Podcasts about Medicare

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  • 3,766PODCASTS
  • 15,234EPISODES
  • 34mAVG DURATION
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  • Oct 16, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Medicare

Show all podcasts related to medicare

Latest podcast episodes about Medicare

Finishing Well
The Medicare 10 For 2022

Finishing Well

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 27:40


We have reached part 4 of the Medicare saga. Hans and Robby discuss important information and details about Medicare 10 for next year. Don't forget to get your copy of “The Complete Cardinal Guide to Planning for and Living in Retirement” on Amazon or on CardinalGuide.com for free!   You can contact Hans and Cardinal by emailing hans@cardinalguide.com or calling 919-535-8261. Learn more at CardinalGuide.com.  Find us on YouTube: Cardinal Advisors.

Macro n Cheese
Things That Should Not Be with Scott Fullwiler

Macro n Cheese

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 69:05


Scott Fullwiler, an MMT OG, talks to Steve about the myths & truths of Social Security, regressive taxation, and the debt ceiling. He explains the operational realities of the Fed and Treasury.

Mastering Money
Mastering Money 10/15/21

Mastering Money

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 52:14


People who don't like losing money in the stock market are often described as “risk-averse”. In reality, behavioral scientists will say that you may not be RISK averse, but rather LOSS averse. There is a difference, and it matters when you are designing your financial plan.  Las Vegas is loaded with people who are not risk averse. In fact, they take pleasure  in taking a risk.   But all of them are LOSS averse. Today, we'll clearly define the difference and why you need to know it when determining HOW to allocate your investments for retirement, and it may SHOCK you! Then health insurance and Medicare expert Shelley Grandidge joins us for the Q & A.  An important show you don't want to miss....MASTERING MONEY is on the air!!

Avalere Health Essential Voice
Medicare Part D, Part IV: Budget Neutrality and Congressional Scoring

Avalere Health Essential Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 12:05


In this episode of Avalere Health Essential Voice, the fourth in our Medicare Part D miniseries, our experts discuss key elements of the legislative process including budget neutrality and congressional scoring.

Retirement Boss Radio with Saba Khan-Smith
Ep 37 Financially Fearless This week Saba Kahn offers tips on how to protect your nest egg in spite of a market downturn. 

Retirement Boss Radio with Saba Khan-Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 51:19


You've made it to retirement, now what. What happens if the market makes the inevitable correction. Can you recover and still have the retirement you planned? This week Saba Kahn offers tips on how to protect your nest egg in spite of a market downturn.  Visit 1890Wealth.com Call 800-730-3385. 

HIMSSCast
Taking the CDC's Diabetes Prevention Program digital — with Laurence Girard

HIMSSCast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 29:07


The CDC's Diabetes Prevention Program is one of the first lifestyle and behavior-based interventions to be proven, in a large clinical study, to be more effective than a comparable drug (in this case metformin). Digital implementations can make the DPP more accessible and more scalable, and a number of digital health companies have been tackling this for the last few years.Fruit Street Health is one of those companies and its CEO Laurence Girard joins host Jonah Comstock on today's HIMSSCast to discuss the challenges, opportunities, and successes his company has had in this space.Talking points:A brief history of the CDC Diabetes Prevention ProgramWhy Fruit Street and others are taking the DPP digitalChallenges and opportunities of virtual DPP implementationOngoing reimbursement challenges with Medicare and MedicaidAdvantages of group-based programs via video chatsQuestions and misconceptions about scalabilityMaking sure pre-diabetes interventions work for everyoneCultural food expectations and combatting food deserts, both through partnershipsDirect-to-consumer DPP outreachAre DPP programs (in-person and virtual) making a dent in the problem?More about this episode:Fruit Street to deliver CDC's National Diabetes Prevention Program through live video classesFruit Street Health raises $3 million in doctors-only roundUK passes on Apple, Google's Bluetooth contact tracing tool, Fruit Street Health launches COVID-19 telemedicine platform and more digital health news briefsAHIP, CDC to partner on diabetes preventionMedicare to reimburse for Diabetes Prevention Program, including Omada's digital versionDiabetes Prevention Program under the Affordable Care Act is working, HHS Secretary Burwell saysAmerican Medical Association pushes public, private health plans to cover National Diabetes Prevention ProgramCMS calls for extending Diabetes Prevention Program into Medicare, proposes new doc fees to boost chronic care

The Takeout
Progressive Leader Rep. Pramila Jayapal on Infrastructure Negotiations

The Takeout

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 45:15


This week, Rep. Pramila Jayapal joins Major to discuss the latest developments in congressional negotiations of both a bipartisan infrastructure bill and a "soft infrastructure" bill that would increase social safety nets for Americans. Jayapal maintains that child care, Medicare expansion, prescription drug price limits, climate change, immigration, and affordable housing will remain in the slimmed-down social spending bill being negotiated between the White House and congressional Democrats. But she concedes some programs may have to be altered. This conversation was recorded on October 12th, 2021.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

SBS Spanish - SBS en español
¿Merece la pena contratar un seguro médico privado en Australia?

SBS Spanish - SBS en español

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 7:52


El seguro médico privado ayuda a las personas a evitar largos tiempos de espera para procedimientos que no son urgentes y les permite acceder a servicios que Medicare no cubre. Pero los pagos extra pueden ser un impedimento para que muchas personas lo utilicen para pagar sus gastos médicos.

ProAging Podcast
Prepare for Medicare 2022 Open Enrollement

ProAging Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 66:04


Starting on October 15th, current Medicare beneficiaries can make changes for the 2022 plan year. Learn about changes in Medicare, how to review your options, and how to have a successful annual review. This is a live interactive event so you can get the answers to all your Medicare questions. Featuring John Norce, Founder of the Medicare Portal

Connecting ALS
"Medicare Open Enrollment…"

Connecting ALS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 21:13


This week, Jeremy is joined by Dr. Neil Thakur, chief mission officer at The ALS Association, to talk about the efforts to make sure Medicare works for people living with ALS, and talks to Courtney Jones at the Patient Advocate Foundation about navigating the Medicare open enrollment period. Access the Medicare resource line at https://www.als.org/navigating-als/financial-information/medicare-information/als-medicare-resource-lineTo learn more about Medicare go to https://www.als.org/navigating-als/financial-information/medicare-informationFor tips on navigating open enrollment go to https://www.als.org/blog/navigating-medicare-open-enrollmentHear Dr. Thakur's comments to CMS about optimizing Medicare at https://www.als.org/blog/als-association-cms-administrator-we-urge-you-listen-people-living-alsThis episode is brought to you by The ALS Association in partnership with CitizenRacecar.

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network
Andy Hetzel, VP of Corporate Communications @BCBSM -- Medicare Health Coverage for New Seniors

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 10:27


Relentless Health Value
EP341: How to Cut Administrative Waste AND Attract and Retain Doctors and Nurses, With Gary Campbell

Relentless Health Value

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 32:50


First, let's talk about reducing administrative waste in the US healthcare system. There was a pretty famous 2019 study by Shrank et al. that estimated about 25% of the $3.6 trillion the US spends on healthcare annually is potentially wasteful. This is each person spending $2500 unnecessarily. Robert Kocher wrote a really interesting article about getting rid of administrative waste and inefficiencies, and he said that it is the “safest form of health care cost savings; virtually no one argues that administrative costs should remain high. Reducing administrative waste should be the highest priority … [because] everyone, including patients and clinicians, would benefit from lower health care costs.” In my mind, “everyone” means payers, policy makers, and also providers who are or want to take some accountability for the total cost of care here. To talk about the possibilities, I have the perfect guest: Gary Campbell, who is the CEO of Johnson Health Center, which is an FQHC, a Federally Qualified Health Center, in Lynchburg, Virginia. Why is the CEO of an FQHC a great person to talk about cutting out administrative waste with? Well, first of all, the patient population is what many would consider challenging at an FQHC. Second, they really have to cut out as much waste as possible because there is zero potential to cost shift. They do not have the option to charge their commercial lives 4x Medicare or whatever and effectively cost shift the impact of inefficiencies. There basically are no commercial lives. You either figure out how to be efficient, or the patient population does not get care. As Gary and I were talking, however, it became clear that when you cut out administrative waste, you wind up actually with the potential to become a great place to work. One reason for this just has to do with the process of cutting out waste, which requires culture and process. And a by-product of a great culture and a great process means a great place to work. You might be thinking, as I was thinking, that this show, which is supposed to be about cutting administrative waste, is going to be all about how to do lean and Six Sigma and pretty much go peak MBA. Spoiler alert: It's not. When I asked Gary how to be operationally efficient, it all ladders up to organizational leadership: leaders who commit to putting patients first, to have core values with the expectation to actually achieve them (for reals—not just in the marketing). Because without effective, accountable, committed leadership, patient first, lowering the cost of care, removing administrative waste … it ain't gonna happen. Leaders should be visible, have a vision, a strategic plan, project plans, and be inspirational. They also need to not be afraid to “move along,” as they say, people who are pulling the team down and holding it back—maybe even if a short-term revenue hit will transpire. Before we get started here, let's talk about FQHCs for a sec just in case you're unfamiliar. Besides the acronym giving me fits of dyslexia—my brain always wants to invert the letters, so I have a Post-it Note here and I'm staring at it so, hopefully, I'll be able to keep this straight—FQHCs (Federally Qualified Health Centers) are usually nonprofits that are oriented to take care of the underserved. Today they serve upwards of 30 million people in the United States, and that's a growing number. There's something like 1500 of them across all 50 states. They're federally funded. They are a safety net really for individuals out there who may not be able to access care anywhere else. There's generally bipartisan support for FQHCs and often a real purpose and passion to really care for people regardless of their ability to pay. They also tend to offer a lot of resources under one roof (eg, medical care, dental care, other things, mental health care), which can add substantially to the operational complexity. Gary Campbell, my guest in this healthcare podcast as I said, is the CEO of an FQHC. Gary has a procurement and operations background, and this background informs how he approaches leadership and care delivery in ways that I find inspirational—and I hope that you do, too. Some of the conversation that we had in this episode reminded me of the interview with Tony DiGioia, MD, in EP332; so if you want to dig further into this topic, go back and listen to that episode. That interview is very specifically about how to create a patient-centric value system, which Dr. DiGioia says should be the new OS for healthcare delivery. During this show, I also mention my conversation with Jerry Durham (EP297), where we talk about streamlining the front desk.  I didn't mention this in the show, but another episode that would be great to go back and listen to if this topic intrigues you is the one with Matt Anderson, MD, MBA, talking about how things get better when the scrubs and the suits collaborate (EP266).   You can learn more at impact2lead.com.  Gary Campbell is the founder and owner of Impact2Lead, LLC, and the CEO of Johnson Health Center (JHC), where he has enjoyed a career centered on leading for-profit/not-for-profit organizations and helping to unleash potential in others along the way. In 2011, he left Bayer and came to JHC; and in 2013, he launched Impact2Lead to provide transformation-consulting services to other firms across the United States. Since joining JHC, the center has enjoyed unprecedented success and growth by transforming the culture using his Impact Leadership model and becoming the first Federally Qualified Health Center to be recognized as an Employer of Choice by Employer of Choice International, Inc. The health center has achieved multiple workplace and community awards since that time and has enjoyed exponential growth during his seven years as the CEO. Gary currently speaks and consults nationally on leadership, workplace strategies, and motivational topics. 05:15 Why is there no opportunity to cost shift in an FQHC? 05:46 What happens when an FQHC is operating inefficiently? 06:12 “Have you workflowed it out? … You can overstaff yourself in a way that your cost per patient goes way up.” 06:37 Why is taking a lean approach not an excuse to cut staff? 08:05 “The nurses are linchpins to everything.” 09:05 How does standardizing care lead to personalization of care? 10:28 “Our clinical teams see that we care.” 10:48 “If you don't have a vision for where you want to be two and three years down the road, you're struggling.” 11:03 “I want everybody to understand, What is their why?” 20:10 “They don't teach leadership in most medical schools.”—Dr. Robert Pearl 21:19 “Get to know these clinicians … sincerely.” 23:11 “From a core values perspective, you can make every single decision … on core values.” 23:35 “We always start with those values. … They're embedded in everything we do.” 24:16 “You have to project plan things out that you want.” 25:09 How does an FQHC or private practices that are patient-oriented attract talent? 30:45 “First and foremost, be visible.” You can learn more at impact2lead.com.  @Impact2Lead discusses #administrativewaste and #healthcareemployment on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth Why is there no opportunity to cost shift in an FQHC? @Impact2Lead discusses #administrativewaste and #healthcareemployment on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth What happens when an FQHC is operating inefficiently? @Impact2Lead discusses #administrativewaste and #healthcareemployment on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth “Have you workflowed it out? … You can overstaff yourself in a way that your cost per patient goes way up.” @Impact2Lead discusses #administrativewaste and #healthcareemployment on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth Why is taking a lean approach not an excuse to cut staff? @Impact2Lead discusses #administrativewaste and #healthcareemployment on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth “The nurses are linchpins to everything.” @Impact2Lead discusses #administrativewaste and #healthcareemployment on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth How does standardizing care lead to personalization of care? @Impact2Lead discusses #administrativewaste and #healthcareemployment on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth “Our clinical teams see that we care.” @Impact2Lead discusses #administrativewaste and #healthcareemployment on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth “I want everybody to understand, What is their why?” @Impact2Lead discusses #administrativewaste and #healthcareemployment on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth “Get to know these clinicians … sincerely.” @Impact2Lead discusses #administrativewaste and #healthcareemployment on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth “We always start with those values. … They're embedded in everything we do.” @Impact2Lead discusses #administrativewaste and #healthcareemployment on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth “You have to project plan things out that you want.” @Impact2Lead discusses #administrativewaste and #healthcareemployment on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth How does an FQHC or private practices that are patient-oriented attract talent? @Impact2Lead discusses #administrativewaste and #healthcareemployment on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth “First and foremost, be visible.” @Impact2Lead discusses #administrativewaste and #healthcareemployment on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth Recent past interviews: Click a guest's name for their latest RHV episode! Kristin Begley, David Contorno (AEE17), David Contorno (EP339), Nikki King, Olivia Webb, Brandon Weber, Stacey Richter (INBW30), Brian Klepper (AEE16), Brian Klepper (EP335), Sunita Desai, Care Plans vs Real World (EP333), Dr Tony DiGioia, Al Lewis, John Marchica, Joe Connolly, Marshall Allen, Andrew Eye, Naomi Fried, Dr Rishi Wadhera, Dr Mai Pham, Nicole Bradberry and Kelly Conroy, Lee Lewis, Dr Arshad Rahim, Dr Monica Lypson, Dr Rich Klasco, Dr David Carmouche (AEE15), Christian Milaster, Dr Grace Terrell

