Podcasts about Antarctica

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  • 3,963PODCASTS
  • 6,962EPISODES
  • 46mAVG DURATION
  • 4DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 17, 2022LATEST
Antarctica

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Best podcasts about Antarctica

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Latest podcast episodes about Antarctica

EXOPOLITICS TODAY with Dr. Michael Salla
A Year working on the South Pole Ice Cube Neutrino Detector - the Secret Space Program connection

EXOPOLITICS TODAY with Dr. Michael Salla

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 79:05


Beginning in October 2010, Eric Hecker spent a year working at the South Pole's Amundsen Scott Station for the Raytheon Polar Services Company where he performed maintenance on scientific equipment including the massive Ice Cube Neutrino Detector. He learned that Ice Cube did far more than passively record neutrinos passing through the Earth, but acted as a giant transmitter. Its size and power suggested it could be used for Deep Space quantum communications with spacecraft traveling throughout our solar system and beyond. More ominously, its vast transmission power made it also the world's largest Directed Energy Weapon, far eclipsing the infamous HAARP facility in Alaska. Eric described how Ice Cube could be used for weather modification, mind control, and played a role in two Earthquakes that struck Christchurch New Zealand in September 2010 and February 2011. Eric also describes his experiences as a gifted child and brief service with the US Navy that led him to concluding he was part of a secret space program, and that the Raytheon corporation played a key role in his covert service. Since Raytheon was his employer during the year he worked at the South Pole, he suspects his work there was a cover for his continued service in a secret space program operating out of Antarctica, all memories of which have been wiped. Eric described his efforts to recall more of his secret space program service and how it relates to the year he spent working in Antarctica. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/exopolitics/support

Planet Sleep: Relaxing Nature Stories & Sounds
15: An Icy Chill Expedition In Antarctica

Planet Sleep: Relaxing Nature Stories & Sounds

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 29:38


Subscribe On Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/3EYP9zs  Follow On Spotify: https://spoti.fi/3MD1xI3 Watch On YouTube: https://bit.ly/3F2LFfj  Follow the show on social media! Twitter: https://bit.ly/3MIgOHo Instagram: https://bit.ly/373BN8G  Links: https://linktr.ee/planetsleep My CBD Brand: Higher Love Wellness: http://higherlovewellness.com​ Get 10% off your order by entering code: sleep at checkout! Instagram: https://bit.ly/3F2cAb1  Twitter: https://bit.ly/3LzfPcs  New episodes are released every Monday! The freezing, frigid, frosty ice caps of Antarctica only allow the most adaptive animals to survive its conditions. Without a thick layer of blubber or a group of friends to huddle with, not many survive. Although this continent might be one of the cruelest places on Earth, it also tells us about the health of the planet. One of the harshest places to survive is also the greatest mirror to our own survival. Host: Josh Twitter: https://bit.ly/3MJkBVd Instagram: https://bit.ly/366sl3D Producer: Karelly IG: https://bit.ly/2TcxnoD   Twitter: https://bit.ly/3f9ngcN  Writer: Austin Keith Instagram: https://bit.ly/3vS2pld  Artwork: Eden Redpath Instagram: https://bit.ly/3KozJpi Featured Music:  Chris Collins - http://indiemusicbox.com ✉ Send us mail ✉ Josh Thomas 8547 E Arapahoe Rd Ste J # 233 Greenwood Village, CO 80112

The Offbeat Life - become location independent
Ep. 265: How This Writer Turned Her Love for Travel Into a Career with Jordi Lippe-McGraw

The Offbeat Life - become location independent

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 44:58


In this episode, I speak with Jordi who is a freelance travel writer and family travel expert.  She's traveled to all 7 continents (including Antarctica at 5 months pregnant) and writes for top outlets like Forbes, Travel + Leisure, Conde Nast Traveler, and more. Listen on to find out how Jordi is able to balance her career and family life as a writer and freelancer. --------- Hey Offbeat Family, I really appreciate you listening to this episode. I would love to hear more from you and what you think of the podcast. Remote work resources: https://www.theoffbeatlife.com/ Contact me: hello@theoffbeatlife.com Show credits: Audio Engineer: Ben Smith - Ben@howtocreateapodcast.com

The Adventures of Power Dog in Dogland!

We are so pleased to share this next leg of Power Dog's adventure- a crossover tale of tails in which we visit the characters and place from Stories For Wonderful Children! Hosted by Dan Wendelin, this podcast is a fellow member show in the wonderful organization we belong to dedicated to high-quality audio for families called Kids Listen. You can also read more about Dan and his show on the Kids Listen Medium channel here: https://medium.com/kidslisten/get-to-know-a-show-stories-for-wonderful-children-d383379ecea9 Hank would like to especially recommend that you listen to all of Dan's stories, and especially the short series featuring the Cats of the Elysium. From Dan, "Deep in Antarctica lies the mystical Cat Elysium, a magical paradise for Flibbertygibit's feline subjects. Flip-Flop, the prankster of the royal cat family passes idyllic days there as caretaker. But when trouble comes to the Elysium, will Flip-Flop's joking ways be able to rise to the challenge?" The best place to start is with Stories For Wonderful Children Episode 37: Where's Flibbertygibit. Special thanks to Jason Roark, our creative partner and ultimate Renaissance Bunny Supreme! He records, edits, and designs this show. He also provides original music including our opening theme song, which is sung & performed by him and the wonderful, talented Jen Bernard. Our song that plays at the end of this episode is a song we wrote along with Hank's Granny & Gramps, aka Murphy & Marckx. It's called “Power Dog, He Won't Give Up!” It started as poetry. Colin Laurel illustrated our cover art, which was directed by Jen Wick. Creating it was visualizing poetry. You can find out more and send us jokes at www.powerdogadventures.com This podcast was made possible, in part, by a grant from The Regional Arts & Culture Council in Portland, OR. It was made more possible by listeners like you! Thank you for your support! https://www.patreon.com/powerdogadventures The Adventures of Power Dog in Dogland is created in the ancestral lands of the Multnomah, Wasco, Kathlamet, Clackamas, Cowlitz, bands of Chinook, Tualatin Kalapuya, Molalla, and many other Tribes of the first people who made their homes along the rivers. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/powerdogadventures/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/powerdogadventures/support

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast
How to help unempowered PO's step up, and start to make decisions | Julie Wyman

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 12:43


Read the full Show Notes and search through the world's largest audio library on Scrum directly on the Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast website: http://bit.ly/SMTP_ShowNotes. The Great Product Owner: Two characteristics that make a great PO This Product owner had two characteristics that made her a great Product Owner for the team. She had: a) domain expertise, and b) availability to work with the team. She also knew that it was important to involve others in making decisions and actively asked help from other experts when needed. She was also great at collecting feedback.  The Bad Product Owner: Helping unempowered PO's step up, and start to make decisions This Product Owner was missing empowerment to make decisions. This was further complicated by the fact that the PO was part of a larger program, where there were multiple PO's that also did not feel empowered. We discuss how to help these Product Owners slowly start to gain ownership, and assert their ability to make decisions. Are you having trouble helping the team work well with their Product Owner? We've put together a course to help you work on the collaboration team-product owner. You can find it at bit.ly/coachyourpo. 18 modules, 8+ hours of modules with tools and techniques that you can use to help teams and PO's collaborate. About Julie Wyman Julie Wyman has been working with Agile teams for over a decade and is continuously learning with and from them. She's based just outside Washington, D.C., but has had the pleasure of supporting teams distributed across the globe and even experienced her own Agile takeaways all the way in Antarctica. You can link with Julie Wyman on LinkedIn.

Robert McLean's Podcast
Quick Climate Links: The Sweaty Penguin; The Net-Zero Innovate podcast; Great Barrier Reef bleached, again

Robert McLean's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 2:24


Here is something different, "The Sweaty Penguin" podcast, argued to be "Antarctica's Hottest Podcast". Take a listen to the Business Green podcast: "Net Zero Innovate Podcast 2 Lord Adair Turner and the exciting world of green industrial innovation". Other Quick Climate Links for today are: "‘Criminalising our right to protest': green groups' anger over public order bill"; "Queensland floods: woman dies after vehicle is swept away as more heavy rain forecast"; "‘Shocking' coral bleaching report quietly released after accusations of political interference"; "Nigeria, 10 other countries demonstrate actions to meet climate goals"; "There will never be a better time to save the planet"; "What pundits don't say about climate change"; "Things I Read: A solar future isn't just likely — it's inevitable"; "Electricity prices are spiking, ten times as much as normal. Here are some educated guesses as to why"; "Climate change hits low-income earners harder – and poor housing in hotter cities is a disastrous combination"; "Australia has rich deposits of critical minerals for green technology. But we are not making the most of them … yet"; "The Biggest Potential Water Disaster in the United States"; "The Southwest's Drought and Fires Are a Window to Our Climate Change Future"; "Insights. Ideas. Integration. Impact."; "Revealed: the ‘carbon bombs' set to trigger catastrophic climate breakdown" "‘We will believe it when we see it': the unanswered questions surrounding the Dungowan Dam"; "‘AFL players are concerned': how the black summer fires spurred Tom Campbell to act on climate change"; "‘Our ancestors are in the rocks': Australian gas project threatens ancient carvings – and emissions blowout"; "Coalition urges integration of climate resilience measures in WASH"; "New Energy Nexus"; "Renewable energy uptake surges globally despite war, COVID pandemic"; "Prairie Island Indian Community uses nuclear waste fund for net-zero carbon goal"; "Therapy dogs help wildland firefighters relieve stress"; "Radon – yet another higher risk from thawing permafrost"; "Inside Just Stop Oil: the 'hooligan' climate protesters taking on the tankers – video"; "‘We are living in hell': Pakistan and India suffer extreme spring heatwaves"; "Swapping 20% of beef for microbial protein ‘could halve deforestation"; "EVs can be cheaper on a monthly basis than gas-powered cars"; "Illinois' new climate bill is ambitious, justice-focused and a model for the nation"; "The Allied for Climate Transformation 2025"; "The Goulburn Broken Catchment Management Authority (GBCMA) is the regional floodplain management authority within the Goulburn and Broken Catchments in Victoria"; "Katrina Survivors Were Told They Could Use Grant Money to Rebuild. Now They're Being Sued for It."; "Labor pledges more money to protect Great Barrier Reef from climate change if elected"; "An election guide: fact checking Morrison and Albanese on climate claims"; "Aware Super under pressure ahead of AGL coal split vote"; "What the next Australian government must do to save the Great Barrier Reef"; "Climate change isn't just making cyclones worse, it's making the floods they cause worse too – new research"; "‘Like 20 tip trucks pouring sand on every metre-wide strip': how extreme storms can replenish beaches, not just erode them"; "4 reasons why the Morrison government's forestry cash splash is bad policy"; "Political will for climate ambition, but what about action?"; "Ex-Green MPs question Govt's climate record"; "Living near wildfires ups cancer risk"; "Climate change is devastating the Global South"; "Think about climate policy when you vote"; "91% Of Surveyed Corals Bleached Along Great Barrier Reef, Australia Says"; "US fracking boom could tip world to edge of climate disaster"; "Rare UK seabirds put at risk by ‘alarming loophole', say campaigners"; "GB News chairman has history of dismissing threat of climate crisis"; "Living costs in outer suburbs would be slashed under plan to ‘electrify everything', analysis finds"; "New Zealand's dairy industry should stop using Māori culture to pretend it's sustainable"; "Climate chaos certain if oil and gas mega-projects go ahead, warns IEA chief". Enjoy "Music for a Warming World". Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/climateconversations

This is Our Time
Assisted Evolution with Dr Adriana Humanes

This is Our Time

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 5:33


​Dr. Adriana Humanes is a coral reef scientist from Venezuela. She completed her Ph.D. in Australia, and now is pursuing a postdoc with the @Coralassist_Lab through Newcastle University in the UK….I met her on the ship to Antarctica in 2018.For the last four years Adriana, and her colleagues have conducted field work in Palau, which is an archipelago of more than 300 islands situated in the Pacific Ocean between Indonesia and the Philippines.As Adriana explains, coral reefs are facing and unprecedented decline due to marine heatwaves, and also because of mass coral bleaching events. In the last decade, there have been five large scale coral bleaching and mortality events which have affected hundreds of reefs around the world.During the last massive bleaching event, on the Great Barrier Reef of Australia, almost half of the coral cover lost. Over the last 30 years, worldwide, coral cover has decreased by an alarming 20 per cent.The research at the Coralassist lab (as well as Adriana's) focuses on testing the feasibility of assisting evolution by identifying coral colonies that have a high tolerance to heat stress, and then, sexually breeding them. The goal is to create next generation corals that have inherited heat tolerance from their parents.Adriana first went to Palau in 2018, which was not long after I met her, in Antarctica. Although the pandemic has restricted her ability to travel there to continue her onw field research, by coincidence, one lone Ph.D student working with the  Coralassist lab  flew to Palau on March 7, 2020 … which turned out to be a long stay for her, 18 months, to be exact, where she became the lone student there tasked with keeping the Lab research project going.Adriana and her colleagues hope to returned this year, for their final leg of field research...after being away for years. And good news! They found corals spawning! Hopefully this is one more step towards the goal to use these sexually produced corals to help increase their future resilience, and hopefully even restore some vreefs that have been damaged or degraded from heat waves. Who knows, maybe they could even restore some reefs that have endured massive bleaching events, which are predicted to be more frequent in future climate change scenarios.Only science will tell.This episode was brought to you by the newsletter Audio Love, where I share unforgettable stories, with sound and word. To subscribe, go here:https://bit.ly/Audio-love

Theories of the Third Kind

A mysterious continent, that is covered in ice, and uninhabited. Rumors of crashed UFO's, secret government operations, Nazi secret bases, and hidden Ancient Civilizations.

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast
Involving the Scrum team in defining our success as Scrum Masters | Julie Wyman

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 8:42


Read the full Show Notes and search through the world's largest audio library on Scrum directly on the Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast website: http://bit.ly/SMTP_ShowNotes. Julie invites us to ask what success looks like for the teams we work with. Based on that, and a few other questions that Julie suggests, we can assess our impact, as well as invite the teams themselves into the reflection about success.  In this segment, we talk about Psychological Safety, a topic we have also covered in previous episodes.  Featured Retrospective Format for the Week: Mixing up formats to focus on the right question for the team Julie likes to mix up several formats as a way to try and tap into what's critical for the teams at that time. We also talk about bringing up the team working agreements regularly, to ensure that the team sticks to the agreements they have made.  In this segment, we refer to the Agile Retrospectives book and a tool Julie calls The Working Agreement Report Card, where the team scores themselves on how well they follow the agreements they had defined for themselves. Do you wish you had decades of experience? Learn from the Best Scrum Masters In The World, Today! The Tips from the Trenches - Scrum Master edition audiobook includes hours of audio interviews with SM's that have decades of experience: from Mike Cohn to Linda Rising, Christopher Avery, and many more. Super-experienced Scrum Masters share their hard-earned lessons with you. Learn those today, make your teams awesome!   About Julie Wyman Julie Wyman has been working with Agile teams for over a decade and is continuously learning with and from them. She's based just outside Washington, D.C., but has had the pleasure of supporting teams distributed across the globe and even experienced her own Agile takeaways all the way in Antarctica. You can link with Julie Wyman on LinkedIn.

