Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York

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Leonard Lopate, the Peabody and James Beard Award-winning broadcaster, is back on WBAI where he began his radio career. Tune in weekdays from 1-2pm at 99.5fm New York or you can listen to the show live at WBAI.org.

Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York


    • Sep 30, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekdays NEW EPISODES
    • 55m AVG DURATION
    • 713 EPISODES

    4.7 from 125 ratings Listeners of Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York that love the show mention: leonard lopate, wbai, pappa, lenny, interviewers, radio, brilliant, glad, joy, smart, interviews, insightful, long, best, interesting, always, show, love, great.



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    Latest episodes from Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York

    Eleanor Herman examines Off with Her Head

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 54:57


    In a story that is shocking, eye-opening, and a powerful force for change, New York Times bestselling author Eleanor Hermans explores the patterns that have been operating for more than three thousand years—and are still operating today—against powerful women across the globe, including Cleopatra, Anne Boleyn, Marie Antoinette, Catherine the Great, Hillary Clinton, Kamala Harris, and more. Join us on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large, when Eleanor Herman expounds on this particular kind of rage—she calls unadulterated bloodlust—usually reserved for women, especially women in power or vying for it. From the ancient world, through the European Renaissance, up to the most recent U.S. elections, the Misogynist's Handbook, as Eleanor Herman calls it, has been wielded to put uppity women in their place.

    Pete Muroski of Hudson Valley Native Landscaping

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 55:03


    Pete is a lifelong environmentalist and outdoorsman owner of Hudson Valley Native Landscaping specializing in woodland restoration, invasive species removal, native landscaping and tree care. During this conversation Pete provides a colorful and dynamic perspective into the plant kingdom. Pete approaches everything ecologically and aims to restore local woodland habitats while supporting pollinators through native landscaping. Started by John Messerschmidt in 2009, they are leaders in ecological landscaping serving Dutchess, Ulster, Columbia, Greene and Orange counties in New York.

    Tim Bakken on The Plea of Innocence

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 55:11


    According to Tim Bakken, while almost all the participants within the system hope that only guilty people will be convicted, the unfortunate reality is that innocent people are convicted and imprisoned at an alarming rate. With the privatization of defense institutions, accused innocent people are themselves responsible for finding the facts that could exonerate them. Though the poor are represented by public defenders—in fact, almost no one who is charged with a crime has enough money to pay for a complete defense—it is still accused people, not public officials, who bear the entire burden of proving their innocence. Join us when Professor of Law at the US Military Academy, West Point examines his book The Plea of Innocence: Restoring Truth to the American Justice System ont this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    Luliia Mendel on The Fight of Our Lives

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 54:02


    Zelenskyy's former press secretary tells the story of his improbable rise from popular comedian to the president of Ukraine. Luliia Mendel had a front row seat to many of the key events preceding the 2022 Russian invasion. From attending meetings between Zelenskyy and Putin and other European leaders, visiting the front lines in Donbas, to fielding press inquiries after the infamous phone calls between Donald Trump and Zelenskyy that led to Trump's first impeachment. Mendel saw first hand Zelenskyy's efforts to transform his country from a poor, backward Soviet state into a vibrant, prosperous European democracy. Mendel sheds light on the massive economic problems facing Ukraine and the entrenched corrupt oligarchs in league with Russia. She witnessed the Kremlin's repeated attacks to discredit Zelenskyy through disinformation and an army of bots and trolls. Join us when Luliia Mendal shares her details about her own life as a member of Zelenskyy's new Ukraine. Written with the sound of Russian bombs and exploding shells in the background. Mendel details life lived under Russian siege in 2022 as she says goodbye to her fiancé who joins the front lines, like so many other Ukrainian men on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large. Throughout this story of Zelenskyy, Ukraine, and its extraordinary people, Iuliia Mendel reminds us of the paramount importance of truth and human values, especially in these darkest of times.

    Ethan Chorin on BENGHAZI!

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 54:57


    Ten years after an attack on the US diplomatic mission in Benghazi killed Ambassador Christopher Stevens and three other Americans, Ethan Chorin reveals Benghazi was a watershed moment in American history, one that helped create the world America lives in today: polarized, fearful, and dangerously unstable. According to Chorin, Benghazi is not a story contained in 13 hours, but a decades-long history beginning with the rise of Muammar Gaddafi, stretching through 9/11, the War on Terror, and the Arab Spring. Chorin draws on his own experience during the Benghazi attack, his expertise as a former diplomat and scholar of Libyan history, and new interviews with Libyan insiders, eyewitnesses, and key players like Hillary Clinton and Ben Rhodes. Join us when Chorin makes clear why Benghazi still matters so much ten years later—and why we can't afford to continue overlooking and misunderstanding it on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    Author Michael Patrick MacDonald