Hi 5
Trending News – October 14, 2021

Hi 5

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 15:59


In this minisode, Mindy, Ryan, and Jen discuss a few recent newsworthy items including: the latest in COVID-19 vaccines and treatments (00:34), updates on Pfizer's copay assistance legal battle (03:55) and surprise billing arbitration (06:30), and the start of Medicare Advantage & Part D open enrollment (10:42). Podcast Tags: COVID-19, vaccines, Medicare, Medicare Advantage, surprise billing, copay assistance, healthcare, healthcare news Source Links: · https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/22/us/politics/pfizer-boosters-fda-authorize.html · https://www.fiercebiotech.com/biotech/merck-s-oral-covid-19-antiviral-slashes-hospitalizations-prevents-deaths-phase-3-sparking?mkt_tok=Mjk0LU1RRi0wNTYAAAF_26eZ92mFcnqWj2kp5mJmBNQxAYY92bvbzylD4BZwugrf-Cgj2MFcLKaDtVAgudm2ZoB_CwSBt4ZrAyzpplj9smBgVLNevUxhsi8R6BGMi0nHVRyiqg&mrkid=65631392 · https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/01/us/politics/fda-pfizer-children-boosters-moderna-johnson.html · https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/04/us/politics/johnson-vaccine-booster-coronavirus.html?utm_campaign=KHN%3A%20Daily%20Health%20Policy%20Report&utm_medium=email&_hsmi=166828072&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-8zjAA2sq6MFpwO_AjAqN3mJu0jM89LHFfRU55EtZuYIYnmV5vsziga14y_jLNq9u2ehvyvxiaxzg-gkUuJdwpU1kEnoQ&utm_content=166828072&utm_source=hs_email · https://www.statnews.com/pharmalot/2021/10/03/pfizer-medicare-kickbacks-copay-assistance-hhs-lawsuit/?mkt_tok=ODUwLVRBQS01MTEAAAF_6kX1RFxQX7PI_L66DtpDUawamai0HLEEnHaSmt0ATcAT48baYoL2p7rxaPINzCrkEAk9mLuHauRXyDDMRtYoSX_PSBrTNdYUWaxBCbB_MBP7 · https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/hospitals/biden-admin-releases-surprise-billing-rule-detailing-arbitration-process?mkt_tok=Mjk0LU1RRi0wNTYAAAF_3LPxV-4OsO5wC33D-Ukc9RW9RI95pNRuBwRkNX_dt8A2VORhoIb_jcD-w3VtkDYOlDJyq5y4bkGhL5qxE7XWtot6Cxf1QTJD0q4GLQ0HctkjsXzwXg&mrkid=65631392 · https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/medicare-advantage-premiums-to-decline-slightly-2022-part-d-to-rise-by-nearly-5?utm_medium=nl&utm_source=internal&mrkid=65631392&mkt_tok=Mjk0LU1RRi0wNTYAAAF_1ced-_CJWe5bAtj7FVS_ngBpZ3lN-zDY2ZQ9YV5wwFelcw6QW1Cq5Xscpxj5XgtFnoukouNyaVYOzlGel6ILx5qZ7s4jTqiahM3PoLKrYum0kC1H5A· https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/unitedhealthcare-aetna-cigna-anthem-medicare-advantage-2022?utm_medium=nl&utm_source=internal&mrkid=65631392&mkt_tok=Mjk0LU1RRi0wNTYAAAF_6kQ3h-pgu8OegBwTgK1RPMvnDGIyyDJF1BWGkxJPnLZ2WZrIySzaQyTSsiK71dcZBDs05tuD4n1hoHunsQ6EP7QqJvbEoDW3ZxuHnMFe0aUt6-wVKg For additional discussion, please contact us at TrendingHealth.com or share a voicemail at 1-888-VYNAMIC. Mindy McGrath, Healthcare Industry Learning Lead mindy.mcgrath@vynamic.comRyan Hummel, Executive and Head of Provider Sectorryan.hummel@vynamic.comJen Burke, Healthcare Industry Strategistjen.burke@vynamic.com

Gist Healthcare Daily
Thursday, October 14, 2021

Gist Healthcare Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 6:31


Medicare open enrollment starts Friday, but once signed up few seniors change plans. Companies are ignoring Texas' vaccine mandate ban. And in California, Governor Newsom hasn't delivered on his big healthcare reform promises.

Barron's Live
Medicare Open Enrollment, What to Know and How to Prepare

Barron's Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 32:29


MarketWatch retirement reporter Alessandra Malito and Chapter co-founder Ari Parker discuss open enrollment period for Medicare and share the best tips for maximizing your coverage and more.

Loving Liberty Radio Network
10-11-2021 Liberty RoundTable with Sam Bushman

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 109:37


Hour 1 * Guest: Lowell Nelson – CampaignForLiberty.org – RonPaulInstitute.org. * Welcome to Our Celebration of Columbus and Christianity, on Columbus Day! – Columbus Day celebrates the landing of Christopher Columbus in the Americas on October 12, 1492. * Biden Formally Recognizes Indigenous Peoples' Day. * Parents Should Control Education – Ron Paul. * Biden Administration: Investigate Protesting Parents For ‘Domestic Terrorism'! – What should we do? Starve the beast. Take your children out of public school. They miss out on the money they get when your children attend the public schools. * Teaching Kids About Race & Gender? – Chris Sweeney. * Candace Owens: Parents should remove their children from public schools because they are brainwashing children with “Marxist principles. “Pull your children out of public schools,” Owens told Fox News' “Sunday Morning Futures. “The time is now, remove your children from these indoctrination camps, they're not learning to be smart, they're not focused on hard academics, they are being brainwashed and systematically controlled. * The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals has overturned the decision by Judge Robert Pitman to temporarily block the Texas Heartbeat Act. Hour 2 * Dr. Pierre Kory: Members of Congress Treated for COVID-19 with Ivermectin – Kory states claim comes from a highly credible source inside Congress – Between 100–200 members of Congress and their families & staffers have been treated with IVM & our I-MASK+ protocol for COVID. NO hospitalizations. * Guest: Dr. Murray Sabrin PhD., A retired professor of finance at Ramapo College, Co-founded the Sabrin Center for Free Enterprise in the Anisfield School of Business in 2007. Sabrin emigrated with his parents from West Germany to the United States in 1949. * Who decides what medical care you can get? – Dr Murray Sabrin, widely recognized as a leading voice in the American Libertarian movement, tackles that question and the nation's health crisis with stunning insights and solutions in his intriguing new book, “Universal Medical Care from Conception to End of Life: The Case for a Single-Payer System.” * Sabrin wants to phase out employer-based insurance, Medicare, Medicaid and Obamacare! He says medicine and government should be separated – just like government and religion. * Sabrin's single-payer system is based on strong Libertarian principles. He proposes: Direct primary care where patients pay cash, a mega health savings account where you would put money in tax free, it would grow tax free and you would take it out tax free – to pay for extraordinary expenses, A catastrophic policy for really big expenses, such as heart surgery, The indigent wouldn't need Medicaid, saving taxpayers billions of dollars per year, by the creation of thousands of non-profit medical centers * Do you even know what a Fee Schedule is? --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

The Joyce Kaufman Show
The Joyce Kaufman Show 10/13/21

The Joyce Kaufman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 3:32


Joyce discusses normal people and celebrities losing their jobs because of the vaccine mandate. She talks about Trump's comment Joyce talks about how the left is prepping the community Government regulations putting a strain on supplies. Clara Del Villar of Freedomworks calls in to talk about Medicare and President Biden's Bill Back Better Fund.

Grow Money Business with Grant Bledsoe
Ep #98 - Everything You Need to Know About Medicare With Danielle Roberts

Grow Money Business with Grant Bledsoe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 48:00


With the open enrollment period set to start on October 15th 2021, this is a great time to dive deep into the vital facts related to Medicare. In today's episode, we have a distinguished guest, Danielle Roberts, joining us. Danielle is a co-owner of Boomer Benefits, a firm dedicated to helping senior citizens make confident decisions when enrolling into Medicare, as well as the author of the best-selling book “10 Costly Medicare Mistakes You Can't Afford to Make”. Throughout this episode, Danielle shares her wisdom on all the crucial points you need to know if you intend to enroll in Medicare. [02:25] Danielle's Background - Danielle introduces herself and explains what they do at Boomer Benefits. [04:00] Common Mistakes - Danielle shares some of the most common mistakes she sees people make when enrolling for Medicare, and what you can do to avoid them. [08:01] Parts of Medicare – Parts A, B, C, and D of Medicare and the differences between them. [10:49] Medigap Plan and Medicare Advantage Plan - Danielle broadly describes the role of Medicare Advantage policy and the Medigap plans while highlighting their differences. [16:59] Most Suitable Plan for You - Though 34% of beneficiaries choose Medicare advantage plans, Danielle explains how to be mindful when making the best decision for you. [21:47] Subsequent Changes to the Plan – Danielle's suggestions on how beneficiaries can change their enrolled plans in subsequent years. [26:48] Switching Between Medigap Policies - Possible ways to switch between different Medigap policies and the procedures you'll need to follow. [28:59] Eligibility Criteria for Medicare - Danielle outlines the eligibility criteria for enrolling in Medicare. [32:23] Medicare Fund - The correlation between the reserves in the Medicare fund and the benefits Medicare offers. [38:08] Single-payer System - Danielle shares her insights on the rising health care costs and the viability of a single-payer system. [42:23] Pharmaceuticals and Drugs - Grant and Danielle discuss some of the current trends in the pharmaceuticals industry and the business interests that may affect Medicare. [47:09] Boomer Benefits - Danielle talks about how Boomer Benefits helps people with Medicare basics, benefits, and coverage.     Resources Connect with Danielle Roberts: Website: boomerbenefits.com/ YouTube: youtube.com/c/BoomerBenefits Facebook Page: facebook.com/BoomerBenefits Facebook Group: facebook.com/groups/BoomerBenefits LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/daniellekunkle/   Mentioned in the episode: 10 Costly Medicare Mistakes You Can't Afford to Make: goodreads.com/book/show/55204934-10-costly-medicare-mistakes-you-can-t-afford-to-make?from_search=true&from_srp=true&qid=1Wia7eTzTY&rank=1 The United States Social Security Website: ssa.gov/ Official U.S. government site for Medicare: medicare.gov/

Elevate Eldercare
Change the Incentives, Change the Care

Elevate Eldercare

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 53:10


This past summer, the American Bar Association overwhelmingly passed a resolution urging Congress to make private rooms and bathrooms, along with other small-home touches, a prerequisite for nursing homes to receive Medicare and Medicaid funding.   To learn more about this attempt to overhaul the landscape by radically changing the financial incentives at play – as well as the ABA's future plans for nursing home reform efforts— “Elevate Eldercare” welcomes Charles Sabatino, the longtime director of the ABA's Commission on Law and Aging. In addition to the resolution and a similar plan currently before Congress, Sabatino talks about his history with eldercare reform movements, and how he thinks progressive groups with a variety of different policy prescriptions can work together toward the common goal of real change.   Learn more about the ABA resolution here: https://thegreenhouseproject.org/resources/aba-private-rooms/ Keep up with the ABA Commission on Law and Aging: https://www.americanbar.org/groups/law_aging/ Check out all of GHP's advocacy efforts and learn how you can get involved: https://thegreenhouseproject.org/resources/advocacy/ Read Charles Sabatino and Charlene Harrington's call for structural change for long-term care: https://www.americanbar.org/groups/law_aging/publications/bifocal/vol-42/bifocal-vol--42-issue-6--july---august-2021-/policy-change-to-put-the-home-back-into-nursing-homes/   Show notes/call to action: Learn more about The Green House Project: www.thegreenhouseproject.org

Medicare For The Lazy Man Podcast
Ep. 247 - Age 65+ and still employed? What should be done about Medicare?