Rewildology
Ep. 75 | Using Science & Tourism to Uncover the Mysteries of Antarctica with Allison Cusick

Rewildology

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 111:12


In this episode, we’re sitting with Allison Cusick, a PhD candidate at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, a founder of the Fjord Phyto Project, polar guide, and has been called a Polar Hero by Conde Nast Traveler. She also starred in Jeff Goldblum's “The World According to Jeff Goldblum” series on Disney+. Allison and I have such a fun time covering everything including her incredibly winding path that led to today, how she discovered oceanography after being terrified of the ocean all of her life, why her work studying Antarctica's phytoplankton is vitally important to understanding the region's entire food web, and what the science is telling us about what is going on in this part of the world. See full show notes at rewildology.com. If you're liking the show, please hit the follow button and share with someone you think would enjoy this episode. Sharing is the best way to help the show grow! Check out the new Rewildology merch shop! https://rewildology.com/shop/Recording gear provided by Focusrite: https://focusrite.com/en/usb-audio-interface/scarlett/scarlett-solo-studioDiscover more ways to watch, listen, and interact: https://linktr.ee/RewildologyJoin the Rewildologists Community Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/rewildologistsFollow RewildologyInstagram: https://instagram.com/rewildology/TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@rewildologypodcastFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/rewildologyTwitter: https://twitter.com/rewildologyYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxNVIeC0km8ZGK_1QPy7-iA

I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast
Your Questions Answered

I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 71:08


For links to every news story, all of the details we shared about Proa, and our fun fact check out https://iknowdino.com/Proa-Episode-389/Join us at www.patreon.com/iknowdino for dinosaur requests, bonus content, ad-free episodes, and more.Dinosaur of the day Proa, a basal iguanodont that lived in the Early Cretaceous in what is now Teruel Province, Spain.We answer the following questions:What “Dino of the day” most surprised you / most interested you in researching it for an episode?What famous dino field expedition would you liked to have been part of?Who of the early paleontologists do you wish you could have interviewed?If you had to take a side in the Bone Wars, would it be Marsh or Cope?Will there ever be a chance that your favorite groups of dinosaurs (sauropods and ankylosaurs) could change?What are your favorite non-saurian extinct animals?Do you have ancient plant or fungal life you find interesting?Did you have a favorite dinosaur toy growing up?How long would a human survive in the early-Triassic, mid-Jurassic, or end-Cretaceous?What is the Coolest fossil you have found or seen?What makes Velociraptor (and other feathered dinosaurs) dinosaurs and not birds?Which fossil most seems to be missing from the record, but you hope or expect to be found? Maybe a feathered T. rex?What is—and isn't—known about dinosaur skin? How is it known, soft tissue preservation?Do you have a routine for how you do the research for each episode?Is there a specific specimen you want to visit and see someday?Have any dinosaur fossils been found in the in Antarctica? Is their any chance any skin, bone etc could be locked in the permafrost? This episode is brought to you by our patrons. Their generous contributions make our podcast possible! You can join our community, help us keep the show going, and get the show ad-free for $9/month with an annual subscription. Go to Patreon.com/iknowdino to sign up.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Passive House Podcast
Evan Anderson – Zola Windows (Special PH Component Episode)

Passive House Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 44:42


In this special Passive House Component Episode, Passive House Podcast cohost Zack Semke interviews Evan Anderson, general manager of Zola Windows, a longtime supporter of North America's Passive House movement and the first Founding Sponsor of Passive House Accelerator.  Evan shares his path to Passive House and the world of high performance windows, talks about how Zola Windows are being applied in the field, including in a recent project in Antarctica, and gives a preview of Zola's brand new steel frame line. Don't miss this Monday's (May 16) Passive House Component Spotlight event featuring Sam McAfee of Zola Windows: https://passivehouseaccelerator.com/event-announcements/zola-component-spotlight 

WIRED Science: Space, Health, Biotech, and More
A Vast Underground Water System Helps Drive Antarctica's Glaciers

WIRED Science: Space, Health, Biotech, and More

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 7:35


Scientists have finally found Antarctica's missing groundwater, which will help them predict ice flows on the continent.

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast
Introducing Agile to a new organization with Kanban | Julie Wyman

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 12:13


Read the full Show Notes and search through the world's largest audio library on Scrum directly on the Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast website: http://bit.ly/SMTP_ShowNotes. While working with an organization in their Agile transition, Julie and colleagues recommended that they start with Kanban. Kanban would bring minimal disruption to the teams, and enable them to learn what Agile would mean in their context. However, there was a lot more to do before the teams were able to run a Kanban flow and start learning what Agile meant for them. In this episode, we explore not only how to introduce Kanban, but also what to consider when bringing Agile to a group of teams that are new to Agile.  About Julie Wyman Julie Wyman has been working with Agile teams for over a decade and is continuously learning with and from them. She's based just outside Washington, D.C., but has had the pleasure of supporting teams distributed across the globe and even experienced her own Agile takeaways all the way in Antarctica. You can link with Julie Wyman on LinkedIn.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
How Climate Change Is Making Us Sick And What We Can Do About It with Amanda Ravenhill

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 68:40


This episode is brought to you by Rupa Health, InsideTracker, and Mitopure.I recently took a life changing trip to Antarctica to see what is really happening to our environment as the result of climate change. Before you roll your eyes or gloss over this episode, I want you to understand this: Climate change is not just floods, droughts, a hotter planet, and deadly weather events, which are all scary enough to think about. It affects our whole body health—impacting chronic disease, infectious diseases, our food supply, our mental health, and so much more. On my way to Antarctica, I had an important conversation with my friend Amanda Ravenhill about one of the most critical aspects of climate change and human health—our food system. We also dive into why apathy around climate change is so dangerous. Amanda is an active member of the international community focused on addressing imminent global challenges. She is the Co-Founder and Founding Executive Director of Project Drawdown, the most comprehensive plan ever proposed to reverse global warming. This episode is brought to you by Rupa Health, InsideTracker, and Mitopure.Rupa Health is a place where Functional Medicine practitioners can access more than 2,000 specialty lab tests from over 20 labs like DUTCH, Vibrant America, Genova, and Great Plains. You can check out a free, live demo with a Q&A or create an account at RupaHealth.com.InsideTracker is a personalized health and wellness platform like no other. Right now they're offering my community 20% off at insidetracker.com/drhyman. Mitopure is the first and only clinically tested, pure form of a natural gut metabolite called Urolithin A that clears damaged mitochondria away from our cells and supports the growth of new, healthy mitochondria. Get 10% off at timelinenutrition.com/drhyman and use code DRHYMAN10 at checkout. Here are more details from our interview (audio version / Apple Subscriber version): Why you should care about climate change if you care about your health (7:06 / 3:51)Overcoming apathy to feel empowered about climate solutions (12:01 / 7:10) Our food system is the number-one driver of and solution to climate change (14:36 / 11:10)Eating and shopping regeneratively (25:22 / 20:05) Reframing carbon and its potential to promote planetary life (30:29 / 25:38) The role of government and corporations in helping to create climate solutions (32:33 / 27:37) The case for investing in women farmers (36:38 / 32:03) Applying corporate personhood to grant personhood to rights to nature (44:46 / 35:38) What you can do on an individual level to support the regeneration of climate (49:18 / 44:22) Shifting the climate conversation from one of despair to one of hope (56:28 / 51:53) Learn more about Amanda Ravenhill at amandajoyravenhill.com. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Screaming in the Cloud
Reliability Starts in Cultural Change with Amy Tobey

