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  • Aug 12, 2022LATEST
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    Code source
    [REDIFF] Aya Nakamura : comment l'enfant d'Aulnay-sous-Bois est devenue la française la plus écoutée au monde

    Code source

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 21:43


    Episode publié pour la première fois le mardi 24 novembre 2020.Il y a six ans, c'était une inconnue. Aujourd'hui, à 25 ans, Aya Nakamura, de son vrai nom Aya Danioko, est la nouvelle reine de la pop.Originaire de Bamako au Mali, elle a grandi dans la cité des 3000 à Aulnay-sous-Bois. En 2014, à seulement 19 ans, elle enregistre son premier titre, «Karma». En 2017, elle sort son premier album, «Journal intime». L'année suivante, son titre «Djadja» est un succès planétaire. Le 13 novembre dernier, pour la promotion de son troisième album intitulé «AYA», la chanteuse française frappe un grand coup en affichant sa silhouette sur l'un des écrans géants de Times Square, à New York. En quatre jours, «AYA» a été téléchargé plus de 12 millions de fois sur Spotify. La jeune malienne est même acclamée par Rihanna ou Madonna. Marie Poussel, journaliste au service Culture du Parisien, raconte son ascension fulgurante dans Code Source. Crédits. Direction de la rédaction : Pierre Chausse - Rédacteur en chef : Jules Lavie - Reporter : Clawdia Prolongeau - Production : Marion Bothorel, Raphaël Pueyo et Thibault Lambert - Réalisation et mixage : Alexandre Ferreira - Musiques : François Clos, Audio Network, Aya Nakamura - Identité graphique : Upian - Archives : TMC, M6, Canal +, TF1. Notre politique de confidentialité GDPR a été mise à jour le 8 août 2022. Visitez acast.com/privacy pour plus d'informations.

    Decoding 40
    Cooked & Jerked | Ep 153

    Decoding 40

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 67:01


    Welcome back to another episode of Decoding 40! We are now the self-proclaimed kings of podcasting as the show continues to expand its reach to Mumbai and Singapore. Each week we are encouraged by how this show is growing. Thank you! In this episode of Decoding 40, the fellas get together and spend a long weekend ending hanging out. It starts with a 4:20 420 smoke in Times Square with a friend to the show, Slink Johnson aka Black Jesus.The next day the guys head out to the hip hop festival, Rock the Bells where the guys along with Slink found themselves trying to survive the extreme heat. The festival was HOT, literally, with several concertgoers passing out from the heat.This and so much more on the latest episode of Decoding40.You'll hear this and so much more on this episode of Decoding 40.If you want to leave us a message or ask us a question, give us a call at (619) 940-4040.Want to be our Whiskey Warrior of the Week? Or, do you have an event or product that you would like us to attend, sample, and promote? Then, send us an email at Decoding40@gmail.com to start the discussion.Follow us on all social media platforms @decoding40.

    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat
    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat Episode 101: The Alice Mayo Murder Case

    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 34:26


    Airing from 1949 to 1954, Broadway Is My Beat, is a radio crime drama, about a Times Square detective named Danny Clover who worked homicide "from Times Square to Columbus Circle—the gaudiest, the most violent, the lonesomest mile in the world." GSMC Classics presents some of the greatest classic radio broadcasts, classic novels, dramas, comedies, mysteries, and theatrical presentations from a bygone era. The GSMC Classics collection is the embodiment of the best of the golden age of radio. Let Golden State Media Concepts take you on a ride through the classic age of radio, with this compiled collection of episodes from a wide variety of old programs. ***PLEASE NOTE*** GSMC Podcast Network presents these shows as historical content and have brought them to you unedited. Remember that times have changed and some shows might not reflect the standards of today's politically correct society. The shows do not necessarily reflect the views, standards, or beliefs of Golden State Media Concepts or the GSMC Podcast Network. Our goal is to entertain, educate give you a glimpse into the past.

    The Debrief
    Inside the Gap and J.Crew Comeback Attempts

    The Debrief

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 29:43 Very Popular


    BoF's Cathaleen Chen and Marc Bain join Lauren Sherman to talk about retailers' big hires, hopes and plans for bringing their brands back to life.   Background:      J.Crew and Gap defined how Americans dressed for much of the '90s and 2000s, until their clothes grew stale, malls emptied out and fast fashion took retail's reins. Then, during the pandemic, J.Crew filed for bankruptcy and Gap closed hundreds of stores. More recently, they've both orchestrated attempts to win back consumers: Gap, with its Yeezy-Gap collaboration, and J.Crew, with new mainline designers, including former Supreme creative director and Noah-founder Brendon Babenzien, whose menswear collection dropped a few weeks ago.    Though they share similar histories, the retailers' comeback plans couldn't be any more different.    “[Fashion] is a challenging business because people love it but to actually make money in it is not the easiest thing in the world… It takes a lot of ruthlessness and difficult decision making,” said Lauren Sherman, BoF chief correspondent.      Key Insights:      In the late-aughts, CEO Mickey Drexler and designer Jenna Lyons turned J.Crew  into a fashion powerhouse before insurmountable debt sent it into bankruptcy a few years later. Meanwhile, Gap struggled to define its design aesthetic after dominating 1990s mall fashion with its preppy basics.  With its 2020 appointment of the artist then known as Kanye West, Gap has been able to generate hype, but not sustained sales. Yeezy Gap and Gap are still mostly bifurcated: its retail rollout in Times Square featured clothes in black trash bags, in a blacked-out room separate from the rest of the Gap store. Gap has a mostly mass-market customer — begging the question of whether Yeezy Gap, even if better integrated into its model, is the right fit.  Under former Madewell chief Libby Wadle's leadership, J.Crew has restructured and tapped two sharp designers to home in on its heritage while edging it up and playing with trends. Babenzian released his first collection in late July, which generated a ton of buzz on social media.  Both retailers face significant headwinds, but J.Crew is best poised to win given its balanced merchandising strategy aimed at satisfying new and old customers, said retail correspondent Cathaleen Chen. Particularly tough, added technology correspondent Marc Bain, is the fact that Gap is so large, and beholden to shareholders.     Additional Resources:      J.Crew's and Gap's Comeback Playbooks Couldn't Be More Different. Only One Is Working: After the pandemic, the American retailers hired big fashion names to breathe life into their brands. But as the collections released this week show, the similarities end there. The J.Crew Comeback Starts Now: With its new menswear collection under creative director Brendon Babenzien, the retailer has its best shot in years at returning to the fashion zeitgeist. Yeezy Gap Brings a Dystopian Retail Experience to Stores: Clothes from the collaboration between Gap and Ye (formerly Kanye West) went on sale in a physical Gap store for the first time today, in a blacked out space where clothes were piled into plastic bags.     Follow The Debrief wherever you listen to podcasts. 

    Teacher Needs A Drink Podcast
    Back To School Prep, Masks, First Day Activities, & Spit or Times Square. Ep 148

    Teacher Needs A Drink Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 28:09


    Howdy Folks! Today Elvis is joined by Bunny O'Hare, Lady Shithead, & Mamma Chicken! Listen as we discuss our mindsets going back into the schools, masks, and our thoughts on first day activities! You can support Teacher Needs a Drink and hear other bonus exclusive episodes at Patreon!! https://www.patreon.com/TeacherNeedsaDrinkPodcast Teacher Needs a Drink Podcast is proudly sponsored by Ludlam Dramatics Educational Theatre Classroom Posters. Check them out at www.LudlamDramatics.com     

    21 Hats Podcast
    Trash, Rats, and Garbage Juice: A Case Study in PR

    21 Hats Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 48:28


    This week, in episode 119, Liz Picarazzi tells Jay Goltz and Sarah Segal about her first brush with bad publicity. Liz's debacle started with a negative post that appeared in a prominent local blog. It was about a Times Square pilot program for which her business, Citibin, is supplying trash bins. The problem? The bins were not being maintained properly, and there were photos to prove it. At the time we recorded this conversation, Liz was bracing for additional stories in both the New York Post and The New York Times. Both of those stories have since been published—we'll talk about them in a coming episode—and you can find links to all of the coverage in the show notes. For Liz, perhaps the biggest challenge was defending her company without trashing her client.Show Notes:Here's the Streetsblog post: https://nyc.streetsblog.org/2022/07/20/gross-clean-curbs-bins-show-growing-pains-in-times-square/Here's the New York Post story: https://nypost.com/2022/07/30/nyc-citibins-leaking-garbage-left-open-in-times-square/And here's The New York Times story: https://www.nytimes.com/2022/08/06/nyregion/new-york-city-garbage-containers.html

    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat
    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat Episode 100: The Irene Hall Murder Case

    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 34:10


    Airing from 1949 to 1954, Broadway Is My Beat, is a radio crime drama, about a Times Square detective named Danny Clover who worked homicide "from Times Square to Columbus Circle—the gaudiest, the most violent, the lonesomest mile in the world." GSMC Classics presents some of the greatest classic radio broadcasts, classic novels, dramas, comedies, mysteries, and theatrical presentations from a bygone era. The GSMC Classics collection is the embodiment of the best of the golden age of radio. Let Golden State Media Concepts take you on a ride through the classic age of radio, with this compiled collection of episodes from a wide variety of old programs. ***PLEASE NOTE*** GSMC Podcast Network presents these shows as historical content and have brought them to you unedited. Remember that times have changed and some shows might not reflect the standards of today's politically correct society. The shows do not necessarily reflect the views, standards, or beliefs of Golden State Media Concepts or the GSMC Podcast Network. Our goal is to entertain, educate give you a glimpse into the past.

    Slacker & Steve
    Full show - FrYiday - Judge, The Hack House, Erin wants Slacker to go to Times Square, Funeral songs, Hogwarts houses

    Slacker & Steve

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 68:37


    Full show - FrYiday - Judge, The Hack House, Erin wants Slacker to go to Times Square, Funeral songs, Hogwarts houses

    Guy Benson Show
    Bonus Benson: Pickles, Tattoos and Psychics OH MY!

    Guy Benson Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 49:13


    Bonus Benson:  Should you stay in touch with your job while you're on vacation? Where was Cookie last week? From Pizza to Dip, Chips and Popcorn, Pickle Is Summer's Big Flavor Cookie's adventure in Times Square last night  Times Square Follow up: How Guy Benson ruined it all!  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    The Daily Show With Trevor Noah: Ears Edition
    Aaron Rodgers Gives Props to Psychedelics | Amandla Stenberg

    The Daily Show With Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 24:25 Very Popular


    Scientists reanimate cells from dead pigs, Michael Kosta hosts another trivia game in Times Square, and actor Amandla Stenberg discusses her horror comedy film "Bodies Bodies Bodies."See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Slacker & Steve
    Erin wants Slacker to go to Times Square

    Slacker & Steve

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 3:49


    Slacker thinks that Times Square is overrated and too commercialized, but Erin disagrees. What's a tourist trap that you've been to?