Medicare For The Lazy Man Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 25:05


Based on questions arriving at the MLM Mailbag, there is considerable confusion in some quarters about the ideal time to enroll in Medicare. There are some variables involved but the proper course will avoid any lapse in coverage while minimizing out-of-pocket costs.  (Most severe critic: A+)   Inspired by "MEDICARE FOR THE LAZY MAN; Simplest & Easiest Guide Ever! (2021)" on Amazon.com. Return to leave a short customer review & help future readers. Official website: https://www.MedicareForTheLazyMan.com Send questions & love notes: DBJ@MLMMailbag.com

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2694 - Fannie Lou Hamer And The Trail She Blazed For The Activists Of Today w/ Keisha Blain

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 68:50


Sam and Emma host Keisha Blain, Associate Professor of History at the University of Pittsburgh, to discuss her recent book Until I Am Free: Fannie Lou Hamer's Enduring Message to America, on how Hamer's long life led up to a final decade and a half of incredibly influential activism. Professor Blain walks Emma and Sam back to the 1920s and the first years of Fannie Lou Hamer's life, growing up on a sharecropping plantation in Mississippi where she was confronted with, beyond the labor abuses of the plantation, constant racial violence, exploitation, and coercion of her community. Specifically, they reflect on the explicit mob violence she saw with the lynching of tenant farmer Joe Pullum, alongside the general poverty and hunger that plagued those around her, before Keisha dives into the breaking point that set up Fannie Lou's eventual dip into non-violent action; her forced sterilization at the hands of a white doctor supposedly removing a tumor. Following this incredibly traumatizing experience, Hamer eventually heard talk of a Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) meeting at her local church, at which the public abuses of her community, and their unconstitutional nature, are crystallized for her. Next, Professor Blain brings Emma and Sam along Hamer's life as an activist, organizing for voter registration, from workshops to actually attempting to register in the face of civilian and police brutality, and arrest, just sixty years ago, and they work their way up to her speech at the Credentials Committee in Atlantic City which had even President LBJ on his heels. Keisha then walks through the influence of Hamer's activism today, looking particularly at the story of Breonna Taylor and Kate Young's use of social media to force the mainstream media to acknowledge her name. They wrap up the interview by touching on Fannie Lou Hamer's consciousness around the use of class and poverty to reinforce white supremacy, and looking at how her role as a key civil rights activist is obscured through the whitewashing of history. Sam and Emma also discuss the Right's commitment to the pro-COVID stance. And in the Fun Half: Emma and Sam discuss the brand new 2010 Republican talking point on the Democrats'… dismantling of Medicare? They cover the confirmation of the Boogaloo Boys' classic leftist organizing tactic of actively sowing chaos, shooting up buildings, and committing arson to undermine leftist protests, touching on the slow and steady replacement of election officials in the shadow of the Right's “Big Lie” as well, before Bro Flamingo fittingly calls in to talk cults. Charlie Kirk talks Senator Schumer's kinks, Jay from Chicago discusses the de-normalization of Obama's violent administration, Matt Walsh and Emma share some misinformation on extinction events, and the crew covers some updates from the Kellogg's strikes. Emma also gets on the record regarding the NFL and Jon Gruden, plus, your calls and IMs! Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here. Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) You can now watch the livestream on Twitch Check out today's sponsors: Egnyte: All over the world, companies hit by ransomware attacks have their valuable digital files held hostage and are forced to decide whether to pay cybercriminals to get them back. EGNYTE is the first ever file system with sophisticated ransomware detection and recovery tools fully baked in. Behind the scenes, Egnyte gives companies with limited IT and security staff the power of much larger teams. With Egnyte, you'll know exactly where key documents are and who has access. Learn more about how Egnyte can protect your business from ransomware. Or see why Egnyte is rated number one for data security by real customers in G2 Crowd. Start your free trial today at egnyte.com. That's egnyte.com. sunsetlakecbd is a majority employee owned farm in Vermont, producing 100% pesticide free CBD products. Great company, great product and fans of the show! Use code Leftisbest and get 20% off at http://www.sunsetlakecbd.com. And now Sunset Lake CBD has donated $2500 to the Nurses strike fund, and we encourage MR listeners to help if they can. Here's a link to where folks can donate: https://forms.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Support the St. Vincent Nurses today as they continue to strike for a fair contract! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! Check out The Nomiki Show live at 3 pm ET on YouTube at patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada, at patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop Watch More Perfect Union's video about the striking Kellogg's workers here.  

Talk Ten Tuesdays
Outpatient CDI Risk Adjustment and HCC Capture

Talk Ten Tuesdays

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 56:18


Outpatient CDI programs can have real impact with risk adjustment and Hierarchical Condition Categories (HCCs). An important component of the HCC risk adjustment model is accurate and appropriate HCC capture, representing a patient's disease burden year over year.HCCs reflect hierarchies within related disease categories. A patient can have multiple HCC categories assigned, and each category, along with patient demographics, is factored into the patient's overall risk adjustment factor (RAF) score.The higher the RAF score, the sicker the patient. On the upcoming edition of Talk Ten Tuesdays, we'll will cover the basics of HCCs and what steps to take in order to begin your outpatient CDI program with a focus on these factors. Broadcast Special Guest Colleen Deighan will also conduct a Talk Ten Tuesdays Listener Survey on this topic.The live broadcast will also feature these other segments:The Coding Report: In keeping with the broadcast's theme, Laurie Johnson will report on the new psychiatric codes for fiscal year 2022.Tuesday Focus: CMS Resumes Targeted Probe-and-Educate Program: Nationally recognized professional, coder, auditor, and educator Terry A. Fletcher will return to the broadcast to report on the resumption of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Targeted Probe-and-Educate (TPE) program, which was delayed in response to the COVID-19 public health emergency (PHE) in March 2020. CMS has given the Medicare Administrative Contractors (MACs) the go-ahead to resume paused TPE reviews and initiate new reviews.Special Report: CMS One-Year Extension: Susan Gatehouse, founder and president of Axea Solutions, will report on the CMS one-year extension of New Technology Add-on Payments (NTAPs) for 13 technologies for which the payments otherwise would have discontinued beginning in 2022.News Desk: Timothy Powell, compliance expert and ICD10monitor national correspondent, will anchor the Talk Ten Tuesdays News Desk.TalkBack: Erica Remer, MD, founder and president of Erica Remer, MD, Inc., and Talk Ten Tuesdays co-host, will report on a subject that has caught her attention during her popular segment.

Fifteen Minute Financial Advisor

Enrolling in your health care plan can be easy, if you're keeping everything the same. But it can be incredibly difficult if you're going it alone, or even choosing from a list of options that is vastly different than what you're used to. Also a reminder: Medicare open enrollment begins Friday October 15th, 2021 and runs through Tuesday December 7th, 2021.  Obamacare open enrollment begins Monday November 1st, and runs through Wednesday, December 15th.    Questions? Email me: Mike@ngpfp.com

OMG I'm Getting Older and So Is My Mom
Episode 417: Ep. 417 - October 11, 2021

OMG I'm Getting Older and So Is My Mom

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 59:51


Medicare open enrollment can be the most dangerous time of the year for Medicare recipients. So much to consider and so confusing but Desirae Mearns helps us understand the risks and the benefits in this most important show. 

Progressive Voices
The Disadvantages of Medicare Advantage

Progressive Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 11:00


Despite the barrage of television commercials touting Medicare Advantage, is it really superior to traditional Medicare? How do the two programs differ on coverage, access and cost? Join host Brenda Gazzar and Dr. Ed Weisbart, retired family physician, former executive director of Express Scripts and board member of Physicians for a National Health Program, for a deep dive into dismaying developments with Medicare, including how Medicare Advantage plans are draining the Medicare Trust Fund.

MoneyBall Medicine
A New Era of Participatory Medicine: Talking with E-Patient Dave, Part 2