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 46:37


About AmyAmy Tobey has worked in tech for more than 20 years at companies of every size, working with everything from kernel code to user interfaces. These days she spends her time building an innovative Site Reliability Engineering program at Equinix, where she is a principal engineer. When she's not working, she can be found with her nose in a book, watching anime with her son, making noise with electronics, or doing yoga poses in the sun.Links Referenced: Equinix Metal: https://metal.equinix.com Personal Twitter: https://twitter.com/MissAmyTobey Personal Blog: https://tobert.github.io/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Optimized cloud compute plans have landed at Vultr to deliver lightning-fast processing power, courtesy of third-gen AMD EPYC processors without the IO or hardware limitations of a traditional multi-tenant cloud server. Starting at just 28 bucks a month, users can deploy general-purpose, CPU, memory, or storage optimized cloud instances in more than 20 locations across five continents. Without looking, I know that once again, Antarctica has gotten the short end of the stick. Launch your Vultr optimized compute instance in 60 seconds or less on your choice of included operating systems, or bring your own. It's time to ditch convoluted and unpredictable giant tech company billing practices and say goodbye to noisy neighbors and egregious egress forever. Vultr delivers the power of the cloud with none of the bloat. “Screaming in the Cloud” listeners can try Vultr for free today with a $150 in credit when they visit getvultr.com/screaming. That's G-E-T-V-U-L-T-R dot com slash screaming. My thanks to them for sponsoring this ridiculous podcast.Corey: Finding skilled DevOps engineers is a pain in the neck! And if you need to deploy a secure and compliant application to AWS, forgettaboutit! But that's where DuploCloud can help. Their comprehensive no-code/low-code software platform guarantees a secure and compliant infrastructure in as little as two weeks, while automating the full DevSecOps lifestyle. Get started with DevOps-as-a-Service from DuploCloud so that your cloud configurations are done right the first time. Tell them I sent you and your first two months are free. To learn more visit: snark.cloud/duplo. Thats's snark.cloud/D-U-P-L-O-C-L-O-U-D.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Every once in a while I catch up with someone that it feels like I've known for ages, and I realize somehow I have never been able to line up getting them on this show as a guest. Today is just one of those days. And my guest is Amy Tobey who has been someone I've been talking to for ages, even in the before-times, if you can remember such a thing. Today, she's a Senior Principal Engineer at Equinix. Amy, thank you for finally giving in to my endless wheedling.Amy: Thanks for having me. You mentioned the before-times. Like, I remember it was, like, right before the pandemic we had beers in San Francisco wasn't it? There was Ian there—Corey: Yeah, I—Amy: —and a couple other people. It was a really great time. And then—Corey: I vaguely remember beer. Yeah. And then—Amy: And then the world ended.Corey: Oh, my God. Yes. It's still March of 2020, right?Amy: As far as I know. Like, I haven't checked in a couple years.Corey: So, you do an awful lot. And it's always a difficult question to ask someone, so can you encapsulate your entire existence in a paragraph? It's—Amy: [sigh].Corey: —awful, so I'd like to give a bit more structure to it. Let's start with the introduction: You are a Senior Principal Engineer. We know it's high level because of all the adjectives that get put in there, and none of those adjectives are ‘associate' or ‘beginner' or ‘junior,' or all the other diminutives that companies like to play games with to justify paying people less. And you're at Equinix, which is a company that is a bit unlike most of the, shall we say, traditional cloud providers. What do you do over there and both as a company, as a person?Amy: So, as a company Equinix, what most people know about is that we have a whole bunch of data centers all over the world. I think we have the most of any company. And what we do is we lease out space in that data center, and then we have a number of other products that people don't know as well, which one is Equinix Metal, which is what I specifically work on, where we rent you bare-metal servers. None of that fancy stuff that you get any other clouds on top of it, there's things you can get that are… partner things that you can add-on, like, you know, storage and other things like that, but we just deliver you bare-metal servers with really great networking. So, what I work on is the reliability of that whole system. All of the things that go into provisioning the servers, making them come up, making sure that they get delivered to the server, make sure the API works right, all of that stuff.Corey: So, you're on the Equinix cloud side of the world more so than you are on the building data centers by the sweat of your brow, as they say?Amy: Correct. Yeah, yeah. Software side.Corey: Excellent. I spent some time in data centers in the early part of my career before cloud ate that. That was sort of cotemporaneous with the discovery that I'm the hardware destruction bunny, and I should go to great pains to keep my aura from anything expensive and important, like, you know, the SAN. So—Amy: Right, yeah.Corey: Companies moving out of data centers, and me getting out was a great thing.Amy: But the thing about SANs though, is, like, it might not be you. They're just kind of cursed from the start, right? They just always were kind of fussy and easy to break.Corey: Oh, yeah. I used to think—and I kid you not—that I had a limited upside to my career in tech because I sometimes got sloppy and I was fairly slow at crimping ethernet cables.Amy: [laugh].Corey: That is very similar to growing up in third grade when it became apparent that I was going to have problems in my career because my handwriting was sloppy. Yeah, it turns out the future doesn't look like we predicted it would.Amy: Oh, gosh. Are we going to talk about, like, neurological development now or… [laugh] okay, that's a thing I struggle with, too right, is I started typing as soon as they would let—in fact, before they would let me. I remember in high school, I had teachers who would grade me down for typing a paper out. They want me to handwrite it and I would go, “Cool. Go ahead and take a grade off because if I handwrite it, you're going to take two grades off my handwriting, so I'm cool with this deal.”Corey: Yeah, it was pretty easy early on. I don't know when the actual shift was, but it became more and more apparent that more and more things are moving towards a world where you could type. And I was almost five when I started working on that stuff, and that really wound up changing a lot of aspects of how I started seeing things. One thing I think you're probably fairly well known for is incidents. I want to be clear when I say that you are not the root cause as—“So, why are things broken?” “It's Amy again. What's she gotten into this time?” Great.Amy: [laugh]. But it does happen, but not all the time.Corey: Exa—it's a learning experience.Amy: Right.Corey: You've also been deeply involved with SREcon and a number of—a lot of aspects of what I will term—and please don't yell at me for this—SRE culture—Amy: Yeah.Corey: Which is sometimes a challenging thing to wind up describing or putting a definition around. The one that I've always been somewhat partial to is, “SRE is DevOps, except you worked at Google for a while.” I don't know how necessarily accurate that is, but it does rile people up.Amy: Yeah, it does. Dave Stanke actually did a really great talk at SREcon San Francisco just a couple weeks ago, about the DORA report. And the new DORA report, they split SRE out into its own function and kind of is pushing against that old model, which actually comes from Liz Fong-Jones—I think it's from her, or older—about, like, class SRE implements DevOps, which is kind of this idea that, like, SREs make DevOps happen. Things have evolved, right, since then. Things have evolved since Google released those books, and we're all just figured out what works and what doesn't a little bit.And so, it's not that we're implementing DevOps so much. In fact, it's that ops stuff that kind of holds us back from the really high impact work that SREs, I think, should be doing, that aren't just, like, fixing the problems, the symptoms down at the bottom layer, right? Like what we did as sysadmins 20 years ago. You know, we'd go and a lot of people are SREs that came out of the sysadmin world and still think in that mode, where it's like, “Well, I set up the systems, and when things break, I go and I fix them.” And, “Why did the developers keep writing crappy code? Why do I have to always getting up in the middle of the night because this thing crashed?”And it turns out that the work we need to do to make things more reliable, there's a ceiling to how far away the platform can take us, right? Like, we can have the best platform in the world with redundancy, and, you know, nine-way replicated data storage and all this crazy stuff, and still if we put crappy software on top, it's going to be unreliable. So, how do we make less crappy software? And for most of my career, people would be, like, “Well, you should test it.” And so, we started doing that, and we still have crappy software, so what's going on here? We still have incidents.So, we write more tests, and we still have incidents. We had a QA group, we still have incidents. We send the developers to training, and we still have incidents. So like, what is the thing we need to do to make things more reliable? And it turns out, most of it is culture work.Corey: My perspective on this stems from being a grumpy old sysadmin. And at some point, I started calling myself a systems engineer or DevOps or production engineer, or SRE. It was all from my point of view, the same job, but you know, if you call yourself a sysadmin, you're just asking for a 40% pay cut off the top.Amy: [laugh].Corey: But I still tended to view the world through that lens. I tended to be very good at Linux systems internals, for example, understanding system calls and the rest, but increasingly, as the DevOps wave or SRE wave, or Google-isation of the internet wound up being more and more of a thing, I found myself increasingly in job interviews, where, “Great, now, can you go wind up implementing a sorting algorithm on the whiteboard?” “What on earth? No.” Like, my lingua franca is shitty Bash, and no one tends to write that without a bunch of tab completions and quick checking with manpages—die.net or whatnot—on the fly as you go down that path.And it was awful, and I felt… like my skill set was increasingly eroding. And it wasn't honestly until I started this place where I really got into writing a fair bit of code to do different things because it felt like an orthogonal skill set, but the fullness of time, it seems like it's not. And it's a reskilling. And it made me wonder, does this mean that the areas of technology that I focused on early in my career, was that all a waste? And the answer is not really. Sometimes, sure, in that I don't spend nearly as much time worrying about inodes—for example—as I once did. But every once in a while, I'll run into something and I looked like a wizard from the future, but instead, I'm a wizard from the past.Amy: Yeah, I find that a lot in my work, now. Sometimes things I did 20 years ago, come back, and it's like, oh, yeah, I remember I did all that threading work in 2002 in Perl, and I learned everything the very, very, very hard way. And then, you know, this January, did some threading work to fix some stability issues, and all of it came flooding back, right? Just that the experiences really, more than the code or the learning or the text and stuff; more just the, like, this feels like threads [BLEEP]-ery. Is a diagnostic thing that sometimes we have to say.And then people are like, “Can you prove it?” And I'm like, “Not really,” because it's literally thread [BLEEP]-ery. Like, the definition of it is that there's weird stuff happening that we can't figure out why it's happening. There's something acting in the system that isn't synchronized, that isn't connected to other things, that's happening out of order from what we expect, and if we had a clear signal, we would just fix it, but we don't. We just have, like, weird stuff happening over here and then over there and over there and over there.And, like, that tells me there's just something happening at that layer and then have to go and dig into that right, and like, just basically charge through. My colleagues are like, “Well, maybe you should look at this, and go look at the database,” the things that they're used to looking at and that their experiences inform, whereas then I bring that ancient toiling through the threading mines experiences back and go, “Oh, yeah. So, let's go find where this is happening, where people are doing dangerous things with threads, and see if we can spot something.” But that came from that experience.Corey: And there's so much that just repeats itself. And history rhymes. The challenge is that, do you have 20 years of experience, or do you have one year of experience repeated 20 times? And as the tide rises, doing the same task by hand, it really is just a matter of time before your full-time job winds up being something a piece of software does. An easy example is, “Oh, what's your job?” “I manually place containers onto specific hosts.” “Well, I've got news for you, and you're not going to like it at all.”Amy: Yeah, yeah. I think that we share a little bit. I'm allergic to repeated work. I don't know if allergic is the right word, but you know, if I sit and I do something once, fine. Like, I'll just crank it out, you know, it's this form, or it's a datafile I got to write and I'll—fine I'll type it in and do the manual labor.The second time, the difficulty goes up by ten, right? Like, just mentally, just to do it, be like, I've already done this once. Doing it again is anathema to everything that I am. And then sometimes I'll get through it, but after that, like, writing a program is so much easier because it's like exponential, almost, growth in difficulty. You know, the third time I have to do the same thing that's like just typing the same stuff—like, look over here, read this thing and type it over here—I'm out; I can't do it. You know, I got to find a way to automate. And I don't know, maybe normal people aren't driven to live this way, but it's kept me from getting stuck in those spots, too.Corey: It was weird because I spent a lot of time as a consultant going from place to place and it led to some weird changes. For example, “Oh, thank God, I don't have to think about that whole messaging queue thing.” Sure enough, next engagement, it's message queue time. Fantastic. I found that repeating myself drove me nuts, but you also have to be very sensitive not to wind up, you know, stealing IP from the people that you're working with.Amy: Right.Corey: But what I loved about the sysadmin side of the world is that the vast majority of stuff that I've taken with me, lives in my shell config. And what I mean by that is I'm not—there's nothing in there is proprietary, but when you have a weird problem with trying to figure out the best way to figure out which Ruby process is stealing all the CPU, great, turns out that you can chain seven or eight different shell commands together through a bunch of pipes. I don't want to remember that forever. So, that's the sort of thing I would wind up committing as I learned it. I don't remember what company I picked that up at, but it was one of those things that was super helpful.I have a sarcastic—it's a one-liner, except no sane editor setting is going to show it in any less than three—of a whole bunch of Perl, piped into du, piped into the rest, that tells you one of the largest consumers of files in a given part of the system. And it rates them with stars and it winds up doing some neat stuff. I would never sit down and reinvent something like that today, but the fact that it's there means that I can do all kinds of neat tricks when I need to. It's making sure that as you move through your career, on some level, you're picking up skills that are repeatable and applicable beyond one company.Amy: Skills and tooling—Corey: Yeah.Amy: —right? Like, you just described the tool. Another SREcon talk was John Allspaw and Dr. Richard Cook talking about above the line; below the line. And they started with these metaphors about tools, right, showing all the different kinds of hammers.And if you're a blacksmith, a lot of times you craft specialized hammers for very specific jobs. And that's one of the properties of a tool that they were trying to get people to think about, right, is that tools get crafted to the job. And what you just described as a bespoke tool that you had created on the fly, that kind of floated under the radar of intellectual property. [laugh].So, let's not tell the security or IP people right? Like, because there's probably billions and billions of dollars of technically, like, made-up IP value—I'm doing air quotes with my fingers—you know, that's just basically people's shell profiles. And my God, the Emacs automation that people have done. If you've ever really seen somebody who's amazing at Emacs and is 10, 20, 30, maybe 40 years of experience encoded in their emacs settings, it's a wonder to behold. Like, I look at it and I go, “Man, I wish I could do that.”It's like listening to a really great guitar player and be like, “Wow, I wish I could play like them.” You see them just flying through stuff. But all that IP in there is both that person's collection of wisdom and experience and working with that code, but also encodes that stuff like you described, right? It's just all these little systems tricks and little fiddly commands and things we don't want to remember and so we encode them into our toolset.Corey: Oh, yeah. Anything I wound up taking, I always would share it with people internally, too. I'd mention, “Yeah, I'm keeping this in my shell files.” Because I disclosed it, which solves a lot of the problem. And also, none of it was even close to proprietary or anything like that. I'm sorry, but the way that you wind up figuring out how much of a disk is being eaten up and where in a more pleasing way, is not a competitive advantage. It just isn't.Amy: It isn't to you or me, but, you know, back in the beginning of our careers, people thought it was worth money and should be proprietary. You know, like, oh, that disk-checking script as a competitive advantage for our company because there are only a few of us doing this work. Like, it was actually being able to, like, manage your—[laugh] actually manage your servers was a competitive advantage. Now, it's kind of commodity.Corey: Let's also be clear that the world has moved on. I wound up buying a DaisyDisk a while back for Mac, which I love. It is a fantastic, pretty effective, “Where's all the stuff on your disk going?” And it does a scan and you can drive and collect things and delete them when trying to clean things out. I was using it the other day, so it's top of mind at the moment.But it's way more polished than that crappy Perl three-liner. And I see both sides, truly I do. The trick also, for those wondering [unintelligible 00:15:45], like, “Where is the line?” It's super easy. Disclose it, what you're doing, in those scenarios in the event someone is no because they believe that finding the right man page section for something is somehow proprietary.Great. When you go home that evening in a completely separate environment, build it yourself from scratch to solve the problem, reimplement it and save that. And you're done. There are lots of ways to do this. Don't steal from your employer, but your employer employs you; they don't own you and the way that you think about these problems.Every person I've met who has had a career that's longer than 20 minutes has a giant doc somewhere on some system of all of the scripts that they wound up putting together, all of the one-liners, the notes on, “Next time you see this, this is the thing to check.”Amy: Yeah, the cheat sheet or the notebook with all the little commands, or again the Emacs config, sometimes for some people, or shell profiles. Yeah.Corey: Here's the awk one-liner that I put that automatically spits out from an Apache log file what—the httpd log file that just tells me what are the most frequent talkers, and what are the—Amy: You should probably let go of that one. You know, like, I think that one's lifetime is kind of past, Corey. Maybe you—Corey: I just have to get it working with Nginx, and we're good to go.Amy: Oh, yeah, there you go. [laugh].Corey: Or S3 access logs. Perish the thought. But yeah, like, what are the five most high-volume talkers, and what are those relative to each other? Huh, that one thing seems super crappy and it's coming from Russia. But that's—hmm, one starts to wonder; maybe it's time to dig back in.So, one of the things that I have found is that a lot of the people talking about SRE seem to have descended from an ivory tower somewhere. And they're talking about how some of the best-in-class companies out there, renowned for their technical cultures—at least externally—are doing these things. But there's a lot more folks who are not there. And honestly, I consider myself one of those people who is not there. I was a competent engineer, but never a terrific one.And looking at the way this was described, I often came away thinking, “Okay, it was the purpose of this conference talk just to reinforce how smart people are, and how I'm not,” and/or, “There are the 18 cultural changes you need to make to your company, and then you can do something kind of like we were just talking about on stage.” It feels like there's a combination of problems here. One is making this stuff more accessible to folks who are not themselves in those environments, and two, how to drive cultural change as an individual contributor if that's even possible. And I'm going to go out on a limb and guess you have thoughts on both aspects of that, and probably some more hit me, please.Amy: So, the ivory tower, right. Let's just be straight up, like, the ivory tower is Google. I mean, that's where it started. And we get it from the other large companies that, you know, want to do conference talks about what this stuff means and what it does. What I've kind of come around to in the last couple of years is that those talks don't really reach the vast majority of engineers, they don't really apply to a large swath of the enterprise especially, which is, like, where a lot of the—the bulk of our industry sits, right? We spend a lot of time talking about the darlings out here on the West Coast in high tech culture and startups and so on.But, like, we were talking about before we started the show, right, like, the interior of even just America, is filled with all these, like, insurance and banks and all of these companies that are cranking out tons of code and servers and stuff, and they're trying to figure out the same problems. But they're structured in companies where their tech arm is still, in most cases, considered a cost center, often is bundled under finance, for—that's a whole show of itself about that historical blunder. And so, the tech culture is tend to be very, very different from what we experience in—what do we call it anymore? Like, I don't even want to say West Coast anymore because we've gone remote, but, like, high tech culture we'll say. And so, like, thinking about how to make SRE and all this stuff more accessible comes down to, like, thinking about who those engineers are that are sitting at the computers, writing all the code that runs our banks, all the code that makes sure that—I'm trying to think of examples that are more enterprise-y right?Or shoot buying clothes online. You go to Macy's for example. They have a whole bunch of servers that run their online store and stuff. They have internal IT-ish people who keep all this stuff running and write that code and probably integrating open-source stuff much like we all do. But when you go to try to put in a reliability program that's based on the current SRE models, like SLOs; you put in SLOs and you start doing, like, this incident management program that's, like, you know, you have a form you fill out after every incident, and then you [unintelligible 00:20:25] retros.And it turns out that those things are very high-level skills, skills and capabilities in an organization. And so, when you have this kind of IT mindset or the enterprise mindset, bringing the culture together to make those things work often doesn't happen. Because, you know, they'll go with the prescriptive model and say, like, okay, we're going to implement SLOs, we're going to start measuring SLIs on all of the services, and we're going to hold you accountable for meeting those targets. If you just do that, right, you're just doing more gatekeeping and policing of your tech environment. My bet is, reliability almost never improves in those cases.And that's been my experience, too, and why I get charged up about this is, if you just go slam in these practices, people end up miserable, the practices then become tarnished because people experienced the worst version of them. And then—Corey: And