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 53:09


    Michael Patrick MacDonald grew up in the Old Colony Housing Project in South Boston, a neighborhood that held the highest concentration of white poverty in the United States. After losing four of his eleven siblings and seeing his generation decimated by poverty, crime, addiction, and incarceration, he learned to transform personal and community trauma by becoming a leading Boston activist, organizer and writer. McDonald serves as Author-in-Residence & Professor of the Practice at Northeastern University's Honors Department, where he teaches his curricula: “Non-Fiction Writing & Social Justice Issues” and “The North of Ireland: Colonialism, Armed Resistance and the Struggle for Peace with Justice" every fall. Regular contributor to the program Michael Patrick MacDonald is the author of the book All Souls: A Family Story From Southie and the acclaimed Easter Rising: A Memoir of Roots and Rebellion. On this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large, activist Michael Patrick McDonald will focus on Queen Elizabeth's Complicated Relationship with Ireland, Britain's First Colony on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    Richard Barone on Music + Revolution: Greenwich Village in the 1960s

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 53:49


    (9-15-2022) Music + Revolution: Greenwich Village in the 1960s, is a narrative appreciation of the Greenwich Village music scene of that decade -- in particular the glorious collision of music and message that created the protest song movement. Even before the Beatnik Riots of 1961, New York City's Greenwich Village was the epicenter of revolutionary movements in American music and culture. But, in the early 1960s and throughout the decade, a new wave of writers and performers inspired by the folk music revival of the 1950s created socially aware and deeply personal songs that spoke to a generation like never before. Join us when Richard Barone examines his book Music + Revolution: Greenwich Village in the 1960s on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    Jamil Hassan on Promises Betrayed

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 53:47


    Author of Promises Betrayed, Jamil Hassan provides a first-hand account of the Afghanistan evacuation, all told from the unique perspective of an Afghan ally. Having served as a translator for General David Petraeus and General John Nicholson in Afghanistan Jamil and his family were, and are, high-value targets for possible Taliban retribution. Jamil provides account of how he and his family, by the narrowest of margins, eventually made their way onto a plane and out of Kabul, on August 18, 2021. Join us when Jamil Hassan examines Promises Betrayed, the story of America's "War on Terror" in Afghanistan, the Biden Administration's actions, and the Afghans who were left behind on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    Phil Allen Jr. on The Prophetic Lens

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 54:50


    (9-9-2022) Martin Luther King used news cameras as a means of exposing anti-Black violence by white mobs in the 1950s and 60s. Darnella Frazier used her phone to record and post the murder of George Floyd by Derek Chauvin in May 2020. These are just two of many people who have captured images of injustice for the world to see. The Prophetic Lens takes an important look at the use of the video camera as an indispensable prophetic tool for the security of Black lives and greater possibility for racial justice. Join us when Phil Allen Jr. founder of the non-profit organization Racial Solidarity Project based in Los Angeles, CA. shares his passion for dialogue, resistance, and solutions to the problem of systemic racism which was fostered by his family and personal life experiences as well as his educational journey, on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    The After Dinner Opera Company on Sacco and Vanzetti

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 54:27


    Join us on Leonard Lopate at Large when the After Dinner Opera Company reviews the New York and Orchestral Staged Premiere of SACCO AND VANZETTI Begun by Marc Blitzstein. Completed & Conducted by Leonard Lehrman. Directed by Benjamin Spierman. In 1921, Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, both Italian-Americans, were convicted of robbery and murder. Although the arguments brought against them were mostly disproven in court, the fact that the two men were known radicals prejudiced the judge and jury against them.

    Annemarie Sammartino on Freedomland

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 52:15


    In Freedomland, Annemarie H. Sammartino tells Co-op City's story from the perspectives of those who built it and of the ordinary people who made their homes in this monument to imperfect liberal ideals of economic and social justice. Located on the grounds of the former Freedomland amusement park on the northeastern edge of the Bronx, Co-op City's 35 towers and 236 townhouses have been home to hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers and is an icon visible to all traveling on the east coast corridor. In 1965, Co-op City was planned as the largest middle-class housing development in the United States. It was intended as a solution to the problem of affordable housing in America's largest city. While Co-op City first appeared to be a huge success story for integrated, middle-class housing, tensions would lead its residents to organize the largest rent strike in American history. Join us when Annemarie H. Sammartino tells Co-op City's story from the perspectives of those who built it and of the ordinary people who made their homes in this monument to imperfect liberal ideals of economic and social justice on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    Bob Hennelly of Stuck Nation

