Podcasts about us mexico

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  • 859PODCASTS
  • 1,242EPISODES
  • 42mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 14, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about us mexico

Show all podcasts related to us mexico

Latest podcast episodes about us mexico

Habit Based Lifestyle
EP406 Pastor Chris Estrada Audio Habits

Habit Based Lifestyle

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 48:18


Pastor and author of the book ‘Habits', Chris Estrada, didn't always have a relationship with God.  Growing up on the US/Mexico border, Chris was in an environment of drug wars and cartel killings.  By the age of 12 he had a drug and anger problem.  He enjoyed playing basketball and found an open court at a local church.  After a while, the youth pastor invited him to church camp.  Chris thought he would go to meet girls, but on his first night there he found Jesus instead at the age of 16.  From there he was hooked, and he knew his calling was to grow the kingdom of God.  He's dedicated the last 15 years of his life to raising up leaders and voices to create transformation.  With so many people living for the spotlight and not for significance, Chris hopes to inspire others to grow closer with God.   -- Are you looking to connect with a group of like-minded habit hacking people? Join my private Facebook group along with 100's of others in my habit-based lifestyle secrets page https://www.Facebook.com/groups/307809586529906/ where I'll be dropping daily habits, tips, and tricks every single week.   Want additional information on our programs and other ways to get involved, check out my website http://jesseewell.com/ or www.Habitbasedlifestyle.com

Seattle Sucks
Ending the Myth - EP 11.5 – The Nadir of Race Relations, pt 2

Seattle Sucks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 98:55


Munya & Brian conclude their four-part discussion of the Progressive Era by taking a look at the evolution of American immigration laws and violence & racism on the US-Mexico border. For this ep we will be talking about themes from chapter 9 in End of the Myth.

The Marc Cox Morning Show
MCMS: 2021 Revisited- Lara Logan reports on her visit to US/Mexico border

The Marc Cox Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 11:19


Lara Logan interview from February 2021 recaps her investigation into US/Mexico border and immigration. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

San Diego News Fix
Wait times at the U.S.-Mexico border are way up

San Diego News Fix

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 6:55


Since the border reopened in November to non-essential travel, border waits have swelled to exceedingly long lines that could stifle local commerce and economic recovery.

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK
Terrorism in 2022 with Dr. James Mitchell

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 58:59


The US-Mexico border is wide-open for illegal entry and advertised as such all around the world. America's immigration system has never been perfect, but it has also never been in the shape it appears to be at this very moment. Is America headed toward another 9/11 catastrophe? What safeguards should we be taking? Dr. James Mitchell is on The Voice of a Nation...

Only in America with Ali Noorani
What's happening at the Southern Border

Only in America with Ali Noorani

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 32:12


A record number of people have been attempting to cross the US-Mexico border this year, many of them children. There are reports of a backlog of thousands of people willing to take a chance. And those turned back usually wait a bit in Mexico and try again. So how does the number of people attempting to cross the border this year compare to previous years? What are these individuals and families facing? And what approaches can we take immediately to start addressing these issues? This week, an on-the-ground look at the U.S.-Mexico border as we speak with Joanna Williams, Executive Director of the Kino Border Initiative, Linda Chavez, a former Reagan White House official and Danilo Zak, Policy & Advocacy Associate at the Forum. Here's Linda's recent piece for The Bulwark, and our explainer on the border situation.

The CBN News Daily Rundown - Audio Podcast
Migrants Accepting Christ in Droves at This Mexican Border Church

The CBN News Daily Rundown - Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021


CBN's George Thomas recently visited a Mexican church situated just south of the US/Mexico border, where a pastor is serving the physical needs of thousands of migrants while sharing the Gospel with them as well. His story is a shining example of what happens when we trust and follow God. The story begins at the 13:00 mark in the podcast as we round up several top news stories of the day.

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness
How Much History Is In A Burrito? with Pati Jinich

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 56:58


 This week's episode is as nourishing as they get, as chef Pati Jinich joins Jonathan to discuss cuisines along the US-Mexico border, holiday foods she associates with growing up in Mexico, and what we can learn from taking a bite out of a burrito. Pati Jinich is a James Beard Award-winning Mexican chef who has dedicated her career to building a shared understanding between her two home countries: Mexico and the United States. Her long-running PBS series Pati's Mexican Table has brought Mexican flavors, colors and textures into American homes and kitchens, as viewers have watched Pati thoughtfully and enthusiastically guide them through the various geographic regions of the country.  Pati is also the host of the recently released PBS Primetime special La Frontera, which highlights the unique foods and culture along the Texas-Mexico border, and has authored three cookbooks including the recently released Treasures of the Mexican Table. You can follow Pati on Instagram and Twitter @PatiJinich, and learn more about her work at patijinich.com. Find out what today's guest and former guests are up to by following us on Instagram and Twitter @CuriousWithJVN. Transcripts for each episode are available at JonathanVanNess.com.Check out Getting Curious merch at PodSwag.com.Listen to more music from Quiñ by heading over to TheQuinCat.com.Jonathan is on Instagram and Twitter @JVN and @Jonathan.Vanness on Facebook.

KGO 810 Podcast
December 20, 2021: Nikki Medoro - Texas reprises Trump border wall

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 15:43


Texas Governor Greg Abbott has inaugurated the first stretch of a new barrier along the US/Mexico border, calling it an “unprecedented investment” in security. As he works to win the votes of Donald Trump's supporters, Abbott has been prioritizing border security as he runs for re-election with Trump's endorsement.  ABC News Correspondent Jim Ryan is with Nikki Medoro to explain what money is being used and what is next for the border wall. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Morning Show with Nikki Medoro Podcast
December 20, 2021: Nikki Medoro - Texas reprises Trump border wall

The Morning Show with Nikki Medoro Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 15:43


Texas Governor Greg Abbott has inaugurated the first stretch of a new barrier along the US/Mexico border, calling it an “unprecedented investment” in security. As he works to win the votes of Donald Trump's supporters, Abbott has been prioritizing border security as he runs for re-election with Trump's endorsement.  ABC News Correspondent Jim Ryan is with Nikki Medoro to explain what money is being used and what is next for the border wall. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

What a Hell of a Way to Die
Border Deployments, Border DUIs feat. Davis Winkie

What a Hell of a Way to Die

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 52:19


This week, Francis speaks with Army Times investigative reporter Davis Winkie (@davis_winkie) about his recent story covering troop deployments at the US-Mexico border and the spate of incidents–to include deaths, serious injuries, and enormous amounts of UCMJ–and the fact that soldiers and officers at every echelon are reaching out with one very important statement: they shouldn't be there. Read Davis' story here: https://www.armytimes.com/news/your-army/2021/12/08/death-drugs-and-a-disbanded-unit-how-the-guards-mexico-border-mission-fell-apart/ And if you want to contact Davis, his details are as follows: davis.winkie@militarytimes.com and davis.winkie@protonmail.com For this week's bonus, it's a cross-post from Trashfuture's Britainology series, in which Nate, Francis, and Joe force Milo to learn about the Midwest. Now it's the good-natured Midwestern oafs in the driver's seat, and we explain the name of the region itself, why ICP had such appeal to our generation, and why literally everyone has a driving-while-intoxicated story involving being thrown out of someone's house. Get it on Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/posts/59837759 *SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT* We now have a storefront to sell the patches, buttons, and magnets that we also give out as flair for our $10 tier. Buy some sweet gear here: https://www.patreon.com/posts/58626568  https://www.hellofawaytodie.com/shop We have a YouTube channel now -- subscribe here and get sweet videos from us in which we yell in our cars like true veterans: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwlHZpNTz-h6aTeQiJrEDKw You can follow the show on Twitter here: @HellOfAWay Follow Nate here: @inthesedeserts Follow Francis here: @ArmyStrang

The Best Storyteller In Texas Podcast

Kent shares his thoughts on the crisis and the US/Mexico border.

Charlotte Readers Podcast
Jane Rosenthal's “Del Rio,” is a Suspenseful Thriller set on the U.S.-Mexico Border

Charlotte Readers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 37:27


Zero Blog Thirty
Liver King and President Biden vs Putin

Zero Blog Thirty

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 83:47


ROUND 1: Whats up, primals. Every year new fitness and lifestyle trends pop up. This has been the year of the Liver King. Should we all start living like our primal ancestors? ROUND 2: The Marine Corps is adding “foraging” as a course in The Basic School and this couldn't come soon enough since Chaps is obsessed with Round 1 ROUND 3: An Air Force Major was relieved of command and her actions were so shameful we might even give her firewatch ROUND 4: How bad are things for the National Guard unit deployed to the US/Mexico border? Well one troop wrote a manifest & slid it under his boss's door begging to “wave the white flag and send us all home”. ROUND 5: President Biden put on his big boy pants with Putin this week as the beating of the war drums starts to pick up the pace.

The Cipher Brief Open Source Report
The Cipher Brief Open Source Report for Thursday, Dec 9, 2021

The Cipher Brief Open Source Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 8:51


In this episode: President Biden hosts 111 world leaders today for a Democracy summit (Beijing angry over Taiwan's attendance); Many questions and few details following major AWS outage on Tuesday; US House passes Uighur Forced Labor Prevention Act; US-Mexico restart Remain in Mexico Program; Russia says US to blame for diplomatic row while accusing Ukraine of increase military tensions along border and Harvard's Belfer Center out with new report about China's ability to overtake US in advanced tech.  