with the remote explosion as well, it turns out that changing jobs basically means their company sends you a different Mac, and the next Monday, you wind up signing into a different Slack team.Amy: Yeah, so the culture really matters, right? You can't cover it over with foosball tables and great lunch. You actually have to deliver tools that developers want to use and you have to deliver a software engineering culture that brings out the best in developers instead of demanding the best from developers. I think that's a fundamental business shift that's kind of happening. If I'm putting on my wizard hat and looking into the future and dreaming about what might change in the world, right, is that there's kind of a change in how we do leadership and how we do business that's shifting more towards that model where we look at what people are capable of and we trust in our people, and we get more out of them, the knowledge work model.If we want more knowledge work, we need people to be happy and to feel engaged in their community. And suddenly we start to see these kind of generational, bigger-pie kind of things start to happen. But how do we get there? It's not SLOs. It maybe it's a little bit starting with incidents. That's where I've had the most success, and you asked me about that. So, getting practical, incident management is probably—Corey: Right. Well, as I see it, the problem with SLOs across the board is it feels like it's a very insular community so far, and communicating it to engineers seems to be the focus of where the community has been, but from my understanding of it, you absolutely need buy-in at significantly high executive levels, to at the very least by you air cover while you're doing these things and making these changes, but also to help drive that cultural shift. None of this is something I have the slightest clue how to do, let's be very clear. If I knew how to change a company's culture, I'd have a different job.Amy: Yeah. [laugh]. The biggest omission in the Google SRE books was [Ers 00:22:58]. There was a guy at Google named Ers who owns availability for Google, and when anything is, like, in dispute and bubbles up the management team, it goes to Ers, and he says, “Thou shalt…” right? Makes the call. And that's why it works, right?Like, it's not just that one person, but that system of management where the whole leadership team—there's a large, very well-funded team with a lot of power in the organization that can drive availability, and they can say, this is how you're going to do metrics for your service, and this is the system that you're in. And it's kind of, yeah, sure it works for them because they have all the organizational support in place. What I was saying to my team just the other day—because we're in the middle of our SLO rollout—is that really, I think an SLO program isn't [clear throat] about the engineers at all until late in the game. At the beginning of the game, it's really about getting the leadership team on board to say, “Hey, we want to put in SLIs and SLOs to start to understand the functioning of our software system.” But if they don't have that curiosity in the first place, that desire to understand how well their teams are doing, how healthy their teams are, don't do it. It's not going to work. It's just going to make everyone miserable.Corey: It feels like it's one of those difficult to sell problems as well, in that it requires some tooling changes, absolutely. It requires cultural change and buy-in and whatnot, but in order for that to happen, there has to be a painful problem that a company recognizes and is willing to pay to make go away. The problem with stuff like this is that once you pay, there's a lot of extra work that goes on top of it as well, that does not have a perception—rightly or wrongly—of contributing to feature velocity, of hitting the next milestone. It's, “Really? So, we're going to be spending how much money to make engineers happier? They should get paid an awful lot and they're still complaining and never seem happy. Why do I care if they're happy other than the pure mercenary perspective of otherwise they'll quit?” I'm not saying that it's not worth pursuing; it's not a worthy goal. I am saying that it becomes a very difficult thing to wind up selling as a product.Amy: Well, as a product for sure, right? Because—[sigh] gosh, I have friends in the space who work on these tools. And I want to be careful.Corey: Of course. Nothing but love for all of those people, let's be very clear.Amy: But a lot of them, you know, they're pulling metrics from existing monitoring systems, they are doing some interesting math on them, but what you get at the end is a nice service catalog and dashboard, which are things we've been trying to land as products in this industry for as long as I can remember, and—Corey: “We've got it this time, though. This time we'll crack the nut.” Yeah. Get off the island, Gilligan.Amy: And then the other, like, risky thing, right, is the other part that makes me uncomfortable about SLOs, and why I will often tell folks that I talk to out in the industry that are asking me about this, like, one-on-one, “Should I do it here?” And it's like, you can bring the tool in, and if you have a management team that's just looking to have metrics to drive productivity, instead of you know, trying to drive better knowledge work, what you get is just a fancier version of more Taylorism, right, which is basically scientific management, this idea that we can, like, drive workers to maximum efficiency by measuring random things about them and driving those numbers. It turns out, that doesn't really work very well, even in industrial scale, it just happened to work because, you know, we have a bloody enough society that we pushed people into it. But the reality is, if you implement SLOs badly, you get more really bad Taylorism that's bad for you developers. And my suspicion is that you will get worse availability out of it than you would if you just didn't do it at all.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Revelo. Revelo is the Spanish word of the day, and its spelled R-E-V-E-L-O. It means “I reveal.” Now, have you tried to hire an engineer lately? I assure you it is significantly harder than it sounds. One of the things that Revelo has recognized is something I've been talking about for a while, specifically that while talent is evenly distributed, opportunity is absolutely not. They're exposing a new talent pool to, basically, those of us without a presence in Latin America via their platform. It's the largest tech talent marketplace in Latin America with over a million engineers in their network, which includes—but isn't limited to—talent in Mexico, Costa Rica, Brazil, and Argentina. Now, not only do they wind up spreading all of their talent on English ability, as well as you know, their engineering skills, but they go significantly beyond that. Some of the folks on their platform are hands down the most talented engineers that I've ever spoken to. Let's also not forget that Latin America has high time zone overlap with what we have here in the United States, so you can hire full-time remote engineers who share most of the workday as your team. It's an end-to-end talent service, so you can find and hire engineers in Central and South America without having to worry about, frankly, the colossal pain of cross-border payroll and benefits and compliance because Revelo handles all of it. If you're hiring engineers, check out revelo.io/screaming to get 20% off your first three months. That's R-E-V-E-L-O dot I-O slash screaming.Corey: That is part of the problem is, in some cases, to drive some of these improvements, you have to go backwards to move forwards. And it's one of those, “Great, so we spent all this effort and money in the rest of now things are worse?” No, not necessarily, but suddenly are aware of things that were slipping through the cracks previously.Amy: Yeah. Yeah.Corey: Like, the most realistic thing about first The Phoenix Project and then The Unicorn Project, both by Gene Kim, has been the fact that companies have these problems and actively cared enough to change it. In my experience, that feels a little on the rare side.Amy: Yeah, and I think that's actually the key, right? It's for the culture change, and for, like, if you really looking to be, like, do I want to work at this company? Am I investing my myself in here? Is look at the leadership team and be, like, do these people actually give a crap? Are they looking just to punt another number down the road?That's the real question, right? Like, the technology and stuff, at the point where I'm at in my career, I just don't care that much anymore. [laugh]. Just… fine, use Kubernetes, use Postgres, [unintelligible 00:27:30], I don't care. I just don't. Like, Oracle, I might have to ask, you know, go to finance and be like, “Hey, can we spend 20 million for a database?” But like, nobody really asks for that anymore, so. [laugh].Corey: As one does. I will say that I mostly agree with you, but a technology that I found myself getting excited about, given the time of the recording on this is… fun, I spent a bit of time yesterday—from when we're recording this—teaching myself just enough Go to wind up being together a binary that I needed to do something actively ridiculous for my camera here. And I found myself coming away deeply impressed by a lot of things about it, how prescriptive it was for one, how self-contained for another. And after spending far too many years of my life writing shitty Perl, and shitty Bash, and worse Python, et cetera, et cetera, the prescriptiveness was great. The fact that it wound up giving me something I could just run, I could cross-compile for anything I need to run it on, and it just worked. It's been a while since I found a technology that got me this interested in exploring further.Amy: Go is great for that. You mentioned one of my two favorite features of Go. One is usually when a program compiles—at least the way I code in Go—it usually works. I've been working with Go since about 0.9, like, just a little bit before it was released as 1.0, and that's what I've noticed over the years of working with it is that most of the time, if you have a pretty good data structure design and you get the code to compile, usually it's going to work, unless you're doing weird stuff.The other thing I really love about Go and that maybe you'll discover over time is the malleability of it. And the reason why I think about that more than probably most folks is that I work on other people's code most of the time. And maybe this is something that you probably run into with your business, too, right, where you're working on other people's infrastructure. And the way that we encode business rules and things in the languages, in our programming language or our config syntax and stuff has a huge impact on folks like us and how quickly we can come into a situation, assess, figure out what's going on, figure out where things are laid out, and start making changes with confidence.Corey: Forget other people for a minute they're looking at what I built out three or four years ago here, myself, like, I look at past me, it's like, “What was that rat bastard thinking? This is awful.” And it's—forget other people's code; hell is your own code, on some level, too, once it's slipped out of the mental stack and you have to re-explore it and, “Oh, well thank God I defensively wound up not including any comments whatsoever explaining what the living hell this thing was.” It's terrible. But you're right, the other people's shell scripts are finicky and odd.I started poking around for help when I got stuck on something, by looking at GitHub, and a few bit of searching here and there. Even these large, complex, well-used projects started making sense to me in a way that I very rarely find. It's, “What the hell is that thing?” is my most common refrain when I'm looking at other people's code, and Go for whatever reason avoids that, I think because it is so prescriptive about formatting, about how things should be done, about the vision that it has. Maybe I'm romanticizing it and I'll hate it and a week from now, and I want to go back and remove this recording, but.Amy: The size of the language helps a lot.Corey: Yeah.Amy: But probably my favorite. It's more of a convention, which actually funny the way I'm going to talk about this because the two languages I work on the most right now are Ruby and Go. And I don't feel like two languages could really be more different.Syntax-wise, they share some things, but really, like, the mental models are so very, very different. Ruby is all the way in on object-oriented programming, and, like, the actual real kind of object-oriented with messaging and stuff, and, like, the whole language kind of springs from that. And it kind of requires you to understand all of these concepts very deeply to be effective in large programs. So, what I find is, when I approach Ruby codebase, I have to load all this crap into my head and remember, “Okay, so yeah, there's this convention, when you do this kind of thing in Ruby”—or especially Ruby on Rails is even worse because they go deep into convention over configuration. But what that's code for is, this code is accessible to people who have a lot of free cognitive capacity to load all this convention into their heads and keep it in their heads so that the code looks pretty, right?And so, that's the trade-off as you said, okay, my developers have to be these people with all these spare brain cycles to understand, like, why I would put the code here in this place versus this place? And all these, like, things that are in the code, like, very compact, dense concepts. And then you go to something like Go, which is, like, “Nah, we're not going to do Lambdas. Nah”—[laugh]—“We're not doing all this fancy stuff.” So, everything is there on the page.This drives some people crazy, right, is that there's all this boilerplate, boilerplate, boilerplate. But the reality is, I can read most Go files from top to the bottom and understand what the hell it's doing, whereas I can go sometimes look at, like, a Ruby thing, or sometimes Python and e—Perl is just [unintelligible 00:32:19] all the time, right, it's there's so much indirection. And it just be, like, “What the [BLEEP] is going on? This is so dense. I'm going to have to sit down and write it out in longhand so I can understand what the developer was even doing here.” And—Corey: Well, that's why I got the Mac Studio; for when I'm not doing A/V stuff with it, that means that I'll have one core that I can use for, you know, front-end processing and the rest, and the other 19 cores can be put to work failing to build Nokogiri in Ruby yet again.Amy: [laugh].Corey: I remember the travails of working with Ruby, and the problem—I have similar problems with Python, specifically in that—I don't know if I'm special like this—it feels like it's a SRE DevOps style of working, but I am grabbing random crap off a GitHub constantly and running it, like, small scripts other people have built. And let's be clear, I run them on my test AWS account that has nothing important because I'm not a fool that I read most of it before I run it, but I also—it wants a different version of Python every single time. It wants a whole bunch of other things, too. And okay, so I use ASDF as my version manager for these things, which for whatever reason, does not work for the way that I think about this ergonomically. Okay, great.And I wind up with detritus scattered throughout my system. It's, “Hey, can you make this reproducible on my machine?” “Almost certainly not, but thank you for asking.” It's like ‘Step 17: Master the Wolf' level of instructions.Amy: And I think Docker generally… papers over the worst of it, right, is when we built all this stuff in the aughts, you know, [CPAN 00:33:45]—Corey: Dev containers and VS Code are very nice.Amy: Yeah, yeah. You know, like, we had CPAN back in the day, I was doing chroots, I think in, like, '04 or '05, you know, to solve this problem, right, which is basically I just—screw it; I will compile an entire distro into a directory with a Perl and all of its dependencies so that I can isolate it from the other things I want to run on this machine and not screw up and not have these interactions. And I think that's kind of what you're talking about is, like, the old model, when we deployed servers, there was one of us sitting there and then we'd log into the server and be like, I'm going to install the Perl. You know, I'll compile it into, like, [/app/perl 558 00:34:21] whatever, and then I'll CPAN all this stuff in, and I'll give it over to the developer, tell them to set their shebang to that and everything just works. And now we're in a mode where it's like, okay, you got to set up a thousand of those. “Okay, well, I'll make a tarball.” [laugh]. But it's still like we had to just—Corey: DevOps, but [unintelligible 00:34:37] dev closer to ops. You're interrelating all the time. Yeah, then Docker comes along, and add dev is, like, “Well, here's the container. Good luck, asshole.” And it feels like it's been cast into your yard to worry about.Amy: Yeah, well, I mean, that's just kind of business, or just—Corey: Yeah. Yeah.Amy: I'm not sure if it's business or capitalism or something like that, but just the idea that, you know, if I can hand off the shitty work to some other poor schlub, why wouldn't I? I mean, that's most folks, right? Like, just be like, “Well”—Corey: Which is fair.Amy: —“I got it working. Like, my part is done, I did what I was supposed to do.” And now there's a lot of folks out there, that's how they work, right? “I hit done. I'm done. I shipped it. Sure. It's an old [unintelligible 00:35:16] Ubuntu. Sure, there's a bunch of shell scripts that rip through things. Sure”—you know, like, I've worked on repos where there's hundreds of things that need to be addressed.Corey: And passing to someone else is fine. I'm thrilled to do it. Where I run into problems with it is where people assume that well, my part was the hard part and anything you schlubs do is easy. I don't—Amy: Well, that's the underclass. Yeah. That's—Corey: Forget engineering for a second; I throw things to the people over in the finance group here at The Duckbill Group because those people are wizards at solving for this thing. And it's—Amy: Well, that's how we want to do things.Corey: Yeah, specialization works.Amy: But we have this—it's probably more cultural. I don't want to pick, like, capitalism to beat on because this is really, like, human cultural thing, and it's not even really particularly Western. Is the idea that, like, “If I have an underclass, why would I give a shit what their experience is?” And this is why I say, like, ops teams, like, get out of here because most ops teams, the extant ops teams are still called ops, and a lot of them have been renamed SRE—but they still do the same job—are an underclass. And I don't mean that those people are below us. People are treated as an underclass, and they shouldn't be. Absolutely not.Corey: Yes.Amy: Because the idea is that, like, well, I'm a fancy person who writes code at my ivory tower, and then it all flows down, and those people, just faceless people, do the deployment stuff that's beneath me. That attitude is the most toxic thing, I think, in tech orgs to address. Like, if you're trying to be like, “Well, our liability is bad, we have security problems, people won't fix their code.” And go look around and you will find people that are treated as an underclass that are given codes thrown over the wall at them and then they just have to toil through and make it work. I've worked on that a number of times in my career.And I think just like saying, underclass, right, or caste system, is what I found is the most effective way to get people actually thinking about what the hell is going on here. Because most people are just, like, “Well, that's just the way things are. It's just how we've always done it. The developers write to code, then give it to the sysadmins. The sysadmins deploy the code. Isn't that how it always works?”Corey: You'd really like to hope, wouldn't you?Amy: [laugh]. Not me. [laugh].Corey: Again, the way I see it is, in theory—in theory—sysadmins, ops, or that should not exist. People should theoretically be able to write code as developers that just works, the end. And write it correct the first time and never have to change it again. Yeah. There's a reason that I always like to call staging environments in places I work ‘theory' because it works in theory, but not in production, and that is fundamentally the—like, that entire job role is the difference between theory and practice.Amy: Yeah, yeah. Well, I think that's the problem with it. We're already so disconnected from the physical world, right? Like, you and I right now are talking over multiple strands of glass and digital transcodings and things right now, right? Like, we are detached from the physical reality.You mentioned earlier working in data centers, right? The thing I miss about it is, like, the physicality of it. Like, actually, like, I held a server in my arms and put it in the rack and slid it into the rails. I plugged into power myself; I pushed the power button myself. There's a server there. I physically touched it.Developers who don't work in production, we talked about empathy and stuff, but really, I think the big problem is when they work out in their idea space and just writing code, they write the unit tests, if we're very lucky, they'll write a functional test, and then they hand that wad off to some poor ops group. They're detached from the reality of operations. It's not even about accountability; it's about experience. The ability to see all of the weird crap we deal with, right? You know, like, “Well, we pushed the code to that server, but there were three bit flips, so we had to do it again. And then the other server, the disk failed. And on the other server…” You know? [laugh].It's just, there's all this weird crap that happens, these systems are so complex that they're always doing something weird. And if you're a developer that just spends all day in your IDE, you don't get to see that. And I can't really be mad at those folks, as individuals, for not understanding our world. I figure out how to help them, and the best thing we've come up with so far is, like, well, we start giving this—some responsibility in a production environment so that they can learn that. People do that, again, is another one that can be done wrong, where it turns into kind of a forced empathy.I actually really hate that mode, where it's like, “We're forcing all the developers online whether they like it or not. On-call whether they like it or not because they have to learn this.” And it's like, you know, maybe slow your roll a little buddy because the stuff is actually hard to learn. Again, minimizing how hard ops work is. “Oh, we'll just put the developers on it. They'll figure it out, right? They're software engineers. They're probably smarter than you sysadmins.” Is the unstated thing when we do that, right? When we throw them in the pit and be like, “Yeah, they'll get it.” [laugh].Corey: And that was my problem [unintelligible 00:39:49] the interview stuff. It was in the write code on a whiteboard. It's, “Look, I understood how the system fundamentally worked under the hood.” Being able to power my way through to get to an outcome even in language I don't know, was sort of part and parcel of the job. But this idea of doing it in artificially constrained environment, in a language I'm not super familiar with, off the top of my head, it took me years to get to a point of being able to do it with a Bash script because who ever starts with an empty editor and starts getting to work in a lot of these scenarios? Especially in an ops role where we're not building something from scratch.Amy: That's the interesting thing, right? In the majority of tech work today—maybe 20 years ago, we did it more because we were literally building the internet we have today. But today, most of the engineers out there working—most of us working stiffs—are working on stuff that already exists. We're making small incremental changes, which is great that's what we're doing. And we're dealing with old code.Corey: We're gluing APIs together, and that's fine. Ugh. I really want to thank you for taking so much time to talk to me about how you see all these things. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, where's the best place to find you?Amy: I'm on Twitter every once in a while as @MissAmyTobey, M-I-S-S-A-M-Y-T-O-B-E-Y. I have a blog I don't write on enough. And there's a couple things on the Equinix Metal blog that I've written, so if you're looking for that. Otherwise, mainly Twitter.Corey: And those links will of course be in the [show notes 00:41:08]. Thank you so much for your time. I appreciate it.Amy: I had fun. Thank you.Corey: As did I. Amy Tobey, Senior Principal Engineer at Equinix. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, or on the YouTubes, smash the like and subscribe buttons, as the kids say. Whereas if you've hated this episode, same thing, five-star review all the platforms, smash the buttons, but also include an angry comment telling me that you're about to wind up subpoenaing a copy of my shell script because you're convinced that your intellectual property and secrets are buried within.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast
Can you stomach the idea of recycled water?