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 55:24


    Robert "Bob" Hennelly is an award-winning, print and broadcast journalist. For more than 30 years, he has reported on a broad spectrum of major public policy questions, ranging from homeland security to the economy, environmental contamination to corruption, and occupational safety to homelessness. Join us when Bob Hennelly shares his investigative work--focusing on national labor issues and public policy, occupational safety and health, the New York City politics and civil service on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    Britt Halvorson/Joshua Reno on Imagining the Heartland

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 54:30


    (8/30/2022)According to Socio-cultural Anthropologist Joshua Reno and Associate Professor of Anthropology Britt Britt Halvorson, many associate racism with the regional legacy of the South yet in fact, it is the Midwest that has upheld some of the nation's most deep-seated convictions about the value of whiteness. From Jefferson's noble farmer to The Wizard of Oz, imagining the Midwest has quietly gone hand-in-hand with imagining whiteness as desirable and virtuous. Since at least the U.S. Civil War, the imagined Midwest has served as a screen or canvas, projecting and absorbing tropes and values of virtuous whiteness and its opposite, white deplorability, with national and global significance. Imagining the Heartland provides a poignant and timely answer to how and why the Midwest has played this role in the American imagination. Join is when anthropologists Britt Halvorson and Josh Reno argue that there is an unexamined affinity between whiteness, Midwestness, and Americanness, anchored in their shared ordinary and homogenized qualities on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    Luke Savage on The Dead Center

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 54:04


    (8-29-2022)Jacobin staff writer Luke Savage exposes the hollowness and futility of the liberal project in the 21st century, offering searing critiques of some of its leading figures, notably Barack Obama and Justin Trudeau, and touching on topics that extend over the milquetoast politics of the Biden presidency, Aaron Sorkin's The West Wing, the monopolists of Silicon Valley, and the worst excesses of cable news punditry. Join us when Luke Savage writer and essayist whose work has appeared in The Atlantic, The New Statesman, The Washington Post, and The Guardian explores his new book The Dead Center on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    Kathryn and Ross Petras of You're Saying It Wrong

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 54:19


    Join us for a discussion when sibling language experts and regular contributors to the program Kathryn and Ross Petras. This language duo are authors of the bestselling You're Saying It Wrong: A Pronunciation Guide to the 150 Most Commonly Mispronounced Words—and Their Tangled Histories of Misuse and the hosts of a popular NPR podcast. Kathryn & Ross Petras are the New York Times bestselling authors of You're Saying It Wrong, as well as companion “word nerd” books That Doesn't Mean What You Think It Means and Awkword Moments, and numerous other non-fiction books. On this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large Kathy and Ross return to discuss language trends.

    SUSAN HARTMAN ON CITY OF REFUGEES

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 54:38


    For over 20 years, Journalist Susan Hartman has been writing intimate stories about immigrants and their communities. Her book, City of Refugees, the Story of Three Newcomers Who Breathed Life into a Dying American Town. Hartman shows how an influx of refugees helped revive Utica, New York, an old upstate manufacturing town that was nearly destroyed by depopulation and arson. According to Susan Hartman Many Americans imagine refugees as threatening outsiders who will steal jobs or be a drain on the economy. But across the country, refugees are rebuilding and maintaining the American Dream. Hartman follows 3 of these newcomers over the course of 8 years as they and their families adjust to new lives in America. Hartman was educated at Kirkland College and received an MFA from Columbia University's School of the Arts, where she now teaches. She has taught journalism at Yale, NYU, and Barnard College. Join us when Hartman examines City of Refugees is a complex and poignant story of a small city but also of America—a country whose promise of safe harbor and opportunity is knotty and incomplete, but undeniably alive.

    Jerome Charyn on Big Red

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 54:14


    Since he first appeared on the American literary scene, Jerome Charyn has dazzled readers with his “blunt, brilliantly crafted prose” With Big Red, Charyn reimagines the life of one of America's most enduring icons, “Gilda” herself, Rita Hayworth, whose fiery red tresses and hypnotic dancing graced the silver screen over sixty times in her nearly forty-year career. The quintessential movie star of the 1940s, Hayworth has long been objectified as a sex symbol, pin-up girl, and so-called Love Goddess. Reanimating such classic films as Gilda and The Lady from Shanghai, Big Red is a bittersweet paean to Hollywood's Golden Age, a tender yet honest portrait of a time before blockbusters and film franchises―one that promises to consume both Hollywood cinephiles and neophytes alike. Lauded for his “polymorphous imagination” (Jonathan Lethem), Charyn once again has created one of the most inventive novels in recent American literature.