Common Good Podcast
Ride Week Day 3 - Faith Groups Stretched Thin because of Inhumane Border Policies

Common Good Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 66:52


Doug Pagitt and Dan Deitrich discuss how Border Patrol offloads asylum seekers to churches and non-profs instead of providing any level of support to those awaiting asylum hearings. Later in the hour, they are joined by Alma Ruth of Practice Mercy, a faith-based non-profit serving vulnerable women and children at the US/Mexico border.    Practice Mercy Foundation   Val Verde Border Humanitarian Coalition   Doug Pagitt is the Executive Director and one of the founders of Vote Common Good. He is also a pastor, author, and social activist.  @pagitt   The Common Good Podcast is produced and edited by Daniel Deitrich. @danieldeitrich Our theme music is composed by Ben Grace. @bengracemusic   votecommongood.com votecommongood.com/podcast facebook.com/votecommongood twitter.com/votecommon

Sam's Army
Ep 2.129: RBL does Marsch dirty, Villa vs Lester + Antwerp/USMNT's Sammy Vines

Sam's Army

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 95:51


HEADLINES: PSG women's drama update, RBL unceremoniously tells Jesse Marsch thanks for the years of hard work see ya, MLB fumbling the Big 4 bag and MLS Next Pro. PREMIER LEAGUE: more Hammy love, Aston Villa or Lester - who finishes higher this season, Brighton in trouble, Power Rankings and weekend preview (ft Gerrard's Villa visiting Anfield). REST OF WORLD: MLS Playoffs, Der Klassiker controversy, NWSL moves. BEST BETS and GOAWs. Next up [1:04:15] Sammy Vines joins to discuss his move from Colorado Rapids to Royal Antwerp in August, immediately getting throw into the deep end in Europa, insider perspective on US/Mexico f/t who drove the "Man in the Mirror" situation, plus Sammy invents a new official #SamFam hand gesture and pledges to throw it up when he scores a goal for the USMNT (thus allowing me to die happy).

Rich Conversations
176. Gigi Flores on Living on the US-Mexico Border, Film, and Creative Writing

Rich Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 62:35


Gigi Flores is from Juárez, Mexico and has lived in El Paso, Texas for over 11 years. She shares what it's like to live on the US-Mexico border and how it shapes and affects regional culture. Gigi dives into her favorite films and what makes them interesting storytelling. She also shares her exploration into creative writing and documentary poetry. Follow her on Instagram @gigiflores02

Catching Foxes
Ecumenism isn't Watered Down Christianity, with Nathan Smith

Catching Foxes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 114:49


Guest: Nathan Smith, Director of Ecumenism for Glenmary Home Missioners and the Field Representative for USCCB on Ecumenism Podcast: Glenmary Unity: “Interviews and discussions from Christian ministers and theologians on ecumenical efforts between Catholics and Evangelical and Pentecostal groups.” https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/glenmary-unity/id1561579846 *How Luke introduced us via email: * “Nathan, meet Gomer. Gomer, meeting Nathan. Nathan is now a Catholic that works for Glenmary doing ecumenical work. He was a Protestant pastor, loves Benedict and Balthasar and dresses very well. Nathan, one time Gomer and I spent 8 hours in rural Mingo Junction eating $0.25 wings and drinking $5 pitchers until it closed. It was awesome. Gomer, Nathan has to endure standing next to during the US - Mexico game after I'd been drinking since 2:30 pm. I lead an awesome life. -Luke” *Topics range from: * 1. Seeker-sensitive church movements and creating a Sunday service for the unchurched and not for the churches. The pros and cons of this movement within protestant Christianity and now how it's being adopted whole cloth into Catholicism 2. The process of how Nathan became Catholic 3. Deconstruction within evangelicalism and is that coming to Catholicism? Is it the same thing? What are the differences you see? 4. You had the unfortunate experience of being next to Luke in the US men's national team soccer game against Mexico where they won 2-0. How much therapy are you receiving via Betterhelp.com/foxes? 5. Ecumenism doesn't have to be watered down or fake. Ecumenism can actually mutually enrich both sides if both sides keep truth as the central aim.

Warden's Watch
TGL022 Jamie McCallum - Force for Nature

Warden's Watch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 76:03


Jamie McCallum Ph.D. brings a unique set of experience to the enormous challenges of environmental protection. Combining his doctorate in Biological Sciences and decade in conservation with his early career in high-end corporate sponsorship; Jamie founded Force For Nature.  Backed by leading conservation groups, global media partners and the world's biggest brands, Jamie focused on a human based solution to many of the world's environmental problems - wildlife Rangers. Supporting and guiding them to be more effective can ensure that the resources upon which we all depend can theoretically last for ever.Back in 2008, in a bid to pursue his lifelong passion for environmental protection, Jamie left a thriving career in sports sponsorship (Usain Bolt, IMG, Ferrari F1 and Orange) and media (BBC, Discovery) to study for a Ph.D. in Biological Sciences. His research with the US National Park Service on the US-Mexico border used cutting edge technology to help improve management of protected areas. He then set up and ran the Technology Programme at the Zoological Society of London (ZSL), including the management of a Citizen Science App and the development of software and hardware for field staff. These projects were facilitated through partnerships with Google, Iridium and Microsoft Research. Since 2015 he has been the UK/EU Director for Peace Parks Foundation (PPF). As well as fundraising and partnership management, Jamie operates closely with field teams on resource protection, community development and management training tools. He also works with the Southern African Wildlife College, which trains hundreds of conservation staff each year and he advises the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) on protected area effectiveness. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Mike Broomhead Show Audio
How secure is the U.S. - Mexico border?

The Mike Broomhead Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 31:19


Thousands of border agents remain unvaccinated...Mike talks about what affect this will have on security at the U.S. - Mexico border if they were to be forced off the job.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

San Diego News Matters
Asylum seekers remain in limbo

San Diego News Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 14:45


Foreign citizens who are vaccinated can now cross the US-Mexico border. But asylum seekers still cannot cross, even if they are vaccinated, because a controversial Trump-era public health order remains in place. Meanwhile, students at UCSD are hoping the latest City Council redistricting proposal will be changed. It would split the school's east and west campuses into two separate districts. Plus, in 2025, Universal preschool will begin across the state of California but some believe it would do more harm than good.

Invasion of the Remake Podcast
Ep.315 The 31 Days of Horror Challenge 2021 Part One

Invasion of the Remake Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 139:53


Welcome to part one of Invasion of the Remake's annual horror movie challenge in which each host watched 31 movies over the 31 days of October which we have never seen before. Which ones will make you jump in terror and which ones will make your eyes bleed? We'll spill our guts on the good and bad of 31 Days of Horror! Sam's List: 1. Open 24 Hours (2018, Canada), 2. The Monster Project (2017, US), 3. Bunnyman Massacre (2014, US), 4. I Am Lisa (2020, US), 5. The Man in the Orange Jacket (2014, Latvia), 6. Brackenmore (2016, Ireland), 7. Look Away (2018, Canada/US), 8. The Body Tree (2017, US/Russia/Spain), 9. The Happiness of the Katakuris (2001, Japan), 10. Antrum: The Deadliest Film Ever Made (2018, Canada), 11. Euthanizer (2017, Finland), 12. Absurd (1981, Italy), 13. Memoir of a Murderer (2017, Korea), 14. Thale (2012, Norway), 15. Grave & Bones (2016, Iceland), 16. Something Weird (1967, US) Trish's List: 1. Deadheads (2011, US), 2. Eloise (2016, US), 3. Death of a Vlogger (2019, UK), 4. Maniac (1980, US), 5. Maniac (2012, France/US), 6. Night of the Creeps (1986, US), 7. I'm Sorry I Killed You (2020, US), 8. The Curse of Humpty Dumpty (2021, UK), 9. Abominable (2020, US), 10. Another Evil (2017, US), 11. Alligator (1980, US), 12. Grandmother's House (1988, US), 13. Blood Theatre (1984, US), 14. The Last House on the Left (1972, US), 15. The Last House on the Left (2009, US), 16. The Last (Lawst) Inn (2021, US) Jason's List: 1. A Quiet Place Part II (2020, US), 2. Demon (2015, Poland/Isreal), 3. Censor (2021, UK), 4. Benny Loves You (2019, UK), 5. Saint Maud (2019, UK), 6. Blood Red Sky (2021, Germany/US), 7. Slaxx (2020, Canada), 8. The Forever Purge (2021, Us/Mexico), 9. Shadow in the Cloud (2020, New Zealand/US), 10. Night of the Animated Dead (2021, US), 11. Willy's Wonderland (2021, US), 12. Dolls (1987, US/Itally), 13. Basket Case (1982, US), 14. Zombillenium (2017, France/Belgium), 15. His House (2020, UK), 16. The Tingler (1959, US) Support independent podcasts like ours by telling your friends and family how to find us at places like Apple Podcasts, iTunes, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tune In Radio, PodChaser, Amazon Music, Audible, Libsyn, iHeartRadio and all the best podcast providers. Spread the love! Like, share and subscribe! You can also help out the show with a positive review and a 5-star rating over on iTunes. We want to hear from you and your opinions will help shape the future of the show. Your ratings and reviews also help others find the show. Their "earballs" will thank you. Follow us on Twitter: @InvasionRemake Like and share us on Facebook & Instagram: Invasion of the Remake Email us your questions, suggestions, corrections, challenges and comments: invasionoftheremake@gmail.com Buy a cool t-shirt, PPE masks and other Invasion of the Remake swag at our TeePublic Store!

The Smerconish Podcast
How much money should families separated at the US-Mexico border receive?