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 11:52


Apart from Antarctica, Australia is the driest continent on earth, but the purification of wastewater for drinking hasn't really caught on just yet. Toowoomba famously flushed the idea in 2006, even as it stared down the worst drought on record. But according to a case study by engineering group Aurecon, a proposed facility in Greater Melbourne could produce water that's cheaper and purer, than the desalinated version you've been paying for.

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast
Getting a Scrum team back on the retrospectives train | Julie Wyman

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 14:25


Read the full Show Notes and search through the world's largest audio library on Scrum directly on the Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast website: http://bit.ly/SMTP_ShowNotes. Julie was part of a team supporting a large program of 10 scrum teams. The team that Julie was working with, started to skip the retrospectives because they were trying to catch-up. However, after they had been able to catch-up, the team did not come back to start holding their retrospectives again. When should the Scrum Master stand-up and push the team to hold their retrospectives again? In this episode, we talk about the critical role Scrum Masters play in keeping the teams accountable to themselves when it comes to process, and how sometimes, it is important to stop, even if that affects delivery, because retrospectives are the “power station” for the rest of the work the team does.  Featured Book of the Week: Impact Mapping, by Gojko Adzic In Impact Mapping: Making a Big Impact with Software Products and Projects by Gojko Adzic, Julie found a way to crystalize the concept of business impact. Impact Mapping, is a short book with lot of visuals. You can also learn about Impact Mapping in Gojko Adzic's presentation on Impact Mapping.  How can Angela (the Agile Coach) quickly build healthy relationships with the teams she's supposed to help? What were the steps she followed to help the Breeze App team fight off the competition? Find out how Angela helped Naomi and the team go from “behind” to being ahead of Intuition Bank, by focusing on the people! Download the first 4 chapters of the BOOK for FREE while it is in Beta! About Julie Wyman Julie Wyman has been working with Agile teams for over a decade and is continuously learning with and from them. She's based just outside Washington, D.C., but has had the pleasure of supporting teams distributed across the globe and even experienced her own Agile takeaways all the way in Antarctica. You can link with Julie Wyman on LinkedIn.

Learn Spanish with Stories
The Atacama Desert, Another Planet on Earth (El Desierto de Atacama, Otro Planeta Dentro de la Tierra)

Learn Spanish with Stories

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 21:54


The deserts across the planet are some of the most majestic and impressive destinations you will ever witness; Latin America is no exception. But there is one specific Latin American desert that has managed to blow the minds of even the highest level of scientists on the globe: The Atacama Desert.Known for being the most arid (driest) desert outside of Antarctica, Atacama has still managed to sustain life, and is the place where you are most likely to have the best visibility of distant stars and galaxies – so much, in fact, that NASA extensively studies space from there.Furthermore, its potential for tourism is so high that more and more people are crossing Chile and South America to visit it every year. Want to know more? Listen to our latest episode of Learn Spanish with Stories and enjoy!Transcript of this episode is available at: https://podcast.lingomastery.com/listen/1070

Nobody Listens to Paula Poundstone
Ep 200 - Right Here, Right Meow

Nobody Listens to Paula Poundstone

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 113:50


Last week we explored the incredible talents of dogs. This week we give equal time to explore the question: Do cats HAVE any talents? And if so, can they be persuaded to, you know, use them? For good? Can Paula's cats be taught to think INSIDE the box? Mikel Delgado helps us get inside the feline mind! Also, in our quest to find new listeners, we're heading to Antarctica. For some reason. It's Toni and Bonnie's Oral Report. GUEST Mikel Delgado https://mikeldelgado.com http://www.felineminds.com HOUSE BAND Jay Clanin https://roadrunnerproductions.net/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast
Learning to coach, and listening to the Scrum team's needs | Julie Wyman

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 12:41


Read the full Show Notes and search through the world's largest audio library on Scrum directly on the Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast website: http://bit.ly/SMTP_ShowNotes. As we move from our mentoring/training stance, to more of a coaching stance, we need to be mindful of the team's own journey. In this episode, we talk about the transition that Julie was going through, from mentoring to coaching, and how the team reacted to her change. Listening to the team, and learning what is the right stance to take is critical for Scrum Masters.  About Julie Wyman Julie Wyman has been working with Agile teams for over a decade and is continuously learning with and from them. She's based just outside Washington, D.C., but has had the pleasure of supporting teams distributed across the globe and even experienced her own Agile takeaways all the way in Antarctica. You can link with Julie Wyman on LinkedIn.

EXOPOLITICS TODAY with Dr. Michael Salla
The 100 year UFO ET Cover Up - timeline of events, people & organizations

EXOPOLITICS TODAY with Dr. Michael Salla

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 92:59


Dan Willis served with the US Navy where he first encountered evidence of a UFO/ET coverup in 1969. He was among a select group of 20 insiders/whistleblowers who came forward to share their testimony about the coverup in the famous May 2001 Disclosure Project press conference held in Washington DC. In his first Exopolitics Today interview, Dan covers his background, participation in the Disclosure Project, and his timeline of the UFO extraterrestrial cover up dating back to 1922. Key events discussed include Maria Orsic, the Third Reich's flying saucer program, Temporal War, Antarctica, Operation Highjump, President Eisenhower's meetings and agreements, and how these relate to current events. Dan Willis' timeline is available here: https://thewebmatrix.net/disclosure/timelineofevents.html Dan Willis' testimony in the 2001 Disclosure Project is here: https://youtu.be/ClhNHIEPCKE?t=2030 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/exopolitics/support

ZakBabyTV
Antarctica HORROR Stories

ZakBabyTV

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 55:23


Canary Cry News Talk
PINEAL PENGUINS

Canary Cry News Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 243:35


Canary Cry News Talk #481 - 05.06.2022 PINEAL PENGUINS LINKTREE: CanaryCry.Party SHOW NOTES: CanaryCryNewsTalk.com CLIP CHANNEL: CanaryCry.Tube SUPPLY DROP: CanaryCrySupplyDrop.com SUPPORT: CanaryCryRadio.com/Support MEET UPS: CanaryCryMeetUps.com Basil's other podcast: ravel Gonz' YT: Facelikethesun Resurrection Gonz Archive Youtube: Facelikethesun.Live App Made by Canary Cry Producer: Truther Dating App   LEAD UKRAINE Biden Admin needs to “shut up” about helping Ukraine kill (MSN/Insider)   UFO/ALIENS UFO briefing Capital Hill, Lawmakers not impressed (Politico) → NASA to send naked pictures of humans to space   BEAST SYSTEM/CONNECTED First Commercial Brain Computer Interface human trial begins (Bloomberg)   INTRO (M-W-F) B&G Update V4V/Exec./Asso./Support   FLIPPY Robot sidekick helps build remote control plane (Mashable)   [Party Pitch/Ravel/CCClips/text alerts]   GREAT RESET PepsiCo to promote mental health with “Great Shuffle Reset” (Happi)   MIND CONTROL WEAPONS PR Firms tell big companies NOT to comment on abortion leak (Pop info)   [TREASURE/SPEAKPIPE/BYE YOUTUBE]   COVID CDC tracked millions of phones to assess lockdown orders (Vice) What Pfizer documents reveal (Newsweek)   [TALENT]   ANTARCTICA/SPACE Giant MRI of Antarctica reveals Groundwater system (Phys.org) Scientists baffled that beheaded penguins wash up on shore (DailyMail) Emperor Penguins in trouble in Antarctica (Reuters) → Melatonin and Pineal Gland (Medscape) → Serotonin levels in Penguins, study → Wikileaks Tweet about penguin pineal glands → Biblical Pineal   [TIME/OUTRO]   EPISODE 481 WAS PRODUCED BY… Executive Producers Brandon C**   Producers Debra S, MORV, Isaac G, James M, Liz M, Cloud Suriel, LX protocol V2, Sir James knight and Servant of the Lion of Judah, Jackie U, Sir Scott Knight of Truth, Sir Casey the Shield Knight, Gail M, Veronica D, Runksmash   AUDIO PRODUCTION (Jingles, Iso, Music): Leirbag3K   ART PRODUCTION (Drawing, Painting, Graphics): Dame Allie of the Skillet Nation, Sir Dove Knight of Rusbeltia   CONTENT PRODUCTION (Microfiction etc.): Runksmash: Epilogue: In the violent reaction of ice and magma the rectenna is destroyed, ending the global power transmission. The last movement on the planet is Heather and Russ, leaving behind only the husk of Grace and a pair of Amazarms in an eternal embrace.   CLIP PRODUCER Emsworth, FaeLivrin, Epsilon   Timestamps: Mondays: Jackie U Wednesdays: Jade Bouncerson Fridays: Christine C

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan
Critter of the Week: Slaters

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 14:17


Slaters, or woodlice, are part of the isopod family. They're a type of crustacean - like crabs and crayfish - but they moved from the oceans onto the land millions of years ago. There are probably 5000-7000 species worldwide, and they've colonised diverse and extreme places from Antarctica to deserts in Australia.

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast
Journal Nature has a stark message for Australian lawmakers- Science with Jonathan Webb

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 7:30


The editorial in the latest edition of the journal Nature has a stark message for Australian lawmakers. And new study describes a huge reservoir of ground water that sits beneath the ice sheet of Antarctica.

Horror Hangout | Two Bearded Film Fans Watch The 50 Best Horror Movies Ever!

Whoever wins... We lose.Alien vs. Predator (stylized as AVP: Alien vs. Predator) is a 2004 science fiction action film written and directed by Paul W. S. Anderson, and starring Sanaa Lathan, Raoul Bova, Lance Henriksen, Ewen Bremner, Colin Salmon, and Tommy Flanagan. It is the first film installment of the Alien vs. Predator franchise, adapting a crossover bringing together the eponymous creatures of the Alien and Predator series, a concept which originated in a 1989 comic book written by Randy Stradley and Chris Warner. During an archaeological expedition on Bouvetøya Island in Antarctica, a team of archaeologists and other scientists find themselves caught up in a battle between the two legends. Soon, the team realize that only one species can win.00:00 Intro07:26 Horror News20:19 What We've Been Watching34:16 Film Review1:49:07 Name Game1:57:18 Film Rating2:03:40 OutroPodcast - https://podlink.to/horrorhangout​​​Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/horrorhangoutFacebook - https://www.facebook.com/hawkandcleaverTwitter - https://twitter.com/hawkandcleaver​​​Website - http://www.hawkandcleaver.com​​​Ben - https://twitter.com/ben_errington​​​Andy - https://twitter.com/AndyCTWritesAudio credit - Taj Eastonhttp://tajeaston.comSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/thehorrorhangout. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Getting to Good Enough
Episode 202: Acting on Good Impulses (Redux)

Getting to Good Enough

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 29:18


Due to circumstances beyond our control, we're not able to publish a new episode this week. Instead, we're rerunning this episode, which we originally published on February 13, 2020. Enjoy! Good people (like our listeners) have many good impulses. But how often do you act on them? This week, Shannon and Janine discuss how perfectionism can get in the way of acting on new impulses and how you can get past that. Discussion topics include: • Our excitement over breaking into the top 100 Health & Fitness podcasts in Poland! (And that we're still on the quest for a listener in Antarctica.) • How perfectionism can stop some people from acting on their good impulses • The fact that it really is the thought that counts and most people just want to be remembered--they don't care how. • The story that sparked this episode topic: how Shannon was able to soothe a little girl at a coffee shop (and the cartoon she drew of it) • How it's so easy to censor yourself and not act on the impulse to help others • One easy way to make someone's day: Give directions to someone who appears lost • The complexity of Shannon's neighborhood that allows her to help many lost people • How Shannon's picking up of garbage on her training walks started as a good impulse • Making it easy for yourself to act on good impulses • The challenge of letting go of perfectionism around acting on good impulses • How perfectionism can really trip us up on writing thank-you notes Visit the show notes at www.gettingtogoodenough.com for links!

