Podcasts about Vietnam War

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1955–1975 conflict in Vietnam

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Best podcasts about Vietnam War

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Latest podcast episodes about Vietnam War

SOFcast
S2E3 Legendary Green Beret J. Stryker Meyer - MAC-V SOG, indig partnerships, and jungle warfare!

SOFcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 62:25


Members of today's US Special Operations Forces are often regarded as heroes, but there are those that today's elite operators look up to and regard as their own heroes. John Stryker “Tilt” Meyer is one of those men! As a member of the clandestine MAC-V SOG operating in the midst of the Vietnam War, Tilt recounts his combat experiences, some very close calls, and how close partnership with indigenous forces along with coordinated joint operations lead to successful missions in places where American troops “officially” never were. Subscribe today and leave us a review!

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
COI #177: Colin Powell's Career Supporting the War State guest Scott Horton

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 65:45


On Conflicts of Interest #177, the great Scott Horton returns to the show to discuss the true legacy of Colin Powell, who served in many high-level roles during his long career in government. Scott breaks down Powell's infamous UN speech that swayed millions of Americans to support the Iraq War. However, Powell's bloody legacy stretches far beyond the 2003 invasion, all the way back to the Vietnam War. Scott explains Powell was wrongly lauded as a successful military leader and then used his faux reputation to sell the American people on war.  Scott also discusses his take on his debate with Bill Kristol at the Soho Forum.  Justin Raimondo on Colin Powell https://original.antiwar.com/justin/2000/12/25/the-canonization-of-colin-powell/ Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify iHeart Radio Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD

Revelations Radio Network
TMR 270 : Philip Kraske : A Legacy of Chains

Revelations Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021


“Let one version come out, then another, then another. Let the public pick and choose. Nothing stinks more... than the classic seamless narrative.”—A Legacy of Chains We welcome back the author Philip Kraske—who joined us in 2019 to discuss his novel, 11/9 and the Terrorist Who Loved Bonsai Trees—for a discussion about his latest book, A Legacy of Chains and Other Stories, a novella plus six shorter stories that "range from the personal to the political, from the comic to the dramatic". In the novella, A Legacy of Chains, Kraske engages imaginatively with the issue of American POWs allegedly left behind in Vietnam after the Vietnam War, and crafts a vivid tale of nine American servicemen—now in their sixties and seventies—who turn up on the south coast of Spain having escaped from Vietnam after decades in captivity. By way of contrast in the short stories—"The Rainmaker", "Pioneer Woman", "Shoccer", "Alan the Newsboy", "Pirates" and "Exposures"—Kraske explores subjects as diverse as soccer, blackmail, poinsettia theft, and the imagined back-room planning for the "Raid" on Osama bin Laden's "compound" in Pakistan. Join us as we discuss a few of the more "conspiratorial" aspects of the stories and consider some of the historical claims that underpin the fiction. [Podcast theme music by Antony Raijekov (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0).] For show notes please visit https://themindrenewed.com

The Mind Renewed : Thinking Christianly in a New World Order
TMR 270 : Philip Kraske : A Legacy of Chains

The Mind Renewed : Thinking Christianly in a New World Order

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 51:38


“Let one version come out, then another, then another. Let the public pick and choose. Nothing stinks more... than the classic seamless narrative.”—A Legacy of Chains We welcome back the author Philip Kraske—who joined us in 2019 to discuss his novel, 11/9 and the Terrorist Who Loved Bonsai Trees—for a discussion about his latest book, A Legacy of Chains and Other Stories, a novella plus six shorter stories that "range from the personal to the political, from the comic to the dramatic". In the novella, A Legacy of Chains, Kraske engages imaginatively with the issue of American POWs allegedly left behind in Vietnam after the Vietnam War, and crafts a vivid tale of nine American servicemen—now in their sixties and seventies—who turn up on the south coast of Spain having escaped from Vietnam after decades in captivity. By way of contrast in the short stories—"The Rainmaker", "Pioneer Woman", "Shoccer", "Alan the Newsboy", "Pirates" and "Exposures"—Kraske explores subjects as diverse as soccer, blackmail, poinsettia theft, and the imagined back-room planning for the "Raid" on Osama bin Laden's "compound" in Pakistan. Join us as we discuss a few of the more "conspiratorial" aspects of the stories and consider some of the historical claims that underpin the fiction. [Podcast theme music by Antony Raijekov (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0).] For show notes please visit https://themindrenewed.com

Podcast UFO
477. Alfred Quiroz

Podcast UFO

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 114:45


Vietnam War veteran, Alfred J. Quiroz his UFO/USO incidents while he served in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War. Alfred dropped out (neighborhood internet outage) and callers for the end of the show, including Linda Zimmermann.Show Notes

The Underworld Podcast
The Burmese Heroin Jungle Kingpin & the Transgender Opium Queen

The Underworld Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 53:06


Khun Sa was a mercenary, a rebel, a warlord and a freedom fighting drugmaker who all-but created the modern heroin industry in the wake of the Vietnam War's smack epidemic. At one point, the Shan hero, his fiefdom buried deep in the Burmese brush, supplied three quarters of all the gear in America. No wonder Washington called him the ‘Prince of Death.' But Khun Sa's path was actually paved by a princess, who eschewed a life of Kokang royalty to become a gun-toting shaven-headed, trans opium kingpin. Few dared to mess with Miss Hairy Legs, who dated Hollywood stars and went everywhere with a cigarette-carrying lackey.

From The Green Notebook
Rabbi Mordecai Finley- Finding Inner Well-Being

From The Green Notebook

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 60:42


Rabbi Mordecai Finley sits down to talk with Joe about the power of self-reflection and how it can lead to inner well-being and help reduce conflict in our lives. He also shares lessons from decades counseling couples, earning his black belt in jujitsu, and serving in the Marine Corps following the Vietnam War. 

Prevail with Greg Olear
House of Unger, House of Olear (with Craig Unger)

Prevail with Greg Olear

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 80:03


Craig Unger, the journalist and author of “American Kompromat: How the KGB Cultivated Donald Trump, and Related Tales of Sex, Greed, Power, and Treachery” and “House of Trump, House of Putin,”joins Greg Olear for a wide-ranging discussion on the Vietnam War, Reagan's October Surprise, the failures of the New York Times, Trump's cultivation by the KGB, Semion Mogilevich, and Craig's incredible eighth grade year. Plus: a law firm provides a specific service. Follow Craig on Twitter: https://twitter.com/craigunger Buy Craig's books: https://www.amazon.com/Craig-Unger/e/B001H6EMQO Craig's Esquire article: https://classic.esquire.com/article/1991/10/1/october-surprise Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Scheer Intelligence
The brave boys who helped end the Vietnam War

Scheer Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 32:30


Documentary filmmaker Judith Ehrlich joins Robert Scheer on this week's “Scheer Intelligence” to discuss “The Boys Who Said No,” a documentary about the Vietnam War draft resisters. 

Warriors In Their Own Words | First Person War Stories
Lt. Col. Thomas D. Ferran III: Sniping in Vietnam, Part II

Warriors In Their Own Words | First Person War Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 30:21


Lt. Col. Thomas D. Ferran III volunteered to be a part of the first group of trained Marine Corps snipers in the Vietnam War. He spent almost all his time in the field, accompanying various infantry units on their missions.  Ferran describes sniping as a personal business, that is simultaneously an art, and a hunt. He was a co-founder and former president of the USMC Scout / Sniper association, and received two Purple Hearts, five presidential Unit Citations, and the Marine Corps Combat Action Ribbon. Learn more about Ferran, and his service, here.

Intelligence Matters
CIA Chief Historian David Robarge on Pivotal Global Events

Intelligence Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 39:30


In this episode of Intelligence Matters, host Michael Morell speaks with David Robarge, Chief Historian at the CIA, about the agency's performance during some of the most important global issues of the last 50 years. Morell and Robarge discuss the insight and warnings CIA provided at pivotal moments during the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Vietnam War, the collapse of the Soviet Union, the first Gulf War, and the September 11, 2001 terror attacks. Robarge explains why the CIA has at times struggled to provide adequate tactical warnings of significant developments. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Aced Out Podcast
EP 23: Muruga Booker [P-FUNK, et al]