The Smerconish Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 24:09


Michael offers a commentary on the story of families suing the US Government over the separation of children from their parents at the US-Mexico border. Original air date 12 November 2021.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Parsing Immigration Policy: Life on the U.S. – Mexico Border: The Abandoned Americans (#29)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 35:02


Summary Americans have watched the videos of the migrant caravans comprised of thousands of migrants from all over the world coming to the southern border. Americans have read the numbers – agents apprehended 1,659,206 illegal migrants in FY2021, an all-time record for apprehensions at the southwest border, and tens of thousands of ‘gotaways' entered the […]

ExtraTime
Who will rule Concacaf? Full USA-Mexico preview + Canada takes center stage

ExtraTime

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 82:42


Does Concacaf have a big three or does Mexico still reign supreme? Andrew, Doyle, Charlie and David preview the Octagon, featuring USA-Mexico and Canada-Mexico clashes that could decide who goes to the World Cup. Cesar Hernandez of the Mexican Soccer Show also joins to give the El Tri perspective. 3:32 - The mood ahead of US - Mexico 10:18 - What are the stakes for the US? 15:32 - Thoughts on the USMNT roster 20:36 - Interview: Cesar Hernandez previews Mexico 45:17 - How many minutes can Chrisitan Pulisic give the USMNT? 58:27 - What should the midfield trio be for the US? 1:05:08 - Who starts at goalkeeper for the US? 1:08:36 - Ricardo Pepi looks like a locked in starter  1:10:00 - Predictions for US - Mexico  1:12:39 - Why Canada's game against Costa Rica is huge

San Diego News Fix
The U.S.-Mexico border is now open to travelers

San Diego News Fix

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 9:12


U.S. land borders opened to nonessential travelers Monday for the first time since March of 2020. Here's what you need to know.

Dogs & Deadlifts - Building Better Dogs and People!
Ep45: Scent training for dogs with Fred Helfers

Dogs & Deadlifts - Building Better Dogs and People!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 38:40


Fred has skillfully combined science with practical handling exercises to provide a foundation for the Nose Work dog handler. Fred Helfers began working with detection dogs in the early eighties. After a short stint with the US Border Patrol working on the southern US / Mexico border, Fred got to see firsthand how effective dogs were at detecting contraband. He soon realised that working for the US Border Patrol was not for him and moved to Washington State to work with a municipal Police department, north of Seattle WA. Already training and hunting with Brittany Spaniels, Fred knew that dogs had good noses, but never really knew how dogs worked odour sources. In 2012 Fred was introduced to the sport of K9 Nose work® by founder and friend Ron Gaunt. While cautious at first, Fred was overwhelmed and inspired by the passion, dedication and camaraderie displayed by the K9 Nose work® handlers and their instructors. He was soon recognized as a Certified K9 Nose work® Instructor (CNWI®) and began teaching detection classes, seminars and workshops throughout the United States. Fred Helfers Website: https://www.fredhelfers.com/ Want to Join the Dogs & Deadlifts Community? "I teach people how to ignite their performance dog, and connect with other dog fitness lovers from around the world all in one place." Link:https://www.canineconditioning.club/Membership

Bringin' it Backwards
Interview with Andrew Belle

Bringin' it Backwards

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 39:20


We had the pleasure of interviewing Andrew Belle over Zoom video! Andrew Belle writes songs by feel. The composition comes first. The melody follows. Only after Belle has an internal reaction to the composition do the lyrics finally come. Finding the right words to express what has always been there, but is only now being fully realized. Track by track. Belle writes songs by feel and Nightshade is a vibe.On Nightshade, Belle collaborated once again with long time producer Chad Copelin (LANY, Ben Rector, BRONCHO), James McAlister (Sufjan Stevens, The National), and fellow artist SYML - who co-wrote with Belle ‘My Poor Heart' the first single off his fourth full length album. The track is a pulsing, driving love song that chronicles the phases of a seasoned relationship, with each chorus returning to the initial spark that drew the lovers together to begin with.When it came time to record the album, the Chicago-based singer-songwriter, chose to take his trusted collaborators to the vaunted Sonic Ranch Studios, located on the US-Mexico border in Tornillo, Texas. The studio compound, which sits on a 1,700-acre pecan orchard, boasts the world's largest residential recording studio complex and has been the birthplace of albums by Bon Iver, Beach House and a slew of other notable artists.A good portion of Nightshade takes on a subject that has become part of our cultural zeitgeist – mental health. Specifically, how we deal with life itself and why a lot of us seem to be drawn toward unhealthy coping mechanisms. While a few tracks address these themes head on – ‘Spectrum', ‘Inside Voices' and ‘Surprise Surprise' – the album as a whole serves as a soundtrack for anyone driving out of a season of perpetual midnight in their life; toward a sunrise that is a little more hopeful - through a desert just north of the border. Nightshade is a vibe.We want to hear from you! Please email Tera@BringinitBackwards.com.www.BringinitBackwards.com#podcast #interview #bringinbackpod #AndrewBelle #zoom Listen & Subscribe to BiBFollow our podcast on Instagram and Twitter! 

CFR Campus
Academic Webinar: The Future of U.S.-Mexico Relations

CFR Campus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021


842f8cfc-021f-423b-af6f-7df465a2080a Wed, 03 Nov 2021 17:00:00 EDT Academic Conference Calls podcasts@cfr.org

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: The Future of U.S.-Mexico Relations