    Professor Falguni Sheth on Unruly Women

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 54:45


    According to Professor Falguni Sheth despite the disapproval that "visibly" Muslim women face in the West, the U.S. does not ban the hijab or niqab. Nevertheless, it does find a way to manage assertive Muslim women. How so? Subtly and without outright confrontation: through the courts, bureaucratic processes and liberal discourses. Join us when Professor Sheth examines her book Unruly Women.

    Marc Lamont Hill on Seen and Unseen

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 50:36


    (8/11/22) Marc Lamont Hill and New York Times bestselling author Todd Brewster weave four recent pivotal moments in America's racial divide into their disturbing historical context—starting with the killing of George Floyd—Seen and Unseen reveals the connections between our current news headlines and social media feeds and the country's long struggle against racism. According Hill for most of American history, our media has reinforced and promoted racism. But with the immediacy of modern technology—the ubiquity of smartphones, social media, and the internet—that long history is now in flux. From the teenager who caught George Floyd's killing on camera to the citizens who held prosecutors accountable for properly investigating the killing of Ahmaud Arbery, ordinary people are now able to reveal injustice in a more immediate way. As broad movements to overhaul policing, housing, and schooling gain new vitality, Seen and Unseen demonstrates that change starts with the raw evidence of those recording history on the front lines. Join us when professor at Temple University, American academic, author, and activist Marc Lamont Hill examines how the power of visual media over the last few years has shifted the narrative on race and reignited the push towards justice on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    Immortal-Valor

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 53:59


    (8-10-22)In 1945, when Congress began reviewing the record of the most conspicuous acts of courage by American soldiers during World War II, they recommended awarding the Medal of Honor to 432 recipients. Despite the fact that more than one million African-Americans served, not a single Black soldier received the Medal of Honor. The omission remained on the record for over four decades. But recent historical investigations have brought to light some of the extraordinary acts of valor performed by black soldiers during the war. Men like Vernon Baker, who single-handedly eliminated three enemy machine guns, an observation post, and a German dugout. Or Sergeant Reuben Rivers, who spearhead his tank unit's advance against fierce German resistance for three days despite being grievously wounded. Meanwhile Lieutenant Charles Thomas led his platoon to capture a strategically vital village on the Siegfried Line in 1944 despite losing half his men and suffering a number of wounds himself. Join us when Robert Childs examines Immortal Valor on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    Will Bunch: After the Ivory Tower Falls

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 54:41


    From Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Will Bunch, the epic untold story of college—the great political and cultural fault line of American life According Will Bunch today there are two Americas, separate and unequal, one educated and one not. The strongest determinant of whether a voter was likely to support Donald Trump in 2016 was whether or not they attended college, and the degree of loathing they reported feeling toward the so-called “knowledge economy of clustered, educated elites. Somewhere in the winding last half-century of the United States, the quest for a college diploma devolved from being proof of America's commitment to learning, science, and social mobility into a kind of Hunger Games contest to the death. That quest has infuriated both the millions who got shut out and millions who got into deep debt to stay afloat. Join us for an examination of After the Ivory Tower Falls, when award-winning journalist Will Bunch embarks on a deeply reported journey to the heart of the American Dream, on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    Taylor Brorby: BOYS AND OIL

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 54:20


    (8/4/22) Taylor Brorby author of Boys and Oil: Growing up gay in a fractured land, recounts his upbringing in the coalfields; his adolescent infatuation with books; and how he felt intrinsically different from other boys. Now an environmentalist, Brorby uses the destruction of large swathes of the West as a metaphor for the terror he experienced as a youth. From an assault outside a bar in an oil boom town to a furtive romance, and from his awakening as an activist to his arrest at the Dakota Access Pipeline, Boys and Oil provides a startling portrait of an America that persists despite well-intentioned legal protections. Join us when Brorby, an Annie Tanner Clark Fellow in Environmental Humanities and Environmental Justice at the Tanner Humanities Center at the University of Utah discusses his memoir about growing up gay amidst the harshness of rural North Dakota, on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI 99.5FM.

    JONATHAN ZIMMERMAN & SIGNE WILKINSON ON FREE SPEECH

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 54:12


    According to author Jonathan Zimmerman, in America we like to think we live in a land of liberty, where everyone can say whatever they want. Throughout our history, however, we have also been quick to censor people who offend or frighten us. We talk a good game about freedom of speech, then we turn around and deny it to others. Free speech allows us to criticize our leaders. It lets us consume the art, film, and literature we prefer. And, perhaps most importantly, it allows minorities to challenge the oppression they suffer. While any of us are censored, none of us are free. Join us when, historian Jonathan Zimmerman and Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Signe Wilkinson discuss their perspective of free speech in America: who established it, who has denounced it, and who has risen to its defense, on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    Thomas Cleaver on The Cactus Air Force

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 54:34


    (8/1/22) Using diary entries, interviews and first-hand accounts, author and screenwriter Thomas McKelvey Cleaver brings to life the struggle in the air over the island of Guadalcanal between August 20 and November 15, 1942. For 40 years from 1961, the late Eric Hammel interviewed more than 150 American participants in the air campaign at Guadalcanal, none of whom are still alive. These interviews are the most comprehensive first-person accounts of the battle assembled by any historian. More importantly, they involved the junior officers and enlisted men whose stories and memories were not part of the official history, thus providing a unique insight. Join us when Pacific War expert Thomas McKelvey Cleaver examines the unpublished stories covering these events.

