as well—is  most developers are—and organizations—are building mostly on one cloud. I don't see a lot of  multi-cloud in that organization. But we ourselves need to be multi-cloud in order to go to where those people are working. And so that's the distinction. It's for us as a company that delivers product to those people, it's important for us to go where they are, whereas they themselves are not necessarily running on all three cloud products; they're probably running on one platform.Corey: Yeah. On a workload-by-workload basis, that's what generally makes sense. Anytime you have someone who has a particular workload that needs to be in multiple providers, okay, great, you're going to put that out there, but their backend systems, their billing, their marketing, all the rest, is not going to go down that path for a variety of excellent reasons, mostly that it is a colossal pain, and a bunch of, more or less, solving the same problems over and over, rather than the whole point of cloud being to make it someone else's. I want to thank you for taking so much time to speak to me about how you're viewing the evolution of the market, how you're seeing your move into cloud, and how you're effectively targeting folks who can actually care about the implementation details of a database rather than, honestly, suits. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Brian: They can go to our website; it's the easiest place to go. So, influxdata.com. You can read all about InfluxDB, it's a pretty easy sign up to get underway. So, I recommend that people get their hands dirty with the product. That's the easiest way to understand what it's all about.Corey: And if you do end up doing that, please tell them I sent you because the involuntary flinch whenever people mention my name to vendors is one of my favorite parts of being me. Brian, thank you so much for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it.Brian: Thanks so much for having us on. It was great.Corey: Brian Mullen, Chief Marketing Officer—and dealmaker—at InfluxData. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a long, angry comment telling me that you work on the Timestream service team, and your product is the best. It's found huge success, but I've just never met any of your customers and I can't because they all live in Canada.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

MarTech Podcast // Marketing + Technology = Business Growth
Tech Skills Gap Facing Marketing Teams -- Lynne Capozzi // Acquia

MarTech Podcast // Marketing + Technology = Business Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 15:27


Acquia's Chief Marketing Officer, Lynne Capozzi, discusses the tech skills gap facing marketing teams. The marketing space is one that is constantly changing. And today as a marketer, you also need a strong background in data analytics to be successful. Today, Lynne shares her take on how the roles within marketing teams are changing. Show NotesConnect With: Lynne Capozzi: Website // LinkedInThe MarTech Podcast: Email // LinkedIn // TwitterBenjamin Shapiro: Website // LinkedIn // TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Destination On The Left
Episode 256: How to Personalize Your Destination Marketing, with Gregory Lim

Destination On The Left

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 43:38


Greg was previously the CMO at LifeLock. He is a seasoned executive with a unique knowledge of start-ups and how to create an innovative strategy and align it with practical execution to achieve exceptional results. Greg possesses a progressive and diverse background in Marketing (brand management, digital and traditional marketing, business-to-business (B2B) and business-to-consumer (B2C) marketing), Finance (budgeting, planning, debt & equity raise, IPO), and Operations (process improvement, risk management, call centers, and reporting & analytics). He has over 17 years of experience, ranging from Chief Marketing Officer of a $1B+ public company to the financial lead of a start-up that went public. On this episode of Destination on the Left, I talk with Greg Lim, who gives his actionable tips on ways you can create meaningful connections with prospective customers through personalization and data. He demystifies how to incorporate personalization into your marketing by sharing his crawl, walk, run approach to implementing new marketing tactics. Greg also highlights the importance of collaboration between destination marketing organizations and how personalization can boost the success of co-op programs. What You Will Learn: How to deliver different personalized experiences to help a wide range of audiences and potential visitors in their trip planning Why differentiate landing pages according to interest then extend the customer experience to your core website How we've normalized bad communication and bad behavior in marketing through the historical limitations of technology Using touchpoints to personalize a consumer experience to engage and delight virtual visitors Approaching marketing personalization from a crawl, walk, run perspective with regards to technology Technical solutions that allow marketers to take control of their campaigns and integrate their social media channels Prioritize Your Website Marketing Invest in your website — because that's where all of your social channels and your marketing are sending everyone. So, if you invest in your website, your website performs better, and you'll get a better conversion rate and return on your investment. You can also build new partnerships and add value to your existing partners with your destination marketing site. Personalization can empower your team to go out and find collaboration opportunities. With your destination marketing site, you can create an exciting way to expand your partnership inventory and serve the different audiences coming to your website. Personalization Shouldn't Be Overwhelming Gregory shares the common-sense middle ground in marketing personalization. He gives his insights on how to deliver meaningful experiences to your consumers that delight them and do it in a way that is not invasive. You want to create a powerful experience for them that will ultimately drive your business results. The most significant opportunity for the travel and tourism industry is to take all the micro conversations and engagements that we already have with our visitors then carry that same conversation through to the website. To learn more about Gregory and his company, Persosa, please check out the contact links below: Website: https://www.persosa.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/gregorylim/ https://www.linkedin.com/company/persosa Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/teampersosa/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/teampersosa

MarTech Podcast // Marketing + Technology = Business Growth
What CMOs Should Consider When Choosing A CDP -- Lynne Capozzi // Acquia

MarTech Podcast // Marketing + Technology = Business Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 16:00


Chief Marketing Officer at Acquia, Lynne Capozzi, shares her thoughts on what CMOs should be considering when making a CDP choice. The move away from third-party data has increased the value of first-party data. Companies have to become smarter about the way they handle user data. Today, Lynne looks at the factors CMOs should consider when choosing a CDP. Show NotesConnect With: Lynne Capozzi: Website // LinkedInThe MarTech Podcast: Email // LinkedIn // TwitterBenjamin Shapiro: Website // LinkedIn // TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Demand Gen Visionaries
Everything Starts & Ends with Great People with Nikhil Behl, CMO of FICO

Demand Gen Visionaries

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 37:02


This episode features an interview with Nikhil Behl, CMO of FICO, a leading analytics software company helping businesses in over 85 countries. Nikhil has over 25 years of technology, software and e-commerce experience. Prior to FICO, he was COO of Mercantila and spent 12 years in a number of executive-level positions at Hewlett-Packard. Nikhil is best known for being a part of the founding team that built H-P-Shopping.com and turned it into one of the top-five I-R 500 retailers in just seven years. On this episode, Nikhil uncovers the main ingredient for crafting the perfect customer testimonial, why the people you work with are the main driver for creativity, and his strategic tips for creating curated events that perform.----------------“You have to be able to tell these stories just in time with the right medium and not taking up too much of that, person's either time or ability to digest something. And so taking a story and starting to break it up into either multiple components or segments, putting it into multiple mediums, whether it's a video or audio or through social or long form and helping these things actually build on each other is really important.” — Nikhil Behl----------------Episode Timestamps:*(2:15) - Nikhil's first role in marketing*(3:31) - Nikhil's current role as CMO at FICO*(4:10) - Segment: The Trust Tree*(5:52) - What the buying committee looks like for FICO*(9:19) - Nikhil's marketing strategy*(10:37) - The way Nikhil organizes his marketing team*(12:26) - Segment: The Playbook*(17:38) - How Nikhil craft's his customer testimonials*(21:38) - How Nikhil thinks about FICO's website*(26:48) - Tips on creating curated events*(29:07) - What it's like being a serial entrepreneur and CMO*(31:50) - Segment: The Dust Up*(34:00) - Segment: Quick Hits----------------SponsorDemand Gen Visionaries is brought to you by Qualified.com, the #1 Conversational Marketing platform for companies that use Salesforce and the secret weapon for Demand Gen pros. The world's leading enterprise brands trust Qualified to instantly meet with buyers, right on their website, and maximize sales pipeline. Visit Qualified.com to learn more.----------------LinksConnect with Nikhil on LinkedInFollow Nikhil on TwitterFollow Ian on TwitterConnect with Ian on LinkedInwww.caspianstudios.com

The Brave Marketer
The Decentralized Revolution and the Emergence of NFTs

The Brave Marketer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 22:41


Jeremy Epstein, CMO at Gtmhub, shares how he's shaping the future of work by empowering companies to measure performance based on target outcomes (OKR method). He also dives deep into how the decentralized revolution and emergence of NFTs is impacting brands and marketers by shifting the power back to communities.  In this episode we also discuss: Considerations for NFT marketing and the utilization of decentralized technologies  Identifying and listening to your brand champions to create community Examples of how Dapper Labs delivers blockchain-based experiences and NFT digital collectibles via Crypto Kitties and collaborations with the NBA and Dr. Seuss How email marketing has changed and what it takes to be successful Guest Bio: Jeremy Epstein is the Chief Marketing Officer at Gtmhub, the world's leading SaaS provider enabling the OKR (Objectives and Key Results) goal-setting methodology. In December 2020, Gtmhub raised the largest Series B round in the history of the category ($30 million) and serves global brands like Société Générale, CNN, Adobe, Red Hat, and TomTom. Prior to Gtmhub, Jeremy was the VP/Marketing at Sprinklr which grew from a $20 million valuation and 30 people to $1.8 billion valuation and 1400 people during his 4-year tenure. Concurrently, Jeremy serves as the co-Chief Investment Officer of the Crypto Futura Fund, a thesis-driven hedge fund that identifies undervalued, high potential blockchain-based tokens in the emerging crypto asset class. The Fund returned 90% in 2020. ----------------------------------------------------------------------- About this Show: Brave is at the forefront of a new online privacy frontier and has unique insight into the future of marketing and advertising in a cookieless world. If you're an agency, brand marketer or entrepreneur challenged by the changes in ethical advertising, consumer privacy and buyer expectations, this podcast will provide a backstage view of how influential marketers at top brands and agencies are responding to what's next. Music by: Ari Dvorin Hosted by: Donny Dvorin