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021


Guadalupe Correa-Cabrera, associate professor in George Mason University's Schar School of Policy and Government and global fellow in the Wilson Center's Latin America Program, leads a conversation on the future of U.S.-Mexico relations.   CASA: Welcome to today's session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I am Maria Casa, director of the National Program and Outreach at CFR. Thank you all for joining us. Today's discussion is on the record and the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/academic if you would like to share it with your colleagues or classmates. As always CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We are delighted to have Guadalupe Correa-Cabrera with us to discuss the future of U.S.-Mexico relations. Dr. Correa-Cabrera is associate professor in the Schar School of Policy and Government at George Mason University and global fellow in the Latin America Program at the Wilson Center. She also serves as nonresident scholar at the Center for the United States and Mexico in Rice University's Baker Institute, is a fellow at Small Wars Journal-El Centro, and is co-editor of the International Studies Perspectives Journal. Previously Dr. Correa-Cabrera was principal investigator of a research grant to study organized crime and trafficking in persons in Central America and Mexico, supported by the U.S. Department of State's Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons. She is past president of the Association for Borderland Studies and the author of several books. Welcome, Guadalupe. CORREA-CABRERA: Thank you, Maria. CASA: Thank you very much for speaking with us today. CORREA-CABRERA: Thank you, Maria. Thank you very much to everyone, especially the Council on Foreign Relations, for the opportunity to talk to you about the relationships of my two countries, the United States and Mexico. So today, I'm going to start by explaining what is the current state of Mexico-U.S. relations, but in the context of a very important event that took place some days ago, in the context of the U.S.-Mexico Bicentennial Framework for Security, Public Health, and Safe Communities. The bicentennial—so-called Bicentennial Understanding. There was a concern at the beginning of the current administration in the United States that the relationships between the United States and Mexico were going to be difficult. Notwithstanding the last, the current year has been extremely productive in many areas. And with this new understanding, the Bicentennial Understanding, that it states in the Bicentennial Framework for Security, Public Health, and Safe Communities, the United States and Mexico's relation has been reframed in a very important way. There is an understanding that the Mérida initiative that had been the center of the relationship between the United States and Mexico, focused on security, needed to be reframed. And then, you know, that was—that was considered that the priorities remained the same, the priorities of the two countries, with some changes that I'm going to be talking about. But the three—I mean, the high-level understanding, this high-level meeting told us what's supposed to be—I mean, where we're going to see in the future. So I just wanted to point out some of the points that were discussed. This framework was informed by each country's security priorities, that I'm going to be talking about. And the focus is addressing violence, but through a response that's driven by justice and use of intelligence against organized crime, and based on tactical cooperation in law enforcement, based on the previous mistakes that had been identified. But currently, the focus would be on public health and development as a part of the strategy of cooperation between the two countries. I'm taking some words from the—from the communique of this understanding. And, you know, with the consideration of—for a more secure and prosperous region, the Mexico-U.S. Bicentennial Framework serves to reaffirm the friendship and cooperation that exists between the two nations. You know, as you see, the language is very friendly. It's based on an understanding that the relationship is important, cooperation is important. Apparently the two countries are in the same boat in this regard. The United States recognizes that support of militarization is not the way probably to go. And a greater focus on public health and development to address the root causes of violence in the southern hemisphere, particularly in Mexico, is probably the way to go, with an understanding to promote a more secure and prosperous region. There are four themes—I mean, this is the idea. This was—I mean, that was the conversation that's on the table. We don't necessarily know ourselves today how this is going to be implemented, what are the particular policies that—or, the collaboration, or the amounts of money to make this happen. But this is kind of like the idea of the future of this collaboration. However, I am going to be talking about the opportunities, and particularly the challenges, considering the priorities of the two nations that, in a way, and when we have the meetings of this type, and when we listen to the language and read the media and talk to the politicians that were present, we have a sense. But then when everybody goes home, we kind of, like, think about this better and we see opportunities, but more challenges than we initially thought. So there are four main things in the United States-Mexico relations that need to be highlighted, plus one that has been also always important but today is more important due to the pandemic. Which is the theme of public health, where an important collaboration between Mexico and the United States has been observed but at the same time poses certain challenges with regard to the border management. Title 42 is still in place and the borders are going to be opened gradually, considering, you know, the vaccination status of people. But that has had a major impact on border communities, and certain impacts on trade and development, particularly at the U.S.-Mexico border. The other four main themes of U.S. Mexico relations that I want to talk about are immigration, security, trade, and energy. I mean, I don't want to place them in order of priority. I think that energy is going to define the future of Mexico-U.S. relations, but I'm going to mention the four in the context of the present—I mean, the present situation. So with regards to trade, the successful passage and, you know, implementation of renegotiation of NAFTA, today in the shape of USMCA, has been extremely successful. Poses some challenges, of course. And this is going to be connected with the last subject we'll be talking about, the proposal of the Mexican government to reform the electricity sector. This is something that is going to be very, very important, and what are the priorities of the United States in the framework of build back better? But with regards to trade, apparently their relationships could not be, you know, better than today. There are some challenges, of course, that have to be with labor rights and unions in Mexico that would cause some loss of competitiveness in the manufacturing sector. And in the framework build back better, of course, this is going to benefit the United States and it's going probably to affect the manufacturing sector of Mexico. Let's see how it works. But with regards to trade, things are mainly, you know, stable, with exception of the future. And this is going to be very, very important. The potential passage, we don't really know, it's very difficult that the electricity reform in Mexico will pass. But anyway, the president—the current president of Mexico, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, has a very important amount of—I mean, segment of the population, and a very important support from his base that might help him to achieve his goal. I see it very differently, but we'll talk about that. So the next area that I would like to talk about is immigration. Here we have enormous challenges, enormous challenges that have been visualized with, you know, the current situations at the border that started since the beginning of this administration. During the past years, I mean, they had started to be increasing in magnitude, or at least in visibility. As I mentioned, Title 42 is maintained, and the migration protection protocol—Migrant Protection Protocols, so Stay in Mexico program, where a number of asylum seekers would have to wait for their cases to be decided in Mexico, there's a new definition in this framework. The Supreme Court of the United States very recently made a decision with regards to the reinstatement of the Migrant Protection Protocols. In the beginning the Department of Homeland Security, you know, made the declaration that they would—they would continue with that, but very recently they intention is not to continue with the Migrant Protection Protocols. In the end, and this is why this is very important in the very current conversation, in the end the continuation of this—of this program that has been highly criticized. Then it's also—it has put the human rights of undocumented migrants and asylum seekers at risk. That might—this will not work if Mexico—if the government of Mexico does not accept it. We have to see what is going to be the result. But we have a definition in this regard. The role of Mexico is key in the management of the U.S.-Mexico border, in the management of what some call migrant crisis, and then a crisis at the border. We observed that crisis very recently with a number of Haitian citizens that all left their country, went to South America, and from South America—from countries such as Ecuador, Brazil, Chile—traveled north through different countries, finding different challenges and dangers, and arrived to one point of the U.S.-Mexico border, with the help of a number of actors, such as migrant smugglers and corrupt authorities, but with the aim of making—I mean, escaping a terrible life and making a better life in the United States. We have a caravan that's now in direction to Mexico City. They were going go—they will put their demands on the table, but their intent is to continue going to the United States. There is a very big definition with regards to the migrant crisis, or what some call the migrant crisis, and the immigration issues that the government of the United States has recognized very accurately, and the Mexican government too, that there need to be collaboration to address the root causes of the situation that has to do with the development of the countries of Central America, of South America. And, you know, to achieve stability in South America, probably not through militarization. Secretary Blinken in a very surprising statement has led us to believe that today the United States is also reframing its aid to Latin America, to Central America and the Caribbean. And the focus is not going to be in aid in military equipment or in the militarization of the region. This is very important. And this brings me to talk about the third important—the third theme in the U.S.-Mexico relations. Mexico's security—the relationship of Mexico and the United States in the past few years has been focused on this connection between security and immigration. That's in the end centered on a specific attention of border enforcement, of border security cooperation. The situation in Mexico has deteriorated in the past few years, and the situation has not improved in an important way. Mexico's homicides remained at high levels, despite the pandemic. During the pandemic the decrease was very small, but today and we expect that this year the homicide rate continues growing in a trend that does not seem to be going down. The approach of the Mexican government since the transition period was—I mean, I can be summarized in the phrase talks not bullets. Which means, like, a completely—I mean, a complete shift of the declaration of Mexico's war on drugs to some other, like, approaches that will focus as well to solve the root causes of violence insecurity in Mexico, mainly development frameworks. However, the prior militarization of criminal groups in different parts of the country, and the events—the shootings and the diversification of criminal activities by armed groups in the country—has also caused a very complicated situation. The count of homicides in Mexico shows that killings remain essentially unchanged, more than 36,000 homicides in the year 2020. As I mentioned before, this year we expect an important increase. I don't know what will be the magnitude, but we have observed since the beginning of the year very unfortunate events. For example, at the U.S.-Mexico border, in the city of Reynosa, the massacre of migrants, and also assassinations and disappearances in a very key highway of Mexico from Nuevo Laredo and Monterrey. We still remember the Culiacanazo in the year 2019, which was a very complicated year. And today the situation in states like Michoacán, Guerrero, and Sinaloa, the massacres that be found, and people who disappear—or, that remain disappeared, is a very big concern, both to Mexico and the United States. There is not really an understanding of how this collaboration with regards to security will be framed. However, there was a very big advancement in the Bicentennial Understanding initial talks that the Mérida Initiative, at least on paper, supposed to be ending. But there's going to be a focus on dismantling transnational criminal organizations, probably in a different way and not with a focus on the military sector or on armed forces. At least, this is what we have on the paper. Mexico has been very straightforward with regards—and very critical with regards to the role of the DEA. And that has caused several tensions in this relationship. We also have the issue of security and the—I mean, the priorities of the United States with regards to build back better proposal or reform. And then we have, as I said, the reform of the electric sector in the Mexico state, who want to recover the control of the management of electricity, of the electricity market, and the capacity of the state to manage the lithium. So Mexico has—and the Mexican government has three main projects: the construction of the refinery in—the Dos Bocas in Tabasco, the Santa Lucia airport, and the Maya Train. There is a tension between Mexico and the United States with regards to priorities. Mexico has a priority to continue with the support of oil and gas. This is—this is reflected in the construction of the refinery. And here, we're probably going to see the main point of tension. Because of build back better and the commitment with build back better, and also focus on U.S. internal markets where Mexico has been benefitting from the growth of its manufacturing sector. We don't really know how this is going to be playing out, but at least, you know, on paper things are going to be good. But definitely the priorities with regards to energy are very different, and the focus of the U.S.