Aced Out Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 158:24


** visit acedoutpodcast.com to see photos and more **“The funk is the stench that you smell after you work really hard.” So says MURGA BOOKER, drummer, percussionist, shaman & card-carrying funkateer. And he would know. After all, from 1980 to ‘85, Booker was deeply embedded in the P-Funk camp, working with George Clinton and everyone else around Disc Ltd. Studios in Detroit. He was snatched up by Rubber Band drummer Frankie “Cash” Waddy and Bootsy Collins himself after they had heard him play the Moroccan clay drums at his pad. They were also impressed by Booker's work with Weather Report, bassist Michael Henderson, and Detroit soul group the Fantastic Four. By then, Muruga had figured out how to make himself indispensable to producers and bandleaders alike. “I saw everybody in Detroit at Motown playing congas and bongos and maybe some timbales.” He explains. “So I went to Israeli and Greek doumbek and Moroccan clay drums… By having those instruments, I was not in any direct competition.” This explains the sounds of albums like the Electric Spanking of War Babies, which you might have noticed has a lot more varied and freaky percussion in the mix than Funkadelic records previous. Muruga's funky hands are also busy on Clinton solo joints such as Computer Games (1982) and You Shouldn't Nuf Bit Fish (1983), the P-Funk AllStars' Urban Dance Floor Guerillas (1983), and the lesser known gem, a Bootsy project called GodMama (1981). But that's not all. Being around George during this period also put Murugua in direct proximity to Sly Stone, whom Booker was able to entice to play bass (!) on his project, Muruga and the Soda Jerks, a quirky, New Wave-sounding version of the P signed and produced by Clinton. But Muruga's contribution to Parliament-Funkadelic was not only musical but also medicinal. He served as the group's masseuse and yoga instructor, teaching Bernie Worrell, George, Sly, et al breathing techniques in between bites of Booker's mother's paprikash. But Muruga's musical journey didn't start with the P — not by a long shot. In fact, as a teenager in 1960, Steve (not yet Muruga) Booker already had a hit. The band was called the Low Rocks and the song was “Blueberry Jam,” a super-sped up reworking of “Blueberry Hill” by Fats Domino. “We were the young garage punks of the era” says Booker, who was recruited directly from the audience when the previous Low Rocks drummer abruptly quit at a house party. The gig wound up lasting only a year, but the band had some exciting opportunities, including backing up Little Stevie Wonder in a battle of the bands. Soon after that, Steve Booker began to see the drums not just as an instrument but also as a theory of life. He basically moved into Detroit's legendary blues and folk club the Chess Mate, where he would eventually become bandleader. There he would play hours-long drum solos every night. But the young Serbian stickman still lacked some key ingredients. One night, after he had finished yet another one of his extended excursions, a Black gentleman approached. “I see what you're trying to do,” he told Booker. But rather then launching into a lecture, the man handed him a cassette tape of Drums of Passion by Nigerian drummer Babatunde Olatunji. And just like that, Booker's life changed. He spent the next two weeks in his mom's living room, eight hours per day, dancing to Drums and seeing how the music made his body move. Things were starting to make sense. “If you do not love Africa or it's people, then you cannot love the blues, or jazz, or rock and roll,” he says. The lessons came in handy when he played support for none other than John Lee Hooker, whom he grew to admire deeply. “I realized that Hooker was not just a blues man, but he was a spiritual ju ju man, a healer,” says Booker. “Also he was a storyteller… That comes from griot. The griot is the storyteller of the tribe.” The pairing of the two went so well they were featured as a double bill, “Hooker & Booker.” Booker also had some of the best jams in his life at The Scene club in New York, where the top musicians of the day would go to let it all hang out musically when they weren't in the studio or on tour. There the Band of Gypsys' Buddy Miles served as a musical lightning rod of sorts. “When you go play the top clubs like The Scene,” Booker explains, “it's top musicians going there, but jamming and intermingling and exchanging with each other… That's the place where a George Clinton or a Sly Stone or a Mitch Mitchell or a Larry Coryell could go. But Buddy Miles… He was creating an atmosphere that drew all of those musicians like bees to honey.” By the late 60's into the 70s, Booker's deep plunges into musical depths had evolved into an intense curiosity and appreciation for spiritual contemplation—even more so than many peers of the era. This phase of his journey truly began on Day 1 of the iconic Woodstock Festival, where he landed in a helicopter to perform with Tim Hardin. It was there that he found himself in the presence of Swami Satchidananda, with whom Booker would live in ashram for two years as a celibate monk. In fact, it was Satchidananda who gave Muruga his name.As a result of such intense studies, Muruga became very adept at tuning in rather than tuning out, and adapting his more avant garde, exploratory tendencies to a centered principle. “A musician has to listen,” he explains. “Then you respond.” But he contends that he reached his highest plateau as a drummer once he mastered the concept of ambience and space, which he defines as: “to play the space as well as the note, and to create ambience with the space within the notes.” This seemingly unlikely marriage of freedom and discipline ultimately leads to Muruga's theory of employing “law and grace” when serving up the Funk. “1-2-3-4 is a law,” he teaches. “On the one is the law… But grace is ‘I'm being in the oneness' while I am playing.” In other words, the law guides you until you are ready to transcend it, to exist in the groove. “You must know this,” he insists. “Otherwise you don't even know funk.” Today, Muruga lives in Ann Arbor and is as jovial and active as ever, an orthodox priest and patented inventor of the Nada drum with a catalog of music that is deep and wide. In this expansive, inspiring and often hilarious interview, Muruga talks about how he used to add wah-wah's and phasers to his cymbals in order to “wake people up” by reenacting the then-ongoing Vietnam War onstage—causing half an audience in the South to give him a standing ovation, and the other half to walk out. Muruga also talks about why the rhythmic concept of “the push and drag” is the essence of life, mistakes drummers tend to make when playing the blues, and why he got scared the first time he heard the drum machine. As if that weren't enough, Muruga also describes being made fun of by Don Rickles for 20 minutes straight, the magic of Sly Stone's recording techniques, why Richie Havens is an “illuminary,” and that time he jammed one-on-one with JIMI HENDRIX on bass.Produced & Hosted by Ace AlanCohosted by Jay Stonew/ Content Produced by Aaron Booker & AndreFoxxeWebsite & Art by 3chardsEngineered by Nick “Waes” Carden at the Blue Room in Oakland, CABut we couldn't have done it without Mawnstr and especially Scott SheppardIntro track “I Can Never Be” from Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth by the Funkanauts. Go get it wherever music is sold. RIP Brotha P. Rest in Power ROBIN RUSSELL of New Birth(Aug 27, 1952 — Sep 8, 2021) ** visit acedoutpodcast.com to see photos and more **

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 132: Every Box Tells a Story: Marc Cohen's Box Art Jewelry with Art Jeweler, Marc Cohen- Part 1

