Podcasts about Financial Times

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London-based international daily newspaper

  • 2,436PODCASTS
  • 4,740EPISODES
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  • Oct 19, 2021LATEST
Financial Times

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Best podcasts about Financial Times

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Latest podcast episodes about Financial Times

The Munk Debates Podcast
Be it resolved: America's best days are behind it

The Munk Debates Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 53:05


Falling wages. Failing infrastructure. Soaring public debts. Many believe that America's future looks anything but bright. Stark ideological and partisan divisions have fractured the country at home while a string of failed foreign military interventions have soured Americans on the country's role as defender of the liberal international order. Add in exploding disparities between rich and poor, a bungled pandemic response, and lacklustre economic growth and you have all the markers of a country in decline. Others argue that betting against America has always been a losing proposition. Declinists fail to account for the country's amazing ability to adapt and re-invent itself time and time again. From world beating technological innovations in Silicon Valley to vaccine breakthroughs to the frontiers of commercial space exploration, America has proven it can rise to meet new challenges and opportunities. The strength of its diversity, size of its population, its entrepreneurial drive, military might, and financial prowess all ensure its continued dominance as a global power in the 21st century. In a world beset with authoritarian regimes, statist economies and the absence of human liberty, America will remain a powerful magnet for talented people the world over committed to democracy and freedom. Arguing for the motion is Gideon Rachman, Chief Foreign Affairs Commentator of the Financial Times and author of Easternization: Asia's Rise and America's Decline From Obama to Trump and Beyond. Arguing against the motion is Kori Schake, Director of Foreign and Defense Policy at the American Enterprise Institute and the author of America vs the West: Can the Liberal World Order Be Preserved? QUOTES: GIDEON RACHMAN “I've never seen the country in the state it's in now...it seems to me to be of a different order and one that does raise quite profound questions about the enduring success of the American experiment.”  KORI SCHAKE “Don't underestimate the loud raucous conflictual way America solves its problems... that's how we have traditionally clawed our way towards being a better republic and I believe that continues to happen now.” Sources: The Hill, CNET, Global News, CNN, Yahoo Finance, CNBC, Thames TV, ABC The host of the Munk Debates is Rudyard Griffiths - @rudyardg.   Tweet your comments about this episode to @munkdebate or comment on our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/munkdebates/ To sign up for a weekly email reminder for this podcast, send an email to podcast@munkdebates.com.   To support civil and substantive debate on the big questions of the day, consider becoming a Munk Member at https://munkdebates.com/membership Members receive access to our 10+ year library of great debates in HD video, a free Munk Debates book, newsletter and ticketing privileges at our live events. This podcast is a project of the Munk Debates, a Canadian charitable organization dedicated to fostering civil and substantive public dialogue - https://munkdebates.com/ The Munk Debates podcast is produced by Antica, Canada's largest private audio production company - https://www.anticaproductions.com/   Executive Producer: Stuart Coxe, CEO Antica Productions Senior Producer: Ricki Gurwitz Editor: Kieran Lynch Associate Producer: Abhi Raheja

Axios Today
Why China's hypersonic missile test matters for the U.S.

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 11:10


China tested a hypersonic missile last August, according to new reporting from the Financial Times. China says it wasn't a nuclear-capable missile, but a routine spacecraft check. So how worried should we be? Plus, more tension between the Joes: Biden and Manchin. And, remembering former Secretary of State Colin Powell. Guests: Axios' Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian and Hans Nichols. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Dan Bobkoff, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Sabeena Singhani, Alex Sugiura, Lydia McMullen-Laird, Michael Hanf, and David Toledo. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893. Go deeper: A different kind of cold war Scoop: Manchin's red lines Obama says Powell exemplified what America "can and should be" Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The John Batchelor Show
1776: Orbital hypersonic missile launch: "We don't know how they did this." Brandon Weichert @WeTheBrandon and @GordonGChang, Gatestone, Newsweek, The Hill

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 10:50


Photo:  Hypersonic weapon, demonstrating its non-parabolic trajectory (denoted in red), has a distinctive signature which is being tracked by one of the layers of the National Defense Space Architecture (NDSA) beginning in 2021. Tranche 0 is to begin deployment in 2022. The satellites of the NDSA, in gray, are to be deployed in constellations orbiting Earth, and constantly keep Earth in their view (as depicted by the blue triangles [really, cones] representing the fields of view of the satellite constellations). The satellites are to intercommunicate and serve the defensive systems arrayed against the enemy hypersonic weapons (in red), and build a kill chain against it. Conversely, if a hypersonic weapon were friendly, the satellites follow the progress of the friendly trajectory (not shown), and perform battle damage assessment of the strike against its target. See JADC2 (Joint all-domain command and control) Orbital hypersonic missile launch:  "We don't know how they did this."   Brandon Weichert @WeTheBrandon  and @GordonGChang, Gatestone, Newsweek, The Hill  https://twitter.com/FinancialTimes/status/1449469070814896132 Brandon Weichert,  @WeTheBrandon, The Weichert Report and author of Winning Space: How America Remains a Superpower.

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles
Hypersonic Surprise: Did PLA Gen. Li Forget to Tipoff Gen. Marxist Milley?

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 64:14


Today on TRUNEWS, Communist China caught the US Pentagon sleeping. Beijing tested a nuclear-capable hypersonic glide missile in August. News of the unpublished test flight was reported by London's Financial Times, saying the PLA launched a rocket carrying a hypersonic glide vehicle that flew through low orbit space. It circled the planet before cruising toward its test target, with US intelligence totally unaware of the flight. Rick and Doc discuss the implications of this stunning info. Kerry Kinsey joins the program to talk about the reactions of various police departments and the TSA to the vaccine mandates. Also, the pedophile scandal rocking the French Catholic Church could see its national holdings liquidated by Pope Francis. Rick also has few words of comfort at the recent loss of Rob Skiba, Russ Dizdar, and CDR Dave Lewis of the USS Liberty. Rick Wiles, Doc Burkhart, Kerry Kinsey. Airdate 10/18/21

ETF Edge
The Future(s) of Bitcoin & Tracking the "Trillions"

ETF Edge

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 37:11


CNBC's Bob Pisani spoke with Simeon Hyman, Global Investment Strategist at ProShares and Robin Wigglesworth, Global Finance Correspondent at The Financial Times and author of the new book "Trillions". ProShares will be launching the first ever Bitcoin futures ETF tomorrow on the New York Stock Exchange. Plus, Bob dives into the history of the index fund and how its evolved over time. In the 'Markets 102' portion of the podcast, Bob continues the conversation with Robin Wigglesworth from the Financial Times about his book, "Trillions".

Today with Claire Byrne
Johnson to lead tribute to David Amess

Today with Claire Byrne

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 6:10


George Parker, Political Editor of the Financial Times, reports on the killing of David Amess

Slate Money
Succession: "Weevils in the Flour Sack"

Slate Money

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 43:41


Slate Money is obsessed with Succession, HBO's wonderful drama about the lives of the superrich Roy family. So, every Monday, we'll be discussing the previous night's episode with spoiler-filled glee. For the series premier, Felix Salmon and Emily Peck are joined by Janine Gibson, assistant editor of Financial Times to talk about Geri's glass cliff promotion, who might be going to jail, and all the best one liners. Podcast production by Cheyna Roth. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Slate Daily Feed
Slate Money Succession: "Weevils in the Flour Sack"

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 43:41


Slate Money is obsessed with Succession, HBO's wonderful drama about the lives of the superrich Roy family. So, every Monday, we'll be discussing the previous night's episode with spoiler-filled glee. For the series premier, Felix Salmon and Emily Peck are joined by Janine Gibson, assistant editor of Financial Times to talk about Geri's glass cliff promotion, who might be going to jail, and all the best one liners. Podcast production by Cheyna Roth. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Culture Gabfest
Succession: "Weevils in the Flour Sack"

Culture Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 43:41


Slate Money is obsessed with Succession, HBO's wonderful drama about the lives of the superrich Roy family. So, every Monday, we'll be discussing the previous night's episode with spoiler-filled glee. For the series premier, Felix Salmon and Emily Peck are joined by Janine Gibson, assistant editor of Financial Times to talk about Geri's glass cliff promotion, who might be going to jail, and all the best one liners. Podcast production by Cheyna Roth. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Géopolitique
La Chine teste un nouveau type de missile et change le rapport de forces

Géopolitique

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 3:20


durée : 00:03:20 - Géopolitique - par : Pierre  Haski  - Les services américains auraient été pris par surprise par un test, révélé par le « Financial Times », d'un missile hypersonique chinois susceptible de rendre les armes anti-missiles américaines dépassées.

Jill on Money with Jill Schlesinger
Trillions: How a Band of Renegades Invented the Index Fund Part Two

Jill on Money with Jill Schlesinger

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 18:46


Fifty years ago, the Manhattan Project of money management was quietly assembled in the financial industry's backwaters, unified by the heretical idea that even many of the world's finest investors couldn't beat the market in the long run. The motley crew of nerds, including economist wunderkind Gene Fama, humiliated industry executive Jack Bogle, bull-headed and computer-obsessive John McQuown, and avuncular former WWII submariner Nate Most, succeeded beyond their wildest dreams.  Passive investing now accounts for more than $20 trillion, equal to the entire gross domestic product of the US, and is today a force reshaping markets, finance and even capitalism itself in myriad subtle but pivotal ways. Yet even some fans of index funds and ETFs are growing perturbed that their swelling heft is destabilizing markets, wrecking the investment industry and leading to an unwelcome concentration of power in fewer and fewer hands. In Trillions, Financial Times journalist Robin Wigglesworth unveils the vivid secret history of an invention Wall Street wishes was never created, bringing to life the characters behind its birth, growth, and evolution into a world-conquering phenomenon.  Have a money question? Email us, ask jill [at] jill on money dot com. Please leave us a rating or review in Apple Podcasts. "Jill on Money" theme music is by Joel Goodman, www.joelgoodman.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The John Batchelor Show
1771: 3/12: #CrossfireHurricaneDiary: The first sign of the attack on Svetlana Lokhova and Michael Flynn, the Financial Times, December 16, 2016. Svetlana Lokhova @TheRealSLokhova

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 18:51


Photo:   Financial Times 1888 front page 3/12: #CrossfireHurricaneDiary: The first sign of the attack on Svetlana Lokhova and Michael Flynn, the Financial Times, December 16, 2016. Svetlana Lokhova @TheRealSLokhova

This Week in Intelligent Investing
David Spiegelhalter on Risk and the Use (and Misuse) of Statistics | Suprising Market Internals

This Week in Intelligent Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 50:33


In this episode, co-hosts Phil Ordway, Elliot Turner, and John Mihaljevic discuss (i) an interview with Sir David Spiegelhalter on risk and the use (and misuse) of statistics, published in the Financial Times on April 16, 2021; and (ii) a table from Morgan Stanley, showing that more than 90% of stocks have declined more than 10% from their YTD highs (>30% for Nasdaq and Russell 2000 stocks) even as the market indices remain only a few percentage points off their highs. Enjoy the conversation!   About the Co-Hosts: Elliot Turner is a co-founder and Managing Partner, CIO at RGA Investment Advisors, LLC. RGA Investment Advisors runs a long-term, low turnover, growth at a reasonable price investment strategy seeking out global opportunities. Elliot focuses on discovering and analyzing long-term, high quality investment opportunities and strategic portfolio management. Prior to joining RGA, Elliot managed portfolios at at AustinWeston Asset Management LLC, Chimera Securities and T3 Capital. Elliot holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation as well as a Juris Doctor from Brooklyn Law School.. He also holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Emory University where he double majored in Political Science and Philosophy. Philip Ordway is Managing Principal and Portfolio Manager of Anabatic Fund, L.P. Previously, Philip was a partner at Chicago Fundamental Investment Partners (CFIP). At CFIP, which he joined in 2007, Philip was responsible for investments across the capital structure in various industries. Prior to joining CFIP, Philip was an analyst in structured corporate finance with Citigroup Global Markets, Inc. from 2002 to 2005. Philip earned his B.S. in Education & Social Policy and Economics from Northwestern University in 2002 and his M.B.A. from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University in 2007, where he now serves as an Adjunct Professor in the Finance Department. John Mihaljevic leads MOI Global and serves as managing editor of The Manual of Ideas. He managed a private partnership, Mihaljevic Partners LP, from 2005-2016. John is a winner of the Value Investors Club's prize for best investment idea. He is a trained capital allocator, having studied under Yale University Chief Investment Officer David Swensen and served as Research Assistant to Nobel Laureate James Tobin. John holds a BA in Economics, summa cum laude, from Yale and is a CFA charterholder.   The content of this podcast is not an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy any security in any jurisdiction. The content is distributed for informational purposes only and should not be construed as investment advice or a recommendation to sell or buy any security or other investment, or undertake any investment strategy. There are no warranties, expressed or implied, as to the accuracy, completeness, or results obtained from any information set forth on this podcast. The podcast participants and their affiliates may have positions in and may, from time to time, make purchases or sales of the securities or other investments discussed or evaluated on this podcast.