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 44:32


Today we bring you the second half of Harry's conversation with Dave deBronkart, better known as E-Patient Dave for all the work he's done to help empower patients to be more involved in their own healthcare. If you missed Part 1 of our interview with Dave, we recommend that you check that out before listening to this one. In that part, we talked about how Dave's own brush with cancer in 2007 turned him from a regular patient into a kind of super-patient, doing the kind of research to find the medication that ultimately saved his life. And we heard from Dave how the healthcare system in the late 2000s was completely unprepared to help consumers like him who want to access and understand their own data.Today in Part 2, we'll talk about how all of that is gradually changing, and why new technologies and standards have the potential to open up a new era of participatory medicine – if, that is, patients are willing to do a little more work to understand their health data, if innovators can get better access to that data, and if doctors are willing to create a partnership with the patients over the process of diagnosis and treatment.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian.Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence.Big data.Predictive analytics.In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening much faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own healthcare and the healthcare of your loved ones, you'll need to some of these new tips and techniques of how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of the new book I have coming out soon, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we'll bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.In the previous episode we met Dave deBronkart, better known as E-Patient Dave for all the work he's done to help empower patients to be more involved in their own healthcare. If you missed it, I'm gonna recommend that you listen to the first discussion, and then come back here.We talked about how Dave's own brush with cancer in 2007 turned him from a regular patient into a kind of super-patient, doing the kind of research to find the medication that ultimately saved his life. And we heard from Dave how the healthcare system in the late 2000s was completely unprepared to help consumers like him who want to access and understand their own data.Today in Part 2, we'll talk about how all of that is gradually changing, and why new technologies and standards have the potential to open up a new era of participatory medicine – if, that is, patients are willing to do a little more work to understand their health data, if innovators can get better access to that data, and if doctors are willing to create a partnership with the patients over the process of diagnosis and treatment.We'll pick up the conversation at a spot where we were talking about that control and the different forms it's taken over the years.Harry Glorikian: You've observed like that there's some that there's this kind of inversion going on right now where for centuries doctors had sole control over patient data and sole claims to knowledge and authority about how patients should be treated. But now patients may have more detailed, more relevant and more up to date data than your doctors does. Right. You've talked about this as a Kuhnian paradigm shift, if I remember correctly, where patients are the anomalies, helping to tear down an old paradigm, you know. Walk us through the history here. What was the old paradigm and what's the new paradigm and what are you some of your favorite examples of this paradigm shift?Dave deBronkart: Well, so I want to be clear here. I have the deepest admiration for doctors, for physicians and for licensed practitioners at all levels for the training that they went through. I don't blame any of this on any of them. I did a fair amount of study about what paradigms are Thomas Kuhn's epic book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, like discovering that the Earth isn't the center of the solar system and things like that. The paradigm is an agreement in a scientific field about how things work. And it is the platform, the theoretical model on which all research and further study is done. And these anomalies arise when scientists operating in the field keep finding outcomes that disagree with what the paradigm says. So in the case of the planets circling the earth and the how the solar system works. They discovered that Mars and other planets all of a sudden would stop orbiting and when they would do a little loop de loop. I mean, that's what they observed. And they came up with more and more tortured explanations until finally, finally, somebody said, hey, guess what? We're all orbiting the sun. Now, the paradigm inn health care has been that the physician has important knowledge. Lord knows that's true. The physician has important knowledge and the patient doesn't and can't. Therefore, patient should do as they're told, so called compliance, and should not interfere with the doctors doing their work. Well, now along comes things like all of those things that I mentioned that the patient community told me at the beginning of my cancer. None of that is in the scientific literature. Even here, 15 years later, none of it's in the literature. What's going on here? Here's that first clunk in the paradigm. Right. And we have numerous cases of patients who assisted with the diagnosis. Patients who invented their own treatment. And the shift, the improvement in the paradigm that we have to, where just any scientific thinker -- and if you want to be a doctor and you don't want to be a scientific thinker, then please go away -- any scientific thinker has to accept is that it's now real and legitimate that the patient can be an active person in healthcare.Dave deBronkart: Yeah, I mean, you've said you don't have to be a scientist or a doctor anymore to create a better way to manage a condition. So, I mean, it's interesting, right? Because I always think that my doctor and I are partners in this together.Dave deBronkart: Good participatory medicine. Perfect.Harry Glorikian: You know, he has knowledge in certain places I definitely don't. But there are things where him and I, you know, do talk about things that were like, you know, we need to look into that further. Now, I'm lucky I've got a curious doctor. I found somebody that I can partner with and that I can think about my own health care in a sort of different way. But I mean, sometimes he doesn't have all the answers and we have to go search out something. You know, I was asking him some questions about HRV the other day that, you know, he's like, huh, let me let me ask a few cardiologists, you know, to get some input on this. So do you see that, I mean, I see that as the most desired outcome, where a patient can have their record. They're not expected to go and become a physician at that level of depth, but that the physicians who also have the record can work in a participatory way with the patient and get to a better outcome.Dave deBronkart: Exactly. And the other thing that's happened is and I've only recently in the last year come to realize we are at the end of a century that is unique in the history of humanity until science got to a certain point in the late 1800s, most doctors, as caring as they were, had no knowledge of what was going wrong in the body with different diseases. And then and that began a period of many decades where doctors really did know important things that patients had no access to. But that era has ended. All right, we now have more information coming out every day than anyone can be expected to keep up with. And we now are at a point also where we've seen stories for decades of patients who were kept alive. But at what cost? Right. Well, and we now we are now entering the point where the definition of best care cannot be made without involving the patient and their priorities. So this is the new world we're evolving into, like and Dr. Sands wears a button in clinic that says what matters to you?Harry Glorikian: So I mean, one of the other, based on where you're going with this, I think is you know, there are some movements that have been arising over the years. I don't know, maybe you could talk about one of them, which is OpenAPS. It's an unregulated, open source project to build an artificial pancreas to help people with type 1 diabetes. And I think it was Erich von Hippel's work on patient driven innovation. I talk in my book about, and I ask whether we should be training people to be better patients in the era of, say, A.I. and other technologies. What do you think could be done better to equip the average patient with to demand access to patient data, ask their doctors more important questions, get answers in plain English. You know, be more collaborative. What do you think is going to move us in that direction faster or more efficiently, let's say?Dave deBronkart: Well, I want to be careful about the word better, because I'm very clear that my preferences are not everyone's preferences. Really, you know, autonomy means every person gets to define their own priorities. And another thing is one of the big pushbacks from the hospital industry over the last 10 years as medical records, computers were shoved down their throats along with the mandate that they have to let patients see their data in the patient portal was a complaint that most patients aren't interested. Well, indeed, you know, I've got sorry news for you. You know, when I worked in the graphic arts industry, I worked in marketing, people don't change behavior or start doing something new until they've got a problem. If it's fun or sexy, you know, then they'll change, they'll start doing something new. What we need to do is make it available to people. And then when needs arise, that gets somebody's attention and they're like, holy crap, what's happening to my kid? Right. If they know that they can be involved, then they can start to take action. They can learn how to take action. It's having the infrastructure available, having the app ecosystem start to grow, and then just having plain old awareness. Who knows? Maybe someday there will be a big Hollywood movie where people where people learn about stories like that and. You know, from that I mean that I think nature will take its course.Harry Glorikian: Well, it's interesting because I recently interviewed a gentleman by the name of Matthew Might. He's a computer scientist who became a surrogate patient advocate for his son, Bertrand, who had a rare and undiagnosed genetic disorder that left him without an enzyme that breaks down junk protein in the cells. But he, you know, jumped in there. He did his own research found in over-the-counter drug, Prevacid of all drugs., that could help with Bertrand's deficiency. But, I mean, Dave, you know, Matt is a, he was a high-powered computer scientist who wasn't afraid to jump in and bathe in that, you know. Is that the type of person we need? Is that a cautionary tale, or an inspiring tale? How do you think about that?Dave deBronkart: Desperate people will bring whatever they have to the situation. And this is no different from, you know, there have been very ordinary people who had saved lives at a car crash because they got training about how to on how to stop bleeding as a Boy Scout. You know, it is a mental trap to say, "But you're different." Ok. Some people said, "Well, Dave, you're an MIT graduate, my patients aren't like you." And people say, well, yeah, but Matt Might is a brilliant PhD type guy. What you mentioned few minutes before gives the lie to all of that, the OpenAPS community. All right, now, these are people you need to know appreciate the open apps world. You need to realize that a person with type 1 diabetes can die in their sleep any particular night. You know, they can even have an alarm, even if they have a digital device connected with an alarm, their blood sugar can crash so bad that they can't even hear the alarm. And so and they got tired of waiting the industry. Year after year after year, another five years will have an artificial pancreas, another five years, and a hashtag started: #WeAreNotWaiting. Now, I am I don't know any of the individuals involved, but I'll bet that every single diabetes related executive involved in this thought something along the lines of, "What are they going to do, invent their own artificial pancreas?" Well, ha, ha, ha, folks. Because as I as I imagine, you know, the first thing that happened was this great woman, Dana Lewis, had a digital insulin pump and a CGM, continuous glucose meter, and her boyfriend, who's now her husband, watched her doing the calculation she had to do before eating a hamburger or whatever and said, "I bet I could write a program that would do that."Dave deBronkart: And so they did. And one thing led to another. His program, and she had some great slides about this, over the course of a year, got really good at predicting what her blood sugar was going to be an hour later. Right. And then they said, "Hmm, well, that's interesting. So why don't I put that in a little pocket computer, a little $35 pocket computer?" The point is, they eventually got to where they said, let's try connecting these devices. All right. And to make a long story short, they now have a system, as you said, not a product, they talked to the FDA, but it's not regulated because it's not a product. Right. But they're not saying the hell with the FDA. They're keeping them informed. What are the scientific credentials of Dana Lewis and her boyfriend, Scott? Dana is a PR professional, zero medical computer or scientific skills? Zero. The whole thing was her idea. Various other people got involved and contributed to the code. It is a trap to think that because the pioneering people had special traits, it's all bogus. Those people are lacking the vision to see what the future you is going to be. See, and the beautiful thing from a disruptive standpoint is that when the person who has the problem gains access to power to create tools, they can take it in whatever direction they want. That's one of the things that happened when typesetting was killed by desktop publishing.Harry Glorikian: Right.Dave deBronkart: In typesetting, they said "You people don't know what you're doing!" And the people said, whatever, dude, they invented Comic Sans, and they went off and did whatever they wanted and the world became more customer centered for them.Harry Glorikian: So. You know, this show is generally about, you know, data, Machine learning and trying to see where that's going to move the needle. I mean, do you see the artificial intelligence umbrella and everything that's under that playing a role to help patients do their own research and design their own treatments?Dave deBronkart: Maybe someday, maybe someday. But I've read enough -- I'm no expert on AI, but I've read enough to know that it's a field that is full of perils of just bad training data sets and also full of immense amounts of risk of the data being misused or misinterpreted. If you haven't yet encountered Cathy O'Neil, she's the author of this phenomenal book, Weapons of Math Destruction. And she said it's not just sloppy brain work. There is sloppy brain work in the mishandling of data in A.I., but there is malicious or ignorant, dangerously ignorant business conduct. For instance, when companies look at somebody who has a bad credit rating and therefore don't give them a chance to do this or this or this or this, and so and they actually cause harm, which is the opposite of what you would think intelligence would be used for.Harry Glorikian: So but then, on the opposite side, because I talk about some of these different applications and tools in in the book where, you know, something like Cardiogram is able to utilize analytics to identify, like it alerted me and said "You know, you might have sleep apnea." Right. And it can also detect an arrhythmia, just like the Apple Watch does, or what's the other one? Oh, it can also sort of alert you to potentially being prediabetic. Right. And so you are seeing, I am seeing discrete use cases where you're seeing a movement forward in the field based on the analytics that can be done on that set of data. So I think I don't want to paint the whole industry as bad, but I think it's in an evolutionary state.Dave deBronkart: Absolutely. Yes. We are at the dawn of this era, there's no question. We don't yet have much. We're just going to have to discover what pans out. Really, I. Were you referring to the Cardia, the Acor, the iPhone EKG device a moment ago?Harry Glorikian: No, there's there's actually an, I've got one here, which is the you know...Dave deBronkart: That's it. That's the mobile version. Exactly. Yeah. Now, I have a friend, a physician friend at Beth Israel Deaconess, who was I just rigidly absolutely firmly trust this guy's brain intelligence and not being pigheaded, he was at first very skeptical that anything attached to an iPhone could be clinically useful. But he's an E.R. doc and he now himself will use that in the E.R. Put the patient's fingers on those electrodes and and send it upstairs because the information, when they're admitting somebody in a crisis, the information gets up there quicker than if he puts it in the EMR.Harry Glorikian: Well, you know, I always try to tell people like these devices, you know, they always say it's not good enough, it's not good enough. And I'm like, it's not good enough today. But it's getting better tomorrow and the next day. And then they're going to improve the sensor. And, yep, you know, the speed of these changes is happening. It's not a 10 year shift. It's it's happening in days, weeks, months, maybe years. But, you know, this is a medical device on my arm as far as I'm concerned.Harry Glorikian: It's a device that does medical-related things. It certainly doesn't meet the FDA's definition of a medical device that requires certification and so on. Now, for all I know, maybe two thirds of the FDA's criteria are bogus. And we know that companies and lobbyists have gamed the system. It's an important book that I read maybe five years ago when it was new, was An American Sickness about the horrifying impacts of the money aspect of health care. And she talked about, when she was talking specifically about device certification, she talked about how some company superbly, and I don't know if they laughed over their three martini lunch or what, some company superbly got something approved by the FDA as saying, we don't need to test this because it's the same as something else.Harry Glorikian: Ok, equivalence.Dave deBronkart: And also got a patent on the same thing for being completely new. Right. Which is not possible. And yet they managed to win the argument in both cases. So but the this is not a medical device, but it is, gives me useful information. Maybe we should call it a health device.Harry Glorikian: Right. Yeah, I mean, there are certain applications that are, you know, cleared by the FDA right now, but, you know, I believe what it's done is it's allowing these companies to gather data and understand where how good the systems are and then apply for specific clearances based on when the system gets good enough, if that makes sense.Dave deBronkart: Yes. Now, one thing I do want to say, there's an important thing going on in the business world, those platforms. You know, companies like Airbnb, Uber, whatever, where they are, a big part of their business, the way they create value is to understand you better by looking at your behavior and not throwing so much irrelevant crap at you. Now, we all know this as it shows up. As you know, you buy something on Amazon and you immediately get flooded by ads on Facebook for the thing that you already bought, for heaven's sake. I mean, how stupid is that? But anyway, I think it's toxic and should be prohibited by law for people to collect health data from your apps and then monetize it. I think that should be completely unacceptable. My current day job is for this company called Pocket Health, where they collect a patient's radiology images for the patient so the patient can have 24/7 access in the cloud. And when I joined there, a friend said, oh, I gather they must make their money by selling the data. Right? And I asked one of the two founding brothers, and he was appalled. That's just not what they do. They have another part of the company. And anybody who gets any medical device, any device to track their health should make certain that the company agrees not to sell it.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll   like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer.It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available for pre-order. Just go to Amazon and search for The Future You, Harry Glorikian.Thanks. And now back to our show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: You mentioned FHIR or, you know, if I had to spell it out for people, it's Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resource standard from, I think, it's the Health Level 7 organization. What is FHIR? Where did it come from and what does it really enable?Dave deBronkart: So I'll give you my impression, which I think is pretty good, but it may not be the textbook definition. So FHIR is a software standard, very analogous to HTTP and HTML for moving data around the same way those things move data around on the Web. And this is immensely, profoundly different from the clunky, even if possible, old way of moving data between, say, an Epic system, a Cerner system, a Meditech system nd so on. And the it's a standard that was designed and started five or six years ago by an Australian guy named Graham Grieve. A wonderful man. And as he developed it, he offered it to HL7, which is a very big international standards organization, as long as they would make it free forever to everyone. And the important thing about it is that, as required now by the final rule that we were discussing, every medical record system installed at a hospital that wants to get government money for doing health care for Medicare or Medicaid, has to have what's called a FHIR endpoint. And a FHIR endpoint is basically just a plug on it where you can, or an Internet address, the same way you can go to Adobe.com and get whatever Adobe sends you, you can go to the FHIR endpoint with your login credentials and say, give me this patient's health data. That's it. It works. It already works. That's what I use in that My Patient Link app that I mentioned earlier.Harry Glorikian: So just to make it clear to someone that say that's listening, what does the average health care consumer need to know about it, if anything, other than it's accessible? And what's the part that makes you most excited about it?Harry Glorikian: Well, well, well. What people need to know about it is it's a new way. Just like when your hospital got a website, it's a new way for apps to get your data out of the hospital. So when you want it, you know that it has to be available that way. Ironically, my hospital doesn't have a FHIR endpoint yet. Beth Israel Deaconess. But they're required to by the end of the year. What makes me excited about it is that... So really, the universal principle for everything we've discussed is that knowledge is power. More precisely, knowledge enables power. You can give me a ton of knowledge and I might not know what to do with it, but without the knowledge, I'm disempowered. There's no dispute about that. So it will become possible now for software developers to create useful tools for you and your family that would not have been possible 15 years ago or five years ago without FHIR. In fact, it's ironic because one of the earliest speeches I gave in Washington, I said to innovators, data is fuel. Right. We talked about Quicken and Mint. Quicken would have no value to anybody if they couldn't get at your bank information. Right. And that's that would have prevented. So we're going to see new tools get developed that will be possible because of FHIR and the fact that the federal regulations require it.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, my first one of my first bosses actually, like the most brilliant boss, I remember him telling me one at one time, he goes, "Remember something: Knowledge is power." I must have been 19 when he told me that. And I was, you know, it took me a little while to get up to speed on what he meant by that. But so do you believe FHIR is a better foundation for accessing health records than previous attempts like Google Health or Microsoft Health Vault?Dave deBronkart: Well, those are apples and oranges. FHIR is a way of moving the data around. Several years into my "Give me my damn data" campaign, I did a blog post that was titled I Want a Health Data Spigot. I want to be able to connect the garden hose to one place and get all my data flowing. Well, that's what FHIR is now. What's at the other end of the hose? You know, different buckets, drinking glasses, whatever. That's more analogous to Google Health and Health Vault. Google Health and Health Vault might have grown into something useful if they could get all the important information out there, which it turns out was not feasible back then anyway. But that's what's going to happen.Harry Glorikian: What is the evolution you'd like to see in the relationship between the patient and the U.S. health care systems? You know, you once said the key to be would get the money managers out of the room. You know, if you had to sort of think about what you'd want it to evolve to, what would it be?Dave deBronkart: Well, so. There are at least two different issues involved in this. First of all, in terms of the practice of medicine, the paradigm of patient that I mentioned, collaboration, you know, collaboration, including training doctors and nurses on the feasibility and methods of collaboration. How do you do this differently? That won't happen fast because the you know, the I mean, the curriculum in medical schools doesn't change fast. But we do have mid career education and we have people learning practical things. So there's a whole separate issue of the financial structure of the U.S. health system, which is the only one I know in the world that is composed of thousands of individual financially separate organizations, each of which has managers who are required by law to protect their own finances. And the missing ingredient is that as all these organizations manage their own finances, nobody anywhere is accountable for whether care is achieved. Nobody can be fired or fined or put out of business for failing to get the patient taken care of as somebody should have. And so those are those are two separate problems. My ideal world is, remember a third of the US health care spending is excess and somebody a couple of years ago...Guess what? A third of the US health care spending is the insurance companies. Now, maybe the insurance companies are all of the waste. I don't know. I'm not that well-informed. But my point is there is plenty of money there already being spent that would support doctors and nurses spending more time with you and me beyond the 12 or 15 minutes that they get paid for.Harry Glorikian: So it's interesting, right? I mean, the thing that I've sort of my bully pulpit for, for a long time has been, once you digitize everything, it doesn't mean you have to do everything the same way. Which opens up, care may not have to be given in the same place. The business model may now be completely open to shift, as we've seen with the digitization of just about every other business. And so I you know, I worry that the EMRs are holding back innovation and we're seeing a lot of innovation happen outside of the existing rubric, right, the existing ivory towers, when you're seeing drug development using A.I. and machine learning, where we're seeing imaging or pathology scans. I mean, all of those are happening by companies that are accessing this digitized data and then providing it in a different format. But it's not necessarily happening inside those big buildings that are almost held captive by the EMR. Because if you can't access the data, it's really hard to take it to that next level of analytics that you'd like to take it to.Dave deBronkart: Yes, absolutely.Harry Glorikian: I mean, just throwing that out there, I know we've been talking about the system in particular, but I feel that there's the edges of the system aren't as rigid as they used to be. And I think we have a whole ecosystem that's being created outside of it.Harry Glorikian: Absolutely. And the when information can flow you get an increasing number of parties who can potentially do something useful with it, create value with it. And I'm not just talking about financial value, but achieve a cure or something like that. You know, interestingly, when the industry noticed what the open apps people were doing, all of a sudden you could no longer buy a CGM that had the ability to export the data.Harry Glorikian: Right.Dave deBronkart: Hmm. So somebody is not so happy about that. When an increasing number of people can get out data and combine it with their other ideas and skills and try things, then the net number of new innovations will come along. Dana Lewis has a really important slide that she uses in some presentations, and it ties in exactly with Erich von Hippel's user driven innovation, which of course, shows up in health care as patient driven innovation. The traditional industrial model that von Hippel talks about is if you're going to make a car, if you're going to be a company going into the car business, you start by designing the chassis and doing the wheels and designing the engine and so on and so on. And you do all that investment and you eventually get to where you've got a car. All right. Meanwhile, Dana shows a kid on a skateboard who can get somewhere on the skateboard and then somebody comes up with the idea of putting a handle on it. And now you've scooter. Right. And so on. The user driven innovations at every moment are producing value for the person who has the need.Harry Glorikian: Right. And that's why I believe that, you know, now that we've gotten to sort of that next level of of datafication of health care, that these centers have gotten cheaper, easier, more accessible. You know, like I said, I've got a CGM on my arm. Data becomes much more accessible. FHIR has made it easier to gain access to my health record. And I can share it with an app that might make that data more interpretable to me. This is what I believe is really sort of moving the needle in health care, are people like Matthew Might doing his own work where it's it's changing that. And that's truly what I try to cover in the book, is how these data [that] are now being made accessible to patients gives them the opportunity to manage their own health in a better way or more accurately and get ahead of the warning light going on before the car breaks down. But one of the things I will say is, you know, I love my doctor, but, you know, having my doctor as a partner in this is makes it even even better than rather than just me trying to do anything on my own. Dave deBronkart: Of course, of course. Dr. Sands is fond of saying "I have the medical training or diagnosis and treatment and everything, but Dave's the one who's the expert on what's happening in his life." Right. And and I'm the expert on my own priorities.Harry Glorikian: Right. Which I can't expect. I mean, my doctor has enough people to worry about, let alone like, me being his sole, the only thing he needs to think about. So, Dave, this was great. It was great having you on the show. I hope this is one of many conversations that we can have going forward, because I'm sure there's going to be different topics that we could cover. So I appreciate you taking the time and being on the show.Dave deBronkart: Well, and same to you. The this has been a very stimulating I mean, and the you've got the vision of the arriving future that is informed by where we're coming from, but not constrained by the old way of thinking. And that really matters. The reality, the emerging reality, whether anybody knows it or not, is that people with a big problem are able to act now in ways that they weren't before. I mean, another amazing example is a guy in England named Tal Golesworthy has Marfan syndrome. And one problem that people with Marfan syndrome face is aortic dissection. The walls of the aorta split open and it can be pretty quickly fatal. And he describes himself in his TED talk as a boiler engineer. And he says when we have a weak pipe, we wrap it. So he came up with the idea of exporting his CAT scan data or the MRI data of his beating heart and custom printing a fabric mesh to wrap around his aorta. And it's become and medically accepted treatment now. Harry Glorikian: That's awesome, right.Dave deBronkart: This is the data in the hands of somebody with no medical training, just. But see, that's the point. That's the point. He enabled by the data, is able to create real value, and it's now an accepted treatment that's called PEARS and it's been done hundreds of times. And, you know, here's a beautiful, it's sort of like the Dana Lewis skateboard scooter progression, years later, a subsequent scan discovered something unexpected. The mesh fabric has migrated into the wall of his aorta. So he hadn't he now has a know what doctor, what hospital, what medical device company would have ever dreamed of trying to create that? That's the beauty of liberation when data gets into the hands of the innovators.Harry Glorikian: Well, that's something that everybody can take away from today is at least thinking about their data, how it can help them manage their health better or their life better. Obviously, I always say, in cahoots with your doctor, because they have very specific knowledge, but having the data and managing yourself is better than not having the data and not understanding how to manage yourself. So on that note, Dave, thank you so much for the time today. It was great.Dave deBronkart: Thank you very much. See you next time.Harry Glorikian:That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and MoneyBall Medicine at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show.You can find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