    Edward Miller on A Conspiratorial Life

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 54:16


    Though you may not know his name, Robert Welch (1899-1985)—founder of the John Birch Society—is easily one of the most significant architects of our current political moment. In A Conspiratorial Life, the first full-scale biography of Welch, Edward H. Miller delves deep into the life of an overlooked figure whose ideas nevertheless reshaped the American right. Welch became an unlikely candy magnate, founding the company that created Sugar Daddies, Junior Mints, and other famed confections. In 1958, he funneled his wealth into establishing the organization that would define his legacy and change the face of American politics: the John Birch Society. Join us when Edward H. Miller an associate teaching professor at Northeastern University and the author of A Conspiratorial Life: Robert Welch, connects the accusatory conservatism of the midcentury John Birch Society to the inflammatory rhetoric of the Tea Party, the Trump administration, Q, and more on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    ROBERT JENSEN ON AN INCONVENIENT APOCALYPSE

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 52:46


    (7/26/22) Robert Jensen co-authors of An Inconvenient Apocalypse argues that humanity's future will be defined not by expansion but by contraction. For decades, our world has understood that we are on the brink of an apocalypse—and yet the only implemented solutions have been small and convenient, feel-good initiatives that avoid unpleasant truths about the root causes of our impending disaster. On this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large, Jensen examines how geographic determinism shaped our past and led to today's social injustice, consumerist culture, and high-energy/high-technology dystopias. Jensen weaves a secular reading of theological concepts—the prophetic, the apocalyptic, a saving remnant, and grace—to chart a collective, realistic path for humanity not only to survive our apocalypse but also to emerge on the other side with a renewed appreciation of the larger living world.

    Lawrence Ubell of Accurate Building Inspectors

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 53:55


    As we experience extreme heat temperatures during this home improvement season Lawrence Ubell of Accurate Building Inspectors will be live in studio discussing everything from cooling to upgrades. As regular listeners know, there are few construction questions that Ubells of Accurate Building Inspectors don't know how to answer. In this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI, one of our favorite handymen will answer your questions on any home repair projects you may be working on this Summer. Call-in 212.209.2877

    Paisley Currah on Sex Is as Sex Does

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 54:23


    Acclaimed author Jamie Susskind suggest not long ago, the tech industry was widely admired, and the internet was regarded as a tonic for freedom and democracy, not anymore. Every day, the headlines blaze with reports of racist algorithms, data leaks, and social media platforms festering with falsehood and hate. In The Digital Republic, author Jamie Susskind argues that these problems are not the fault of a few bad apples at the top of the industry. They are the result of our failure to govern technology properly. The Digital Republic charts a new course. It offers a plan for the digital age: new legal standards, new public bodies and institutions, new duties on platforms, new rights and regulators, new codes of conduct for people in the tech industry. Join us when Jamie Susskind examines his publication Inspired by the great political essays of the past, steeped in the traditions of republican thought, offering a vision of a different type of society: a digital republic in which human and technological flourishing go hand in hand on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    Jamie Susskind on The Digital Republic

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 51:25


    acclaimed author Jamie Susskind suggest not long ago, the tech industry was widely admired, and the internet was regarded as a tonic for freedom and democracy, not anymore. Every day, the headlines blaze with reports of racist algorithms, data leaks, and social media platforms festering with falsehood and hate. In The Digital Republic, author Jamie Susskind argues that these problems are not the fault of a few bad apples at the top of the industry. They are the result of our failure to govern technology properly. The Digital Republic charts a new course. It offers a plan for the digital age: new legal standards, new public bodies and institutions, new duties on platforms, new rights and regulators, new codes of conduct for people in the tech industry. Join us when Jamie Susskind examines his publication Inspired by the great political essays of the past, steeped in the traditions of republican thought, offering a vision of a different type of society: a digital republic in which human and technological flourishing go hand in hand on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    John Allen Paulos on Who's Counting?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 53:49