Jill on Money with Jill Schlesinger
Trillions: How a Band of Renegades Invented the Index Fund Part One

Jill on Money with Jill Schlesinger

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 21:46


Fifty years ago, the Manhattan Project of money management was quietly assembled in the financial industry's backwaters, unified by the heretical idea that even many of the world's finest investors couldn't beat the market in the long run. The motley crew of nerds, including economist wunderkind Gene Fama, humiliated industry executive Jack Bogle, bull-headed and computer-obsessive John McQuown, and avuncular former WWII submariner Nate Most, succeeded beyond their wildest dreams.  Passive investing now accounts for more than $20 trillion, equal to the entire gross domestic product of the US, and is today a force reshaping markets, finance and even capitalism itself in myriad subtle but pivotal ways. Yet even some fans of index funds and ETFs are growing perturbed that their swelling heft is destabilizing markets, wrecking the investment industry and leading to an unwelcome concentration of power in fewer and fewer hands. In Trillions, Financial Times journalist Robin Wigglesworth unveils the vivid secret history of an invention Wall Street wishes was never created, bringing to life the characters behind its birth, growth, and evolution into a world-conquering phenomenon.  Have a money question? Email us, ask jill [at] jill on money dot com. Please leave us a rating or review in Apple Podcasts. "Jill on Money" theme music is by Joel Goodman, www.joelgoodman.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Behind The Wheel Podcast
How to Thrive in Business 20yrs w/Stephen Kempson

Behind The Wheel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 35:29


Expert bespoke clothier Stephen Kempson has outfitted leaders in business, entertainment, and media and continues to draw a diverse clientele due to his ability to keenly understand the individual tastes and needs of his clients while simplifying the bespoke process. Stephen is recognized among the country's finest personal tailors. He has been featured in The Financial Times, The Robb Report, Departures magazine, and other leading publications. Things haven't always been easy, when Kempson stepped out on his own in August 2001 he had no idea terrorists would fly planes into the World Trade Towers. The first two years were a struggle but, what kept Stephen focused was his passion and his love to serve and create an experience for his clients. If you're tired of a station that doesn't speak to your needs and you're interested in learning more about the BTW Podcast visit RUNUTAINMENT. BTW Podcast is listener-supported, I started a Ko-fi page to allow small businesses and entrepreneurs to sponsor an episode. BTW Podcast now has a Patreon page. BTW Podcast is listener-supported. The launching of my Ko-fi and Patreon page is me embracing my talents, this is me walking in my purpose, this is me taking the leap, acknowledging that what I'm doing is providing a valuable service for the audience, the guest and sponsors. BTW Podcast is a business. You can visit Derek Oxley to stay up today on current happenings with BTW Podcast, sign up for the Newsletter, check out the blog or order merchandise. I took the leap 4 years ago to drive for Uber/Lyft Full-time, so I could have the flexibility to devote to building BTW Podcast. Like everyone BTW Podcast was impacted with the pandemic. Ko-fi is platform that will allow entrepreneurs/business owners to sponsor an episode PRE, MID or POST roll, it also allows you to buy me a cup of coffee. Patreon will allow listeners to show their support for the podcast on a monthly basis, Patreon supporters of the show will gain access to behind the scenes material, early access to merchandise, bonus episodes, and access to UINC, TIPS and RUNUTAINMENT articles. Thanks for accompanying my on this ride. Leave a voicemail on Anchor to let us know how we're doing and receive a shout out in a future episode or you can now visit my brand spanking new BTW Podcast website in lower righthand corner there's a microphone simply click that and record a message --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/derek-oxley/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/derek-oxley/support

Post Corona
The Merits of Merit - with Adrian Wooldridge of The Economist

Post Corona

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 60:02


During the pandemic, standardized tests were suspended in an entire range of educational institutions. Will these changes be temporary or permanent? More than 600 of these institutions switched from a mandatory to optional test for the 2020-21 application season, and many just flat out refused to accept a test at all in their application process. According to the editor in chief of the Princeton Review, “That is a tectonic change for many schools.” According to Smithsonian Magazine, “The pandemic sped up changes that were already afoot; even before Covid, more than 1,000 colleges had made the tests optional. Many had been turned off by the way the tests perpetuated socioeconomic disparities, limiting their ability to recruit a diverse freshman class.” Concerns about disparities in outcomes, at the core of this massive shift, have been behind Mayor Bill DeBlasio's agenda in New York City, including his past efforts to eliminate the entrance exam for the City's seven specialized high schools. While that effort has experienced a setback in the State Legislature, the fight will likely carry on by other political leaders. And more recently, the Mayor announced a plan to make sweeping changes to the gifted program in the City's elementary schools. There are similar efforts in other cities across the country. Joining today's conversation is Adrian Wooldridge, a longtime journalist at The Economist, where he is political editor and writes a column on British life and politics, and before that he penned the Schumpeter column on business, finance and management. He was previously the Washington bureau chief for The Economist, where he also wrote the Lexington column. Prior to his role in Washington, he was The Economist‘s West Coast correspondent, management correspondent and Britain correspondent. Adrian has written a number of books. His most recent books include “Capitalism in America: A History”, which he co-authored with Alan Greenspan, “The Wake-Up Call: Why the Pandemic Has Exposed the Weakness of the West, and How to Fix It”, which he co-wrote with John Micklethwait of Bloomberg News, and just out this year: “The Aristocracy of Talent: How Meritocracy Made the Modern World”. Adrian's most recent book has been shortlisted for The Financial Times and McKinsey Book of the Year Award. Feel free to drop us a line with questions, feedback and ideas for the new podcast at Dan@unlocked.fm

Italian Wine Podcast
Ep. 677 Susannah Gold Interviews Alicia Lini | Clubhouse Ambassador's Corner

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 44:39


Episode 677 Stevie Kim moderates Clubhouse's Ambassadors Corner. In this episode Susannah Gold interviews Alicia Lini - These sessions are recorded from Clubhouse and replayed here on the Italian Wine Podcast! Listen in on this series as Italian Wine Ambassadors all over the world chat with Stevie and their chosen wine producer. Which producer would you interview if you had your pick? Before telling you more about our great episode we want to give a shout out to our new Sponsor Vivino! the world's largest online wine marketplace - The Vivino app makes it easy to choose wine. Enjoy expert team support, door to door delivery and honest wine reviews to help you choose the perfect wine for every occassion. Vivino - Download the app on Apple or Android and discover an easier way to choose wine! Find out more about by visiting: https://www.vivino.com/IT/en/ or download the app: https://www.vivino.com/app About today's guest Host - Susannah Gold Susannah enjoys sharing her love of wine to educate both the trade and consumers. She holds 10 wine certificates from schools around the world including Italian Wine Ambassador qualification from Vinitaly International Academy, An educator, a journalist, and a communications professional, susannah also acts as a brand Ambassador, for individual producers and for regions. She has been the Lugana East Coast Ambassador for the past seven years and was named the brand ambassador for Oltrepo' Pavese this year. Her writing on wine has appeared in The Financial Times, Gourmet Retailer, Food, Food & Beverage Business, Snooth.com, the Organic Wine Journal, the Sommelier Journal, F&B Magazine, GDO Week and Palate Press. If you want to learn more about today's guest host, you can by visiting: https://susannahgold.com/ About today's guest producer: Alicia Lini represents the fourth generation of the Lini family, producers of some of Italy's most acclaimed and highly rated sparkling wines. Since 1910, when they first established their winery in Correggio township (Reggio Emilia province, in the region of Emilia-Romagna), they have never followed the trends or fashions that have driven Lambrusco production in this century and the last. They make their Lambrusco — including their classic method Lambrusco, produced using traditional hand-riddling — the same way they always have: The traditional “dry” style of Lambrusco, with a focus on freshness, brilliant fruit flavors, and food-friendliness. They ascribe their success to their vision of what Lambrusco is and should be. And it's thanks to their patience and precision that they have been able to create such iconic wines from their appellation. If you want to learn more about today's guest producer, you can by visiting: https://www.lini910.it/ Instagram: @alicialini Facebook: @Alicia Lini More about the moderator Stevie Kim: Stevie hosts Clubhouse sessions each week (visit Italian Wine Club & Wine Business on Clubhouse), these recorded sessions are then released on the podcast to immortalize them! She often also joins Professor Scienza in his shows to lend a hand keeping our Professor in check! You can also find her taking a hit for the team when she goes “On the Road”, all over the Italian countryside, visiting wineries and interviewing producers, enjoying their best food and wine – all in the name of bringing us great Pods! To find out more about Stevie Kim visit: Instagram: @steviekim222 Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ We also want to give a shout out to our sponsor Ferrowine. https://www.ferrowine.it/ Until next time, Cin Cin!

Intelligence Squared
Can We Fix Capitalism? Yanis Varoufakis vs Gillian Tett

Intelligence Squared

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 59:40


Should capitalism be reformed or replaced? Former Greek Finance Minister and economist Yanis Varoufakis and Gillian Tett US editor at large at the Financial Times discuss and debate their visions for a post-COVID economy live in London. The moderator is Anne McElvoy senior editor at The Economist. For the Intelligence Squared discount on Gillian Tett's book click here: https://www.primrosehillbooks.com/product/anthro-vision-how-anthropology-can-explain-business-and-life-gillian-tett/For the Intelligence Squared discount on Yanis Varoufakis's book click here:https://www.primrosehillbooks.com/product/another-now-dispatches-from-an-alternative-present-yanis-varoufakis/ Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
UK doubles down on Brexit demands

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 7:18


George Parker, political editor at the Financial Times, on reform of the NI protocol.

Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Tuesday, October 12, 2021

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 15:58


Let's Go Brandon and more on today's CrossPolitic Daily Newsbrief. I'm Toby Sumpter and today is October 12, 2021. What do you do when you're a Christian University -- say Liberty University -- and you really want to join in the trend, but you're a Christian University? Play during opening music: 0:00-0:06 FEMA Failed to Investigate Half of the Sexual Misconduct Allegations https://justthenews.com/accountability/watchdogs/federal-sexcapades-fema-failed-properly-investigate-half-its-sexual Turns out FEMA is like the worst youth group missions trip on steroids. The U.S. government's disaster recovery agency received more than 300 allegations of workplace sexual misconduct and harassment from 2012 to 2018 and failed to properly investigate more than half of them, according to an internal watchdog report. This article says that the report “exposes the limits [of] the #MeToo movement has met inside the federal bureaucracy.” The limits of the #metoo movement… The article continues: The Federal Emergency Management Agency's problems extend beyond proper handling of complaints, as a survey of its workforce exposed a potentially pervasive hostile work environment, according to a report issued this month by the Homeland Security Department's inspector general. "One-third (255 of 765) of the employees who responded to our questionnaire indicated they had experienced sexual harassment or sexual misconduct, but they did not report it because they did not believe the allegations would be investigated," the inspector general reported. "Unaddressed sexual harassment and sexual misconduct in the workplace can have negative effects on employees, including decreased performance, low morale, and increased turnover," the report added [stating the screaming obvious.] They also noted that if you can't breathe it is not conducive to a long life. Also from the report: "The agency mustered a poor response to the flood of allegations," investigators said. These people are hilarious. Get it? Flood of allegations? FEMA? Hurricanes and floods and... "We were unable to determine whether FEMA properly handled 153 of these allegations, because it could not provide complete investigative and disciplinary files," the report said. "For allegations that had complete files available, at times we were unable to determine whether FEMA conducted an investigation. Finally, we found FEMA did not document whether it reviewed some sexual harassment-related Equal Employment Opportunity complaints to determine whether potential employee misconduct occurred." Look, I don't really trust the report -- since I have little confidence that biblical standards for evidence, testimony, and witnesses were follwed , but I do know that we live in a debauched culture, where public school sex education courses encourage pagan kids to do whatever feels good, and then we are somehow shocked when they grow up and do just that. I mean is Darwin right or not? Are we just highly evolved animals or not? 1:11-1:18 But of course rather than completely defunding FEMA as we ought to and letting the states and counties take care of themselves, we will no doubt create another government agency that is tasked with studying the sex habits of government employees. I actually do think this is tied to youth group mission trip culture. While I don't object to very carefully crafted mission trips, I'm generally against the whole lot because I think there's a high degree of likelihood that a bunch of hormonal teenagers can actually do a lot more harm than good. And I also think that those who are most invested in a community are in the best position to help their own communities. They have to live with the results of all their help. I mean I really do feel for Haiti-- for example. But we should all be looking at Haiti as a cautionary tale. How many millions were poured into that country after the earthquakes? And how's it doing? A complete mess? Right. Ditto for FEMA. Guitar AD Have you always wanted to play guitar but didn't know where to start? Learning to play the guitar can be a lonely, confusing and expensive experience. But it doesn't have to be that way. Fight Laugh Feast member David Harsh has created a unique, online monthly membership, that has community, a clear success path, and it's super affordable. David has spent decades of touring, leading worship, and teaching guitar. He's helped thousands of guitar players discover their potential. You may have heard us talk about GuitarSuccess4U. Here's an update. Several of our listeners have joined this membership, and they are having a blast! Maybe it's time for you to hop on board! When you join this membership, you can learn at your own pace, from home, alongside a community of guitarists including worship leaders, hobbyists, retirees, stay-at-home moms and more. Through video lessons, worksheets, and weekly Zoom calls, David will take you step-by-step towards becoming the musician you were made to be. GuitarSuccess4U is only $29 a month – that's less than a dollar a day, and a fraction of the cost of guitar lessons. Learn more and join now at GuitarSuccess4U.com. That's “Guitar Success,” the number “4” and the letter “U,” dot com. Join today and get 5 instant bonuses to help accelerate your progress! Head on over to GuitarSuccess4U.com to start your guitar journey. That's Guitar Success, the number “4” and the letter “U,” dot com. Doug Wilson Responds to the Maricopa County Audit https://dougwils.com/books-and-culture/s7-engaging-the-culture/maricopa-pudding.html “So I will look sideways—squinty-eyed and scowling—at this particular election to my dying day. And I will do so with sunshine in my conscience. Anomalies do require explanation. As Thoreau once put it, “Some circumstantial evidence is very strong, as when you find a trout in the milk.” You know, like a turtle on top of a fence post. When you are driving down a country road, and you happen to see a turtle on top of a fence post, the situation is clear, and the first thing that comes to mind is President Biden. You understand he didn't get there by himself, he really doesn't belong there, he doesn't know what to do as long as he's up there, and all you want to do is help the poor little guy get down. This election in Maricopa is like that. Not everything in this mess goes together. It is like you went to dig into your vanilla Maricopa pudding, made fresh just this morning, and you discover that it is resting on a bed of cole slaw.” Pastor Wilson also linked to this doozy of a conversation that happened in Maricopa County regarding the deleted/archived files from the voting machines that audit did not have access to. Play Audio: 0:00-1:54 When the voting machine records were subpoenaed, they just deleted/archived certain files and figured that the subpoena didn't apply to those records. Bring back my laugh track: HAHAHAHA! Former Pentagon Softwar Chief Says China Has Won the Tech War https://nypost.com/2021/10/11/pentagon-software-chief-nicolas-chaillan-resigns/?utm_campaign=SocialFlow&utm_source=NYPTwitter&utm_medium=SocialFlow From the New York Post: The Pentagon's former software chief said he quit because China has already won the tech war guaranteeing global dominance — with some US government systems mere “kindergarten level” in comparison. Nicolas Chaillan, 37, told the Financial Times on Sunday that there is “good reason to be angry” at the US failing to rise to China's cyber threat, even fearing that it puts his children's future at risk. “We have no competing fighting chance against China in 15 to 20 years. Right now, it's already a done deal; it is already over, in my opinion,” Nicolas Chaillan, 37, told the paper. Chaillan — who was the Pentagon's first chief software officer — said China will dominate the future of the world by controlling everything from media narratives to geopolitics. He claimed that the US, like Beijing, should have prioritized artificial intelligence, machine learning and cyber capabilities over traditional military spending like building new fighter jets. “Whether it takes a war or not is kind of anecdotal,” he told the paper of his prediction of China's route to future world dominance. He attacked Google for not working on AI with the US Defense Department, while Chinese companies are obliged to work with Beijing. The US is also wasting time debating the ethics of AI while China makes “massive investment” and eschews such concerns, he said. Some US government cyber-defense systems are so dated, they are merely at “kindergarten level,” he insisted. “While we wasted time in bureaucracy, our adversaries moved further ahead,” Chaillan wrote in a scathing letter on LinkedIn last month when first announcing his resignation. “At this point, I am just tired of continuously chasing support and money to do my job,” he said of the pioneering Pentagon job that was “probably the most challenging and infuriating of my entire career.” Chaillan told the Financial Times that he plans in the coming weeks to testify to Congress about the Chinese cyber threat to US supremacy, including in classified briefings. [This] comes as a new poll shows that about 9 in 10 Americans are at least somewhat concerned about hacking, while about two-thirds say they are very or extremely concerned. The poll by the Pearson Institute and the Associated Press shows that roughly three-quarters also eye the Chinese and Russian governments as major threats to the cybersecurity of the US government. I mean, if we put this together with what we've already covered on today's newsbrief, there are troubling trends. Maricopa county voting officials have no concerns about deleting (I mean archiving) files before turning them over to an audit. And our Federal Emergency Management Agency cannot even manage the emergency of sexual misconduct in its own ranks. Put that together, and how likely does it seem that some of our governmental tech programs are kindergarten level compared to China? I would say the chances are pretty high. Remember Solomon: when he went in for all the sex, he had to build altars and shrines for all the gods of his wives and concubines. Instead of using his strength to continue to build productive and useful things, his strength was used to destroy his family and nation. Is America strong? Sure. But we are pouring our strength down the tubes. But let's not end on a sour note. Remember God is God, and this is His world. China's so-called strength isn't real strength either. As it happens, pure coercive power will crush LGBT flower power every day of the week, but both are false versions of power. Neither will ultimately work. Both are parasitic on Christian virtues. Both have to assume certain creational realities are real and true. They have to deny Darwin and believe that there is order and goodness in the universe in order to maintain a semblance of coherence. Psalm of the Day: Psalm 20 0:00-0:57 Remember you can always find the links to our news stories and these psalms at crosspolitic dot com – just click on the daily news brief and follow the links. This is Toby Sumpter with Crosspolitic News. A reminder: if you see news stories and links that you think we should cover on the daily news brief, please send them to news @ crosspolitic.com and don't forget to check deft wire dot com where we are constantly posting all our stories. Support Rowdy Christian media, and share this show or become a Fight Laugh Feast Club Member. You always get a free Fight Laugh Feast t-shirt with a membership and remember if you didn't make it to the Fight Laugh Feast Conferences, club members have access to all the talks and lots more. Join today and have a great day.