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 36:47


What you'll learn in this episode: Why Marc's box art jewelry was inspired by his time working in the theater industry How Marc went from selling his work on the streets of New York City to selling them to Hollywood's biggest celebrities Why artists have always borrowed from each other's work Why box art is a conversation starter that breaks down barriers How every box tells a story Additional Resources: Instagram Photos: Museum of Israel Exhibition  Currently on view at SFO Airport  Marc Cohen and Lisa Berman (no relation)  About Marc Cohen: Marc Cohen is a highly regarded artist known for his wearable box art. As a former actor, stage manager and set designer, Cohen's two-inch-square boxes resemble stage sets with three-dimensional figures and images. His one-of-a-kind pieces sit on the shelves of numerous celebrities and can be worn like a brooch or pin. The archive of Cohen's work is housed at California art jewelry gallery Sculpture to Wear. Transcript: Inspired by his time in theater and created to resemble a stage, Marc Cohen's box art pieces are well-known among rare jewelry lovers and Hollywood's most famous artists, actors and producers. Part three-dimensional art, part jewelry, the two-by-two boxes feature images and tiny figures that reflect our world. He joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about his process for creating box art; what it was like to work with theater greats like Tom O'Horgan and Paula Wagner; and why his pieces are more than just shadow boxes. Read the episode transcript for part 1 below.  Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guest is Marc Cohen. Marc is a former actor, set designer and stage manager. He is a highly regarded artist recognized for his box art, which graces the shelves of many celebrities. The box art pieces are often worn as brooches. We'll hear all about his jewelry journey today, but before we do that, I want to thank Lisa Berman of Sculpture to Wear for making it possible for Marc to be with us today. Marc, so glad to have you. Marc: As am I. Thank you for inviting me. Sharon: Great to be with you. Tell us about your jewelry journey. It started with you traveling around the world from what you've said. Tell us about that and how everything worked from there. Marc: I was a 20-year-old young man and I left America, basically, on a freight ship. That's how I started the journey. I have a saying now, which is “Every box art tells a story.” The irony of that is that when I travel, because I was on the road for a very long time, going all over the world, I liked collecting things but I had no place to put them. I found these little, tiny boxes that I used to take candy out of, and when they were empty, I went, “Oh, this is a great thing to put little things inside of.” I already was starting the idea of collecting little objects that I might go back to at some point and use it as a part of the art. But I traveled; I went around the world all the way to India until 1970. Then in 1970, I decided to return to America and relocate myself within the country. Prior to that, I had left in 1966. It was during the Vietnam War.  I was raised in Southern California, so I came back to America and went back to my roots. I have a stepsister, and she had a friend named Tom O'Horgan. Tom O'Horgan is actually very famous in the theater world, primarily because he directed the show on Broadway called “Hair.” He directed many other shows after that, but that is the one he's most known for. In meeting each other for the first time, he asked me about myself, and I said, “I traveled around the world and I don't have any real direction about what I want to do next.” He said, “Well, I need a driver because I'm working on these film projects. Do you drive?” and I said, “Yeah, I drive.” So, he hired me as a driver.  During that period, which was in the mid-70s, I drove him around Los Angeles. I knew Los Angeles like the back of my hand, and we went to all these different studios and met all these different, incredibly famous people; directors, writers and the like, actors and so on and so forth. I was getting a little bit of a background, but what I didn't know at the time, not until many years later, was how I ended up becoming a curator and jewelry maker. I was influenced by the work of Tom O'Horgan. Being a set director, he did plays. The things he worked on in LA ended up getting finished, and he said, “I'm going back to New York. Keep in touch with me. Maybe there's some work for you in New York.”  About six months later, I called him on the phone. He said, “Marc, we're doing this show on Broadway. It's about Lenny Bruce and I have a great job. I'd love you to come and work on it.” I said, “Well, I've never lived in New York, but I do know who Lenny Bruce is. So yeah, I'm coming.” I went to New York and got a room at the Chelsea Hotel. It was during the time of Andy Warhol and a lot of other people living in the Chelsea Hotel. So here I am, in the middle of this incredible epicenter of activity; there was so much different art on the walls of the Chelsea Hotel back in those days, and all these Warhol people and other characters from the avant garde world in New York City. That's the background of how I got to where I got. What I mean is that as a young guy, I didn't know a lot, and I didn't have a lot of background in art per se. I was more like a young guy who was just wandering on the planet, as I said earlier.  So, here I am in New York. I'm in the middle of an epicenter of activity, and Tom says to me, “Well, we're in pre-production for the show, and there are a lot of other things I would like you to do for me.” He gave me a lot of different jobs, and I went around and did that for a while until the show went into production. During those pre-production meetings, he would meet with all these different designers. One of those designers is now a very famous set designer by the name of Robin Wagner. Robin Wagner went on to design “A Chorus Line” and a lot of other incredible Broadway productions. Robin, over the years, became one of my closest friends. The reason I bring him up is because we used to go his studio, which at the time was in a building called 890 Studios, which is owned by Michael Bennett, who was the director of “A Chorus Line.” I'd go to his studio with Tom, and he would have models of shows. I was picking up the incredibly creative process of how you put together an idea for a show and a stage. He would have little characters he would use to put on models of shows. I took note of those little figures, but I kept it hidden in the back of my brain, not knowing anything, nothing preplanned about what I was doing other than being Tom's assistant. We eventually went to Broadway with “Lenny.” “Lenny” opened. It was a big success and for about 30 years, I worked primarily with Tom O'Horgan in theater.  Sharon: Is it Tom O'Horgan? Marc: Yes, it's spelled O-‘-H-o-r-g-a-n. He was an artist. He always considered himself to be one of those people that didn't do things that are the typical Broadway. I mean, when you think about “Hair”—I didn't work on the original. I worked on a later production with Tom, but by that point, I had already worked on “Lenny Bruce,” “Jesus Christ Superstar” and so many other amazing things. We did opera. Tom did a lot of things, and Tom's influences and Robin's influences are guides to what I eventually ended up becoming, which is an artist who creates wearable art.  When you think about jewelry, for me, typically jewelry would be semiprecious stones, silver, gold, pearls, all that kind of stuff. I'm not the kind of creator or designer that would even know where to start to put those things together. I love beads. In the 60s, I made my own beads and necklaces, but I didn't see that as where I wanted to go. Because of my memory of the stage and theater and stories—when I told you earlier about the boxes, during the period I was living in New York, I collected a lot of things in my little East Village apartment.  I happened to be downtown in the Soho area; I was down on Canal Street. I was walking along the street, and all the shops had things out in front of them for sale. I walked by, and there were empty boxes and lots of other things. I was just motivated to buy them, so I bought them. I brought them back to my apartment and I was sitting at my little worktable looking at all these objects. I'm thinking, “Maybe I could make something out of this. I know that this coming year, Tom has this big Christmas party, and usually he's the guy who gives everybody something unique for a present.” There I was, looking at all these things, and I looked at the little box and glued a little figure I had inside the box. For example, this is a box. It's an empty one. Sharon: Like an acrylic, plastic box. Marc: A plastic box, an acrylic plastic box. Most people would take this box. It has a lid. They would put anything in it, but they didn't think they could put a whole story together. When I put the little figures in the box like that, and it has a lid and I put it like that, then I have a box with people standing in front of it, but they're sort of looking through. What are they looking at? I started to figure out I needed to have an image to tell the story. This is the World Trade Center. Sharon: So, you're creating little worlds inside the box. Marc: Right. Since I started the idea in 1985, I have made thousands, and out of those thousands, many of them are one-of-a-kind. How I can I put it? Because of my traveling and because I'm a very sentimental guy—with these boxes, the little characters can't talk; they're little plastic figures. They only way you could tell the story, as jewelry tells a story, is by what you put behind them. So, in this case, I put the World Trade Center. I had a little character standing there looking at it. I actually made this before the World Trade Center fell down.  My meaning of all of this is that it was something in the beginning I was aware of. The one I'm wearing on my lapel—this one is a door. There's a woman standing, looking not at us; she's looking towards the doorway. Anybody who would come up and look at my work, they would say, “Wow, that is amazing! Where did you get that?” This is how it started and how I got into fashion. “Where did you get that?” and I said, “Well, I made it.” And they said, “Really? Where can I get one?” And I said, “You can buy this one.” In the beginning, I used to sell right off my lapel. I love dressing. Double-breasted suits are my favorite attire, so I would have a box on my lapel. As I said, I would go all over New York City to openings, plays and the like. At openings and galleries and museums or wherever I went, people from across the gallery, they would see me dressed and see this thing on my lapel, curious to what it is. They would walk up to me. They wouldn't even look at me; they would look right at the box and go, “Oh my god, what is that?” When I said, “Well, it's a box and I made it,” they would go, “Wow! I want it.”  It got me to the point where—this is the most interesting thing—many years later, after traveling and having lived in Israel—one of the places I did live—after about 25 years, I decided to go back there for a visit. I had friends that had immigrated to Israel, and some of my friends were there to stay. I went to visit them, and they all are in the arts. When I was there, one day they said, “Why don't we go to the Israel Museum up in Jerusalem?” I was in Tel Aviv staying with them. We go up to Jerusalem. I was wearing a box. I'm walking around the Israel Museum—this is so amazing to me—and a woman from across the room, a very tiny lady, walks up to me. She says the same thing many other people said: “Wow! What is that? Where did you get that?” I said, “Well, I made it,” as I said earlier.  The point of it is that these boxes have a story in them. For me, every story leads into another. How I mean that is that a person who I don't even know comes up to me, looks at my work; they're inspired by it; they talk about it; they tell me things about it that I've never myself, as the creator of it, imagined how significant it was or what it meant to them. As in theater, as in my relationship to Tom O'Horgan—who broke the fourth wall when he did “Hair” on Broadway—during the period I was creating these, people in New York and probably everywhere else didn't exactly walk up to each other and start a conversation with strangers. I had the object that changed all that, and I had not realized that until I started going out and wearing them.  Getting back to Israel, this woman, who I later found out was named Tammy Schatz, she was the curator of one of the wings in the Israel Museum. She invites me the next day to come and sit and talk with them, because they were planning this show and exhibition the following year called “Heroes.” So, I went back the next day. I sat with her and bunch of other people and they started telling me what they were planning. They said, “Well, you're an American, and you must know a lot about American pop culture. You know Superman and Batman and all the stuff like that,” and I said, “Yeah, I do.” Once they learned I worked in theater and designed sets—because by this point, I was not only making little box sets, I was also making large set pieces for shows. I have also done installations and the like. So, they invited me based on an illustration I sent to them. The next year, I went back to Israel, and I did this 10-feet-high, 25-feet-long three-dimensional cityscape. It was boxes, another version of boxes. It goes on and on from there, Sharon. It's always been fascinating me, how these boxes have gotten me into all kinds of great trouble. As I continue to say, every box tells a story. Sharon: We'll have pictures of the boxes when we post the podcast, but I want to describe it to people. These are small. What, two by two?  Marc: Two-inch square, three quarters of an inch deep. When you buy them, they're empty; they don't have anything except the lid and the box. I basically invented an idea; up to that point, I never saw anybody else doing what I was doing. Later on, I found that I inspired other people's creativity. There was these little boxes, and every picture tells a story. A picture's worth a thousand words. Sharon: Marc, before all this happened, before you befriended Tom and he befriended you, did you consider yourself artistic or creative? Was that a field you wanted to pursue? Marc: Kind of. I didn't literally say, “Wow, I'm an artist! I'm going to create.” When I was a young guy growing up—I grew up in Philadelphia until I was about 13. My father and mother were in the beauty business. My father was a very well-known women's hairdresser. He had his own beauty parlor. My parents were beatniks back in the 50s in Philadelphia. They were very artistic people, and all their friends were very artistic. When you're a 13, 14-year-old, it doesn't register, “Oh, I'm going to grow up to be like my parents,” but they are influences. They all wore black all the time, and as I was growing up, that was my look; I wear all black. I'm going to high school during the 60s, and it's all surfers and bleach blond hair, and here comes me with skin-tight black pants and Beatle boots and cravats. Kids who were friends, they would come up and say, “Who are you? What do you think you're doing? You must be an artist.” The idea stuck, but as I said about journeys through life, the fascinating thing for me is that I could go around the world, have all these different things happening in my 20s, return to New York and be on this journey where I'm still at.  I know your podcast has to do with why we're here: to talk about jewelry. I came up with a way for people to wear jewelry that has a story in it and it isn't just a beautiful necklace. Most of my clients over the years have been women, and women know something much more than men know about wearing an object that attracts attention. Women know how to find beautiful objects and adorn themselves, whether it's a necklace or earrings or the like. What I also found was interesting—and this actually happened; I neglected to mention this, but at one point when I stopped doing theater with Tom and only focused on making box art, I ended up becoming a street artist.  I was selling in the beginning to every major department store, and I was getting orders for thousands of boxes that I had to come up with. I was a one-man factory, so I was pulling my hair out of my head thinking, “How the hell am I going to get all these boxes out?” Eventually I discovered there's no way I can be a manufacturer of these things; they're all one-of-a-kind. I'm not going to make 12 of the same thing. A friend of my said, “There's a street fair down on Broadway. Maybe you should go there and sell on the street.” That opened a doorway, like this doorway that's on my lapel, into a world that I have never been able to look back on. What I mean by that is that once I discovered going to Soho, which was in the early stages of its evolution to become an epicenter for artists, many of them very famous—Keith Haring, David Hockney, the list is incredible of the people that were living in Soho during this period.  I went down there; on West Broadway there were very few artists, and I was one of them. I would be standing there all dressed, and people would be walking up and down the street. It was the most incredible way for them to find out if I was marketing what I had on my lapel. People would walk by, they'd see this guy with a fedora all in black, wearing a box, and they'd be curious. “What's he wearing?” They'd come up. They wanted to ask me a about them and how much they were. They would say, “I'll take that one, that one and that one,” and that used to happen to me constantly. I never could make enough. The thousands I had made that never got sold in department stores were being sold like crazy on the streets of Soho. I started to get a reputation as the box man. One of the clients that bought from me called me the box man. There were times I would go down to Soho in the early morning on Saturday or Sunday, and there were people milling around where I would stand, waiting for me. They would go, “Here comes the box man.” It was crazy.  Among all those people, some of the people that stopped and looked at my work were people like David Hockney. David Hockney actually came up to me one day, after a lot of people walked away buying my stuff, and he was looking at them real close up. He started talking to me and giving me suggestions about what I could do with them and how I could display them. He said, “You've got this little box. Where are you going to put it? Maybe you should put it in something, like a frame?” That was the most incredibly brilliant selling idea for my boxes. What I did with the frame idea, when I figured out how to do it—there are many of them behind me; they're all frames. The idea was that you can wear it, but you can also put it on your wall, and your wall can wear your art. I made it so the frame had an opening in it that the box sat inside of. If you're going out to an opening or a fashion show or something like that, “I think tonight I'll wear one of the Marc Cohens.” That was the idea, and that took off like crazy from there.  I have to also tell you I didn't have any agents. I didn't have a rep or anything like that. The only rep I had was Marc Cohen. So, it was a cool journey through art. I evolved the idea of being an artist selling on the street, where I just had an easel, to having a pushcart. It was like immigrants coming to America way, way back, my family being some of them that went to Philadelphia. My great, great grandmother, she had a pushcart on South Street in Philadelphia. It's another part of the story of jewelry. It bridged into me getting even more known.  I went back to California where I grew up. I found that in Santa Monica, they had a promenade they were developing. They actually had people with carts they rented they would put out on the promenade. I found out I could rent carts, so I rented one and came up with this idea. It actually came from people on the street. People would walk by and say, “Wow, you're like a tiny gallery with all your art.” I came up with this name, the World's Smallest Art Gallery. I took the cart and turned it into a miniature to scale, like if you went into a gallery, but it was open to the people to see it from all different sides. I had walls and characters that were larger than the ones in my boxes. They were standing looking at the art. It was all on that level; it was very interactive. People would walk by, and there would be a lot of celebrities all the time on the street. Suddenly, not only was it regular people buying work, not only David Hockney, but very famous people in Hollywood. Along the way, I reconnected with a friend of mine who was very famous, Paula Wagner. She's now very famous for being a producer with Tom Cruise; they had a company called Cruise Wagner. She's a friend of mine from all the way back to the “Lenny” days. We rekindled our friendship in LA. She knows everybody in Hollywood, and once she saw my work, she flipped out and said, “We've got to do something with this.” She hired me, and the first thing I did for her was wearable box art in a frame. It was for Oliver Stone.  Sharon: I'm sorry, who it was for? I didn't hear. Marc: Oliver Stone the director. Sharon: Oliver Stone, oh wow!  Marc: She also represented Val Kilmer and Tom Cruise and Demi Moore. Before you know it, she's asking me if I can make a box for this person, on and on. The biggest thing for me at the time was Madonna. I knew Madonna from a long time ago. When I say I knew her, I lived in New York in the early 70s and 80s, and I used to go to all these clubs. I would go to this one called Danceteria. At the time, Madonna was a coat check girl there, and eventually she did a show there, which I saw with a bunch of my friends. Then she went on to do whatever she wanted on her own.  Somehow or another, a friend of hers bought one my pieces to give to her as a gift, but this is the best part of it. I didn't know this until much later on. One night in LA, I went to this private photo exhibition; it was a photographer who had done all the photography for Rudi Gernreich, the fashion designer with those bathing suits. I'm going to the exhibition with friends. I had my box on my lapel. I'm walking around and it's a tiny, little gallery, so people don't follow each other—everybody goes wherever they're going. A bunch of people are coming that way and we're walking, walking, walking. We come to this one, most famous photograph of a topless model. I'm looking at photograph, and standing next to me is Madonna. I turn and right away, she looks at me and goes, “I have one of those boxes.” I said, “I'm the artist. I made it,” and she said to me, “I Iove that box and I have it right by my bed,” and I said, “Oh, how cool.” She asked me a few questions and I filled her in on my background. I didn't bring up the fact that I remember her from Danceteria.  Then it was like an avalanche. I got picked up by Maxfield's Clothing Store in LA when I started the frames. Everybody saw how cool it is as an art piece, but you can wear it. Maxfield loved what I was doing, and he took me on and carried my stuff in his store. This is another amazing thing: the dresser for Arsenio Hall was in the store one day buying things for him to wear on the show. I don't know whether it was a man or a woman, but they bought an outfit for Arsenio, and the salesperson said, “We just got this new wearable art piece in. You've got to see this.” They looked at it and bought one. That night on the Arsenio Hall Show—if you ever watch his talk show, there's intro music, and then the curtain goes away and he stands there; it's Arsenio Hall. On that particular night, he's standing there, wearing a collarless Armani suit, and on his jacket is a square.  From a distance you can't tell what it is. I found out this afterwards. I got the tape. It was amazing; he didn't himself know what it really was, but he came out and the camera zooms up on him. When I saw what the box was, I got a chill. It was a period where I started to not just do people standing in the box, looking at the image or looking out away from the image; it was a period where I was putting images up against the face, so it would be a three-dimensional idea. In this particular one, it was Martin Luther King. I had done part of his face in profile in the foreground, and then I had done some backdrop. It had something to do about racial issues.  I didn't just make cutesy box art. I really am not about cutesy box art. I'm very passionate about a lot of things in life. I'm very political about certain things, and I want people to have an opportunity to talk with each other about things that are meaningful, particularly where we live these days. It's important to have that doorway of how people get through it and interact with each other without being sensitive and thinking you're going to be judged by whatever they say or do. We are in a period where people have to be careful about that. So, it amazes me that this tool—because it is a tool—is, in a way, much different than things made by other jewelry designers that Lisa Berman curates or represents. That is mostly what Lisa represents, like Robert Lee Morris. I knew Robert Lee Morris personally. He's a genius and he's a friend. Thomas Mann is one of my closest friends. I'm friends with others as well because of how we interact with each other.  The image is what it's about. It's how the characters are placed within the box. Along the way, I started thinking, “I want to get out even more than what I've done. I want to try to make work even more original.” We live in a period where they have this thing called a 3D printer. It prints pretty much anything. I can create a series of my own characters, which is something I always wanted to do. I've only just started doing this. I started developing this idea, where I custom make three-dimensional boxes on this scale and a much larger scale. That's where I'm headed. I have lots of collectors. They would be more than happy if I started making little box art again. My newest work is much larger. I make boxes now that are 20 feet big, installation pieces.  Sharon: They're hard to wear. Marc: They're hard to wear, right? I know your program is primarily about jewelry. The thing about that, though, is what I am planning to do. When I do have that exhibition, the large-scale Marc Cohen box art exhibition, I will have miniatures of that exhibition, like many other people do when they market things. The Van Gogh Experience—I don't know if you've seen this, but there's a thing on the road right now that's video mapping Van Gogh's paintings on a building. When you go to the gift shop, they've marketed Van Gogh's work to death. I would do something similar as a collectable.  I had Sotheby's in London; they heard about me through our people in Israel. I was invited to do this big exhibition at Sotheby's. It's a big auction and a silent auction. I got commissioned to make three boxes with lights. There weren't any more wearable, but I did that, and it sold for the equivalent to $10,000. Suddenly, my prices are changing. The people that bought my boxes on the street from the beginning—it's embarrassing to say—but when I first started selling them, my boxes were $20. They're no longer $20. They have been selling at auction for a lot more than $20. Now there's talk about me in way that I never, ever imagined, and it's joyful. After 40 years of doing nothing but making boxes, I don't know what— This is part 1 of a 2 part episode please subscribe so you can get part 2 as soon as its released later this week! Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.