MarTech Podcast // Marketing + Technology = Business Growth
Creating Digital Experiences For The Post-Pandemic Consumer -- Lynne Capozzi // Acquia

MarTech Podcast // Marketing + Technology = Business Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 14:20


Lynne Capozzi, Chief Marketing Officer at Acquia discusses the process behind improving your company's digital experiences. Modern consumers demand a highly customized user experience online. They expect the same value from brands both online and offline. Today, Lynne addresses creating digital experiences for the post pandemic consumer. Show NotesConnect With: Lynne Capozzi: Website // LinkedInThe MarTech Podcast: Email // LinkedIn // TwitterBenjamin Shapiro: Website // LinkedIn // TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Marketing Trends
Marketing Team Metamorphosis through Company Growth with Amy Cook, CMO of Simplus

Marketing Trends

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 44:26


Predicting exactly how much growth to expect (or strive for) in your business can be tricky to forecast. This week we look to Amy Cook, CMO of Simplus, Amy has grown, scaled, and been a part of many merging teams throughout her career. Their growth has been rapid and expansive, which definitely required great leadership. “Simplus was doing a few million and had just barely done a series A. [We had]  a growth rate of over 300% year-over-year. I attribute so much of that to our CEO who really empowered each team member on the executive team to do the very best that they could. And then he kept it all together with his vision and focus on culture. It was really an amazing opportunity; since then [in] the past 18 months we've been acquired by Infosys. That has been another humongous learning curve to learn how to be part of a massive organization of 250,000 people.”Regardless of the size of the team or the title on your email signature, Amy is all about finding the best marketing solutions to her questions. Her success in marketing can be attributed to her openness and collaboration. In this episode of Marketing Trends, Amy dives into, scaling and growing a marketing business to enterprise size, and as a part of that keeping the marketing part of the business integrated with the whole organization. Prepare to benefit from Amy's optimistic and collaborative attitude about growth and best marketing team practices up next on Marketing Trends. Main TakeawaysScaling Well and Growing to Enterprise Size: Focus on culture when merging two companies; the larger the company, the more important being able to integrate both teams becomes. Keeping a strong line of communication to the whole organization about the mission and vision is critical to help everyone work together more effectively. Looking around to see what other companies of the same size are doing can be helpful. Replicating the best methods and practices you see in their organizations is a big time-saver. Agencies Can Help if you're Struggling with Retention: If you lose someone on your team, or can't scale the team as quickly as you need, agencies are a solution to your problem. It's still best to keep the heart of the marketing department in-house, but farming out smaller portions of the marketing mix that can be executed by an agency can help you address bandwidth issues on your team. Marketing as an Integral Part of the Whole Organization: It's important to stay closely connected with the rest of the company in the marketing department. Alignment across departments spans more than just sales and marketing. Siloing yourself off in a bubble will keep you from valuable insights that the rest of the team could impart. Building relationships at every level internally and externally can help you reach more customers with a message that solves their problems.  Key Quotes“Simplus was doing a few million and had just barely done a series A. [We had]  a growth rate of over 300% year over year. I attribute so much of that to our CEO who really empowered each team member on the executive team to do the very best that they could. And then he kept altogether with his vision and focus on culture. It was really an amazing opportunity; since then [in] the past 18 months we've been acquired by Infosys. That has been another humongous learning curve to learn how to be part of a massive organization of 250,000 people.”“ [Agencies] work really well if you're having trouble retaining people, then an agency can give you that unlimited support. You can fire your agency at any time if they're not performing well for you with no consequences. At the agency, we go by the hour. And so there's a hundred percent utilization out of your team. So if the price is low enough and the utilization is a hundred percent, there's a really good case to fill in some of those gaps“When marketing [takes on] more of an ancillary role, then you lose a lot of the positivity that you can have from marketing. I have finance meetings with the team each week.. Not only do you have to connect internally [with teams], but you also need to connect with your partners with your customers and do joint co-marketing with your partners to reach the same customers. It's a whole lot of relationship-building, even more than I would have expected when I just started doing marketing deliverables all those years ago.” “I know that I'm only going to get event ROI if I empower sales leaders to lead the event. And [sales] knows that [they're] only going to get marketing support if those salespeople [are] accountable for the event. So there's a really great understanding of each other.”“Every sales leader is a little bit different and you have to be adaptable. Marketing has to take a support role, aligned behind the sales leader,  and say, ‘I'll use your playbook. What does your playbook look like?'” “I approach marketing [believing] everybody's got good ideas; the delivery team's got amazing ideas; our legal department gives us great marketing ideas; we can all flow together and collect our marketing knowledge.” “As you [grow] more into the enterprise you can see what other lines of business are doing. For us, a 30% growth rate is now what we're achieving, or what we're desiring to achieve because the account sizes are so much larger. So when you're a little company, you can expect an insane growth rate. And then when you're in an enterprise your growth rates are going to be more like 30%. When you're forecasting, [do] some underwriting on what other companies like you were doing and setting your goal, maybe 10% higher, so you can crush your competition.” BioAmy Osmond Cook, Ph.D., is the Chief Marketing Officer of Simplus, an Infosys Company. At Simplus, she led the marketing efforts from Series A through acquisition, helping the company achieve a 3-year growth rate of 1,578% and acquire seven companies before being acquired by Infosys for $250M. Amy is also the founder of Osmond Marketing, which has been named one of the fastest-growing businesses in Utah by MountainWest Capital for five years in a row. She is an adjunct faculty member at BYU-Hawaii and has taught business and communication courses at BYU, University of Utah, and ASU intermittently for the past 25 years. Amy is a columnist for the Daily Herald and a regular contributor to Forbes, the Orange County Register, and other publications. She received her doctorate from the University of Utah in Organizational Communication, and her research interests, informed by Critical Theory, include organizational identification, communication ethics, and gender dynamics in the workplace. ---Marketing Trends podcast is brought to you by Salesforce. Discover marketing built on the world's number one CRM: Salesforce. Put your customer at the center of every interaction. Automate engagement with each customer. And build your marketing strategy around the entire customer journey. Salesforce. We bring marketing and engagement together. Learn more at salesforce.com/marketing.

Deconstructor of Fun
TWIG #159 Candy Crush' new CMO comes from a footwear company / Moon Active's $5 billion valuation / the Esports bubble debate

Deconstructor of Fun

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 70:48


Articles: Moon Active valuation surges to $5 billion on back of $300 million Insight funding Esports - a marketing investment? Gaming Giant King Names Fernanda Romano as Chief Marketing Officer for Candy Crush Links: Send us Questions and Feedback Deconstructor of Fun Newsletter Deconstructor of Fun Slack Group Hosts: Mishka Katkoff, Eric Kress, Adam Telfer and Eric Seufert Sponsors: ironSource, Appsflyer, Beamable, Betahat, Xsolla Image: Adweek --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/deconstructoroffun/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/deconstructoroffun/support

The Mac Attack Podcast
Seth Bennett on Hornets and the Community

The Mac Attack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 8:53


The guys are joined by Seth Bennett, the Chief Marketing Officer for the Hornets, to talk about the team's involvement in the community and the overall excitement around the team this season. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Innovation Inside LaunchStreet: Leading Innovators | Business Growth | Improve Your Innovation Game
How to Break Through the Digital Noise with Everyday Innovator Stephen Pacinelli

Innovation Inside LaunchStreet: Leading Innovators | Business Growth | Improve Your Innovation Game

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 49:09


There's no denying that we live in an increasingly digital world where a lot of our communication takes place via text on screens, i.e. email. That's why human connection is ever more important in helping us build those relationships. Steve Pacinelli has just the insights to share on how we can use videos to stand out in a cluttered inbox and rehumanize our businesses. Stephen's Everyday Innovator style: Risk Taker Futuristic Stephen Pacinelli is the Chief Marketing Officer of BombBomb, a tool that helps users create and send simple videos via email. As a Sales Manager, Vice President of Events, and the National Speaker for Realtor.com, Steve has immense experience in sales, marketing, and speaking, which he taps into to help people improve human connection. Recently, Steve co-authored the definitive guide to better business communication, Rehumanize Your Business, which explains how to dramatically improve relationships and results in your business through video. What are we missing by communicating via email? It's not just about conveying your tone to the other person, but also overcoming their current feelings at the time. Steve explains how BombBomb allows people to make email as warm and personal as a face-to-face meeting through connecting people, and rehumanizing business. We discuss how to harness video as a tool even in regular communication, and what makes video such a powerful tool to influence decisions — you can ignore the text on a screen, but not a person. Steve shares some case studies of how videos help to make communication personal and human, and his tips and strategies for leveraging video to stand out and grab attention amidst all the distractions. BombBomb Stephen Pacinelli on LinkedIn Rehumanize Your Business: How Personal Videos Accelerate Sales and Improve Customer Experience, by Ethan Beute and Stephen Pacinelli Discover your Everyday Innovator Style Everyday Innovators Digital Toolkit Everyday Innovators Online Facebook Group Innovation is Everybody's Business Book Connect with Tamara on LinkedIn or join the innovator Facebook group to listen in live and have the opportunity to connect.   