Murder Moose Podcast
Murder Moose: A Horror Podcast - Episode 83: The Thing (1982)

Murder Moose Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 82:39


The Murder Moose Podcast is here! Rod and Josh are here to talk about horror, focusing on independent and foreign horror! In episode 83, Rod and Josh dive into a John Carpenter masterpiece, 1982's The Thing. A research team in Antarctica is hunted by a shape-shifting alien that assumes the appearance of its victims. https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0084787/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1 http://murdermoose.com/ The show's twitter is at https://twitter.com/MooseMurderPod  Show's Discord discord.me/murdermoose and the show's email is murdermoosepodcast@gmail.com Rod can be found on twitter at https://twitter.com/rod_johnston Josh can be found at https://joshwrb.com Josh's twitter https://twitter.com/joshwrb/

Web Crawlers
MAILBAG: Kidnapping Scam & Fake Birds

Web Crawlers

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 40:30


VOICEMAILS: Listener's husband works in Antarctica. Getting misgendered at work. Birds aren't real. A real life magician calls. Jeb is still out there looking for Maria. What constitutes a “monster.” Mormon lore about Bigfoot. A kidnapping scam targeting Mexican-Americans. Another call for the chief of police regarding Maria. Webcrawlerspod@gmail.com626-604-6262Discord / Twitter / Instagram / Patreon / MerchSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/webcrawlers. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Live Wire with Luke Burbank
Best News: "A Robot Walks into a Bar..."

Live Wire with Luke Burbank

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 19:53


Luke and Elena discuss recording this week from a Mazda rental car, a robot living with a penguin colony in Antarctica, and a nonprofit that sends unused hotel soap to people in need.

The Weather Lounge
Glaciers and Sea Level Rise: A Discussion on Climate Change w/ Dr. Richard Alley

The Weather Lounge

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 58:31


We know it's a touchy subject, but we have to address the elephant in the room. It's no question that the climate is changing, and we decided to talk to one of the leading experts to figure it out a bit more.  Our guest this week is none other than Dr. Richard Alley; the Evan Pugh University Professor of Geosciences at Penn State. He's studied climate since 1987, focusing on ice sheets, glaciology, and ice cores. Dr. Alley has made numerous trips to Antarctica and Greenland during his studies, participated in the UN Intergovernmental Panel Climate Change, was a co-recipient of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize, and even an advisor to multiple members of congress and a former US Vice President. You can find more about his work here   Feel free to email us: weatherlounge@weatherworksinc.com if you have any comments about the show, or have suggestions for future topics.  Also, follow us on Social Media! Twitter Facebook Instagram LinkedIn YouTube    

Bad Dads Film Review
Midweek Mention... The Thing

Bad Dads Film Review

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 30:22


THE THING is John Carpenter's 1982 horror masterpiece, combining a simple but sensational premise with some of the most incredible special effects ever devised from legendary prosthetic makeup designer Rob Bottin.  Crash landing on earth over 100,000 years ago, an unknowable alien entity has lain dormant in Antarctica until unfrozen by a doomed scientific team. It's unique ability is to precisely mimic any life it comes in contact with and this ingeniously paranoid idea sees the audience in the same predicament as our hero MacReady (Kurt Russell, THE CHRISTMAS CHRONICLES); not knowing which of our excellent ensemble cast might be the cosmic abomination until their face splits open to reveal some grotesque transgressive horror. As tension mounts and the team start to fracture, scenes of almost unimaginable awfulness unfold from a terror truly beyond human understanding and the ambiguous downbeat ending is an all-time classic. Tune in to hear us discuss Ennio Morricone's Razzie nominated score, gather tips on how to spot which characters might be The Thing and unpack the unsettling existential implications of its terrifying central conceit. The iconic poster was conceptualised, painted and delivered to the studio in less than 24 hours by the wonderful film poster artist Drew Struzan and a copy of his artwork hangs on my office wall so if you can't tell already I'm a bit of a fan of this one.

Concert Pipeline
Ep. 361 - Madame Gandhi

Concert Pipeline

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022


Concert Pipeline’s three hundred sixty first episode featuring Madame Gandhi, in which we chat about musical lessons learned from living in New York and India, spending time in Antarctica recording the sounds of glaciers, her trilogy of EPs, including “Vibrations,” which is expected this fall, and the upcomingBottleRock music festival in Napa.

Radio Galaksija
Radio Galaksija #147: Fizika arktičkog leda (dr Predrag Popović) [03-05-2022]

Radio Galaksija

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 116:30


U ovoj epizodi Radio Galaksije bavili smo se Arktikom! Pričali smo o arktičkom ledu, stvaranju i topljenju leda, jezercima na arktičkom ledu i fizici koja ih opisuje. Gost je  bio dr Predrag Popović sa Instituta za fiziku Zemlje iz Pariza. Ako vas zanima kako se geofizičari bave Arktikom, kako se fizičkim modelima može opisati evolucija arktičkih jezeraca na ledu, problem koji značajno utiče na lokalni arktički sistem i određuje globalne parametre za globalne modele klimatskih promena, poput albeda, recimo, poslušajte ovu epizodu. Pričali smo o problemima istraživanja leda na Arktiku, fizici procesa nastajanja leda i topljenja leda, stvaranja jezeraca, njihovim oblicima, distribuciji po veličini, kao i kako kritična granica perkolacije (saznaćete u emisiji šta je to ;) ) kontroliše evoluciju jezeraca tokom vremena. Govorili smo o modelima koji opisuju raspodelu jezeraca i njihovu evoluciju, kao i kako je dobijena analitička zavisnost koja nam određuje globalne parametre važne za globalne klimatološke modele i posmatranja Arktika na osnovu lokalnih i malih struktura jezeraca i njihove povezanosti na ledu Arktika. Takođe, pričali smo i o ubrzavanju topljenja arktičkog leda stvaranjem jezeraca i značaju ovog procesa za globalne klimatske promene i globalno zagrevanje. Ako vas zanimaju detalji, možete više pročitati u Peđinom doktoratu i u radovima: Popovic, P., 2020. Idealized Models of Arctic Sea Ice Melt Ponds.Popović, P., Cael, B.B., Silber, M. and Abbot, D.S., 2018. Simple rules govern the patterns of Arctic sea ice melt ponds. Physical review letters, 120(14), p.148701.Popović, P., Silber, M.C. and Abbot, D.S., 2020. Critical percolation threshold restricts late‐summer Arctic sea ice melt pond coverage. Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, 125(8), p.e2019JC016029.Popović, P., Finkel, J., Silber, M.C. and Abbot, D.S., 2020. Snow topography on undeformed Arctic sea ice captured by an idealized “snow dune” model. Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, 125(9), p.e2019JC016034.Macdonald, G.J., Popović, P. and Mayer, D.P., 2020. Formation of sea ice ponds from ice-shelf runoff, adjacent to the McMurdo Ice Shelf, Antarctica. Annals of Glaciology, 61(82), pp.73-77.Ukoliko naš rad želite da podržavate iznosom koji sami određujete na mesečnom nivou, to možete učiniti ovde: https://patreon.com/join/radiogalaksija. Ukoliko želite da donirate Radio Galaksiju jednokratno preko PayPal-a, to možete učiniti ovde: http://paypal.me/radiogalaksija. Hvala!Pratite nas i na društvenim mrežama: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Reddit.A ukoliko više volite da čitate e-mailove, prijavite se na naš newsletter, ovde. Support the show

Adventure Deficit
Kevin Cusack: Nearing the Edge in Antarctica

Adventure Deficit

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 64:10


So the saying goes..."There are old climbers, and there are bold climbers, but there are no old bold climbers". Enter Kevin Cusack, whose reputation for adventure sports flies well under the radar. As a seasoned athlete and adventurer, Kev keeps company with many of the big names on the outdoor scene, sharing personal history with the likes of the late Scott Fischer. He bags big peaks, and his latest includes a saga he and his adult son tackled on Vinson, Antartica (16,860 ft). The winds got wild, perspective shifty, and the lessons commenced. Tune in and #TakeYourMedicine!

chycho
Ep.129: Happy 420, 2022 Live Stream, Open Discussion [ASMR, Snacks, herbs and Good Times]

chycho

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 129:23


Video on BitChute: https://www.bitchute.com/video/lbqeWFOKcH1T/ Video on Rumble: https://rumble.com/v13dfad-happy-420-2022-live-stream-open-discussion-asmr-snacks-cannabis-and-good-ti.html Video on Odysee: https://odysee.com/@chycho:6/Happy_420_2022:4 Introduction Video on CensorTube: https://youtu.be/POsgRtRsbkY ***SUPPORT*** ▶️ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/chycho ▶️ Paypal: https://www.paypal.me/chycho ▶️ Subscribe Star: https://www.subscribestar.com/chycho ▶️ Streamlabs at: https://streamlabs.com/chycholive ▶️ ...and crypto, see below. ▶️ Guilded Server: https://www.guilded.gg/chycho APPROXIMATE TIMESTAMPS: TIMESTAMPS: - CensorTube Introduction (0:00-16:16) - The Batman 2022 Movie Review and Discussion (4:59-10:49) - Lots of random discussion - Some of Our Herbs We Harvested Last Year, and the Arizer Vaporizer I've Been Using for the last Decade (18:26-25:01) - 420 Break #1, and lots of random discussion 420 style - Back from 420 Break (34:40) - What's Going on In Antarctica? The Happy 420 Questions (36:26-40:07) - My Happy 420 Snacks, and Some Random Discussion (42:54-53:35) - 420 Break #2, and lots of random discussion 420 style - Back from 4:20 Break (1:07:15) - What the Discard from the Vaporizer Looks Like (1:17:16-1:08:34) - Now We Know the Answer to How Could They Allow It to Happen? The Greatest Psyop in Human History (1:08:34-1:12:50) - How to Clean Your Vaporizing Pipes (1:12:55-1:15:10) - More random discussion - Julian Assange (1:19:00) - More random discussion - 420 Break #3, and lots of random discussion 420 style (1:29:00) - Back from 4:20 Break (1:38:40) - Lots of random discussion - New Laptop Computer Unboxing: Happy 420 Celebration (1:46:27-1:57:50) - Snack Time: Died Yellow Peaches (1:59:15) ***VIDEO PLATFORMS*** ▶️ BitChute: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/chycho ▶️ Rumble: https://rumble.com/c/chycho ▶️ Odysee: https://odysee.com/$/invite/@chycho:6 ▶️ Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/chycholive

Unapologetically Abundant
How to accelerate your spiritual awakening with Dr. Nikki Starr Noce

Unapologetically Abundant

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 31:45


On this episode, we talked about: Healing and transforming your life Following my heart's calling Discovering your heart's true desire Following your curiosity Honoring your evolution and where you are Lack creates lack Activating superhuman potential Embodying all your inner work Doing self-care practice Finding what inspires you   "I just knew that there was something more, and I started to follow my heart's calling and intuition"   "You're going to go through changes and transformations, so just honor what's true for you at the moment"   "Invest in yourself, you are your best return of investments and put one foot in front of the other"   About Dr. Nikki:   Dr. Nikki Starr Noce is a medical doctor turned transformational life coach, spiritual healer, and power and purpose activator.  By age 25 she traveled the world touching every continent except Antarctica, where she experienced different healing modalities, sacred sites, initiations and medicine people, which sparked her spiritual awakening and ignited her innate healing gifts as she was born into a lineage of Colombians healers and shamans. Now based in Malibu Beach, California she works with people worldwide via her bespoke 1:1 programs and online courses with the goal of reaching millions of people for the awakening and healing of humankind. To learn more visit DrNikkiStarr.com and follow her on Instagram @drnikkistarr and @nikkistarr.noce   