Agent Survival Guide Podcast
Rules for Hosting a Compliant Medicare Educational Event

Agent Survival Guide Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 11:41


  Not sure about hosting a Medicare educational event this year? Get the details to make sure you're compliant with the Medicare Advantage and Part D Communications Requirements! We've updated this episode to cover how to plan, promote, and present your next event, amidst the 2nd pandemic AEP.   Read the text version.   Register for your FREE RitterIM.com account   Mentioned in this episode:   CMS 2019 Medicare Communications and Marketing Guidelines CMS Memo [8/16/2019]: Medicare Communications and Marketing Guidelines Contact the Team at Ritter Insurance Marketing Do's and Don'ts of Medicare Compliance Federal Register 101 Medicare Advantage Communication Requirements Navigating Insurance Sales During the Medicare AEP & COVID Part D Communication Requirements What to Know About SOAs in Senior Market Sales   More episodes you'll like:   Do's and Don'ts of Medicare Compliance Navigating Insurance Sales During the Medicare AEP & COVID Staying Compliant Without Compromising Salesmanship   Articles to Share with Your Clients:   Signs Food Has Started to Spoil The Value of Working with an Insurance Agent Why Seniors Should Indulge Their Inner Artist   Ritter Insurance Marketing eBooks & Guides:   Modern Medicare Marketing for Today's Agents Social Media Marketing for Insurance Agents The Complete Guide on How to Sell Medicare Advantage Plans   Subscribe & Follow:   Apple Podcasts Google Podcasts Overcast Podbean Spotify Stitcher   Connect on social:   Facebook LinkedIn Twitter YouTube Instagram Sarah's LinkedIn Sarah's Instagram  

SBS Russian - SBS на русском языке
Here's what you need to know about buying a private health cover - Что нужно знать о покупке частной медицинской страховки?

SBS Russian - SBS на русском языке

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 8:03


Is private health insurance worth it for you? This is a Russian language content. - Medicare гарантирует всем австралийцам доступ к медицинским услугам. Однако более половины жителей страны имеют частную медицинскую страховку. Многие покупают ее, чтобы избежать долгого ожидания в очереди или для доступа к стоматологии, другие делают это из-за налоговых льгот. Нужна ли вам частная медицинская страховка?

Rusted Culture Podcast
Allowing Medicare to negotiate lower drug prices: Let‘s deconstruct Mitch McConnell‘s statement and how we got where we are today

Rusted Culture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 5:59


Is it any surprise that Mitch McConnell vowed today to not allow Medicare to negotiate lower drug prices? Is it any surprise that the reason we are where we are today is brought to you by the Republicans? In today's episode, I'll deconstruct this and what Democrats have done to change this in past years and what the real outcome of allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices would be (in addition to lower drug prices).

Liberty Roundtable Podcast
Radio Show Hour 2 – 10/11/2021

Liberty Roundtable Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 54:49


* Dr. Pierre Kory: Members of Congress Treated for COVID-19 with Ivermectin - Kory states claim comes from a highly credible source inside Congress - Between 100–200 members of Congress and their families & staffers have been treated with IVM & our I-MASK+ protocol for COVID. NO hospitalizations. * Guest: Dr. Murray Sabrin PhD., A retired professor of finance at Ramapo College, Co-founded the Sabrin Center for Free Enterprise in the Anisfield School of Business in 2007. Sabrin emigrated with his parents from West Germany to the United States in 1949. * Who decides what medical care you can get? - Dr Murray Sabrin, widely recognized as a leading voice in the American Libertarian movement, tackles that question and the nation's health crisis with stunning insights and solutions in his intriguing new book, “Universal Medical Care from Conception to End of Life: The Case for a Single-Payer System.” * Sabrin wants to phase out employer-based insurance, Medicare, Medicaid and Obamacare! He says medicine and government should be separated - just like government and religion. * Sabrin's single-payer system is based on strong Libertarian principles. He proposes: Direct primary care where patients pay cash, a mega health savings account where you would put money in tax free, it would grow tax free and you would take it out tax free – to pay for extraordinary expenses, A catastrophic policy for really big expenses, such as heart surgery, The indigent wouldn't need Medicaid, saving taxpayers billions of dollars per year, by the creation of thousands of non-profit medical centers * Do you even know what a Fee Schedule is?

The Everything Medicare Podcast!
Episode 258: Why Some Get Burned by Medicare Advantage Plans!

The Everything Medicare Podcast!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 16:54


This is the Everything Medicare Podcast hosted by Christian Brindle. It can be found on most major platforms that podcasts can be found. Christian Brindle was raised & brought up around the insurance industry. With his dad being an insurance broker for close to 30 years, Christian had the luxury of being able to learn all about the industry from a young age. Christian has worked with people far and wide on their Medicare plans and has seen close to any situation. Christian believes in empowering people on Medicare by not just finding them a plan, but showing them and educating them on why that plan is a good fit. Christian hosts the most popular Medicare podcast on the internet called The Everything Medicare Podcast, written and published two books about Medicare, and is the founder of his own company that is dedicated to helping people on Medicare everywhere. Don't forget to like and subscribe for more videos! Helping people in Utah, Idaho, Colorado, Washington, Oregon, California, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Alabama, Florida, Arizona, Nevada, Alaska, Mississippi, Kentucky, Arkansas, Illinois, Kansas, Nebraska, Maryland, Georgia, Tennessee, Missouri, Indiana, Louisiana, Pennsylvania, Maine, Michigan, Wisconsin. Visit our website for more information: www.christianbrindleinsuranceservices.com Pick up Christian's Medicare Guidance book and learn everything you need to know to make a good choice: https://www.amazon.com/Medicare-Guida...​ Follow us on social! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/christianbri...​ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/christianbr...​ Twitter: https://twitter.com/C_E_Brindle​ #Medicare​ #Medigap​ #Insurance​ #HealthInsurance​ #Health​ #Healthcare​ #Medicaresupplement​ #MedicareAdvantage​ #Medicare2021​ #Medicarehealthplan​ #InsuranceAgent​ #MedicarePodcast Medicare, Medigap, Medicare Supplement, Insurance, Health Insurance, Health, Healthcare, HAS, Retire, Retirement, Social Security, Christian Brindle, FICA, Medicare Podcast, Medicare Advantage, Medicaid, Medicare Part A, Medicare Part B, FICA, FICA Tax, Retirement, Retire

Retirement Today
Medicare doesn't cover this...

