Podcasts about Arctic

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Polar region of the Earth's northern hemisphere

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  • Dec 2, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about Arctic

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Latest podcast episodes about Arctic

The SideHustle Lounge
The Art of Slow Travel

The SideHustle Lounge

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 45:30


For more details on this podcast visit: https://www.sidehustlelounge.com/blog/ep34Episode 34: Not all those who wander are lost.  Bhavana Gesota is an Indian American former technology professional, a self-taught artist, writer, thinker, and meditator. Her working life coupled with her own desire since she was a child to explore the world led her to living in nine countries, working in seven, and traveling to twenty-two more over five continents. What began as fast vacation travel eventually gave way to a love for slow travel.What brought her to write this book is her firm belief that slow travel can be a real eye-opener to our very ideas of living through a deep and rich encounter with an unfamiliar culture. Slow travel, thus is not just external traveling but also leads to inner journeying. This book is a sum culmination of her own experiences and is meant to inspire and help you to dive into a journey of discovery—internal and external—and find your insights.Apart from being a passionate advocate of slow travel, Bhavana is an avid food lover, finds cooking to be therapeutic, and considers food as medicine. She loves natural hot springs, engaging conversations over a cup of good coffee, watching sunsets in silence, long train journeys, playing with children, and has a particular weakness for dark bitter chocolate.Despite a few attempts, she laments that she is to witness the Aurora Borealis in the Arctic sky. The time for that has not yet come.Go to author.bhavanagesota.com/home to subscribe to my newsletter and link to purchase the book.The ever evolving artist website is artist.bhavanagesota.comBlog Description:If the road is calling you, maybe it's time to answer. Author Bhavana Gesota shares her insights from 25 years of what she calls, "Slow Travel." Hear what she's learned of herself and others on this cosmic walk through life, and learn of a whole new dimension of yourself. Even if the idea of global travel doesn't excite you, Bhavana shares how you can get similar value from experiencing your own city with a fresh perspective. Timestamps:3:37   What is “Slow Down” travel? Slow down and take in where you are. Drop the list of to-do things and just soak in the atmosphere and get to feel the essence of the place rather than going from one to another, to the third, to the fourth and so on.15:31   So again, there's this myth that if you go away for a long period of time, like six months or a year or two years, you won't be able to get back into your career. And I found that and proved that to myself, that that's not true. You can come back. And in fact, actually, when you do go on this type of a travel, it it's such an enriching experience that it adds several different life skills to your sort of portfolio. And if an employer does not appreciate that, you probably don't want to work for that employer.16:47   Especially in the COVID times, more and more employers are absolutely open to the idea of letting people work remotely. Companies like Facebook, Google, and LinkedIn, they've already told the employees, you don't need to come back to office as long as you don't want to. There are many other professions, you know, like editors and writers and yoga teachers and so on, who can take their skills on the road and create an income stream while they're on the road.Full transcription of this podcast: https://www.sidehustlelounge.com/blog/ep34This episode was produced and marketed by the Get Known Podcast Service: www.getknownstrategy.com/podcast-service

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast
Research Filter: no smoking incentives, arctic rain and Tassie Devil whiskers

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 8:36


French researchers have found a way to incentivise pregnant women to stop smoking and deliver better health outcomes for their children. Plus scientific communicator and broadcaster Lee Constable looks at the new predictions about the amount of arctic rain that's expected to fall by 2060, plus what's in the whiskers of a Tasmanian Devil?

On The Land
Lemau Bantatua: Growing Indigenous Youth Podcasters

On The Land

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 17:00


Waqaa! And welcome to an On The Land Mini Series featuring Indigenous Youth Voices! Lemau Bantatua is from Norvik, and created a podcast about Iñupiaq fur sewing based upon an interview with her Ana (Grandma).In spring of 2021, we teamed up with the Alaska Humanities Forum, See Stories, and Bitanga Productions to host a month-long podcasting workshop with a small group of middle and high school students across western Alaskan villages. Students had the opportunity to create their own 5-15 minute episode featuring interviews with their family, friends, and their teachers.Mentioned in this Episode: Alaska Humanities Forum https://www.akhf.org/Bitanga Productions https://www.bitangaproductions.com/See Stories https://www.seestoriesalaska.org/On The Land Media ontheland.orgCoffee & Quaq https://www.coffeeandquaq.com/Native Time: Village City https://www.nativetimeak.com/The music for this episode was provided by Epidemic Sound featuring the song Glimmer by AGST

Miss Pursuit's Podcast
Gift Guide for Outdoorsmen:: Holiday Gift Ideas for Hunters and Anglers

Miss Pursuit's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 22:09


Today we're talking all things HOLIDAY GIFTS. Yes, it's ALREADY that time of year. Make sure to check out our Holiday Gift Guide on our website (https://misspursuit.com/gift-guide-for-outdoorsmen/). We have promo codes and everything listed out by category.  Let's get to it! HUNTING Pro-Tracker Archery Bad Boy FOC Sleeve:: Bad Boys are an FOC arrow sleeve that slides over the shaft of your arrow, allowing your shot to carry more momentum for fatal penetration. Priced at $44.99. Lazy CK Ranch:: The Future Hunters Camp attendees will understand animal care, shot placements, weapon selection, meat care and preparation, as well as conservation through hunting. Perfect for industry professionals, women, men, and kids ages 9+. Priced at $2,500. Bushnell:: The Elite 4500 2.5-10×40 is the scope you need when you want more horsepower than a typical 3-9×40. It has a wider field of view for close-in shots and offers more magnification for those further distances. Priced at $269.99. ANGLERS Salt Life:: What do you get an angler? A new rod and reel? Salt Life actually started out as a decal, but really embodies the passion for the ocean, the salt air, and most importantly, a way of life. Salt Life's team of avid watermen has helped put Salt Life's apparel to the test, and it is designed to withstand the harsh environment that comes with the territory of saltwater sports. OUTDOORSY KIDS Posted:: Posted is a stylish youth hat company for children aged 6 months to 10 years founded by two moms. For each hat sold, Posted donates $1 to California State Parks. The company motto is: Play Hard. Be Kind. Stay Posted. They have a super cute holiday gift bundle that includes a Posted hat, t-shirt, and book. Use code Holiday10 for 10% off a hat. Lindie Lou Adventure Series:: For children ages 5 to 9, the Lindie Lou Adventure Series' author Jeanne Bender takes children on delightful journeys filled with positive messages, life lessons, and motivation delivered through vibrant illustrations and easy-to-understand language. The 5th book in the series, Lindie Lou On Ice: Exploring the Arctic with a Polar Bear Cub inspires young readers to go on an exciting expedition with puppy Lindie Lou as she embarks on her biggest adventure yet: heading to the Arctic circle to study the Northern Lights and solar winds with a team of scientists! Prices starting at $17.94. STOCKING STUFFERS PHOOZY:: Phoozy enables technology users (anyone else can't put their phone down?!) to pursue their passions and epic outdoor adventures without worry of environmental limitations, aka – hot and cold temps! ICU Eyewear:: Yup! ICU Eyewear designs have revolutionized the reading glass industry with fun styles, bright colors and unique patterns at affordable prices for the everyday customer. As a pioneer in the eyewear industry, ICU Eyewear was the first to develop and implement a manufacturing process for eco-friendly reading glasses made from reclaimed plastic, recycled metal, and sustainable bamboo. Gifts for Women Badlands:: Badlands launched a women's camo line in August of 2021. We know Badlands has always been the best of the best when it comes to packs, but, as of now, women can be done making do with hand-me-down hunting gear. Badlands has the tough-as-nails, triple-stitched, made-to-fit-US, guaranteed-for-life women's hunting gear we've been waiting for. So, if you are a western or big game hunter, love a great tree stand sit for whitetail, or hunt mule deer in the Texas Panhandle, the Badlands women's camo line is going to be your new best friend in the field. Designed by women – for women. Head over to Badlands and use code MISSPURSUITBL30 for 30% off. KiraGrace:: KiraGrace helps us all celebrate women's beauty, strength, and grace as we move through life's (messy and magical) journeys. They offer yoga tops, yoga bottoms, and yoga outfits that are uniquely designed to be uplifting and inspiring. Gifts for the Home Wicked Edge Precision Knife Sharpeners:: Wicked Edge is a small, family-owned company that appreciates the beauty and efficiency of well-kept tools. The Wicked Edge Precision Sharpeners will change the way you think about sharpening knives. Perfect for outdoor enthusiasts, chefs and home cooks, tactical pros, and knife collectors. Made with state-of-the-art manufacturing in Santa Fe, New Mexico – their sharpeners will last generations. Make the holidays bright and wicked sharp. Prices start at $375.00. Miserable Holiday Stories by Alex Bernstein:: Everyone knows the holiday season is absolutely depressing, no matter how hard you try. What to do? Why not curl up with the latest “miserable” collection from humorist Alex Bernstein. Miserable Holiday Stories offers tongue-in-cheek thought-provoking tales that just might prompt you to appreciate something about your own holiday experiences. Priced at $14.99. Gifts for Nature Lover My Gift Stop:: Oh, my goodness. My Gift Stop is literally your one-stop-shop for ANYTHING. My Gift Stop is perfect for finding last-minute gifts for friends and family or great deals for yourself. Sawyer:: Sawyer sells products that keep you protected from the Backcountry to the Backyard™, while offering the best, high technology solutions against bad water, insect bites, the sun, and field injuries. The newly released Tap Filter allows for fast & safe drinking water straight from your tap and/or hose bib up to 500 gallons a day. It's an ideal component to add to your emergency preparedness kit for use during natural disasters such as floods, hurricanes, fires, and earthquakes. Sawyer also has ++++ Permethrin that offers 6 weeks or 6 washings of protection that allows you to enhance your hunting experience by bringing home the trophy–not the ticks. Patriot Coolers:: Patriot Coolers' mission is to provide customers with great quality products and give back to veterans in the process. With every purchase, a portion of the net proceeds is donated to Homes For Our Troops, a nonprofit that builds custom/accessible housing for disabled post 9/11 veterans. Use code PURSUIT10 at checkout to get 10% off. We have super cute merchandise, too! Shirts, necklaces and more!

Adventure Begins Podcast
Navigating the West Coast with Royal Caribbean

Adventure Begins Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 39:52


After more than a decade Royal Caribbean is sailing from the West Coast once again and has brought their beautiful ship, the Navigator of the Seas, to entertain their guests along the Mexican Riviera. Don't miss all that this newly amplified ship has to offer. *PLUS* - Emily and Jennifer have holiday fun at Disneyland - Disney Cruise Line is now require vaccines for guests 5 and up - We learn geography through music ... So pack your bags, tune in, and let the adventure begin!

1623 Studios Podcasts
Revolution at Sea — An Altered Seascape Emerges (Ep 28)

1623 Studios Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 28:23


Ocean is no longer the only way for people to travel across oceans. The oceanic empires rapidly collapse. Nuclear power makes true submarines possible and helps open the Arctic. Bulk cargo, the container, and the internet make new complete logistics networks possible and change our lives as consumers.

Global News Podcast
Ex-Trump aide Mark Meadows to cooperate with January 6 investigations

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 27:32


The US congressional committee investigating the deadly assault on the Capitol building says Mark Meadows has agreed to appear before it 'soon'. Also: IS man guilty of genocide in Yazidi murder trial, and Arctic could see more rain than snow in thirty years.

Newshour
In Yemen, Houthi rebels close in on key city

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 48:32


Rebel Houthis, a group based in the north, and allied to Iran, have seized large amounts of strategically important territory -- and are advancing on the oil rich city of Marib, where 800,000 people are displaced. We hear from our correspondent as well as a former Yemeni deputy foreign minister. Also on the programme, as incoming German chancellor Olaf Scholz announces he wants to hold a vote to determine whether to make the vaccine compulsory, we discuss the new Omicron variant with the director of the Center at the University of Minnesota. And, research published today on how the Arctic may soon get more rainfall than snowfall. The lead author of the report discusses its implications. (Photo: Armed Houthi supporters hold up weapons during a gathering to mobilize more fighters into the battlefronts amid an escalating war between the Houthis and Saudi-backed Yemeni troops, in Sana"a, Yemen, 24 November 2021. EPA/YAHYA ARHAB)

Garage Logic
11/29 Turns out arctic temperatures have been warming since at least 1900

Garage Logic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 66:25


Turns out arctic temperatures have been warming since at least 1900, according to new research that casts doubt on scientific modeling. Our friend Bill Stein alerts us to a new scam that GL'ers need to be aware of. Too much violence in the middle schools in Rochester.

Talk Nerdy with Cara Santa Maria
Pizzly Bears w/ Larisa DeSantis

Talk Nerdy with Cara Santa Maria

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 72:50


In this episode of Talk Nerdy, Cara is joined by Dr. Larisa DeSantis, paleontologist and associate professor of biological sciences at Vanderbilt University. They talk about the devastating effects of climate change on both living and extinct species, as well as the remote possibility for a warming arctic full of "pizzly bears."

Rewilding Earth
Episode 81: Proposed Solution To State Wildlife Mismanagement With Rick Steiner

Rewilding Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 41:34


About Rick Steiner is a conservation biologist in Anchorage, Alaska, and founder of Oasis Earth. He has been involved in the global conservation movement for over 40 years. From 1980-2010 he was a marine conservation professor with the University of Alaska, stationed in the Arctic, Prince William Sound, and Anchorage, specializing in marine conservation, and […] Read full article: Episode 81: Proposed Solution To State Wildlife Mismanagement With Rick Steiner

Nightlife
Grass Roots: Keeping invasive species out of Antarctica

Nightlife

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 16:19


Antarctica may be a remote and pristine location, but things are changing.

BirdNote
Ivory Gull and Conservation

BirdNote

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 1:46


Polar Bears symbolize the icy landscapes of the far north like no other animal. The bear's way of life — its very survival — is inseparable from the Arctic pack-ice. Less familiar is a remarkable bird that shares with the Polar Bear this vital link to ice: this Ivory Gull. The gulls feed on small fish and other marine life, but also scavenge carcasses, including those left by Polar Bears. Global warming has brought increasing change to the world of ice-dependent species such as the Ivory Gull and Polar Bear. Learn more at BirdNote.org.