Morning Fire!
Using Crisis to Pivot with Drew Neisser

Morning Fire!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 26:29


On today's podcast I have CEO and Founder of Renegade, Drew NeisserUniquely wired as both strategist and writer, Drew has helped dozens of CMOs unleash their inner renegade and told the stories of over 450 marketers via the #2 podcast for CMOs called Renegade Thinkers Unite, a live-streaming show on LinkedIn called Renegade Thinkers Live, his CMO Spotlight column for AdAge, and his 1st book The CMO's Periodic Table: A Renegade's Guide to Marketing.His 2nd book, Renegade Marketing: 12 Steps to Building Unbeatable B2B Brands recently launched and is out now. Considered among the top B2B influencers by Adobe/Marketo, Gartner, IBM and Pega Systems, Drew has been a featured marketing expert on ABC News, CNBC, CBS Radio and Tony Robbins' podcast among many others. A frequent keynote speaker and moderator at industry conferences, Drew is deeply passionate about the role marketing can play to make our lives a bit better if not save the planet. Have a listen!Where to find Drew:https://renegade.com/https://www.linkedin.com/in/drewneisser/

Voices of Search // A Search Engine Optimization (SEO) & Content Marketing Podcast
How To Have A Great Meeting About SEO -- Andy Crestodina // Orbit Media

Voices of Search // A Search Engine Optimization (SEO) & Content Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 18:54


Co-founder and Chief Marketing Officer at Orbit Media Studios, Andy Crestodina, explores improving conversations around SEO. When it comes to building out effective SEO strategies, the conversations are not always happening with SEO professionals. Without data, these discussions can miss the mark. Andy shares his insights on having great SEO conversations. Show NotesConnect With: Andy Crestodina: Website // LinkedInThe Voices of Search Podcast: Email // LinkedIn // TwitterBenjamin Shapiro: Website // LinkedIn // TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Demand Gen Visionaries
Redefining Shared Experiences with 3-time CMO Anthony Kennada, CMO of Hopin

Demand Gen Visionaries

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 41:14


“Every company needs to start acting like a media company or risk going out of business, pure, plain and simple. And when the cookie-less future that we're all staring down comes to light, the companies that survive are the ones that caught this early and were able to start investing in building their own content moat around the business.” — Anthony Kennada-------------Episode Timestamps:*(2:05) - Anthony's first job in marketing*(2:45) - More about Anthony's role at Hopin as CMO*(4:05) - Segment: The Trust Tree*(6:41) - Who's the buying committee for Hopin *(8:37) - How Anthony's marketing team is organized *(14:23) - How events have changed over the last 18 months*(25:15) - Segment: The Playbook*(29:45) - The investments Anthony makes into brand*(31:54) - How to think about investing in content*(35:30) - Segment: The Dust Up*(38:45) - Segment: Quick Hits SponsorDemand Gen Visionaries is brought to you by Qualified.com, the #1 Conversational Marketing platform for companies that use Salesforce and the secret weapon for Demand Gen pros. The world's leading enterprise brands trust Qualified to instantly meet with buyers, right on their website, and maximize sales pipeline. Visit Qualified.com to learn more. LinksConnect with Anthony on LinkedInFollow Anthony on TwitterFollow Ian on TwitterConnect with Ian on LinkedInwww.caspianstudios.com

Women Blazers
The One with Iris Diaz

Women Blazers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 48:00


In this episode we welcome Iris Diaz, Chief Marketing Officer for the Dallas Mavericks of the NBA. Iris brings the energy in this conversation as she shares her remarkable journey, a journey with humble beginnings, a no quit mentality, and an inspiring determination rooted by her family to lead the life she imagined for herself.

Voices of Search // A Search Engine Optimization (SEO) & Content Marketing Podcast
Why Does The SEO Industry Have Such A Bad Reputation -- Andy Crestodina // Orbit Media

Voices of Search // A Search Engine Optimization (SEO) & Content Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 19:12


Andy Crestodina, Co-founder and Chief Marketing Officer at Orbit Media Studios talks about questionable practices within the SEO industry. When it comes to laying the blame for SEO's spammy reputation, several parties are at fault. With the industry slowly trending towards better SEO practices, Andy looks into why the SEO industry has a bad reputation. Show NotesConnect With: Andy Crestodina: Website // LinkedInThe Voices of Search Podcast: Email // LinkedIn // TwitterBenjamin Shapiro: Website // LinkedIn // TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Friend of a Friend
Taking A C-Suite Job At Nine Months Pregnant: How To Have It All with Behnaz Ghahramani

Friend of a Friend

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 32:45


Today we're joined by Stuart Weitzman's Chief Marketing Officer, Behnaz Ghahramani. Her resume in the business of fashion is extensive - she's led strategy for prestigious brands like Gucci and Ralph Lauren, and then came her first C Suite executive job offer at the New York-based shoe brand. She also happened to be nine months pregnant at the time. In this episode, Behnaz shares the keys to having it all, how she climbed the corporate fashion ladder, and how she's worked with collaborators like Serena Williams to bring maternity rights to the forefront of her work.    Love the show? Follow us and leave a review! And for more behind-the-scenes, follow Liv on Instagram, @LivvPerez.  Produced by Dear Media

Action and Ambition
Jason Kutasi Established an Independent Book Publisher Focused on The Children Demographic

Action and Ambition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 31:00


Welcome to another episode of the Action and Ambition Podcast! Guesting on the show is Jason Kutasi. He is the CEO and Founder of the San Diego-based  independent children's publishing company Puppy Dogs & Ice Cream (PDIC) which is focused on direct-to-consumer marketing. Previously, he was the CEO of Del Mar Capital and Chief Marketing Officer of PushPoint. PDIC has grown repadily since its launched in 2017 They offer a publishing alternative to the traditional publishing model which benefits authors and customers alike.  They have a strong belief in supporting American businesses, and all of their books are printed in the US. Tune in to learn more about this!

Our Voices Matter Podcast
Walk With Purpose - Toni Harrison

Our Voices Matter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 45:11


Toni Harrison was raised to walk with purpose.  As the Chief Marketing Officer of a new fin tech company, she is doing just that -- on a mission to help solve the racial wealth gap.She's the proud granddaughter of a civil rights activist who helped bring Texas Southern University to Houston.  Her father, Charles "Tex" Harrison, was an OG of the famed Harlem Globetrotters -- his consolation prize for being denied a shot at the NBA.The self-described “creative disruptor” is now making her own mark.  As CMO of Fair Fintech, Toni is using her considerable communication skills to help solve the racial and opportunity wealth gap.An Offer She Couldn't RefuseThe CEO of the new firm, Khalid Parekh,  was well aware of Toni's award-winning PR campaigns and strategies .  He was her client at Etched Communication, the agency she founded, along with global powerhouses Pepsi, Polaris and McDonald's.Toni's expertise in the diversity and multicultural space is exactly what Parekh was looking for to help put the first multilingual neobank on the map.So, when he started Fair, he made Toni an offer she couldn't refuse.Purpose and IntentionFor Toni, it's all about purpose and intention.   It's about bringing her personal perspective to the table, even when it's painful.I'm always grateful when a guest is willing to "go there".   Because that's where growth happens.  And that is what Our Voices Matter podcast is all about.  Sharing the stories that help remind us of our common humanity.So, thank you, Toni, for being open and vulnerable and showing us what it looks like to walk with purpose.www.ourvoicesmatterpodcast.comwww.lorellemedia.comThis podcast is devoted to empowering us all to better understand each other's differences...one story at a time.  Emmy Award-winning journalist, Linda Lorelle, guides guests through insightful, unexpected conversations that reveal our common humanity.  This show is not about politics per se; it is about finding a way to reclaim civility in the context of the contentious times in which we live, by sharing our personal and professional stories, in hopes that others might find a glimpse of themselves.Support the show (http://patreon.com/OurVoicesMatterPodcast)

Brands, Beats & Bytes
Album 3 Track 16 – Steve Hallowell, Chief Marketing Officer at Herschend Enterprises, previously Director of Marketing at Darien Lake Resorts and Director of Consumer Experience Marketing at Kodak

Brands, Beats & Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 74:59


Album 3 Track 16 – Steve Hallowell, Chief Marketing Officer at Herschend Enterprises, previously Director of Marketing at Darien Lake Resorts and Director of Consumer Experience Marketing at Kodak.Steve brings stories of his experience from post-college labor jobs to bringing joy and entertainment to families worldwide. From Kodak to Herschend Enterprises (you most likely know better as the owners of Silver Dollar City, Dollywood, or the Harlem Globetrotters), Steve understands the importance of hard work and the power of joy in experiences. A few takeaways:  Theme parks and shows may be the product, but more importantly, it's about the experience that your consumers have when engaging with Herschend companies. It's essential to stand firm in your opinions, all while trusting your gut to lead you in the right direction. Be vigilant about strategy and flexible with tactics. As a leader, self-awareness can be your best quality for your team.

Nice Jewish Girls
Michal Cohen: A Seat at the Table

Nice Jewish Girls

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 42:32


This week, Julia sits down with Michal Cohen, the Chief Marketing Officer of Jewish on Campus. The two discuss the challenge of campus antisemitism and the power that comes with giving young voices a seat at the table.