    One More Thing With Solo Green
    S4, Ep. 132: Sports Teams Need To Handle Trades With More Respect

    One More Thing With Solo Green

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 21:51


    In this episode, I talk about how players are so often disrespected when they get traded away from their teams. I also talk about a woman who was stabbed by a random guy with a boxcutter in Times Square. Sources: https://nypost.com/2022/08/01/the-awkward-moment-christian-vasquez-learned-he-was-traded/ https://www.nba.com/news/when-players-find-out-theyve-been-traded-social-media https://nypost.com/2022/08/02/times-square-daylight-slashing-suspect-identified/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/1morethingwsologreen/support

    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat
    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat Episode 99: The Lois Conrad Murder Case

    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 35:08


    Airing from 1949 to 1954, Broadway Is My Beat, is a radio crime drama, about a Times Square detective named Danny Clover who worked homicide "from Times Square to Columbus Circle—the gaudiest, the most violent, the lonesomest mile in the world." GSMC Classics presents some of the greatest classic radio broadcasts, classic novels, dramas, comedies, mysteries, and theatrical presentations from a bygone era. The GSMC Classics collection is the embodiment of the best of the golden age of radio. Let Golden State Media Concepts take you on a ride through the classic age of radio, with this compiled collection of episodes from a wide variety of old programs. ***PLEASE NOTE*** GSMC Podcast Network presents these shows as historical content and have brought them to you unedited. Remember that times have changed and some shows might not reflect the standards of today's politically correct society. The shows do not necessarily reflect the views, standards, or beliefs of Golden State Media Concepts or the GSMC Podcast Network. Our goal is to entertain, educate give you a glimpse into the past.

    Sixteen:Nine
    Hans Feil, Etulipa

    Sixteen:Nine

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 36:27


    The 16:9 PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY SCREENFEED – DIGITAL SIGNAGE CONTENT E-paper displays are, by far, best known for the little e-readers people use instead of printed books. The core technology used for those readers is what's also being used for things like meeting room displays and updated bus stop schedule signs that run off batteries and, in some cases, solar chargers. But that's all been in black and white and gray. Color displays, and particularly displays that can do full motion graphics and video playback, have largely stayed in the bucket of future technology. A small Dutch company is well along the path of changing all that - using something called electro-wetting display technology that gets its brightness from the sun, and would be used as low-energy alternatives to big LED video displays used for out of home advertising. In this podcast, I have a detailed chat with Etulipa founder Hans Feil, whose company is rapidly evolving and maturing the technology, and has a big investment and R&D partner in Daktronics, the big South Dakota-based LED manufacturer. We get into what the technology is and how it works, its differences with other kinds of e-paper, how it sets up, and its benefits. The company is still at the advanced R&D stage, but far enough along that it anticipates being in small quantity production next year, through a manufacturing partner in Taiwan. Subscribe to this podcast: iTunes * Google Play * RSS TRANSCRIPT Hans, thank you very much for joining me. Let's just get right to it. What the heck is electro wetting display technology?  Hans Feil: That's a good question. It's what they call reflective display technology. Of course, you probably know about it already, but if people don't know, the introduction that I made is that I say you probably will have an e-reader, many people have e-readers nowadays and it's black and white and a little bit slow, but you can read it outdoors. If you take your iPad outdoor in the sun, it's difficult to read. We have something like your the display on the e-reader, but then with color and it's fast, and that's the that's the difference. So it's a reflective display technology. It reflects light so there's no back light behind, it doesn't emit light. So if you take our display into the dark, you don't see anything unless you light it up with a back light or front light. So that's for newcomers. If you're a chemist or a physicist or a scientist, I'd probably say it a little bit different, in the sense that what we do is that we manipulates liquids colored oils, and we have a layer colored oils and with little cells with oils and we can make small droplets with it and the size of the droplets we can.  For instance, if you compare to print, many people have ink-jet printers and if they would take a magnifying glass and look at the paper, they're see little cyan, magenta and yellow droplets on the white paper, and what we do is we're mimicking this printing with cyan, magenta and yellow. So we have a white paper or white reflector, we call it. And we have three layers of glass on top of it with cyan, magenta, and yellow oil and each individual layer, we can switch this oil droplets, making them small or big. And if all the layers are spread, it's black because you don't see anything, all the lights are absorb. And if there are all the droplets are small, white or nearly white and depending on which droplets you switch and can get all the colors of the rainbow, and that's all very low power.  From what I read on your website, unlike traditional, if you wanna call traditional ePaper, what we would know from E-ink displays primarily, this can do 25 frames per second motion, which is quite a bit different because when you see something change on an ePaper screen, it goes nuts for a fraction of a second as it reorganizes itself.  Hans Feil: Yes, and in our case, it doesn't really reorganize, droplets just become big or small and it goes very fast.  Was that a big step to get to the point where you could change them that quickly or is that kind of inherent in the technology design?  Hans Feil: It comes automatically with the technology. It has never been slow.  And with ePaper, and I'm certainly not banging on Eink, but they spent 20+ years advancing their color displays and they'll put out press releases saying we now have more color support than we used to but basically it's been a very long road to get 'em to full color.  You're saying you've got full color gamut right now?  Hans Feil: Yes, but also in our case, it was a very long long route too. The first paper of Rob Hayes and Johan Feenstra from Phillips Research was from 2003, so 19 years ago, this nature paper, where they're first showing to the world electro wetting display, or at least the concept and some examples. So that's 19 years ago and since then we are working very hard on progressing technology, making better making it possible to manufacture displays and so forth. So it's also a very long route.  So what's the tie, if there is one to Phillips?  Hans Feil: Right now, there is no tie except that we are located here in Eindhoven, what they call High Tech Campus, Eindhoven and it used to be the same campus, but smaller from Phillips Research in the old days. So the technology originally, the effect of switching oil droppers, was initially invented here a few hundreds of meters a away from the place where I'm standing now.  Am I remembering correctly that you have a background with Phillips as well? Hans Feil: That's correct, yeah. I worked what they call the Phillips Research Labs since 1988 in various functions, but mostly quite scientific work in the old days, when it was a very scientific lab. And then I worked for a number of years in battery technology, lithium polymer batteries, and by the end of the 90s, and I got in touch of the guys who started this electro wetting displays, I think in 2004, so I'm 18 years active in electro wetting displays already.  So like you said, it has been a bit of a road then?  Hans Feil: Yes, sure.   When did Etulipa start?  Hans Feil: I'll share a bit of history. At Phillips, when we were working on electro wetting display technology, we did a spinoff called Liquavista, you may have heard the name. It was early 2006 and a little bit prior to that, there was interest from the German automotive mirror manufacturer, a very big one, who wanted to see if this technology could be used for rear view auto dimming mirrors, and at that time it looked very promising. In fact, after co-founding Liquavista, half a year later, together with an old colleague, I cofounded Miortech and Miortech was dedicated to use this electro wedding display technology for rearview mirrors. So by the end of 2006, we started this company, Miortech, trying to make the mirrors. Turned out to be that technology was not as fast as we hoped so there was a lot of development work to do. We really had to go back to the drawing table. In fact, we found out that there was a better way of making electro wetting displays with a different architecture that solved most of the initial problems. We patented that and then we started making prototypes of this mirrors, but basically it was a little bit too late, the market evolved and these automotive companies didn't want to really want it anymore.  But also in fact, if you're trying to make a mirror with small oil droplets or small cells, there's also always some light scattering from this droplets and so we could never get this mirrors fully free from haze. It was always a little bit of haze, so it was not good enough. So by the end of 2012, so it was almost 10 years ago, we said these mirrors are no good. It's a display technology. We have our own patented way of making electro wetting displays, maybe there are display companies who are interested in, for instance, licensing this technology, the way that we make the devices. Turns out to be not so easy, but at some point of time, we were asked, “Can't you make outdoor display with this technology?” And in fact, that's the sweet spot of electro wetting display.  If you really want to have bright, reflective colors, you need CMY, the stack of cyan, magenta, yellow. Just black and white display plus color filters is just not bright enough because you are throwing away two third of the light and so for reflective, you need CMY, and this stack has always a certain thickness because of the glass thickness, which also mean that it limits the the pixel density that you can reach. The rule of thumb is that the the thickness of the stack, CMY is roughly in the same range as the pixel size. And for outdoor displays, if you have a 10 millimeter pixels that's pretty good, that's pretty high resolution already.  So we made a few samples with CMY, very simple samples. And we went along to outdoor display companies, including Daktronics at the time, it was 2013 or 2014 or something like that and we showed it to the folks at Daktronics and they liked it. So they said this looks promising, of course, it was very early days, we just had samples. But since then, we have worked together with Daktronics. They became a shareholder, supporting us all the way, step by step from small displays to black and white displays to full color displays that we have right now. So the story started in 2013, when we stopped the mirrors and said, okay, we need to move to outdoor displays with this, and I think it was a good bet.  Did you find yourself going in the direction of outdoor displays because of market size or was it more the case of a company in Daktronics that specializes in large format, outdoor displays, was interested in it and therefore you had an automatic market partner?  Hans Feil: No, the funny thing is, when we were still at Phillips and we were looking for what kind of markets we would first do with Liquavista, with the technology. I did some research on different markets and I found out that outdoor display markets was in the sweet spot of the technology. But then, and we are talking about 2005 or something like that, the venture capitalist who invested in Liquavista really want to go in mobile displays. So it was at a time when Nokia was still big and the market was growing so reflective displays for cell phones was the automatic market and we put aside the outdoor display at that time.  So talking about my first PowerPoints I had and spreadsheet about market sizes for electro wedding displays for outdoor was already in 2005, so I had it always in my back of the minds and I had presentations ready when we made the switch. That's the reason why we visited Daktronics and a few others. So we didn't make the move to outward display just because of Daktronics, we had chosen for outdoor displays and it just fits with Daktronics.  So just like LED displays, the kind that are manufactured by Daktronics primarily, these displays have a pixel pitch, correct? Hans Feil: Correct.  So there's a gap between each pixel basically?  Hans Feil:. Yes, they're point sources, sort of.  And right now it's 10 millimeters, which in  LED terms would sometimes be referred to as P10 or something, but I'm reading that you anticipate that you can get it down to 2.5mm?  Hans Feil: Yes, that's correct. We already have made samples with TFT back planes with 2.5mm pixel pitch. So right now we have P10, so that are the first displays that we're making but the next stop would be 2.5 millimeter and also larger tiles.  At P10, that's very competitive with conventional billboards that you would see on the side of a road and up above a building, that sort of thing. 2.5 means you could have it as a sidewalk level display that somebody would be able to view quite nicely from say 10 feet away? Hans Feil: Yes, exactly, like bus stops, sidewalks and that kinda stuff.  Yeah. Do you have to get even tighter than that, and is it possible if you wanted to do print and bus schedules and things like that?  Hans Feil: If we want to go to smaller pixel sizes, what's needed is somewhat thinner glass. So right now, the glass that we use is 0.5 millimeter and we have a stack of number of pieces of glass but if you go glass that's 0.2 millimeter or 0.3 millimeter, we can go to pixel sizes of 1 or 1.5 millimeter.  Is that something that's possible, or it's not even developed yet by the glass manufacturers? Hans Feil: Oh no, the glass is there. There's even thinner. Basically, we do it step by step, but the glass is there.  So this isn't a wish, it's just a when?  Hans Feil: Yeah, exactly. There are many things that are a when.  These units are, again, similar in certain respects to LED displays in terms of they have cabinets or tiles, and they stack together? Hans Feil: Correct.  What are the sizes of these tiles, and are there limitations as to how many you can put together or is it modular and it can be as big as you want? Hans Feil: It's modular. The the tiles that we have right now are roughly 10 inch, and we have six tiles in one panel. That's how we build the displays that we have here in our backyard. And the next step with 2.5 millimeter, we're looking for 21 inch tiles so there'll be bigger tiles and smaller pitch, but there are no limits in how big you can make the displays of it. It's just metal scaling up the electronics and it's all modular.  With the video support, I read that right now you're demonstrating animations and not full color video. Is there a reason for that or is just a matter that that's what makes sense right now?  Hans Feil: Yeah, that it's mostly electronics development. There are two parts to this, one is the uniformity of the tiles. We are constantly improving the uniformity so the gray scales and the gray scale definitions become better and better, so that's what's needed, and the electronics development is a separate thing since we have to see how fast we can make the electronics work with the number of gray levels we have. Right now, it's designed with 7 bits color so you can have 128 droplet sizes per color, which for reflective is very much, to be honest, the uniformity is not so good that we can really make this one on the 128 droplet sizes very precise. It's a little bit less but that's all about scaling up the electronics.  In the advertising world, generally speaking for digital out-of-home advertising, they're not using full motion anyways, except for spectaculars in Times Square and those big wrap arounds and so on. There's one heck of a lot of deployed stock that is just digital posters basically? Hans Feil: Yeah, for example, along freeways, you're not allowed to do any animation and so on.  So as long as you can address full color and have the clarity that people want, they're happy?  Hans Feil: Yeah, with the first display out here, it was a test for us to see what's the color space that we can see, what's the impression that we have, and so far we are quite happy.  In fact, all the visitors that come along, many of them do not have very high expectations because they don't know what to expect with reflective colors and the the veterans, so to say, who have seen reflective displays before, they know when colors are dull. But everybody was surprised when they walk outdoor and see what we have in terms of color and brightness. People are amazed.  I believe I saw that these displays can handle 15,000 lumens, that's the maximum brightness?  Hans Feil: To be honest, we didn't measure it exactly yet. That really depends on how much sun comes on it. It scales perfectly with the with the amount of sunshine in the environment. It's like when you have newspaper, I don't have to tell you, of course, that newspaper in the bright sun is very bright but because your eyes are accommodated to the brightness of the environment, you don't do not really notice that it's so bright and that's the same with our display.  In fact, here's a funny story, the cameraman who made his shots for the video clip that we have, he was he was used to taking shots of video or display and he suddenly realizes that he didn't have to adjust all his systems when the sun goes behind the cloud, the display didn't become less bright because the trees and the grass, et cetera, also became less bright. It was then when he realized, okay this is different from what I've seen so far because LED displays are brighter compared to the surroundings all the time. Yeah. It's wildly different, it's the opposite of outdoor LCDs, which are the primary things used for display totems to advertise street furniture, that kind of thing. They're always battling the sun, they've gotta be at least 2500 nits to eve overpower glare and so on, and you're saying, the brighter it is, the better it's gonna get? Hans Feil: Oh yeah, it's fine. But also, today's very gray weather here and I've been there with visitors when it was raining in and it still looked pretty good. It's only when it's getting really dark, likewhen the sun goes down, then you really notice. But it's the same with your eReader. At some point of time, you realize, okay, now I do not see enough contrast anymore, I have to switch on my back light or front light or whatever you have.  That backlight or front light, whatever it may be, that's running off of a battery that's charged by solar collectors, right? Hans Feil: Yeah, that's correct.  So you can be completely autonomous from electrical power grid, but is there enough power out of that battery to do cellular connectivity for updates?  Hans Feil: Yes, sure. In fact, the trailer that we have out here, that was designed to have an LED display mounted on it, so that there's a little bit big battery, but it's one solar panel, a lead acid batteries in this trailer. In fact, we have never charged this one, never. Previously we had a black and white display on it and with our color display, the power consumption of our display is so low, we don't need to charge it. One thing I noticed in the reference photos is that the units have seams. It reminds me of 5-10 years ago when the LCD manufacturers every year would come up with some definition or description of even narrower bezel or seams in between the displays, and when LED came along, that got of a lot interest just because the seams went away, and people who were designing spaces were saying, okay, I wanna use LED instead, because there are no seams. Are you getting any pushback about that about the seams that exist and will those with time go away?  Hans Feil: Pushback is a big word, but people do notice the seams, and although the seam here that we have here is smaller than the width of one pixel, so if you walk to the display, of course you see the seam, and we prefer to have narrow seams or no seams, but you can see the seams. If you walk away, they become less noticeable, and if you cannot discriminate between individual pixels anymore, then the seams are also becoming very thin or hardly visible. With LED display, if you walk toward the display, at some point of time, you can see the individual LEDs, right? The image breaks down and it become little light dots. And in our case, you start noticing the seam more and more. If you're really standing in front of it, of course you'll see many seams, but when you walk away on to say 30-50 feet for P10 pixel then it's hardly noticeable anymore. But again, of course, everybody wants to have thinner seams or no seams. So we have a program working on that to get them thinner, less noticeable. And also in future, when we go to larger tiles, seams will become thin.  We had a big outdoor advertiser here in Holland who who used our 100 square meters screens with P10 pixels, and said that this solution would be good, and not to worry about the seams very much because for 100 square meter display, you're standing 50 meters away or even more, and you won't see the seams anymore.  Where's the product at, are you now shipping or is it still in R&D?  Hans Feil: No, we are now in the testing phase. So we have it out here in the backyard. The next display will be made and shipped to South Dakota for evaluating by Daktronics and their customers. By the end of the year, we are targeting to have a production capacity with our partner, URT in Taiwan, for 50 square meters per year, which isstill not much, but it's doable. And then early next year, we think the first display will be used by first customers here in the region because turns out there are parties that connected to us that have been waiting for low power display for many years but they couldn't go anywhere because the only thing that they had was LED, right? And now they have this option which some of them were looking for it for many years already.  We have a client who, every two years, was making calculations about power consumption of the display and every two years he was disappointed that it was never low enough, and now suddenly he got in touch with us and said, this is what I need. So he'll probably use a number of our displays in the first half of next year.  Are the upfront costs for this going to be higher than that for the upfront cost of conventional LED displays for the same footprint and are the savings more on the backend because you're not using power? Hans Feil: Yeah, that's correct. Right now, we are making them in small quantities So the price is not really reflecting how it can be. But indeed, there is a huge savings in situations where people have to make a connection to the grid, which can take months before they can get a connection, and it's also very often very expensive. We had one small, black and white display in a New York City bus stop, it turns out to be that the solution with our displays in that bus stop with a solar panel and a battery was 30% cheaper than the original version with LED displays, which were connected to the grid.  This connection to the grid and all the work that, that goes along it and permits and so forth, make it very expensive. So even when there was a battery added and a solar panel added, and our display was more expensive than the LED one, it was much cheaper to have reflective displays. It was also new for us at that time.  So going forward into 2023, if I am a outdoor media company in, let's say Australia, and I want to buy this, am I going to be buying it through Daktronics, or will you be licensing this more broadly than that?  Hans Feil: Most likely through Daktronics. Probably the first smaller smaller display here in the region, we will install ourselves because that's more convenient, it's nearby, et cetera. But once this becomes bigger and more mature, it's our goal, our business plan that we will be creating the panels and Daktronics will make displays with those panels and sell them worldwide. And as you scale up maybe the existing manufacturer in Taiwan who right now might be a contract manufacturer doing small lots, you would figure it out from there what kind of manufacturing capacity you'd need?  Hans Feil: Yeah. So for now that they have enough capacity, there should be no problem. We are open for talks, the whole consortium of URT, Daktronics and ourselves, if there are any other major display company who says, okay, I also want to adopt electro wetting displays, because we always believe if we want to make this successful, we should not really keep it all for ourselves. And there's lots of money to be made,-without a lot of grief-in licensing. Hans Feil: Yeah, we're open to do anything that's reasonable. But there are many in fact, maybe all the major display companies that at some point of time tried making electro wetting displays and did R&D but they found it very difficult and stopped with it.  We have our own technology, what we call second generation technology with different approach and we solved all those problems that were there with the first generation electro wetting displays. It has taken some time, but it's worked quite well now. I'm looking forward to seeing it at some point, somewhere. I hope I don't have to go to South Dakota in the middle of the winter, but you never know.  Hans Feil: Well, you could also come here, but I'm not sure if you are in Europe anytime soon.  Yeah, well, Eindhoven has a better football team than Brookings South Dakota, so that would be a better trip for me.  Anyway, thank you very much for spending some time with me. Hans Feil: Yeah, I'm very glad that I got opportunity from you to talk about this. And I hope you can watch our display anytime soon, either here or in the US somewhere. Seeing is believing, in fact, and reflective is just different.  Yeah. I completely buy into the idea that it's one of those things that it's interesting to read and to hear about in a podcast, but to walk up and see it is where you're gonna close the deal. Hans Feil: Yeah, exactly.  All right, thanks again. Hans Feil: Thank you very much, and hope to see you soon.