Nonviolence Radio
How to Escalate Nonviolence

Nonviolence Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 55:07


Robert Levering comes to Nonviolence Radio this week to talk to Stephanie Van Hook and Michael Nagler about the film “The Boys Who Said No!” and the powerful draft resistance movement that helped to end the Vietnam War. Robert is an executive producer of the film, a position he is well suited to as he himself was a draft resister in the 1960s. In the interview, we hear how Robert worked collectively to refuse the draft, and more, to stand up actively and nonviolently to an unjust and oppressive system …the draft sort of makes it us vs. the government. It's very frightening just individually to face the government and all the power it has. But the communities that we developed helped to give us the kind of strength that we really needed in order to do that confrontation. I know that I never would have – I don’t know what I would have done. I mean, you never can tell. But it made it really much, much easier to do something as part of a community rather than just simply doing it individually. Robert's discussion of his work in the 60s reveals how groups like those opposing the war in Vietnam came together with the Civil Rights Movement to create a power that finally ‘overwhelmed' the US government, pushing it to end the war and change some of its racist policies. We are seeing strong echoes of this kind of collaboration today, as shown in Michael's nonviolence report at the end of the show: diverse groups dedicated to nonviolence in many different forms, directed at many causes are coming together, joining hands and actively building a better world. Transcript archived at Waging Nonviolence [pending] The post How to Escalate Nonviolence appeared first on Metta Center.

Whiskey And Wonder
Ep.52 – 20th SOS "The Pony Express"

Whiskey And Wonder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 99:32


This week, Tyler & Megan learn all about Megan's grandfather's time during the Vietnam War as part of the 20th SOS division. These recently declassified stories will take your breath away! While learning this week, the two will be sampling Stranahan's Sherry Cask Single Malt Whiskey, a whiskey brought to us by her family from Colorado.  As always, thank you so much for your support! Don't drink and drive!   Places you can find us: whiskeyandwonder.com Instagram: @whiskeypodcast or @whiskey.tyler or @whiskey.megan YouTube: Whiskey & Wonder Twitter: @whiskyandwonder or @tyler_whiskey Email:  contact@whiskeyandwonder.com     tyler@whiskeyandwonder.com megan@whiskeyandwonder.com  Facebook: facebook.com/whiskeyandwonder Paypal: paypal.me/whiskeyandwonder Patreon: patreon.com/whiskeyandwonder   If you have a drinking problem, reach out to the folks at 1-800-662-HELP (4357).

Histories of the Unexpected

In this latest episode, the Unexpected duo, Professor James Daybell and Dr Sam Willis uncover the unexpected history of LEAVES! Which is all about agent orange and the Vietnam War, good luck, four-leaf clovers, superstition and nettle-eating, Christmas and what to do with festive foliage, and leaf-peeping in modern day New England! Who knew! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Ideas from CBC Radio (Highlights)
The Devil's Trick: How Canada Fought the Vietnam War

Ideas from CBC Radio (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 54:07


There's a fantasy about Canada's role in the Vietnam War: that from the beginning, Canada was the conscience of America, taking a stand against conflict, welcoming war resisters, and opening the doors for refugees. But historian John Boyko picks apart that fantasy, showing how divisive the war was in Canada, in his book 'The Devil's Trick.'