Clicks 2 Bricks
Ep 49: Kieran Donahue is the Chief Marketing Officer for IHOP

Clicks 2 Bricks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 44:31


Tackling the marketing for a restaurant chain during a pandemic is no small feat. Today's guest Kieran Donahue took up the challenge when she became the Chief Marketing Officer for IHOP mid-COVID. While she is not solely responsible for the very impressive 40% growth that the brand recently announced, she did play a part in it. After a long career in hospitality with brands like Hilton and Marriott, Kieran joined this leading family dining brand to take on a new challenge in the restaurant industry. Today she joins us to discuss this transition, how she approached her new job, and what IHOP did pre-COVID that helped them survive the pandemic. She describes how she transferred some of the best practices from her experience in hospitality into her role at IHOP. She also talks about the importance of knowing your customers and how technology can be used to achieve this. To find out how IHOP is developing their brand and their tech stack in parallel, how they view their relationship with third parties, and insight into their new fast-casual concept Flip'd, tune in today!

Remote Works
From Great Resignation to Great Rejuvenation

Remote Works

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 20:21


In August, 4.3 million Americans left their jobs. We'll talk to one worker who quit in search of more flexibility and a better work life balance. Plus Liz Fosslien, Head of Content at Humu, unpacks what this means for companies, and what we can learn at this transformational moment.Citrix research offers insights into the Great ResignationTim Minahan, Executive Vice President, Business Strategy and Chief Marketing Officer at Citrix, offers further insight hereAccording to a recent survey conducted by Citrix, two-fifths (40%) of US office workers have left a job in the last  year or are considering doing so.Liz Fosslien is the Head of Content at Humu and co-author of the best-seller No Hard Feelings: The Secret Power of Embracing Emotions at Work.

Wharton FinTech Podcast
Ryan George, CMO of Docupace -- Modernizing and Digitizing the Back Office

Wharton FinTech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 24:12


Gabriela Ariana Campoverde sits down with Ryan George, Chief Marketing Officer of Docupace. Founded in 2002, Docupace is a solutions provider focused on digitizing and automating operations in the financial advice and investment industry. For close to two decades, this company has served wealth managers and helped them to work faster, more securely, and with fewer errors. The platform is composed of client onboarding, document management, advisor transition, and regulation business intelligence features. In this episode you will learn about how Docupace empowers its users to do more in less time, the types of users the company works with, the importance of back office innovation and Ryan's fifteen-year career in Financial Services. Ryan George Ryan George is the Chief Marketing Officer of Docupace. Prior to joining Docupace, Ryan was in various marketing positions at GuideStone Financial Resources, 1st Global, and U.S. Global Investors. He has spent over fifteen years of his career in Financial Services and is a proud Texan. He is a graduate of the University of Texas at Austin, where he studied Public Relations. To follow him on Twitter visit twitter.com/RealRyanGeorge1. About Docupace Docupace is a technology company built for the wealth management industry. They've been on a mission to eliminate paperwork since 2002. For additional information on Docupace, please visit docupace.com | Twitter: twitter.com/docupace For more FinTech insights, follow us below: Medium: medium.com/wharton-fintech WFT Twitter: twitter.com/whartonfintech Gabriela's Twitter: twitter.com/byGabyC Gabriela's LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/gcampoverde

My Worst Investment Ever Podcast
Jeff Bullas – Don't Force Things, Learn to Go With Your Flow

My Worst Investment Ever Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 40:29


BIO: Jeff Bullas is the owner of jeffbullas.com. Forbes calls him a top influencer of Chief Marketing Officers and the world's top social marketing talent. Entrepreneur lists him among 50 online marketing influencers to watch. Inc.com has him on the list of 20 digital marketing experts to follow on Twitter. STORY: Jeff bought a mattress and bedding furniture store, an area he had no experience or passion in. He did no research or did any due diligence, and within no time, he was deep in debt and had to close the store. He lost everything, including his marriage and the family home. LEARNING: Don't start a business unless you have expertise and passion in that industry. Running a business is not all about the money.   “Just start. Create and share your craft, and then the world will show up.”Jeff Bullas  Guest profilehttps://www.linkedin.com/in/jeffbullas/ (Jeff Bullas) is the owner of https://www.jeffbullas.com/ (jeffbullas.com). Forbes calls him a top influencer of Chief Marketing Officers and the world's top social marketing talent. Entrepreneur lists him among 50 online marketing influencers to watch. Inc.com has him on the list of 20 digital marketing experts to follow on https://twitter.com/jeffbullas (Twitter). Worst investment everJeff once bought a mattress and bedding furniture store on a whim. He had zero experience in running a retail business. He did zero research and due diligence. He was just thinking of the money he would make from the business. Within a day or two of buying the store, Jeff realized he'd made the wrong decision. Instead of making money, the business was chewing up cash for months on end. Jeff's bank balance was getting lower and lower. He decided to pivot to another location to get a long-term lease. Jeff hated running this business. He was in the store seven days a week. He felt trapped. Eventually, he got to a point where he realized that he needed to pull the pin. Jeff closed the doors one day and walked away. This failure caused Jeff's marriage to break. He was too deep in debt that the bank took possession of the family home, and he was left with nothing. Lessons learnedWhen starting a business, don't do it just for the money. Start a business that you're uniquely qualified to run. Ask yourself if you have the curiosity, passion, and expertise to do it. If not, don't do it. Just start. Create and share your craft, and then the world will show up. Entrepreneurship is not just about chasing the money; it's also about tapping into why you're here and why you're doing it. Andrew's takeawaysMost people fail to do their research when starting a business. They see an opportunity, get seduced by it, and end up putting aside their normal rationality because they're excited about it. Money is an outcome of your passion. Failure can shake not only your confidence but the confidence of the people around you. But, don't forget that failure is inevitable and when it happens, just walk away. Actionable adviceDon't force it. We live in a perfect world, but it doesn't always unfold in the way we want. When you try to force it, generally, bad things happen. No. 1 goal for the next 12 monthsJeff's number one goal for the next 12 months is to launch a new product and have some fun doing it. Parting words  “Just start and learn. Don't try to be a perfectionist.”Jeff Bullas  [spp-transcript]   Connect with Jeff Bullashttps://www.linkedin.com/in/jeffbullas/ (LinkedIn) https://twitter.com/jeffbullas (Twitter) https://www.facebook.com/jeffreybullas (Facebook) https://www.youtube.com/c/TheJeffBullasShow/featured (YouTube) https://www.jeffbullas.com/ (Website) https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/the-jeff-bullas-show/id1502649184 (Podcast) Andrew's bookshttps://amzn.to/3qrfHjX (How to Start Building Your Wealth Investing in the Stock Market) https://amzn.to/2PDApAo (My Worst Investment Ever) https://amzn.to/3v6ip1Y (9 Valuation Mistakes and How to Avoid...

Demand Gen Visionaries
Part 5: Top CMOs Share Their Most Uncuttable Demand Gen Budget Items

Demand Gen Visionaries

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 27:18


Find parts one, two, three & four------Episode Timestamps: Part five of this special mini-series features 12 CMOs and marketing leaders from some of the world's fastest-growing companies, including:*(4:00) - Amanda Malko, CMO, G2*(7:40) - Raj Khera, Head of Growth, SalesIntel.io*(9:05) - Katrina Wong, VP Product Marketing and Demand Gen, Segment*(11:11) - Morgan Norman, CMO, Dialpad*(12:30) - Kady Srinivasan, SVP Global Head of Marketing, Klaviyo*(13:55) - Joy Corso, CMO, Vonage*(15:05) - Justin Shriber, CMO, People.ai*(18:40) - Susan Beermann, CMO, NAVEX Global*(20:21) - Keith Messick, SVP Marketing, LaunchDarkly*(22:20) - Kyle Lacy, VP Marketing, Seismic*(23:45) - William Tyree, CMO, Revenue.io*(25:30) - Jon Miller, CMO, Demandbase SponsorDemand Gen Visionaries is brought to you by Qualified.com, the #1 Conversational Marketing platform for companies that use Salesforce and the secret weapon for Demand Gen pros. The world's leading enterprise brands trust Qualified to instantly meet with buyers, right on their website, and maximize sales pipeline. Visit Qualified.com to learn more. LinksFollow Ian on TwitterConnect with Ian on LinkedInwww.caspianstudios.com

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain
Excellence is your Greatest Currency

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 57:19


Sarah talks to a powerhouse panel of women in sports including Heidi Browning, the Chief Marketing Officer of the NHL, Kelly Kleine, the Executive Director of Football Operations for the Denver Broncos, Nicole Lynn, the President of Football Operations for Klutch Sports, and Mollie Marcoux Samaan, the Commissioner of the LPGA.