-Mexico government on the lessening of climate change. And this focus is going to be very different—very difficult. The United States is committed to meet its climate goals, create millions of jobs inside the United States. And that has really changed their relationship. So we can talk more about these. Thank you for listening to this. And as I said, we'll probably be talking a lot about energy and the inequalities that public health and vaccination rates, that will also cause tensions. And immigration is another point that we need to talk about in greater depth. Thank you. CASA: Thank you, Guadalupe, for that introduction. There certainly is a lot to talk about. Now let's open this up to questions from our participants. (Gives queuing instructions.) Let's see. We will start with a written question from Paul Haber, who's a professor at University of Montana. He asks: Can you please provide some detail regarding the changes in labor required in Mexico by the USMCA? And what has happened to date? And do you expect a real deepening of the reforms between now and the end of the AMLO administration? CORREA-CABRERA: This is a very important question. With regard to the USMCA, mainly the main point that might cause tensions have to do—has to do with labor unions, particularly in the maquiladora sector, in manufacturing sector. The United States has been very clear with regards to that requirement, but that would, at the same time, lower the competitiveness of Mexico's manufacturing sector. As I said, there have been, I mean, in the past couple of years an attempt to create independent labor unions in the maquiladora sector, but there are still extreme tensions. And there have not been a real advance in this—in this sense. But at the same time, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, with his theme of primero los pobres, the poor first, and a support of Mexican labor, an increase—a very important increase since the beginning of his administration of wages, he is supposedly committed to help Mexican workers and to—and he has been focused as well on supporting not only the labor unions or the labor sector, but with his social programs that have been, I mean, advertised a great extent. Such as Jóvenes Construyendo el Futuro, the Youth Constructing Future, which is a very important, for him, but also very criticized program. And the support of mothers without—I mean, single mothers. And, I mean Youth Constructing Future for those who don't have jobs. So on the one hand Andrés Manuel López Obrador, also in order to continue building his base of support or maintaining his base of support, focused—has focused on these programs, these social programs, that are not necessarily just focused on labor, as the way that the United States wants this to be seen in order to also rebuild the economy by changing the focus to internal development. I don't see in that regard if what—if your interest comes from the United States, what has happened with the union is—with the labor unions and their capacity to really, I mean, grow in the Mexican manufacturing sector—I don't see—I don't see a lot of advancement in that area. And definitely in this regard, there are very different priorities in Mexico versus the United States. But Andrés Manuel López Obrador has been able to convince a number of his supporters, a number of Mexican workers, because he has increased in a very important way Mexican wages. And he is probably going to be able to achieve more increases when the elections—the presidential elections approach. But definitely we don't see very definite changes with regards to this area as the USMCA has been posed. CASA: Next we have a raised hand from Sherice Nelson, assistant professor at Southern University in Baton Rouge. Sherice. Q: Good afternoon. Thank you so much for your talk. And I appreciate you leaving time for us to ask questions. As a professor, how do—the biggest challenge often is to get students to back away from some of the stereotypical information they get about U.S.-Mexico and the relationship, and the centering of that—of that relationship on immigration, when there's far—as you mentioned—there are far other issues that define our relationship. Where are places that we can lead students to, to get better information that is not as stereotypical about the relationship, that will pique their interest? Thanks so much. CORREA-CABRERA: That's a very important question. Thank you for asking. And absolutely, there is a way to present the issue on immigration, to place it in a political perspective—either from the right side or the left. The problem with immigration and the quality development and the access for jobs—I mean, it has been studied in depth by Mexican academics, United States academics. Issues have more to do with development and with the jobs that are offered in the United States, the pull and push factors of undocumented immigration, for example. And we have very different areas to be thinking about migration or immigration. And the focus recently has been at the border, has been with regards to asylum seekers, has been politicized in the United States, while many other areas have been, to some extent, ignored. There are—for educators, there are a number of analyses. One particular area that's important to know, it's United States—I mean, immigrants—how immigrants in the United States, coming from different countries, have been able to develop, have been able to make this country great. That's one area that we have to focus on. And there is a lot of information in that regard. Another, I mean, issue that it's important to know are the pull and push factors of undocumented immigration. And one important factor that usually we're not focused on are the jobs that exist in the United States, and the perspective from—I mean, the undocumented immigration from the perspective of employers. And that is connected to this analysis of the role of immigrants in the United States. Where are they coming from? What are they doing? How they came here, and not just of those who want to come. Another issue that has been widely covered is the one that has to do with migration. Migration flows that start in countries such as Chile, that dangerous journey where that media has been focused on, without analyzing this as a whole, without analyzing this understand that there are jobs in the United States, there is a comprehensive immigration reform that's on the table, and that that comprehensive immigration reform will definitely help to solve the problems of a system that needs the, I mean, immigrants to continue working, but it's creating all sorts of problem. The disfunctions of U.S. immigration system have been identified. There is a proposal that's bipartisan to solve these issues with temporary visas, pathway towards citizenship for those that are already here, that already have jobs, that already contribute to this economy. But unfortunately, immigration is definitely, as you correctly mention, a subject that has been utilized, that has been polarized, because it touches very important sentiments of the electorate. And we don't understand it. Definitely the immigration system in the United States needs to change. And there are—there is a very important amount of articles, of studies that analyze not just those who want to come or the so-called migrant crisis at the border, but how the market in the United States works, the labor markets, what undocumented migrants do in the United States, how to solve these issues with these bipartisan efforts that have been put together in documents, such as the Comprehensive Immigration Reform, and also those that want to work. And many of these problems would probably be solved through the mechanisms that think tanks, and analysts, and academics have done. Important work by think tanks like the Migration—MPI, the Migration Policy Institute, or the—I mean, other initiatives in Mexico. There have been a lot of—there's a lot of information about the possible policies to solve these issues. It's important to consider that information is there, that the work is done, but the problem is the coverage. And definitely our students need to go to understand the suggested—the suggested solutions, creating legal pathways to migration, to temporary work in the United States, is probably the way to go. But unfortunately, we got into these politicized moments, and these electoral moments, and the discourse gets politicized. But there is a lot there, a lot of analysis, a lot of proposals that you can find. Amazing work, both in the United States, in Mexico, and in many other countries of the Americas, because right now the issue of undocumented immigration, irregular immigration does not only have to do with Mexico and the United States. Immigrants have to pass through Mexico in order to get to where they want to go in order to go where the works are located. But we know and we have seen that a number of people, for example, that what was called the Haitian crisis at the border, like, the journey was done from countries as far as Chile, and so many countries have to deal with that. For example, the situation in Venezuela—many migrants that have been—I mean, finding jobs and a home in Colombia temporarily are also going—also moving up and are going to the border. So there's a lot there, and our students, you know, can find a lot of information. It's just to get out of the media discourses that are presented and that do not allow us to see the reality. But there is a lot out there that we can access, particularly for our students. CASA: Our next question is a written question and comes from Pedro Izquierdo, a graduate student at George Mason University. He asks, what improvements and flaws do you see in the bicentennial framework regarding arms trafficking, unlike the Mérida Initiative? CORREA-CABRERA: Well, it's—the Bicentennial Understanding is not—at this point it's just a number of good wishes and the recognition of certain problems. Arms trafficking has been recognized in this Bicentennial Understanding. As of today, we don't really know what the United States is going to be able to do with regards to arms trafficking, and there is a very important and complicated situation here because in the United States it's not by decree, it's not by—I mean, the arms possession and the way that United States citizens understand their rights with regards to bearing arms. It's a constitutional right; therefore—and there's a lot of—you know, there's a very, very big business that will not end so easily. Therefore, the two countries might, you know, might agree on—I mean verifying or collaborating to end or to lessen the issue of arms smuggling. However, this is going to be very difficult unless something important happens in the United States with regards to the legislation to place some limits on the bearing of arms. This is very important. As of today, Pedro, there is not a concrete plan of how the two countries are going to collaborate in this regard. As we know, the minister of foreign affairs—I mean the Mexican government through the minister of foreign affairs, I mean, has a lawsuit against United States arms manufacturers with regards to the arms that come to Mexico and end up in the hands of drug traffickers. There is nothing else that it's current today where we will know what the two countries are going to be doing. And this is the same with many of the good wishes, many of the areas of the collaboration, the end of the Mérida Initiative and the beginning of this understanding. We really don't know what specific programs are going to be implemented and how these programs are going to be implemented, how much money is going to be directed to these programs at this time. We just have an understanding of how the priorities can get together to improve and to reframe, to some extent, the collaboration in terms of security and development. CASA: Next we are going to a raised hand; we have Terron Adlam, an undergraduate student at Delaware State University. Please go ahead, Terron. Q: Can you hear me now? CASA: Yes. Q: Hi. Yes. So I'm thinking about more the energy sector of this talk. So in Mexico I know there's a lot of geothermal activity, so isn't there a more effective way of, like—because global warming is increasing more and more as time goes on, like, the flooding, the overheating of the ozone, stuff like—couldn't geothermal usage be more effective in Mexico and solar too, versus the oil refineries? CORREA-CABRERA: This is a very important question. The understanding of climate change in the United States is very different from Mexico. In the developed world, the concern about the environment has been focused—I mean, this has now been the center of the discussion and the center of the development programs and projects. In the developing nations, there are more immediate needs to be covered. With regards specifically to Mexico, there is not—climate change is not in the center of the discourse and the priorities of the Mexican government. Mexico has oil and gas and the current Mexican president—I mean, notwithstanding the analysis of other actors. What the Mexican government has had as a priority since the beginning of the administration has more to do with the development from the state, more centralization of the state, a greater role of the state in the sector of oil and gas. The climate change priority comes from the United States. Today, you know, the diplomatic efforts are going to be done to make Mexico to turn into the renewable sector, but at this point, it is not the priority of the Mexican government, neither the priority of a majority of the Mexican people, because in the developing world, climate change is important but it's more important sometimes in certain parts of Mexico, such as Guerrero, Michoacán, and Tamaulipas, and it's particularly the poorest regions of Mexico—Oaxaca or Chiapas—where there are several problems and, you know, immediate needs of people are not covered. And I'm talking about food. I'm talking about security very particularly. These pictures of children with arms in Guerrero and Michoacán tell us what the emergency situation is for a number of people, and the Mexican president has been able to create a discourse around these needs, around the needs for poor people, around the needs of those who can listen to that better, and he has a priority today—I mean, he sent a proposal to achieve an electric reform; well, the state is going to have more involvement and also a focus on electricity with the technologies that the Mexican state has been managed, which is not connected to solar or wind or the mindset that the United States has had in the past few years. So the priorities are very different and the studies are not directed there. The Department of Energy of the United States, through one of the laboratories of renewable energies, conducted a—I mean conducted a study and released the results of this report talking about the—according to the report—the negative effects in terms of emissions of carbon by Mexico and the increase in the cost of producing electricity. The Mexican government—the president alleged that that study was not based in reality. And you can see, then, what Mexico wants. And, you know, currently, Mexico has actively participated in the COP26 and it's been involved in the conversation, but definitely we don't know how much money or how this—(inaudible)—is going to be made. This is a very important question because I wasn't able to go in depth with this. This is probably going to be the main point of tensions between the two countries in the future—definitely for Andrés Manuel López Obrador. Andrés Manuel López Obrador was a very big critic of the recent energy reform of 2013, 2014, the energy reform that allowed private capital to get into the oil sector. He