TheHealthHub
Inside The Great Vaccine Race With Dugald Maudsley

TheHealthHub

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 53:18


In this episode we speak with Dugald Maudsley about his new documentary Inside The Great Vaccine Race. Dugald is an award-winning documentary filmmaker. He is also Creative Director of Infield Fly Productions, a Toronto-based independent that creates blue chip science and natural history documentaries for broadcasters around the world. At Infield Fly Productions, Dugald helped create the popular series Myth or Science for The Nature of Things with David Suzuki, on CBC Television. It has been broadcast in more than 50 countries. Infield Fly Productions has also worked with renowned broadcaster, Sir David Attenborough, to produce the award-winning documentary Jumbo: The Life of an Elephant Superstar for CBC TV and the BBC Television. Dugald has created and produced highly acclaimed series, feature documentaries and one off documentaries. He's currently working on films about the pandemic, climate change and a three part series for Netflix, Sky TV and the CBC on the unique way animals use sound to survive. Over a 30-year career Dugald has been an on-air national reporter and produced documentaries from many of the world's war zones. His interest in real life, personal stories comes from a career of traveling the globe to make films on subjects as varied as the HIV crisis in Africa, the war on heroin in Pakistan, and Saddam Hussein's oppression of the Kurds. He began working as a television journalist in New Zealand before joining the Australia ABC. Here he won the country's highest journalism award for a series on the Russian coup before becoming the executive producer of a prime time documentary series called Foreign Correspondent. In this role Dugald oversaw the production of more than 120 hours of programming that garnered dozens of international awards. In 2006, Dugald created the Gemini-nominated genealogy series Ancestors in the Attic for History Television. During four successful seasons he produced 49 documentaries shot around the world from Canada's high Arctic to West Africa, China and Belarus. Dugald also helped produce a four part series on wildlife trafficking for Nat Geo Wild in the United States, and another documentary on human trafficking for Explorer on the National Geographic Channel. Infield Fly Productions has been honoured with numerous awards including three prestigious Canadian Screen Awards, the Documentary POV Award at the 2021 Yorkton Film Festival and a Jackson Hole Science Media Award. Talking Points: 1. The unprecedented level of collaboration between scientists involved in COVID vaccine research 2. The profound personal sacrifices made by these scientists 3. RNA technology as a game changer in the field of medicine Social Media: https://www.instagram.com/cbcgem https://gem.cbc.ca/ https://www.cbc.ca/natureofthings/episodes/inside-the-great-vaccine-race https://www.cbc.ca/natureofthings/

On The Land
Jessica Chingliak: Growing Indigenous Youth Podcasters

On The Land

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 16:27


Waqaa! And welcome to an On The Land Mini Series featuring Indigenous Youth Voices! Jessica Chingliak is from Goodnews Bay, and created a podcast about teaching in Goodnews Bay based upon an interview with her English / Language Arts Teacher.In spring of 2021, we teamed up with the Alaska Humanities Forum, See Stories, and Bitanga Productions to host a month-long podcasting workshop with a small group of middle and high school students across western Alaskan villages. Students had the opportunity to create their own 5-15 minute episode featuring interviews with their family, friends, and their teachers.Mentioned in this Episode: Alaska Humanities Forum https://www.akhf.org/Bitanga Productions https://www.bitangaproductions.com/See Stories https://www.seestoriesalaska.org/On The Land Media ontheland.orgCoffee & Quaq https://www.coffeeandquaq.com/Native Time: Village City https://www.nativetimeak.com/The music for this episode was provided by Epidemic Sound featuring the song Glimmer by AGST

CODEPINK Radio
Episode 119: Voices From COP26 to the Arctic!

CODEPINK Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 55:00


Listen to CODEPINK Congress (11/16/21) with Bernadette Demientieff, Executive Director of the Gwich'in Steering Committee in Alaska, sharing the indigenous nation's victories in convincing banks not to loan money for oil drilling on ancestral lands-also Boston University Professor Neta Crawford on the importance of avoiding the term "national security threat" when talking about the climate crisis because such terminology validates further US military aggression, and CODEPINK Co-founder Jodie Evans, who traveled with CODEPINK peacebuilders Nancy Mancias and Suzie Gilbert to Glasgow to march in the streets with an estimated hundred thousand, if not more, activists demanding climate justice (reparations for the Global South) and inclusion of militarism reporting and accountability in UN climate agreements.

Be Well, Be Keto: Ordinary People, Extraordinary Results!
#191 Brian Keane - The Fitness Mindset

Be Well, Be Keto: Ordinary People, Extraordinary Results!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 54:30


Over the past seven years, Brian has gone from working full-time as a school teacher to one of Ireland and the UK's leading thought leaders on all things health, fitness, and nutrition. Brian is the author of two bestsellers The Fitness Mindset and Rewire Your Mindset. On top of his ever-growing social media platforms, with over half a million followers, he also hosts one of the world's top health podcasts which is regularly featured #1 on the iTunes Health Charts. He has spoken at major wellness events around the world such as Wellfest Ireland, Mefit Dubai and was a Keynote speaker at Google HQ in Dublin for their 2018 wellness event. Among his many fitness and athletic achievements, Brian has transitioned from a professional fitness model to an ultra-endurance athlete running through the Sahara, the Arctic, and completing a 100-mile ultra marathon.

Net Assessment
America and the Arctic: A Song of Fire and Ice

Net Assessment

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 56:26


Chris, Zack, and Melanie get together to talk about ongoing developments in the Arctic. Climate change is causing flooding and environmental damage, but it is also providing new opportunities for navigation, mining, fishing, tourism, and defense. How can America's national security and economic interests best be protected in the face of increasing Russian and Chinese activity there? How should we prioritize the region when we have other critical threats to address? Have we and our partners that border the Arctic missed chances for influence there that we cannot recover? Is it possible for the United States to strengthen its position there without appearing to encourage an arms race? Chris wishes we could consider the merits of arguments instead of personally attacking those making them, Zack condemns the Chinese government's treatment of Olympian Peng Shuai, and Melanie looks at the hypocrisy of governors who claim to support free markets but want to prohibit businesses from imposing vaccine mandates. Links: Andrea Kendall-Taylor and Jim Townsend, Partners, Competitors, or a Little of Both?: Russia and China in the Arctic, Center for a New American Security, March 2021, https://www.cnas.org/publications/reports/partners-competitors-or-a-little-of-both. Andrea Kendall-Taylor, Jim Townsend, Lawson W. Brigham, and Nick Lokker, Navigating Relations with Russia in the Arctic: A Roadmap for Stability, Center for a New American Security, Nov. 18, 2021, https://www.cnas.org/publications/reports/navigating-relations-with-russia-in-the-arctic. Berkeley Lovelace, Jr., “Pfizer says its Covid pill with HIV drug cuts the risk of hospitalization or death by 89%,” CNBC, Nov. 5, 2021, https://www.cnbc.com/2021/11/05/pfizer-says-its-covid-pill-with-hiv-drug-cuts-the-risk-of-hospitalization-or-death-by-89percent.html. David Auerswald, “A U.S. Security Strategy for the Arctic,” War on the Rocks, May 27, 2021, https://warontherocks.com/2021/05/a-u-s-security-strategy-for-the-arctic/. Frank Jordans, “Vaccine maker BioNTech to use mRNA tech to target malaria,” Associated Press, July 26, 2021, https://abcnews.go.com/Business/wireStory/vaccine-maker-biontech-mrna-tech-target-malaria-79064005. Future Foreign Policy Series: Reinvigorating US diplomacy, New American Engagement Initiative, Nov. 29, 2021, https://www.atlanticcouncil.org/event/future-foreign-policy-series-reinvigorating-us-diplomacy/. NAEI Annual Student Competition, https://www.atlanticcouncil.org/programs/scowcroft-center-for-strategy-and-security/new-american-engagement-initiative/naei-annual-student-competition/. Rebecca Hersman and Eric Brewer, Deep Dive Debrief: Strategic Stability and Competition in the Arctic, Jan. 6, 2021, https://www.csis.org/analysis/deep-dive-debrief-strategic-stability-and-competition-arctic. Steve Contorno, “Florida Special Session begins as DeSantis Continues Battle against Vaccine Mandates,” CNN, Nov. 15, 2021, https://www.cnn.com/2021/11/15/politics/desantis-florida-legislature-vaccine-mandates/index.html. "Taiwan," Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, Oct. 25, 2021, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Y18-07g39g. Will Quinn, Tweet thread, Nov. 11, 2021, https://twitter.com/wc_quinn/status/1458891500344029189?t=l7ugkXe7tuA75d7XbjYd5Q&s=15. "WTA says Peng Shuai's call with Olympic officials does not alleviate concerns about her well-being," ESPN, Nov. 22, 2021, https://www.espn.com/tennis/story/_/id/32688106/wta-says-peng-shuai-call-olympic-officials-not-enough. Zahra Ullah and Fred Pleitgen, “As the US and Russia Spar Over the Arctic, Putin Creates New Facts on the Ground,” CNN, May 21, 2021, https://www.cnn.com/2021/05/21/europe/russia-arctic-military-intl-cmd/index.html.

Crazy Canuck Truckin'
Ep 40 Jacob Ballsy takes us from Mexico to Canada

Crazy Canuck Truckin'

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 56:20


Jacob was born in Mexico to Mennonite parents. Follow along on his crazy journey from Mexico to Arizona and then to Alberta Canada. You can reach him on Twitter @eatbeefnowThinking of suicide? Please call 1-833-456-4566 toll free (In QC: 1-866-277-3553), 24/7 or visit www.crisisservicescanada.ca.In ND call 211National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or Live Online Chathttps://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/chat/https://letstalk.bell.ca/en/our-initiatives/ David Henry is a long distance trucker with a passion for storytelling. He has pounded the asphalt ribbon across all lower 48 States and most of Canada including the Arctic.He is a freelance writer and can be found on Twitter @crazycanuckdave. On Instagram follow the episodes at @crazycanucktruckin . We are now also on Youtube as Crazy Canuck Truckin Bridgette Readel is a technical agronomist with a flair for using creative ways to explain the hows and whys of farming. Check her out on Twitter @bmreadel Victoria Paulik is a social media expert. Check out her Instagram @redsignsocial or at www.redesignsocial.com 

Lawfare No Bull
House hearing on climate change and Arctic national security

Lawfare No Bull

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 86:44


Last week, the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Europe, Energy, the Environment and Cyber met to discuss climate change in the Arctic. The virtual hearing, led by Chair William R. Keating, heard from four expert witnesses who explained the national security, environmental and societal impacts that global warming poses to the Arctic. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Strokecast
Surfer, Author, and Survivor Blake Hill's Journey

Strokecast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 62:14


Click here for a machine-generated transcript. Blake Hill is an over achiever with an easy going attitude. Talking to him, you get the sense of a calm guy going with the flow, but underneath, he is paddling like crazy to get to the next big wave. After surviving a stroke, the turbulence in his life continued to increase, to the point where he was biking up a mountain in Canada and knew it was time to write Westfalia. We explore the events leading up to his mainly auto-biographical novel in this episode. To listen to episode, click the player above or click this link. About Blake Hill Blake is often thought of as a quiet person. Put a strong cup of good coffee in him and he becomes a chatter box. Although quiet on the surface his brain is always engaged and bounces from thought to thought. If you ask him his greatest accomplishment in life. It would be his role as Dad. Blake has two amazing children. He has spent countless hours flying on airplanes and traveling the world with his pro-surfer son. They have chased waves from California to Europe, Mexico, Indonesia, Japan, Australia and countless other destinations. He's the proud dad of a daughter who's strong and independent with a passion for dance. Blake's professional life began in the movie business doing lighting for movies and TV shows. During this time period he would balance working on set with cultivating his passion for writing. His day would typically begin at 3am. He honed his craft for writing screenplays while also working on the set of movies. Over the years he amassed a collection of ten screenplays and a children's book along with having his poetry published many times. Once his children were born he chose to quit the movie business and focus on his kids. This was truly an amazing time in his life and a true gift from the universe. He is truly grateful to have had so much time with his children while they were growing up. There's an adventurous spirit that lives within his soul. He's been riding motorcycles since he could walk. He's raced motocross, hare n' hounds and spent days riding across the Mojave Desert and camping under the stars. His rides across the USA have taken him through blizzards, tornadoes, and across the Arctic circle. His passion for life was dimmed one day when he encountered a stroke. It was as if a light switch had been turned off. This experience was beyond humbling and fueled his passion for living even more. He's not only physically strong but he's mentally fit. The stroke tested his will and mental fortitude. He kept the event private with only a few friends knowing about his mental capacity. He was challenged by the everlasting question of; how are you feeling? His focus was on healing and getting his memory back. He didn't want the constant reminder of what had happened. His physical self is truly one hundred percent. His mental self is challenged occasionally with loss of memory. He is extremely grateful to be where he is today on a physical, emotional and spiritual level. Blake's typical day begins at 4am with an awesome cup of coffee, splashed with cream while spending some quiet time with his two dogs. He works out with free weights, resistance bands, hikes with his dogs and tries to surf every day. He believes that keeping active mentally and physically is the key to happiness. He's 55 years old and with each and every wave he surfs, he strives to ride the next one better than the last. He truly feels blessed for his amazing life. You can find Westphalia at Amazon* or wherever you find your books. Writing Practice Blake's method of writing combines old school and new. He starts with a distraction-free environment. To keep himself in the mindset of writing every time, he listens to the same music -- Jackson Browne's Solo Acoustic Volumes 1 and Volume 2.* He also does all his drafts on yellow legal pads. These habitual behaviors help ease the brain into writing mode.  It's another way of leveraging the power of neuroplasticity -- the nerves that fire together, wire together. By reinforcing these patterns repeatedly, it makes it easier to write in the future. Then, he takes his handwritten drafts and types them up. As he types them in to the computer, he's doing a first editing pass. Visualization Blake talks about the importance of visualization. He describes how athletes learn to enhance their performance by visualizing that performance. In their mind they go through the movements, activities, and successful results. The idea is that parts of he brain can't distinguish between actually doing a thing and visualizing doing a thing. You get extra practice.  Last year, Peter Levine, author of Stronger After Stroke, talked about the same thing. Peter talked about it from thew scientific/medical perspective. According to studies with FMRI machines, when you watch someone walk or run, you activate the same part of the brain that lights up when you actually walk or run. Imagining the activity gives you similar results to doing the activity. The best parts of visualization is that it's free and completely harmless. There is no downside and there is a significant upside. So when you have a few moments or hours as you try to get back a limb or control your jaw, take some time to imagine yourself doing it again and again. To learn more, listen to my interview with Peter G Levine in this episode. Hack of the Week Blake talked about his strategy for dealing with the massive life changes after a stroke. Accept where you are. You can start to fix a situation or otherwise address it. Process it. Spend some time with the situation and feel your feelings about it. Ignoring your feelings isn't going to help. Forgive yourself for your feelings. If your feelings are counterproductive, that's okay. Forgive yourself for feeling that way. Then you can work on the situation or reality that you are in. Visualize where you want to be. Leverage the power of your brain to engage your natural neuroplasticity. Figure out how you want your life to look, and visualize your life that way and your abilities that way. Do it again and again. Use your mantra. A preferred phrase or mantra can help you center yourself and bring your mind back to focusing on your priorities and where you want to be. Links Helpful resources for more information. (If you don't see the links below, visit http://Strokecast.com/ByBlakeHill) Where do you want to go from here? Learn more about Blake and his work at ByBlakeHill.com and connect with him on Instagram @ByBlakeHill Share this episode with someone you know by giving them the link http://Strokecast.com/ByBlakeHill Subscribe to the free Strokecast email Newsletter at Strokecast.com/News Don't get best…get better