Uncharted Podcast
Uncharted Podcast #108 featuring Jay Gaines: Why Sales is a Great Prerequisite for a Successful Marketing Career

Uncharted Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 31:32


Jay Gaines is passionate about great marketing leadership that drives innovation, positive transformation, and measurable results. His career spans more than 20 years in a variety of B2B industries, and his experience includes organizational design and leadership, marketing strategy and planning, branding and category design, demand creation, sales and marketing alignment, and digital strategy. Jay has held executive-level marketing and business development positions at both well-established and startup b-to-b companies where he consistently transformed marketing organizations to achieve significant and measurable business contribution. Jay is currently head of marketing at AgentSync, and prior to that, he was chief marketing officer at Forrester and SiriusDecisions. Jay has worked as an advisor to many leading Chief Marketing Officers to drive positive organizational change, innovate, and help them to create the most effective, measurable, and focused marketing function possible. He holds a bachelor of arts degree from Columbia University. This week's episode was brought to you with the support of bambee.com/scale and marpipe.com/uncharted --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/uncharted1/support

Data And Analytics in Business
E81 - Max Métral - How Data Drives Racing - The Data Science Behind the Sports Industry

Data And Analytics in Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 65:03


With over half a billion fans following its events worldwide, Formula 1 is the greatest racing spectacle in the world. But very few of us know about Formula 1 as a corporate entity. What makes F1 such a highly successful organisation with raving fans? Max Métral, the Senior Analytics Manager at Formula 1®, is here to give us an insider view into the inner workings of data and analytics in the corporate sports entertainment media landscape. At F1, Max is currently involved in leading the business analytics department, which works to maximize commercial opportunities of both B2B and B2C ventures of F1 by optimising decision making using data analytics. Max uses data to deepen the customers/consumers/fans knowledge and make better data-informed decisions. Before becoming the Senior Analytics Manager, Max was the Insight Manager. As the Insights Manager, he developed the organisation's first-ever fan data analytics strategy. He also built up the F1 data team from scratch. Max also enjoys teaching and sharing his real-life experience as a visiting lecturer at various universities across London, Paris, and Brussels. Previously, Max has worked as a data and insights analyst at City Football Group, Accenture Uk, and Adidas. Academically, Max studied at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - Kenan-Flagler Business School and has a Master of Science in Management (MSc) degree from ESSEC Business School in France. He frequently speaks at reputed industry events involving data analytics, sports business analytics, and sports marketing. In this exclusive episode, Max shares how data and analytics are used in the landscape of sports media and sports analytics. The interview kicks off with Max sharing his passion and experience in teaching and writing, when he is not working. Not only does he find joy from these activities, but equally, he uses the opportunity to sharpen his knowledge too. Max provides a lot of business context for Formula 1 and how it's evolving from B2B to B2C and the DTC model. How data analytics are becoming ever more critical in their B2B business because broadcasters and promoters are asking more questions than ever before to justify the ROI. How Max and his team had to create the fans database from scratch when he first started the job at Formula One. How, eventually, the fans database has allowed Formula One to start building its B2C business. Why data analytics is becoming more critical for Above the Line Marketing. Why we can't blindly trust the data and spend all our marketing budget for Below the Line Marketing. How to build a customer database with a global perspective and some of the challenges it would come with. How to create a new B2C market if you're traditionally a B2B business and why data plays such an important role to make both of them complement each other. If you are Chief Marketing Officer in a large corporation or work in the media industry, listening to this episode is highly recommended. This episode is sponsored by the new program at DDA. It's an analytics leader mentorship program for senior managers and executives in the business team who want to develop a data-driven business to drive customer experience excellence. For a small one-off annual fee, you get to book Unlimited Strategy Sessions for a Full Year. For more information about this program, please reach out to DDA! BusinessAnalytics, CustomerExperience, DataScience --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/analyticsshow/message

CBJectively Speaking
75. Fun (Dip) with Kathryn Dobbs!

CBJectively Speaking

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 76:36


In the 75th episode of CBJectively Speaking, we welcome very special guest, Kathryn Dobbs, Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer of the Columbus Blue Jackets to the show. Join us as we discuss Columbus as a hockey market, what drew Kathryn to the Columbus Blue Jackets, how her fandom was established well before her employment, her favorite memories with the team, and of course, we discuss the phenomenon that has taken the 5th Line by storm... you guessed it - FUN DIP! We discuss the literal and metaphorical meaning of Fun Dip, how the movement started, where the movement is going and how you can get involved. You won't want to miss this one! The Jackets also take the ice again on Friday, so we look ahead to the Jackets' matchup with the Capitals and the Rangers! You can follow us on Twitter and Instagram @CBJectivelyPod, find us on Facebook by searching "CBJectively Speaking", and check out our website cbjectivelyspeaking.com. You can also access our merch store by heading to cbjectivelyspeaking.threadless.com. Be sure to follow Kathryn on Twitter @KateDobbs99! Be sure to rate, review, and subscribe wherever you listen! Keep up with the other shows on The Hockey Podcast Network by following @Hockeypodnet. Support for this podcast is brought to you by DraftKings, use promo code "THPN" for your chance to win cold hard cash this season!

Reimagine Hybrid Work
Verint's Celia Fleischaker

Reimagine Hybrid Work

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 20:18


Maribel speaks with on Celia Fleischaker, the Chief Marketing Officer of Verint on creating winning customer experiences and employee engagement. You can follow her at: Celia's Linkedin https://www.linkedin.com/in/celiafleischaker/ Celia's Twitter: @cfleischaker URL: https://www.verint.com/

Partnering Leadership
How Chick-fil-A Became an Iconic Brand with Chick-fil-A's former Chief Marketing Officer Steve Robinson | Partnering Leadership Global Thought Leader

Partnering Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 49:35


In this episode of Partnering Leadership, Mahan Tavakoli speaks with Steve Robinson, former executive vice president and chief marketing officer of Chick-fil-A. Steve Robinson shared lessons from his decades-long experience leading marketing at Chick-fil-A, including stories from his book Covert Cows and Chick-fil-A: How Faith, Cows, and Chicken built an Iconic Brand. In addition, Steve Robinson shared what made Chick-fil-A culture and marketing unique and continues to help the brand differentiate in a competitive market.  Some highlights:-The importance of hiring the people who fit the organization's culture and value-How Steve Robinson come up with the Blue Ocean Strategy and its vital role in the successful branding of Chick-fil-A-The impact of the leadership of Chick-fil-A's founder, Truett Cathy, on the organization's culture-Lessons that Steve Robinson learned on the 2-million dollar mistake-Steve Robinson shared marketing and business insights in building a brand that people cannot live withoutAlso mentioned in this episode:-John Rossman, author of The Amazon Way book series (Listen to John's episode on the Partnering Leadership Podcast here)-Truett Cathy, founder of Chick-fil-A-Dan Cathy, CEO of Chick-fil-A-Jimmy Collins, former president of Chick-fil-ABook by Steve Robinson:Covert Cows and Chick-fil-A: How Faith, Cows, and Chicken Built an Iconic BrandBook Resources:The Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill by William Manchester, Paul ReidBlue Ocean Strategy by Renée Mauborgne and W. Chan KimBuilt to Last: Successful Habits of Visionary CompaniesThe Bible: Book of Proverbs, Psalms, Ecclesiastes, JoelConnect with Steve Robinson:S. Robinson ConsultingSteve Robinson on LinkedInConnect with Mahan Tavakoli:MahanTavakoli.comMore information and resources available at the Partnering Leadership Podcast website: PartneringLeadership.com

Cause Talk Radio: The Cause Marketing Podcast
JEDI, Mentorship & Corporate Partners With Artis Stevens

Cause Talk Radio: The Cause Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 31:58


In today's episode, Engage for Good's Alli Murphy is joined by Artis Stevens, President & CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters of America (BBBSA). He's been on the podcast before - at the time he was the Senior Vice President & Chief Marketing Officer for the National 4-H Council, and before that, he was the National Vice President of Marketing, Strategy & Operations at Boys & Girls Clubs of America. An award-winning nonprofit marketing leader with a passion for building purpose-driven brands, boards and teams, Artis' experience has led to transformational outcomes in fundraising and DEI initiatives. Tune into today's episode to learn all about: Five pieces of advice for attracting corporate partners and Artis' advice to those companies themselves Big Brothers Big Sisters of America's JEDI programming goals and the organization's newly launched "JEDI Council" The power of mentorship in the social impact space and how it relates to partnerships, team development, employee engagement, employee resource groups, etc. Artis' experience leading BBBSA; a role he's been in for almost a year Links & Notes [Big Brothers Big Sisters Of America Website] (https://www.bbbs.org/) [Artis on Twitter] (https://twitter.com/artisnstevens?lang=en) [Artis on LinkedIn] (https://www.linkedin.com/in/artis-stevens-b386195/) [Ep324: How Microsoft And National 4-H Council Empower And Connect Today's Youth] (https://engageforgood.com/ep324-how-microsoft-and-national-4-h-council-empower-and-connect-todays-youth/) Elevate Your Social Impact Sign up for Engage for Good's newsletter Check out past Cause Talk Radio episodes Access free resources Check out our monthly webinars Let Alli know what you think of the show!

You Rock! With Sherri Johnson
Converting More Leads Through Your Website and Get More Reviews With David Tamm l Ep 74

You Rock! With Sherri Johnson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 65:04


In this episode of "Rockstar Interview With Sherri Johnson", I speak with David Tamm. David is the Chief Marketing Officer of CAST Services, a consulting firm with partners and advisors from both the residential real estate sector and outside industries.We discuss how to convert more leads through the website and get more reviews. So sit back, relax, and enjoy the show!Watch the video version of this on my Youtube page at www.Youtube.com/SherriJohnson.Try out my new online coaching platform Playbook™ for 30 days! Get access to 15 plus courses and a monthly group Q and A coaching session. Get your free trial here https://bit.ly/3hjHvEj.