was a pretty big critic. There have been a number of events that link corrupt Mexican governments with the concessions in the oil sector, oil and gas sector, so this is probably going to be—continue to be discussed. And if the president has the capacity of passing the reform—that I see it very difficult because of the numbers that he needs—the situation is going to become more tense, because his vision is nationalistic and it's not—and nationalism—Mexican nationalism of today is not looking at climate change as its main priority. And you can see the supporters of Andrés Manuel López Obrador are really not discussing climate change. Mexican elites are discussing climate change and, of course, the opposition against Andrés Manuel López Obrador against the government of the Fourth Transformation, but they have an important majority—they don't have a majority, sorry, the opposition. The important majority is within the government of the Fourth Transformation, and their support for electric reform is important. I don't know how this is going to play out in the end, but in the United States and in Mexico, climate change is perceived in a very different way. That has to be understood very clearly because we don't see the media, we don't see how in the schools and how in Mexico overall the issue is well-ingrained into the society, because, of course, the society, the Mexican society, particularly the most vulnerable ones in the country, the very important number of poor people in the country has other priorities that have to do with food insecurity—have to do with food insecurity. CASA: Thank you. Our next question is a written question; it's from Yuri Mantilla, professor of law at Liberty University, and he writes, can you please analyze the influence of political ideologies in Mexico and the U.S. that are shaping both international relations between the two countries and perceptions of the Mexican and American people regarding the current political contexts under the Biden administration in the U.S. and the López Obrador leadership in Mexico? CORREA-CABRERA: That's an amazing question, but that is a very difficult question to answer very quickly. OK, let me try to do it. It's a very big challenge. This is a very challenging question. As I mentioned with regards to climate change, the ideologies in Mexico and the United States, what is right and what is left in the two countries is quite—it's, to some extent, different in the United States, the left and right. And today, because we have a president that ran on a left-wing platform and he was recognized as a left-wing president and also a very big critic of so-called neoliberal reforms and the neoliberal system that were represented by the previous administrations and that by the administrations that achieved democratization in Mexico. I'm talking about the National Action Party and all the parties that supported those reforms, the democratization in the country. And because of that, today, the ideology has transformed, to some extent; it's not about—I mean, support for the Washington consensus as it was in the previous decades versus—which was represented in the government—versus another project that direct—the relationship more with the people. Now that mindset, that discourse, sometimes propagandistic in certain ways, is in the government. So the government presents itself as a left-wing government. Nationalism and a conception of first the poor—the poor first, very big criticism, in discourse only, about neoliberalism, without, you know, a real perspective what neoliberalism is because of the support that the current Mexican government has provided to USMCA, which is one of the foundation parts of what is perceived as neoliberalism, which is mainly liberalism in—not in the perspective of the United States overall—free markets, the importance of free markets in the economy. It's a very challenging question because in the United States and Mexico there are important concepts that mean different things for people. Liberalism or neoliberalism for Mexicans mean support of markets and a support of the right, while in the United States, when we talk about liberalism, we think about progressive thinking; we think about equality but in a different way. In Mexico the center is equality in the economic regard, and the president today, the government, you know, is governing with the flag of equality, is governing with the flag of the left. And the so-called left is with the Mexican—or allegedly voted for the current Mexican president, but now some of them are debating themselves in different areas. So it's not as easy to place the right and the left as it is more in the United States; even in the United States there are many issues with regards to position yourself in right and left. We have the progressive part of the electorate in the United States versus a more moderate left, and, as you all know, the Republican Party or the conservative segment of the U.S. population that's more connected with Republican candidates, it's kind of like a very different conception in Mexico. The right wing in Mexico in many ways support, for example, the Democratic Party in the United States. What is conceived as the opposition to Andrés Manuel López Obrador even are very critical of Andrés Manuel López Obrador's relationship with feminism or the feminist movement. Andrés Manuel López Obrador is not supporting the feminist movement because Andrés Manuel López Obrador alleges the feminist movement has been supported by other countries and the opposition. So for the alleged left that is represented by the government, feminism is not a part of their agenda, while in the United States the LGBTQIA movement, the feminist movement, support for climate change, those important values are part of the progressive movement of the left. I mean, in Mexico, and I explain this is why this is very, very important and a very challenging question to answer—I mean, just very quickly—is that, for example, climate change is not in the agenda and climate change is in the—it has been taken by the opposition to the Mexican government. Many representatives of the opposition are criticizing the current Mexican government but not focusing on not going and continuing with the desire of constructing the Dos Bocas refinery and going with oil and gas and focusing on electricity as in the previous times of the PRI. So a number of the Mexican elite that is in opposition—I mean that's considered the opposition are supporting climate change. Why—not supporting climate change but are supporting, like, you know, the development of renewable energies and have as an objective climate change but mainly to criticize what the Mexican government is doing. So in that regard, we see a very big polarization between the ones that supported previous administrations versus this current government that connects with the left, while in the United States we see what is the ideological spectrum. A number of those who represent, as I said, the opposition are connected with the current administration objectives. For example, President Felipe Calderón Hinojosa presents very frequently his photographs with members of the Democratic Party, the current president, Joe Biden, and he's very critical of Andrés Manuel López Obrador, so there's a confusion that we can have based on our own ideologies that's not very easy to understand in very quick explanation. But I hope that I was, to some extent, clear in this regard. CASA: Next we're going to a raised hand. Ellen Chesler, who's senior fellow at the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center. Ellen? Q: I actually had put my question in the chat, I thought, but I'll ask it. Thank you so much for this interesting overview. I wanted to—I'm a historian by training and was going to ask you to historically frame some of your introductory remarks in a little bit more depth. First, of great interest to me, your comments about the importance of public health, specifically reproductive health policy. Have United States policies and support of Mexico in the last, you know, twenty-five years or so, in your view, been positive for the country, and what are the challenges that remain? And in a way linked to that, from your introductory comments, a question about labor: You mentioned, of course, that NAFTA, in your view, was successful, certainly from Mexico's standpoint, but has remaining challenges, largely relating to labor organization and the raising of wages in Mexico to equalize the situation between the two countries. Can you comment on what prospects there are for that happening today in Mexico? CORREA-CABRERA: Very interesting questions. With regards to reproductive health, this also has to do with the ideology. The left in Mexico, which is now represented, in a way, by the current Mexican government, the current Mexican government has adamantly—since Andrés Manuel López Obrador was head of the government of Mexico City there have been, you know, an advancement with regards to reproductive rights, reproductive health, and that is not under question of the current administration, which is very interesting because in the United States the—I mean, there's a different type of tension. And in other countries of the hemisphere too, we can see—you know, because we're Catholic countries we can see that area as very complex and a lot of opposition with regards to that. In Mexico, there needs to be an opposition because of the mentality, because of the culture, but there has been an advancement in the courts, and recently there was a decision in one state of Mexico that decriminalized—and it's very interesting how the Mexican government has been able to build a different discourse that has allowed the current government to advance in that direction. Decriminalization of abortion is a way that this has advanced. So I believe that possibly—I dare to say that possibly in the Americas, Mexico is one of the most progressive governments with regards to this subject, reproductive health and reproductive rights. It is very interesting—there must be a number of studies coming from this decision of the courts of one state of Mexico that's going to be defining the future of reproductive rights in the country. With regards to the second question about NAFTA, labor rights, there is an understanding in the United States that NAFTA has been good, particularly for Mexico. In the technocracy sector, particularly those that, you know, contributed to renegotiate NAFTA—I mean, the Mexican elites recognize the gains of Mexico in the framework of NAFTA, particularly if we focus on the manufacturing sector. The jobs that we're creating in maquiladoras, the jobs that were created due to NAFTA, were not enough to achieve or to allow Mexico to grow at rates that were acceptable. During the time of NAFTA, Mexico has grown at the same—almost at the same level of demographic rates of population rates. So overall, a number of jobs were lost in the beginning, the first years of NAFTA. Many of these people needed to move to the United States. So the effects of NAFTA in Mexico have been very extremely, extremely unequal. But what you will read probably in the reports that have been produced by Mexican academics, Mexican analysts and think tanks and in the think tanks of the United States is that NAFTA has been overall very good for Mexico. It has not been bad for Mexico. It has allowed the country to have access to a number of products but, at the same time, has affected some other sectors that could be considered of national security. And I'm thinking about the production of grain in the agricultural sector in particular. But with regards to labor rights—and this is why the question is very important, and I'm not sure that I answered it correctly. The United States has different priorities and has had different priorities that were manifested in the growth of dissatisfaction among an important segment of the U.S. population that has not been able to—I mean, become part of the development in the United States. That gave place to the Make America Great Again movement where the intention or the importance that a number of people in the United States, both in the left or in the right—the idea of a Green New Deal that it's right now in the form of the Build Back Better framework has this idea in mind, to generate jobs inside the United States, because globalization or very aggressive globalization after the end of the Cold War really put a number of people in the United States in a complicated situation because the jobs were performed outside the borders of the United States. So today, this is why it is important to understand what USMCA is about with regards to labor. There is an important pressure from the United States, in particular, to Mexico to increase or—the conditions of the workers in the manufacturing sector overall because there is an important focus on wages. But if wages are—increase more than what the president already increased, you know, into this framework and labor unions make more complicated the entrance of foreign capital and the foreign capital goes back to the United States, will Mexico lose its competitiveness? And the losses will be for Mexico. So there is a tension there and definitely this tension has not been solved. The wages in Mexico have been low but that has to do with the labor supply and with the conditions of labor markets overall. And if there is a force to create the labor unions, this is probably not going to be in the—I mean it's not going to benefit Mexican workers because the businesses are probably not going to generate those jobs and will probably relocate. That's a conversation that has been going on and we have not solved. And we have not seen an improvement overall in the conditions or the wages of workers, more than the one that Andrés Manuel López Obrador by decree—has been given to the workers by increasing in double, particularly at the border wages in the manufacturing sector. But in the framework of USMCA, we haven't yet seen the results and we have not yet seen also the pressure if Mexico has not because the unions have not been created and there are many tensions in that sector. There was an attempt to start with the first labor union in the maquiladora sector by—I mean today a person who is right now in Congress, Susana Prieto Terrazas—she ended up in jail in the state of Tamaulipas, so this is a very complicated subject that we haven't been able to solve. CASA: I'm afraid we have to close now. We're not able to get to all the questions, but we will give you the contacts for the professor and you can reach out to her directly, if you would like to continue the conversation. Guadalupe, thank you very much for being with us today, and to all of you for your great questions and comments. You can follow Guadalupe on Twitter @GCorreaCabrera. Our next Academic Webinar will take place on Wednesday, November 17, at 1:00 p.m. Eastern Time. Jason Bordoff, founding director of the Center of Global Energy Policy and professor of professional practice in international and public affairs at Columbia University, will lead a conversation on energy policy and efforts to combat climate change. In the meantime, I encourage you to follow @CFR_Academic on Twitter and visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for new research and analysis on global issues. Thank you again for joining us today. We look forward to tuning in on November 17. (END)