Retirement Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 13:22


Getting older brings health complications that you must prepare. Having a solid plan for the future of your healthcare will help entering retirement to be as easy and comfortable as possible. Check out this week's episode of Retirement Today to hear Mike explain why you need to ensure you have a plan for healthcare.

Retirement Starts Today Radio
3 Social Security Do-Over Options, Ep # 213 

Retirement Starts Today Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 16:36


Do you wish that you could have a mulligan when it comes to taking your Social Security benefit? Once you file for Social Security, it seems like your decision is set in stone. But what if I told you that you have options to reverse your decision?  In this episode of Retirement Starts Today, we'll explore an Investment News article written by one of my favorite Investment News contributors, Mary Beth Franklin. This article provides options for those who have remorse about the timing of their Social Security claim. In the listener questions segment, we'll discuss Jerry's question about his health insurance premiums under the Affordable Care Act and how they are affected by the 8.5% rule. This episode is jam-packed with helpful retirement information, so press play now to continue your retirement education. Outline of This Episode [3:02] 3 Social Security do-over options [8:25] Check out the Retirement Repair Shop podcast [9:24] Jerry's ACA insurance premium questions [13:50] Clarification on the ACA 8.5% rule  There are 3 ways that you could reverse your Social Security timing Have you found yourself regretting the timing of your Social Security benefits claim? Maybe you wish that you had waited longer to receive a larger benefit or maybe your retirement timeline has changed based on the pandemic or other factors. If so, I have good news for you. There are 3 ways that you could reverse your decision.  There are many people that wish they could go back and change the timing of their Social Security claim, so if you are one of them make sure to listen to this episode to learn which choice might best fit your needs.  Withdraw your application You may not realize this, but you can withdraw your Social Security benefits application. Use form 521 to do so, but keep in mind that there's a catch.  You'll have to repay any earnings you or your dependents have received. Withdrawing your application can only be done once, but doing so will allow you to apply again later when your monthly check would be higher.  You'll also want to consider whether you are already enrolled in Medicare. If you withdraw your application, your Medicare premiums will no longer be automatically deducted from your Social Security benefit, so you'll have to find another way to pay.  Suspend your benefits If repaying your Social Security benefits isn't feasible, then you might want to consider suspending your benefits. This way you don't have to repay anything, however, keep in mind that not only will your benefits stop, but also this action will stop any benefits to a dependent family member. Your benefits would then start again at age 70. Listen in to discover why this may be a good strategy for married couples.  Request a lump sum payout Requesting a lump sum payout works only for individuals who have reached full retirement age. They can request a lump-sum payout of up to 6 months of retroactive benefits. This option would best be used by someone who has an urgent need for cash or for people who waited until after their full retirement age to claim either spousal or survivor benefits. After receiving a lump-sum payment, that person could then voluntarily suspend benefits and earn delayed retirement credits up to age 70 which would boost future monthly benefits.  Claiming Social Security seems like such a permanent decision so if life comes along and changes your plans it's good to know that you have these alternatives to consider.  Resources & People Mentioned November 2020 Medicare series with Danielle from Boomer Benefits Boomer Benefits Retirement Repair Shop podcast with Mary Beth Franklin 3 Social Security Do-Over Options article Retirement Answer Man podcast Stay Wealthy podcast Financial Symmetry podcast Market Watch article on the ACA subsidy cliff KFF.org - resources for the ACA and other health matters Connect with Benjamin Brandt Get the Retire-Ready Toolkit: http://retirementstartstodayradio.com/ Follow Ben on Twitter: https://twitter.com/retiremeasap Subscribe to the newsletter: https://retirementstartstodayradio.com/newsletter Subscribe to Retirement Starts Today on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, Podbean, Player FM, iHeart, or Spotify

Plan Your Federal Retirement Podcast
Ep #36: Medicare Advantage Within and Outside of FEHB

Plan Your Federal Retirement Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 31:40


At 65, something happens to all of us where we have this forced decision that we have to deal with when it comes to Medicare—and it opens up a few more options. There are a lot of rumors about Medicare that go around (some true, some not true), so facing plan changes and all the uncertainties can be a bit overwhelming. Today, Micah and Tammy get into some of the most important parts of this key decision so you will have a better idea of how to plan for when that time comes. You can find all show notes for this episode at: https://plan-your-federal-retirement.com/36

Hold These Truths with Dan Crenshaw
Can $1 Trillion Buy Us Better Healthcare? | Lanhee Chen

Hold These Truths with Dan Crenshaw

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 49:32


Another policy deep dive episode that will make you a lot more knowledgable about our healthcare system and what's happening with Medicare. Lanhee Chen joins us to break down the $1 trillion component of Bernie's $3.5 trillion "human" infrastructure bill, which supposedly expands Americans access to Medicare. We also cover the funding challenges with the current Medicare program, better ideas to help the working poor, debunk some myths about Britain and Canada's single payer systems, and ask whether or not Obamacare lived up to its promise of equalizing healthcare access for all Americans. Lanhee J. Chen, Ph.D. is the David and Diane Steffy Fellow in American Public Policy Studies at the Hoover Institution and Director of Domestic Policy Studies and Lecturer in the Public Policy Program at Stanford University. Follow Lanhee Chen on Twitter at @lanheechen.

MSU Podcast
Medicare at 60? DVH built into Medicare? Best AEP Prep and Practices?

MSU Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 50:42


Medicare at 60? DVH built into Medicare? Best AEP Prep and Practices? You need to watch this one! Danielle Kunkle Roberts brings her years of expertise to the table. Her company has grown to now over 100 employees and they rank high on Google searches related to Medicare. She is the Content Queen and friend so I was glad to have her on to discuss all these awesome topics. You'll want to make sure and watch this!

Mastering Money
Mastering Money 10/8/21

Mastering Money

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 50:54


Historically, we've always referred to the traditional sources of retirement income as a three-legged stool, composed of: 1. Government entitlement programs (Social Security and Medicare)...2. Personal savings and investments ...and , 3. Employer-sponsored defined benefit plans like pensions.  In the past, retirees could typically count on ALL three sources for retirement income roughly divided into thirds. With this traditional scenario, both the government and employer-sponsored plans were considered predictable, reliable income sources that may also be adjusted for inflation. So two thirds of your plan for retirement was set. Only one-third was the responsibility of the individual. Today, TWO thirds of the responsibility is yours, and the other leg--Social Security--is getting a little loose in the screws. Today we'll examine how COVID 19 may affect your Social Security, and then Medicare specialist SHELLEY GRANDIDGE joins us for a show you don't want to miss!  MASTERING MONEY is on the air!!!

FORward Radio program archives
Single Payer Radio | Local activists Kay Tillow, Harriette Seiler & Charlie Casper | Oct. 8, 2021

FORward Radio program archives

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 57:27


Kentuckians for Single Payer Healthcare activists Kay Tillow, Harriette Seiler, and Charlie Casper discuss the movement to privatize the Medicare program.

FORward Radio program archives
Single Payer Radio | Handing Medicare To Wall Street | Sept. 23, 2021

FORward Radio program archives

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 58:29


This episode of Single Payer Radio is an excerpt from a webinar co-sponsored by Physicians for a National Health Program discussing a movement by private investment groups called Direct Contracting Entities (DCEs)that threaten our highly successful beloved Medicare program. Moderator Dr. Susan Rogers, president of PNHP leads the panel that includes Representative Katie Porter.

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead
Spotlight: U.S. Debt-Ceiling Crisis: Why It's Nothing To Lose Sleep Over

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 2:55


There's a lot of noise about the calamity the nation will face if Republicans don't go along with raising the debt ceiling. Don't fall for it. Steve Forbes on the hysteria surrounding the U.S. debt ceiling and why it's nothing to lose sleep over.Steve Forbes shares his What's Ahead Spotlights each Tuesday, Thursday and Friday.

The Kim Monson Show
I'm a Uniter with Reggie Carr and Clancie Jones

The Kim Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 56:37


Expect Kim's Voters Guide to be in your Sunday newsletter.  Kim will be analyzing the three statewide questions and school board races.  We do not need LEAP, Learning Enrichment and Academic Progress Program, nor do we need CRT, Critical Race Theory, nor the sexualization of our children in the classroom.  Our students must be educated in the core academics of reading, science, math and critical thinking.  This Sunday on America's Veteran's Stories, Kim will be interviewing Army Veteran John Lohre, who served between the Korean and Vietnam Wars.  You can listen in at 3pm and 10pm on KLZ 560 AM and KLZ 100.7 FM. Guests Reggie Carr and Clancie Jones, hosts of the new KLZ I'M A Uniter radio show debuting today at 9am, join Kim and Producer Steve for a discussion on current events.  Afghan gun stores are selling American equipment that was left behind.  Immigration is out of control with southern “open borders.”  Resources are now being diverted in the name of politics.  We must first get our own house in order, including the hundreds of thousands across America that are homeless, before welcoming others.  Trump stepped aside and encouraged other countries to be responsible for their own country’s needs.  Kirsch Insurance Group (ikirsch.com) is a phone call (303-397-7830) away to help anyone with Medicare questions during the open enrollment period, October 15th-December 7th Reggie and Clancie met at Denver's Juneteenth Celebration.  During their conversation they realized that although they come from different political viewpoints, they actually have a lot in common.  Reggie and Clancie seek the truth and do not want to be branded by political affiliation.  They'll be upbeat as there is too much darkness in the world today.  That's where Reggie's deep love for music comes in.  Musicians must know who they are so they can appropriately know the words and tone when writing a musical piece.  Reggie references his new for purchase “album” on a credit card sized USB.  You can add additional music and other files onto the card.  Clancie's final comment encourages people to have an open dialogue based on fact, not emotion.  Reggie states that life is too short.  You must have fun and be kind.

Get to Know TRICARE
Get to Know TRICARE: Series 3, Episode 1 - Turning 65 Soon? Start Your TFL Checklist

Get to Know TRICARE

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021


Getting TRICARE For Life coverage starts with having Medicare Part A and Part B. Tune in to find out how you can sign up for Medicare and when your TFL coverage starts. Guest: Lennya Bonivento, Health Systems Analyst, Benefit Education and Research Team, Defense Health Agency

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.07.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 51:37