Curiously Polar
142 Climate COP26 in Glasgow

Curiously Polar

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 44:08


The Arctic and the Antarctic are privileged locations for observers interested in understanding how our world is shaped by the forces of nature and the workings of history. These areas have inspired countless humans to undertake epic expeditions of discov

Third Pod from the Sun
Staff Picks: Toxic City Under the Ice

Third Pod from the Sun

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 32:04


In 1959, the United States built an unusual military base under the surface of the Greenland ice Sheet. Camp Century was a hub for scientific research, but it also doubled as a top-secret site for testing the feasibility of deploying nuclear missiles from the Arctic. When Camp Century was decommissioned in 1967, its infrastructure and waste were abandoned under the assumption they would be forever entombed beneath the colossal sheet of ice. But climate change has warmed the Arctic more than any other region on Earth, and parts of the Greenland Ice Sheet are melting faster than snow can accumulate. What will happen in the coming decades if the melting ice exposes the biological, chemical, and radioactive waste left behind at Camp Century?As part of our Staff Picks series while Third Pod is on break, University of Colorado Boulder glaciologist Mike MacFerrin recounts Camp Century's intriguing history and its role in the Cold War. He discusses the potential hazard Camp Century's waste poses to the environment and surrounding communities and examines what, if anything, should be done about it now.This episode was produced and mixed by Lauren Lipuma and Shane M Hanlon.

The Fisheries Podcast
151 - Tracking Fish, Marine Food Web Dynamics, and more with Danielle Orrell

The Fisheries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 38:41


This week, Zach chats with Danielle Orrell (she/her), who is a PhD candidate at the University of Windsor studying marine food web dynamics and the movement of fish in the nearshore environment surrounding Ascension Island. Also discussed is her experience studying fish movement and ecology in some incredibly different parts of the world such as the Arctic, The Bahamas, and Mozambique, as well as her experience as a queer woman in the field of fisheries science. Check it out! Danielle's social media: Instagram- @bigfishmoves   Twitter- @DaniOrrell _____________________________________________________________________ Get in touch with us! The Podcast is on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook: @FisheriesPod  Become a Patron of the Fisheries Podcast here: https://www.patreon.com/FisheriesPodcast Buy podcast merch: https://teespring.com/stores/the-fisheries-podcast-fan-shop Thanks as always to Andrew Gialanella for the fantastic music. The Fisheries Podcast is a completely independent podcast, not affiliated with a larger organization or entity. Reference to any specific product or entity does not constitute an endorsement or recommendation by the podcast. The views expressed by guests are their own and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. Views and opinions expressed by the hosts are those of that individual and do not necessarily reflect the view of any entity with with those individuals are affiliated in other capacities (such as employers).

Fish Nerds Fishing Podcast
NaPodPoMo #17 Fishing for Arctic Grayling in Alaska

Fish Nerds Fishing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 20:51


Our FN LIbrarian, Jeff Danaldson, went to Alaska, here is his report #NaPodPoMo #arcticgrayling 

Aiming For The Moon
Creating the Modern-Day Wooly Mammoth: Dr. George Church (Professor at Harvard and MIT, Co-Founder of Colossal)

Aiming For The Moon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 26:47


Dr. George Church, a leading genetics engineer, professor at Harvard and MIT, and the co-founder of Colossal, is taking on an ambitious mission. His goal: to upgrade our current elephants with woolly mammoth genes to make them suitable for the Arctic circle. Sound crazy? Listen in to find out his plan!Our Website: https://www.aimingforthemoon.com/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/aiming4moon/Twitter: https://twitter.com/Aiming4MoonYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6-TwYdfPcWV-V1JvjBXk

This Date in Weather History
Arctic cold outbreak leads to record temperatures in East US

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 1:44


An early-season arctic cold outbreak on November 19, 2008, led to records being broken, both for overnight lows and daytime highs all across the eastern part of the United States. Worcester, MA had a high of only 29 degrees. Even as far south as Saint Simons Island, GA there was a record cold day, with a high of only 50 degrees. Killing frost and freezes were felt in the deep South and with a strong wind accompanying the cold many marginal plants and vegetation didn't stand a chance putting an abrupt end to the growing season all the way to the Gulf coast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Living Planet | Deutsche Welle
Where do we go from here?

Living Planet | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 30:00


COP26 conclusions, a glimpse into the future of green tech-powered living in Sweden, the marvel of meadow-made cheese in Italy, and speaking science to power to save the Arctic.

Flip & Mozi's Guide to How To Be An Earthling

Flip and Mozi's spaceship crash lands on Earth, and there's no interstellar tow-truck in sight... for the next 3000 years. That leaves plenty of time to explore and learn what it means to be an earthling! Join Flip and Mozi as they meet their first earthling, the Arctic Fox. Featuring songs "What is That Thing?!" and "Can You Imagine," discover with Flip and Mozi how this Arctic Fox can smell from 24 miles away and survive the cold winters of the Arctic. Head to flipandmozi.com for more!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Engines of Our Ingenuity
Engines of Our Ingenuity 2152: Far From home

Engines of Our Ingenuity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 3:46


Episode: 2152 Far from home: Traveling with the USO.  Today, UH theatre director Sidney Berger is far from home.

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Energy Policy and Efforts to Combat Climate Change