Brightest Voices
054: Be Faithful Where You're At with Kristy Holliday

Brightest Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 36:20


In this episode of the Brightest Voices Podcast, missionary Kristy Holliday shares about her work in Mexico at a school for the death, her journey to the missions field, and her life currently loving on her community during tough times. Kristy also prays over every listener that they would have the courage to let the Lord use them where they're at.                                                      About Kristy   Kristy Holliday is about to celebrate 31 years of marriage to Tim. they have 6 kids and 5 grandkids and one on the way.  she grew up in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and was a Political Science and Public Policy major, at one time considering law school. her husband spent 20 years as a submariner in the US Navy, and so they moved around a lot. she came to know and follow Jesus as Lord while in college. She served as an ESL director and teacher trainer for about 15 years, before becoming a missionary and since coming to the field she serves with Mission to the World at Isaiah 55 Ministries in Reynosa, Mexico, at the US/Mexico border just south of McAllen, Texas. She am the coordinator for Neighborhood Outreach Ministries at Isaiah 55 Ministries, and is also responsible for communications and other administrative tasks.

Finding Brave
199: Award-Winning Mexican Chef and Political Analyst Hosts Groundbreaking PBS Special La Frontera

Finding Brave

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 44:58


Thank you for listening to our Finding Brave show, ranked in the Top 100 Apple Career Podcasts! “I wanted to stay connected to my own roots, but I also wanted to open a window so that Americans, or whomever would watch [La Frontera] would understand the Mexico that I missed, that I loved, and that nurtured me and my family so much.” - Pati Jinich Today's Finding Brave guest has dedicated her career to building a shared understanding between her two home countries, Mexico and the United States, through the lens of food, culture and community. In this episode, she not only reveals how she is furthering this mission through two new and exciting projects, including a PBS Primetime special, but also shares about the many twists and turns on her beautiful journey that have helped her arrive at where she is today, inspiring, entertaining and educating thousands around the world. Pati Jinich is the James Beard Award-winning Mexican chef whose long running PBS series Pati's Mexican Table has brought Mexican flavors, colors and textures into American homes and kitchens, as viewers have watched Pati thoughtfully and enthusiastically guide them through the various diverse geographic regions of the country. Named one of the “100 Greatest Cooks of All-Time,” Pati has won a Gracie Award for her television work, is the resident chef of the Mexican Cultural Institute, has been named one of the “Top 5 Border Ambassadors” by The Council of Americas, and has authored two cookbooks highlighting Mexican cuisine. Her third cookbook, Treasures of the Mexican Table, releases this November and is the culmination of over a decade of travel across her birth country, as she showcases the diversity of Mexican cuisine and sheds light on some lesser known dishes and recipes. Earlier this month, Pati made her PBS Primetime debut as the host of the new culinary travel special, La Frontera, which highlights the fascinating, yet misunderstood, US-Mexico border region where countries and cultures collide. In following Pati's journey since 2014 when I first featured her work in my Forbes column, she has inspired me and so many around the world, with her brilliance, light, creativity and insight. Today on the show, I ask Pati not only about her professional journey but her personal one, and what she believes are keys to achieving the impact and reach she has. Pati's messages inform and inspire us to follow the recommendations she offers: to find work and endeavors that make you proud, to build a solid foundation from which to grow, to continue to hone your skills and knowledge, and most importantly, to commit to doing what feels good and right to you, that is true reflection of all that you are and wish to be. To learn more about today's guest, visit: https://patijinich.com/ 

Talking Nonprofits with Tephanie
Segundo Barrio Futbol Club-Helping Kids Succeed in Life through Soccer

Talking Nonprofits with Tephanie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 23:51


Meet Simon Chandler Originally from England, Simon has lived on the US/Mexico border since the early 90s. Born and raised in Marlborough, UK, he came to the United States after completing a bachelor's degree in International Relations from Stafford University, UK. He spent about a decade working with refugees and undocumented immigrants in El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua with Annunciation House. He is also the founder and executive director of Segundo Barrio Futbol Club. He first got involved in youth soccer as a volunteer with his son's team. Segundo Barrio Futbol Club is a small, all-volunteer nonprofit that started in 2011. It seeks to use soccer as a tool for social change by providing opportunities for low-income youth to play the sport. Today it has several soccer programs with over 150 boys and girls ages 8 to 18. On the podcast, we discuss: Segundo Barrio Futbol Club's mission is to use soccer as a tool for change. How many of the kids struggle in school academically and need a lot of support, and they wanted to start a program to do more than just recreational soccer. Segundo Barrio Futbol Club uses the philosophy of guided discovery to create the conditions and the structure where the kids learn to resolve problems themselves. Find out more about Segundo Barrio Futbol Club at https://www.segundobarriofutbolclub.org/ https://www.facebook.com/segundobarriofutbolclub/ Lettie Intebi Velasco of Coldwell Banker sponsors this podcast episode. If you've been thinking about getting that bigger yard, or downsizing now that the kids are gone, give my friend Lettie a call at (915) 820-8281. Lettie Intebi Velasco of Coldwell Banker.

Haymarket Books Live
The Border Crossed Us: The Case for Opening the US-Mexico Border

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 92:31


Join us for a discussion about how re-building the international labor movement requires solidarity with migrant workers and opening borders Join Justin Akers Chacón, Yanny Guzmán, and Magally “Maga” Miranda Alcázar for a discussion about the history and function of the US-Mexico border, why we should fight to open it, and the way forward for the migrant justice movement. This event marks the release of Justin Akers Chacón's latest book, The Border Crossed Us: The Case for Opening the US-Mexico Border. Contemporary North American capitalism relies heavily on an inter-connected working class which extends across the border. Cross-border production and supply chains, logistics networks, and retail and service firms have aligned and fused a growing number of workers into one common class, whether they live in the US or Mexico. While money moves without restriction, the movement of displaced migrant workers across borders is restricted and punished. But despite the growth and violence of the police state dedicated to the repression of transborder populations—the migra-state—migrant workers have been at the forefront of class struggle in the United States. This timely book persuasively argues that labor and migrant solidarity movements are already showing how and why, in order to fight for justice and re-build the international union movement, we must open the border --------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Justin Akers Chacón is an activist, labor unionist, and educator living in the San Diego-Tijuana border region. He is a Professor of Chicana/o History at San Diego City College. His most recent book is The Border Crossed Us: The Case for Opening the US-Mexico Border. He is also the author of No One is Illegal (with Mike Davis) and Radicals in the Barrio. Magally “Maga” Miranda Alcázar (she/they) is a graduate student in Chicana/o and Central American Studies at UCLA. Using methods that emphasize the co-production of knowledge with rank-and-file workers, their research explores the contested meanings of care, work and Latinidad in the context of the global economy of care. Maga is also the co-founder of the multimedia platform SAL(T): Xicana Marxist Thoughts. Yanny Guzmán is a Xicana living on Lenape land, now known as the Bronx. She is a daughter of immigrant parents indigenous to Mexico and Ecuador. She is a socialist, activist, organizer and rank & file union member. Currently she is a tenant organizer and member of the South Bronx Tenants Movement, a legal advocate for low income tenants in the Bronx, and a member of Southern Solidarity, a grassroots, community-based group of volunteers in solidarity with the unhoused in their quest toward liberation. She previously was a writer, reporter, website administrator, and a graphic designer for the Working Class Heroes Radio. --------------------------------------------------------------------- Order a copy of The Border Crossed Us: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1655-the-border-crossed-us --------------------------------------------------------------------- This event is sponsored by Haymarket Books. While all of our events are freely available, we ask that those who are able make a solidarity donation in support of our important publishing and programming work. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/IBZi8dVGrZU Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

The Sporkful
Pati Jinich Can Read Your Fridge Like A Tarot Card

The Sporkful

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 34:17


Pati Jinich has always had to move between worlds — as a Jew growing up in Mexico, and as a Mexican immigrant to the US, where she first worked as a policy analyst. “It wasn't until I switched to cooking,” she tells us this week, “that I was finally able to make sense of all the pieces of myself.” Since that transition she's spent a decade documenting Mexico's vast and varied food cultures in her cookbooks, and on her PBS show Pati's Mexican Table, which is watched by more than 65 million people around the world. Her new docu-series, La Frontera, is more political, examining the US-Mexico border, and the people who navigate the two worlds between it. It's also her most personal work yet. She talks with Dan about why this show is so important to her. Plus she peers into his fridge over Zoom, and tells us about a deep fried quesadilla in Jalisco that she'll never forget. // Get 500+ more great Sporkful episodes from our catalog and lots of other Stitcher goodness when you sign up for Stitcher Premium: www.StitcherPremium.com/Sporkful (promo code: SPORKFUL). Transcript available at www.sporkful.com.

The Buck Sexton Show
Sleepy, Creepy Joe Despises the Unvaxxed

The Buck Sexton Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 21:37


Biden has a town Hall where he shows disdains for the unvaccinated and is dismissive of first responders getting fired for refusing the shot. He also won't speak out against the Thomas Jefferson statue removal in New York, because he is a coward. And says he is too busy to go to the US-Mexico border. Fauci pushes vaccines on kids, while Ron DeSantis tries to defend Floridians from mandates.  Please subscribe to the podcast! And get more exclusive content from Buck at BuckSexton.com. Find Buck on: Twitter @BuckSexton   Facebook @BuckSexton  Instagram @BuckSexton  Email the Podcast: TeamBuck@IHeartMedia.com Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

World Socialist Web Site Daily Podcast

Trump & Miller attempted to deploy 250,000 troops to US-Mexico border in Spring 2020 / UK government refuses appeals for mitigations as COVID surge threatens to swamp hospitals / John Deere workers in Mannheim, Germany, support striking workers in US

San Diego News Fix
The U.S.-Mexico border is reopening after 19 months

San Diego News Fix

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 11:59


The United States will soon open its Mexico and Canada borders to vaccinated people. The borders have been closed for more than a year and a half, and only so-called essential travelers have been able to cross.

Turley Talks
Ep. 699 PATRIOT MILITIAS Move into Texas BORDER County!!!

Turley Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 10:58


Highlights:  “Sam Hall, President and Founder of Patriots for America Militia, announced during a special meeting at Kinney County that upwards of a hundred of Patriot militiamen would indeed be in Kinney County in a matter of days. And he vows that they would not be leaving until the situation in the border is finally secured.”“Biden's woke minions have been transporting illegal immigrants by the thousands in the middle of the night.”“Now, we're not just seeing border walls at the US-Mexico border, we may in fact be seeing border walls around Texas counties at this point.”“Our whole nation can indeed breathe a sigh of relief knowing that while we may have Bumblin' Biden in the White House, we got Texas Patriots at the border.”Timestamps:[02:45] How Patriot militiamen are coming to the rescue at our southern border[04:44] How Biden's woke minions are transporting illegal immigrants[06:52] On Biden's collapsing approval rating[08:00] Gov. Abbott building the border wall and Kinney County sheriff planning to build a fence around his entire county[09:05] Sen. Ted Cruz establishing processing centers for illegal immigrants in Democrat districtsResources:Ep. 691 Oath Keepers Are TAKING OVER Law Enforcement!!!JOIN US for our Virtual gathering of New Conservative Patriots on November 12th and 13th and Learn How YOU Can Build a Society FREE from WOKENESS! Register today at http://conferences.turleytalks.com/no...Get Your Brand-New PATRIOT T-Shirts and Merch Here: https://store.turleytalks.com/Become a Turley Talks Insiders Club Member and get the first 7 days FREE!!: https://insidersclub.turleytalks.com/welcomeFight Back Against Big Tech Censorship! Sign-up here to discover Dr. Steve's different social media options …. but without the censorship! https://www.turleytalks.com/en/alternative-media.com Thank you for taking the time to listen to this episode.  If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and/or leave a review.Do you want to be a part of the podcast and be our sponsor? Click here to partner with us and defy liberal culture!If you would like to get lots of articles on conservative trends make sure to sign-up for the 'New Conservative Age Rising' Email Alerts. 