Natural compound in basil may protect against Alzheimer's disease pathology University of South Florida, October 5, 2021 Fenchol, a natural compound abundant in some plants including basil, can help protect the brain against Alzheimer's disease pathology, a preclinical study led by University of South Florida Health (USF Health) researchers suggests. The new study published Oct. 5 in the Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, discovered a sensing mechanism associated with the gut microbiome that explains how fenchol reduces neurotoxicity in the Alzheimer's brain. Emerging evidence indicates that short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs)– metabolites produced by beneficial gut bacteria and the primary source of nutrition for cells in your colon—contribute to brain health. The abundance of SCFAs is often reduced in older patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia. However, how this decline in SCFAs contributes to Alzheimer's disease progression remains largely unknown. Gut-derived SCFAs that travel through the blood to the brain can bind to and activate free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFAR2), a cell signaling molecule expressed on brain cellscalled neurons. "Our study is the first to discover that stimulation of the FFAR2 sensing mechanism by these microbial metabolites (SCFAs) can be beneficial in protecting brain cells against toxic accumulation of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) protein associated with Alzheimer's disease," said principal investigator Hariom Yadav, Ph.D., professor of neurosurgery and brain repair at the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, where he directs the USF Center for Microbiome Research. One of the two hallmark pathologies of Alzheimer's disease is hardened deposits of Aβ that clump together between nerve cells to form amyloid protein plaques in the brain. The other is neurofibrillary tangles of tau protein inside brain cells. These pathologies contribute to the neuron loss and death that ultimately cause the onset of Alzheimer's, a neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of memory, thinking skills and other cognitive abilities. Dr. Yadav and his collaborators delve into molecular mechanisms to explain how interactions between the gut microbiome and the brain might influence brain health and age-related cognitive decline. In this study, Dr. Yadav said, the research team set out to uncover the "previously unknown" function of FFAR2 in the brain. The researchers first showed that inhibiting the FFAR2 receptor (thus blocking its ability to "sense" SCFAs in the environment outside the neuronal cell and transmit signaling inside the cell) contributes to the abnormal buildup of the Aβ protein causing neurotoxicity linked to Alzheimer's disease. Then, they performed large-scale virtual screening of more than 144,000 natural compounds to find potential candidates that could mimic the same beneficial effect of microbiota produced SCFAs in activating FFAR2 signaling. Identifying a natural compound alternative to SCFAs to optimally target the FFAR2 receptor on neurons is important, because cells in the gut and other organs consume most of these microbial metabolites before they reach the brain through blood circulation, Dr. Yadav noted. Dr. Yadav's team narrowed 15 leading compound candidates to the most potent one. Fenchol, a plant-derived compound that gives basil its aromatic scent, was best at binding to the FFAR's active site to stimulate its signaling. Further experiments in human neuronal cell cultures, as well as Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans (worm) and mouse models of Alzheimer's disease demonstrated that fenchol significantly reduced excess Aβ accumulation and death of neurons by stimulating FFAR2 signaling, the microbiome sensing mechanism. When the researchers more closely examined how fenchol modulates Aβ-induced neurotoxicity, they found that the compound decreased senescent neuronal cells, also known as "zombie" cells, commonly found in brains with Alzheimer's disease pathology. Zombie cells stop replicating and die a slow death. Meanwhile, Dr. Yadav said, they build up in diseased and aging organs, create a damaging inflammatory environment, and send stress or death signals to neighboring healthy cells, which eventually also change into harmful zombie cells or die. "Fenchol actually affects the two related mechanisms of senescence and proteolysis," Dr. Yadav said of the intriguing preclinical study finding. "It reduces the formation of half-dead zombie neuronal cells and also increases the degradation of (nonfunctioning) Aβ, so that amyloid protein is cleared from the brain much faster." Before you start throwing lots of extra basil in your spaghetti sauce or anything else you eat to help stave off dementia, more research is needed—including in humans. In exploring fenchol as a possible approach for treating or preventing Alzheimer's pathology, the USF Health team will seek answers to several questions. A key one is whether fenchol consumed in basil itself would be more or less bioactive (effective) than isolating and administering the compound in a pill, Dr. Yadav said. "We also want to know whether a potent dose of either basil or fenchol would be a quicker way to get the compound into the brain."   Researchers find sense of purpose associated with better memory Florida State University, October 6, 2021 Add an improved memory to the list of the many benefits that accompany having a sense of purpose in life. A new study led by Florida State University researchers showed a link between an individual's sense of purpose and their ability to recall vivid details. The researchers found that while both a sense of purpose and cognitive function made memories easier to recall, only a sense of purpose bestowed the benefits of vividness and coherence. The study, which focused on memories related to the COVID-19 pandemic, was published in the journal Memory. "Personal memories serve really important functions in everyday life," said Angelina Sutin, a professor in the College of Medicine and the paper's lead author. "They help us to set goals, control emotions and build intimacy with others. We also know people with a greater sense of purpose perform better on objective memory tests, like remembering a list of words. We were interested in whether purpose was also associated with the quality of memories of important personal experiences because such qualities may be one reason why purpose is associated with better mental and physical health." Nearly 800 study participants reported on their sense of purpose and completed tasks that measured their cognitive processing speed in January and February 2020, before the ongoing coronavirus pandemic took hold in the U.S. Researchers then measured participants' ability to retrieve and describe personal memories about the pandemic in July 2020, several months into the public health crisis. Participants with a stronger sense of purpose in life reported that their memories were more accessible, coherent and vivid than participants with less purpose. Those with a higher sense of purpose also reported many sensory details, spoke about their memories more from a first-person perspective and reported more positive feeling and less negative feeling when asked to retrieve a memory. The researchers also found that depressive symptoms had little effect on the ability to recall vivid details in memories, suggesting that the connection between life purpose and memory recall is not due to the fewer depressive symptoms among individuals higher in purpose. Purpose in life has been consistently associated with better episodic memory, such as the number of words retrieved correctly on a memory task. This latest research expands on those connections to memory by showing a correlation between purpose and the richness of personal memory. "We chose to measure the ability to recall memories associated with the COVID-19 pandemic because the pandemic is an event that touched everyone, but there has been a wide range of experiences and reactions to it that should be apparent in memories," said co-author Martina Luchetti, an assistant professor in the College of Medicine. Along with the association with better memory, previous research has found other numerous benefits connected with having a sense of purpose, from a lower risk of death to better physical and mental health. "Memories help people to sustain their well-being, social connections and cognitive health," said co-author Antonio Terracciano, a professor in the College of Medicine. "This research gives us more insight into the connections between a sense of purpose and the richness of personal memories. The vividness of those memories and how they fit into a coherent narrative may be one pathway through which purpose leads to these better outcomes.   Vitamin D protects against severe asthma attacks Queen Mary University of London, October 3, 2021 Taking oral vitamin D supplements in addition to standard asthma medication could halve the risk of asthma attacks requiring hospital attendance, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). Asthma affects more than 300 million people worldwide and is estimated to cause almost 400,000 deaths annually. Asthma deaths arise primarily during episodes of acute worsening of symptoms, known as attacks or 'exacerbations', which are commonly triggered by viral upper respiratory infections. Vitamin D is thought to protect against such attacks by boosting immune responses to respiratory viruses and dampening down harmful airway inflammation. The new study, funded by the National Institute for Health Research, and published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, collated and analysed the individual data from 955 participants in seven randomised controlled trials, which tested the use of vitamin D supplements. Overall, the researchers found that vitamin D supplementation resulted in: a 30 per cent reduction in the rate of asthma attacks requiring treatment with steroid tablets or injections - from 0.43 events per person per year to 0.30. a 50 per cent reduction in the risk of experiencing at least one asthma attack requiring Accident and Emergency Department attendance and/or hospitalisation - from 6 per cent of people experiencing such an event to 3 per cent. Vitamin D supplementation was found to be safe at the doses administered. No instances of excessively high calcium levels or renal stones were seen, and serious adverse events were evenly distributed between participants taking vitamin D and those on placebo. Lead researcher Professor Adrian Martineau said: "These results add to the ever growing body of evidence that vitamin D can support immune function as well as bone health. On average, three people in the UK die from asthma attacks every day. Vitamin D is safe to take and relatively inexpensive so supplementation represents a potentially cost-effective strategy to reduce this problem." The team's use of individual participant data also allowed them to query the extent to which different groups respond to vitamin D supplementation, in more detail than previous studies. In particular, vitamin D supplementation was found to have a strong and statistically-significant protective effect in participants who had low vitamin D levels to start with. These participants saw a 55 per cent reduction in the rate of asthma exacerbations requiring treatment with steroid tablets or injections - from 0.42 events per person per year to 0.19. However, due to relatively small numbers of patients within sub-groups, the researchers caution that they did not find definitive evidence to show that effects of vitamin D supplementation differ according to baseline vitamin D status. Professor Hywel Williams, Director of the NIHR Health Technology Assessment Programme, said: "The results of this NIHR-funded study brings together evidence from several other studies from over the world and is an important contribution to reducing uncertainties on whether Vitamin D is helpful for asthma - a common condition that impacts on many thousands of people worldwide." Dr David Jolliffe from QMUL, first author on the paper, added: "Our results are largely based on data from adults with mild to moderate asthma: children and adults with severe asthma were relatively under-represented in the dataset, so our findings cannot necessarily be generalised to these patient groups at this stage. Further clinical trials are on-going internationally, and we hope to include data from them in a future analysis to determine whether the promise of today's results is confirmed in an even larger and more diverse group of patients."     Study Shows Lifestyle Choices Have Significant Impact on Multiple Chronic Conditions, Significant Implications For Reducing Costs Yale University,  October 05, 2021 In a study published in the Journal of Preventive Medicine, Adams and colleagues showed a linear association between a number of modifiable risk factors and multiple chronic conditions, making those modifications a key to health care cost savings and to preventing a wide range of conditions. The data analyzed for the study, https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1VpFeKt2pmc9H, were from the publicly available 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and included 483,865 non-institutionalized US adults ages 18 years old or older. Chronic conditions included asthma, arthritis, heart disease, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cognitive impairment, cancer other than skin, and kidney disease. Risk factors included obesity, current smoking, sedentary lifestyle, inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption and sleeping other than seven to eight hours, while depression, hypertension, high cholesterol, and diabetes were considered in each category. Previous research by Thorpe and colleagues had estimated that the care of adults with four or more chronic conditions (17.1% of all adults in the study) is responsible for 77.6% of all health care costs in the U.S. today. The potential savings by reducing just two risk factors (diabetes and hypertension) and their related comorbidity was estimated previously by Ormond and colleagues at $9 billion annually over one to two years and closer to $25 billion a year after 5 years or more, factoring in possible complications. True Health Initiative founder, at Yale University  Director and study co-author David L. Katz, MD, MPH, FACLM, pointed out that in addition to costs, another implication of the study results is an individual's access to healthcare if they have one or more of the chronic conditions. "Although insurers decide what qualifies as a pre-existing condition, all the chronic conditions used in this study except cognitive impairment are commonly included," he said. "Individuals with a pre-existing condition could be denied coverage or face higher premiums. While having a pre-existing condition might not affect coverage for adults eligible for Medicare, over half of all adults with multiple chronic conditions are ages 18 to 64 years." American College of Lifestyle Medicine President George Guthrie, MD, MPH, FACLM, said the study confirms the necessity for addressing the root cause of chronic conditions. "The evidence shows that the risks for chronic disease are rooted in lifestyle choices," he said. "More than ever, it is important to emphasize lifestyle medicine as the first treatment option for preventing, treating, and in some cases, reversing the cause of chronic conditions. If we can help people with chronic conditions, we can add years to their life and life to their years, as well as lower the ever-increasing costs of healthcare for everyone."     Physical athletes' visual skills prove sharper than action video game players University of Waterloo (Canada), October 7, 2021 Athletes still have the edge over action video gamers when it comes to dynamic visual skills, a new study from the University of Waterloo shows. For an athlete, having strong visual skills can be the difference between delivering a peak performance and achieving average results. "Athletes involved in sports with a high-level of movement—like soccer, football, or baseball—often score higher on dynamic visual acuity tests than non-athletes," said Dr. Kristine Dalton of Waterloo's School of Optometry & Vision Science. "Our research team wanted to investigate if action video gamers—who, like e-sport athletes, are regularly immersed in a dynamic, fast-paced 2D video environment for large periods of time—would also show superior levels of dynamic visual acuity on par with athletes competing in physical sport." While visual acuity (clarity or sharpness of vision) is most often measured under static conditions during annual check-ups with an optometrist, research shows that testing dynamic visual acuity is a more effective measure of a person's ability to see moving objects clearly—a baseline skill necessary for success in physical and e-sports alike.  Using a dynamic visual acuity skills-test designed and validated at the University of Waterloo, researchers discovered that while physical athletes score highly on dynamic visual acuity tests as expected, action video game players tested closer to non-athletes.  "Ultimately, athletes showed a stronger ability to identify smaller moving targets, which suggests visual processing differences exist between them and our video game players," said Alan Yee, a Ph.D. candidate in vision science. All participants were matched based on their level of static visual acuity and refractive error, distinguishing dynamic visual acuity as the varying factor on their test performance. These findings are also important for sports vision training centers that have been exploring the idea of developing video game-based training programs to help athletes elevate their performance. "Our findings show there is still a benefit to training in a 3D environment," said Dalton. "For athletes looking to develop stronger visual skills, the broader visual field and depth perception that come with physical training may be crucial to improving their dynamic visual acuity—and ultimately, their sport performance."  The study, Athletes demonstrate superior visual dynamic visual acuity, authored by Waterloo's School of Optometry & Vision Science's Dalton, Yee, Dr. Elizabeth Irving and Dr. Ben Thompson, was recently published in the journal Optometry and Vision Science.     Probiotic Akkermansia muciniphila and environmental enrichment reverse cognitive impairment associated with high-fat high-cholesterol consumption University of Oviedo (Spain), September 8, 2021 Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is one of the most prevalent diseases globally. A high-fat, high-cholesterol (HFHC) diet leads to an early NASH model. It has been suggested that gut microbiota mediates the effects of diet through the microbiota–gut–brain axis, modifying the host's brain metabolism and disrupting cognition. Here, we target NASH-induced cognitive damage by testing the impact of environmental enrichment (EE) and the administration of either Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) or Akkermansia muciniphila CIP107961 (AKK). EE and AKK, but not LGG, reverse the HFHC-induced cognitive dysfunction, including impaired spatial working memory and novel object recognition; however, whereas AKK restores brain metabolism, EE results in an overall decrease. Moreover, AKK and LGG did not induce major rearrangements in the intestinal microbiota, with only slight changes in bacterial composition and diversity, whereas EE led to an increase in Firmicutes and Verrucomicrobia members. Our findings illustrate the interplay between gut microbiota, the host's brain energy metabolism, and cognition. In addition, the findings suggest intervention strategies, such as the administration of AKK, for the management of the cognitive dysfunction related to NASH. In this study, we described cognitive, brain metabolism, and microbiota alterations associated with high-fat and high-cholesterol consumption. In addition, we clearly showed that environmental enrichment and A. muciniphila CIP107961 restore cognitive dysfunction. Furthermore, we revealed that cognitive improvement is associated with differential effects of environmental enrichment and this strain of A. muciniphila on brain metabolism and gut microbiota. Finally, we discovered that restored cognitive function was associated with the administration of A. muciniphila CIP107961, but not L. rhamnosus GG, which may be clinically relevant when selecting probiotics for treating HFHC-derived pathologies. In conclusion, the microbiota and cognition are intimately connected through the gut–brain axis, and in HFHC pathologies they can be influenced by environmental enrichment and A. muciniphila CIP107961 administration. Cognitive improvement was accompanied by changes in brain metabolic activity and gut microbial composition analysis, pointing to specific microbiota targets for intervention in diet-induced pathologies. However, some mechanisms other than major changes in microbiota composition and the combined effect of environmental enrichment and A. muciniphila administration, which we identified in this study, may also be biologically relevant and will need to be investigated in future studies due to their relative contributions to the selection of effective treatments for patients.           