    For decades, New York Times best-selling author John Allen Paulos has enlightened readers by showing how to make sense of the numbers and probabilities behind real-world events, political calculations, and everyday personal decisions. Who's Counting? features dozens of his insightful essays—original writings on contemporary issues like the COVID-19 pandemic, online conspiracy theories, “fake news,” and climate change. With an abiding respect for reason, a penchant for puzzles with societal implications, Paulos clarifies mathematical ideas for everyone and shows how they play a role in government, media, popular culture, and life. He argues that if we can't critically interpret numbers and statistics, we lose one of our most basic and reliable guides to reality. Join us when author John Allen Paulos shares his research on probability, and the philosophy of science on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    INDUSTRIAL HYGIENIST MONONA ROSSOL ON HEALTH UPDATES

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 53:59


    (7/15/2022) Chemist, artist and industrial hygienist Monona Rossol is the founder of Arts, Crafts and Theater Safety, Inc. A not-for-profit corporation dedicated to providing health and safety services to the arts. She is also the Health and Safety Director for the Local 829 union of the United Scenic Artists International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees. Join us when, Monona addresses concerns of the COVID pandemic actually being over, health statistics, as well as new findings of Money Pox on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI 99.5FM.

    Bob Hennelly of Stuck Nation

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 54:39


    (7/14/2022) Robert "Bob" Hennelly is an award-winning, print and broadcast journalist. For more than 30 years, he has reported on a broad spectrum of major public policy questions, ranging from homeland security to the economy, environmental contamination to corruption, and occupational safety to homelessness. Join us when Bob Hennelly shares his investigative work--focusing on national labor issues and public policy, occupational safety and health, the New York City politics and civil service on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    Ellis Cose on Race and Reckoning

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 55:03


    (7/11/22) Ranging from chattel slavery, through the New Deal to the Covid pandemic, Ellis Cose has produced a groundbreaking work that investigates how pivotal decisions have established and perpetuated discriminatory practices. Race and Reckoning: From Founding Fathers to Today's Disruptors -- examines our nation's history, in which numerous racialized decisions have solidified the fates of generations of citizens of color. Some of the earliest involved race-based slavery, the removal of Indigenous peoples from their lands, and the exclusion of most Asians. More have proliferated over time. While America grew into a superpower in the twentieth century, it continued to discriminate against people of color—both soldiers who served overseas and civilians on the home front, herding Japanese Americans into internment camps during World War II and denying Black citizens their right to vote. Join us when Ellis Cose shares research which uncovers how, at countless points in history, America's leaders have upheld a narrative of American greatness rooted in racism, as he offers a hopeful yet clear-eyed vision of American possibility on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    Bob Keefe on Climatenomics:

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2022 51:55


    (7/8/22) According to Bob Keefe, the battle against climate change is no longer just an environmental or social issue. As shareholders demand corporations protect assets against climate change and the economic impact of environmental disasters suck billions of dollars out of the economy, capitalism itself has become an ally. The economic impact of climate change is rattling the foundation of our economy at its very core. It's blowing up centuries-old industries from automobiles to oil and gas, creating new opportunities for investors and entrepreneurs. It's costing Americans billions of dollars each and every year. And most importantly, it's forcing politicians to pass long-overdue policies that will transform our businesses, our lives and our future like never before. Join us when Bob Keefe, executive director of E2, a national, nonpartisan organization dedicated to providing business perspectives on environmental issues, shares with listeners how this new reality will impact their industries, businesses, jobs, and communities and transform our country's economy.

    Joshua Prager on The Family Roe

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 54:54


    Roe v. Wade, was a landmark decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in which the Court ruled that the Constitution of the United States generally protects the liberty to choose to have an abortion. Recently The Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade, ending right to abortion upheld for decades Despite her famous pseudonym, no one knows the truth about “Jane Roe,” Norma McCorvey (1947–2017), whose unwanted pregnancy in 1970 opened a great fracture in American life. Join us when Journalist Joshua Prager, examine the years spent with Norma, her personal papers, a previously unseen trove, and his experience of her final moments. With an explosive revelation at the core of the case, he tells her full story for the first time on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    Author Michael Patrick MacDonald

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 54:33


    McDonald serves as Author-in-Residence & Professor of the Practice at Northeastern University's Honors Department, where he teaches his curricula: “Non-Fiction Writing & Social Justice Issues” and “The North of Ireland: Colonialism, Armed Resistance and the Struggle for Peace with Justice" every fall. Regular contributor to the program Michael Patrick MacDonald is the author of the book All Souls: A Family Story From Southie and the acclaimed Easter Rising: A Memoir of Roots and Rebellion. On this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large, activist Michael Patrick MacDonaldt will focus on his efforts to reduce violence and promote grassroots leadership for the most impacted communities.