    Jiffy Pop Culture
    Ep 110. Times Square

    Jiffy Pop Culture

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 108:48


    Two girls act like they're co-captains of a softball team and live together in Times Square but they're not gay.

    The Overnightscape Underground
    The Overnightscape 1934 – Games (8/2/22)

    The Overnightscape Underground

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 109:37


    1:49:37 – Frank in New Jersey, plus the Other Side. Topics include: Games I invented but abandoned, Games Magazine, Montana, Hearthstone, Magic Arena, Kinjabang Noodles, Better Call Saul, Cinnabon, Cottonwood Mall, Tapioca Tundra, George Jetson was born on Sunday, 209, Amazon Fresh, Joe Boxer, Swatch .beat, Times Square at the turn of the Millennium, and much more… plus […]

    Podcast – The Overnightscape
    The Overnightscape 1934 – Games (8/2/22)

    Podcast – The Overnightscape

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 109:37


    1:49:37 – Frank in New Jersey, plus the Other Side. Topics include: Games I invented but abandoned, Games Magazine, Montana, Hearthstone, Magic Arena, Kinjabang Noodles, Better Call Saul, Cinnabon, Cottonwood Mall, Tapioca Tundra, George Jetson was born on Sunday, 209, Amazon Fresh, Joe Boxer, Swatch .beat, Times Square at the turn of the Millennium, and much more… plus […]

    You're Wrong About...
    Porn Wars w. Nona Willis Aronowitz

    You're Wrong About...

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 67:02 Very Popular


    Here's some money, go see a Porn War. This week we're going on a field trip to Times Square with Nona Willis Aronowitz, author of Bad Sex, to learn about Deep Throat, “porno chic,” and the unresolved feminist battle over whether to eradicate pornography or make more of it. Digressions include Carol Clover, this discovery of the clitoris, and Harry Reems (Joel Reems' distant cousin).Here's where to find Nona:WebsiteBad Sex (book)Support us:Bonus Episodes on PatreonBonus Episodes on Apple PodcastsDonate on PaypalBuy cute merchWhere else to find us:Sarah's other show, You Are Good [YWA co-founder] Mike's other show, Maintenance PhaseLinks:https://www.theothernwa.com/http://patreon.com/yourewrongabouthttp://apple.co/ywahttps://www.teepublic.com/stores/youre-wrong-abouthttps://www.paypal.com/paypalme/ywapodcasthttps://www.podpage.com/you-are-goodhttp://maintenancephase.comSupport the show

    The Part-Time CEO
    EP198: The Importance of Marketing Ecosystems with Stacey Wodin

    The Part-Time CEO

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 35:33


    Stacey Wodin is an exceptional marketer who has even had a client featured on a billboard in Times Square. But when she realized she needed more hours back in her day, she knew she needed outside help in her business. That's when she started interviewing business coaches. In this episode, she shared the moment she knew I was the one, talks about her marketing experience and also shares why you need marketing ECOSYSTEMS, not necessarily funnels (even though those can be useful, too). Enjoy!