Midnight Train Podcast
The Oakland County Child Killer AKA The Babysitter Killer

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 124:02


Today's episode is taking us back to the world of unsolved true crime. This episode deals with pretty tough stuff so consider this your trigger warning as the episode does talk about the killings of young children.    We are heading to the state of Michigan for this one. Oakland county to be exact. Oakland county is part of the metropolitan Detroit area, located northwest of the city. As of the 2020 Census, its population was 1,274,395, making it the second-most populous county in Michigan, behind neighboring Wayne County. The county seat is Pontiac. The county was founded in 1819 and organized in 1820. Oakland County is among the ten highest income counties in the United States with populations over one million people. The county's knowledge-based economic initiative, coined "Automation Alley", has developed one of the largest employment centers for engineering and related occupations in the United States. This county would spawn a serial killer. From February 1976 to March 1977 four children were abducted and murdered with their bodies left in various locations within or just outside Oakland County.   There were at least two other murder cases that investigators believe may have been victims of the “Oakland County Child Killer” or “The Babysitter Killer,” as some called him.   The ensuing murder investigation was the largest of its kind in U.S. history at the time. One suspect was even from our neck of the woods! We'll check out the victims and then get into the suspects. Again, this is definitely a touchy episode for some so if you're uncomfortable with this sort of thing, you might want to skip this episode.   Still with us? Ok so here we go.   Every 40 seconds, a child goes missing or is abducted in the United States. Approximately 840,000 people are reported missing each year in the United States and the F.B.I. estimates that between 85 and 90 percent of these are children. On a positive note, More than 99 percent of children reported missing in America in recent years have come home alive.    According to the Washington State Attorney General's Child Abduction Murder Research: In 74 percent of the missing children homicide cases studied, the child murder victim was female and the average age was 11 years old. In 44 percent of the cases studied, the victims and killers were strangers, but in 42 percent of the cases, the victims and killers were friends or acquaintances. Only about 14 percent of the cases studied involved parents or intimates killing the child. Almost two-thirds of the killers in these cases have prior arrests for violent crimes, with slightly more than half of those prior crimes committed against children. The primary motive for the child abduction killer in the cases studied was sexual assault. In nearly 60 percent of the cases studied, more than two hours passed between the time someone realized the child was missing and the time police were notified. In 76 percent of the missing children homicide cases studied, the child was dead within three hours of the abduction–and in  88.5 percent of the cases the child was dead within 24 hours.   Pay attention to your kids, folks. Be that parent. The one who annoys them constantly by asking where they are and knowing who they're with. Protect the fuck out of them with every last fiber of your being. THAT is your number one job as a parent.   The First victim was 12 year old Mark Stebbins. Mark was from Ferndale Michigan and was last seen at 1:30 pm on Feb. 15 1976. His body was found three days later in Ferndale. He was sexually assaulted and suffocated to death.  Mark was last seen and heard from at 1:30 p.m. Feb. 15. He talked to his mother on the phone. He was letting her know that he was leaving the American Legion Hall to head home. He never made it and at 11 p.m. that night Mark's mother called the Ferndale Police Department to report Mark missing.   At about 11:45 a.m. Feb. 19, 1976, a businessman named Mark Boetigheimer left his office building and headed toward a drug store located inside the New Orleans mall at 10 Mile and Greenfield roads. On his way something caught his eye in the northeast corner of the parking lot. He saw what looked like a mannequin dressed in a blue jacket and jeans. But as he got closer he knew he stumbled into a situation much more grim. It was a body, a human body. It was the lifeless body of 12-year-old Mark Stebbins.    Another person told police that they walked their dog around that parking lot, just so it could get some exercise. That was around 9:30 a.m. the same morning the body was found. The man said his dog was on a 20-foot leash and they walked that part of the lot. He said if that body was there at the time, his dog would have found it. If that's true, Mark's body wasn't there at 9:30 a.m. But it was at 11:45 a.m. when Mark Boetigheimer found him. That means there was a 2-hour-and-15-minute window in which someone or some people dumped Mark's body in the area.   Mark was a 7th-grader at Lincoln Junior High School. He stood 4 feet 8 inches and weighed about 100 pounds. He had strawberry-blond hair.  The autopsy showed the cause of death as asphyxia by way of smothering, but the report also showed rope burns on his neck, wrists and ankles. It appeared that Mark was also sexually assaulted.   Brooks Patterson, who was the Oakland County prosecutor at the time, said Mark's body was washed by an autopsy team, washing away any fingerprints.   The second victim was also 12 years old. Jill Robinson was from Royal oak Michigan.    Karol Robinson had three daughters and was recently divorced. She and her oldest, Jill, would butt heads and on one occasion in December of 1976 they did just that. It was an argument that led to Jill running away from home. She was last seen at a hobby shop on Woodward Avenue, then the Donut Depot on Maple Road between 6 a.m. and 7 a.m. Dec. 23. According to Karol, Jill's mother, the two were arguing about biscuits. Jill was asked to help make them for dinner, she refused. Sometime after a heated back-and-forth, Karol told her to leave until she became part of the family. Jill went to her room, packed up her clothes and a plaid blanket into a denim bag. Before she left she dressed herself in blue jeans, a shirt, an orange winter coat and a blue knit cap with a yellow design on it, and then she would leave, just like her mother asked her to. She rode her bike away from her mother and her home.   Jill would later be seen by a family friend at a hobby shop on Woodward Avenue, just four and 1/2 blocks away from her mother's home. The next morning, two witnesses said they saw her in the Donut Depot on Maple Road -- this was between 6 a.m. and 7 a.m.   Jill's father, Thomas Robinson, made a call to police at 11:30 p.m. the day she left. Jill was found on the side of I-75, north of Big Beaver Road. She was laying on her back, fully clothed, not bound in any way, but a ring of deep dark red surrounded her head. The killer had transported her here, then shot her at close range in the head with a shotgun. It was later decided that Jill was fed and cared after for at least three days. She seemed to be washed, clean and with no signs of sexual abuse at all.   The third victim was 10 year old Kristine Mihelich. Kristine was from Berkley Michigan. She was last seen on January 2nd, 1977. Her Body was found on Jan. 21, 1977 -- she was missing for 19 days -- she was found in a snowbank along Bruce Road in Franklin Village, Mich. The cause of death was suffocation -- she was not sexually assaulted.   Police said there were no signs of violence and that she was in the same clothes she was last seen in. Her body was on its back, knees drawn up. That's when a Franklin Village mailman, Jerry Wozny, saw her. He saw her blue jacket in the snow on the same route he'd been driving for eight years. State police Sgt. Robert Robertson supervised the removal of the girl's body. Thirty-five officers from nine different departments made a task force that Prosecutor Patterson called “the strongest effort I've ever seen in this county.” The task force was headquartered in Southfield. Police Sgt. Joseph Krease was charged with tracking down Kristine's abductor.   Kristine's mother, Deborah Ascroft said “people keep talking about the Royal Oak girl (Jill Robinson) but I'm just not even going to think about that.” Ascroft said that in an interview on Jan. 5, 1977. At the time, Kristine had two younger brothers and according to her mother they kept asking “when is she coming home?”   Shortly after Kristine's disappearance, a child from the elementary school she attended was missing, which set off a panic at the school. A frantic search went on for about 20 minutes and the child eventually was found on school grounds. Tensions were at an all-time high.   Parents at Pattengill Elementary School were lined up outside school to pick up their children -- many of them used to walk home, but not now. When Kristine's body was found in a snowbank at the end of a dead end street in Franklin Village, it was so frozen officials had to wait until the following day to perform an autopsy, because of the body's frozen state.   Wozny -- the mail carrier who found her -- said: “I saw a hand ... It scared the hell out of me.”    Kristine was the fifth young person from Oakland County to die within the year. As of late January 1977, Patterson had no evidence to link Mark and Kristine's deaths. 11 year old Timothy King was the fourth victim. He was last seen on March 16, 1977 and his body was found on March 23, 1977 in a ditch along Gill Road, about 300 feet south of 8 Mile Road in Livonia -- He was missing for seven days. The cause of death was again suffocation -- he also was sexually assaulted.    Timothy King left his Birmingham home with 30 cents he borrowed from his older sister, Catherine, and headed to the corner store. He wanted some candy and it wasn't rare for him to make this trip of about three blocks. He left with his skateboard and football, headed toward the Hunter-Maple Pharmacy.   Tim's older brothers -- he had two -- were not around. One was babysitting a neighbor's kids while the other was rehearsing for a school play. Tim's parents were out to dinner at a nearby Birmingham restaurant.   A clerk, Amy Walters, said she sold Tim candy and he left through the back door into a dark parking lot around 8:30 p.m.. Birmingham Police Chief Jerry Tobin said “whatever happened to Tim happened between the time he left the store and before he got home. It doesn't look particularly good at this time.”   This was now the seventh child that had gone missing in the area. The six prior to Timothy had been found -- murdered. Tim was only the second boy. The hysteria was at an all-time high. According to Catherine, Tim's sister, Tim asked that she leave the front door ajar, so when he got back from the store he could get back in easily.   Catherine also left for the night. It would have been the first time little Timmy would be home alone at night for any period of time. Timothy's parents got back to the house around 9 p.m. to find the door ajar, but there was no sign of Tim.   The King family searched everywhere for Tim. They called his friends, searched the neighborhood and surrounding area. By 9:15 a.m. the next day, Chief Tobin called on the task force, requesting their full involvement. By the afternoon -- the day after Timmy went missing -- headquarters were established in the Adams Fire House, just a few blocks from the King family home. Door-to-door searches were conducted and classmates questioned.   Tim was abducted on a Wednesday. By Thursday, 100 lawmen from Oakland County, volunteers, Oakland County Sheriff's investigators, the county helicopter and the special Oakland County Task Force all were scouring the area. That Thursday the Kings stayed behind closed doors most of the day, but did say “we very much want Tim to come home.” That was Barry, Tim's father.   “We love him very much. He had a basketball game Saturday and missed practice today (Thursday). He's active in a school play. He's an achiever and a participator. We just love Tim and want him to come home.” Barry said.   Barry told reporters that the week before Tim told his mother that he wouldn't speak to strangers, that “he'd run away from them.”   “It's awful,” said a neighbor of the King family who also had an 11-year-old daughter. “When it happens to other people, you feel sympathy. When it strikes your neighborhood, you're scared.”   Other possible victims   Cynthia Rae Cadieux was 16 years old from Roseville Michigan. Last seen: 8:20 p.m. Jan. 15, 1976 Body found: 1:05 a.m. Jan. 16, 1976 in Bloomfield Township, Mich.   Cynthia Cadieux lived with her mother and stepfather. She attended Roseville High School, which was within walking distance from her home. Even though the school was close, one of her friends, Rose DeStesafano, offered to give her a ride home. On a cold January day in 1976, Rose offered Cynthia a ride.   “Cynthia refused, just like she always does,” said DeStesafano.   That decision may have been a fatal mistake.   The date was Jan. 15, 1976, and Cynthia walked, not to her mother and stepfather's home, but to a girlfriend's house. It was a planned visit. In fact, her parents thought Cynthia was spending the night there, but the girls didn't think so. Cynthia planned to go home that Thursday night. Police were able to verify that she'd made it to the friend's house that evening. They were also able to figure out she'd left her friend's home around 8 p.m., presumably heading back to her home. Her body would later be found that night -- technically morning in Bloomfield Township, which is about 26 miles away.   At 1:05 a.m. Jan. 16, a driver noticed something on the side of the road. What the person saw was the naked, lifeless body of Cynthia Rae Cadieux. It appeared that her skull was crushed by a blunt instrument. Police revealed Cynthia was raped and sodomized -- possibly by more than one person.   This case was looked at under a proverbial microscope that was designed to find the link or links between several other dead children in the Oakland County area.   Sheila Srock was 14 years old and from Birmingham Michigan. Last seen: 8:20 p.m. Jan. 19, 1976 Body found: Jan. 19, 1976   Birmingham is “the place” most consider to be the model community in southeastern Michigan. It's a place everyone wanted to live, but most couldn't afford. Those who knew of Birmingham would never have associated it with violence or crime, but that would change Jan. 19, 1976.   January in Michigan is a cold time and place, usually snow-covered. That's why a resident on Villa Street was shoveling snow from his roof a little after 8 p.m. Monday. While he was up there, he saw something through a neighbor's window -- something horrible.   Inside the next house over was 14-year-old Shiela Srock. She was babysitting her brother's baby while he was out. Shiela and the baby were upstairs, likely playing. At the same time a dark figure slithered in and out of homes in the neighborhood, stealing anything and everything he could. Eventually this intruder found himself on the doorstep of Shiela's brother's house. He rang the doorbell, and there was no answer. From there he popped the lock open and made his way in. The neighbor was able to see him as he ran into Shiela, gun drawn. The robber was upset that he didn't find anything of value and that now he'd been seen. According to police, the robber had Shiela remove her clothing. He then raped her, sodomized her and ultimately killed her.   The neighbor apparently saw most or all of these horrible actions. Obviously, he didn't have a cell phone in 1976, so he couldn't call for help right away since he was on the roof.   The assailant was described as a thin, white man between 18 and 25 years old, who stood about 6 feet tall. He had a prominent nose and a pointed chin, according to witnesses. The attacker's car also was identified. He drove away in a 1967 Cadillac. People at the crime scene said the killer mingled and chatted with onlookers. He asked questions about what was going on as he subtly fit into the crowd.   Eventually a man did admit to this killing. In March 1976, Oliver Rhodes Andrews confessed to and later was convicted of the murder of Srock. He is serving a life sentence in prison. According to a March 4, 1976 report from the Ludington Daily News, Andrews was wanted for questioning “in some 200 burglaries in several states.”   “(He) admitted in a four-hour confession late Monday that he raped the girl and shot her five times when the babysitter surprised him as Andrews broke into a home he thought was empty,” reads the report.   Jane Louise Allan was a 14-year-old girl from Royal Oak. She was considered a runaway because she had done so five times before. She was last seen hitchhiking along I-75 in Pontiac on Aug. 7, 1976. Her body was found in a lake in Miamisburg, Ohio five days later. Police said she died from carbon monoxide poisoning after being kept in the trunk of a car.   The information about the victims was taken from a great article on clickondetroit.com.   