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021


Jason Bordoff, cofounding dean, Columbia Climate School, founding director of the Center on Global Energy Policy, and professor of professional practice in international and public affairs at Columbia University, leads a conversation on energy policy and efforts to combat climate change.   FASKIANOS: Welcome to today's session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I am Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record. And the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/academic. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We are delighted to have with us today Jason Bordoff to talk about energy policy and efforts to combat climate change. Jason Bordoff is cofounding dean of the Columbia Climate School, founding director of the Center on Global Energy Policy, and professor of professional practice in international and public affairs at Columbia University. He previously served as special assistant to President Obama and senior director for energy and climate change on the National Security Council, and he has held senior policy positions on the White House's National Economic Council and Council on Environmental Quality. He is a columnist for Foreign Policy magazine and is often on TV and radio. So, we're really happy to have him with us today. So, Jason, thank you very much. We are just coming off the COP26 conference that took place in Glasgow that started on October 31, I believe, and concluded last Friday, November 12. Could you talk about what came out of the conference at a high level, if you think that the agreements that were reached went far enough or didn't go far enough, and what your policy recommendations are to really advance and fight the countdown that we have to the Earth warming? BORDOFF: Yeah. Thanks. Well, first, thanks to you, Irina, and thanks to CFR for the invitation to be with you all today. Really delighted to have the chance to talk about these important issues. I was there for much of the two-week period in Glasgow representing the Energy Center and the Climate School here at Columbia. I think it's kind of a glass half-full/glass half-empty outlook coming out of Glasgow. So I think the Glasgow conference was notable in several respects. We'll look back on it, I think, and some of the things we will remember are—some of the things we'll remember—(dog barking)—sorry—are the role of the private sector and private finance, I think, was much more prominent in Glasgow this year. I think there were commitments around some important things like methane, a very potent greenhouse gas, was much higher on the priority list in this U.N. climate meeting than in prior ones. You had pledges on deforestation and other things that are important. And then the final agreement did have some important elements to it, particularly around Article 6, how you design carbon markets around the world. But the glass half-empty outlook is still we are nowhere close to being on track for the kind of targets that countries and companies are committing to: net zero by 2050 or 1.5 degrees of warming. I think there were—there should be hope and optimism coming out of COP. The role of the youth—at Columbia, we were honored to organize a private roundtable for President Obama with youth climate activists. It's hard to spend time with young people in COP or on campus here at Columbia or anywhere else and not be inspired by how passionately they take these issues. So the activism you saw in the streets, the sense of urgency among everyone—activists, civil society, governments, the private sector—felt different, I think, at this COP than other COPs that I have attended or probably the ones I haven't attended. But there was also for some I saw kind of we're coming out of this and we're on track for below two degrees. Or, you know, Fatih Birol, the head of the International Energy Agency, tweeted that when you add up all the pledges we're on track for 1.8 degrees Celsius warming. He's talking about all of the pledges meaning every country who's promised to be net zero by 2050, 2060, 2070, and at least from my standpoint there's a good reason to take those with a grain of salt. They're not often backed up by concrete plans or ideas about how you would get anywhere close to achieving those goals. So it's good that we have elevated ambition, which is kind of one of the core outcomes of the COP in Glasgow. But it is also the case that when you elevate ambition and the reality doesn't change as fast or maybe faster than the ambition is changing, what you have is a growing gap between ambition and reality. And I think that's where we are today. Oil use is rising each and every year. Gas use is rising. Coal use is going up this year. I don't know if it's going to keep going up, but at a minimum it's going to plateau. It's not falling off a cliff. So the reality of the energy world today—which is 75 percent of emissions are energy—is not anything close to net zero by 2050. It is the case that progress is possible. So if you go back to before the Paris agreement, we were on track for something like maybe 3.7 degrees Celsius of warming. If you look at a current outlook, it's maybe 2.7, 2.8 (degrees), so just below three degrees. So progress is possible. That's good. If you look at the nationally determined contribution pledges—so the commitments countries made that are more near term, more accountability for them; the commitments they made to reduce emissions by 2030, their NDCs—we would be on track for about 2.4 degrees Celsius warming, assuming all those pledges are fulfilled. But history would suggest a reason to be a little skeptical about that. The U.S. has a pledge to get to a 50 to 52 percent reduction in emissions by 2030, and look at how things are working or not working in Washington and make your own judgment about how likely it is that we'll put in place the set of policies that would be required to get to that ambitious level of decarbonization by 2030. And I think the same healthy dose of skepticism is warranted when you look elsewhere in the world. But even if we achieve all of those, we're still falling short of below two degrees, nevertheless 1.5 (degrees). And so, again, I think the outcome from COP for me was optimism that progress is possible—we have made a lot of progress in the last ten years—but acute concern that we're nowhere close to being on track to take targets like 1.5 degrees Celsius or net zero by 2050 seriously. And we just need to be honest as a climate and energy community—and I live in both of those worlds; there's a lot of overlap between them, obviously—about how hard it is to achieve the goals we are talking about. Renewables have grown incredibly quickly. Optimistic headlines every day about what is happening in solar and wind. Costs have come down more than 90 percent. Battery costs have come down more than 90 percent in the last decade. But solar and wind create electricity, and electricity is 20 percent of global final energy consumption. The outlook for electric vehicles is much more promising today. Lots of companies like Ford and others are committing to be all-electric by a certain date ten or twenty years from now. Cars are 20 percent of global oil demand. About half of the emission reductions—cumulative emission reductions between now and 2050 will need to come from technologies that are not yet available at commercial scale and sectors of the economy that are really hard to decarbonize like steel and cement and ships and airplanes. We're not—we don't have all the tools we need to do those yet. And then, in Glasgow, the focus of a lot of what we did at Columbia was on—we did a lot of different things, but one of the key areas of focus was the challenge of thinking about decarbonization in emerging and developing economies. I don't think we talk about that enough. The issue of historical responsibility of loss and damage was more on the agenda this year, and I think you'll hear even more about it in the year ahead. The next COP is in Africa. There was growing tension between rich and poor countries at this COP. I think a starting point was what we see in the pandemic alone and how inequitable around the world the impacts of the pandemic are. Many people couldn't even travel to Glasgow from the Global South because they couldn't get vaccinated. We need, between now and 2050, estimates are—a ballpark—$100 trillion of additional investment in clean energy if we're going to get on track for 1.5 (degrees)/net zero by 2050. So the question that should obsess all of us who work in this space: Where will that money come from? Most of it's going to be private sector, not public. Most of it is going to be in developing and emerging economies. That is where the growth in energy is going to come from. Eight hundred million people have no access to energy at all. Nevertheless, if you model what energy access means, it's often defined as, you have enough to turn on lights or charge your cellphone. But when you talk about even a fraction of the standard of living we take for granted—driving a car, having a refrigerator, having an air conditioner—the numbers are massive. They're just huge, and the population of Africa's going to double to 2.2 billion by the year 2050. So these are really big numbers and we need to recognize how hard this is. But we should also recognize that it is possible. We have a lot of the tools we need. We need innovation in technology and we need stronger policy, whether that's a carbon price or standards for different sectors. And then, of course, we need private-sector actors to step up as well, and all of us. And we have these great commitments to achieve these goals with a lot of capital being put to work, and now we need to hold people accountable to make sure that they do that. So, again, I look back on the last two weeks or before, two weeks of COP, the gap between ambition and reality got bigger. Not necessarily a bad thing—ambition is a good thing—but now it's time to turn the ambition into action. We need governments to follow through on their pledges. Good news is we have a wide menu of options for reducing emissions. The bad news is there's not a lot of time at our current rate of emissions. And emissions are still going up each and every year. They're not even falling yet. Remember, what matters is the cumulative total, not the annual flow. At our current rate of emissions, the budget—carbon budget for staying below 1.5 (degrees) is used up in, around a decade or so, so there's not much time to get to work. But I'm really excited about what we're building with the first climate school in the country here at Columbia. When it comes to pushing—turning ambition into action, that requires research, it requires education, and it requires engaging with partners in civil society and the public sector and the private sector to help turn that research into action. And the people we're working with here every day on campus are the ones who are going to be the leaders that are going to hopefully do a better job—(laughs)—than we've done over the last few decades. So whatever you're doing at your educational institution—be it teaching or research or learning—we all have a role to play in the implementation of responsible, forward-thinking energy policy. I'm really excited to have the chance to talk with you all today. Look forward to your questions and to the conversation. Thank you again. FASKIANOS: Jason, that's fantastic. Thank you very much for that informative and sobering view. So let's turn to all of you now for your questions. So I'm going to go first to—I have one raised hand from Stephen Kass. Q: OK. Thank you. Jason, thank you for the very useful and concise summary. What specific kinds of energy programs do you think developing countries should now be pursuing? Should they be giving up coal entirely? Should they be importing natural gas? Should they be investing in renewables or nuclear? What recipe would you advise developing countries to pursue for their own energy needs? BORDOFF: It's going to need to be a lot of different things, so there's no single answer to that, of course. And by the way, I'll just say it would be super helpful if people don't mind just introducing yourself when you ask a question. That would be helpful to me, at least. I appreciate it. I think they need to do a lot of different things. I think I would start with low-hanging fruit, and renewable electricity is not the entire answer. The sun and wind are intermittent. Electricity can't do certain things yet, like power ships and airplanes. But the low cost of solar and wind, I think, does mean it's a good place to start, and then we need to think about those other sectors as well. I think a key thing there comes back to finance, and that's why we're spending so much time on it with our research agenda here. Access to financing and cost of capital are really important. Clean energy tends to be more capital-intensive and then, like solar and wind, more CAPEX, less OPEX over time. But attaining financing in poor countries is really difficult and expensive. Lack of experience with renewable energy, local banks are often reluctant to lend to those kinds of projects. And then foreign investors, where most of that capital is going to come from, view projects often in emerging markets and developing economies particularly as more risky. Local utilities may not be creditworthy. There's currency inflation risk in many developing countries, people worry about recouping their upfront investment if bills are paid in local currency. There's political risk, maybe corruption, inconsistently enforced regulations. And it can be harder to build clean energy infrastructure if you don't have other kinds of infrastructure, like ports, and roads, and bridges and a good electrical grid. So I would start there. And I think there's a role for those countries to scale up their clean energy sectors, but also for policymakers and multilateral development banks and governments elsewhere—there was a lot of focus in Glasgow on whether the developed countries would make good on their promise made in Copenhagen to send $100 billion a year in climate finance to developing countries. And they fell short of that. But even that is kind of a rounding error, compared to the one to two trillion (dollars) a year that the International Energy Agency estimates is needed. So there are many other things besides just writing a check that government, like in the U.S. or elsewhere, can do. The Development Finance Corporation, for example, can lend to banks in local and affordable rates, finance projects in local currency, expand the availability of loan guarantees. I've written before about how I think even what often gets called industrial policy, let's think about some sectors—in the same way China did with solar or batteries fifteen years ago. Are there sectors where governments might help to grow domestic industries and, by doing that, scale—bring down the cost of technologies that are expensive now, the premium for low-carbon or zero-carbon cement or steel. It's just—it's not reasonable to ask a developing country to build new cities, and new highways, and all the new construction they're going to do with zero-carbon steel and cement because it's just way too expensive. So how do you bring those costs down? If we think about investments, we can make through U.S. infrastructure or other spending to do that, that not only may help to grow some domestic industries and jobs here, that can be its own form of global leadership if we're driving those costs of those technologies down to make it cheaper for others to pick up. So I think that's one of the places I'd start. But there are a lot of other things we need to do too. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question—and let me just go back. Stephen Kass is an adjunct professor at NYU. So the next question is a written question from Wei Liang, who is an assistant professor of international policy studies at Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. And the question is: I wonder if you could briefly address the Green Climate Fund and individual countries' pledge on that. BORDOFF: Yeah, I mean, it touches a little bit on what I said a moment ago about the need for developed countries to provide climate finance to developing countries. And so I think that's—it's important that we take those obligations seriously, and that we, in advanced economies, step up and make those funds available. And but, again, we're talking—the amount we're still talking about is so small compared to the amounts that are needed to deal both with the impacts of climate change, and then also to curb climate change, to mitigate climate change. Because we know that developing countries are in the parts of the world that will often be most adversely impacted by climate impacts—droughts, and heat waves, and storms, and food security issues—from a standpoint of equity are the parts of the world that have done the least to cause this problem, responsible for very few emissions. If you look cumulatively at emissions since the start of the industrial age, about half—nearly half have come from the U.S. and EU combined. Two percent from the entire continent of Africa. So they are using very little energy today, haven't therefore contributed to the problems, and have the fewest resources, of course, to cope with the impacts, and also to develop in a cleaner way. Sometimes it's cheaper to develop in a cleaner way. Renewables are often today competitive with coal, even without subsidy. But there are many areas where that's not the case, and there is a cost. And we need to help make sure that, you know, we're thinking about what a just transition looks like. And that means many different things for different communities, whether you're a coal worker or an agricultural worker in California that may, you know, be working outside in worse and worse heat. But it also means thinking about the parts of the world that need assistance to make this transition. So I think we need to be taking that much more seriously. FASKIANOS: Next question is a raised hand from Tara Weil, who is an undergraduate student at Pomona College. Q: Hi. So, given that developed nations are the largest contributors to carbon emissions, as you've said, how can larger powers be convinced as to the importance of addressing global inequality with regards to climate change? And thank you so much, also, for giving this talk. BORDOFF: Yeah. Thank you for being here. I don't have a great answer to your question. I mean, the politics of foreign aid in general are not great, as we often hear in events at CFR. So I do think one—we need to continue to encourage, through political advocacy, civil society, and other ways, governments in advanced economies to think about all the tools they have at their disposal. I think the ones that are going to be—I'm reluctant to try to speak as a political commenter rather than a climate and energy commenter on what's going to work politically. But part of that is demonstrating what—it's not just generosity. It is also in one's self-interest to do these things. And just look at the pandemic, right? What would it look like for the U.S. to show greater leadership, or any country to show even greater leadership and help cope with the pandemic all around the world in parts of the world that are struggling to vaccinate their people? That is not only an act of generosity, but it is clearly one of self-interest too, because it's a pretty globalized economy and you're not going to be able to get a pandemic under control at home if it's not under control abroad. Of course, the same is true of the impacts of climate change. It doesn't matter where a ton of CO2 comes from. And we can decarbonize our own economy, but the U.S. is only 15 percent of annual emissions globally. So it's not going to make a huge difference unless everyone else does that as well. There is also the potential, I think, to—and we see this increasingly when you look at the discussion of the Biden infrastructure bill, how they talk about the U.S.-China relationship, which of course are the two most important countries from the standpoint of climate change. It is one of cooperation. That was one of the success stories in Glasgow, was a commitment to cooperate more. We'll see if we can actually do it, because it's a pretty difficult and tense U.S.-China relationship right now. So the question is, can you separate climate from all those other problems on human rights, and intellectual property, and everything else and then cooperate on climate? It's been hard, but there's a renewed commitment to try to do that. But also, a recognition that action in the clean energy space is not only about cooperation but it's also about economic competition. And you have seen more and more focus on both the Republican and Democratic sides of the aisle on thinking about the security of supply chains, and critical minerals, and the inputs in lithium and rare earth elements that go into many aspects of clean energy. To my point before about aspects of industrial policy that might help grow your own domestic economy, I think there are ways in which countries can take measures that help—that help their own economies and help workers and help create jobs, and that in the process are helping to drive forward more quickly the clean energy technologies we need, and bring down the cost of those technologies to make them more accessible and available in some of the less-developed countries. So I think trying to frame it less as do we keep funds at home, do we write a check abroad? But there are actually many steps you could do to create economic opportunities and are win-win. Without being pollyannish about it, I think there is some truth to some of those. And I think we can focus on those politically as well. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take an international question from Luciana Alexandra Ghica, who is an associate professor for international cooperation at the University of Bucharest. What type of topics do you think we should address immediately in university programs that provide training in climate, development, global policies, or international public affairs, so that a new generation of leaders really pushes forward the agenda on climate change? BORDOFF: Yeah. Well, I'll say a quick word about what we're doing at Columbia, and maybe it's relevant to that question, because Columbia has made this historic commitment to build a climate school. There are many initiatives, and centers, and institutes. There was not only a handful of schools—law school, business school, medical school, engineering school. And it is the largest commitment a university can make to any particular topic, is something on the scale of a school with degree-granting authority and tenure-granting authority, and all the things that come with a school. And it's just the scale at a place like Columbia, and many other places, is just enormous. That's what we're doing on climate. We have created a climate school. And I'm honored President Bollinger asked me to help lead it. And we're going to build a faculty. We have our first inaugural class of masters' students, about ninety students that are going through the program right now, and we have a building in Manhattan for the climate school, and on and on. The idea—but the question is, what is climate, right? Because academia has been historically organized into traditional academic disciplines. So you have people who you hire through a tenured search, and they go to the engineering faculty and build their lab there. And there's law professors, and their business school professors, and on and on and on, social work. But for climate, you need all of those, right? They all kind of need to come together. And, like, interdisciplinary doesn't even sort of do justice to what it means to think about approaching this systemic—it's a systemic challenge. The system has to change. And so whatever solution you're talking about—if you want to get hydrogen to scale in the world, let's—you know, for certain sectors of the economy that may be hard to do with renewable energy, or in terms of renewable energy and, say, green hydrogen. You need engineering breakthroughs to bring down the cost of electrolyzers, or you need new business models, or you need financial institution frameworks that figure out how you're going to put the capital into these things. You need the policy incentives. How are you going to—you need permitting and regulation. How do we permit hydrogen infrastructure? It's barely been done before. There are concerns in the environmental justice community about some aspects of technologies like that or carbon capture that need to be taken seriously and addressed. There are geopolitical implications, potentially, to starting to build a global trade in ammonia or hydrogen, and what security concerns—energy security concerns might accompany those, the way we thought about oil or gas from Russia into Europe. I have an article coming out in the next issue of Foreign Affairs about the geopolitics of the energy transition. So we need disciplines that come together and look at a problem like that in all of those multifaceted dimensions, so we can figure out how to get from a lab to scale out in the world. And so when we think about the areas of concentration here, climate finance, climate justice, climate in society, climate in international security—I mean, a range of things that I think are really important to help people understand. And that's going to be a major focus of what we do at the climate school here. FASKIANOS: Fantastic. Let's go next to Sean Grossnickle, who has raised his hand. A graduate student at Fordham University. Q: Speak now? Hi, this is not Sean but Henry Schwalbenberg, also at Fordham, where I teach in our international political economy and development program. I went to a conference about a month ago in Rome. And there was a physicist from CERN. And he was a big advocate of something I'd never heard of, and this is this thorium for nuclear reactors. And he was going through all the pros, but I wanted a more balanced perspective on it. And I'm hoping that you might give me a little pros and cons of this thorium nuclear reactor technique. BORDOFF: Yeah. I will be honest and say that nuclear is not my area of focus. We have a pretty strong team here that works in nuclear, and I think is optimistic about the breakthroughs we're going to see in several potential areas of nuclear—advanced nuclear technology, that being one of them, or small modular reactors, and others. At a high level, I will say I do think if you're serious about the math of decarbonization and getting to net zero by 2050, it's hard to do without zero-carbon nuclear power. It's firm, baseload power. It runs all the time. Obviously, there are challenges with intermittency of solar and wind, although they can be addressed to some extent with energy story. Most of the analyses that are done show not necessarily in the U.S. but in other parts of the world significant growth in nuclear power. The International Energy Agency just modeled what it looks like to get to net zero by 2050, and this pathway that got a lot of attention for saying things like we would not be investing in new oil and gas supply. The world has to change a lot pretty quickly. And they have about a hundred new nuclear plants being built by 2030, so that's a pretty big number. So we're going to need all tools—(laughs)—that we have at our disposal. And unfortunately, I worry we may still fall short. So I think at a high level we need to think really hard about how to improve nuclear technology. The people who know that really well I think are optimistic about our ability to do that. And I will follow up on thorium in particular with my colleagues at Columbia, and happy to follow up with you offline about it. FASKIANOS: Great. I'm going to take a written question from Stephen Bird, who's an associate professor of political science at Clarkson University. He thanks you, and he wanted you to talk a little bit more about political will. The overall dollar amounts are clear. Much cheaper to address climate change than to ignore it. That said, countries are, clearly, lagging. Is it a case of countries just don't want to take action now because of issues of fairness or because of lack of domestic political support, i.e., citizens aren't convinced that they should pay costs now with payoffs that come later, and what might we do to improve that issue in terms of persuading or arguing for more political will? BORDOFF: Yeah. It's a question for, you know, a political scientist as much as an energy or climate expert, and I wish I had a better answer to it. I think it is—climate