    The Bowery Boys: New York City History
    Rewind: The Story of the Yellow Taxi Cab

    The Bowery Boys: New York City History

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 56:15 Very Popular


    In honor of the 125th anniversary of the first ELECTRIC CABS hitting the streets of New York, the Bowery Boys are revisiting this episode from 2015, recounting almost 175 years of getting around New York in a private ride. The hansom, the romantic rendition of the horse and carriage, took New Yorkers around during the Gilded Age. But unregulated conduct by — nighthawks — and the messy conditions of streets due to horses demanded a solution.At first it seemed the electric car would save the day but the technology proved inadequate. In 1907 came the first gas-propelled automobile cabs to New York, officially — taxis — due to a French invention installed in the front seat.By the 1930s the streets were filled with thousands of taxicabs. During the Great Depression, cab drivers fought against plunging fare and even waged a strike in Times Square. In 1937, Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia debuted the medallion system as a way to keep the streets regulated.By the 1970s many cabdrivers faced an upswing of crime that made picking up passengers even more dangerous than bad traffic. Drivers began ignoring certain fares — mainly from African-Americans — which gave rise to the neighborhood livery cab system.Today New York taxicab fleets face a different threat — Uber and the rise of private app-based transportation services. Will the taxi industry rise to the challenge in time for the debut of their taxi of tomorrow.Visit the website for images and more information.

    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat
    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat Episode 98: The John Elgin Murder Case

    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 35:12


    Airing from 1949 to 1954, Broadway Is My Beat, is a radio crime drama, about a Times Square detective named Danny Clover who worked homicide "from Times Square to Columbus Circle—the gaudiest, the most violent, the lonesomest mile in the world." GSMC Classics presents some of the greatest classic radio broadcasts, classic novels, dramas, comedies, mysteries, and theatrical presentations from a bygone era. The GSMC Classics collection is the embodiment of the best of the golden age of radio. Let Golden State Media Concepts take you on a ride through the classic age of radio, with this compiled collection of episodes from a wide variety of old programs. ***PLEASE NOTE*** GSMC Podcast Network presents these shows as historical content and have brought them to you unedited. Remember that times have changed and some shows might not reflect the standards of today's politically correct society. The shows do not necessarily reflect the views, standards, or beliefs of Golden State Media Concepts or the GSMC Podcast Network. Our goal is to entertain, educate give you a glimpse into the past.

    Everyone Loves Guitar
    Cory Churko - Shania Twain, Kelly Clarkson: From a CUBICLE to TIMES SQUARE, literally OVERNIGHT

    Everyone Loves Guitar

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 98:19 Very Popular


    Cory Churko Interview: Cory opens up about busking on the streets for 4 years, in Canada… leaving the music business and getting back in (with an incredible gig)... being a sideman vs. running his own band… getting married, being a vegan, how he stays happy & more, very candid Cool Guitar & Music T-Shirts!: http://www.GuitarMerch.com Cory is a multi-instrumentalist & mix engineer who's worked with Shania Twain, Mutt Lange, Kelly Clarkson, Reba McEntire, Slash & others, and he also has his own band, Toque, which is just about to release their second LP Subscribe & Website:  https://www.everyonelovesguitar.com/subscribe Support this show: http://www.everyonelovesguitar.com/support  

    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat
    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat Episode 97: The John Mooney Murder Case

    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 34:52


    Airing from 1949 to 1954, Broadway Is My Beat, is a radio crime drama, about a Times Square detective named Danny Clover who worked homicide "from Times Square to Columbus Circle—the gaudiest, the most violent, the lonesomest mile in the world." GSMC Classics presents some of the greatest classic radio broadcasts, classic novels, dramas, comedies, mysteries, and theatrical presentations from a bygone era. The GSMC Classics collection is the embodiment of the best of the golden age of radio. Let Golden State Media Concepts take you on a ride through the classic age of radio, with this compiled collection of episodes from a wide variety of old programs. ***PLEASE NOTE*** GSMC Podcast Network presents these shows as historical content and have brought them to you unedited. Remember that times have changed and some shows might not reflect the standards of today's politically correct society. The shows do not necessarily reflect the views, standards, or beliefs of Golden State Media Concepts or the GSMC Podcast Network. Our goal is to entertain, educate give you a glimpse into the past.

    Culture Factor 2.0
    Season 4 Trailer: The Artist, Collector and Web3 Business Summer Series

    Culture Factor 2.0

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 1:17


    Hey, Culture Factor family Season Four is here, I'm so excited. But if you have been listening or just arrived here, Season Three brought us an education in Web3 technologies and NFTs. And I was able to share the business strategy side. So you can see how Web2 and Web3 can ignite experiences and creativity. So if you are new here, dig in. I also concluded that season with my own NFT education, it was a collaboration where you can join the Culture Factor family while supporting this indie podcast. So go to hollyshannon.com If you want to make your own, and maybe we'll see it on Twitter. Now, let's talk about Season Four. It is a Summer Series where we talk about the creative shift for artists the mindset of the collector and how businesses evolve products to support the Creator economy. After speaking at NFT.NYC, I found myself in conversations backstage with talent that was on the billboards of Times Square and lighting up all the iconic stages in New York. I bring this all to you in my summer series. I'm really excited. So go grab some rosé let's sip together and please share this show and a glass with your friends.Holly Shannon's WebsiteZero To Podcast on AmazonMint Holly Shannon + Culture Factor NFTHolly Shannon, LinkedinHolly Shannon, InstagramHolly Shannon, TwitterWatch Culture Factor and VaynerNFT #web  #business  #backstage  #education  #talk  #collector #NFTNYC #billboards  #indie #timessquare #technologies #conversations #creativity #creators #nfts #nft #nftart #cryptocurrency #blockchain #metaverse #culturefactor #web3 #smartcontracts #bitcoin #nftartist #nftcollectors #eth #ethereum #marketingdigital #marketingstrategy #marketingtips #youtubers #tiktok #instagram #reels #branding #authorsofig #podcastersofinstagram #authorpreneur #entrepreneur #solopreneur #coach #consulting #zerotopodcast #podcast #jobsearching #thoughtleader #thoughtleadership #b2bmarketing #b2b #b2bsales #writersofig #howtopodcast #startapodcasttoday #startapodcastalready #nofear #lifelonglearning  #experiences #experientialmarketing #bitcoin #companyculture #employeeengagment #web3 #smartcontracts #bitcoin #nftartist #nftcollectors #eth #ethereum #community #peertopeer #decentralizedeconomy 

    Roommates In Law
    #36 - Dad Giveaway

    Roommates In Law

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 74:01


    Tom gets heckled in Austin and is the maddest he's ever been onstage (still pretty tame). Meanwhile Tim performs in the middle of Times Square, which obviously goes great. Rate, subscribe, tell a friend! 

    Talkhouse Podcast
    Taylor Bennett with Matt Johnson (Matt and Kim)

    Talkhouse Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 52:43


    On this week's Talkhouse Podcast, we've got what might seem at first to be an unusual pairing, but that has its genesis in some serious fandom: Taylor Bennett and Matt Johnson. Taylor Bennett is a musician, entrepreneur, and community activist who has helped guide the career of his older brother Chance the Rapper while also busting genres on his own records. Bennett is a restless musician, rarely content to make the same moves twice. He raps and sings, and has proudly been sample-free on his last few records. A few years back, he released Be Yourself, a manifesto of sorts that championed inclusivity and positivity—he also told the world around the same time that he's proudly bisexual. For this year's Coming of Age, Bennett once again found inspiration in all different kinds of music, even bringing in some guests from various areas on the musical spectrum. One guest he was particularly excited to work with was Matt Johnson of Matt and Kim, the New York indie duo behind some of the past two decades' most invigorating songs. Johnson contributed vocals to “Kick Back,” from Coming of Age—check out that song right here. As I said, Matt Johnson is half of Matt and Kim—you can probably guess which half—the life-affirming duo behind one really big hit, “Daylight,” a breakthrough music video that you'll hear about in this chat, the end-credits song in a Lego movie, and perhaps most importantly, the sort of we-did-it-our-way career that should be the envy of their peers. Matt and Kim have released six albums in their two decades together, and they've built a relationship with their audience through undeniably joyous live shows and a sense of gratitude you don't always see in bands. Their energy is, to use a true rock cliche, infectious, and it's a big part of their appeal—along with damn catchy songs, of course. The inability to get out in front of his fans has made Matt a little itchy over the past couple of years, which you'll hear about in this chat. Johnson and Bennett also talk about giant dildos in this podcast, so prepare yourself for that. If that's not enough to pique your interest, the two also talk about trying to separate the art from the artist, about the real reason to remain independent, and about what it's like to get completely naked in Times Square in the dead of winter for a video shoot. It's a lot of fun, and I hope you enjoy listening to it as much as I did. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Taylor Bennett and Matt Johnson for chatting. If you like what you heard, please follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcasting platform, and check out our great written pieces and vast podcasting network on this very site. This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!

    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat
    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat Episode 96: The Gordon Merrick Murder Case

    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 34:48


    Airing from 1949 to 1954, Broadway Is My Beat, is a radio crime drama, about a Times Square detective named Danny Clover who worked homicide "from Times Square to Columbus Circle—the gaudiest, the most violent, the lonesomest mile in the world." GSMC Classics presents some of the greatest classic radio broadcasts, classic novels, dramas, comedies, mysteries, and theatrical presentations from a bygone era. The GSMC Classics collection is the embodiment of the best of the golden age of radio. Let Golden State Media Concepts take you on a ride through the classic age of radio, with this compiled collection of episodes from a wide variety of old programs. ***PLEASE NOTE*** GSMC Podcast Network presents these shows as historical content and have brought them to you unedited. Remember that times have changed and some shows might not reflect the standards of today's politically correct society. The shows do not necessarily reflect the views, standards, or beliefs of Golden State Media Concepts or the GSMC Podcast Network. Our goal is to entertain, educate give you a glimpse into the past.

    The Indicator from Planet Money
    LIVE From New York, the Beigie Awards!

    The Indicator from Planet Money

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 9:15 Very Popular


    Two years ago, the pandemic haunted New York City. But now the Big Apple is back in full swing, with tourists and bodegas galore. To celebrate the return to normal, join us for the Beige Awards, live from Times Square!