Ok so now you're asking yourselves, well there must be suspects right? The answer is… Yes there are… And we're gonna talk about em.   Let's talk about the profile the police came up with.    All related killings happened on days that it snowed. All children were last seen within a mile of Woodward Avenue between 9 Mile and 15 Mile roads. All children were fed and cared for.   The killer(s) either bathed them or made them bathe. Both male victims had rope burns on his wrists and ankles.   A psychological profile created by police described the killer as fanatically clean, smart and sexually abnormal. The big lead police had -- even as of March 24, 1977 -- was the witness who saw TimothyKing speaking with a man inside a blue AMC Gremlin.   Speaking of the gremlin… Let's run through that real quick. Eventually a woman came forward with some vital information. She said she saw Tim talking to a man in the pharmacy parking lot. She said Tim and the man were about two car-lengths away from her. She was able to describe the man she saw talking to the boy, whom she believed to be Timothy King. This witness also described the vehicle she believed the man to be driving; a dark-blue AMC Gremlin with a white stripe on its side, she called it a “hockey stick” stripe.       Police say the man described by witnesses was between 25 and 35 years old, white, with a dark brown hair cut in a shag style. He had muttonchop sideburns, a fair complexion and a husky build. He was driving a late model blue AMC Gremlin with whitewall tires.   Police also said they suspected Tim was abducted by one or possibly two men, and that person -- or people -- could have been involved in the other six cases of murdered children from the area.   The Oakland County Task Force released the following suspect profile on March 16, 1977:   Male 20-30 years old Above average education Above average intelligence Caucasian Ability and capacity to store child for at least 18 days Homosexual Plus mental problems Compulsively clean -- fanatically so No substance abuse involving drugs or alcohol Different (stranger ranger) Work -- schedule December-January, vacation off work Clean car, clean house Single dwelling -- attached garage, cost above $30,000 Prior contact with police Seeing psychiatrist White collar job, 9-5 schedule Area of southern Oakland County Wants bodies found   A few weeks after King's murder, a psychiatrist who worked with the task force received a letter, riddled with spelling errors, written by an anonymous author ("Allen") claiming to be a sadomasochist slave of the killer ("Frank").[12] "Allen" wrote that they had both served in the Vietnam War, that "Frank" was traumatized by having killed children, and that "Frank" had taken revenge on more affluent citizens, such as the residents of Birmingham, for sending forces to Vietnam.[12] "Allen" expressed fear and remorse in his letter, saying he was losing his sanity and was endangered and suicidal, and admitted to having accompanied "Frank" as the latter sought boys to kill.[13] He instructed the psychiatrist to respond by printing the code words "weather bureau says trees to bloom in three weeks" in that Sunday's edition of the Detroit Free Press,[12] before offering to provide photographic evidence in exchange for immunity from prosecution. The psychiatrist arranged to meet "Allen" at a bar, but "Allen" did not show up and was never heard from again.   Suspects:   Ted Lamborgine   Ted Lamborgine, a retired auto worker believed to have been involved in a child pornography ring in the 1970s, was arrested in parma heights Ohio. Ted had  transferred from Detroit to the Ford plant in Brook Park Ohio around the time the killings stopped. Before his arrest he moved from apartment to apartment like a man trying to escape creditors. Sometimes he'd stay for only a few months. Once he moved from an apartment in one tower of a complex to an identical apartment in another tower, for no apparent reason.   Even when he was in one place, he couldn't sit still. A neighbor who lived next to Ted in an Olmsted Township trailer park says he constantly moved his furnishings around. And he never once used his kitchen, eating out every day, even for breakfast.   Ted tried the stable life. He bought a little lemon-colored home in Slavic Village that had a tiny patch of front yard. His elderly mother and his sister even drove down from Detroit to see the place on a rare visit. It didn't last long though and he sold there house and moved again. He was running from his last in Michigan Theodore Lamborgine and his partner in crime, Richard Lawson, were part of a 1970s sex ring that preyed on young boys in Detroit's Cass Corridor. According to Lawson,Cass Corridor was a six-block section of dope dealers, hookers, bars, and poverty. Big families had moved from the South to work the auto plants. Hundreds of kids ran wild in the streets. It was a pedophile's paradise. Those poor kids from the neighborhood had nothing. So the men put money in their pockets and food in their bellies. In some cases the men even helped the mothers out, taking care of those gas bills to get families through the cold northern winters. Back at their homes, in motel rooms, and in the greasy basement of a neighborhood bike shop, the men used the boys -- some as young as nine -- to enact their darkest fantasies. Lawson said they tried not to be too rough. After all, they wanted the boys to come back the next time they cruised up with a crisp 10-spot. And so the boys came back, some of them for years. Sometimes, though, Ted got a little carried away. On special occasions he'd bring kids from the hood up to mossy suburbs like Royal Oak for "parties" at other pedophiles' homes. Police suspect there may have been hundreds of men involved, networking like members of a book club. The parties were potluck orgies: Everyone brought a kid to share, and things were known to get wild. Kids were sodomized, photographed, then thrown in a bathtub and hosed off.   Then there was the time Ted scared even Lawson. They were at the apartment of Bob Moore, owner of the bike shop, when Ted whipped out a photo album Moore kept of their little sweethearts. Ted pointed to one picture of a little boy with a wing-cut and a cute, dimpled chin. The kid wasn't one of the Cass hood-rats the men usually settled for. This was a kid from the other side of 8 Mile Road, the dividing line between the dust and crumble of the city and the bird's nest of suburbs in northern Detroit. This kid was clean and had nice clothes. "Looks like the King boy, doesn't it?" Ted had said, winking.  Lawson never forgot the moment.  Out of the five men involved in their Lamborgine and Lawson were the only two living members of that ring when they were charged in 2006. Lamborgine faced 19 counts of sexually assaulting children, while Lawson faced 28 similar charges.   Lawson, who was already serving a life sentence for murder, told WDIV in 2006 that he knows who the Oakland County Child Killer is. WDIV later obtained documents detailing molestations of many children in the 70s and 80s. Three new names of suspects in the investigation were listed and one of those names matched the one Lawson gave as the Oakland County Child Killer. The name Lawson gave was Bobby Moore, one of the deceased members of the sex ring. Investigators said they were looking into all of those people.   Investigators also said they did not believe Lamborgine or Lawson to be the killer, but they did think the men had valuable information that could help solve the case.   Lamborgine is serving a life sentence at Kinross Correctional Facility in Michigan's Upper Peninsula.   Many people believe that Ted was the killer dealer investigators believing it was somebody else. At the very least it's send that Ted could have been involved in some way.    Archibald Edward Sloan:   In July 2012, Prosecutor Cooper discussed Archibald Edward Sloan and his 1966 Pontiac Bonneville. A hair found in the car is a DNA match to evidence at two of the crime scenes -- Mark Stebbins' and Timothy King's. The hair is not his but police believe it belongs to an acquaintance.   Sloan is reportedly the owner of the car where the hair was found. Prosecutors were considering him an accomplice to the suspect. He could be a direct link to whoever the killer is, prosecutors said.   It is believed Sloan worked at a garage or gas station near 10 Mile and Middlebelt roads during the time of the Oakland County Child Killer murders. Seven years after the death of Timothy King, Sloan was arrested again. He was charged with two counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct. The offense took place in October 1983. He was sentenced to life in prison in January 1985. In February 2019, the Investigation Discovery channel aired a two-part, four-hour documentary about the killings. At this same time, WXYZ-TV investigative reporter Heather Catallo announced that Arch Edward Sloan had failed a polygraph test when he was interviewed by the Oakland County Child Killer Task Force in 2010 and 2012.   Sloan, 77, is serving his life sentence at the Gus Harrison Correctional Facility in Adrian, Mich.    James Vincent Gunnels:   At one point investigators said James Vincent Gunnels was the best lead in the decades-old serial killer mystery. His DNA is a mitochondrial DNA match to a hair found on the body of victim Kristine Mihelich. A mitochondrial match means the hair belongs to Gunnels or a male relative on his mother's side.   In 2012 Gunnels told WDIV that he had nothing to do with the child killings.   “I'm not guilty. There it is there. But at the same time, I know how the state police twist words to their advantage,” Gunnels said. “My heart goes out to those families. It really really, really does. I don't feel that they were served justice through any of this.”   After WDIV spoke with Gunnels, he decided he wanted to speak to the victim's family face-to-face. He reached out to the King family.   “When the request first came in, I was hesitant to go,” said Chris King. “I felt it would be too hard to be in the same room as a suspect in this case. It's clearly theoretically possible that he somehow aided in (Kristine Mihelich's) abduction, or killing.”   The King family contacted police who have questioned Gunnels on several occasions. According to police records, Gunnels failed a lie detector test. They wondered what Gunnels might say to the family.   “We weren't sure what to expect,” Chris King said. “But we had just been told to ask open-ended questions, see what he says, listen to his story. Um, who knows. He might be able to shed some light on, or tell us something he hadn't before.”   It wouldn't be easy. Chris King took his father Barry King along with him to the meeting with Gunnels.   “It was grueling,” Chris King said. “My dad is a lot tougher than I am. I found it exhausting, you know, mentally and physically.”   Barry King said Gunnels' story wasn't off-the-wall, but not exactly promising.   “I believe that the story he told Chris and I was believable,” Barry King said. “But it was contradicted by previous stories that he has told other people.”   Gunnels told the Kings that Bush was a child predator who lived in Oakland County at the time.   “It seems clear that he must have had at least some knowledge of the crimes,” Chris King said.   However, Gunnels denied knowing anything about the Oakland County Child Killings.   “I say right now I have no idea what that man did to anyone else,” Gunnels said.   Chris King asked him about two polygraph tests.   “My questions for him were, you know it's hard to understand you tried to cheat on one polygraph exam and failed a second polygraph exam,” Chris King said. “So, if you had absolutely no involvement or knowledge of these crimes, why would you feel that you had to cheat in the first place and then why would you fail the second one? It doesn't make sense.”   Gunnels told the Kings that he felt terrible.   “I couldn't imagine having that happen and not knowing all those years,” Gunnels said. “I really really couldn't.”   Chris and Barry King have been going the extra mile to try and solve the case, not knowing if they have done any good.   “It was kind of a long shot that it would help,” Chris King said. “But law enforcement said, ‘Who knows. Sometimes these guys have remorse and they end up telling you things.' So, we went with that hope.”   Christopher Busch:   Christopher Busch was a convicted pedophile who lived in Bloomfield Hills and killed himself in 1978. For decades, victims' family members had believed Busch could have been the killer. In 1977, Gregory Greene, 27, was arrested on child sexual assault charges. Greene led investigators to 26-year-old Busch, telling them Busch killed Stebbins. However, Busch and Green both passed polygraph examinations. Greene was convicted and sentenced to life in prison for sexually assaulting young boys. Busch first got probation for the same charges before ultimately killing himself.   However, in 2012 it was revealed that there is zero evidence suggesting Busch is the Oakland County Child Killer. His DNA does not match the physical evidence that investigators have.   “Whatever evidence that may or may not exist does not come back to Busch,” said Oakland County Prosecutor Jessica Cooper.   Police sources had told WDIV that Busch's suicide scene was suspicious and may have been a murder. They know he had a drawing of a tortured boy that closely resembled victim Mark Stebbins. Ropes were found in his closest. He had a blue Vega car which looked like the infamous blue Gremlin spotted at one of the abductions. It was later revealed by investigators that Busch was in custody while police investigated the killings and admitted he was a pedophile. Investigators wanted to keep him in jail but he was let go after he agreed to a plea deal.   However, none of that matters now after investigators said Busch did not commit the murders.   “There isn't a piece of evidence that we can point to and say Mr. Bush killed Timothy King, Jill Robinson, Kristine Mihelich or Mark Stebbins,” said Paul Walton, chief assistant Oakland County prosecutor.   Chis King, Timothy King's brother, said he thought Busch was involved because the suicide scene photos show potential evidence linked to the cases. One photograph shows the drawing that was pinned on Busch's wall, which closely resembles Stebbins.    The photographs also show ropes that appear to have blood on them and a shotgun shell. However, the shotgun shell in Busch's room cannot be matched with the caliber used to kill Jill Robinson.   “They even took it to NASA to try and see if they could get an identification of the caliber and there was no way in which they could do that,” said Cooper.   Prosecutors also said they tracked down the scientist who analyzed the ropes found at the home of suspect Busch.   “He conclusively told us that he was aware of these facts and that had there been any blood on that rope or ligature he would have sent it on to the evidence unit,” said Walton.   So there's the main suspects in the case. What do you guys think? Was it one of these guys? Did one of these guys have at least some involvement? We may never know.  Oh and one other quick note, John Wayne Gacy makes an appearance in this story briefly. One witness described two men he claimed to have seen abducting King. One of those men's descriptions bite a striking resemblance to John Wayne Gacy. Gacy was rumored to have been in Michigan at the time of the killings. It was found that gacy's DNA did not match DNA found on the victims however, and that was the end of that. But who knows… There's plenty of people that think there were multiple people involved, could he have been one?   Well that's almost everything, there were a few things that we found from around 2013 but they were just small nuggets that we could not find anything to really update the situations with. So we have left those out as well. There is also a side plot, if you will, involving a man using the alias Jeff claiming that he was part of an investigative team putting over 10,000 hours into their own investigations. They claim to know the identity of the killer but would not divulge the name unless they were able to set the information the police had to confirm the person's identity. The police would not share the info. There were lawsuits and other crap and the whole thing  seems kind of ridiculous. You can check it out on your own if you'd like though.    So there you have it! What do you guys think?  To horror movies of the 70s   https://www.ranker.com/list/scariest-70s-horror-movies/ranker-horror   BECOME A P.O.O.P.R.!! http://www.patreon.com/themidnighttrainpodcast   Find The Midnight Train Podcast: www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com www.facebook.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.twitter.com/themidnighttrainpc www.instagram.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.discord.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.tiktok.com/themidnighttrainp   And wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts.   Subscribe to our official YouTube channel: OUR YOUTUBE   Support our sponsors www.themidnighttraintrainpodcast.com/sponsors   The Charley Project www.charleyproject.org