Savage Minds Podcast
Michael Hudson

Savage Minds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 64:18


Michael Hudson, American economist and author of Super Imperialism: The Economic Strategy of American Empire (1972) discusses the rentier economy that accounts for the growing disparity in wealth due to finance capitalism. Giving a history of the the polarisation of the US economy since the 1960s through the present, Hudson discusses how the high costs of education and housing have led to a growing problem of student debt, higher costs of living and increasing austerity. Noting how 80% of bank loans are made for real estate in the US, Hudson expounds upon how loans and exponentially growing debts outstrip profits from the economy proving disastrous for both the government and the people who are paying increasing amounts on housing with little to no money left to spend on goods and services. Hudson contends that finance capitalism is a “self-terminating” oligarchical system leaving workers traumatised, afraid to strike or react to working conditions, while they are pushed towards serfdom as US and Europe are heading towards a debt crisis on par with that of Argentina and Greece.TranscriptIntroduction: Welcome to Savage Minds. I'm your host, Julian Vigo. Today's show marks the launch of our second season with a very special guest: Michael Hudson. Michael Hudson is a financial analyst and president of the Institute for the Study of long term economic trends. He is a distinguished research professor of economics at the University of Missouri Kansas City, and the professor at the School of Marx studies, Peking University in China. He's also a research fellow at the Levy Institute of Bard College, and he has served as an economic adviser to the US Canadian, Mexican, and Latvian governments. He's also been a consultant to UNITAR, the Institute for Research on Public Policy and the Canadian Science Council, among other organisations. He holds a BA from the University of Chicago and an MA and PhD in economics from New York University. Professor Hudson is the author of Killing the Host: How Financial Parasites and Debt Bondage Destroy the Global Economy (2015), and most recently, J is for junk economics, a guide to reality in an age of deception. His super imperialism, the economic strategy of the American Empire has just been translated into German after its appearance in Chinese, Japanese and Spanish. He sits on the editorial board of lap times quarterly and has written for the Journal of International Affairs, Commonweal, International Economy, Financial Times, and Harper's, and he's a regular contributor to CounterPunch. I welcome Michael Hudson, to Savage Minds.Julian Vigo: Class analysis in the United States is rather subterfuge amidst all these other narratives of the American dream as it's framed—that being the right to own one's home. In the UK, that became part of the Trojan horse, that Thatcher built to win her election. It was a very smart move. She won that election—she won her elections—by the reforms in the “right to buy” scheme as I'm sure you know. I t was really clever and disastrous for human rights in the country. I've spent quite a bit of my life in the UK and to see that in 1979 was, I believe, 49% of all residential housing was council housing. And when I wrote a piece on this for the Morning Star about eight, nine years ago, that rate was reduced to under 11%. So we're seeing the haves- and have-nots. And this is where your work really struck a chord for me. And let's kick into the show at this point. I have written over the years, about rentier capitalism, a term that is increasingly used to describe economies dominated by rentier, rents and rent-generating assets. And you discuss this quite a bit in your work, more recently, your article from July, “Finance Capitalism versus Industrial Capitalism: The Rentier Resurgence and Takeover.” And in this article, you discuss how today the finance, insurance and real estate sectors have regained control of government creating a “neo-rentier” economy as you put it, while you note—and I quote you: “The aim of this postindustrial finance capitalism is the opposite of industrial capitalism as known to nineteenth-century economists: it seeks wealth primarily through the extraction of economic rent, not industrial capital formation.” Unquote. I was wondering if we might begin our talk by branching out from this piece you wrote in July. And if you could explain for our listeners why discerning rentier capitalism is essential for understanding the global push to privatise and financialise those sectors that formerly existed in the public domain such as—and we see this everywhere, including in the EU—transportation, health care, prisons, policing, education, the post office, etc.Michael Hudson: Well, most textbooks depict a sort of happy world that almost seems to exist in the 1950s. And this “happy world” is when wealthy people get money, they build factories and buy machinery and hire workers to produce more goods and services. But that's not what the credits created for today, it's the textbooks that pick the banks that take in people's deposits and lend them out to people who build industrial production, and you'll have a picture of workers with lunchboxes working in. But actually, banks only lend money against assets. And the main assets do not make a profit by employing people to produce things there. They simply are opportunities to extract rent, like real estate 80% of bank loans are made for real estate. And that means they're made against primarily buildings that are in land that are already there. And the effective more and more bank credit is to raise the price of real estate. And in the United States, in the last year, housing prices have gone up 20%. And typically, in America, if you go to a bank and take out a loan, the government is going to guarantee the bank that you will pay the loan up to the point where it absorbs 43% of your income.So here's a big chunk of American income going to pay simply for housing, those price increases, not because there's more housing, or better housing. But in fact, the housing is built worse and worse every year, by lowering the standards, but simply inflation. There are other forms of rent, other people pay, for instance, 18% of America's GDP is healthcare, much higher than the percentage in any other country for much lower quality of service. So you know, that's sort of taken out of people's budgets. If you're a worker in the United States, right away, you get your paycheque 15%—a little more, maybe 16% now—is deducted for Social Security and medical care for when you're older. They also need up to maybe 30%, for income tax, federal, state and local income tax before you have anything to spend. And then you have to spend for housing, you have to pay for transportation, you have to pay for your own medical insurance contributions, your own pension contributions. So there's very, very little that is left over in people's budgets to buy goods and services. Not only have real wages in the United States, gone down now for three decades, but the disposable income that people and families get after they meet their sort of monthly “nut,” what they can spend on goods and services is shrunk even more. So while they're getting squeezed, all this money is paid to rentiers as at the top. And because of the miracle of compound interest, the amount that the 1% of the economy has grows exponentially. Any rate of interest is a doubling time. And even though people know that there's only a 0.1% rate of interest, now for the banks, and for large wall firms, it's about 3% if you want to buy a mortgage. and so this, the 0.1% is lent out to large companies like Blackstone that are now buying up almost all of the housing that comes onto the market in the United States. So in 2008, 69% of homeowners of Americans own their own homes. Now it's fallen by more than 10%. It's fallen to about 51%. All this difference has been basically the financial sector funding a transformation away from home ownership into landlordship—into absentee ownership. And so the if you're part of the 1%, the way that you make money is by buying stocks or bonds, or corporate takeovers, or buying real estate and not building factories. And that's why the factories and the industry have been shifting outside of the United States over to China, and other countries. So, what we're having is a kind of…I won’t say its post-industrial capitalism, because people thought that the what was going to follow industrial capitalism was going to be socialism. They thought that there will be more and more government spending on providing basic needs that people had. And instead of socialism, and a more, egalitarian distribution of wealth and income, you've had a polarization of wealth and income, you've had the wealthy people making money financially, and by real estate, and by rent seeking, and by creating monopolies, but not by building factories, not by producing goods and services. And that is why the economy's polarizing, and so many people are unhappy with their conditions. Now, they're going further and further into debt and their student debt. Instead of education here being a public utility that's provided freely, it's become privatised at NYU, it's now $50,000 or $60,000 a year. There is no way in which the United States can compete industrially with other countries when they've loaded down new entrants into the labor force with huge housing costs, student debt, huge taxes have been shifted off the 1% onto the 99%. So in the United States, finance capitalism basically is self-terminating. It leads to a polarised economy, it leads to austerity. And it leaves countries looking like Greece looked after 2015, after its debt crisis, it looks like Argentina is trying to struggle to pay its foreign debts. And that seems to be the future in which the US and Europe are moving towards.Julian Vigo: I posted on my Facebook wall about this about maybe five weeks ago, that the rentier class, I'm not just including the likes of Blackstone, but the middle class that are multiple home dwellers. I noted that during the lockdown, I was reading through accounts on social media of people who were being threatened by landlords, landlords, who actually had no mortgage to pay. And I had to wonder at that point, what is the input of the rentier class by the landowning class who are not necessarily part of the 1%. These are people who, as some of these people came on my wall and said, “I worked hard to buy my second and third houses!” And I thought, “Well, let me pull out my violins.” One thing that really alerted me during lockdown was the lack of sympathy for renters. And I don't just mean in the US, in fact, I think the US had a kinder response to renting in some sectors such as New York state where there has been—and still—is a massive pushback against any form of relaxation of rent forgiveness, since lockdown in the EU and Italy and France. It's appalling the kind of treatment that renters received here. I spoke to people in Bologna, who were doing a rent strike, but fearful of having their name mentioned. I ended up not being able to run the piece because of that. And there are so many people who don't have money to pay their rent in the EU, in the UK, and yet, we're somehow focusing oftentimes on these meta-critical analyses of the bigger corporations, the 1%. But where does the middle class fit into this, Michael, because I do have to wonder if maybe we should be heading towards the model I hold in my mind and heart is St. Ives in Cornwall, which about eight years ago set a moratorium saying no second homes in this city. Now, they didn't do it because of any allegiance to Marxism or socialism. They did it in part because of that, and because of a left-leaning politics, but mostly because they didn't want to have a ghost town that when the summer was over, you had very few people living in town. What are the answers to the rentier class that is also composed of people who consider themselves hard-working people who just want someone else to pay for their house, as one person on Twitter, put it.Michael Hudson: This is exactly the problem that is plaguing left wing politics, from Europe to America in the last fifty years.Julian Vigo: Exactly. It's astounding because there was a lot of debate on Twitter around last summer, when one woman wrote, I just did the math, I'm almost 29 years old, and I paid and she listed the amount in rent, I have just bought my landlord a second house. And people are adding it up that we are back to understanding. And I think in terms of the medieval period, remember in high school in the US when you study history, and you learn about feudalism, and the serfs coming in from far afield having to tend to the Masters terrain. And I think, are we heading back to a kind of feudalism under a new name? Because what's dividing those who can afford rents and those who can, it's not only your eligibility to receive a bank loan in this climate, which is quite toxic in London. I know many architects, lawyers, physicians who cannot get bank loans. Ironically, the bar is being raised so high that more and more people in London are moving on to the canal system—they're renting or buying narrowboats. The same is happening in other parts of the world where people are being barred out of home ownership for one reason or another and at the same time, there's a class of people often who got loans in a period when it was quite easy in the 80s and early 90s, let's say and they hold a certain control over who's paying—43% of income of Americans goes on housing. And as you know, in New York City that can be even higher. How can we arrive at a society where there's more equality between these haves and have-nots? Because it seems that the middle class is playing a role in this. They're trying to come off as being the hard-working schmoes, who have just earned their right to own their second or third homes, and then the others who will never have a foot on that ladder, especially given the crash?Michael Hudson: Well, I think you've put your finger on it. Most people think of economies being all about industry. But as you've just pointed out, for most people, the economy is real estate. And if you want to understand how modern economies work, you really should begin by looking at real estate, which is symbiotic with with banking, because as you pointed out that in a house is worth whatever a bank will lend. And in order to buy a house, unless you have an enormous amount of savings, which hardly anyone has, you'll borrow from a bank and buy the house. And the idea is to use the rent to pay the interest to the bank. And then you end up hoping late hoping with a capital gain, which is really land price gain. You borrow from the bank hoping that the Federal Reserve and the central bank or the Bank of England is going to inflate the economy and inflate asset prices and bank credit is going to push prices further and further up. As the rich get richer, they recycle the money in the banks and banks lend it to real estate. So, the more the economy is polarised between the 1% and the 99%, the more expensive houses get the more absentee landlords are able to buy the houses and outbid the homebuyers, who as you pointed out, can't get loans because they're already loaned up. If they can't get loans in England to buy a house, it's because they already owe so much money for other things. In America, it would be because they own student debt or because they own other bank loans, and they're all loaned up. So the key is people are being squeezed more than anywhere else on housing. In America, it rents care too and on related sort of monopoly goods that yield rent. Now the problem is why isn't this at the centre of politics?Is it because— and it's ironic that although most people in every country, Europe and America are still homeowners, or so they only own their own home—they would like to be rocky as a miniature? They would like to live like the billionaires live off the rents. They would like to be able to have enough money without working to get a free lunch and the economy of getting a free lunch. And so somehow, they don't vote for what's good for the wage earners. They vote for well, if I were to get richer, then I would want to own a house and I would want to get rent. So I'm going to vote in favour of the landlord class. I'm going to vote in favour of banks lending money to increase housing prices. Because I'd like to borrow money from a bank to get on this treadmill, that's going to be an automatic free lunch. Now, I not only get rent, but I'll get the rising price of the houses that prices continue to rise. So somehow, the idea of class interest, they don't think of themselves as wave generators, they think of themselves as somehow wouldn't be rentiers in miniature without reaising that you can't do it in miniature. You really have to have an enormous amount of money to be successful rentier.So no class consciousness means that the large real estate owners, the big corporations like Blackstone, that own huge amounts can sort of trot out a strapped, homeowner and individual, and they will sort of hide behind it and say, “Look at this, poor family, they use their money to buy a house, the sort of rise in the world, and now the tenants have COVID, and they can't pay the rent. Let's not bail out these, these landlords.” So even though they're not getting rent, we have to aid them. And think of them as little people, but they're not little people. They're a trillion dollar, money managers. They're huge companies that are taking over. And people somehow personify the billionaires and the trillion dollar real estate management companies as being small people just like themselves. There's a confusion about the economic identity.Julian Vigo: Well, certainly in the United States, we are known to have what's called the “American dream.” And it's, it's quite interesting when you start to analyse what that dream has morphed into, from the 1960s to the present, and I even think through popular culture. Remember Alexis, in Dynasty, this was the go-to model for success. So we've got this idea that the super rich are Dallas and Dynasty in the 80s. But 20 years after that, we were facing economic downfalls. We had American graduates having to go to graduate school because they couldn't get a job as anything but a barista. And the model of getting scholarships or fellowships, any kind of bursary to do the Masters and PhD. When I was doing my graduate work, I was lucky enough to have this, but that was quickly disappearing. A lot of my colleagues didn't have it. And I imagine when you went to school, most of your colleagues had it. And today, and in recent years, when I was teaching in academia, most of my students doing advanced degrees had zero funding. So, we've got on the one hand, the student debt, hamster wheel rolling, we have what is, to me one of the biggest human rights issues of the domestic sphere in countries like the US or Great Britain, frankly, everywhere is the ability to live without having to be exploited for the payment of rent. And then we have this class of people, whether they're Blackstone, and huge corporations, making billions, or the middle class saying, “But I'm just living out the American dream.” How do we square the “American dream,” and an era where class consciousness is more invisible than ever has it been?Michael Hudson: I think the only way you can explain that is to show how different life was back in the 1960s, 1950s. When I went to school, and the college, NYU cost $500 a semester, instead of 50,000, that the price of college has gone up 100 times since I went to college—100 times. I rented a house in a block from NYU at $35 a month on Sullivan Street. And now that same small apartment would go for 100 times that much, $3,500 a month, which is a little below the average rent in Manhattan these days. So, you've had these enormous increases in the cost of getting an education, they cost of rent, and in a society where housing was a public utility, and education was a public utility, education would be provided freely. If the economy wanted to keep down housing prices, as they do in China for instance, then you would be able to work if the kind of wages that Americans are paid today and be able to save. The ideal of China or countries that want to compete industrially is to lower the cost of living so that you don't have to pay a very high wages to cover the inflated cost of housing, the cost of education.If you privatise education in America, and if you increase the housing prices, then either you're going to have to pay labor, much higher rates that will price it out of world markets, at least for industrial goods, or you'll have to squeeze budgets. So yes, people can pay for housing, and education, but they're not going to buy the goods and services they produce. And so and that's one of the reasons why America is not producing industrial manufacturers. It's importing it all abroad. So the result of this finance capitalism that we have the result of the rent squeeze, that you depict, and the result of voters not realising that this is economic suicide for them is that the economy is shrinking and leaving people basically out in the street. And of course, all of this is exacerbated by the COVID crisis right now. Where, right now you have, especially in New York City, many people are laid off, as in Europe, they're not getting an income. Well, if your job has been closed down as a result of COVID, in Germany, for instance, you're still given something like 80% of your normal salary, because they realise that they have to keep you solvent and living. In the United States, there's been a moratorium on rents, they realise that, well, if you've lost your job, you can't pay the rent. There's a moratorium on evictions, there's a moratorium on bank foreclosures on landlords that can't pay their mortgage to the bank, because their tenants are not paying rent. All of that is going to expire in February, that’s just in a few months.  So they're saying, “OK, in New York City, 50,000 tenants are going to be thrown out onto the street, thousands of homes are going to be foreclosed on.” All over the country, millions of Americans are going to be subject now to be evicted. You can see all of the Wall Street companies are raising private capital funds to say, “We're going to be waiting for all this housing to come onto the market. We're going to be waiting for all of these renovations to take place. We're going to swoop in and pick it up.” This is going to be the big grab bag that is going to shape the whole coming generation and do to America really what Margaret Thatcher did to England when she got rid of—when she shifted from housing, the council housing that you mentioned, was about half the population now dow to about 1/10 of the population today.Julian Vigo: This is what I wonder is not being circulated within the media more frequently. We know that major media is not...