    Sixteen:Nine
    Rosemary Valenti, Outdoor Solutions Group

    Sixteen:Nine

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 32:30


    The 16:9 PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY SCREENFEED – DIGITAL SIGNAGE CONTENT New York City is a massive out of home media environment, but much of the attention gets directed to the giant LED boards in Times Square, when there all kinds of other interesting and high opportunity environments that also generate a LOT of eyeballs ... like the ferries across the Hudson River. Outdoor Solutions Group has many, many years under its belt doing static advertising on the ferries that take commuters back and forth from New Jersey - from wraps on boats and shuttle buses to ad posters and big banners in the ferry terminals. The company had been slow-walking its digital plans for a variety of reasons, but when COVID hit, the company decided it was time to start converting some of that printed stock to digital. Part of that was triggered by the simple observation that as the economy and riders started coming back from lockdowns, digital interest and buys were coming back faster. I spoke with Rosemary Valenti, who has spent a long career in New York OOH media circles and fully took over the business when her husband died a few years ago, after a long scrap with cancer. She now has a son helping her out, and partnerships with established digital partners in Broadsign, Pearl Media and TSItouch. In this podcast, we get into why Valenti's firm took the digital plunge, its challenges and benefits, and her plans to convert more of the print positions to quickly refreshed digital displays. Subscribe to this podcast: iTunes * Google Play * RSS TRANSCRIPT Rosemary Valenti: I'm Rosemary Valenti. I'm the CEO of an Outdoor Solutions Group in New York, and I've been in this out-of-home world for a very long time. I started this company with my husband, Mark Valenti in 1996, but we were both in the out-of-home world prior to that, we were in companies that are now considered outfront media. And your son's still involved in the business, right?  Rosemary Valenti: Yes, actually, Matthew was an infant when I started OSG, and then by the time he was 15 we had him, as a courier almost, going in, dropping off mail, that's how he earned his allowance, did some inside of the ferry postings and he was an intern, he was great. He learned a lot of the business and now he is Vice President of Outdoor Solutions Group.  Nice, and you've run it on your own since you lost your husband?  Rosemary Valenti: Yes, in 2018, we unfortunately lost Mark to cancer. I took over the helm, but Mark and I did this for years. I had a backseat for a while, and he was more in the forefront when the kids were little, and then I would in those say 10 years, we were just in tandem running it pretty much, and then when he got sick, we needed a little help, and then after that, I just started to run it and then Matthew had some experience at Clear Channel Outdoor for a little bit, and then came in and joined forces with me and is instrumental in everything that we do together. He's great.  Good. It's nice to have him involved, I guess.  Rosemary Valenti: Yeah, even my other son has posted things. It was a family affair for a while. But that's not my other son's career path. But we do all participate in this.  Your environment is transit, and particularly the ferries, along the New York waterways, correct?  Rosemary Valenti: Yes, New York Waterway Ferries are our business partner, and they specialize in ferrying people from New Jersey waterfront properties or New Jersey over to Manhattan, and then we have locations in Midtown and Brookfield Place, and it was static for a long time, and then we decided to introduce the digital, which we needed to do, especially after COVID.  We got shut down for a little while in COVID, and had to rebuild it from the ground up, basically. So we had a lot of entertainment, a lot of Broadway, so we lost everything, and also New York Waterway had only essential service for a few months, and so they were shut down, and so we slowly have come back just like many transit systems, but in New York we were hit hard so it took us a long time to get this back up and we're there now. But we took a hard look at the company and we saw digital coming back faster and bouncing back faster than any kind of traditional transit, so we implemented converting some of our traditional, basically if you wanna call theem street furniture, but they're six foot by four foot, that's what we pulled out in some of the terminals, and we put in a 75 inch Samsung QMRs which really is helpful to have, you can send creative right from the office desk.  Yeah, really. So why do you think digital was coming back faster than static? Rosemary Valenti: I think people wanted cancellation clauses, there were less production fees. You could easily take something in and out, you can change creative. They were a lot of people who were speaking to the public about COVID through out-of-home and we didn't have that in the beginning. We didn't have that opportunity, but you saw advertisers doing messaging about COVID, and then saying, we're back and all different things. But we were shut down and so when we were coming back, we wanted to make sure we had something like that and what Waterway also wanted that, they have their own spot, they can alk to their customers through us because we put them inside the ferry terminals, and we also put them inside the ferries themselves.  Yeah. So you have various terminals, they're like small airport terminals with concourses and you've got what used to be light boxes are now digital, and then you've got, I think portrait displays that you've got on the actual ferries?  Rosemary Valenti: Yes, we did everything portrait display. So our in wall in the ferry terminals, which is really in the waiting areas and some of the pathways that they walk through to get into and then to get onto the slips. Those are 75 inch portraits, and then in one of the areas we have like maybe a 55 inch where some of the seating is facing, and then when they get into the ferries, they're 43 inch and they're right at the entrance and exit door. So you come into the lower level of the ferry and that's where our screens are, everything's portrait. We figured one piece of creativity is easier.  We're trying to do a two minute uninterrupted loop through the whole system, so an advertiser gets the entire system, which then can give them 90% of the ridership almost, if you think about that, they're in the highest traffic ferries, and then they're at the terminals. Right now, on the New Jersey side, in Port Imperial / Weehawken, and in Midtown and in these ferries, that's our phase one. We intend on putting in some more digital. We just have to do it in phases.  You're also still recovering from COVID, right? Not health wise, but business wise.  Rosemary Valenti: Yes, that's why we're doing it in phases. But much of the ridership is back and it's a little bit different. It used to be more Monday to Friday. Now they're seeing those as many people on a weekend, then there might be a Tuesday probably because of split work weeks, right? So I think people are taking advantage of this city more because they don't have to go every day to work.  Our partners, New York Waterways, they're seeing almost a steady flow back in, it's just different for them, which is great. Is the ferry ridership profile a bit different from what you would see on Long Island rail, or particularly the subway?  Rosemary Valenti: Definitely different from the subway. I would say it's an affluent audience. So I would say maybe more a Metro North that goes up to Westchester and somewhat like a Long Island railroad. We have a very affluent and high education especially there's people that live on the waterfront. So some of those waterfront areas in New Jersey have all been built up into these million dollar apartments, so it's really becoming a beautiful area. They have a beautiful skyline view, and then what Waterway did is once they land in Midtown, they provide a complimentary bus service to go Midtown down 34th street, 42nd, 50th. You take your route and they make it, basically from home to the office so you can circumvent subways, you can circumvent everything, they call it door to door, and it's a complimentary bus.  So those are the buses that we wrap. They have a fleet of buses along with the fleet of ferries and then downtown Brookfield place area and Wall Street, it's all pedestrian, you walk to your offices from there, cuz it's much closer. So they don't have to take mass transit really.  And I would assume that if I think about being on New York subways, that a great many of the ads are for English as a second language courses and career colleges and things like that, I'm guessing that you're getting different kinds of brands who are advertising on your screens? Rosemary Valenti: I would say that the subways have a mix of different types of advertisers, but we're getting high end real estate, we've been getting some alcohol brands, we had HubSpot where they wrapped a ferry and they went onto the digital and they wrapped a bus. So that's a CRM. So we're getting certain things like that, and Broadway have come back. We have Disney's Lion King and Aladdin, and we're getting more interest in that sector again. But, we had lost a lot of that so that's coming back and we just got Fire Islands, Hulu. So they did like a partial ferry wrap, but they also got onto the digital and obviously streaming is like digital. So that's great, and they had done a big pride event here. So we had sponsors of that pride event and then they were also on our ferries and the ferries were chartered to get to that pride event in Governor's island. It was called pride island. Yeah, there's different types of advertisers that we would get high end real estate that they might not get in the subway.  I'm guessing that long before you decided to start the conversion over to digital, you were getting banged on by no end of display and software companies to make that conversion quicker. What was holding you back?  Rosemary Valenti: Strategy, trying to figure out exactly what to do because there were options. Do we do a big spectacular, do we do LED instead of the screens, so we really wanted to figure out where should we go? And as we looked at our own dioramas on our walls, right at eye level, and we said, it make perfect sense to update these into digital because they're sitting on benches next to them, they're buying tickets next to them, they're walking past them when they're trying to get to the bathrooms. They're all in the area, in the ferry terminals that make the most sense, and inside the ferries, it was absolutely an easy decision to just put these right at the entryways. So you come in, you sit down and you face our screens.  Is it technically challenging to put them in something like a ferry becaused of the salt air and everything else? Rosemary Valenti: Yes, actually, we worked with TSI Touch and they gave us these anti-glare screens and protective coverings, so we needed to work on a design with that. Even in the ferry terminals, they have a wall of glass that you are sitting in and there's a wall of glass facing the Hudson river. So we needed anti-glare. We wanted to make sure they were protected with tempered glass because people do roll their suitcases sometimes. So we needed to get all these components factored, like what do we need in this to put this in?  And then TSI Touch actually supplied us with them once we told 'em what we were looking for, and then we had to deal with the design of our ferry terminals. So in Midtown, there was a lot of steel. So they helped us fabricate the enclosures that kind of go with the flow and looked somewhat like the enclosures we had on a more updated version of the enclosures, and same with the Port Imperial / Weehawken, we did a a black covering so it looked like a giant iPhone. But we had that kind of color on the walls prior. So they were instrumental in helping us with the design and they also made sure that the heat could escape. There's all these elements that you have to do when you have to put these in, then you have computers in the walls, and I would say that when you talk about inside the ferries, we have had to get to a cradle poin because there's no LTE. So you had to figure out how to get the LTE across the Hudson and back every 20 minutes, and there is electrical issues on ferries, just like in trucks.  Yes, they call it dirty power! Rosemary Valenti: Dirty power! That's exactly what they call it. Yeah, we had to work with Marine electricians to make sure we had the right surges or something that may deal with a low power instead of a high power. So that's some stuff I didn't understand, but now I understand.  The good news is, you had your baptism in fire. So if you can put screens with everything involved on a bouncing, rocking ferry, going across the Hudson, putting them in a static, enclosed building like a ferry terminal should be a walk in the park? Rosemary Valenti: Yeah. That's why we did the ferry terminals first. Yes, we had to learn about the ferries and deal with ferry operations and you know, they're using these vehicles, you gotta take them outta service for us to install them. It's not as easy, but they're very helpful and they wanted this and we work well together, but I didn't understand a lot of Marine things, and I've heard terminology that I never understood, like “give her a splash” and that means a ferry going back into the water.  And then for software, we use Broadsign for content and programmatic because that's something that everybody's taking advantage of and we wanted to get involved in that as well. So Broadsign educates you, they have the support staff, they teach you everything, and they're fabulous to work with. So we're really getting dynamic advertising. I would imagine that's another baptism in fire you had. If you're been doing static advertising for 20 plus years, to all of a sudden wade into this Labyrinth, I would almost call it the programmatic world, must have been bewildering, cuz I try to write about it and I'm bewildered. Rosemary Valenti: It is. I think that's why I think my husband was even approached prior to that and didn't wanna do it in the beginning. He saw a lot of companies like that start and then maybe fail. So we waited quite some time, but my son was at Clear Channel and he was selling Times Square billboards and things like that so he understood digital more than I did. So he was a great asset for that, and then we partnered with Pearl Media last year, and they also helped us understand this and they helped strategize with us and we ended up using one of their guys who branched off on his own Daniel, Oak city Integrations is his company and he helped us with the software and guided us in the implementation of all of this. Okay, so you do media sales through Pearl and you also get backed up through programmatic buys? Rosemary Valenti: We have a rep deal with Pearl Media, so they help us with the advertising as well as ourselves, and programmatic goes through Broadsign, and that makes that side very easy. So yeah, that's how we are getting an influx in sales between OSG's staff and then Pearl's sales staff. Because you are in terminals and ticketed environments, people go through turnstiles or something like that, I would assume you've got a pretty reliable one traffic and impressions count, and you wouldn't have to rely so much on venue analytics? Rosemary Valenti: We joined Geopath and they rated not only our buses on the streets, but our dioramas that were existing and then our digital, it was switched out to digital. So we worked with Geopath and we have over 2 million monthly impressions per advertiser, because there's a lot of signs in there. We launched with 27 screens. So because we were rated first with Geopath as static and then converted existing things, it was pretty easy for them to help us. We explained that it was 15 second spots within a two minute loop and they could easily do the conversion and help us with that. All advertisers look for the audited so we give audited impressions.  And are you with other associations as well?   Rosemary Valenti: We worked for the buses, which are static, with Street Metrics and they helped audit those, and OAAA is somebody we belong to but that's just a membership organization. They had done a study once on one of our ferries, which was all state. So we've seen those studies. But  they're a good source.  Do you think you could have stayed as just analog or now that you've gone the digital route it makes sense?  Rosemary Valenti: We knew we needed to go digital, we didn't wanna stay analog. We wanted to be updated. It's just that my husband's health was a problem, and so it held us back the 17 months he was sick, so it held us back. But then, when COVID hit, we knew we needed to convert.  And now that you've done it, you talked about the quick turn on being able to change ads and things like that. Have you been able to assess the ROI value of it? Like you've done it and it makes sense?  Rosemary Valenti: Yes, it makes sense. It happened faster than I thought, some of the return on investment, which is great. So we're seeing the digital take off and people really like it. Like I said, they can just send you a file, we can push play.  We've even had like the Yankees come in for two day stints and then two day stints, like when they first open season and then a bobblehead thing. So those short term campaigns we could never have done with static so it really helps.  Yeah, I would assume with the static thing, particularly if you're gonna replace a bunch of light box posters with new print ones that don't turn that quickly, it's like numerous days, at least?  Rosemary Valenti: You mean just to post? Well, if somebody says, “I would like to do this” then the creative's gotta be done, and then it's gotta be printed, then it's gotta be sent to the site, then somebody's gotta switch it out and everything else, it doesn't happen in half an hour.  Rosemary Valenti: Right. You need an install team, you need to print them. Your print could take a few days for us, say a regular diorama, which is six foot by four foot, but it could take several days to print a bus or a ferry and it takes over a day to wrap a bus. It takes a day to wrap a bus and a ferry. It could be one day if it's good weather, but with the ferries you're dealing with weather conditions. But the combination, they're starting to like the combination because you get to hundred percent share a voice with your static, and then you get this digital where you can change creative. We've had the cannabis expo run with us. They had four different creatives on the walls that were running, simultaneously and then they gave us some static. So the combination, they knew they were always gonna be there, and the diorama sat down in Brookfield place, but they were part of a loop inside the ferries so they were getting on the wall and in the ferries as well as some traditional and that combination is really nice.  There was a company that didn't last, maybe it was COVID, but I think it was more about regulations, that was floating an LED display on a barge on a river. I can't remember whether it was the East River or the Hudson.  Rosemary Valenti: It was on the Hudson. They they made it illegal. I think it still may exist out in Florida or something, but…  Yeah, I think they're in Miami. Rosemary Valenti: It was removed because it was interrupting the Hudson river view for one of those people that paid a lot of money to have that view, and this light is flashing in your giant windows, they all contacted the mayor and the governor and they got that removed. I think, to them, it was unsightly. It was very bright. In their offices, you could see it going up and down. That's why ours is static, it's static on the ferries, it's not something that's lit up like that. It's still a fabulous 84 foot long message on the ferries, but to put the digital on the water and then flash it up into both waterfront sides of the river when these people, I think, pay all this money to have a waterfront view, but imagine just putting your kid to sleep or something, and then you these lights are flashing in the window. I can't even imagine all the things that they were hearing, but they did force them out of New York. Yeah, I was just curious because if you are doing static, doing basically vehicle wraps, but on a ferry, if you could do that with LED that was permanently there and just changed the file, even if it wasn't flashing, it was just solid, that would be very efficient and maybe have an ROI down the road, but then you might face the same heat.  Rosemary Valenti: Yeah, that's not something that we're interested in. I would imagine some of those screens have to use generators, which could make things even louder, or you're on the waterfront, you're bumping around, but it probably is taxing. Think about if it's a generator that has to use gas and now you've got this whole diesel/fuel issue right now going on with how much everything is, but I think that it's too invasive, the digital going inside the waterfronts, their views.  I think there's too many voices saying we don't want this.  How competitive is the media environment in New York? I know it has been like that for a very long time, but I'm curious because there's just so many different ways that people are putting advertising on.  Rosemary Valenti: I would say it's very competitive because you have traditional billboards going down the West side highway, you have all the transits, you have the subways, you have buses. So we're all fighting for the budgets. But we are the only ferry wrap program but there is digital inside of some of the other ferries that run around, but all out-of-home in Manhattan is competitive. We're all looking for an edge. Yeah, and they're all coming out of COVID, just the way you guys are as well, right?  Rosemary Valenti: We're all coming along. I think I think we're pretty much back. We're one of the top markets, right? So if we're gonna be anywhere, it's nice to be here because we have a lot of people, but I would say that I'm seeing that people are contacting me daily to ask me about my rates and my business and that's a plus because we did go a while in COVID when it was deafening.  Are you looking to expand or is it more about building out the digital side of the portfolio you already have?  Rosemary Valenti: We are looking to expand on the digital inside of our terminals more and we're partnered with Pearl so we're strategizing if there's other opportunities. They have some good stuff too. So they're right i near where we are so it offers this great synergy.  We're looking to expand. We buy again, we still wanna, we still have a little bit more phase to build out just with New York waterway.  All right. It was a pleasure to speak with you. Rosemary Valenti: It was great to speak with you too. I appreciate it.  All right. Thanks for your time.   