Break It Down Show
The Honorable Lewis Owens – Del Rio Texas, US-Mexico Border

Break It Down Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 55:23


The Honorable Lewis Owens – Del Rio Texas, US-Mexico Border - Del Rio Texas sits on the US/Mexico border 400 miles from El Paso, Dallas and Houston. The Honorable Lewis Owens is charged with handling this international focal point for human trafficking, drug smuggling, crime and immigration. Host Pete A Turner has been traveling along the border examining the Ground Truth to bring some honest coverage to the continued failure of US Immigration policies. Our guest, the Honorable Lewis Owens is constantly in the news as he and the Sheriff work to address the city/county needs as the crisis continues. Please support the Break It Down Show by doing a monthly subscription to the show  All of the money you invest goes directly to supporting the show!   For the  of this episode head to   Haiku US-Mexico Holding borders ain't simple What is the right way? Similar episodes: Xander Bullock  John Green  Pete A Turner  Join us in supporting Save the Brave as we battle PTSD.  Executive Producer/Host: Pete A Turner  Producer: Damjan Gjorgjiev  Writer: Dragan Petrovski  The Break It Down Show is your favorite best, new podcast, featuring 5 episodes a week with great interviews highlighting world-class guests from a wide array of shows.

SkyWatchTV Podcast
Five in Ten 10/12/21: New Wave of Migrants Coming North

SkyWatchTV Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 21:00


Reports from the border region between Colombia and Panama warn that as many as 20,000 more Haitian migrants are walking northward, drawn by the belief that pregnant women and families with children will get preferential treatment by the U.S. government. SkyWatchTV was banned by YouTube! Please follow SkyWatchTV on Rumble: www.rumble.com/skywatchtv 5) Southwest Airlines cancelled more than 2,000 flights over the weekend for reasons that aren't clear; 4) New surge of Haitian migrants headed for US-Mexico border; 3) 136 nations agree to 15% minimum corporate tax; 2) Transgender doctors warn against puberty blocking drugs for children; 1) Government using “keyword warrants” to secretly access Google searches.

The Ernie Brown Show
Another Caravan of 60K Migrants (Mostly Haitian's) Headed For the U.S./Mexico Border

The Ernie Brown Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 12:49


Ernie talks to Chris Cabrera, VP of Nat'l Border Patrol Council Rio Grand Valley Sector.  "We do not have the manpower to handle this," said Cabrera. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

John Clay Wolfe Show
#321 John Clay Wolfe Show 10.09.21

John Clay Wolfe Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 148:43


On this week's show, the Wolfe Pack covers it all--we've got serious political reporting from the My Pillow guy, cutting edge predictions from this week's best college football matchups, ideas about how to spend your Powerball Lottery winnings (if you can win 'em), a groovy Hall & Oates/Nine Inch Nails mashup you've GOT to check out, and an in-depth US/Mexico border report from our new gal pal Appolonia Angelica Ramos--plus, visits from our old friends Cluck Norris, Matthew McConaughey and more, and of course: when you want to sell your car, who you gonna call? Pleased to meet ya friend. Hope you guessed our name. 

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast
A Haitian Odyssey Across The Americas

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 28:42


In recent weeks, images of thousands of Haitian migrants living in squalid conditions in a temporary camp in Texas have caused widespread shock and anger in the United States. US Border patrol agents on horseback forced many of them back across the Rio Grande into Mexico. Thousands more were deported back to Haiti, which is in the grip of its deepest economic and political crisis for years. The US Special Envoy to Haiti, Daniel Foote, resigned last month in protest at the Biden Administration's deportations policy, which he described as “inhumane” and “counterproductive”. Some of the migrants say it was also arbitrary, with no clarity about the process deciding who made it into the US and who was sent home. Will Grant met two families, at the US-Mexico border and in Haiti, whose journeys north came to very different ends: Last year, Thailand was rocked by student-led protests, which for the first time broke a taboo on criticising the monarchy. But the Thai government led by General Prayuth Chan-ocha fought back, using a raft of repressive laws to prosecute the protest leaders. Together with a rapid rise in Covid infections, that appeared to put a stop to the street rallies. The protest gatherings have now resumed but on a smaller scale. As Jonathan Head has been finding out, the heady optimism of the students last year has been replaced by a harder-edged realism over just how long it might take to reform Thailand's politics. Last weekend, thousands of people from 150 towns and cities across Brazil joined street protests against its President, Jair Bolsonaro. Many of them were angry about his handling of the pandemic which has killed at least 600,000 Brazilians so far. Not all the criticism is centred on Covid, though. Some of his former supporters are now calling for his resignation too – and their concerns are more ideological. The President is as combative as ever – and he still has control of Congress, though his public support has slumped to its lowest level yet in opinion polls. Katy Watson reports from Sao Paulo. Questions about the future of coal have caused some of the deepest divisions in modern Australia. The debate may soon get even sharper as COP26 and other climate-change summits try to push rich nations to set a faster pace in giving up fossil fuels. Australia still uses coal to generate about 70% of its electricity, making it the most carbon-polluting nation per person in the world. As Phil Mercer explains, the country's vast natural resources help fuel its domestic politics, as well as its power stations. And the BBC's new Middle East correspondent Anna Foster offers some personal first impressions of settling in to her posting to the Lebanese capital, Beirut - and of the extraordinary resilience which keeps the city's people going. Producer: Polly Hope

The Real News Podcast
From ‘boat people' in the ‘70s to border refugees today, US disdain for Haitians has a long history

The Real News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 28:57


Just weeks ago, as we reported previously on The Real News, onlookers in the US and around the world were horrified yet again by scenes of pain, desperation, and brutality at the US-Mexico border in Del Rio, Texas. With COVID-19 and global vaccine apartheid continuing to exacerbate a public health crisis, with continuing political turmoil following the assassination of former President Jovenel Moïse in July, and after another devastating earthquake shook the battered nation in August, thousands of Haitian refugees have been forced to leave their homes in the hope of seeking asylum in the US.Instead of having their appeals for asylum heard and their situation recognized for the crisis of humanity that it is, these refugees were met by menacing US Border Patrol agents on horseback who rode them down and rounded them up in brutal fashion. Since then, the US government under President Joe Biden has deployed the Trump-era Title 42 policy to mass expel thousands of refugees back to Haiti without hearing their asylum claims, even though the Department of Homeland Security designated Haiti for Temporary Protected Status in May.While the news cycle has moved on from the immediate so-called “crisis at the border,” the nightmare for Haitians and the country of Haiti is still very much ongoing. In this interview, TRNN Editor-in-Chief Maximillian Alvarez talks with Pascal Robert about the larger political context that led to the horrifying scenes at the US-Mexico border last month, and about the deep disdain, fear, and imperialist designs that have historically shaped US policy toward Haiti and its people. Pascal Robertis an essayist and political commentator whose work covers Black politics, global affairs, and the history and politics of Haiti. He is the co-host of the podcast THIS IS REVOLUTION, a frequent contributor to the Black Agenda Report, and his writing has been featured in outlets like The Huffington Post, Alternet, and the Washington Spectator.

Fresh Air
What's Happening At The U.S.-Mexico Border?

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 46:46


'Atlantic' immigration reporter Caitlin Dickerson talks about Haitian immigrants at the border, and explains how both Trump and Biden immigration policies are based on a racist system created by the Founding Fathers. "The story of the United States being a nation of immigrants is much more complex than we often discuss and acknowledge as a country," Dickerson says. She explains how the legacy of racist immigration law is very much alive today. Also, Ken Tucker reviews remixed Pere Ubu albums.

Timcast IRL
Timcast IRL #381 - NBA Players REFUSE Vaccine And Face Calls To Be FIRED w/Jorge Ventura & Sagnik Basu

Timcast IRL

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 125:55


Tim, Ian, and Lydia join investigative reporters Jorge Ventura and Sagnik Basu of the Daily Caller to talk about the breaking news of NBA stars refusing to get the Covid vaccination and how it highlights a divide between the rich and the poor, the ESPN anchor who got the Covid vaccine because refusing it would have cost her a cushy job, the North Carolina hospital exacerbating a nursing shortage by firing over a hundred employees who refuse the Covid vaccine, the stash house found full of unmasked illegal immigrants, as reported by Fox News, the Chinese cartel's role on America's southern border, and how Jorge and Sagnik found the wristbands that human smugglers use to mark their trafficked victims across the US/Mexico border. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis
The O'Reilly Update, September 24, 2021

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 12:52


On this Friday edition of The O'Reilly Update: The Biden administration struggling to deport thousands of Haitian Immigrants waiting at the US-Mexico border, a poll from Gallup showing Mister Biden's approval rating cratering among Independent voters, and mixed news on COVID-19. Plus, Bill's Message of the Day, listeners sound off. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Up First
Thursday, September 23, 2021

Up First

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 13:12


Who is eligible to get Pfizer's COVID-19 booster shots? And why are certain Haitian migrants detained along the US-Mexico border being released while others are deported? Plus, new documents reveal the extent of Ethiopia's hunger crisis.