    Pete Muroski of Native Landscapes Garden Center

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 54:13


    Join us when Pete Muroski of Native Landscapes Garden Center focuses our attention on organic edible landscape techniques, such as organic gardening and how it can be incorporated into landscaping. Vegetable gardens -- terrace, roof top or windowsill gardening. How to grow fruits and vegetables in a healthy manner, pesticide free, the early summer growing season and more on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI 99.5FM.

    Sergio Miller on No Wider War

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 54:20


    No Wider War is the second volume of a two-part exploration of America's involvement in Indochina from the end of World War II to the Fall of Saigon. Drawing on the latest research, unavailable to the authors of the classic Vietnam histories, including recently declassified top secret National Security Agency material, Sergio Miller examines in depth both the events and the key figures of the conflict to present a masterful narrative of America's most divisive war. Join us on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large when Sergio Miller examines No Wider War, A History of the Vietnam War on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    Lori Garver on Escaping Gravity

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 54:47


    Escaping Gravity is former NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver's firsthand account of how a handful of revolutionaries overcame the political patronage and bureaucracy that threatened the space agency. The success of Elon Musk's SpaceX, Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin, Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic, and countless other commercial space efforts were preceded by decades of work by a group of people Garver calls “space pirates.” Join us when Garver examines the quest to transform NASA which put Garver in the crosshairs of Congress, the aerospace industry, and hero-astronauts trying to protect their own profits and mythology within a system that had held power since the 1950s, on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    Rebecca Wragg Sykes on Kindred

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 55:05


    Rebecca Wragg Sykes uses her experience at the cutting-edge of Palaeolithic research to share our new understanding of Neanderthals, shoving aside clichés of rag-clad brutes in an icy wasteland. She reveals them to be curious, clever connoisseurs of their world, technologically inventive and ecologically adaptable. Above all, they were successful survivors for more than 300,000 years, during times of massive climatic upheaval. Since their discovery 150 years ago, Neanderthals have gone from the losers of the human family tree to A-list hominins. The perception of the Neanderthal has changed dramatically, but despite growing scientific curiosity, popular culture fascination, and a wealth of coverage in the media and Sykes asks are we getting the whole story? Join us when Rebecca Wragg Sykes shares her complex and fascinating research on the reality of 21st century Neanderthals which remains virtually unknown and inaccessible outside the scientific literature, on this installment of Leoanrd Lopate at Large.

    Co-Host Bob Hennelly and Leonard Lopate

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 53:43


    Bob Hennelly who has a passion for bringing real news to his audience, will be co-hosting Leonard Lopate at Large touching on local politics, Jan. 6th Hearings, The Poor People's Campaign and more. Join us for a thought provoking Friday afternoon when Bob Hennelly sit in as co-host on the next installment of Leonard Lopate at Leonard.

    Emma Chapman on First Light: Switching on Stars at the

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 54:20


    First Light Switching on Stars at the Dawn of Time by Emma Chapman tells the story of the first stars, hundreds of times the size of the Sun and a million times brighter, that seeded the Universe with the heavy elements that we are made of and tells us how these stars formed, why they were so unusual, and what they can teach us about the Universe today. Emma Chapman a Royal Society research fellow and fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society, based at Imperial College London incorporates the very latest research into this branch of astrophysics, this booksheds light on a time of darkness, telling the story of stars, hundreds of times the size of the Sun and a million times brighter, lonely giants that lived fast and died young in powerful explosions that seeded the Universe with the heavy elements that we are made of. Join us when Emma Chapman tells us how these stars formed, why they were so unusual, and what they can teach us about the Universe today, on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    Industrial Hygienist Monona Rossol on Health Updates

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 53:46


    Chemist, artist and industrial hygienist Monona Rossol is the founder of Arts, Crafts and Theater Safety, Inc. A not-for-profit corporation dedicated to providing health and safety services to the arts. She is also the Health and Safety Director for the Local 829 union of the United Scenic Artists International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees. Join us when, Monona addresses concerns of the COVID pandemic actually being over, health statistics, as well as new findings of Money Pox on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI 99.5FM.

    Bob Hennelly on Stuck Nation

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 54:29


    Robert "Bob" Hennelly is an award-winning, print and broadcast journalist. For more than 30 years, he has reported on a broad spectrum of major public policy questions, ranging from homeland security to the economy, environmental contamination to corruption, and occupational safety to homelessness. Bob has a passion for bringing real news to his audience in a balanced and detailed way. He believes in "old-fashioned" journalism--investigating for himself the facts of a situation, and not assuming that press releases and news service wire-copy provide the whole story.