    The Film Detective Podcast
    E38. Broadway is My Beat: The Mary Demming Murder Case (8/14/1950)

    The Film Detective Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 32:23


    Join host, Carl Amari, for a radio re-broadcast of Broadway is My Beat. Featuring narration by Larry Thor.Running on CBS Radio from February 27, 1949 to August 1st, 1950, Broadway is My Beat introduced listeners to Detective Danny Clover, a hard-boiled New York City cop who worked in the homicide unit. With a jurisdiction from Times Square to Columbus Circle, the series listeners were treated to various tales of crime and murder straight from the gaudiest, most violent, and the most lonesome mile in the world. Originally portrayed by Anthony Ross for the first three months of its airing, the role of Detective Danny Clover then transitioned to radio icon Larry Thor. Although the series went relatively under-the-radar amongst other series at the time, it had done a wonderful job tapping into the darker side of radio detective adventures.Originally airing 08/14/1950, gather around for this week's murder mystery in "The Mary Demming Murder Case," with Detective Danny Clover!Enjoying The Film Detective?You can watch this episode here.Or connect with us here:FacebookInstagramTwitterYouTubeWant even more? Subscribe to our Newsletter here. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat
    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat Episode 95: The Eve Hunter Murder Case [AFRTS]

    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 35:24


    Airing from 1949 to 1954, Broadway Is My Beat, is a radio crime drama, about a Times Square detective named Danny Clover who worked homicide "from Times Square to Columbus Circle—the gaudiest, the most violent, the lonesomest mile in the world." GSMC Classics presents some of the greatest classic radio broadcasts, classic novels, dramas, comedies, mysteries, and theatrical presentations from a bygone era. The GSMC Classics collection is the embodiment of the best of the golden age of radio. Let Golden State Media Concepts take you on a ride through the classic age of radio, with this compiled collection of episodes from a wide variety of old programs. ***PLEASE NOTE*** GSMC Podcast Network presents these shows as historical content and have brought them to you unedited. Remember that times have changed and some shows might not reflect the standards of today's politically correct society. The shows do not necessarily reflect the views, standards, or beliefs of Golden State Media Concepts or the GSMC Podcast Network. Our goal is to entertain, educate give you a glimpse into the past.

    The Art Angle
    What Does the Future of NFTs Look Like Now?

    The Art Angle

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 41:01 Very Popular


    It might be the dog days of summer here in New York, but over in the metaverse, we are firmly in the depths of crypto winter. When NFT NYC, the world's largest NFT conference, descended on Times Square last month, Bitcoin and ether were down more than 70 percent from where they were in November. That put a damper on the proceedings, and it's had a ripple effect on the once-ballooning market for digital collectibles. In the first half of 2021, Christie's had sold $93 million worth of NFTs; this year, they've sold just $4.8 million. Meanwhile, NFT players and platforms are being dogged by claims of insider trading and market manipulation, and many in the art world are reconsidering their relationship with the sector. To offer us a micro-history of this fast-changing market, and a recap of how the crypto crash has transformed the NFT space, Artnet News executive editor Julia Halperin spoke with Zachary Small, an Artnet News contributor and friend of the Art Angle. Zach is the author of the forthcoming book “Token Supremacy: How NFTs (and a Little Money Laundering) Turned Decentralized Finance Into an Art Form.”

    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat
    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat Episode 94: The Raymond Grant Murder Case

    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 34:52


    Airing from 1949 to 1954, Broadway Is My Beat, is a radio crime drama, about a Times Square detective named Danny Clover who worked homicide "from Times Square to Columbus Circle—the gaudiest, the most violent, the lonesomest mile in the world." GSMC Classics presents some of the greatest classic radio broadcasts, classic novels, dramas, comedies, mysteries, and theatrical presentations from a bygone era. The GSMC Classics collection is the embodiment of the best of the golden age of radio. Let Golden State Media Concepts take you on a ride through the classic age of radio, with this compiled collection of episodes from a wide variety of old programs. ***PLEASE NOTE*** GSMC Podcast Network presents these shows as historical content and have brought them to you unedited. Remember that times have changed and some shows might not reflect the standards of today's politically correct society. The shows do not necessarily reflect the views, standards, or beliefs of Golden State Media Concepts or the GSMC Podcast Network. Our goal is to entertain, educate give you a glimpse into the past.

    Kush Chat
    Lost & Found & Live From Dumbo House!