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast
Breaking Barriers Through Conversation To Open Up About A Painful Past | Tracey Nguyen Mang Part 2 S7 E5

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 42:04


Join the Seven Million Bikes Community.This episode's guest, Tracey Nguyen Mang, is the founder and creator of the award winning podcast: The Vietnamese Boat People. This podcast shares the stories of hope, survival and resilience from the Vietnamese diaspora during 1975-1992.Tracey was so interesting and engaging an interview it went for nearly two hours. It's been edited into two parts with bonus content available to the Seven Million Bikes Community.In Part 2 Tracey shares about the Conversation Starter Kit they've developed to help children of Vietnamese Boat People break down barriers and get their family to comfortable open up about their painful past.Read The Accompanying Blog Post.Follow and Listen to the Vietnamese Boat People Podcast here.Season 7 is sponsored by Blue Dragon's Children's Foundation and Saigon Children's Foundation. Please donate if you are in a position to.Follow us on Facebook.Buy us a coffee.-------------------Theme music composed by Lewis Wright.Main Cover Art designed by Niall Mackay and Le Nguyen.Episode art designed by Niall Mackay, with pictures supplied by guests and used with permission.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/SevenMillionBikes)

War Stories by Preston Stewart
160: Fire Support Base Ripcord - Vietnam Veteran Bob Leibecke

War Stories by Preston Stewart

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 64:36


Was fortunate to be able to chat with Vietnam veteran Bob Leibecke to hear about his experiences leading up to and in the Vietnam War. Bob graduated from the Virginia Military Institute in 1969 knowing that he was headed off to war shortly after he commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army. After Ranger School and Jungle Warfare Training, Bob headed to Vietnam where he was assigned to C/2-506 IN, part of the 3rd Brigade of the 101st Airborne Division. Bob's unit was at the center of an incredibly hard fought fight known as the Battle of FSB Ripcord that he gets into during the episode. Books referenced in today's show "Ripcord: Screaming Eagles Under Siege, Vietnam 1970" by Keith Nolan "Hell on a Hill Top: America's Last Major Battle in Vietnam" by Ben Harrison "Remembering Firebase Ripcord" by Christopher Brady

I'm No Expert
The M16: A Case Study in Reliability

I'm No Expert

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 46:17


Did the M 16 lose the Vietnam War for the United States? That's a bold claim and obviously an inaccurate one. BUT, there is an interesting story about the M 16 as it pertains to its reliability (or notorious lack thereof) that we dive into. A little war history, a little product design, a lot of non-expert discussion of a topic brought to mind on the heels of our withdrawal from Afghanistan. Maker Minute: Mikhail Kalashnikov Honorable Mention: Kenmore Progressive Vacuum Cleaner

New Books in American Studies
Mark Atwood Lawrence, "The End of Ambition: The United States and the Third World in the Vietnam Era" (Princeton UP, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 60:26


Histories of the Vietnam War are not in short supply. In U.S. history, it ranks alongside the Civil War and World War Two in terms of author coverage. The aftermath of the war has received a similar amount of attention, with historians noting the effect that the end of the war had on domestic politics and U.S. foreign policy. But what about shifts during the war itself? While the war dominated thinking in the Johnson Administration and overshadowed a whole host of other foreign policy issues, it did not cause them to simply disappear. Quite the opposite: Lyndon Johnson was confronted by a multitude of issues during his time in office, and the fact that those issues occurred in tandem with the Vietnam War shaped the U.S. response to them. In The End of Ambition: The United States and the Third World in the Vietnam Era (Princeton UP, 2021), Mark Atwood Lawrence fills in some of the gaps about U.S. foreign policy during the Vietnam War. While historians have noted that U.S. foreign policy became markedly less ambitious under Richard Nixon, Lawrence notes through five different country case studies that U.S. foreign policy began to shift dramatically under Lyndon Johnson, a shift that eschewed transformative foreign policy and emphasized caution. Lawrence illustrates how the Vietnam War wrought a transformation in U.S. foreign policy whose ramifications can still be felt in the present day.  Zeb Larson is a recent graduate of The Ohio State University with a PhD in History. His research deals with the anti-apartheid movement in the United States. To suggest a recent title or to contact him, please send an e-mail to zeb.larson@gmail.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in History
Mark Atwood Lawrence, "The End of Ambition: The United States and the Third World in the Vietnam Era" (Princeton UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 60:26