[laughts] They like to call themselves left-of-centre but they're neoliberal which I don't look at anything in the liberal, the neoliberal sphere, as “left.” I look at it as a sort of strain of conservatism, frankly. But when you were speaking about paying $35 a month for an apartment on Sullivan Street, get me a time machine! What year was that? Michael?Michael Hudson: That was 1962.Julian Vigo: 1962 And roughly, the minimum wage in New York was just over $1 an hour if I'm not mistaken.Michael Hudson: I don't remember. I was making I think my first job on Wall Street was 50 to $100. A year $100 a week.Julian Vigo: So yes, I looked it up because I was curious when you said 100 times certainly we see that. If the tuition at New York when and New York University when I left was $50,000 a year you were paying $500 a semester. This is incredible inflation.Michael Hudson: And I took out a student loan from the state because I wanted to buy economic books. I was studying the history of economic thought and so I borrowed, you know, I was able to take out a loan that I repaid in three years as I sort of moved up the ladder and got better paying jobs. But that was the Golden Age, the 1960s because in that generation there was the baby boom that just came online. There were jobs for everybody. There was a labor shortage. And everybody was trying to hire—anyone could get a job. I got to New York and I had $15 in my pocket in 1960. I'd shared a ride with someone, [I] didn't know what to do. We stayed in a sort of fleabag hotel on Bleecker Street that was torn down by the time you got there. But I,  took a walk around and who should I run into that Gerde's Folk City, but a friend of mine had stayed at my house in Chicago once and he let me stay at his apartment for a few weeks till I can look around, find a place to live and got the place for $35 a month,Julian Vigo: When there was that debate on Twitter—there were many debates actually about renting on Twitter—and there were a few landlords who took to Twitter angry that they learned that their renters had received subsidies in various countries to pay their rent. And instead of paying their rent, the people use this to up and buy a downpayment on a home. And they got very upset. And there was a bit of shadow on Friday there with people saying, “Well, it's exactly what you've done.” And I find this quite fascinating, because I've always said that the age of COVID has made a huge Xray of our society economically speaking. And it's also telling to me that in countries that I would assume to be more socialist leaning, if not socialist absolutely, in the EU, we saw very few movements against rent. Very few people or groups were calling for a moratorium on rent. It's ironic, but it was in the US where we saw more moratoria happen. What is happening where—and this reaches to larger issues, even outside of your specialty of economics and finance—but why on earth has it come to be that the left is looking a lot more like the right? And, don't shoot me, but you know, I've been watching some of Tucker Carlson over the past few years, someone who I could not stand after 9/11. And he has had more concern and more investigations of the poor and the working class than MSBC or Rachel Maddow in the biggest of hissy fits. What is going on politically that the valences of economic concern are shifting—and radically so?Michael Hudson: Well, the political situation in America is very different from every other country. In the Democratic Party, in order to run for a position, you have to spend most of your time raising money, and the party will support whatever candidates can raise the most money. And whoever raises the largest amount of money gets to be head of a congressional committee dealing with whatever it is their campaign donors give. So basically, the nomination of candidates in the United States, certainly in the Democratic Party, is based on how much money you can raise to finance your election campaign, because you're supposed to turn half of what you raised over to the party apparatus. Well, if you have to run for an office, and someone explained to me in in the sixties, if I wanted to go into politics, I had to find someone to back up my campaign. And they said, “Well, you have to go to the oil industry or the tobacco industry.”And you go to these people and say, “Will you back my campaign?” And they say, Well, sure, what's your position going to be on on smoking on oil and the the tax position on oil, go to the real estate interest, because all local politics and basically real estate promotion projects run by the local landlords and you go to the real estate people and you say, “Okay, I'm going to make sure that we have public improvements that will make your land more valuable, but you won't have to pay taxes on them.” So, if you have people running for office, proportional to the money they can make by the special interests, that means that all the politicians here are representing the special interests that pay them and their job as politicians is to deliver a constituency to their campaign contributors. And so the campaign contributors are going to say, “Well, here's somebody who could make it appear as if they're supporting their particular constituency.” And so ever since the 60s, certainly in America, the parties divided Americans into Irish Americans, Italian Americans, black Americans, Hispanic Americans. They will have all sorts of identity politics that they will run politicians on. But there's one identity that they don't have—and that's the identity of being a wage earner. That's the common identity that all these hyphenated Americans have in common. They all have to work for a living and get wages, they're all subject to, they have to get housing, they have to get more and more bank credit, if they want to buy housing so that all of the added income they get is paid to the banks as mortgage interest to get a home that used to be much less expensive for them. So basically, all of the increase in national income ends up being paid to the campaign contributors, the real estate contributors, the oil industry, the tobacco industry, the pharmaceuticals industry, that back the politicians. And essentially, you have politics for sale in the United States. So we're really not in a democracy anymore—we're in an oligarchy. And people don't realise that without changing this, this consciousness, you're not going to have anything like the left-wing party.And so you have most Americans out wanting to be friendly with other Americans, you know, why can't everybody just compromise and be in the centre? Well, there's no such thing as a centrist. Because you'll have an economy that's polarising, you have the 1% getting richer and richer and richer by getting the 99% further and further in debt. So the 99% are getting poorer and poor after paying their debts. And to be in the centre to say, and to be say, only changes should be marginal, that means—a centrist is someone who lets this continue. With that we're not going to make a structural change, that's radical, we're not going to change the dynamic that is polarising the economy, between creditors at the top and debtors is at the bottom, between landlords at the top and renters at the bottom between monopolists and the top and the consumers who have to pay monopoly prices for pharmaceuticals, for cable TV, for almost everything they get. And none of this is taught in the economics courses. Because you take an  economics course, they say, “There's no such thing as unearned income. Everybody earns whatever they can get.” And the American consciousness is shaped by this failure to distinguish between earned income and unearned income and a failure to see that dynamic is impoverishing them. It's like the proverbial frog that's been boiled slowly in water. So, with this false consciousness people have—if only they can save enough and borrow from a bank—they can become a rentier in Miniature. They're just tricked into a false dream.Intermission: You're listening to savage minds, and we hope you're enjoying the show. Please consider subscribing. We don't accept any money from corporate or commercial sponsors. And we depend upon listeners and readers just like you. Now back to our show.Julian Vigo: I don't know if you saw the movie called Queen of Versailles. It was about this very bizarre effort to construct a very ugly Las Vegas-style type of Versailles by a couple that was economically failing. And it spoke to me a lot about the failings of the quote unquote, “American dream.” And I don't mean that dream, per se. I mean, the aspiration to have the dream, because that is, as you just pointed out, unearned income, that is the elephant in the room. And it almost seems to be the elephant maybe to keep using that metaphor, that the blind Sufi tale: everyone's feeling a different part of it, but no one is naming it. And I find this really shocking, that we can't speak of unearned income and look at the differences as to which country's tax inheritance and which do not—this idea that one is entitled to wealth. Meanwhile, a lot of US institutions are academically, now formally, being captured by the identity lobbies and there are many lobbies out there—it's a gift to them. They don't have to work on the minimum wage, they don't have to work on public housing, they don't have to work on housing.They can just worry about, “Do we have enough pronoun badges printed out?” And I find this really daunting as someone who is firmly of the left and who has seen some kind of recognition have this problem bizarrely, from the right. We seem to have a blind spot where we're more caught up in how people see us, rather than the material reality upon which unearned and earned income is based. Why is it that today people are living far worse than their grandparents and parents especially?Michael Hudson: Well, I think we've been talking about that, because they have to pay expenses as their parents and grandparents didn't have to pay, they have to pay much higher rent. Everybody used to be able to afford to buy a house, that was the definition of “middle class” in America was to be a homeowner. And when I was growing up in the 50s and 60s, everybody on the salary they were getting could afford to buy their house. And that's why so many people bought the houses with working class sell rates. As I told you, I was getting $100 a week. At least if you were quiet you could do it. If you were black, you couldn't do it. The blacks were redlined. But the white people could buy the houses. And that's why today, the white population has so much more wealth than the black population, because the white families would leave the house to the children and housing prices have gone up 100 times. And because they've gone up 100 times, this is endowed with a whole white hereditary class of kids whose family own their own homes, send them to schools. But America was redlined. Now Chicago was redlined, blacks were redlined. In New York City, the banks would not lend money to black neighbourhoods or to black borrowers. I was at Chase Manhattan and they made it very clear: they will not make a loan to a mortgage if they're black people living in my block. And they told me that when I was on Second Street and Avenue B. I won't repeat the epithet racist epithets they used. But what has caused the racial disparity today is what we've been talking about: the fact that whites could buy their own homes, blacks could not.And the reason I'm bringing this up is that if—we're working toward a society where white people are now going to be reduced to the position that black people are in today: of not having their own homes, of not being able to get bank credit. One friend of mine at the Hudson Institute, a black economist, wanted to—we were thinking of cowriting a book, The Blackening of America. The state of, well, the future of the whites, is to become blacks if you don't solve this situation. And I've been unable to convince many black leaders about reparations—that the reparations, very hard to get reparations for slavery, which was to their grandparents, their reparations are due to the blacks today who do not have housing, their own homes, because of the redlining that they have been experiencing right down to today.So, you have this, you do have a separation in this country. But this is not the kind of hyphenated politics that the politicians talk about. Not even the black politicians, the fact that if you're going to hyphenated American, how did this hyphenisation affect the real opportunities for real estate, for homeownership, for education, and all of these other things. I think maybe if people begin to think as to how there is a convergence of what was diverging before—now you're having the middle class pushed down into its real identity which was a dependent wage-earning class all along—you're going to have a change of consciousness. But we're still not to that. People don't realise this difference.And at the top of the pyramid, at New York University, for instance, where we both went to school, I have professor friends there and there was recently an argument about getting more salaries for professors, because they're hiring adjunct professors at very low prices instead of appointing them full time. And one professor turned to my friend and said, “They’re treating us like wage earners.” And my friend said, “Yes, you are a wage earner. You’re dependent on the wage you get from New York University.” And he said, “But I’m a professor,” as if somehow being a professor doesn't mean that you're not a wage earner, you're not dependent on salary, you're not being exploited by your employer who's in it to make money at your expense.Julian Vigo: Oh, absolutely. We've got the push from NYU in the 1990s by adjunct professors to get health insurance, and to have a certain modicum of earnings that would allow them to pay rent in an extremely expensive city. I find it amazing how many of my students at the time had no idea how much I was being exploited at the time, I was at lunch after the graduation of two of my students, they invited me to lunch, and they were having a discussion about how well we must be paid. And I laughed. I didn't go into the details of my salary. But later in later years, they came to understand from other sources, how exploitation functions within the university where they were paying almost quarter of a million to go to school, and graduate school, and so forth. So it's quite shocking that even though we have the internet and all the information is there, anyone can see precisely how much NYU or Columbia cost today, or how much the cost of living is, as opposed to 1961, for instance, that people are still not putting together that when you have housing, that is like income. For most of us, if housing is affordable, the way one lives, the efficiency to live, the ease, the mental health, and physical health improves. And it's fascinating to me that during lockdown, people were told, just to bite the bullet, stay inside, and how many publications, how much of the media went out to discover the many people being locked down in extremely small hovels? Multiple families living in three bedroom houses, even smaller. And I just kept thinking throughout these past 20 months or so that the media has become complicit in everything you've discussed, we've seen an extra tack added on where the media is another arm of industry and the 1% they are able sell lockdown stories: stars singing, Spaniards singing, accordionists from Neapolitan balconies, everyone's happy. But that was a lie. And that was a lie being sold conveniently.I regularly post stories from CNN, where their recent yacht story—they love yachts—their recent yacht story from about five or six days ago was how the super-rich are “saving” the world's ecology. And it was a paid advertisement of a very expensive yacht that uses nuclear power, what you and I hope: that all the rich people are running around with little mini nuclear reactors on the seas. And I keep thinking: what has happened that you mentioned campaign financing? Remember what happened to Hillary Clinton when she suggested campaign finance reform? That went over like a lead balloon. And then we've got CNN, Forbes, all these major publications that run paid sponsored news articles as news. It's all paid for, they legally have to see it as but you have to find the fine print. And we're being sold the 1% as the class that's going to save the planet with this very bizarre looking yacht with a big ball on it. And another another CNN article about yacht owners was about how it's hard for them to pay for maintenance or something and  we're pulling out our tiny violins.And I keep wondering, why is the media pushing on this? We can see where MSNBC and CNN and USA today are heading in a lot of their coverage over class issues. They would much rather cover Felicity Huffman, and all those other stars’ children's cheating to get into a California University scandal which is itself its own scandal, of course. That gets so covered, but you rarely see class issues in any of these publications unless it refers to the favelas of Brazil or the shanty towns of Delhi. So, we're sold: poverty isn't here, it's over there. And over here, mask mandates, lock up, shut your doors stay inside do your part clap for the cares and class has been cleared. Cut out. Even in the UK, where class consciousness has a much more deeply ingrained fermentation, let's say within the culture, it's gone. Now the BBC. Similarly, nightly videos at the initial part of lockdown with people clapping for the cares. Little was said about the salaries that some of these carriers were getting, I don't mean just junior doctors there, but the people who are cleaning the hallways. So, our attention has been pushed by the media away from class, not just the politicians doing the dirty work, or not just the nasty finance campaign funding that is well known in the US. What are some of the responses to this, Michael, that we might advance some solutions here? Because my worry, as a person living on this planet is enough is enough: Why can't we just try a new system? Is it that the fall of the Berlin Wall left a permanent divide in terms of what we can experiment with? Or is there something else at play?Michael Hudson: Well, recently, Ukraine passed a law about oligarchs, and they define an oligarchy as not only owning a big company, but also owning one of the big media outlets. And the oligarchy in every country owns the media. So, of course, CNN, and The New York Times and The Washington Post, are owned by the billionaire class representing the real estate interests and the rentier interests. They're essentially the indoctrination agencies. And so of course, in the media, what you get is a combination of a fantasy world and Schadenfreude—Schadenfreude, when something goes wrong with people you don't like, like the scandal. But apart from that, it's promoting a fantasy, about a kind of parallel universe about how a nice world would work, if everybody earned the money that they had, and the wealth they had by being productive and helping society. All of a sudden, that's reversed and [they] say, “Well, they made a lot of fortune, they must have made it by being productive and helping society.” So, everybody deserves the celebrity, deserves the wealth they have. And if you don't have wealth, you're undeserving and you haven't made a productivity contribution. And all you need is to be more educated, managerial and intelligent, and you can do it. And it doesn't have anything to do with intelligence. As soon as you inherit a lot of money, your intelligence, your IQ drops 10%. As soon as you don't have to work for a living and just clip coupons, you write us down another 30%. The stupidest people I've met in my life are millionaires who don't want to think about how they get their money. They just, they're just greedy. And I was told 50 years ago, “You don't need to go to business school to learn how to do business. All you need is greed.” So what are all these business schools for? All they're doing is saying greed is good and giving you a patter talk to say, “Well, yeah, sure, I'm greedy. But that's why I'm productive.” And somehow they conflate all of these ideas.So, you have the media, and the educational system, all sort of combined into a fantasy, a fantasy world that is to displace your own consciousness about what's happening right around you. The idea of the media is that you don't look at your own position, you imagine other people's position in another world and see that you're somehow left out. So, you can say that the working class in America are very much like the teenage girls using Facebook, who use it and they have a bad self image once they use Facebook and think everybody else is doing better. That's the story in Congress this week. Well, you can say that the whole wage earning class once they actually see how awful the situation is they think, “Well, gee, other people are getting rich. Other people have yard spots, why don't I have my own house? Why am I struggling?” And they think that they're only struggling alone, and that everybody else is somehow surviving when other people are struggling just the way they are. That's what we call losing class consciousness.Julian Vigo: Yes, well, we're back to Crystal and Alexis wrestling and Dynasty’s fountain. Everyone wants to be like them. Everyone wants a car. You know, I'll never forget when I lived in Mexico City. One of the first things I learned when you jumped into one of those taxis were Volkswagen beetles,  Mexicans would call their driver “Jaime.” And I said to them, why are you guys calling the taxi drivers here “Jaime”? And they said, “We get it from you.” And I said, “What do you mean you get it from us? We don't call our taxi drivers Jaime.”And then I thought and I paused, I said,  “James!” Remember the Grey Poupon commercials? That's what we do—we have James as the driver in a lot of these films that we produced in the 1970s and 80s. And the idea became co-opted within Mexico as if everyone has a British driver named James.Now, what we have turned into from this serialised, filmic version of ourselves to the present is dystopic. Again, you talked about the percentage of rent that people are paying in the US, the way in which people are living quite worse than their parents. And this is related to student debt, bank debt, credit card debt, we've had scandals directly related to the housing market. We saw that when there were people to be bailed out, they had to be of the wealthy class and companies to be bailed out. There was no bailout for the poor, of course. I was in London during the Occupy Wall Street. In London, it was “occupy the London Stock Exchange” (Occupy LSX) right outside of not even the London Stock Exchange. It was outside of St. Paul's Cathedral. And there was a tent city, and people were fighting ideological warfare from within their tents. There wasn't much organising on the ground. It was disassembled months later. But I wonder why Americans, even with what is called Obamacare, are still not pushing for further measures, why Hillary Clinton's push for or suggestion merely of finance reform within the campaigning system, all of this has sort of been pushed aside.Are there actors who are able to advance these issues within our current political system in the United States? Or will it take people getting on the streets protesting, to get housing lowered to maybe have national rent controls, not just of the form that we have in New York, which, before I got to New York in the late 80s, everyone was telling me how great rent control was. Now it's all but disappeared? What is the answer? Is it the expropriation of houses? Is it the Cornwall style, no owning more than one house type of moratorium on homeownership? What are the solutions to this, Michael?Michael Hudson: There is no practical solution that I can suggest. Because the, you're not going to have universal medical care, as long as you have the pharmaceuticals. funding the campaign's of the leading politicians, as long as you have a political system that is funded by campaign contributors, you're going to have the wealthiest classes, and decide who gets nominated and who gets promoted. So, I don't see any line of reform, given the dysfunctional political system that the United States is in. If this were Europe, we could have a third party. And if we had an actual third party, the democratic party would sort of be like the social democratic parties in Europe, it would fall about 8% of the electorate, and a third party would completely take over. But in America, it's a two-party system, which is really one party with different constituencies for each wing of that party, and that one party, the same campaign contributors funds, both the Republicans and the Democrats. So it's possible that you can think of America as a failed state, as a failed economy. I don't see any means of practical going forward, just as you're seeing in the Congress today, when they're unwilling to pass an infrastructure act, there's a paralysis of change. I don't see any way in which a structural change can take place. And if you're having the dynamics that are polarising, only a structural change can reverse this trend. And nobody that I know, no politician that I know, sees any way of the trends being reversed.Julian Vigo: The funny thing is that scandal, quote-unquote, scandal over Ocasio Cortez's dress at the Met Gala was quite performative to me. It's typical that the media does. “Tax the rich,” as she sits at a function that I believe cost $35,000 to enter. And she socialised the entire night even if she allegedly did not pay either for her dress nor for the entrance. And I'm thinking, isn't this part of the problem: that we have so much of our socio-cultural discourse wrapped up in politics in the same way that Clinton's suggestion that campaign finance reform disappeared quite quickly? Is there any hope of getting campaign finance reform passed in the States?Michael Hudson: No. Because if you had campaign finance reform, that's how the wealthy people control politics. If you didn't, if you didn't have the wealthy, wealthy people deciding who gets nominated, you would have people get nominated by who wanted to do what the public ones, Bernie Sanders says, “Look, most of them are all the polls show that what democracy, if this were a democracy, we would have socialised medicine, we'd have public health care, we would have free education, we would have progressive taxation.” And yet no party is representing what the bulk of people have. So by definition, we're not a democracy. We're an oligarchy, and the oligarchy controls. I mean, you could say that the media play the role today that the church and religion played in the past to divert attention away from worldly issues towards other worldly issues. That's part of the problem.But not only the pharmaceutical industries are against public health care, but the whole corporate sector, the employer sector, are against socialised medicine, because right now workers are dependent for their health insurance on their employers. That means Alan Greenspan, the Federal Reserve Chairman said, this is causing a traumatised workers syndrome, the workers are afraid to quit, they're afraid to go on strike. They're afraid of getting fired because if they get fired, first of all, if they're a homeowner they lose their home because they can't pay their mortgage, but most importantly, they lose their health care. And if they get sick, it wipes them out. And they go broke and they lose their home and all the assets.Making workers depend on the employer, instead of on the government means you're locked into their job. They have to work for a living for an employer, just in order to survive in terms of health care alone. So the idea of the system is to degrade a dependent, wage-earning class and keeping privatising health care, privatising education, and moving towards absentee landlordship is the way to traumatise and keep a population on the road to serfdom. Get full access to Savage Minds at savageminds.substack.com/subscribe