    Kush Chat

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 22:12


    This week the guys bring you 2 episodes in 1 episode first Live from Times Square in our first sober episode sober chatting about Jason Vee's disappearance, Dumbo House & Hunter Biden. We also bring you an exclusive Bonus Episode Live from Dumbo House with @ral_pacino & @watermelont_ Kush & Drunk chatting about random shit, being high plus drunk & more! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

    Culture Factor 2.0
    Season 4 The Artist, Collector and Web3 Business Summer Series

    Culture Factor 2.0

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 1:17


    Hey, Culture Factor family Season Four is here, I'm so excited. But if you have been listening or just arrived here, Season Three brought us an education in Web3 technologies and NFTs. And I was able to share the business strategy side. So you can see how Web2 and Web3 can ignite experiences and creativity. So if you are new here, dig in. I also concluded that season with my own NFT education, it was a collaboration where you can join the Culture Factor family while supporting this indie podcast. So go to hollyshannon.com If you want to make your own, and maybe we'll see it on Twitter. Now, let's talk about Season Four. It is a Summer Series where we talk about the creative shift for artists the mindset of the collector and how businesses evolve products to support the Creator economy. After speaking at NFT.NYC, I found myself in conversations backstage with talent that was on the billboards of Times Square and lighting up all the iconic stages in New York. I bring this all to you in my summer series. I'm really excited. So go grab some rosé let's sip together and please share this show and a glass with your friends.Holly Shannon's WebsiteZero To Podcast on AmazonMint Holly Shannon + Culture Factor NFTHolly Shannon, LinkedinHolly Shannon, InstagramHolly Shannon, TwitterWatch Culture Factor and VaynerNFT #web  #business  #backstage  #education  #talk  #collector #NFTNYC #billboards  #indie #timessquare #technologies #conversations #creativity #creators #nfts #nft #nftart #cryptocurrency #blockchain #metaverse #culturefactor #web3 #smartcontracts #bitcoin #nftartist #nftcollectors #eth #ethereum #marketingdigital #marketingstrategy #marketingtips #youtubers #tiktok #instagram #reels #branding #authorsofig #podcastersofinstagram #authorpreneur #entrepreneur #solopreneur #coach #consulting #zerotopodcast #podcast #jobsearching #thoughtleader #thoughtleadership #b2bmarketing #b2b #b2bsales #writersofig #howtopodcast #startapodcasttoday #startapodcastalready #nofear #lifelonglearning  #experiences #experientialmarketing #bitcoin #companyculture #employeeengagment #web3 #smartcontracts #bitcoin #nftartist #nftcollectors #eth #ethereum #community #peertopeer #decentralizedeconomy 

    The Gauntlet
    #57 - No Parents, No Rules

    The Gauntlet

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 114:40


    57 - Times Square (1980) / The Apple (1998) This week, mom and dad are out of town and we're throwing a house party with Allan Moyle's punk anthems, Samira Makhmalbaf's stolen ice cream, and a six-pack of self-discovery.

    Lit Up
    Christopher Hermelin of So Many Damn Books on how to break out of a reading rut.

    Lit Up

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 21:39


    Fellow books podcast host Christopher Hermelin (So Many Damn Books) joins Angela for a special crossover episode! Angie and Christopher talk about what to do when the magic of reading has temporarily vanished (especially when your day job is in publishing), books that help us make sense of modern life and the near future, and summer reading plans.  You can hear the other half of Christopher and Angie's chat on the So Many Damn Books podcast feed this week: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/so-many-damn-books/id931442125 And here are a few of Christopher's reading recommendations as shared in this episode:  — The Cricket in Times Square by George Selden (pub. 1960) — The Car by Gary Paulsen (pub. 1994) — The Shimmering State by by Meredith Westgate (pub. 2021)  — The New Me by Halle Butler (pub. 2019) — Ada, or Ardor: A Family Chronicle by Vladimir Nabokov (pub. 1969) — Either/Or by by Elif Batuman (pub. 2022) See you in two weeks! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Cities After... podcast
    Climate Change Series: Reverend Billy on the Sixth Extinction - Pt. 3

    Cities After... podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 64:12


    **Cities After…will be taking a short hiatus. We'll be back with new episodes in September!** Continuing with Pt. 3 of Cities After…Summer Climate Change series, Prof. Robles-Durán talks to the world-renowned performance artist and activist William Tallen, famously known for his character Reverend Billy, described in a recent National Public Radio article as a Veteran anti-consumerist crusader taking aim at capitalism and climate change. Tallen and Robles-Durán discuss the destruction of NY's East River Park, the inseparable connection between art and the environment, the Sixth Extinction, greenwashing, and more. About our guest: William Tallen began performing as Reverend Billy on the sidewalk at Times Square in 1998 outside the Disney Store, where he proclaimed Mickey Mouse to be the anti-Christ, duct-taping Mickey Mouse to a cross. Reverend Billy's early sermons decried the evils of consumerism and the racism of sweatshop labor and what Talen saw as the loss of neighborhood spirit in Rudolph Giuliani's New York. According to William Tallen, the Reverend Billy character isn't so much a parody of a preacher as a preacher motif used to blur the lines between performance and religious experience. "It's definitely a church service," Talen explained to Alternet, but, he added, it's "a political rally, it's theater, it's all three, it's none of them." Alisa Solomon, the theater critic at the Village Voice said of Reverend Billy's persona, "The collar is fake, the calling is real." Along with the Church of Stop Shopping, a project directed by his life partner Savitri D, they have been referred to by academics as "performance activism," "carnivalesque protest," and "commercial disobedience." In addition to protest performances throughout a given year, Reverend Billy and the Church of Stop Shopping have organized various campaigns focused on consumerist and environmental issues, often highlighting a particular company they feel best symbolizes the issue. The group stages actions in public spaces near the targets of their actions, often in the lobbies, halls, and plazas in buildings owned by the companies they protest.  Since April 2020, Reverend Billy and Savitri D, have been hosting the EARTH RIOT podcast, which they describe as a comedy-infused, music-filled exploration of humanity's most urgent issue—the planet's Sixth Extinction. Made by "Earth-loving urban activists" from The Church of Stop Shopping, their podcast educates, inspires, and urges listeners to embrace reality and take action.

    The Lucie Beatrix Podcast
    New York, I Love You: Relationships w People, Places, & Things with Anthony Corballis

    The Lucie Beatrix Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 56:32


    Anthony is a comic, writer, and true New Yorker. He's seen it all from the grit of Times Square in the 80s to the post-pandemic watered down version of the city. We talk the music scene, dating, kink/fetish community, drugs, and money.Watch the episode here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eg2riQartuQ&t=2598sThe Lucie Beatrix Video Podcast / Filmed at Floored Media

    Lit Up
    Christopher Hermelin of So Many Damn Books on how to break out of a reading rut.

    Lit Up

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 21:39


    Fellow books podcast host Christopher Hermelin (So Many Damn Books) joins Angela for a special crossover episode! Angie and Christopher talk about what to do when the magic of reading has temporarily vanished (especially when your day job is in publishing), books that help us make sense of modern life and the near future, and summer reading plans.  You can hear the other half of Christopher and Angie's chat on the So Many Damn Books podcast feed this week: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/so-many-damn-books/id931442125 And here are a few of Christopher's reading recommendations as shared in this episode:  — The Cricket in Times Square by George Selden (pub. 1960) — The Car by Gary Paulsen (pub. 1994) — The Shimmering State by by Meredith Westgate (pub. 2021)  — The New Me by Halle Butler (pub. 2019) — Ada, or Ardor: A Family Chronicle by Vladimir Nabokov (pub. 1969) — Either/Or by by Elif Batuman (pub. 2022) See you in two weeks! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Assorted Calibers Podcast
    Assorted Calibers Podcast Ep 208: Send in the Experts!

    Assorted Calibers Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 72:23 Very Popular


    In This Episode: Given the historic events of last week, we* have brought in professionals this week to expertly analyze and reflect upon what those events mean for us and for our nation. In separate interviews, Benjamin Blatt, Esq. and Clayton Cramer discuss the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act which was recently signed into law. Mr. Blatt then returns to discuss the implications of the NYSRPA v. Bruen Supreme Court decision. *This was Erin's idea, and Erin is NEVER wrong! (Erin says: Weer'd wrote that. I would never say it. But neither am I going to delete it...) Did you know that we have a Patreon? Join now for the low, low cost of $4/month (that's $1/podcast) and you'll get to listen to our podcast on Friday instead of Mondays, as well as patron-only content like mag dump episodes, our hilarious blooper reels and film tracks. Show Notes S.2938 - Bipartisan Safer Communities Act NEW YORK STATE RIFLE & PISTOL ASSOCIATION, INC., ET AL. v. BRUEN (PDF) Clayton Cramer's Website Bipartisan Bill Misreading Four Troublesome Provisions in the Senate Gun Bill Gov Hochul: I don't need numbers New York governor signs bill to ban guns from Times Square, mass transit Store owners wary to alienate customers amid state's changing gun rules Massachusetts Updated Permit Guidance California gun owners leak: Riverside County sheriff calls for investigation: 'Concerning to us' The Reload-California Data leak  

    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat
    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat Episode 93: LQ The Russ Warner Murder Case

    GSMC Classics: Broadway Is My Beat

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 33:46


    Airing from 1949 to 1954, Broadway Is My Beat, is a radio crime drama, about a Times Square detective named Danny Clover who worked homicide "from Times Square to Columbus Circle—the gaudiest, the most violent, the lonesomest mile in the world." GSMC Classics presents some of the greatest classic radio broadcasts, classic novels, dramas, comedies, mysteries, and theatrical presentations from a bygone era. The GSMC Classics collection is the embodiment of the best of the golden age of radio. Let Golden State Media Concepts take you on a ride through the classic age of radio, with this compiled collection of episodes from a wide variety of old programs. ***PLEASE NOTE*** GSMC Podcast Network presents these shows as historical content and have brought them to you unedited. Remember that times have changed and some shows might not reflect the standards of today's politically correct society. The shows do not necessarily reflect the views, standards, or beliefs of Golden State Media Concepts or the GSMC Podcast Network. Our goal is to entertain, educate give you a glimpse into the past.

    CrossPolitic Studios
    Daily News Brief for Monday, July 5th, 2022 [Daily News Brief]