is one of the trickiest problems for so many reasons but one of those is there is no acute event now that you sort of respond to, hopefully, and pull everyone together. It's a set of things that, you know, of course, there would have been storms and droughts before but we know they're intensified and made worse. It's hard to rally public support. We often respond to a crisis kind of proverbial, you know, frog in the boiling water kind of thing. So that makes it hard. There are huge issues—we talked about a just transition a few minutes ago—there are huge issues with intergenerational equity when we talk about climate. There are, clearly, climate impacts and damages today but some of the worst will be in the future, including for people who may not be born yet, and we don't do a great job in our political environment about thinking about those and valuing them today and how you do that, and from an economic standpoint, of course, there are questions about discount rates you apply and everything else. I think, politically, one of the things that has mobilized stronger climate—support for climate action, so it is encouraging that if you look at polling on climate change, the level of urgency that the public in many countries, including the U.S., broadly, ascribe to acting on climate has gone up a lot. It's higher today than it was, you know, a decade or so ago. That's a result of people seeing the impacts and also advocacy campaigns and political campaigns. It is often tied to—it's like a win-win. Like, President Biden says when he thinks of climate he thinks of jobs, and so we're going to deal with climate and we're going to grow the economy faster and we're going to create jobs, and there is truth to that. It is also the case that there are costs. The cost of inaction are higher, but there are costs associated with the transition itself. So if you survey the American public, I think, climate, according to the latest YouGov/Economist poll I saw, you know, it was number two on the list of things they cared the most about. That's much higher than in the past. And then if you ask the American public are they willing to pay $0.25 a gallon more at the pump to act on climate, 75 percent say no. And you look at the challenges the Biden administration is having right now sort of thinking about a really strong set of measures to put in place to move the ball forward on climate, but acute concern today about where oil prices are and inflation and natural gas prices as we head into the winter. If the weather is cold then it's going to be really expensive for people to heat their homes in parts—some parts of the country like New England, maybe. So that's a reality, and I think we need to—it was interesting, in the roundtable we did with President Obama with climate activists, that was a message he had for them. You know, be impatient, be angry, keep the pressure on, but also be pragmatic. And by that he means, like, you know, try to see the world through the eyes of others and people who are worried about the cost of filling up at the pump, the cost of paying their heating bills. They're not—some of them may not be where you are yet. They may not have the same sense of urgency with acting on climate that many of us on this Zoom do and need to take those concerns seriously. So I think that's a real challenge, and it can be addressed with good policy, to some extent, right, if you think about the revenue raised from a carbon tax and how it could be redistributed in a way that reduce the regressive impacts. I've written about how, at a high level—I'll say one last point—if we get on track for an energy transition, which we're not on yet, right. (Laughs.) Oil and gas use are going up each and every year. But imagine we started to get on track where those were falling year after year. It's still going to take decades, and that process of transition is going to be really messy. It's going to be really volatile. We're going to have fits and starts in policy from Obama to Trump to Biden. We're going to make estimate—we're going to make bets on technologies and maybe get those technologies wrong or misunderstand the cost curves, the potential to shut down investment in certain forms of energy before the rest are ready to pick up the slack. If it's messy and volatile and bumpy, that's not only harmful economically and geopolitically, it will undermine public support for stronger climate action. So you see, like, in Washington they're selling off the Strategic Petroleum Reserve because we're moving to a world beyond oil and also we have all this domestic oil now with shale. We need more, not fewer, tools to mitigate volatility for the next several decades if we're serious about making this transition, and I think the same is true for thinking about sort of buffers you could build into geopolitics, foreign policy, and national security, because there will be—in a post-oil and gas world, you know, you may say, well, we're not going to worry as much about the Middle East or about, you know, Russia's leverage in Europe. But there will be new risks created and we can talk about what some of those might be, and we need new tools of foreign policy to mitigate those potential foreign policy risks. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question. Raised hand from Chloe Demrovsky, adjunct instructor at NYU. Q: Hey, can you hear me? BORDOFF: Yes. Thank you. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Hi. Chloe Demrovsky, adjunct at NYU and president and CEO of Disaster Recovery Institute International. Thanks for being with us, Jason. So my question is about the feasibility and your thoughts on artificially altered clouds or solar geoengineering. What are the ethical and geopolitical implications of, perhaps, using this to buy a little time for our energy transition? Thanks. BORDOFF: Yeah. A super interesting question, and I will say, again, I'm sort of—think of myself as an energy expert. So that is where I spend more time than thinking about tools like solar geoengineering. I guess, it seems there's, obviously, huge risks associated with something like that and we need to understand them. We need to do research. We need to figure out what those risks may be. There are global governance concerns. It's actually pretty cheap to do solar geoengineering. So what happens when some country or some billionaire decides they want to start spraying stuff into the atmosphere to cool the planet? And for those who don't know that, you know, solar—I mean, you think of after a volcano the planet cools a little bit because of all the particulates up in the atmosphere. When you model in an energy system model how much phasing out coal will reduce warming, you, obviously, have much less carbon dioxide emissions but that's offset slightly—not completely, of course—it's offset a little bit by the fact that you have less local air pollution, which is a good thing from air pollution. But air pollution has a slightly cooling effect, because you have these little particles floating around that reflect sunlight. So the idea is can we create that artificially and cool the planet, and you can imagine lots of reasons why that could go wrong when you're trying to figure out what—how much to put in there, what unintended consequences could be. You still have other impacts of carbon dioxide like ocean acidification. Maybe you go too far in one direction, that's like you're setting the thermostat. That's why one of the companies doing carbon removal is called Global Thermostat. You're kind of figuring out what temperature it should be. But I will say so it's an area that needs research and I think, given how far we are away from achieving goals like 1.5 and net-zero 2050, I guess what I would say is in the same way that when I worked in the Obama administration it was—I wouldn't say controversial, but there were some people who didn't want to talk about adaptation because it was kind of a more—there was a moral hazard problem there. It was, you know, less pressure to mitigate and reduce emissions if we thought adaptation was a solution. People worry about that from the standpoint of solar geoengineering. But the likelihood—I hope I'm wrong, but the likelihood that we roll the clock forward, you know, later this decade and we realize we've made progress but we're still pretty far short, and the impacts of climate change in the same way the IPCC 1.5 report said, you know what, 1.5 is going to be pretty bad, too, and that's even worse than we thought, the more we learn about climate the more reason there is to be concerned, not less concerned. It seems very plausible to me that we will kind of come to a growing consensus that we have to think about whether this technology can, as you said, buy us time. This is not something you do permanently. You need to get to net zero to stop global warming. But if you want to reduce the impacts of warming on the rate of Arctic sea ice melt and all the rest, can you buy time, extend the runway, by doing this for some number of decades. And I think—I don't have a strong view on the right answer to that. But I think it's something we, certainly, need to be thinking about researching and understanding what the consequences would be because we're going to have to figure out how to take more abrupt actions to close that gap between ambition and reality unless the reality starts to change much more quickly than is the case right now. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I saw a raised hand from Maya but she lowered it. So if you want to raise your hand again, please do so. And in the meantime, I'm going to take a written question from Jennifer Sklarew, who's an assistant professor of energy and sustainability at George Mason University. Was CCS/CCUS, which carbon capture and storage/carbon capture utilization and storage, to write out those acronyms, promoted as a climate change solution in Glasgow and was there a pushback against this technology option as both a climate change solution and a support mechanism for continued fossil fuel use? BORDOFF: There was some pushback but, I think, actually, more in the other direction. So I think there has been a growing recognition from many in the climate world that carbon capture technology, carbon removal technology, need to be part of the solution. I think there's almost no climate model at this point that shows how you would get to 1.5 degrees or net zero—1.5 degrees without huge amounts of negative emissions—carbon removal. Some of that can be nature based, but a lot of it will be—some of it will be technology based as well and focusing on what we care about, which is the emissions, is the most important thing. So and this is not, I don't think, the primary thing you're going to do. You want to do the things that are easiest and cheapest and present the fewest risks. So putting a lot of renewables into the grid, getting electrification into the vehicle fleet—there's a lot of things that you would do before that. But if you think about some of the sectors in the economy we talked about before that are hard to decarbonize like steel and cement, it may well be the case that carbon capture is part of the technology there. There was a big announcement yesterday from the NET Power Allam Cycle gas plant in Texas that they had finally come online with delivering net-zero power to the grid. It was sort of a milestone in that technology. So we need to advance this technology and figure out how we're going to—how we're going to get where we need to be. We need to hold that kind of technology accountable to make sure that it's actually meeting the standards we're talking about so that it actually is very low, if not zero, carbon. But if you look at, you know, most of the scenarios I'm aware of, whether it's—Princeton did the study “Net-Zero America,” how we get to net zero by 2050 in the U.S. The International Energy Agency, as I said, did it for net zero globally. There is a meaningful role for carbon capture, to some extent, in the power sector in these heavy industry sectors like steel and cement, and then making, say, hydrogen some of that will be blue hydrogen. Most of it, eventually, will be green, but there may be some role for blue hydrogen, which is—which is gas with carbon capture. So I think, if anything, there's been a growing understanding that we need all tools on deck right away and, again, I fear even with all the tools we may still fall short. FASKIANOS: Great. There's a written question from Laila Bichara, who's at SUNY Farmingdale, international business. There was a New York Times article, “Business Schools Respond to a Flood of Interest in ESG,” talking about the issue of the scarcity of skills in recent graduates to help with social impact, sustainable investments, climate finance, and social entrepreneurship. And she wanted to know if there are resources that you could point the group to in terms of foundation courses or certification that would provide all students with a basic foundation. BORDOFF: Yeah. That's a really good question and it's a growing area of focus and I think universities should be doing more in. The Tamer Center of Columbia Business School does a lot of work in ESG. We hosted a really interesting roundtable at the Center on Global Energy Policy yesterday on ESG and actually been doing a lot of work thinking about that in the context of state-owned enterprises and national oil companies, which we don't talk about enough. But they're a really, really big part of the problem we're talking about. We tend to focus more on these very well-known private sector companies or financial institutions in places like New York. So there—Bloomberg Philanthropies has done a huge amount in this space. I think there's some really good educational programs with some universities and business schools that have done a lot in the ESG space. But I think it's a need, to be frank. I mean, the fact that you're asking the question and I'm pointing to a few examples, but not a huge number, and it is something that universities need to educate themselves about but then is an opportunity for us to educate others. Maybe a revenue one, too, with executive education or something. But there's a lot of companies and financial institutions that want to understand this better. I worry that while there's a huge growing focus on climate, which is a good thing, in the financial community, the phrase ESG kind of means so many different things right now. It's this alphabet soup of regulations and standards and disclosure requirements, and some may make a difference and some may not and it's hard to figure out which ones matter, and for people who want to do the responsible thing what does that really mean. That's an area where research is needed. I mean, that's a role for what we do every day to think about if the SEC is going to regulate what makes a difference and what doesn't, if you're going to create green bonds. If you're going to call everything green in the finance community, what's real and what's not? What moves the needle? What doesn't? What are the returns for greener portfolios? How is that affecting the cost of capital for clean energy versus dirty energy? You know, on and on. I think those are important research questions for us to take on and then it's our job to help educate others as well. FASKIANOS: Great. So the next question I'm going to take from—oh, OK. Good. Maya Copeland (sp) has written her question. She's a political science major at Delaware State University. Do you believe developed nations like the U.S. have done a lot in reference to climate change or mostly talk? If you believe nations like the U.S. have dropped the ball in this aspect, what do you think it would take to get those powerhouses serious about environmental change? BORDOFF: I think advanced economies have done—many have done a lot. I mean, the European Union has taken climate seriously and has reduced emissions and has pretty strong measures in place with a carbon market, for example, with a pretty high carbon price right now. The politics of this issue are not quite as favorable in the U.S., but the U.S. has seen emissions decline more than most over the last decade and a half, in part because of policy measures that have, you know, advanced renewable energy and brought the cost of that down as well as cheaper natural gas displacing coal for a while. But at a broader level, you know, have we done enough? The answer is no one's done enough—(laughs)—which is why emissions are still going up every single year. So that—so the answer is no, we haven't done enough. Almost no country has done enough at home to be on a trajectory for net zero 2050. You saw the announcements from countries like India saying, we'll get to net zero by 2070, and, you know, people said, oh, well, that's terrible. They're not saying 2050. And implicit in that is sort of saying, well, if you want to get global to net zero by 2050 we're not all going to move at the same speed, right. Some countries have advanced with the benefit of hydrocarbons since the Industrial Age and some haven't. So, presumably, the pathways are going to look different, right. And, you know, that's not always how countries in the advanced—in the developing—in the developed world talk about it. The commitment from the Biden administration is net zero by 2050. So I would say there's been—there are some models to point to of countries that have taken this issue seriously but we're not doing enough and partly because the political will is not there and partly—I come back to what I said before—this problem is harder than people realize. So you say which countries are doing enough, like, point to some models, right, and somebody might point to Norway, which, you know, the share of new vehicles sold that are electric in Norway went from zero to, I think, it's 70 percent now. I mean, that's amazing. Seventy percent of new car sales are electric. And if you go back to the start of that trajectory, about a decade or decade and a half, oil demand is unchanged in Norway. So we can talk about why that is and it's because a lot—as I said earlier, a lot of oil is used for things other than cars, and it's increased for trucks and planes and petrochemicals. It takes time for the vehicle fleet to turn over. So when you start selling a bunch of electric cars, you know, average car is on the road for fifteen years so it takes a while before that—the vehicle stock turns over. So I saw that kind of mapped out on a chart recently, just two lines—one is electric vehicle sales going straight up and then the other is oil demand in a flat line. It's a reminder of how unforgiving the math of decarbonization is. The math of climate is really unforgiving, like, you know, the kind of harmful impacts we're going to see with even 1.5 degrees warming. But the math of energy and decarbonization is really unforgiving, too. It's—and we just need to be honest with ourselves about what it takes to get where we need to go. Because I think it's good to have optimism and ambition, but I worry there should be optimism but not happy talk. We should recognize that there's a lot of work to do and let's get to work doing it. FASKIANOS: Great. So there are several questions in the chat about China. I'm going to start off with Andrew Campbell, who's a student at George Mason University. Is LNG—liquefied natural gas—a bridge toward renewable energy still being considered? If not, how are India and China's expected growth and increase in coal use going to be addressed? And then there are a couple of other comments or questions about China. You know, what's your take on China as the biggest emitter and return somewhat to coal? Can we actually even make stated and adequate new goals? And, you know, given the relationship between U.S. and China, which is contentious, you know, what is the cooperation going to be between U.S. and China on climate? So there's a lot packed in there, but I know you can address it all. (Laughs.) BORDOFF: Yeah. I think the China question is really hard, as I said earlier, this kind of, like, competition and cooperation and we're going to try to do both, and I think there was a hope early on—Secretary Kerry said it—that climate could be segmented from the broader challenges in the U.S.-China relationship, and I think that has proven harder to do than people had hoped, in part, because, you know, you need both parties to want to do that. I think China has signaled it's not necessarily willing to segment cooperation on climate from lots of other issues. And then these things bleed together where, you know, there's measures being taken in Washington to restrict imports of solar panels from China, that there were concerns that were made with—in ways that have human rights abuses associated with them with forced labor or maybe have unfair trade practices in terms of subsidies. China is—you know, the leadership in China takes climate seriously. This is a country that recognizes, I think, climate change is real and that needs to be addressed. They have a set of national interests that matter a lot, obviously, to them in terms of economic growth, and the pathway to get there is challenging. So it's a country that's growing clean energy incredibly quickly, as we're seeing right now, in part because there's a(n) energy crunch throughout Europe and Asia. They are ramping up the use of coal quite a bit again, but also taking some pretty strong measures to advance clean energy and, over time, hopefully, move in a lower carbon direction for reasons both about concerns over climate but also local air pollution, which is much, much worse in many parts of China than it is here and that's a huge source of concern for the public there. So when it comes to things like coal they need to figure out how to address those air pollution problems. And then for reasons of economic competition, like I mentioned a minute ago. I mean, China dominates the global market for refining and processing of critical minerals for solar panels, and there are economic and national competitiveness and strategic reasons to do that. So all of those things motivate them to move in the direction of clean energy, but they need to be moving faster to phase down hydrocarbon energy for sure. And then you ask a really hard question about—not hard, but one of the most contentious questions is about the role of natural gas in the transition, and we can have a whole separate session about that. I think there is a view of many in the climate community and many in developing countries—in developed countries that there's not space left in the carbon budget for natural gas, and you saw the Biden administration recently declare through the Treasury Department that, except in very rare cases of the poorest of the poor like Sierra Leone or something, they would not finance natural gas projects through the multilateral development banks. The vice president of Nigeria, I think, responded—speaking of CFR—in Foreign Affairs by writing that this was not fair and you need to think about a viable pathway for a country like Nigeria to develop and it just—it doesn't work to get there that fast. There has to be a bridge. The role of gas looks very different in different parts of the world. It looks different in the U.S. than it does in an emerging or a developing economy. It looks different in the power sector, where there are a lot more alternatives like renewables than it does in heavy industry or how we heat our homes. It looks different for, say, in the Global South, where you're talking about people who are still using coal and charcoal and dung for cooking to think about solutions like liquefied petroleum gas. So all of those things are true, but we need to think about gas also with the carbon budget in mind. I mean, the math is just the math. (Laughs.) If you're going to build any gas infrastructure and not have it blow through the carbon budget, it's going to have to be retired before the end of its normal economic life and you need to think about how that might look in different parts of the world. So you need to be fair to people, to allow them to grow, but also recognize that the math of carbon, you know, is what it is. FASKIANOS: Great. I just want to credit those last—the China questions came from Lada Kochtcheeva at North Carolina State University and Joan Kaufman, who's director of Schwarzman Scholars based in China. We are really at the end of our time—we started a couple minutes late—and I just wanted to go back to—there are students on the call who are following with a professor on the webinar who wanted you just to comment on blue hydrogen, whether or not it is contributing or helping to reduce greenhouse gases. BORDOFF: I think the answer is it can. You just need to make sure that it actually does. So the question of—and by blue hydrogen we mean, you know, using gas with carbon capture to create hydrogen. It needs to have very low methane leakage rates. It needs to have very high capture rates, and we know that is technically possible. It doesn't mean it will be done that way. So if people are going to pursue blue hydrogen as part of the solution in the—particularly in the near term, you need to make sure that it's meeting those standards. I think in the long run my guess and, I think, most guesses would be that green hydrogen is going to make more sense. It's going to be cheaper. The cost is going to come down. And so if we have a significant part of the energy sector that is hydrogen and ammonia in, say, 2050, more of that's going to be green than blue. But there can be a role for blue if you make sure it's done the right way. You just have to actually make sure it's done the right way. FASKIANOS: Great. And, Jason, we are out of time, but I wanted to give you one last, you know, one-minute or thirty seconds, whatever you want, just to say some parting words on your work at the center or, you know, to leave the group with what they can do, again. So— BORDOFF: Well, I would just say thanks for the chance to be with you all and for the work that you're doing every day. You know, I think Glasgow was a moment when the world came together to elevate ambition and roll up our sleeves and say this is—this is the decisive decade. Like, we'll know ten years from now—(laughs)—if we got anywhere close to making it or not. And so it's time for everyone to kind of roll up their sleeves and say, what can we do? We're doing that, I think, at Columbia with the creation of this new climate school. We do that every day at the Center on Global Energy Policy. And so just in all of your institutions, you know, what does that mean for you? What does it mean for the institution? What does that mean for your own research and time and how you allocate it? How do we step up and say, what can we do in the biggest and boldest way we can? Because we need—we're creating a climate school because I think the view is—you know, a hundred years ago there were no schools of public health and now it's how would you deal with a pandemic without a school of public health? So I think our view is decades from now we'll look back and wonder how we ever thought it was possible to handle a problem as complex and urgent as climate change without universities devoting their greatest kind of resource to them. And the measure of success for universities has to be research and new knowledge creation. It has to be education. It has to be serving our own communities. For us, it's, you know, the community here in New York, Harlem. But also are we focusing the extraordinary resources and capacity and expertise of these great institutions to solve humanity's greatest problems? That has to be a motivating force, too, for much of—maybe not all of but a lot of what universities do. So I'd just ask all of us to go back and think about how we can do that in our own work every day. and we have to do it through partnerships. I think universities don't work together as well as they need to. But this is only going to work if we work together. FASKIANOS: Great way to end. Thank you very much, Jason Bordoff. We really appreciate it. We'll have to look for your article in Foreign Affairs magazine, which is published by CFR. So, we are excited that you continue to contribute to the magazine. You can follow Jason Bordoff on Twitter at @JasonBordoff. Very easy to remember. Our final academic webinar of the semester will be on Wednesday, December 1, at 1:00 p.m. (ET). Michelle Gavin, who is CFR's Ralph Bunche senior fellow for Africa policy studies, will talk about African politics and security issues. So in the meantime, follow us at @CFR_Academic. Come to CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for research and analysis on global issues, and we look forward to continuing the conversation with you. Take care. BORDOFF: Thank you. (END)