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead
Spotlight: Biden's Radical Budget Bill: Can Manchin And Sinema Rescue Their Party From Political Suicide?

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 3:23


President Biden and congressional Democratic leaders ended last week without a vote on two colossal spending bills, recognizing that they had overplayed their hand. So is Biden's radical budget bill in trouble? Steve Forbes on whether Senators Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema can rescue their party from political suicide.Steve Forbes shares his What's Ahead Spotlights each Tuesday, Thursday and Friday.

Grow a Group Practice Podcast
Gabrielle Juliano-Villani on Running an In-Home Counseling Practice | GP 88

Grow a Group Practice Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 32:11


Have you considered taking Medicare in your private practice? How can you use relationship-building as a method to grow your group practice? Are you... The post Gabrielle Juliano-Villani on Running an In-Home Counseling Practice | GP 88 appeared first on How to Start, Grow, and Scale a Private Practice| Practice of the Practice.

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com
5 Retirement Myths

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 24:57


To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/1085/29 Founding Father John Adams once wrote,Facts are stubborn things and whatever may be our wishes, they cannot alter, facts and evidence. Facts are especially handy for dispelling myths that could affect your retirement savings. First up today we'll arm ourselves with those facts and do away with 5 retirement myths. The first myth we want to get rid of is the idea that the withdrawal rate you anticipate for your savings in retirement is a set it and forget it kind of thing. In reality, so much can happen between now and the day you quit working. It's prudent to revisit your calculation periodically. If you've already retired (or are about to), you'll want to get with your advisors regularly to review your anticipated withdrawal rate. You'll take into account how stock prices and inflation may impact your returns. You may have to make adjustments to your retirement income. Younger folks might want to go with a safer withdrawal rate of 3% to 4%; but it could be higher if you faithfully contribute 10 to 15% of your income to your retirement plan. Again, meeting with your advisor will help you set up a strategy that meets your goals and needs. The second retirement myth is that Medicare will cover all of your health care costs. It's a very helpful program for many retirees but was never intended to cover 100% of health care costs. Deductibles and copayments can be high and Medicare doesn't cover dental, vision and hearing conditions. So you need to factor in the cost of a Medigap policy or a Medicare Advantage Plan from a private company to supplement Medicare. That will cover the cost for Medicare Parts A, B, and C, but you also want to add Part D coverage for prescriptions. Our next retirement myth is that the Social Security program will collapse and not be there for you when you retire. While the program definitely has solvency issues that need to be faced, if you're in or nearing retirement, they're not likely to affect you.It's now estimated that, without changes, Social Security's financial reserves will be able to pay full benefits until 2034. At that point, benefits would have to be decreased by about 25%; but will that actually happen? The next retirement myth is that you can simply keep working as long as you need to. The facts don't support this and the COVID pandemic is a case in point. A recent survey showed that 7% of those responding retired earlier than expected due to the pandemic. Another 11% said they now plan to retire sooner than expected. And here are two more surprising statistics: nearly 25% of people in their 20s will become disabled before reaching full retirement age at 67 and nearly 70% of people over 65 will need long term care at some point during retirement. The point is, you have to plan onnotbeing able to work as long as you'd like. The last retirement myth is that you'll simply alter your lifestyle in retirement so that you don't run out of money. Not that it's wrong to do that; it's actually quite wise. But you may not find it as easy as you think, for several reasons. You'll have more time on your hands to socialize, which can lead to overspending. There's a temptation to take more trips, especially if the grandchildren live out of town. You might want to pursue a hobby that leads to unplanned spending. Then there's inflation, which Ronald Reagan once called, the cruelest tax of all. Right now, the Fed is predicting a 2% annual inflation several years into the future. That might not seem like much, but remember, that's acompoundingrate, so it really does add up over time. On today's program we also answer your questions: My husband and I have no will. Is it really necessary to visit an estate planner when everything that we have is in both of our names? I'm also listed as the sole beneficiary on his retirement plan. So, are we going to run into some problems under those circumstances? I have a mortgage and had to have it modified. I was behind on some of the payments because I was laid off.But they had me do a second mortgage, which is like a lien on the property.They said I couldn't pay the second mortgage off until I paid off the first one. So what if I wanted to refinance? Is there any way to get around that? I just received an offer to have our mortgage rate lowered to 3.125%. Can I get a better deal? Remember, you can call in to ask your questions most days at (800) 525-7000 or email them toQuestions@MoneyWise.org. Also, visit our website atMoneyWise.orgwhere you can connect with a MoneyWise Coachanddownload free, helpful resources like the free MoneyWise app. Like and Follow us on Facebook atMoneyWise Mediafor videos and the very latest discussion!Remember that it's your prayerful and financial support that keeps MoneyWise on the air. Help us continue this outreach by clicking the Donate tab on our website or in our app.

Retire With Ryan
Social Security Trustees 2021 Update #65

Retire With Ryan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 11:34


How are you feeling about the future of Social Security? Do you feel confident that the program will be there for you and your family as you enter retirement? Have you been reading rumblings about the program going broke in just a decade or so? If you want to know what is going on with the Social Security program, you've come to the right place! On this episode, we'll take a look at the 2021 Social Security Trustees report and what it means for the future of the valuable public program.    You will want to hear this episode if you are interested in... Understanding the Social Security Trustees 2021 report [0:50] Some proposed solutions for “Fixing” Social Security [3:30] Why the Social Security program needs to be addressed [7:30] Closing thoughts [9:00] The status of Social Security  When you think of retirement, you think of social security - for many Americans, this is just a matter of fact. But can you really count on Social Security to be there when the time comes for you and your family? Recently, the SSA released an Annual Trustees Report for 2021- these reports provide estimates of the financial status of the program. From the report;  “Social Security and Medicare both face long-term financing shortfalls under currently scheduled benefits and financing. Both programs will experience cost growth substantially in excess of GDP growth through the mid-2030s due to rapid population aging….the data and projections presented include the Trustees' best estimates of the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and the 2020 recession, which were not reflected in last year's reports. The finances of both programs have been significantly affected by the pandemic and the recession of 2020.”  While the report does strike a sober note, it doesn't really tell us anything new. The program has been in need of a substantial fix for a long time, the impact of COVID-19 has only exasperated what was already present. Yes, there are some important things that need to be addressed when it comes to Social Security but I don't think it is time to panic, there are some smart people with good solutions out there.  Join me on this episode as we expand on some other important findings in the annual report and so much more, you don't want to miss it!  Resources mentioned https://www.ssa.gov/OACT/solvency/provisions/ https://www.aarp.org/politics-society/government-elections/info-2021/social-security-trust-funds.html https://www.cnbc.com/2019/12/08/this-is-what-experts-really-want-to-see-happen-to-fix-social-security.html Connect With Morrissey Wealth Management  www.MorrisseyWealthManagement.com/contact

The Gateway
Tuesday, October 5, 2021 - The dollars and cents of Medicaid expansion

The Gateway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 9:27


The federal government says Missouri will receive nearly $1 billion for expanding Medicaid to individuals making roughly $17,800 a year. U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Administrator Chaquita Brooks-LaSure says the money helps the state cover more people and encourage more individuals to enroll.

Relentless Health Value
AEE17: Employers and Reference-Based Pricing—David Contorno's Latest Thinking

Relentless Health Value

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 9:20


Reference-based pricing, the way that most employee benefit consultants use the term anyway, refers to a methodology used by employers to pay providers for services. Usually we're talking within a fee-for-service (FFS) environment here. The way it typically works ... there are different flavors, but how it typically works is this: Reference-based pricing (RBP) means that an employer starts with some reference-based price. Many times, it's the Medicare rate. Medicare will pay X dollars for something. The employer—and when I say employer, I mean the vendor/company the employer is using to run this whole thing mainly—but the employer will decide that they're willing to pay some percent over the Medicare rate to providers who render that service to the employee. Maybe it's 10% over the Medicare rate or 20% to 50% as David Contorno talks about in this healthcare podcast. One of the biggest pushbacks against RBP schemes has been that it results in balance bills for employees, meaning that an employee goes to the hospital, the employer decides to pay some RBP amount for that service to the hospital, but the hospital hasn't necessarily agreed to accept that amount. There's no contract in place. So, the hospital decides to bill whatever their chargemaster rate is—which, as we all know, is redonkulous—and the employee gets a giant out-of-network balance bill. For the most part, this doesn't have to happen if you do it right; and David Contorno discusses all of this and more on this An Expert Explains. You can learn more at epoweredbenefits.com. You can also connect with David on LinkedIn.   David Contorno is founder of E Powered Benefits. As a native of New York, David began his career in the insurance industry at the age of 14 and has since become a leading expert in the realm of employee benefits over the last 22 years. David was Benefits Selling magazine's 2015 Broker of the Year, and in March 2016, Forbes deemed him “one of America's most innovative benefits leaders.” More recently, he received the 2017 Leadership Award at ASCEND, the annual conference of The Association for Insurance Leadership, which recognizes those whose leadership in support of improving the value and performance of employee benefits has significantly advanced the industry. David is a member of the board of directors for both the Charlotte Association of Health Underwriters and HealthReach Community Clinic. He served on the NC Insurance Commissioners Life and Health Agent Advisory Committee, as well as participated in the Technical Advisory Group that helped with the market reforms required under the Affordable Care Act in North Carolina. He is a longtime member of the Lake Norman and South Iredell Chambers of Commerce as well as the National, North Carolina, New York, and Long Island Associations of Health Underwriters. David contributes to numerous publications, including Forbes, Benefits Selling magazine, Business Leader magazine, and Insurance Thought Leadership. David is committed to giving back to his community and actively participates in the membership drive for the United Way, assisting the local chapter of Habitat for Humanity, and supporting The Dove House Child Advocacy Center. When he is not working, he enjoys boating and traveling. 01:37 What does good reference-based pricing look like? 01:57 What is the pricing methodology that 97% of healthcare is using? 04:25 How has E Powered Benefits minimized the noise around reference-based pricing? 04:55 “You're getting what we view as balance bills all the time.” 06:47 “What very few people really recognize is that hospitals have multiple revenue streams.” 07:36 “Which is the highest price? The answer is, commercial.” You can learn more at epoweredbenefits.com. You can also connect with David on LinkedIn.   @dcontorno discusses #employers and #referencebasedpricing on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast What does good reference-based pricing look like? @dcontorno discusses #employers and #referencebasedpricing on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast What is the pricing methodology that 97% of healthcare is using? @dcontorno discusses #employers and #referencebasedpricing on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast How has E Powered Benefits minimized the noise around reference-based pricing? @dcontorno discusses #employers and #referencebasedpricing on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast “You're getting what we view as balance bills all the time.” @dcontorno discusses #employers and #referencebasedpricing on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast “What very few people really recognize is that hospitals have multiple revenue streams.” @dcontorno discusses #employers and #referencebasedpricing on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast “Which is the highest price? The answer is, commercial.” @dcontorno discusses #employers and #referencebasedpricing on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast Recent past interviews: Click a guest's name for their latest RHV episode! David Contorno (EP339), Nikki King, Olivia Webb, Brandon Weber, Stacey Richter (INBW30), Brian Klepper (AEE16), Brian Klepper (EP335), Sunita Desai, Care Plans vs Real World (EP333), Dr Tony DiGioia, Al Lewis, John Marchica, Joe Connolly, Marshall Allen, Andrew Eye, Naomi Fried, Dr Rishi Wadhera, Dr Mai Pham, Nicole Bradberry and Kelly Conroy, Lee Lewis, Dr Arshad Rahim, Dr Monica Lypson, Dr Rich Klasco, Dr David Carmouche (AEE15), Christian Milaster, Dr Grace Terrell, Troy Larsgard, Josh LaRosa  

Financial Sense(R) Newshour
Everything You Need to Know About Medicare Enrollment

Financial Sense(R) Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 22:43


Oct 4 – Financial Sense Newshour welcomes Brian McArthur at Bridlewood Insurance to discuss everything you need to know about the upcoming enrollment for Medicare, including what age to sign up,... Subscribe to our premium weekday podcasts: https://www.financialsense.com/subscribe