    CrossPolitic Studios

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 16:54


    CrossPolitic Daily News Brief for Wednesday July 6h, 2022 FLF Conference Plug: Folks, our upcoming Fight Laugh Feast Conference is just 4-months away from happening in Knoxville TN, October 6-8! Don't miss beer & psalms, our amazing lineup of speakers which includes George Gilder, Jared Longshore, Pastor Wilson, Dr. Ben Merkle, Pastor Toby, and we can’t say yet…also dont miss our awesome vendors, meeting new friends, and stuff for the kids too…like jumpy castles and accidental infant baptisms! Also, did you know, you can save money, by signing up for a Club Membership. So, go to FightLaughFeast.com and sign up for a club membership and then register for the conference with that club discount. We can’t wait to fellowship, sing Psalms, and celebrate God’s goodness in Knoxville October 6-8. . 476K Migrant Got-Aways Recorded in 2022 So Far https://www.breitbart.com/border/2022/07/05/exclusive-476k-migrant-got-aways-recorded-in-2022-so-far/ According to Breitbart: “More than 476,000 migrants eluded apprehension by the Border Patrol this fiscal year, according to a source within Customs and Border Protection. The total already eclipses the 389,000 got-aways from FY2021. The source says the number, recorded daily, is based on evidence collected by a range of technology systems and aerial drones that capture images. The metric is usually not released by CBP. Historically, the Border Patrol has relied upon traditional sign-cutting techniques to locate and count footprints and other physical evidence left behind at popular migrant crossings. The latter metric has been all but removed from the equation because manpower is redirected to daily migrant care. The average migrant got-away count, recorded since the fiscal year began in October, remains at roughly 1,700 per day. According to the source, more than 7,000 migrants are arrested by the agency on most days. In some areas, large migrant groups are taxing Border Patrol resources and contributing to the increase in got-aways. As reported by Breitbart Texas, in one Texas border town, 1,772 migrants were apprehended in one day. In April, DHS Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas testified to members of the House Judiciary Committee that there were more than 389,000 got-aways in FY 2021. At the current pace, the total projected number of got-aways will nearly double last year’s count, according to the source. The source says the situation along the southern border will likely worsen. After a recent Supreme Court ruling, DHS will soon end the Trump era Migrant Protection Protocol program also known as Remain in Mexico. DHS Secretary Mayorkas expressed his approval over the ruling that allows the agency to stop returning migrants to Mexico to await asylum processing.” 23 Million California Residents to Receive up to $1,050 in Inflation Relief Funds https://finance.yahoo.com/news/23-million-california-residents-receive-155218841.html According to Yahoo: “On June 30, California approved an inflation relief package — one which will see 23 million residents of the state receive a direct payment of up to $1,050. The $17 billion inflation relief package includes $9.5 billion for tax refunds to help address inflation and offset rising prices. Governor Gavin newsom and Senate President pro Tempore Toni G. Atkins and Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon said in a joint statement” “California’s budget addresses the state’s most pressing needs, and prioritizes getting dollars back into the pockets of millions of Californians who are grappling with global inflation and rising prices of everything from gas to groceries,” “The centerpiece of the agreement, a $17 billion inflation relief package, will offer tax refunds to millions of working Californians. Twenty-three million Californians will benefit from direct payments of up to $1,050. The package will also include a suspension of the state sales tax on diesel, and additional funds to help people pay their rent and utility bills,” they added. The amount of the California inflation relief payments varies depending on the income and dependents in the household, and eligibility is divided into three categories. Payments are expected to be going out to individuals by the end of Oct. 2022 and conclude by the middle of Jan. 2023, according to California’s Franchise Tax Board. Couples filing jointly with an income of $150,000 or less can receive $1,050 with a dependent, and $700 without a dependent. Couples with an income of $150,001 to $250,000 will receive $750 with a dependent and $500 without a dependent. Couples filing jointly with an income of $250,001 to $500,000 are slated to receive $600 with a dependent and $400 without one. For heads of households making $150,000 or less, they qualify for $700 with a dependent and $350 without. Those with an income of $150,001 to $250,000 qualify for $500 with a dependent and $250 without. As for those with an income of $250,001 to $500,000, they qualify for $400 with a dependent, and $200 without.” CPI projections, which are low, project that the average household will experience an increase in about $5K of inflated expenses as a result of inflation…but I think it will be more like $15 to $20K. New York Effectively Nullifies The Supreme Court’s Latest Pro-Second Amendment Decision https://thefederalist.com/2022/07/05/new-york-effectively-nullifies-the-supreme-courts-latest-pro-second-amendment-decision/ According to the Federalist: “New York Gov. Kathy Hochul ushered in the long Independence Day weekend by signing legislation crafted in response to Supreme Court’s recent decision. he U.S. Supreme Court has made clear that the Second Amendment guarantees law-abiding citizens the right to keep and bear arms for self-defense, both in their homes and in public. On Friday, New York responded that it didn’t care. New York Gov. Kathy Hochul ushered in the long Independence Day weekend on Friday by signing into law legislation crafted in response to the Supreme Court’s recent decision in New York State Rifle and Pistol Association, Inc. v. Bruen. Just more than a week earlier, the U.S. Supreme Court in Bruen had declared that New York’s prior “may issue” gun licensing scheme, which prohibited individuals from carrying concealed handguns unless they “demonstrate[d] a special need for self-protection distinguishable from that of the general community,” violated the Second Amendment. In reaching that conclusion, the high court stressed that the right to “bear arms,” by necessity, applies outside the home. The New York legislature responded by calling an extraordinary session and then passing the bill Hochul signed into law on Friday. That hastily passed statute established detailed regulations governing a citizen’s right to obtain a permit to carry a concealed weapon and added restrictive limits to where such concealed weapons could be carried. Both aspects of the New York legislation run headlong into the Supreme Court’s analysis in Bruen—and potentially First Amendment jurisprudence. … The larger constitutional problem with New York’s revised conceal-carry law concerns the state’s attempt to, in essence, declare most public spaces “sensitive locations” in which guns cannot be carried even by permitted individuals. Specifically, the statute makes it a felony to carry firearms “in or upon a sensitive location,” then provides an exhaustive list of sensitive locations which, because of its constitutional significance, is excerpted in full below: (a) any place owned or under the control of federal, state or local government, for the purpose of government administration, including courts; (b) any location providing health, behavioral health, or chemical dependance care or services; (c) any place of worship or religious observation; (d) libraries, public playgrounds, public parks, and zoos; (e) the location of any program licensed, regulated, certified, funded, or approved by the office of children and family services that provides services to children, youth, or young adults, any legally exempt childcare provider; a childcare program for which a permit to operate such program has been issued by the department of health and mental hygiene pursuant to the health code of the city of New York; (f) nursery schools, preschools, and summer camps; (g) the location of any program licensed, regulated, certified, operated, or funded by the office for people with developmental disabilities; (h) the location of any program licensed, regulated, certified, operated, or funded by office of addiction services and supports; (i) the location of any program licensed, regulated, certified, operated, or funded by the office of mental health; (j) the location of any program licensed, regulated, certified, operated, or funded by the office of temporary and disability assistance; (k) homeless shelters, runaway homeless youth shelters, family shelters, shelters for adults, domestic violence shelters, and emergency shelters, and residential programs for victims of domestic violence; (l) residential settings licensed, certified, regulated, funded, or operated by the department of health; (m) in or upon any building or grounds, owned or leased, of any educational institutions, colleges and universities, licensed private career schools, school districts, public schools, private schools licensed under article one hundred one of the education law, charter schools, non-public schools, board of cooperative educational services, special act schools, preschool special education programs, private residential or non-residential schools for the education of students with disabilities, and any state-operated or state-supported schools; (n) any place, conveyance, or vehicle used for public transportation or public transit, subway cars, train cars, buses, ferries, railroad, omnibus, marine or aviation transportation; or any facility used for or in connection with service in the transportation of passengers, airports, train stations, subway and rail stations, and bus terminals; (o) any establishment issued a license for on-premise consumption pursuant to article four, four-A, five, or six of the alcoholic beverage control law where alcohol is consumed and any establishment licensed under article four of the cannabis law for on-premise consumption; (p) any place used for the performance, art entertainment, gaming, or sporting events such as theaters, stadiums, racetracks, museums, amusement parks, performance venues, concerts, exhibits, conference centers, banquet halls, and gaming facilities and video lottery terminal facilities as licensed by the gaming commission; (q) any location being used as a polling place; (r) any public sidewalk or other public area restricted from general public access for a limited time or special event that has been issued a permit for such time or event by a governmental entity, or subject to specific, heightened law enforcement protection, or has otherwise had such access restricted by a governmental entity, provided such location is identified as such by clear and conspicuous signage; (s) any gathering of individuals to collectively express their constitutional rights to protest or assemble; (t) the area commonly known as Times Square, as such area is determined and identified by the city of New York; provided such area shall be clearly and conspicuously identified with signage. Merely skimming these provisions confirms the breadth of the new law, which leaves New York residents with few public places where they may legally carry a gun for self-defense. That bottom line strikes to the core of the Supreme Court’s ruling in Bruen that the Second Amendment guarantees a right for law-abiding, responsible citizens to carry a firearm in public for purposes of self-defense. New York’s expansive list of supposedly “sensitive locations” likewise ignores the Supreme Court’s analysis in Bruen.” Armored Republic The Mission of Armored Republic is to Honor Christ by equipping Free Men with Tools of Liberty necessary to preserve God-given rights. In the Armored Republic there is no King but Christ. We are Free Craftsmen. Body Armor is a Tool of Liberty. We create Tools of Liberty. Free men must remain ever vigilant against tyranny wherever it appears. God has given us the tools of liberty needed to defend the rights He bestowed to us. Armored Republic is honored to offer you those Tools. Visit them, at ar500armor.com After SCOTUS win on EPA case, Patrick Morrisey takes aim at SEC https://justthenews.com/government/courts-law/satafter-scotus-win-epa-case-wv-ag-patrick-morrisey-takes-aim-sec According to Just the News “After the Supreme Court handed him a win on Thursday limiting the authority of the Environmental Protection Agency, West Virginia Republican Attorney General Patrick Morrisey next takes aim at the Biden administration's effort to use its powers to regulate capital markets through the Securities and Exchange Commission to push its environmental agenda. The Supreme Court on Thursday curtailed the EPA's ability to restrict power plant emissions under the Clean Air Act. Morrisey, who brought the suit on behalf of his coal-dependent state, celebrated the ruling on the John Solomon Reports podcast. The legal implications of the decision far transcend environmental policy alone, according to the attorney general. "We wanted to say this is really about maintaining the separation of powers, not climate change, because it was about who gets to make the major decisions of the day, not necessarily what those decisions are, but who gets to make it," said Morrisey. "And the reason that's so important, is because when you have something so fundamental, a vast economic and political significance, you want the people's representatives to make a decision, and to have clear statements, clear lines of delegation to the federal agencies," he added. "And that did not happen here. That's why the court said that it was not going to allow the Clean Power Plan or similar type of regulation to go forward." Morrisey expressed optimism that the ruling would effectively limit overreach by federal regulators and arm states with a legal basis to challenge similar initiatives in the future. "I think it helps really solidify this major questions doctrine, so that you're gonna be able to limit when the bureaucrats can reach down, seize power, and try to take some one strand of ambiguity and turn it into a major rulemaking with incredible burdens on the American people," he said. "And so I am really gratified that the court resolves it on those grounds, as opposed to just merely some technical grounds." Rush toward green energy has left US 'incredibly' vulnerable to summer blackouts, expert warns https://www.foxnews.com/us/rush-green-energy-has-left-us-incredibly-vulnerable-summer-blackouts-expert-warns Did you know renewable energy is putting the country at risk of power outages this summer? The government’s push to renewable energy and away from traditional energy sources is silly. Daniel Turner, founder and executive director at Power the Future told Fox News that he “think(s) the entire country is incredibly vulnerable, because the entire country is facing a huge energy shortage and I don’t think there is any place that is truly safe,", told Fox News. Turner went on to argue that outages will most likely affect the poor and minority neighborhoods. "They will choose what neighborhoods go into darkness," Turner said. "Historically, when we have done this, we have chosen poor and usually minority neighborhoods to do that." Previously planned power outages in states such as California have a history of disproportionately impacting poor neighborhoods, including one instance in 2019 where a poor, mostly Hispanic neighborhood in Sonoma County had its power cut for eight days in October. The deliberate outages not only plunged residents of the area into darkness for days, but the resulting food spoilage strained already tight budgets. "Even if the electricity doesn’t arrive… the bills do," one resident said at the time. "Look who they shut off. Have you ever seen a Kardashian complain about lack of power, or Silicon Valley… Facebook’s headquarters? They’re all fine… they’re never the ones plunged into darkness," Turner said. Washington Post says you need to “calm down and back off” regarding inflation: https://video.foxnews.com/v/6308394937112 Play clip: start to .54 mark This is the Waterboy with your CrossPolitic Daily News Brief. We appreciate your sharing this news brief with your friends, joining our club, and we hope to see you at our Fight Laugh Feast conference Oct. 6th-8th in Knoxville. You can take all these steps at www.FightLaughFeast.com.