One More Thing Before You Go
That Thing About Anxiety in a Foreign Country-Waybback Wednesday

One More Thing Before You Go

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 47:49


In this episode we have a conversation with a woman who suffers from anxiety, a guilt complex, loneliness, and panic attacks, all while being a solo world traveler and podcaster. We talk life as an Expat during COVID-19, and the challenges of being a small travel business owner during a pandemic. Since 2016, Allison Green has hitchhiked through the Balkans, rode camels through the Sahara, boarded down an active volcano, slept atop other volcanoes, gone scuba diving on 3 continents, climbed the highest mountain in Montenegro, gone dogsledding in the Arctic, seen the Northern lights in Sweden, rode a train through Switzerland and gawked at the Matterhorn, swam with sharks in Belize, caved in Guatemala, canyoned in Nicaragua, helicoptered over the Grand Canyon, and hot air ballooned in Cappadocia. You can more about her and her services on my website Beforeyougopodcast.com or on her websites at https://eternalarrival.com/ (Eternal Arrival)https://travelmassive.com/ (Travel Massive)https://imanxiousabout.podbean.com/ (I'm Anxious About)  or Sophia adventures

Alaska News Nightly
Alaska News Nightly: Tuesday, November 16, 2021

Alaska News Nightly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021


Military leaders in Alaska say the Arctic is a strategic priority. Also, Anchorage's mayor throws his support behind a conservative parents rights group. And a Fairbanks restaurant is requiring customers prove they're vaccinated.

Got Science?
Ep. 122: Science and the Rapidly Changing Arctic

Got Science?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 28:59


Arctic expert Joel Clement is back with an update on federal science in the region, and how Alaska Natives are adapting to the changing landscape.

The Ultimate Health Podcast
441: Too Much Comfort Is Destroying Your Health & What to Do About It | Michael Easter

The Ultimate Health Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 88:55


Watch the full video interview on YouTube here: https://bit.ly/michaeleaster441 Michael Easter (IG: @michael_easter) is the author of The Comfort Crisis, a contributing editor at Men's Health magazine, columnist for Outside magazine, and professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV). His work has appeared in more than 60 countries and can also be found in Men's Journal, Vice, Scientific American, Esquire, and others. In this episode, we discuss: The evolution of The Comfort Crisis Time spent outdoors has great mental health benefits Michael's 33-day Alaskan backcountry hunting trip Boredom tells us to go do something different The nature pyramid The feeling of hunting for the 1st time The unforgiving weather conditions in the Arctic tundra Understanding for one thing to live, another has to die How do other cultures view death? Traveling to Bhutan to learn the secret to happiness The cosmic calendar concept Death used to be more intimate Rites of passage What is a misogi? The discomfort of failure The benefits of accomplishing a misogi Experiencing periods of hunger Expanding your comfort zones makes your life better Practicing gratitude gives you perspective Working for your food The big difference between loneliness and solitude Block off time every day for solitude Balancing screen time Show sponsors: Organifi

Places I Remember with Lea Lane
'Fire And Ice': Disaster And Redemption In A Remote Arctic Village

Places I Remember with Lea Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 26:05


Deeanne Burch is a deceptively gentle woman, but super strong when she needs to be. In her travel memoir, Journey Through Fire and Ice: Shattered Dreams Above the Arctic Circle she recounts life in a remote Inuit village. She tells it like it is -- and it gets scary. But she prevails.We begin with her comfortable early life in Canada centering on Toronto and the lake nearby, and memories of her storybook honeymoon in Europe with Tiger, her new husband who is doing a study of an isolated fishing village on an island in northern Alaska.Deeanne talks of the primitive setting, customs, socialization, and challenging chores like drying fish and cutting blubber.  And she has trouble eating foods like raw seal liver.There are moments of beauty, but a disastrous ice camping excursion is followed by an even more devastating experience a few days later with an oil lantern -- which results in a frightening outcome, and having to leave.She and Tiger eventually return to finish the study, but both have changed, and learned. Deanne's story brings up  questions about society, resilience and reality. And she ends orur conversation with an interesting memory._____ Deanne Burch writes children's books and is a photographer. Visit www.Deanneburch.com, or follow her on Facebook at @DeanneBurchAuthor. Journey Through Fire and Ice: Shattered Dreams Above the Arctic Circle  is available from Amazon.com _____Podcast host Lea Lane blogs at forbes.com, has traveled to over 100 countries, written nine books, including Places I Remember, and contributed to guidebooks.  She's @lealane on Twitter; PlacesIRememberLeaLane on Insta; on  Facebook, it's Places I Remember with Lea Lane. Website: placesirememberlealane.com.  Please follow, rate and review this weekly travel podcast!

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.15.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 58:42