Screaming in the Cloud
Leading the Cloud Security Pack with Yoav Alon

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 34:13


About YoavYoav is a security veteran recognized on Microsoft Security Response Center's Most Valuable Research List (BlackHat 2019). Prior to joining Orca Security, he was a Unit 8200 researcher and team leader, a chief architect at Hyperwise Security, and a security architect at Check Point Software Technologies. Yoav enjoys hunting for Linux and Windows vulnerabilities in his spare time.Links Referenced: Orca Security: https://orca.security Twitter: https://twitter.com/yoavalon TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Optimized cloud compute plans have landed at Vultr to deliver lightning fast processing power, courtesy of third gen AMD EPYC processors without the IO, or hardware limitations, of a traditional multi-tenant cloud server. Starting at just 28 bucks a month, users can deploy general purpose, CPU, memory, or storage optimized cloud instances in more than 20 locations across five continents. Without looking, I know that once again, Antarctica has gotten the short end of the stick. Launch your Vultr optimized compute instance in 60 seconds or less on your choice of included operating systems, or bring your own. It's time to ditch convoluted and unpredictable giant tech company billing practices, and say goodbye to noisy neighbors and egregious egress forever. Vultr delivers the power of the cloud with none of the bloat. "Screaming in the Cloud" listeners can try Vultr for free today with a $150 in credit when they visit getvultr.com/screaming. That's G E T V U L T R.com/screaming. My thanks to them for sponsoring this ridiculous podcast.Corey: Finding skilled DevOps engineers is a pain in the neck! And if you need to deploy a secure and compliant application to AWS, forgettaboutit! But that's where DuploCloud can help. Their comprehensive no-code/low-code software platform guarantees a secure and compliant infrastructure in as little as two weeks, while automating the full DevSecOps lifestyle. Get started with DevOps-as-a-Service from DuploCloud so that your cloud configurations are done right the first time. Tell them I sent you and your first two months are free. To learn more visit: snark.cloud/duplocloud. Thats's snark.cloud/D-U-P-L-O-C-L-O-U-D. Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Periodically, I would say that I enjoy dealing with cloud platform security issues, except I really don't. It's sort of forced upon me to deal with much like a dead dog is cast into their neighbor's yard for someone else to have to worry about. Well, invariably, it seems like it's my yard.And I'm only on the periphery of these things. Someone who's much more in the trenches in the wide world of cloud security is joining me today. Yoav Alon is the CTO at Orca Security. Yoav, thank you for taking the time to join me today and suffer the slings and arrows I'll no doubt be hurling your way.Yoav: Thank you, Corey, for having me. I've been a longtime listener, and it's an honor to be here.Corey: I still am periodically surprised that anyone listens to these things. Because it's unlike a newsletter where everyone will hit reply and give me a piece of their mind. People generally don't wind up sending me letters about things that they hear on the podcast, so whenever I talk to somebody listens to it as, “Oh. Oh, right, I did turn the microphone on. Awesome.” So, it's always just a little on the surreal side.But we're not here to talk necessarily about podcasting, or the modern version of an AM radio show. Let's start at the very beginning. What is Orca Security, and why would folks potentially care about what it is you do?Yoav: So, Orca Security is a cloud security company, and our vision is very simple. Given a customer's cloud environment, we want to detect all the risks in it and implement mechanisms to prevent it from occurring. And while it sounds trivial, before Orca, it wasn't really possible. You will have to install multiple tools and aggregate them and do a lot of manual work, and it was messy. And we wanted to change that, so we had, like, three guiding principles.We call it seamless, so I want to detect all the risks in your environment without friction, which is our speak for fighting with your peers. We also want to detect everything so you don't have to install, like, a tool for each issue: A tool for vulnerabilities, a tool for misconfigurations, and for sensitive data, IAM roles, and such. And we put a very high priority on context, which means telling you what's important, what's not. So, for example, S3 bucket open to the internet is important if it has sensitive data, not if it's a, I don't know, static website.Corey: Exactly. I have a few that I'd like to get screamed at in my AWS account, like, “This is an open S3 bucket and it's terrible.” I look at it the name is assets.lastweekinaws.com. Gee, I wonder if that's something that's designed to be a static hosted website.Increasingly, I've been slapping CloudFront in front of those things just to make the broken warning light go away. I feel like it's an underhanded way of driving CloudFront adoption some days, but not may not be the most charitable interpretation thereof. Orca has been top-of-mind for a lot of folks in the security community lately because let's be clear here, dealing with security problems in cloud providers from a vendor perspective is an increasingly crowded—and clouded—space. Just because there's so much—there's investment pouring into it, everyone has a slightly different take on the problem, and it becomes somewhat challenging to stand out from the pack. You didn't really stand out from the pack so much as leaped to the front of it and more or less have become the de facto name in a very short period of time, specifically—at least from my world—when you wound up having some very interesting announcements about vulnerabilities within AWS itself. You will almost certainly do a better job of relating the story, so please, what did you folks find?Yoav: So, back in September of 2021, two of my researchers, Yanir Tsarimi and Tzah Pahima, each one of them within a relatively short span of time from each other, found a vulnerability in AWS. Tzah found a vulnerability in CloudFormation which we named BreakingFormation and Yanir found a vulnerability in AWS Glue, which we named SuperGlue. We're not the best copywriters, but anyway—Corey: No naming things is hard. Ask any Amazonian.Yoav: Yes. [laugh]. So, I'll start with BreakingFormation which caught the eyes of many. It was an XXE SSRF, which is jargon to say that we were able to read files and execute HTTP requests and read potentially sensitive data from CloudFormation servers. This one was mitigated within 26 hours by AWS, so—Corey: That was mitigated globally.Yoav: Yes, globally, which I've never seen such quick turnaround anywhere. It was an amazing security feat to see.Corey: Particularly in light of the fact that AWS does a lot of things very right when it comes to, you know, designing cloud infrastructure. Imagine that, they've had 15 years of experience and basically built the idea of cloud, in some respects, at the scale that hyperscalers operate at. And one of their core tenets has always been that there's a hard separation between regions. There are remarkably few global services, and those are treated with the utmost of care and delicacy. To the point where when something like that breaks as an issue that spans more than one region, it is headline-making news in many cases.So it's, they almost never wind up deploying things to all regions at the same time. That can be irksome when we're talking about things like I want a feature that solves a problem that I have, and I have to wait months for it to hit a region that I have resources living within, but for security, stuff like this, I am surprised that going from, “This is the problem,” to, “It has been mitigated,” took place within 26 hours. I know it sounds like a long time to folks who are not deep in the space, but that is superhero speed.Yoav: A small correction, it's 26 hours for, like, the main regions. And it took three to four days to propagate to all regions. But still, it's speed of lighting in for security space.Corey: When this came out, I was speaking to a number of journalists on background about trying to wrap their head around this, and they said that, “Oh yeah, and security is always, like, the top priority for AWS, second only to uptime and reliability.” And… and I understand the perception, but I disagree with it in the sense of the nightmare scenario—that every time I mention to a security person watching the blood drain from their face is awesome—but the idea that take IAM, which as Werner said in his keynote, processes—was it 500 million or was it 500 billion requests a second, some ludicrous number—imagine fails open where everything suddenly becomes permitted. I have to imagine in that scenario, they would physically rip the power cables out of the data centers in order to stop things from going out. And that is the right move. Fortunately, I am extremely optimistic that will remain a hypothetical because that is nightmare fuel right there.But Amazon says that security is job zero. And my cynical interpretation is that well, it wasn't, but they forgot security, decided to bolt it on to the end, like everyone else does, and they just didn't want to renumber all their slides, so instead of making it point one, they just put another slide in front of it and called the job zero. I'm sure that isn't how it worked, but for those of us who procrastinate and building slide decks for talks, it has a certain resonance to it. That was one issue. The other seemed a little bit more pernicious focusing on Glue, which is their ETL-as-a-Service… service. One of them I suppose. Tell me more about it.Yoav: So, one of the things that we found when we found the BreakingFormation when we reported the vulnerability, it led us to do a quick Google search, which led us back to the Glue service. It had references to Glue, and we started looking around it. And what we were able to do with the vulnerability is given a specific feature in Glue, which we don't disclose at the moment, we were able to effectively take control over the account which hosts the Glue service in us-east-1. And having this control allowed us to essentially be able to impersonate the Glue service. So, every role in AWS that has a trust to the Glue service, we were able to effectively assume a role into it in any account in AWS. So, this was more critical a vulnerability in its effect.Corey: I think on some level, the game of security has changed because for a lot of us who basically don't have much in the way of sensitive data living in AWS—and let's be clear, I take confidentiality extremely seriously. Our clients on the consulting side view their AWS bills themselves as extremely confidential information that Amazon stuffs into a PDF and emails every month. But still. If there's going to be a leak, we absolutely do not want it to come from us, and that is something that we take extraordinarily seriously. But compared to other jobs I've had in the past, no one will die if that information gets out.It is not the sort of thing that is going to ruin people's lives, which is very often something that can happen in some data breaches. But in my world, one of the bad cases of a breach of someone getting access to my account is they could spin up a bunch of containers on the 17 different services that AWS offers that can run containers and mine cryptocurrency with it. And the damage to me then becomes a surprise bill. Okay, great. I can live with that.Something that's a lot scarier to a lot of companies with, you know, serious problems is, yep, fine, cost us money, whatever, but our access to our data is the one thing that is going to absolutely be the thing that cannot happen. So, from that perspective alone, something like Glue being able to do that is a lot more terrifying than subverting CloudFormation and being able to spin up additional resources or potentially take resources down. Is that how you folks see it too, or is—I'm sure there's nuance I'm missing.Yoav: So yeah, the access to data is top-of-mind for everyone. It's a bit scary to think about it. I have to mention, again, the quick turnaround time for AWS, which almost immediately issued a patch. It was a very fast one and they mitigated, again, the issue completely within days. About your comment about data.Data is king these days, there is nothing like data, and it has all the properties of everything that we care about. It's expensive to store, it's expensive to move, and it's very expensive if it leaks. So, I think a lot of people were more alarmed about the Glue vulnerability than the CloudFormation vulnerability. And they're right in doing so.Corey: I do want to call out that AWS did a lot of things right in this area. Their security posture is very clearly built around defense-in-depth. The fact that they were able to disclose—after some prodding—that they checked the CloudTrail logs for the service itself, dating back to the time the service launched, and verified that there had never been an exploit of this, that is phenomenal, as opposed to the usual milquetoast statements that companies have. We have no evidence of it, which can mean that we did the same thing and we looked through all the logs in it's great, but it can also mean that, “Oh, yeah, we probably should have logs, shouldn't we? But let's take a backlog item for that.” And that's just terrifying on some level.It becomes a clear example—a shining beacon for some of us in some cases—of doing things right from that perspective. There are other sides to it, though. As a customer, it was frustrating in the extreme to—and I mean, no offense by this—to learn about this from you rather than from the provider themselves. They wound up putting up a security notification many hours after your blog post went up, which I would also just like to point out—and we spoke about it at the time and it was a pure coincidence—but there was something that was just chef's-kiss perfect about you announcing this on Andy Jassy's birthday. That was just very well done.Yoav: So, we didn't know about Andy's birthday. And it was—Corey: Well, I see only one of us has a company calendar with notable executive birthdays splattered all over it.Yoav: Yes. And it was also published around the time that AWS CISO was announced, which was also a coincidence because the date was chosen a lot of time in advance. So, we genuinely didn't know.Corey: Communicating around these things is always challenging because on the one hand, I can absolutely understand the cloud providers' position on this. We had a vulnerability disclosed to us. We did our diligence and our research because we do an awful lot of things correctly and everyone is going to have vulnerabilities, let's be serious here. I'm not sitting here shaking my fist, angry at AWS's security model. It works, and I am very much a fan of what they do.And I can definitely understand then, going through all of that there was no customer impact, they've proven it. What value is there to them telling anyone about it, I get that. Conversely, you're a security company attempting to stand out in a very crowded market, and it is very clear that announcing things like this demonstrates a familiarity with cloud that goes beyond the common. I radically changed my position on how I thought about Orca based upon these discoveries. It went from, “Orca who,” other than the fact that you folks have sponsored various publications in the past—thanks for that—but okay, a security company. Great to, “Oh, that's Orca. We should absolutely talk to them about a thing that we're seeing.” It has been transformative for what I perceive to be your public reputation in the cloud security space.So, those two things are at odds: The cloud provider doesn't want to talk about anything and the security company absolutely wants to demonstrate a conversational fluency with what is going on in the world of cloud. And that feels like it's got to be a very delicate balancing act to wind up coming up with answers that satisfy all parties.Yoav: So, I just want to underline something. We don't do what we do in order to make a marketing stand. It's a byproduct of our work, but it's not the goal. For the Orca Security Research Pod, which it's the team at Orca which does this kind of research, our mission statement is to make cloud security better for everyone. Not just Orca customers; for everyone.And you get to hear about the more shiny things like big headline vulnerabilities, but we also have very sensible blog posts explaining how to do things, how to configure things and give you more in-depth understanding into security features that the cloud providers themselves provide, which are great, and advance the state of the cloud security. I would say that having a cloud vulnerability is sort of one of those things, which makes me happy to be a cloud customer. On the one side, we had a very big vulnerability with very big impact, and the ability to access a lot of customers' data is conceptually terrifying. The flip side is that everything was mitigated by the cloud providers in warp speed compared to everything else we've seen in all other elements of security. And you get to sleep better knowing that it happened—so no platform is infallible—but still the cloud provider do work for you, and you'll get a lot of added value from that.Corey: You've made a few points when this first came out, and I want to address them. The first is, when I reached out to you with a, “Wow, great work.” You effectively instantly came back with, “Oh, it wasn't me. It was members of my team.” So, let's start there. Who was it that found these things? I'm a huge believer giving people credit for the things that they do.The joy of being in a leadership position is if the company screws up, yeah, you take responsibility for that, whether the company does something great, yeah, you want to pass praise onto the people who actually—please don't take this the wrong way—did the work. And not that leadership is not work, it absolutely is, but it's a different kind of work.Yoav: So, I am a security researcher, and I am very mindful for the effort and skill it requires to find vulnerabilities and actually do a full circle on them. And the first thing I'll mention is Tzah Pahima, which found the BreakingFormation vulnerability and the vulnerability in CloudFormation, and Yanir Tsarimi, which found the AutoWarp vulnerability, which is the Azure vulnerability that we have not mentioned, and the Glue vulnerability, dubbed SuperGlue. Both of them are phenomenal researcher, world-class, and I'm very honored to work with them every day. It's one of my joys.Corey: Couchbase Capella Database-as-a-Service is flexible, full-featured and fully managed with built in access via key-value, SQL, and full-text search. Flexible JSON documents aligned to your applications and workloads. Build faster with blazing fast in-memory performance and automated replication and scaling while reducing cost. Capella has the best price performance of any fully managed document database. Visit couchbase.com/screaminginthecloud to try Capella today for free and be up and running in three minutes with no credit card required. Couchbase Capella: make your data sing.Corey: It's very clear that you have built an extraordinary team for people who are able to focus on vulnerability research. Which, on some level, is very interesting because you are not branded as it were as a vulnerability research company. This is not something that is your core competency; it's not a thing that you wind up selling directly that I'm aware of. You are selling a security platform offering. So, on the one hand, it makes perfect sense that you would have a division internally that works on this, but it's also very noteworthy, I think, that is not the core description of what it is that you do.It is a means by which you get to the outcome you deliver for customers, not the thing that you are selling directly to them. I just find that an interesting nuance.Yoav: Yes, it is. And I would elaborate and say that research informs the product, and the product informs research. And we get to have this fun dance where we learn new things by doing research. We [unintelligible 00:18:08] the product, and we use the customers to teach us things that we didn't know. So, it's one of those happy synergies.Corey: I want to also highlight a second thing that you have mentioned and been very, I guess, on message about since news of this stuff first broke. And because it's easy to look at this and sensationalize aspects of it, where, “See? The cloud providers security model is terrible. You shouldn't use them. Back to data centers we go.” Is basically the line taken by an awful lot of folks trying to sell data center things.That is not particularly helpful for the way that the world is going. And you've said, “Yeah, you should absolutely continue to be in cloud. Do not disrupt your cloud plan as a result.” And let's be clear, none of the rest of us are going to find and mitigate these things with anything near the rigor or rapidity that the cloud providers can and do demonstrate.Yoav: I totally agree. And I would say that the AWS security folks are doing a phenomenal job. I can name a few, but they're all great. And I think that the cloud is by far a much safer alternative than on-prem. I've never seen issues in my on-prem environment which were critical and fixed in such a high velocity and such a massive scale.And you always get the incremental improvements of someone really thinking about all the ins and outs of how to do security, how to do security in the cloud, how to make it faster, more reliable, without a business interruptions. It's just phenomenal to see and phenomenal to witness how far we've come in such a relatively short time as an industry.Corey: AWS in particular, has a reputation for being very good at security. I would argue that, from my perspective, Google is almost certainly slightly better at their security approach than AWS is, but to be clear, both of them are significantly further along the path than I am going to be. So great, fantastic. You also have found something interesting over in the world of Azure, and that honestly feels like a different class of vulnerability. To my understanding, the Azure vulnerability that you recently found was you could get credential material for other customers simply by asking for it on a random high port. Which is one of those—I'm almost positive I'm misunderstanding something here. I hope. Please?Yoav: I'm not sure you're misunderstanding. So, I would just emphasize that the vulnerability again, was found by Yanir Tsarimi. And what he found was, he used a service called Azure Automation which enables you essentially to run a Python script on various events and schedules. And he opened the python script and he tried different ports. And one of the high ports he found, essentially gave him his credentials. And he said, “Oh, wait. That's a really odd port for an HTTP server. Let's try, I don't know, a few ports on either way.” And he started getting credentials from other customers. Which was very surprising to us.Corey: That is understating it by a couple orders of magnitude. Yes, like, “Huh. That seems sub-optimal,” is sort of like the corporate messaging approved thing. At the time you discover that—I'm certain it was a three-minute-long blistering string of profanity in no fewer than four languages.Yoav: I said to him that this is, like, a dishonorable bug because he worked very little to find it. So it was, from start to finish, the entire research took less than two hours, which, in my mind, is not enough for this kind of vulnerability. You have to work a lot harder to get it. So.Corey: Yeah, exactly. My perception is that when there are security issues that I have stumbled over—for example, I gave a talk at re:Invent about it in the before times, one of them was an overly broad permission in a managed IAM policy for SageMaker. Okay, great. That was something that obviously was not good, but it also was more of a privilege escalation style of approach. It wasn't, “Oh, by the way, here's the keys to everything.”That is the type of vulnerability I have come to expect, by and large, from cloud providers. We're just going to give you access credentials for other customers is one of those areas that… it bugs me on a visceral level, not because I'm necessarily exposed personally, but because it more or less shores up so many of the arguments that I have spent the last eight years having with folks are like, “Oh, you can't go to cloud. Your data should live on your own stuff. It's more secure that way.” And we were finally it feels like starting to turn a cultural corner on these things.And then something like that happens, and it—almost have those naysayers become vindicated for it. And it's… it almost feels, on some level, and I don't mean to be overly unkind on this, but it's like, you are absolutely going to be in a better security position with the cloud providers. Except to Azure. And perhaps that is unfair, but it seems like Azure's level of security rigor is nowhere near that of the other two. Is that generally how you're seeing things?Yoav: I would say that they have seen more security issues than most other cloud providers. And they also have a very strong culture of report things to us, and we're very streamlined into patching those and giving credit where credit's due. And they give out bounties, which is an incentives for more research to happen on those platforms. So, I wouldn't say this categorically, but I would say that the optics are not very good. Generally, the cloud providers are much safer than on-prem because you only hear very seldom on security issues in the cloud.You hear literally every other day on issues happening to on-prem environments all over the place. And people just say they expect it to be this way. Most of the time, it's not even a headline. Like, “Company X affected with cryptocurrency or whatever.” It happens every single day, and multiple times a day, breaches which are massively bigger. And people who don't want to be in the cloud will find every reason not to be the cloud. Let us have fun.Corey: One of the interesting parts about this is that so many breaches that are on-prem are just never discovered because no one knows what the heck's running in an environment. And the breaches that we hear about are just the ones that someone had at least enough wherewithal to find out that, “Huh. That shouldn't be the way that it is. Let's dig deeper.” And that's a bad day for everyone. I mean, no one enjoys those conversations and those moments.And let's be clear, I am surprisingly optimistic about the future of Azure Security. It's like, “All right, you have a magic wand. What would you do to fix it?” It's, “Well, I'd probably, you know, hire Charlie Bell and get out of his way,” is not a bad answer as far as how these things go. But it takes time to reform a culture, to wind up building in security as a foundational principle. It's not something you can slap on after the fact.And perhaps this is unfair. But Microsoft has 30 years of history now of getting the world accustomed to oh, yeah, just periodically, terrible vulnerabilities are going to be discovered in your desktop software. And every once a month on Tuesdays, we're going to roll out a whole bunch of patches, and here you go. Make sure you turn on security updates, yadda, yadda, yadda. That doesn't fly in the cloud. It's like, “Oh, yeah, here's this month's list of security problems on your cloud provider.” That's one of those things that, like, the record-scratch, freeze-frame moment of wait, what are we doing here, exactly?Yoav: So, I would say that they also have a very long history of making those turnarounds. Bill Gates famously did his speech where security comes first, and they have done a very, very long journey and turn around the company from doing things a lot quicker and a lot safer. It doesn't mean they're perfect; everyone will have bugs, and Azure will have more people finding bugs into it in the near future, but security is a journey, and they've not started from zero. They're doing a lot of work. I would say it's going to take time.Corey: The last topic I want to explore a little bit is—and again, please don't take this as anyway being insulting or disparaging to your company, but I am actively annoyed that you exist. By which I mean that if I go into my AWS account, and I want to configure it to be secure. Great. It's not a matter of turning on the security service, it's turning on the dozen or so security services that then round up to something like GuardDuty that then, in turn, rounds up to something like Security Hub. And you look at not only the sheer number of these services and the level of complexity inherent to them, but then the bill comes in and you do some quick math and realize that getting breached would have been less expensive than what you're spending on all of these things.And somehow—the fact that it's complex, I understand; computers are like that. The fact that there is—[audio break 00:27:03] a great messaging story that's cohesive around this, I come to accept that because it's AWS; talking is not their strong suit. Basically declining to comment is. But the thing that galls me is that they are selling these services and not inexpensively either, so it almost feels, on some level like, shouldn't this on some of the built into the offerings that you folks are giving us?And don't get me wrong, I'm glad that you exist because bringing order to a lot of that chaos is incredibly important. But I can't shake the feeling that this should be a foundational part of any cloud offering. I'm guessing you might have a slightly different opinion than mine. I don't think you show up at the office every morning, “I hate that we exist.”Yoav: No. And I'll add a bit of context and nuance. So, for every other company than cloud providers, we expect them to be very good at most things, but not exceptional at everything. I'll give the Redshift example. Redshift is a pretty good offering, but Snowflake is a much better offering for a much wider range of—Corey: And there's a reason we're about to become Snowflake customers ourselves.Yoav: So, yeah. And there are a few other examples of that. A security company, a company that is focused solely on your security will be much better suited to help you, in a lot of cases more than the platform. And we work actively with AWS, Azure, and GCP requesting new features, helping us find places where we can shed more light and be more proactive. And we help to advance the conversation and make it a lot more actionable and improve from year to year. It's one of those collaborations. I think the cloud providers can do anything, but they can't do everything. And they do a very good job at security; it doesn't mean they're perfect.Corey: As you folks are doing an excellent job of demonstrating. Again, I'm glad you folks exist; I'm very glad that you are publishing the research that you are. It's doing a lot to bring a lot I guess a lot of the undue credit that I was giving AWS for years of, “No, no, it's not that they don't have vulnerabilities like everyone else does. It just that they don't ever talk about them.” And they're operationalizing of security response is phenomenal to watch.It's one of those things where I think you've succeeded and what you said earlier that you were looking to achieve, which is elevating the state of cloud security for everyone, not just Orca customers.Yoav: Thank you.Corey: Thank you. I really appreciate your taking the time out of your day to speak with me. If people want to learn more, where's the best place they can go to do that?Yoav: So, we have our website at orca.security. And you can reach me out on Twitter. My handle is at @yoavalon, which is @-Y-O-A-V-A-L-O-N.Corey: And we will of course put links to that in the [show notes 00:29:44]. Thanks so much for your time. I appreciate it.Yoav: Thank you, Corey.Corey: Yoav Alon, Chief Technology Officer at Orca Security. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, or of course on YouTube, smash the like and subscribe buttons because that's what they do on that platform. Whereas if you've hated this podcast, please do the exact same thing, five-star review, smash the like and subscribe buttons on YouTube, but also leave an angry comment that includes a link that is both suspicious and frightening, and when we click on it, suddenly our phones will all begin mining cryptocurrency.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Canary Cry News Talk
OPERATION BIRD ABSURD