The Faster Than Normal Podcast: ADD | ADHD | Health
Shelpful Founder Sharon Pope on Instant Human Accountability and ADHD

The Faster Than Normal Podcast: ADD | ADHD | Health

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 17:42


I want to thank you for listening and for subscribing to Faster Than Normal! I also want to tell you that if you're listening to this one, you probably listened to other episodes as well. Because of you all, we are the number one ADHD podcast on the internet!! And if you like us, you can sponsor an episode! Head over to https://rally.io/creator/SHANK/ It is a lot cheaper than you think. You'll reach... about 25k to 30,000 people in an episode and get your name out there, get your brand out there, your company out there, or just say thanks for all the interviews! We've brought you over 230 interviews of CEOs, celebrities, musicians, all kinds of rock stars all around the world from Tony Robbins, Seth Godin, Keith Krach from DocuSign, Danny Meyer, we've had Rachel Cotton, we've had  the band Shinedown, right? Tons and tons of interviews, and we keep bringing in new ones every week so head over to https://rally.io/creator/SHANK/ make it yours, we'd love to have you, thanks so much for listening!  Now to this week's episode, we hope you enjoy it! —— Sharon Pope is the co-founder and CEO of shelpful, the instant accountability service that pairs you with a real-human buddy to help you build good habits (they nudge you and hold you to big habits like getting exercise, or small tasks like taking out the trash on time). Prior to starting shelpful, Sharon was a startup executive for 15 years, running marketing and product. She advised startups at the famous startup accelerator, Y Combinator, and was Chief Marketing Officer at ZeroDown, Green Dot (NYSE: GDOT), GoBank and Loopt. Prior to that she managed PR and content for a range of tech companies at leading San Francisco-based PR agencies. Today we learned how she started her super helpful company Shelpful, how she learned that for her, exercise is medicine, and how she was using her ADHD as a superpower, even before she was diagnosed. Enjoy! In this episode Peter and Sharon Pope discuss:   2:17 - Intro and welcome Sharon, founder of Shelpful  2:50 - What prompted you to come up with this kind of idea? 4:12 - It seems like it's one of those things that truly requires getting to numbers of scale, right? 5:20 - Tell us about what kind of tasks people are using this for? 7:15 - What's the difference between what you do versus someone just saying, Hey Alexa, tell me to drink some water in 30 minutes? 8:17 - Is there an accountability/human trust balance happening here? 10:10 - Why do you think that we don't allow ourselves give ourselves the same respect that we give to other people?  11:35 - As this grows do think that you can find a category for pretty much anything? 13:07 - Is it a monthly subscription; how does it work? 13:48 - So if you are a shelper you're basically on call like full-time? 14:50 - What is the one thing that you know about yourself now, that you didn't know before you got diagnosed with ADHD, that has helped change your life? [How can people find you?] @shelpful on TikTok  INSTA  and Facebook and of course via www.shelpful.com 16:25 - Thank you Sharon! Guys, as always, we are here for you and we love the responses and the notes that we get from you; so please continue to do that! Tell us who you want to hear on the podcast, anything at all; we'd love to know.  Leave us a review on any of the places you get your podcasts, and if you ever need our help I'm www.petershankman.com and you can reach out anytime via peter@shankman.com or @petershankman on all of the socials. You can also find us at @FasterNormal on all of the socials. It really helps when you drop us a review on iTunes and of course, subscribe to the podcast if you haven't already! As you know, the more reviews we get, the more people we can reach. Help us to show the world that ADHD is a gift, not a curse!  16:57 - Faster Than Normal Podcast info & credits   — TRANSCRIPT:  — I want to thank you for listening and for subscribing to Faster Than Normal! I also want to tell you that if you're listening to this one, you probably listened to other episodes as well. Because of you all, we are the number one ADHD podcast on the internet!! And if you like us, you can sponsor an episode! Head over to https://rally.io/creator/SHANK/ It is a lot cheaper than you think. You'll reach... about 25k to 30,000 people in an episode and get your name out there, get your brand out there, your company out there, or just say thanks for all the interviews! We've brought you over 230 interviews of CEOs, celebrities, musicians, all kinds of rock stars all around the world from Tony Robbins, Seth Godin, Keith Krach from DocuSign, Danny Meyer, we've had Rachel Cotton, we've had  the band Shinedown, right? Tons and tons of interviews, and we keep bringing in new ones every week so head over to https://rally.io/creator/SHANK/ make it yours, we'd love to have you, thanks so much for listening!  Now to this week's episode, we hope you enjoy it! — My name is Peter Shankman. You are listening to Faster Than Normal. We are going to be talking about ADHD in all forms of neurodiverse today on this episode. And I am thrilled. That you are here. I have recorded an episode of in about two weeks. It has been a while. So it's great to be back. It is a, I don't know what day it is. It's Thursday. I believe it was a gorgeous day, outside, a little cold here in New York city, but still beautiful. And, uh, it is lovely to be with you today, wherever in the world you happen to be including Portland, Oregon, where our current guest is from.  Let's just say hi to Sharon Pope. Sharon Pope is the co-founder and CEO of a company called. Shelpful It's an instant accountability service that pairs you with a real human buddy to help you build good habits. They nudge you. They hold you to big habits to get you exercise, and small tasks like taking out the trash on time.  5 years, running marketing and product. She advised startups at the famous startup accelerator, Y Combinator, and was Chief Marketing Officer at ZeroDown, Green Dot (NYSE: GDOT), GoBank and Loopt. Prior to that she managed PR and content for a range of tech companies at leading San Francisco-based PR agencies. I love the idea because it's well, well needed and way overdue. Sharon, welcome to Faster Than Normal and first off, tell us what prompted you to come up with this kind of idea other than just finding another thing to do during COVID. Yeah. Thank you. It's really great to be here Peter. Um, yeah, I started this to solve my own problem. So I was, I think for my whole adult life, um, I'm 38 now. Um, was 37 when I started Shelpful. I I've really struggled with this kind of 10:00 PM feeling of  Looking down at my to-do list and realizing I did everything for everyone else, including work, and my two kids and all the “me” completely just fall off the list. So, you know, I to work out for like 20 minutes and that just got blown off because an email came in and that just drew me in. And so, I mean, after struggling with it forever, I tried to build a bot for it, like in 2018 and it sucked, I had kind of a fever dream one night and I was like, oh my gosh, we could do this with real people. So I put up a site overnight, convinced my friend to do it with me and that same week we launched the first version of Shelpful, um, to just try to answer that problem for everyone else, that people kind of needed more support and could use a real human accountability buddy, kind of sitting on your shoulder and saying, Hey, you said you were gonna work out at 8:00 AM. It's time to work out. I'm gonna ask you in 20 minutes, if you did it or not. And that kind of thing was what I needed desperately. And I felt like I wasn't alone.  I love the concept. It seems like it's one of those things that truly requires, um, uh, getting to numbers of scale. Right. You know, if you don't have enough people willing to be the accountability buddy then you gotta problem. Right. And so we have our own, we're kind of structured more like an Uber. So we find the accountability buddies. We train them. I mean, we've found some amazing people who. Are way better than I was in the early days. Uh, just having strong empathy and note-taking, and following up with you and we have them, we staff them, um, you just have to sign up and we put you with them. And honestly, as I dug more into this and looked at what else is out there, everything else requires you to just go find a friend. So you either find a friend in your real life, or you ask your mom to tell you to do something, or you go to Reddit and say, or Twitter or Google and say like somebody, please be my accountability buddy! And the answer is silence. And so that's kind of why we feel like this is working because the people who really need it, get it fast and you're instantly within a day you feel support like you've really never known.  Tell me about, um, what kind of tasks people are using this for? Cause for someone with ADHD, I mean, this seems like an easy and easy way to, to, to kill a lot of birds with one stone. What are people primarily using it for?  Right. So the thing that I was solving mostly was the health stuff, right? Like getting movement in and like planning my lunch instead of freestyling my lunch. For instance, when we saw people signing up, the first things were those things, for sure. But also things like. Help me remember to pay my bill. Um, can you remind me to take my trash out on Tuesday nights? Um, like the small, like kind of any range of things that falls off your list you could ask for help with; also just the habit of making it to do list in the first place. Right. So make sure I do my to do list every night before the next day, so that I can go into the day with, with fresh eyes and a clear idea of what I'm gonna do. Um, when we saw people starting up, we left, we left it really open-ended and now we have a bit more structure because we've seen what people ask for, but the open-ended thing we still get to this day. If people writing in saying I have ADHD and I could use a help with this because I forget to drink water. And I forget to do really simple things that may seem easy to other people, but aren't easy to me. Um, and I think as I, as I told you, that was really eye opening to me because I thought this was a problem that I kind of uniquely had. Cause I was quirky. And when people started saying that, it was this big ton of bricks that hit me, that I realized I actually had ADHD or I, you know, at that point I kind of had all this flashback of me asking doctors throughout my life, why I have to wait to the last minute to do things. And, and they just said, oh, well, you're good at your job, or, oh, you get good grades and you just don't have, you don't have this. Um, and so it was really eye opening to me because my mentors actually ended up kind of telling me that this was working for them. And it was because of the same reasons it worked for me. Tell me why, and I'm just playing devil's advocate here. Um, why couldn't someone just, What's the difference between what you do versus someone just saying, Hey Alexa, tell me to drink some water in 30 minutes?  