Grape consumption benefits gut microbiome and cholesterol metabolism University of California at Los Angeles, November 11, 2021 A new clinical study published in the scientific journal Nutrients found that consuming grapes significantly increased the diversity of bacteria in the gut which is considered essential to good health overall.  Additionally, consuming grapes significantly decreased cholesterol levels, as well as bile acids which play an integral role in cholesterol metabolism.  The findings suggest a promising new role for grapes in gut health and reinforce the benefits of grapes on heart health. In the intervention study], healthy subjects consumed the equivalent of 1.5 cups of grapes[2] per day – for four weeks. The subjects consumed a low fiber/low polyphenol diet throughout the study.  After four weeks of grape consumption there was an increase in microbial diversity as measured by the Shannon index, a commonly used tool for measuring diversity of species.   Among the beneficial bacteria that increased was Akkermansia, a bacteria of keen interest for its beneficial effect on glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as on the integrity of the intestinal lining.  Additionally, a decrease in blood cholesterols was observed including total cholesterol by 6.1% and LDL cholesterol by 5.9%.  Bile acids, which are linked to cholesterol metabolism, were decreased by 40.9%.     Vitamin D supplementation associated with lower risk of heart attack or death during follow-up Kansas City VA Medical Center, November 8 2021.  The October 2021 issue of the Journal of the Endocrine Society published findings from a retrospective study of US veterans that uncovered an association between supplementing with vitamin D and a lower risk of heart attack and mortality from any cause during up to 14 years of follow-up. The study included men and women treated at the Kansas City VA Medical Center from 1999-2018 who had low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels of 20 ng/mL or less. Among 11,119 patients who were not treated with vitamin D supplements, follow-up vitamin D levels remained at 20 ng/mL or lower. For those who received the vitamin, levels improved to 21-29 ng/mL among 5,623 patients and to at least 30 ng/mL among 3,277 patients at follow-up.  Men and women whose vitamin D levels improved to at least 30 ng/mL had a risk of heart attack that was 35% lower than patients whose levels improved to 21-29 ng/mL and 27% lower than the untreated group. The difference in risk between untreated individuals and those whose levels improved to 21-29 ng/mL was not determined to be significant. Patients whose vitamin D levels improved the most also experienced significantly greater heart attack-free survival during follow-up than the remainder of the patients. When mortality from any cause during follow-up was examined, men and women whose vitamin D levels improved to 21-29 ng/mL had a 41% lower risk, and those whose levels improved to 30 ng/mL or more had a 39% lower risk than the untreated group.  “These results suggest that targeting 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels above 30 ng/mL might improve prognosis in the primary prevention setting among individuals with vitamin D deficiency,” authors Prakash Acharya of the University of Kansas Medical Center and colleagues wrote.     Meditative practice and spiritual wellbeing may preserve cognitive function in aging       Alzheimer's Research and Prevention Foundation and Thomas Jefferson University, November 12, 2021 It is projected that up to 152 million people worldwide will be living with Alzheimer's disease (AD) by 2050. To date there are no drugs that have a substantial positive impact on either the prevention or reversal of cognitive decline. A growing body of evidence finds that targeting lifestyle and vascular risk factors have a beneficial effect on overall cognitive performance. A new review in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, published by IOS Press, examines research that finds spiritual fitness, a new concept in medicine that centers on psychological and spiritual wellbeing may reduce multiple risk factors for AD. Research reveals that religious and spiritual involvement can preserve cognitive function as we age. Significantly, individuals who have a high score on a "purpose in life" (PIL) measure, a component of psychological wellbeing, were 2.4 times more likely to remain free of AD than individuals with low PIL. In another study, participants who reported higher levels of PIL exhibited better cognitive function, and further, PIL protected those with already existing pathological conditions, thus slowing their decline.   Radiotherapy may explain why childhood cancer survivors often develop metabolic disease Rockefeller University, November 9, 2021 Decades after battling childhood cancer, survivors often face a new challenge: cardiometabolic disease. A spectrum of conditions that includes coronary heart disease and diabetes, cardiometabolic disease typically impacts people who are obese, elderly, or insulin resistant. For reasons yet unknown, young, seemingly healthy adults who survived childhood cancer are also at risk. Radiation therapy may be to blame. A new study finds that childhood cancer patients who were treated with abdominal or total body irradiation grow up to display abnormalities in their adipose (fat) tissue, similar to those found in obese individuals with cardiometabolic disease. "When physicians are planning radiation therapy, they are very conscious of toxicity to major organs. But fat is often not considered," says Rockefeller's Paul Cohen. "Our results imply that the early exposure of fat cells to radiation may cause long-term dysfunction in the adipose tissue that puts childhood cancer survivors at higher risk of cardiometabolic disease."   Researchers discover link between dietary fat (palm oil) and the spread of cancer   Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (Spain), November 10, 2021 The study, published in the journal Nature and part-funded by the UK charity Worldwide Cancer Research, uncovers how palmitic acid alters the cancer genome, increasing the likelihood the cancer will spread. The researchers have started developing therapies that interrupt this process and say a clinical trial could start in the next couple of years. Newly published findings reveal that one such fatty acid commonly found in palm oil, called palmitic acid, promotes metastasis in oral carcinomas and melanoma skin cancer in mice. Other fatty acids called oleic acid and linoleic acid—omega-9 and omega-6 fats found in foods such as olive oil and flaxseeds—did not show the same effect. Neither of the fatty acids tested increased the risk of developing cancer in the first place. The research found that when palmitic acid was supplemented into the diet of mice, it not only contributed to metastasis, but also exerts long-term effects on the genome. Cancer cells that had only been exposed to palmitic acid in the diet for a short period of time remained highly metastatic even when the palmitic acid had been removed from the diet. The researchers discovered that this "memory" is caused by epigenetic changes—changes to how our genes function. The epigenetic changes alter the function of metastatic cancer cells and allow them to form a neural network around the tumor to communicate with cells in their immediate environment and to spread more easily. By understanding the nature of this communication, the researchers uncovered a way to block it and are now in the process of planning a clinical trial to stop metastasis in different types of cancer.   Study finds consuming nuts strengthens brainwave function Loma Linda University, November 15, 2021 A new study has found that eating nuts on a regular basis strengthens brainwave frequencies associated with cognition, healing, learning, memory and other key brain functions.  In the study titled "Nuts and brain: Effects of eating nuts on changing electroencephalograph brainwaves," researchers found that some nuts stimulated some brain frequencies more than others. Pistachios, for instance, produced the greatest gamma wave response, which is critical for enhancing cognitive processing, information retention, learning, perception and rapid eye movement during sleep. Peanuts, which are actually legumes, but were still part of the study, produced the highest delta response, which is associated with healthy immunity, natural healing, and deep sleep. The study's principal investigator, Lee Berk, DrPH, MPH, associate dean for research at the LLU School of Allied Health Professions, said that while researchers found variances between the six nut varieties tested (almonds, cashews, peanuts, pecans, pistachios and walnuts), all of them were high in beneficial antioxidants, with walnuts containing the highest antioxidant concentrations of all.     Why Nitrates And Nitrites In Processed Meats Are Harmful – But Those In Vegetables Aren't University of Hertfordshire (UK), November 11, 2021 While there are many reasons processed meats aren't great for our health, one reason is because they contain chemicals called nitrates and nitrites.  But processed meats aren't the only foods that contain these chemicals. In fact, many vegetables also contain high amounts – mainly nitrates. And yet research suggests that eating vegetables lowers – not raises – cancer risk. So how can nitrates and nitrites be harmful when added to meat but healthy in vegetables? The answer lies in how nitrates and nitrites in food get converted into other molecules. Nitrates and nitrites occur attached to sodium or potassium, and belong to a family of chemically related molecules that also includes the gas nitric oxide. Vegetables such as beetroot, spinach and cabbages are particularly good sources of nitrates. When we eat something containing nitrates or nitrites, they may convert into a related molecular form. For example, nitrate in vegetables and in the pharmaceutical form nitroglycerine (which is used to treat angina), can convert in the body into nitric oxide. Nitric oxide dilates blood vessels, which can reduce blood pressure. It's actually sodium nitrite – not nitrate – that's linked to cancer. But if consuming nitrites alone directly caused cancer, then even eating vegetables would be harmful to us. Given this isn't the case, it shows us that cancer risk likely comes from when the sodium nitrites react with other molecules in the body. So it isn't necessarily the nitrates and nitrites themselves that cause health issues – including cancer. Rather, it's what form they are converted into that can increase risk – and what these converted molecules interact with in our bodies. The main concern is when sodium nitrite reacts with degraded bits of amino acids – protein fragments our body produces during the digestion of proteins – forming molecules called N-nitroso compounds (NOCs). These NOCs have been shown to cause cancer.     Obama Climate & Environment Record   Seasoned environmentalists were very skeptical of obama from the very start n the 2008 campaign -- notably his coal to liquid technology he advocated and his great enthusiasm for ethanol   Sold off 2.2 billion tons of coal from public land (Greenpeace report). The sales to private interests generated $2.3 billon but CO2 damage estimated between $52-530 billion   His Clean Power Plan -- which Trump administration later trashed -- really had little to do with the plan's name -- had nothing to do with eradicating hazardous pollutants from power generation; it was primarily all based on a cap and trade system to regulate carbon dioxide   Ran on campaign that by 2025, 25% of US energy would be renewable  Was never anywhere close on being on track for that goal   Promoted fracking as a move away from coal to natural gas -- this was a midst promises to have highest standards for fracking on federal land -- never happened   Lowered natural gas export restrictions in order to sell more US natural gas to foeign customers   Made efforts to weaken rules.on methane leaks from oil and gas operations -- leaks account or 3 percent of US gas emissions   Also instrumental in pushing on behalf of pipeline companies and terminals to have major coastal terminals for gas exports (most notable example was Cove Point terminal in Maryland that Obama touted   Flint Water crisis    Sued the EPA over a dozen ties against the agency's effort to increase environmental regulations on corporations   Opened more federal and land (18% increase between 2009-2014) for oil and gas drilling -- including "off limits" regions in the mid Atlantic coast, along Alaska's Arctic coast and Gulf of mexico,    Completely failed on setting rules or clean disposal of coal ash byproduct -- US produces about 100 million tons of this crap annually and just dumps into holes in the ground   Went soft on ozone pollution and smog rules -- did lower Bush's ozone threshold from 75ppb to 70 ppb, but his EPA was recommending 60-65 ppb   Very insensitive to wood pellet development under the disguise as a renewable -- part of his clean power plan

Free Range American Podcast
Black Rifle Coffee Podcast: Ep 180 Mark D‘ambrosio - Discipline, Toughness, Gear Show and Tell

Free Range American Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 92:43


Evan Hafer welcomes former Marine Scout Sniper Mark D'Ambrosio back to the BRCC Podcast. The two discuss mental toughness and all things long-range shooting, from deciding on a caliber and platform to leveling scopes, ideal zeroing distances, and how to read and call wind on a hunt.  Mark was a participant of season 7 of History Channel's hit show, ALONE. Mark battled the Arctic environment by himself for 44 days with only 10 items. Mark is currently an instructor at International Mountain Survival. www.intsurvival.com  

BirdNote
Habitat Defined

BirdNote

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 1:43


When you think of habitat, think of home. For a jay that lives in the forest, the forest is its habitat – where it finds food, water, shelter, and the company of other jays. Or it might live in your back yard or the bank parking lot down the street. Some birds live in different habitats at different times of year. Many sandpipers summer on the Arctic tundra, but during the rest of the year, they live on coastal tide flats. Learn more at BirdNote.org.

Overinvested
Ep. 235: The North Water

Overinvested

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 51:47


This week, Gavia and Morgan finally bring you their much-delayed opinions on Andrew Haigh's ultra-bleak but mesmerizing miniseries "The North Water," starring Jack O'Connell and Colin Farrell as shipmates on a doomed Arctic whaling expedition. Topics include the show's sharp depiction of masculinity and sexuality in Victorian England, its uncompromising approach to violence, stellar performances from O'Connell and Farrell, and more.

D23 Inside Disney
Episode 113: Angelina Jolie and Kumail Nanjiani on “Eternals”

D23 Inside Disney

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 27:50


Exciting announcements to be revealed on Disney+ Day, the Disney Ultimate Toy Drive kicks off for the holiday season, Adventures by Disney announce their first expedition cruises to the Arctic, Disney has greenlit the family animated comedy Primos, Star Wars: Tales from the Galaxy's Edge VR experience is coming to Downtown Disney, Eternals have arrived at Avengers Campus, and new trailer for ESPN's Tom Brady: The Man in the Arena. Plus, Eternals stars Angelina Jolie and Kumail Nanjiani reveal their biggest Marvel surprises, hilarious Disneyland stories, and if Maleficent or Thena would win in a battle.

FAR OUT: Adventures in Unconventional Living
FAR OUT #149 ~ Narwhals, Wilderness & 10 Years of Burning Man with Ian Q. Rowan

FAR OUT: Adventures in Unconventional Living

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 68:08


Listen and explore:Why Ian hasn't cut his beard for 10 yearsThe origin of the unicornFascinating facts about Narwhals you will want to knowWhy Inuits rely on Narwhals for survival and how the oil industry threatens bothIan's journey working to conserve a region of old growth forest along the Molalla river in Oregon"I just kept burning" - what Burning Man has taught Ian about lifeMentioned on this episode:Trailer for Ian's documentary on NarwhalsTrout Creek Wilderness LodgeGrounded: A Fierce, Feminine Guide to Connecting with the Soil and Healing from the Ground Up by Erin Yu-Juin McMorrowConnect with us:Website: www.thefarout.lifeEmail us at info@thefarout.lifeWild Within @ www.thewildwithin.orgSupport this podcast:Discount link to purchase organic, raw ceremonial-grade cacao ethically sourced in Guatemala (a portion of proceeds support this podcast)Become a patron at: https://www.patreon.com/thefaroutcoupleMake one-time donation with PayPal (our account is aplambeck22@gmail.com)Leave a review on iTunes!Share this episode with a friend! :DCredits:Intro music: "Complicate ya" by Otis McDonaldOutro music: "Running with wise fools" written & performed by Krackatoa (www.krackatoa.com)

On The Land
Growing Indigenous Youth Podcasters: Arthur Hanna

On The Land

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 16:08


Waqaa! And welcome to an On The Land Mini Series featuring Indigenous Youth Voices! Today's episode features Arthur Hanna. Arthur is from Bethel, and created a podcast documenting the ice road on the Kuskokwim river from his own perspective and from an Elder's perspective.In spring of 2021, we teamed up with the Alaska Humanities Forum, See Stories, and Bitanga Productions to host a month-long podcasting workshop with a small group of middle and high school students across western Alaskan villages. Students had the opportunity to create their own 5-15 minute episode featuring interviews with their family, friends, and their teachers.Mentioned in this Episode: Alaska Humanities Forum https://www.akhf.org/Bitanga Productions https://www.bitangaproductions.com/See Stories https://www.seestoriesalaska.org/On The Land Media ontheland.orgCoffee & Quaq https://www.coffeeandquaq.com/Native Time: Village City https://www.nativetimeak.com/The music for this episode was provided by Epidemic Sound featuring the song Glimmer by AGST

The Roundtable
Laura Galloway's memoir about her years in a reindeer-herding village in the Arctic Tundra

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 10:35


A DNA test suggesting she shared some genetics with the Sami people, the indigenous inhabitants of the Arctic tundra, tapped into Laura Galloway's wanderlust. An affair with a Sami reindeer herder led her to abandon her high-flying New York life for a fresh start in the tiny town of Kautokeino. When her new boyfriend left her unexpectedly after six months, it would have been easy, and perhaps prudent, to return home. But she stayed for six years. "Dalvi" (Atlantic) is the story of Laura's time in a reindeer-herding village in Arctic Norway, forging a solitary existence as one of the few Westerners living among one of the most remote cultures on earth.

The Attractions Podcast
The Attractions Podcast - Drawn to Life, Eternals in Avengers Campus, and more!