Canary Cry News Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 213:12


Canary Cry News Talk #479 - 05.02.2022 OPERATION BIRD ABSURD LINKTREE: CanaryCry.Party SHOW NOTES: CanaryCryNewsTalk.com CLIP CHANNEL: CanaryCry.Tube SUPPLY DROP: CanaryCrySupplyDrop.com SUPPORT: CanaryCryRadio.com/Support MEET UPS: CanaryCryMeetUps.com Basil's other podcast: ravel Gonz' YT: Facelikethesun Resurrection Gonz Archive Youtube: Facelikethesun.Live App Made by Canary Cry Producer: Truther Dating App   LEAD 5:34 V /  BIRDS ARE'T REAL   Clip: BAR founder interviewed on 60 minutes Clip2: The “Partners” of BAR speaks on 60 minutes note: BAR might have been a CIA op all along   CYBERPANDEMIC 24:40 V/ Volunteer hackers converge on Ukraine conflict with no one in charge (NY Times) leading to all of this → Declaration for the Future of the Internet, US, EU and others (CommonWealth.org) Clip: Why we need internet regulation, Elon bad (CNN)   INTRO (M-W-F)  43:33 V/ B&G Update V4V/Exec./Asso./Support   FLIPPY 48:13 V/ Clip: This robot just broke records for highest jump, skynet (Hot HardWare)   [Party Pitch/Ravel/CCClips/text alerts]  1:02:07 V/   UKRAINE 1:05:11 V/ Clip: Ukrainian detractors arrested, viral clip taken off Reddit (Alleged source) → Nancy secret visit to Ukraine highlights US Support (The Hill) → Ukrainian ambassador calls Pelosi visit “special delight” (ABC)   WOKE/POLYTICKS  1:19:54 V/ UK woman marries her cat to overcome leasing conditions (Times India) College admission horror show (Town and Country) → Why Biden won't go big even if he cancels student debt (Boston Globe)   [TREASURE/SPEAKPIPE/BYE YOUTUBE]  1:41:01 V/ COVID/BILL GATES  2:09:06 V/ Bill Gates: Pushing for new Pandemic Task Force (Insider) → Bill Gates grieving Melinda (Times UK) → Bill Gates, Epstein was a mistake (NY post)   WACCINE  2:22:02 V/ Clip: Severe Mystery Hepatitis in Children, WHO warns! (ABC) Colorado man becomes first bird flu in US (Wash Ex) Clip: Australia Elvis Festival…is pandemic over?   [TALENT]  2:34:323 V/ ANTARCTICA/SPACE  2:49:09 V/ Black Moon seen over Antarctica and southern nations (SPACE) Melting Ice Revealed Uncharted Island in Antarctica! (The Weather Channel)   [TIME/OUTRO]  3:11:25 V/   EPISODE 479 WAS PRODUCED BY… Executive Producers Clara H** Spears Desert**   Producers Kishan, Robert R, Julie S, MORV, Gail M, Cloud Suriel, LX Protocol V2, Sir JC Knight of the TechnoSquatch, Sir Casey the Shield Knight, Sir Scott Knight of Truth, Jackie U, Runksmash, Ernesto Q, Veronica D, Sir James Knight and Servant of the Lion of Judah   AUDIO PRODUCTION (Jingles, Iso, Music): Psalm 40   ART PRODUCTION (Drawing, Painting, Graphics): Dame Allie of the Skillet Nation, Sir Dove Knight of Rusbeltia   CONTENT PRODUCTION (Microfiction etc.): Runksmash: A haggard Basil makes his way through the White Desert hauling a sled full of inanimate robots that once housed his friends. He arrives at the rectenna, battery depleted after the Tolkienesque journey, and begins to rebuild it according to the ELi.   The Sentinel: Basil roller-skates around the warehouse in his beat up off brand skates. Skate-sei Gonz instructed him to complete 50 laps of backwards skating before he returns with lunch. BANG. Basil falls again, his elbows have begun to bleed. Skate-sei Gonz's words echo “Balance key to Roller Skating, learn Balance – be Alpha Skater.” 49 laps… 49 falls. Basil refocuses, tightening his core while letting his hips remain loose. He breathes in, his mind becomes still, he begins to skate his final lap. BANG. He falls again just as Skate-sei Gonz walks in. He groans in frustration. “Basil-san, why are you mad? You improve every day. This is success.” “Yes Skate-sei, but I keep tripping up in these skates” Basil says panting with exhaustion. “I know. You not bad skater, only have bad skates. Here, gift for you.” Skate-sei Gonz extends his arms out with a gift box in his hands.   CLIP PRODUCER Emsworth, FaeLivrin, Epsilon   Timestamps: Mondays: Jackie U Wednesdays: Jade Bouncerson Fridays: Christine C   ADDITIONAL STORIES: Microwave tries to murder man after being given AI (LADBible) Why is Canada euthanizing the poor? (Spectator) NASA Perseverance Rover Begins life hunt (Inferse) Your Metaverse Doppleganger Buddy on Trace Network (Economic Times) Food: Fertilizer shortage, can we survive (Bloomberg) Polyticks: Biden expertly roasts GOP (Indy100) VR: Sweden using VR headsets to train postal workers (Reuters) The Brain “Rotates” Memories to save them from new sensations (Wired) IMF director, it's too late, printed too much money → My pillow guy gets back on Twitter, then gets banned right away (Daily Beast) “Ghost of Kyiv” doesn't actually exist, Ukraine admits (NY Post) Former CDC chief says Trump blocked his agency from briefing public (ABC) In Italy, babies will automatically carry both parents surnames (Fatherly) → NASA Perseverance Rover Begins life hunt (Inferse) The Great Resignation is about to become Great Midlife Crisis (Vox) Clip: This robot just broke records for highest jump, Skynet (Hot HardWare) …more Antarctica → Film about MSU research in Antarctica reaches international audience (NBC) → Australia to increase Antarctic clean up efforts (Antarctica.Gov.Au) → Headline: Losing Britain's Archeological “Atlantis” (Indy UK)