It's a really good question. I have had a notification on my calendar to meditate since 2017 and I've done it once. Um, I think that we, I mean, especially, I mean, people have ADHD. We have a million notifications and snoozing them gives us zero guilt and makes us think zero seconds about it. It's gone. I snooze the notification and it's out of my life and I'm going back to whatever else I was doing. It's really different when you have a real person on the other end. So if you have a shopper, you know, Chanel, we call them shelpers our accountability buddies, you know, she knows asking you, Hey, did you know, have you drank water? Like how many ounces are you? If you ignore her, you feel kind of guilty, but the guilt kind of works in your favor because it's fueling your own habit, right?  Is there a, well, that was my next question. Is there sort of a, I don't wanna say, I don't wanna call it guilt cause I don't want to put it down. Cause having to kinda build it out is not sensitive to be embarrassed, but is there a word I'm looking for a, a…. I don't want to disappoint my accountability. Like, you know, I. Have a trainer at the gym at five 30 in the morning, because I'll probably go to the gym if I didn't have one, but I might not work out as hard.  Right.  Right. And so he makes sure I do so is it? And if I don't, he calls me on it and I don't want to, you know, I don't want him to think that I'm a loser and not doing it.  So is there, is there that level of, have you seen that at all? Have you seen people like, oh yeah, I love this. Because again, for lack of better word, it shames me into making sure that I'm doing.  Right. I mean, there, I shame, shame, disappointment. All those I think are, are mixed in with even just the word accountability, right? Somebody is waiting for you and asking you, and they're just there on the other end. Just kind of like hanging in the balance until you answer them, or you show up at the gym or you show the evidence that you did your to do list. So the fact that it's a real human, I mean, This is something we can all relate with, right, If somebody, if you're doing something for somebody else or in, in community with somebody else, you're much more likely to do it. And I can relate with you, Peter. Like I, the best and healthiest times in my life were admittedly. Pre-kids when I had like a, every single morning workout group that I went to and if I was late, everyone would be delayed in getting like the run around the block that we started out with. I, that, that fear of letting someone else down. Was yes. Maybe shame isn't the greatest word, but it works and it, and I felt good at the end of it. And it wasn't something that stuck with me and made me feel sad. It made me feel good. Cause I got the energy I needed from a workout.  In this case and not in a negative way, but why don't you think we place other people's feelings and not wanting to hurt their feelings or, or, or not show up and disappoint them above our own. I know that if I wake up every day and do an hour of hard workout for 10 minutes on the treadmill or Peleton, whatever, you know, it's going to be beneficial to me. Right. But I don't give myself the same. I don't offer myself that same ability, uh, to, to not disappoint myself that I might offer it to someone I'd have to meet someone else. Why do you think that we don't allow ourselves give ourselves that same respect that we give to other people?  Right. If only I had had the answer for that!! I feel like that's what, I've the question I've been asking myself for a decade, right? Like, and I, that's what I think that. That's that's why shelpful. That's why we created Shelpful, because it's the fact that there's somebody else invested in your personal health and habits on a daily, hourly minute level basis. It, it, it triggers that part of your brain wants to do something for others or that, that get stuff down because somebody else's depending on you. And I mean, that's, that's, you know, for me, a thousand percent why I would get something done over just the fact that it's good for me. Um, I know it's good for me. I could tell you the calories and pretty much any food. I know, I know workouts to do, like I know how to work out, ..but the question is, do I do them just because they're good for me. And that's what I've always struggled with.  Do you think that, um, as this grows, I mean, the categories you have right now are pretty much anything, you know, you can find me accountability, buddy, for virtually anything. Are you breaking it into certain sections or certain, how does it work?  Yeah. So we started out thinking, okay, let's start with health. Right. Cause that was my personal thing. And um, it felt like from my marketing background, like start with a niche and expand and we found really, really early people were clamoring and kind of yelling at us like, well, the reason I don't get my workout done is because this happens that I also need help with. Right. So we're not just the reason we don't get things done. Isn't because we are bad or just go sit in front of the TV. It's because the life happens and makes the other things not work. So we ended up just kind of blowing it up and within like a week of launching and making it just be like, well, you tell us what you need help with. Um, any habits that you want to form our buddies, our shelpers can hold you to they're really. Uh, limit and it's almost, self-limiting like, so Peter, if you came in and said, I want help on 20 things. Well, the shop would probably say, well, let's start with a few so that you don't just snooze me and just put me away or turn off your phone. Like let's kind of start working through it. But once you get a few things established. You could always add on, like while I watched, after I washed my face, I want to like, some people have skincare as, as a goal, right? So after I care for my face, I want to do 20 squats. So you can kind of just keep layering on habits to the ones you've already established a few, and it really is limitless. Is it a monthly subscription; how does it work? Yeah, it's monthly. We have a weekly option too, um, like as, as low as $13.75 a week. And then for month it's a little over $50. Um, and it, yeah, I mean, it feels, people are feeling like it's a really good value cause you get, um, Monday through Friday, basically unlimited access to your shelper so you're kind of just text them and anytime you have an update, they usually respond pretty quickly. And then they nudge you along based on kind of habits that you've established. So you want to work out Monday, Wednesday, Friday at 8:00 AM you're going to get a ping from them saying hey, time to work out, um, and a follow up to make sure you did it. Um, so you.. and then weekends are a bit quieter because shelpers are human, um, so they kind of recharge their batteries on the weekends and then hit it full force again on Monday.  So if you are a shelper you're basically on call, it's like a full-time.  It is, it's a really, it's a flexible gig, right? So they, um, they end up working. I mean, depending on how many have just a couple hours a day. Um, but they are able to, we have technology, we're a technology company, as well as the service. So we have helpful technology that helps them plan and, um, take notes and get things organized. So they're not having to be glued to their, their phone, but they have. The ability to work from their mobile phone. Um, so people who are shoppers are people who really appreciate flexibility. So, um, you know, imagine caregivers stay at home moms, um, hairstylists, we have a few, so people who are- it's a gig, but they're just these naturally empathetic people who are, who care a lot and have great memories and are skilled note takers and they, they really make it happen for their members.  It sounds fascinating. A shelters.xom?  www.SHELPFUL.COM  Sorry. My bad. I meant shelpful, shelpers the people who work at ShelpFul. Awesome.  What is the one thing that you know about yourself now, that you didn't know before you got diagnosed with ADHD that has helped change your life? Wow. Um, I think so.. starting, I started this company in March, kind of had the lights go on in my head that this is something I had in, I don't know, April and by May I had a diagnosis in my hand. Um, I now know that for me, exercise is medicine. Um, it's not something that's optional for me. It actually changes the whole way my day goes. Um, and so now that I'm able to look at it as that I've actually been able to be successful in making it happen. Um, and I, I've joined a shelpful group, which is, we also have a group product. Um, and that allows me and I have group and they hold me accountable to it too. So I have what, you know, I'm trying to put a focus on making sure that I have that fuel that I need. Um, and that awareness of ADHD actually helped me just reframe how I looked at that.  What an awesome answer, thank you Sharon. Very cool.  Guys. You've been listening to Faster Than Normal, our guest today is Sharon Pope. She runs a phenomenal company that I'm falling in love with more & more called Shelpful, and I am definitely check it out. You can find it a www.Shelpful.com you can find me @petershankman and @fasternormal and on www.FasterThanNormal.com anywhere you grab your podcasts, the book. On Amazon. It's actually, I think it's fourth printing, which blows my mind. I get emails every day that people really liked what they were reading and I helped them and it just makes me so happy. I love, I love that. So I will keep doing that for as long as I possibly can. Guys, that feel free to reach out, say hi, tell us any guests that you'd like to see on the show. We'd love to hear you. Anyone who sends me any info tells us of the guests, whether we use them or not. I will send you a shank point, uh, for those who don't know. Uh, it's a long story. I'll tell you another time, but I say anyone who sends guest info to me, I will send you a brand new shank point is currently trading around 10 bucks a coin. It is a cryptocurrency, and it's a lot of fun for some of the ADHD. It's fun because you have to stop yourself from watching everything. Oh, it's up? It's down. Okay. Anyway, squirrel!! Sharon. Thank you again, guys. Thank you for listening. We will see you next week. Have a wonderful week. Stay safe, stay happy. — Credits: You've been listening to the Faster Than Normal podcast. We're available on iTunes, Stitcher and Google play and of course at www.FasterThanNormal.com I'm your host, Peter Shankman and you can find me at petershankman.com and @petershankman on all of the socials. If you like what you've heard, why not head over to your favorite podcast platform of choice and leave us a review, come more people who leave positive reviews, the more the podcast has shown, and the more people we can help understand that ADHD is a gift, not a curse. Opening and closing themes were composed and produced by Steven Byrom who also produces this podcast, and the opening introduction was recorded by Bernie Wagenblast. Thank you so much for listening. We'll see you next week. 