Business Matters
Nobel economics prize awarded for real-life studies

Business Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 53:22


This year's Nobel prize for economics has been shared by three recipients. David Card, Joshua Angrist and Guido Imbens were awarded the prize for their use of "natural experiments" to understand how economic policy and other events connect. Professor Card, of UC Berkeley, tells us about his work on the minimum wage. Also in the programme, with energy prices rising across the US and Europe, we ask David Shepherd, energy editor at the Financial Times to explain what's been happening. And the President of the Environmental Defense Fund, Fred Krupp talks us through methane emission cuts and the difference they can make to climate change . We're joined throughout the programme by Karen Lema, Reuters Bureau Chief for the Philippines and Andy Uhler, Marketplace reporter in Austin Texas. (Picture: The Nobel economics prize is announced. Picture credit: Reuters.)

World Business Report
Update: What's behind rising energy prices?

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 6:24


We've heard about soaring gas prices, rising food prices, and now oil prices are also on the way up and have just topped their highest level in three years. We ask David Shepherd, energy editor at the Financial Times to explain what's been happening. Plus independent economist Peter Jankovsis brings us the latest from the financial markets.

Analysis
Look who's talking - the rise of ‘voice cloning'

Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 28:38


When you listen to a radio programme, watch an animated film, or even receive a phone call, it's unlikely you'll question whether the words you're hearing are coming from the mouth of a human being. But all that could be about to change thanks to the rise of ‘voice cloning'. Elaine Moore is a tech columnist at the Financial Times and she's interested in the ramifications of this new technology. Thanks to artificial intelligence, cloning a human voice can be achieved with just a few minutes of recorded audio. As the technology becomes more sophisticated and its use more widespread, how will this affect our society, our politics and our personal interactions? And is it time we were able to control what happens to our own voice both now and when we die? With contributions from: Carlton Daniel, lawyer at Squire Patton Boggs. Tom Lee, co-founder of LOVO. David Leslie, Ethics Theme Lead at the Alan Turing Institute. Rupal Patel, founder & CEO of VocaliD. Tim McSmythurs, AI Researcher and creator of Speaking AI. James Vlahos, co-founder of HereAfter AI. Producer: Craig Templeton Smith Editor: Jasper Corbett

The John Batchelor Show
1752: 3/12: #CrossfireHurricaneDiary: The first sign of the attack on Svetlana Lokhova and Michael Flynn, the Financial Times, December 16, 2016. Svetlana Lokhova @TheRealSLokhova. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 18:51


Photo: Michael Flynn with General Joseph F. Dunford (Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff), General Joseph Votel and General Raymond A. Thomas at MacDill Air Force Base on February 6, 2017 3/12: #CrossfireHurricaneDiary: The first sign of the attack on Svetlana Lokhova and Michael Flynn, the Financial Times, December 16, 2016.  Svetlana Lokhova @TheRealSLokhova. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety https://www.ft.com/content/d43cd586-c396-11e6-9bca-2b93a6856354

Optimal Business Daily
374: How to Be the Best Public Speaker On the Planet by James Altucher on Tips For Delivering a Publich Speech

Optimal Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 7:57


James Altucher tells you how to be the best public speaker on the planet Episode 374: How to Be the Best Public Speaker On the Planet by James Altucher on Tips For Delivering a Publich Speech James Altucher is an American hedge fund manager, entrepreneur, bestselling author, and podcaster. He has founded or cofounded more than 20 companies and says he failed at 17 of them. He has published 11 books, and is a regular contributor to The Financial Times, TechCrunch, and The Huffington Post. USA Today named his book Choose Yourself one of the 12 Best Business Books of All Time. The original post is located here: https://jamesaltucher.com/blog/how-to-be-the-best-public-speaker-on-the-planet/ Reach customers online and across social networks with an ever-growing suite of channel integrations and apps - including Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, Pinterest, and more. Go to Shopify.com/osd for a free 14-day trial Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalStartUpDaily

Kentucky Author Forum
Anne-Marie Slaughter and Sarah J. Jackson

Kentucky Author Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 43:24


Professor, writer, and CEO Anne-Marie Slaughter discusses her book “Renewal: From Crisis to Transformation in Our Lives, Work, and Politics" with professor and author Sarah J. Jackson. Anne-Marie Slaughter is the CEO of New America and Professor Emerita of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University. From 2009-2011 she served as the director of policy planning for the United States Department of State, the first woman to hold that position. Dr. Slaughter has written or edited seven other books. She is also a frequent contributor to various publications, including The Atlantic, the Financial Times, and Project Syndicate. Sarah J. Jackson is a Presidential Associate Professor at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania and Co-Director of the Media, Inequality, & Change Center. Dr. Jackson is the author of two books, a 2019 New America National Fellow and 2020 Andrew Carnegie Fellow. Her next book traces the contributions of Black media-makers to American democracy.

Business Matters
US Senate to raise debt ceiling again

Business Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 51:57


Leaders in Congress's upper chamber agree to extend the borrowing limit through December - we hear the ins and outs from the Financial Times' Lauren Fedor in Washington, DC. In China, abundant steel manufacturing casts doubt on the country's green commitments, as Robin Brant tells us from Wuzhou. The boss of Kraft Heinz warns of increased food prices due to inflation and Miguel Delaney of the Independent tells us about the purchase of Newcastle United by a consortium backed by Saudi Arabia. Vivienne Nunis visits one of Africa's largest rubbish sites in Kenya, and the story of getting the Covid vaccine to Antarctica. Throughout the programme we're joined from New York by Allison Schrager, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and a contributing editor at City Journal and Enda Curran, Chief Asia Economics Correspondent for Bloomberg News in Hong Kong. (Picture: The US Capitol building. Credit:Reuters)

English Premier League podcast: EPLpod
The Barcelona Complex: the making-and unmaking-of the world's greatest soccer club

English Premier League podcast: EPLpod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 23:48


The Legend chats with Financial Times journalist and author, Simon Kuper. In his latest book, The Barcelona Complex, Kuper tells the story of how FC Barcelona became the most successful club in the world—and how that era is now ending. Vote for EPLpod in the FSA Awards!  

Outside In with Charles Trevail
Michael E. Mann: What's at stake in our “new climate war” and how to win the fight

Outside In with Charles Trevail

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 31:24


In 1998, Michael E. Mann and two of his colleagues published the “hockey stick” graph that would revolutionize and galvanize climate activism. It showed the exponential acceleration of global warming since 1900 and that human reliance on carbon-based fuels was making the planet hotter and the climate consequently more unstable. Mann is now a Distinguished Professor of Atmospheric Science at Penn State and has authored several books, including his latest, The New Climate War: The Fight to Take Back Our Planet, a finalist for the 2021 Financial Times and McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award. He joins the podcast to talk about why, after decades of inaction, we're at an existential crossroads: keep doing nothing and watch the planet warm to levels that create catastrophic climate change, or take the necessary steps right now to decarbonize our economy and end our dependence on fossil fuels. Listen to this episode to learn: • How a spate of inactivists and bad actors have deceived, distracted, and delayed meaningful climate action -- and that fighting against this PR and messaging campaign is the battleground of our “new climate war” • Why mainstream messaging that focuses on personal responsibility (i.e., eat less meat, cut back on air travel, lower your carbon footprint) deflects from what's really causing climate change and the big, systematic changes needed to stop it • The vital leadership role companies must play in fighting climate change -- but why corporate greenwashing initiatives and individual “net zero” commitments, while well-intentioned, are not enough • How the financial industry has in many ways been more progressive than most governments in taking meaningful action against climate change • How words like “adaptation” and “resilience” and promises of “technological innovation” are really just forms of distraction and climate inaction • Why Mann is “cautiously optimistic” about our ability to avoid catastrophic climate change

Varyete
Varyete - Bölüm 6 (Mucide kredi verilmez, Posta büyüktür Financial Times)

Varyete

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 25:17


Alper Çelik, Ömür Okumuş ve Nuri Çetin ile varyantlı hususlara yolculuk

Deep State Radio
Biden's Multi-Tiered China Policy is a Far Cry from Trump's

Deep State Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 41:46


Trump China policy architect Peter Navarro was described by one of his colleagues as a "fucking sociopath." Trump China policy included looking the other way from human rights abuses, seeking trademarks for Ivanka's businesses and extreme Tweets. Biden's is evolving as something very very different--mature, multilayered and reflecting the complexity of the evolving relationship between the world's two major powers. We discuss the latest developments with David Sanger of the New York Times, Rosa Brooks of Georgetown Law School and Ed Luce of the Financial Times. We also discuss whether Sioux Falls, South Dakota exists or not and why that matters. Don't miss the latest Deep State Radio, the official podcast of the Deep State.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/deepstateradio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Deep State Radio
Biden's Multi-Tiered China Policy is a Far Cry from Trump's

Deep State Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 41:46


Trump China policy architect Peter Navarro was described by one of his colleagues as a "fucking sociopath." Trump China policy included looking the other way from human rights abuses, seeking trademarks for Ivanka's businesses and extreme Tweets. Biden's is evolving as something very very different--mature, multilayered and reflecting the complexity of the evolving relationship between the world's two major powers. We discuss the latest developments with David Sanger of the New York Times, Rosa Brooks of Georgetown Law School and Ed Luce of the Financial Times. We also discuss whether Sioux Falls, South Dakota exists or not and why that matters. Don't miss the latest Deep State Radio, the official podcast of the Deep State.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/deepstateradio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Kottke Ride Home
Mon. 10/04 - Thor's Antiviral COVID-19 Pill & Sexist Suitcases

Kottke Ride Home

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 14:55


The sexist history of the rollerboard suitcases. Plus, the facts about Merck's new COVID-19 antiviral pill, including its connection to Thor. And the return of Nick Lutsko's absurdist Spirit Halloween music videos.Sponsor:Novo, BankNovo.com/kottkeLinks:Meet molnupiravir, Merck's Thor-inspired pill that hammers COVID (Ars Technica)How Merck's Covid-19 pill molnupiravir could change the Covid-19 pandemic (Vox)Merck's antiviral pill reduces hospitalization of Covid patients (STAT)How Merck's antiviral pill could change the game for COVID-19 (National Geographic)The hedge fund manager behind a long-shot coronavirus pill (Financial Times, 2020)Mystery of the wheelie suitcase: how gender stereotypes held back the history of invention (The Guardian)Who Actually Invented the Wheeled Suitcase? (Interesting Engineering)Reinventing the Suitcase by Adding the Wheel (NY Times)Spirit Halloween Planet (Nick Lutsko, Twitter)Halloween Planet EP (Nick Lutsko, Bandcamp)Spirit Halloween Theme - FULL TRILOGY (Nick Lutsko, YouTube)Kottke.OrgJackson Bird on TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Risktory: The Story of Risk
Whatever happened to... Wirecard

Risktory: The Story of Risk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 14:46