The Attractions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 52:23


Join hosts Brittani and Seth as they bring you news and discussion about all things theme parks, as well as their thoughts on the latest movies, television, and video games on The Attractions Podcast. This week on The Attractions Podcast, Brittani and Seth discuss original host Kirk Fogg returning to the "Legends of the Hidden Temple" reboot on The CW, Broadway's Jordan Fisher set to perform an original Disney Cruise Line song in Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, Adventures by Disney's new expedition cruises to the Arctic, runDisney's new Springtime Surprise Weekend at Walt Disney World, the return of Universal Orlando's "Buy a Day, Get a Second Day Free" ticket deal, the return of Holidays at Legoland Florida Resort, SeaWorld Orlando's Christmas Celebration kicking off on Nov. 12, the livestream schedule for Destination D23 2021, Knott's Merry Farm bringing the yuletide cheer to Knott's Berry Farm, the return of Universal Orlando's Holiday Tour, character sightings with Marvel's Eternals at Disney California Adventure, and the two new acts revealed for Disney and Cirque du Soleil's "Drawn to Life." This podcast is sponsored by Destinations with Character Travel. Contact them today at DestinationsWithCharacterTravel.com. We welcome your suggestions and want you to be a part of the discussion. Please send your comments to info@attractionsmagazine.com with the subject line “The Attractions Podcast.” Statements or opinions herein are those of the hosts and advertisers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the producers, Dream Together Media LLC, or staff.

Discovery
Geoengineering The Planet

Discovery

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 27:29


Geoengineering is already underway from Australia to the Arctic as scientists try to save places threatened by global heating. It's time for a global conversation about how we research these powerful techniques, with agreements on how and where to deploy them. Global temperature today is 1.2°C hotter than preindustrial levels and it is causing climate change and sea level rise, threatening the lives and livelihoods of millions of people. Coral reef ecosystems are headed for extinction within decades; glacial melt is speeding up with runaway consequences; agriculture has been hit by drought and extreme weather…. And as our carbon emissions rise, it's only going to get worse, because we're headed this century for at least 3°C of temperature rise if governments meet their netzero targets. Faced with this heat emergency, scientists are acting. In Australia, they are brightening clouds to make them more reflective, hoping to save the Great Barrier Reef, and coating the waters with a thin reflective film; in the Arctic, glaciers are being covered with fine glass beads to reflect the sun's heat and slow melting; on the Asian plains, clouds are being seeded to deliver rain over droughtlands. Beaches are being coated with rock dust to try to “react out” the air's CO2, and where coral reefs have already been destroyed by bleaching, scientists are creating artificial coral structures inhabited by genetically modified coral organisms. No global body is overseeing any of this, but it is mostly local and small scale. As temperatures climb further, heatwaves and deadly weather events will kill even more people than today. Scientists want to look at methods of preventing catastrophic temperature rise that could help large regions – potentially cooling global temperature. They want to see if seeding stratospheric clouds with sulphates would be possible, and whether it would have any unwanted affects. But a large vocal group of environmentalists is opposed even to feasibility studies. They claim that this sort of geoengineering is “unnatural”, and instead are pressing for huge societal change that is difficult to achieve, unpopular, and could cause hardship. Planned experiments have been cancelled after pressure by these campaigners, repeatedly, over several years. Now they are trying to get a moratorium on any research into geoengineering. Many fear that even talking about geoengineering risks reducing efforts to decarbonise. Meanwhile, the temperature keeps rising. Undoubtedly, there will come a point when society will decide it is no longer acceptable for thousands of people to die from hot temperatures, and seek to deploy cooling technologies. Technologies that we haven't properly researched. The government of India may decide to unilaterally cool the planet after a deadly heatwave; or the government of the US after an even more violent Sandy; or the government of an island nation after a typhoon that drowns the land… This is not something that should be decided by a few powerful nations, but equally, ignoring these potential lifesaving technologies because of cultural reticence would be a moral and political failure. Instead, we need to have a conversation about how geoengineering should be researched, governed, regulated and deployed. This is a programme about how we cool the planet with the latest geoengineering technologies, and the loaded cultural values and politics around the biggest planetary dilemma of our time. Picture: Rough sea, Credit: Jacob Maentz/Getty Images

Strange Animals Podcast
Episode 249: Strange Seals

Strange Animals Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 14:28


Sign up for our mailing list! We also have t-shirts and mugs with our logo! Thanks to Richard from NC for his suggestion that leads us to learn about some interesting seals! Further reading: Mystery of Siberian freshwater seal food choice solved Under Antarctica's ice, Weddell seals produce ultrasonic vocalizations Further listening/watching: Rarely-heard Weddell Seal Sounds in Antarctica The bearded seal Wikipedia page with audio so you can listen over and over and over The Baikal seal, the world's only fully fresh water seal species: Baikal seal, round boi: The Baikal seal's teeth have teeth: A Weddell seal mama with her pup who seems to be practicing singing: Look ma, no ears! The bearded seal. Can you tell where its name comes from? (Moustachioed seal might be more accurate.) (Also, note the ear opening with no external ear flap.) Show transcript: Welcome to Strange Animals Podcast. I'm your host, Kate Shaw. This week let's learn about some interesting seals. Thanks to Richard from NC who suggested freshwater seals, which is where we'll start. Most seals live on the coast and spend most of the time in the ocean. But there's one species of seal that lives exclusively in fresh water. That's the Baikal [bay-CALL] seal, and the only place it lives is a big lake in Siberia called Lake Baikal. Lake Baikal formed where two sections of the earth's crust are being pulled apart by continental drift. That's called a rift lake or rift valley lake. The lake gets bigger every year, but only by a tiny amount—just under an inch, or 2 cm. Since this has been going on for an estimated 25 to 30 million years, though, it's an extremely big, deep lake. It is, in fact, the deepest lake on earth, and is also the oldest lake on earth. It's more than twice as old as Lake Tanganyika in East Africa, which is also a large, deep rift lake but only about 12 million years old at the most. Lake Baikal is almost 400 miles long, or 636 km, and nearly 50 miles wide, or 80 km. At its deepest point, it's 3,893 feet deep, or 1,186.5 meters. That's from the surface of the water to the muddy bottom. But that mud and sediment on the bottom has been building up for a very long time and there's a lot of it—4.3 miles of it, in fact, or 7 km. The water is very clear and very oxygenated, but the surface freezes for several months out of the year. Then again, there are some hydrothermal vents, especially in the deepest areas, that heat the water around them to 122 degrees Fahrenheit, or 50 Celsius. Because Lake Baikal is so deep, so big, so oxygenated, and so old, lots of species of animal live in and around it that live nowhere else in the world. That includes the Baikal seal. The Baikal seal is related to the Arctic ringed seal but has lived in the lake exclusively for probably two million years. It only grows five and a half feet long at most, or 1.65 meters, and is usually closer to four feet long, or 1.2 meters. It's gray in color and has no external ears, so that its head appears smooth. It can still hear, but because it doesn't have ears sticking out of its head, it's more streamlined than seals with external ears. It has large eyes, a pair of front flippers that it uses to maneuver in the water and on land, and a pair of hind flippers that act like a tail instead of legs. That's actually the main difference between earless and eared seals. Earless seals are more streamlined in general and more adapted for life in the water and for deep diving, but they're awkward on land because they can't use their hind limbs for walking. Eared seals have little flaps of external ears and while their hind flippers act as a tail in the water, the seal can turn its hind flippers over to walk on them on land. The Baikal seal is quite small for a seal, which keeps it from needing as much food as a bigger animal. For a long time people thought the Baikal seal mostly ate fish,

Capture The Magic - Disney World Podcast | Disney World Travel Podcast | Disney World News & Rumors Podcast
Ep 375 - Disney News + Our Top 10 Favorite Holiday Offerings at Disney World

Capture The Magic - Disney World Podcast | Disney World Travel Podcast | Disney World News & Rumors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 48:40


LinksNew Discount Released for Annual Passholders and Florida Residents - Blog MickeyAll of the Holiday Kitchens coming to Festival of the Holidays - Blog MickeyNew Adventures by Disney Itinerary to the Arctic and Antarctica - Blog MickeyMore Club Level openings coming soon - WDWMagicSneak peak of The Eternals is now playing at Walt Disney PresentsDetails Announced for the runDisney Springtime Surprise Weekend - WDWMagicParking Lot Trams are coming back to Disneyland. No word on WDW1901 Candle Company Coming SoonWe're excited to launch our brand new Disney Scented Candles & You Can Learn More at 1901candleco.com.Subscribe To The Show & Leave Us A ReviewApple Podcasts - Click HereStitcher - Click HereSpotify - Click HereGoogle Podcasts - Click HereAmazon Podcasts - Click HereFollow Us on Social MediaCTM Facebook Community: @capthemagicInstagram: @capthemagicTikTok: @capturethemagicTwitter: @capthemagicVisit Us OnlineSubscribe to our YouTube Channel!Capturethemagicpodcast.com - Listen to our weekly podcast!Ctmuniversal.com – find the latest episodes!Join Club 32! Our private group with access to exclusive livestreams, podcasts, and MORE! Visit ctmvip.comSign up for news about our new 1901 brand! - ctm.show/1901Our SponsorsZip A Dee Doo Dah Travel - visit travelwithzip.com to see how they can help you have the vacation of a lifetime!Expedition Roasters - visit ctmexpedition.com to get 15% off you order, no code needed!MEDterra CBD - visit medterracbd.com to save 20% off of your order use code "CTM20"!Kingdom Strollers - visit kingdomstrollers.com to save up to 50% off theme park stroller rental prices

What Fresh Hell: Laughing in the Face of Motherhood
Why Does Everything Feel Hard Right Now?

What Fresh Hell: Laughing in the Face of Motherhood

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 45:43


Why does re-emerging from our pandemic cocoons continue to feel so difficult? Are we all socially deconditioned?  The third-quarter phenomenon is part of the explanation. For people forced to endure long stretches of isolation– astronauts, Arctic explorers, submarine sailors– the most difficult part, regardless of the length of the assignment, has been proven to be about 75% of the way through, precisely when the end of the assignment first comes into distant focus. But the end of this assignment has not and will not come into focus. There is no V-Day, no “all clear” foghorn to indicate that what we went through is totally over. And while we had the camaraderie of reunion and survival sparking us all to reconnect outside last year, the longer this goes on, the less enthusiastic we become about ever returning to the way things used to be.  Psychologist Craig Haney, who studies the effect of insolation on incarcerated people, explains that prisoners in solitary confinement “begin to withdraw from the little amount of social contact that they are allowed to have, because social stimulation, over time, becomes anxiety-arousing.” What most of us are dealing with isn't half so extreme. But we're all dealing with it, and that's the tricky part. In this episode we discuss how to overcome our brains' innate negativity bias and start to look out for the good.  Check out these other episodes of ours for more discussion on this topic: EP 200: WHEN CAN WE START SAYING YES?  EP 205: WAIT, WE'RE NOT READY EP 220: WE THOUGHT THIS WOULD BE OVER BY NOW Special thanks to all of our sponsors for this month:  Brooklinen's luxurious, high-quality sheets are the ultimate bedding upgrade! Go to brooklinen.com and use the promo code FRESH for $20 off your minimum purchase of $100. Dermafacs cream rejuvenates your skin's texture and fades the appearance of damage or scars in just a few weeks. Go to dermafacs.com/whatfreshhell and use the code whatfreshhell for 15% off. Green Chef's expert chefs design flavorful recipes that go way beyond the ordinary. Go to greenchef.com/laughing125 and use code laughing125 to get $125 off including free shipping.  KiwiCo projects make science, technology, engineering, art, and math super fun– and best of all, kids of all ages can work on them independently! Get 50% off your first month at kiwico.com with the code MOTHERHOOD.  Magic Spoon gives you great tasting breakfast cereal that also has the protein your kids need to get through their busy days. Go to magicspoon.com/FRESH and use the code FRESH to get $5 off.  MamaZen is an app that provides a revolutionary solution for motherhood burnout, anxiety, impatience, and more. Download MamaZen today from your app store, and use the code "FRESH" to unlock a free trial. Membrasin is the totally natural, estrogen-free, clinically-proven feminine moisture formula. Go to membrasinlife.com to find out more and use the code FRESH10 to get 10% off.  Prose makes custom hair supplements personally tailored to address your specific cause of shedding. Get 15% off your custom hair supplements at prose.com/laughing.   Somfy powered motorized window coverings are a great way to keep your home cool- and they connect to your smart home systems! Visit http://somfysystems.com/podcast.  StoryWorth is an online service that helps your loved ones share stories through thought-provoking questions about their memories and personal thoughts. Get started with $10 off your first purchase at storyworth.com/whatfreshhell.  SuperBeets are a tasty treat that give you caffeine-free, heart-healthy energy. Get a free 30-day supply and free shipping and returns with your first purchase at superbeets.com/fresh. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Kitchen Sisters Present
176-Arctic Ice, Extreme Weather—Activist Photographer Camille Seaman

The Kitchen Sisters Present

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 26:37


Arctic Ice, Extreme Weather, the Reckoning at Standing Rock—a journey into the deep rich world of photographer Camille Seaman. Born to a Native American father and African-American mother, Camille Seaman has been bearing witness and sounding the alarm through her powerful, other worldly photographs for more than 20 years. Her photographs and vivid stories document her journeys to the Arctic and Antarctic over the past two decades, her work as a storm chaser in the midwest, her documentation of the Standing Rock water protectors, and her ongoing project “We Are Still Here,” photographing Indigenous people around the country, in all walks of life, along with messages to their future ancestors. Camille was raised by her Shinnecock grandparents in Long Island and inspired by her grandfather's teachings about our interrelatedness with nature. She attended the “Fame” High School of Music and Performing Arts in New York City, living from couch to couch, working as a bicycle message and a one-hour photo lab operator.  Her award winning photographs have been published in National Geographic, Time, Newsweek and the New York Times Sunday Magazine. She is a TED Senior Fellow and a Stanford Knight Fellow, and she was honored with a one person exhibition, "The Last Iceberg" at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington D.C. The Kitchen Sisters interviewed Camille Seaman as part of the Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music's 2021 Season. Her imagery was featured at the Festival as part of a piece entitled MELT, a lament on climate change with music composed by Sean Shepherd.