FreightCasts
F3 Day One: Autonomous trucks and systems EP376 WHAT THE TRUCK?!?

FreightCasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 44:07


On today's episode Dooner and The Dude are coming to you live from day one of F3: the Future of Freight. They're covering autonomous trucks; automating operations; the war for talent; the next generation of FreightTech founders and more. They're joined by Matt Carroll, Project Manager at Waymo; Sanjiv Khurana, General Manager, Digital Vehicle Solutions at Daimler Trucks North America; Adrian Garcia, Founder & CEO at Gatego; Lauren Russell, Chief Marketing Officer at Armstrong Transportation and Micah Osborne, CTO and co-founder and Will Jones CEO and co-founder at Loadflex.Visit our sponsorSubscribe to the WTT newsletterApple PodcastsSpotifyMore FreightWaves Podcasts

What The Truck?!?
F3 Day 01: Autonomous trucks and systems

What The Truck?!?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 44:07


On today's episode Dooner and The Dude are coming to you live from day one of F3: the Future of Freight. They're covering autonomous trucks; automating operations; the war for talent; the next generation of FreightTech founders and more. They're joined by Matt Carroll, Project Manager at Waymo; Sanjiv Khurana, General Manager, Digital Vehicle Solutions at Daimler Trucks North America; Adrian Garcia, Founder & CEO at Gatego; Lauren Russell, Chief Marketing Officer at Armstrong Transportation and Micah Osborne, CTO and co-founder and Will Jones CEO and co-founder at Loadflex.Visit our sponsorSubscribe to the WTT newsletterApple PodcastsSpotifyMore FreightWaves Podcasts

Demand Gen Visionaries
The Evolution of ABM with Jon Miller, CMO & CPO of Demandbase

Demand Gen Visionaries

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 38:04


“The thread that runs through these best practices is this concept of account based experience. And it's a concept of really understanding where the account is in its journey and applying all that account intelligence that you have to not treat every account the same, but to really interact with them in a way that's going to be relevant and appropriate for where they are in their journey. So that's absolutely a key theme to how the best companies are doing this.” — Jon Miller-------------Episode Timestamps:*(2:05) - How Jon got started in demand gen*(2:40) - Jon's current role at Demandbase*(4:10) - How COVID-19 changed demand gen*(5:35) - The Trust Tree*(7:20) - The different personas Demandbase is selling to*(11:45) - Where the industry is at with ABM*(14:05) - What the future of ABM looks like*(18:50) - The biggest trends in demand gen*(25:25) - The Playbook*(28:43) - The Dust-Up*(30:54) - Jon's favorite past campaign he's ever run*(31:48) - Biggest learning experience over the years*(33:30) - Quick hits SponsorDemand Gen Visionaries is brought to you by Qualified.com, the #1 Conversational Marketing platform for companies that use Salesforce and the secret weapon for Demand Gen pros. The world's leading enterprise brands trust Qualified to instantly meet with buyers, right on their website, and maximize sales pipeline. Visit Qualified.com to learn more. LinksConnect with Jon on LinkedInFollow Jon on TwitterCheck out Demandbase's guidesFollow Ian on TwitterConnect with Ian on LinkedInwww.caspianstudios.com

Experience This!
EP144: Working, Debating, and Skipping!

Experience This!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 32:36


Learn about the best employee experiences in the country, where customer experience should live in a company, and why one airline is really mad at a third-party flight aggregator. Bite-Sized Delight From the Episode: • Great Employees Deliver Great Customer Experiences - As Newsweek's “Most Loved Workplaces 2021” list shows, happy employees lead to happy customers. • CX Is Important, But Where Should it “Live” - Dan and Joey agree that CX needs a prominent place in organizational hierarchy - but should it be lead by the Chief Marketing Officer or the Chief Experience Officer? • Forcing Customer Loyalty - Southwest Airlines' legal action against Skiplagged claims to preserve customer benefits - but does it? Are You Looking for Things We Referenced? • America's Most Loved Workplaces 2021 - by Newsweek • Southwest Wants to Force Customer Loyalty Learn more about the Experience This Show and the hosts: Joey Coleman Dan Gingiss

Innovating with Scott Amyx
Astor Perkins QC Panel Oct 27th 2021

Innovating with Scott Amyx

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 28:12


Quantum computing panel with Robert Hays, CEO & President of Atom Computing, Dr. Jonathan King, Chief Scientist at Atom Computing and Yuval Bogar, Chief Marketing Officer at Classiq.

TED Talks Daily
The creative power of your intuition | Bozoma Saint John

TED Talks Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 12:20


Great ideas are like electricity -- they snap into sharp focus and sprint from place to place. What's the best way to capture them? Bozoma Saint John, Chief Marketing Officer at Netflix, makes a compelling case to move away from an overreliance on data when making big decisions -- and calls on us all to tap into the power of our intuition and become creative trailblazers.

TED Talks Daily (SD video)
The creative power of your intuition | Bozoma Saint John

TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 12:20


Great ideas are like electricity -- they snap into sharp focus and sprint from place to place. What's the best way to capture them? Bozoma Saint John, Chief Marketing Officer at Netflix, makes a compelling case to move away from an overreliance on data when making big decisions -- and calls on us all to tap into the power of our intuition and become creative trailblazers.

TED Talks Daily (HD video)
The creative power of your intuition | Bozoma Saint John

TED Talks Daily (HD video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 12:20


Great ideas are like electricity -- they snap into sharp focus and sprint from place to place. What's the best way to capture them? Bozoma Saint John, Chief Marketing Officer at Netflix, makes a compelling case to move away from an overreliance on data when making big decisions -- and calls on us all to tap into the power of our intuition and become creative trailblazers.

The Mobile User Acquisition Show

What does it take for an indie studio founded by someone with no game design experience  to achieve 100 million downloads?Our guest in today's episode is Sheetal Bairamadgi. Sheetal is the founder of Crikey, a game studio based in Sydney. Sheetal began her career as a digital marketing manager, and after working with a number of apps during her tenure as Chief Marketing Officer at Leadbolt, Sheetal decided to  start her own gaming studio, Crikey. Crikey has a number of games to its credit, and the most popular one is Phone Case DIY which got 100 million downloads within a couple months of release.In today's episode, Sheetal takes us through the journey of how she envisioned Crikey and how she and her team refined the processes of their ideation and research from their early games that got lukewarm responses to their first big hit. This conversation again proves that it is possible to build hit games by focusing on research, processes and data, even if you don't have much formal game design experience. Key Highlights:

Renegade Thinkers Unite: #2 Podcast for CMOs & B2B Marketers
265: Putting the Chief in Chief Marketing Officer

Renegade Thinkers Unite: #2 Podcast for CMOs & B2B Marketers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 51:32


Forget the notion of born leaders. Leadership is a skill that is that's learned through practice, and even trial and error. It is a skill that needs continual refinement and is always a work in progress. In this episode, we explore the path to leadership with CMOs Amy Messano of Altair, Bill Strawderman of GS1 US, and Toni Clayton-Hine of EY Americas. Tune in as we focus on the “Chief” of Chief Marketing Officer, exploring many aspects of CMOing, from how leadership adapted during COVID to how to lead while following the lead of your CEO. This episode is filled with unique insights into the different paths to leadership as well as tried-and-true ways to inspire employees and organizations to greatness. Don't miss it! For full show notes and transcripts, visit https://renegade.com/podcasts/

The FlipMyFunnel Podcast
980: How To Create An Always-On Experience For Your Customers

The FlipMyFunnel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 50:50


Every business knows that creating a better customer experience should be a priority. And oftentimes, a business will see the benefits right away. The issue, however, is scaling. There's no time to grind away with every individual. Yes, you're creating an advanced customer experience, but at the cost of a lot of time. Our guests today, Lisa Sharapata, CMO at BoostUp.ai, and James Kessinger, Chief Marketing Officer at Hushly, walk us through the ways of scaling your customer's buying experience with ABM.What we discussed:Scaling the customer journey with company investment & technologyWorking with your sales team to get the most out of your accountsAudience questions & answersThis is a #FlipMyFunnel podcast. Check us out on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or here.Listening on a desktop & can't see the links? Just search for Flip My Funnel in your favorite podcast player.

The FlipMyFunnel Podcast
979: How To Become & Stay a CMO

The FlipMyFunnel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 30:36


Becoming a CMO is a success in itself; but retaining the role is another success entirely. To better understand why, we speak with a panel to share personal experience and what it's really like to be a CMO.Shawn Herring, VP of Marketing at PandaDoc, Deanna Ransom, Head Of Global Marketing at Senzing, Inc., and Gaurav Bhatia, Chief Marketing Officer at PenFed Credit Union, join the panel to discuss the CMO position and some hidden truths that could help you make a more informed decision if you're pursuing the role. What you'll hear:Breaking through the ceiling to get promoted What makes a good CMO versus a bad oneWhere CMOs spend the majority of their timeAudience Q&AThis is a #FlipMyFunnel podcast. Check us out on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or here.Listening on a desktop & can't see the links? Just search for Flip My Funnel in your favorite podcast player.

Readily Random
Michael Buzinski | The Rule of 26

Readily Random

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 36:08


Key Focus: Helping service-based businesses drastically increase their website leads using the Rule of 26 and proven website marketing techniques! Michael “Buzz” Buzinski is a life-long entrepreneur, a digital marketing thought leader, an author, and the Chief Marketing Officer of Buzzworthy Integrated Marketing. He has worked with over 750 service-based businesses and helped them make their digital marketing S.I.M.P.L.E. (Streamline, Identify, Market Research, Plan, Launch, and Evaluate). Using the Rule of 26, Michael can double any website's revenue. Michael's sole mission is to help entrepreneurs avoid the time drain and frustration of managing profitable digital marketing campaigns. Michael and the team at Buzzworthy work exclusively on the integrated marketing needs of privately owned businesses. Their service offerings are focused on increasing their clients' digital presence, and they are dedicated to the bottom line while creating the highest return on investment and giving business owners the freedom to focus on their business. Buzzworthy has been nationally recognized by the American Marketing Association for its innovative approach to digital marketing for small to medium-sized businesses. Email: Buzz@Buzzworthy.biz  Web: Buzzworthy.biz LinkedIn: in/MichaelBuzinksi Facebook:  /urBuzzworthy Instagram: @BuzzworthyMarketing