Coming up on this week's episode, whatever happened to Wirecard? The German-based payment processor and financial services unicorn that collapsed in August of 2020.The story, and the lessons learned, from the Wirecard collapse: It's an exercise of what happens when threat is in plain sight, where the canary in the coalmine is practically comatose, and yet, nothing is done to right the ship. Until it's too late.On this week's episode, the rise and fall of a European darling, Wirecard.The Risktory Podcast is created, written, hosted and produced by Jacinthe A Galpin.All rights reserved.Bibliographyhttps://www.ft.com/content/03a5e318-2479-11e9-8ce6-5db4543da632https://www.reuters.com/article/us-germany-wirecard-inquiry-timeline-idUSKBN2B811Jhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wirecardhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wirecard_scandalhttps://www.regulationasia.com/wirecard-the-biggest-fintech-success-and-failure-story-of-all-time/

Intelligence Squared
Business Weekly: Dame Vivian Hunt on Stakeholder Capitalism and the Value of a Diverse Workforce

Intelligence Squared

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 29:49


Today's episode comes from the How To Lead a Sustainable Business podcast, brought to you by Selfridges Group and Intelligence Squared. In the podcast, Alannah Weston, Chairman of Selfridges Group, speaks to inspiring leaders at the forefront of sustainability and business to find out what it takes to lead change and how businesses can put sustainability at their core. In this episode Alannah is joined by Dame Vivian Hunt, a senior partner at the global management consultancy firm McKinsey & Company. She served as managing partner of McKinsey's UK and Ireland offices from 2013-2020 and is a thought leader on productivity, leadership and diversity. She was previously named as one of the top ten “most influential black people in Britain” by the Powerlist Foundation, and The Financial Times identified her “one of the 30 most influential people in the City of London”. She speaks to Alannah about the importance of businesses being open to innovation, stakeholder capitalism and the value of a diverse workforce.How To Lead a Sustainable Business is brought to you by Selfridges Group and Intelligence Squared. If you enjoyed this episode, you can subscribe in Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever your podcasts: https://bit.ly/howtoleadpod Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/intelligencesquared. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Not Almost There
The Power Of Presence with Kristi Hedges

Not Almost There

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 56:32


Kristi Hedges is a senior leadership coach with a specialty in executive communications, and the author of the Amazon bestseller The Power of Presence and The Inspiration Code. Her workshops and coaching programs have been utilized by CEOs and teams in organizations from the Fortune 10 to entrepreneurial ventures to nonprofits. She runs her own coaching practice, The Hedges Company, and is a founding partner in the leadership development firm, Element North. Kristi delivers keynotes to audiences around the world on topics at the intersection of communication and leadership. Kristi writes about leadership for Harvard Business Review and Forbes and is regularly featured in publications such as The Wall Street Journal, The Financial Times, Entrepreneur, BBC, Chief Learning Officer, and CNBC. She is an ICF-certified leadership coach and a teaching faculty member of the Georgetown University Institute for Transformational Leadership. The Hedges Company offers a range of leadership development services, including individual leadership coaching, workshops, vision setting, team facilitation, and customized training. IN THIS EPISODE… Joe and Kristi really dig into the covid work environment with a hyper-focus on communication; specifically delving into adapting your skills, and how our interactions don't have to be the same now that we are out of an office or meeting room. The great aspect about Kristi, and her coaching content, is that you don't need to be a CEO, or a people leader to grow from what she has researched. Kristi shares with Joe her findings from conducting numerous interviews for her latest book, The Inspiration Code, and spoiler alert; it's about listening to those around you and actually paying attention to what they're saying, which Joe confesses to Kristi that his wife calls him out on occasion for that.

World Business Report
Australia to end strict Covid travel ban

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 26:29


Vaccinated Australians can start travelling abroad from November, ending an 18-month ban. Anthony Dennis is travel editor for the Sydney Morning Herald, Melbourne Age and several other publications, and tells us why the government of Australia has made this move now. Also in the programme, Thailand is also easing restrictions from today, halving the length of time required for vaccinated foreign visitors to quarantine to seven days. The BBC's Jonathan Head reports on the potential impact on the country's tourism sector. A global coalition of transport organisations, representing more than 65 million transport workers, is calling on the world's governments to end what they call a "humanitarian and supply chain crisis". Lori Ann Larocco of CNBC in New York follows the global container shipping industry closely, and brings us up to speed on the latest developments in the sector. Plus, Disney has settled a claim the Hollywood star Scarlett Johansson brought with the firm over alleged breach of contract, after it streamed her superhero film at the same time as its cinema release. Disney originally said the case was without merit, and Anna Nicolaou, US media correspondent at the Financial Times, explains what brought about a change of heart. Today's edition is presented by Fergus Nicoll, and produced by Philippa Goodrich and Russell Newlove.

Les actus du jour - Hugo Décrypte
L'affrontement Chine - Etats-Unis, Britney Spears libérée, cordons bleus interdits... Actus du jour

Les actus du jour - Hugo Décrypte

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 10:42


Chaque jour, en moins de 10 minutes, un résumé de l'actualité du jour. Rapide, simple, efficace.SOURCES HASHTAG DOUBLE PEINE : France Inter, Nouvel Obs, Tweets d'Anna ToumazoffTUTELLE BRITNEY SPEARS : HuffPost, Républicain Lorrain, Le Dauphiné, Documentaire NetflixCHINE ETATS-UNIS : Le Figaro, France Info, Financial Times (anglais)PASS SANITAIRE POUR LES ADOS : France Info, Ouest-FranceNICOLAS SARKOZY : Le Monde, Nouvel ObsCORDONS BLEUS CANTINE : LCI, BFM LyonFRÉDÉRIC SAYS : Le podcast (dispo partout), Le livre (dispo partout aussi)​Écriture : Blanche Vathonne - Paul Bonnaud - Manon de Cabarrus - Hugo Travers Montage : Camille Paulet - Stanley Duplan Voir Acast.com/privacy pour les informations sur la vie privée et l'opt-out.

Maghrib in Past & Present | Podcasts
Roots And Traces Of Contemporary Cultural Life In Tangier

Maghrib in Past & Present | Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 27:45


Episode 131: Roots And Traces Of Contemporary Cultural Life In Tangier In this discussion at Youmein 2021: Roots and Traces, anthropologist George Bajalia and journalist Aida Alami explore the roots and traces of contemporary cultural life in Tangier, especially as they relate to northern Morocco's border regions.  From questions of diversity and difference to the roots of present debates around representation, responsibility, and justice, Youmein 2021: Roots and Traces was an open-ended artistic inquiry into how the structures of our past have shaped our current moment. The traces of this past appear in unexpected places, both institutionally and in the social milieu from which we develop artistic reflections. Uncomfortable inequities and realities sit adjacent to the rise of powerful populist and progressive movements worldwide. Since Youmein began in 2014, xenophobia, isolationism, and neo-imperialism have grown simultaneously with new forms of solidarities and ways of being in-common. How will these movements leave their traces in our shifting social orders, and how will they transform, sediment, and root themselves differently? So far, each edition of the Youmein Festival has taken on themes speaking to Tangier as a space of both border and bridge: al-barzakh, crisis, imitation, limit(s), and desire. This year, those themes became the fertile ground on which we will reconvene and dig deep into what has come before and make choices about where we want to go next. After a year of isolated reflections, and alongside the Bicentennial of the Tangier-American Legation, Youmein invited the artists, speakers, and the public to critically reflect on the view from Tangier, and the cultures, peoples, and conditions which compose it.  As a part of the 2021 Youmein Festival, Alami and Bajalia reflected on Tangier and its myths, past and present, and alternative cultural histories and present realities in this corner of the Strait of Gibraltar. From Maalem Abdellah Gourd and the renovation of his home in Tangier medina to the role of the Tangier American Legation Museum in the city, they share thoughts how different flows of people through the city, categorized differently as migrants, immigrants, “ex-pats,” and artists, intersect and overlap.   George Bajalia is an anthropologist (Ph.D., Columbia University), Assistant Professor at Wesleyan University, and theatre director based between Morocco and New York. He is the co-founder of the annual Youmein Creative Media Festival in Tangier, Morocco and the Northwestern University in Qatar Creative Media Festival. His work has been supported by the CAORC-Mellon Mediterranean Research Fellowship, the American Institute of Maghrib Studies Long-Term Fellowship, and the Fulbright Foundation, and he is a Fellow of the Tangier- American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies. Aida Alami is a Moroccan freelance journalist who's frequently on the road, reporting from North Africa, France, the Caribbean, and more recently, Senegal. She regularly contributes to the New York Times, and her work has also been published by the New York Review of Books, The Financial Times, and Foreign Policy. She earned her bachelor's degree in media studies at Hunter College and her master's degree in journalism at Columbia University. She mainly covers migration, human rights, religion, politics and racism. These days, Aida spends a lot of time in France, where she is directing a documentary feature on antiracism activists and police violence. This episode was recorded on July 28th, 2021 at the Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies (TALIM).    Posted by Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

Remake
024. When Change Outpaces Learning

Remake

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 66:30


TODAY'S GUEST Prof. Eddie Obeng is a British organizational theorist, educator, and author, who serves as a professor at Henley Business School and Hult International Business School's Ashridge Executive Education. He is the founder of Pentacle, The Virtual Business School, and serves as its executive director. Professor Obeng has been described as "a leading revolutionary" and "an agent provocateur" by the Financial Times.   EPISODE SUMMARY In this conversation we talk about: How studying material science and observing the changes in modern business led him to the crucial insight that the world is now changing faster than we can catch up with our projections How his insight unravels common wisdom in industry after industry leading him to explore new ways of doing things Why traditional hierarchies no longer make sense in a volatile, complex, and ambiguous world How his insights inspired later development in design thinking, and how his thinking led him to create QUBE, an interactive, virtual, super-real world, which allows organizations to shed their old world culture and thinking and experiment with collaborative, creative problem solving We also discuss: Why has thought leadership stalled? How do we enact change to happen in a more human way to allow people to lead balanced lives? How do we become effective leaders? What can individuals do differently to change their lives for the better?   TIMESTAMP CHAPTERS [2:58] Life in the UK during Covid                            [8:32] Early childhood driving forces                      [11:05] The World After Midnight and the Rapidly Accelerating Pace of Change [20:13] The New World Management concept        [34:55] Leadership in the New World and the death of the hierarchy [43:59] The difference between leadership and management [55:45] A super reality [1:00:15] A sermon on enriching and controlling your life in the New World   EPISODE LINKS Eddie's Links

The Bunker
Daily: Road-trip to the Red Wall – Sebastian Payne and Nick Cohen on Labour's lost direction

The Bunker

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 28:08


The Red Wall has been the backbone of Labour's vote in the Midlands and the North of England. But in 2019, it dramatically turned blue for the first time in living memory. So what do we get wrong about the Red Wall? Nick Cohen talks to the Financial Times' Sebastian Payne about his new book, Broken Heartlands, his time in ten constituencies across the North, and what Labour needs to do to recover regional electoral support.“The collapse of the Red Wall has been gradual, then sudden.”“Brexit broke the umbilical cord between collectivised communities.”“I couldn't tell you a single soundbite from Ken Clarke's career. But he told a convincing narrative.” “There is nothing inevitable about demographics in this country.” Presented by Nick Cohen. Produced by Andrew Harrison. Assistant producers: Jelena Sofronijevic and Jacob Archbold. Music by Kenny Dickinson. Audio production by Alex Rees. THE BUNKER is a Podmasters Production https://www.hive.co.uk/Product/Sebastian-Payne/Broken-Heartlands--A-Journey-Through-Labours-Lost-England/25842557 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Keen On Democracy
Anne-Marie Slaughter on Radical Honesty as a Key to Growth

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 34:24


In this episode of “Keen On”, Andrew is joined by Anne-Marie Slaughter, the author of “Renewal: From Crisis to Transformation in Our Lives, Work, and Politics”, to discuss how we as individuals, organizations, and nations can move backward and forward at the same time, facing the past and embracing a new future. Anne-Marie Slaughter is the CEO of New America, a think ​and action ​tank dedicated to renewing the promise of America, bringing us closer to our nation's highest ideals. She is also the Bert G. Kerstetter '66 University Professor Emerita of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University. Dr. Slaughter is also a contributing editor to the Financial Times and writes a bi-monthly column for Project Syndicate. Visit our website: https://lithub.com/story-type/keen-on/ Email Andrew: a.keen@me.com Watch the show live on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajkeen Watch the show live on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ankeen/ Watch the show live on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lithub Watch the show on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/LiteraryHub/videos Subscribe to Andrew's newsletter: https://andrew2ec.substack.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Business Method Podcast: High-Performance & Entrepreneurship
Ep.522 ~ The Billion Dollar Investor ~ Jim Rogers