    Adam Piore on The New Kings Of New York

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 54:05


    According to award-winning journalist Adam Piore, there's a story behind every apartment sale, every building development, and each real estate transaction in New York City. In this publication Piore charts the extraordinary transformation of America's greatest city from a near-bankrupt urban combat zone into the land of Billionaires' Row and Hudson Yards—a luxury playground for the global 1 percent—and provides an inside look at the bombastic developers behind the biggest real estate deals of this century. The New Kings of New York offers a behind-the-scenes picture of what it's like to operate at the highest levels of the industry, and how some of the skyline-transforming deals were accomplished. Also, featuring the larger-than-life characters behind the deals. Join us when Adam Piore offers a captivating account of the world's biggest (and most disastrous) real estate transaction, as well as the pandemic of 2020 which left 95 percent of Manhattan's office spaces empty on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    Rachel E. Gross on Vagina Obscura

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 54:42


    According to author Rachel E. Gross, a camera obscura reflects the world back but dimmer and inverted. Similarly, science has long viewed woman through a warped lens, one focused narrowly on her capacity for reproduction. As a result, there exists a vast knowledge gap when it comes to what we know about half of the bodies on the planet. That is finally changing. Today, a new generation of researchers is turning its gaze to the organs traditionally bound up in baby-making—the uterus, ovaries, and vagina—and illuminating them as part of a dynamic, resilient, and ever-changing whole. Welcome to Vagina Obscura, an odyssey into a woman's body from a fresh perspective, ushering in a whole new cast of characters. Join us when journalist Rachel E. Gross takes us on a scientific journey to the center of a wonderous world where the uterus regrows itself, ovaries pump out fresh eggs, and the clitoris pulses beneath the surface like a shimmering pyramid of nerves on this episode of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    Lev Menand on The Fed Unbound

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 54:59


    In The Fed Unbound: Central Banking in a Time of Crisis, Lev Menand, a legal scholar and former Treasury official, assesses how and why the Fed has taken on more and more responsibilities to keep the economy out of recession, as it did during the 2008 crisis and again during the COVID-19 pandemic. Join us when Menand argues that the Fed significantly exceeded the bounds of its legal authority—and, more broadly, that using the Fed as our primary instrument of economic policymaking skews our economy in favor of the rich, furthering our economic divide on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    David Hackett Fischer on African Founders

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 54:10


    In his new book for Simon & Schuster, historian David Hackett Fischer argues that African history is American history. AFRICAN FOUNDERS draws on extensive research to show how enslaved Africans and their descendants enlarged American ideas of freedom in varying ways in different regions of the early United States. At a time when many states have banned Critical Race Theory from curriculums. And – seemingly everywhere – the debate rages on as parents and politicians insist that CRT doesn't belong in classrooms teaching American history. AFRICAN FOUNDERS emphasizing the fact that early Black Americans deserve to be recognized as founders of this nation. Join us when, Hackett Fischer, whose 2005 book Washington's Crossing won the Pulitzer Prize for History, reveals how much our country was shaped by these African influences in its early years, changing the landscape of American laws and ethics, and producing a new, distinctly American culture, on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    Ran Abramitzky and Leah Boustan on Streets of Gold

    Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2022 54:26


    According to Ran Abramitzky and Leah Boustan, immigration is one of the most fraught, and possibly most misunderstood topics in American social discourse—yet, in most cases, the things we believe about immigration are based largely on myth, not facts. Join us when Ran Abramitzky and Leah Boustan examine their book Streets of Gold: America's Untold Story of Immigrant Success using powerful story-telling and unprecedented research employ big data and algorithms, provide a new take on American history with surprising results, especially how comparable the “golden era” of immigration is to today, and why many current policy proposals are so misguided on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

    Joe Zammit-Lucia on The New Political Capitalism

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 54:44


    The New Political Capitalism, How businesses and societies can thrive in a deeply politicized world, bridges the gap between the reality of the relationship between politics and business, and the lack of familiarity of the business community, even at the most senior levels, with political thinking. The book demonstrates how businesses that develop effective political antennae can enhance their performance in the emerging age of Political Capitalism. Join us when Dr. Joe Zammit-Lucia an adviser focused on business leadership in contemporary culture, author, public speaker, and commentator in the international press on the inter-relationship between business and politics his book on Leonard Lopate at Large.

    John Bainbridge on Gun Barons

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 53:32


    Love them or hate them, guns are woven deeply into the American soul. Names like Colt, Smith & Wesson, Winchester, and Remington are legendary. Yet few people are aware of the roles these men played at a crucial time in United States history, from westward expansion in the 1840s, through the Civil War, and into the dawn of the Gilded Age. Through personal drive and fueled by bloodshed, they helped propel the young country into the forefront of the world's industrial powers. Join us on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large when John Bainbridge examines his book Gun Barons: The Weapons That Transformed America and the Men Who Invented Them.

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