The Business Method Podcast: High-Performance & Entrepreneurship

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 76:10


Welcome to The Business Method Podcast listeners and today do we have a treat for you. One of the most iconic investors & entrepreneurs in modern history is joining us on the podcast. Jim Rogers is his name & we actually had him on the show a few years ago & are fortunate enough to get him back for another episode. If you don't know who Jim is I suggest you Google him right now & you will start to see why I am so excited to chat with him again. Jim is one of the most seasoned international investors on the planet & I'll give you a brief outline to give you an idea about his expertise.    Jim was born in Alabama in 1942 & attended Yale in the mid-60's, then headed to Oxford to get another degree in Politics & Economics. Next Jim began his Wall Street career. In 1970 Jim apprenticed with Arnhold & S.Bleichroeder, which is where he met George Soros. In 1973, Jim started together with George Soros the Quantum Fund with only $600 in his pocket, one of the first truly international hedge funds. Over the next 10 years their fund went up 4,200% when the S&P500 only rose less than 50%. In 1980, Jim retired & traveled by motorcycle through China. Continuing to manage his own portfolio. Jim served as a guest professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Business. In 1990, Jim set out to fulfill a lifelong dream: motorcycling 100,000 miles across six continents – an achievement that landed him in the Guinness Book of World Records. In 1995, he wrote his first book Investment Biker: Around the World with Jim Rogers. As a private investor, he constantly analyzed the countries through which he traveled in search of investment ideas. He recorded his unique journey in that book.  In 1998, Jim founded the Rogers International Commodities Index, predicting that the next commodity bull run had just begun. The index measures 35 different commodities from 11 different international exchanges & was up 170% over the first decade. In 1999, Jim embarked on a Millennium Adventure, traveling around the world for 3 years, passing through 116 countries & covering more than 152,000 miles – setting yet another Guinness World Record & giving him the title by Time Magazine as, The Indiana Jones of Investing. He recounted this journey in his book “Adventure Capitalist: The Ultimate Road Trip”. In 2005, Jim wrote Hot Commodities & the book A Bull in China. Also in 2007 Jim moved his family to Singapore to be closer to the hottest market in the history of the world saying, “In my view, China is going to be the most important country in the 21st century,”He is regularly featured in leading international media outlets, including Time, The Washington Post, The New York Times, Barron's, Forbes, Fortune, The Wall Street Journal, The Financial Times, The Business Times    03:53 Who is Jim Rogers?     07:03 Crisis & Opportunity Are the Same Thing    12:33 Jim Meets George Soros & Investment History Shift Begins    14:43 Jim Rogers' Money Philosophy    15:53 Why Jim Traveled Around the World via Motorcycle    18:53 What Jim Thinks of Location Independent Entrepreneurs    23:00 Jim Invested in All the Stocks in One Entire Country    25:23 Communist China Are the Best Capitalists in the World    28:03 Looking for New Investment Opportunities Since COVID-19    30:13 The Central Bankers Controlling a Correction    33:38 Positioning Yourself to End Up on the Winning Side of Modern Monetary Theory    35:28 CryptoCurrency Taking the Market from Gold & Silver    39:48 Jim on Focus & What He Would Tell His Past Self    42:08 Do Central Banks Know What They're Doing Today?    45:18 Jim on Getting Kids to Listen About Business & Money    48:08 Getting Commodities from Space    51:03 Short-Term Gold Prices    54:43 What Kind of Macro Economics Indicators is Jim Using When He is Vetting a Country Before He Even Starts Looking at the Broader Market? 1:00:23 Jim's Worst Investment Ever 1:02:48 Would Jim Go Back Into Investment Management? 1:04:33 Who Should We Keep Our Eyes On 1:06:08 Is it a Good Time to Invest in Travel & Tourism? 1:08:28 Where We Should Be Thinking About Living in the Next Decade? 1:13:00 What Jim Wants for His Legacy Contact Info:   https://www.jimrogers.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/iamjimrogers BlliBili: https://space.bilibili.com/560909197 Subscribe to the Podcast:    

The Blizzard
Greatest Games: Aston Villa 10 Burnley 0, 1925

The Blizzard

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 45:15


David Owen joins Jonathan Wilson and Marcus Speller to discuss the immediate ramifications that the 1925 offside rule change had on English football. Villa were keen to impress their fans after a disappointing 1924-25 campaign, and the squad selection had its doubters. But this thumping of Burnley would quell those fears and prove football administrators right who had hoped to bring some much-needed entertainment back to the game following a cagey footballing era post-WW1. Jonathan Wilson founded The Blizzard in 2011 and is editor of the magazine. He's contributed to numerous publications including the Guardian and Sports Illustrated as well as having authored Behind the Curtain, Inverting the Pyramid, The Outsider, Angels with Dirty Faces and most recently The Names Heard Long Ago, among others. Marcus Speller is a host of the Football Ramble podcast as well as Answerable Questions with Questionable Answers. Marcus also regularly hosts our live Q&A events across the country alongside Jonathan. David Owen is a freelance sports journalist, an author and former sports editor of the Financial Times. Listen to every episode of Greatest Games: theblizzard.co.uk/podcasts/greatest-games Subscribe to our quarterly magazine: theblizzard.co.uk Twitter: twitter.com/blzzrd Facebook: facebook.com/blzzrd Instagram: instagram.com/theblizzard__

Revelations Radio Network

Canary Cry News Talk ep. 394 - 09.27.2021 - OCCULTECH MAGIK: Black Goo Greta, $ADA Mystery Religions, Anti-Jab Jocks, X-Men Nephilites - CCNT 394 Our LINK TREE: CanaryCry.Party SUBSCRIBE TO US ON: NewPodcastApps.com SUPPORT: CanaryCryRadio.com/Support MEET UPS: CanaryCryMeetUps.com Basil's other project: Ravel Podcast INTRO Biden gets booster on air Black Goo Greta Cover (Your Celeb Mag) Hamster has been trading crypto, out-performing S&P 500 (Biz Insider)   FLIPPY 0:25:31 Can football (soccer) playing robots beat world cup winners by 2050? (BBC)   GREAT RESET/CRYPTO0:37:03 Chinese News: China cuts power and production (Bloomberg) Note: Gov't must relieve supply chain turmoil (Financial Times) Huge news from Cardano $ADA during summit (Bloomberg) -Hoskinson donates $20 mil to Carnegie Mellon (Carnegie was a Mason, Mellon ties) -Partnership with Dish Network (Dishfire of NSA, $5 bil deal w/ AT&T, AWT 5G partnership) -Acala PRISM to offer DID on $ADA (PRISM of the NSA, DID traditional) -COTI to issue Djed algorithmic stablecoin on $ADA (Djed ancient Egypt) -Ouroboros PoS protocol for $ADA Australia order $14 million Ouroboros sculpture   COVID 19 JINGLE/PANDEMIC SPECIAL 1:09:46 Clip: More tyranny in Australia (Brisbane military airplane drive by) Clip: Even more tyranny in Australia (photo of mask police going viral) Clip: “Get him, he's leaving his house!” Clip: UK protest with thousands Clip: NY Gov says NG to replace unvaccinated medical Ohio State HP “aware and monitoring” possible trucker protest (Fox19) R1 Variant starting to spread (SF Chronicle) Thousands dying but not from C19 (Yahoo/Telegraph) Clip: Natural Immunity potential legal challenge to federal mandates (Yahoo)   I AM WACCINE 1:54:44 Clip: Scientist Dr. Ryan Cole, jab autopsies Headline: Court blocks NY city school mandates (WHBI) Unjabbed clash in NBA, Kyrie Irving satanic conspiracy (Sports Illustrated) Headline: GS Warriors, Andrew Wiggins denied religious exemption (NY Times)   BREAK (producer party) 2:15:31   POLYTICKS 3:20:26 Newsom Science/Alien: CA to replace the word “Alien” for “noncitizen” and “immigrant” Harry Legs: Biden purchases drones from China (National Pulse)   NEPHILIM UPDATE 3:30:55 X-Men could join MCU as Nephilites, not mutants (Screen Rant, MCL)   ADDITIONAL STORIES Church at planned parenthood permanently ordered away from clinic (Spokesman Review) Joe Rogan says Trump will probably win 2024 (DailyMail) Robot Arm milking cows (ChipPewa) Not financial advice, Airport robots to rise to $2.5 bn by 2030 (Global News Wire) Mental Health: Use economic, medical, and social data for policy (WEF) India covering up snake bite massacres (Daily Beast) Proud Boys in contact with FBI on Insurrection Day (Yahoo) Inside CIA secret war against Wikileaks (Yahoo) Facebook Ray-Ban Smart Glasses solves problem, but privacy issue (Yahoo) Will robots be able to have children, celebrate mothers day? (Analytics Insights) The Army is modeling future robots on…squirrels (Pop. Mechanics) Robot designs inspired by nature (Design Boom) Scientists create genetically modified coffee (DailyMail) Waccines C19 death toll surpasses 1918 Spanish flu estimates (Smithsonian) National Guard ready to replace health care workers (Reuters) Gates Foundation, NIH, CDC funded C19 jab effectiveness study (MedRxiv)   PRODUCERS ep. 394: Scott K**, Brian D, Anonymous, Aaron J, Sam W, Sir Sammons Knight of the Fishes, Sir Casey the Shield Knight, JC, Heatheruss, Sarah P, GiantsBane16, Brandt W, Veronica D, Big Tank, Juan A, Gail M, Doughty the Coyote, Runksmash, Ciara, Rob TIMESTAMPS: Christine C ART: Dame Allie of the Skillet Nation Sir Dove, Knight of Rustbeltia Ryan N Mike B Christine C

Deep State Radio
Europe and the Atlantic Alliance After Merkel: What Next?

Deep State Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 40:28


Most Americans don't give much thought to German politics--and that's a good thing given that when we once did it was because those politics were a disaster. But with the departure of Germany's chancellor of the past 16 years, Angela Merkel, it is time we did. Germany is not only a vital ally but thanks in large part to Merkel's leadership, it is a global leader of significance. What comes next in our relationship--especially as the US continues to prioritize its pivot to Asia. We discuss with Ed Luce of the Financial Times, Kori Schake of AEI and Rosa Brooks of Georgetown Law Center. Join us.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/deepstateradio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Deep State Radio
Europe and the Atlantic Alliance After Merkel: What Next?

Deep State Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 40:28


Most Americans don't give much thought to German politics--and that's a good thing given that when we once did it was because those politics were a disaster. But with the departure of Germany's chancellor of the past 16 years, Angela Merkel, it is time we did. Germany is not only a vital ally but thanks in large part to Merkel's leadership, it is a global leader of significance. What comes next in our relationship--especially as the US continues to prioritize its pivot to Asia. We discuss with Ed Luce of the Financial Times, Kori Schake of AEI and Rosa Brooks of Georgetown Law Center. Join us.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/deepstateradio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Black Wine Guy Experience
Been Around The World. Jeff Porter's Sips and Trips.

The Black Wine Guy Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 100:26


MJ's guest is seasoned sommelier, wine educator and founder of Volcanic Selections, Jeff Porter. Jeff has been featured in numerous major food and wine publications, such as The New York Times, Los Angeles Magazine, San Francisco Chronicle, Eater and The Financial Times. Jeff's sommelier career began in Napa Valley, where he worked at Tra Vigne Ristorante in St. Helena. He joined the Bastianich Hospitality Group in 2009 at Osteria Mozza under the auspice of James Beard Award winning chef Nancy Silverton. In 2011 he moved to New York to become the wine director for Del Posto. In 2014, Jeff became the Beverage Operations Director, overseeing the beverage programs for Babbo, Del Posto, Esca, Lupa, Otto, Babbo Pizzeria and more. In 2019, Jeff left the Bastianich group and began his consulting career and a web series about wine, life, and culture called Sip Trip. And in 2020, Jeff opened Volcanic Selections, an import and distribution business. Outside of beverages, Jeff is an avid at-home cook, doting father, passionate traveler, and a lover of all things barbecue.Jeff's passion for food and wine comes through, literally, in this episode. Jeff is the first guest to bring a meal - burger and fries - to accompany his wine selection of A 2019 Dolcetto D'Alba and a 2013 Henskens Rankin of Tasmania Brut Rose'. Neither disappoint. Originally from Texas, Jeff understands a good meal, and it wasn't until his college days - working at a German restaurant as a dishwasher - did he start to understand wine and all its beauty and complexities. MJ and Jeff have only just begun with this conversation, tackling items one by one such as how Jeff went from a small suburb north of Dallas to the inner city of Los Angeles working as a teacher for Teach for America, right out of UT-Austin. Jeff talks about the inspiration he gained from his father who gifted him WINE by Hugh Johnson; his time at Tra Vigne Ristorante and how he learned he had one job: make people happy; essentially throwing a party each and every night. It's Part 1 with Jeff Porter, and it's a juicy one. A huge thank you to Jeff Porter! Follow him on IG @drinkeatlove Check out Volcanic Selectionshttps://volcanicselections.com/ Follow them on IG @volcanicselections This episode's in studio wine:2013 Henskens Rankin of Tasmania Brut Rose'2019 Bartolo Mascarello Dolcetto d'Alba______________________________________________________________Until next time, cheers to the mavericks, philosophers, deep thinkers and wine drinkers! Don't forget to subscribe and be sure to give The Black Wine Guy Experience a five-star review on whichever platform you listen to.For insider info from MJ and exclusive content from the show sign up at Blackwineguy.comFollow MJ @blackwineguy Thank you to our sponsor Skurnik Wine and Spirits, one of the most trusted names in wine for the past 30 plus years. Check them out: https://www.skurnik.com/ Love this podcast? Love the cool content? Get a producer like mine by reaching out to the badass team at Necessary Media. www.necessarymediaproductions.com@necessary_media_ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The John Batchelor Show
1698: 3/12: #CrossfireHurricaneDiary: The first sign of the attack on Svetlana Lokhova and Michael Flynn, the Financial Times, December 16, 2016. Svetlana Lokhova @TheRealSLokhova.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 18:51


Photo: The FT. Fair use. @Batchelorshow 3/12: #CrossfireHurricaneDiary: The first sign of the attack on Svetlana Lokhova and Michael Flynn, the Financial Times, December 16, 2016.  Svetlana Lokhova @TheRealSLokhova. https://www.ft.com/content/d43cd586-c396-11e6-9bca-2b93a6856354