Histories of the Vietnam War are not in short supply. In U.S. history, it ranks alongside the Civil War and World War Two in terms of author coverage. The aftermath of the war has received a similar amount of attention, with historians noting the effect that the end of the war had on domestic politics and U.S. foreign policy. But what about shifts during the war itself? While the war dominated thinking in the Johnson Administration and overshadowed a whole host of other foreign policy issues, it did not cause them to simply disappear. Quite the opposite: Lyndon Johnson was confronted by a multitude of issues during his time in office, and the fact that those issues occurred in tandem with the Vietnam War shaped the U.S. response to them. In The End of Ambition: The United States and the Third World in the Vietnam Era (Princeton UP, 2021), Mark Atwood Lawrence fills in some of the gaps about U.S. foreign policy during the Vietnam War. While historians have noted that U.S. foreign policy became markedly less ambitious under Richard Nixon, Lawrence notes through five different country case studies that U.S. foreign policy began to shift dramatically under Lyndon Johnson, a shift that eschewed transformative foreign policy and emphasized caution. Lawrence illustrates how the Vietnam War wrought a transformation in U.S. foreign policy whose ramifications can still be felt in the present day.  Zeb Larson is a recent graduate of The Ohio State University with a PhD in History. His research deals with the anti-apartheid movement in the United States. To suggest a recent title or to contact him, please send an e-mail to zeb.larson@gmail.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in World Affairs
Mark Atwood Lawrence, "The End of Ambition: The United States and the Third World in the Vietnam Era" (Princeton UP, 2021)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 60:26


Histories of the Vietnam War are not in short supply. In U.S. history, it ranks alongside the Civil War and World War Two in terms of author coverage. The aftermath of the war has received a similar amount of attention, with historians noting the effect that the end of the war had on domestic politics and U.S. foreign policy. But what about shifts during the war itself? While the war dominated thinking in the Johnson Administration and overshadowed a whole host of other foreign policy issues, it did not cause them to simply disappear. Quite the opposite: Lyndon Johnson was confronted by a multitude of issues during his time in office, and the fact that those issues occurred in tandem with the Vietnam War shaped the U.S. response to them. In The End of Ambition: The United States and the Third World in the Vietnam Era (Princeton UP, 2021), Mark Atwood Lawrence fills in some of the gaps about U.S. foreign policy during the Vietnam War. While historians have noted that U.S. foreign policy became markedly less ambitious under Richard Nixon, Lawrence notes through five different country case studies that U.S. foreign policy began to shift dramatically under Lyndon Johnson, a shift that eschewed transformative foreign policy and emphasized caution. Lawrence illustrates how the Vietnam War wrought a transformation in U.S. foreign policy whose ramifications can still be felt in the present day.  Zeb Larson is a recent graduate of The Ohio State University with a PhD in History. His research deals with the anti-apartheid movement in the United States. To suggest a recent title or to contact him, please send an e-mail to zeb.larson@gmail.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books Network
Mark Atwood Lawrence, "The End of Ambition: The United States and the Third World in the Vietnam Era" (Princeton UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 60:26


Histories of the Vietnam War are not in short supply. In U.S. history, it ranks alongside the Civil War and World War Two in terms of author coverage. The aftermath of the war has received a similar amount of attention, with historians noting the effect that the end of the war had on domestic politics and U.S. foreign policy. But what about shifts during the war itself? While the war dominated thinking in the Johnson Administration and overshadowed a whole host of other foreign policy issues, it did not cause them to simply disappear. Quite the opposite: Lyndon Johnson was confronted by a multitude of issues during his time in office, and the fact that those issues occurred in tandem with the Vietnam War shaped the U.S. response to them. In The End of Ambition: The United States and the Third World in the Vietnam Era (Princeton UP, 2021), Mark Atwood Lawrence fills in some of the gaps about U.S. foreign policy during the Vietnam War. While historians have noted that U.S. foreign policy became markedly less ambitious under Richard Nixon, Lawrence notes through five different country case studies that U.S. foreign policy began to shift dramatically under Lyndon Johnson, a shift that eschewed transformative foreign policy and emphasized caution. Lawrence illustrates how the Vietnam War wrought a transformation in U.S. foreign policy whose ramifications can still be felt in the present day.  Zeb Larson is a recent graduate of The Ohio State University with a PhD in History. His research deals with the anti-apartheid movement in the United States. To suggest a recent title or to contact him, please send an e-mail to zeb.larson@gmail.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Vietnam Veteran News with Mack Payne
Episode 2169 – Vietnam War memorial controversy brewing in Elizabethtown, KY

Vietnam Veteran News with Mack Payne

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 13:43


Episode 2169 of the Vietnam Veteran News Podcast will feature a story about the budding controversy growing around a Vietnam War Memorial in Elizabethtown, Kentucky. The featured story appeared in The New-Enterprise of Elizabethtown and is titled: Veteran calls for … Continue reading → The post Episode 2169 – Vietnam War memorial controversy brewing in Elizabethtown, KY appeared first on .

The Douglas Coleman Show
The Douglas Coleman Show w_ Mark Leslie Lefebvre and Nguyen Phan Que Mai

The Douglas Coleman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 48:45


Mark Leslie Lefebvre's first short story appeared in print in 1992, the same year he started working in the book industry.He has published more than twenty-five books under the name Mark Leslie that include thrillers and fiction (Evasion, A Canadian Werewolf in New York, One Hand Screaming), paranormal non-fiction (Haunted Hospitals, Spooky Sudbury, Tomes of Terror) and anthologies (Campus Chills, Tesseracts Sixteen, Obsessions). Under his full name he writes books to help authors navigate publishing. And they include The 7 P's of Publishing Success and An Author's Guide to Working with Libraries and Bookstores.His industry experience includes President of the Canadian Booksellers Association, Board Member of BookNet Canada, Director of Author Relations and Self-Publishing for Rakuten Kobo, Director of Business Development for Draft2Digital and Professional Advisor for Sheridan College's Creative Writing and Publishing Honours Program.Mark lives in Waterloo, Ontario and can be found online at http://markleslie.ca/Dr Nguyễn Phan Quế Mai is an award-winning Vietnamese writer and journalist. She is the author of eleven books of poetry, short fiction and non-fiction. Her books in Vietnamese has received the 2010 Poetry of the Year Award from the Hanoi Writers Association, the Capital's Literature & Arts Award, and First Prize in the Poetry Competition celebrating 1,000 Years of Hanoi. Her debut novel and first book in English, THE MOUNTAINS SING, is an International Bestseller, Finalist of the 2021 Dayton Literary Peace Prize, Winner of the 2020 BookBrowse Best Debut Award, Winner of the Blogger's Book Prize 2021, Winner of the 2021 International Book Awards, Winner of the 2021 PEN Oakland/Josephine Miles Literary Award, and Winner of the 2020 Lannan Literary Award Fellowship for "a work of exceptional quality" and for "contribution to peace and reconciliation".https://nguyenphanquemai.com/The Douglas Coleman Show now offers audio and video promotional packages for music artists as well as video promotional packages for authors. Please see our website for complete details. http://douglascolemanshow.comIf you have a comment about this episode or any other, please click the link below.https://ratethispodcast.com/douglascolemanshow

Sports Business Secrets
Episode 355: The Stockdale Paradox

Sports Business Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 13:04


Faith will bring you through any battle. But it's important to not overlook the most brutal facts of your current situation. Today we learn from the highest ranking US military officer who was held captive during the Vietnam War.

Dad and Me Love History
The Cold War: when, what, why and how?

Dad and Me Love History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 19:07


We investigate the Cold War: when did it happen? What happened during the Cold War? Why did it happen? And how? Between the USA and the USSR, things were very cold, whereas over in Korea and Vietnam things got hot-hot-hot! Listen out in the extras for James's Cold War joke - did Dad understand it? After the outtakes, there's a bonus couple of minutes about who invented the 'cold war' - we discover the famous writer who invented the term and predicted the future! Here are some QUESTIONS to see how well you understood today's episode: When did the cold war begin and end? Why was it called the cold war? Where did the cold war become hot? What is the difference between the Soviet Union during the cold war and Russia today? What was M.A.D.? What's going on in the world today that is the same or similar to how it was during the Cold War? Read industry reviews of Dad's World War II novels, A Chance Kill and The Slightest Chance, at paulletters.com. Available on Kindle, as well as in paperback. Dad's first wartime novel, A Chance Kill, is a love-story/thriller based on real events in Poland, Paris, London and Prague. The Slightest Chance follows the remarkable true story of the only escape from Japanese imprisonment by a Western woman during World War II. Please rate and review us wherever you get podcasts. And share our podcast on social media and recommend it to friends – that's how we'll keep going. We'll be back on the first Monday of next month! Podcast cover art by Molly Austin All instrumental music is from https://filmmusic.io and composed by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com) License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Sound effects used under RemArc Licence. Copyright 2021 © BBC

The Red Line
53 - Vietnam: Frontline of the South China Sea

The Red Line

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 62:02


Vietnam is quickly become the new frontline in the South China Sea, with the nation standing in the direct path of an expansionist China. Will Vietnam be able to once again be the rock great empires crash upon, or will they be pulled into Beijing's gravitational orbit.  On the panel this week  Sebastian Strangio - The Diplomat Huong Le Thu - ASPI Gordon Flake - Perth USAsia Follow the show on @TheRedLinePod Follow Michael on @MikeHilliardAus For more info please visit - www.theredlinepodcast.com  

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast
Breaking Barriers Through Conversation To Open Up Families About Their Painful Past | Tracey Nguyen Mang Part 2 TEASER S7 E4

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 1:26


Join the Seven Million Bikes Community.This episode's guest, Tracey Nguyen Mang, is the founder and creator of the award winning podcast: The Vietnamese Boat People. This podcast shares the stories of hope, survival and resilience from the Vietnamese diaspora during 1975-1992.Tracey was so interesting and engaging an interview it went for nearly two hours. It's been edited into two parts with bonus content available to the Seven Million Bikes Community.In Part 2 Tracey shares about the Conversation Starter Kit they've developed to help children of Vietnamese Boat People break down barriers and get their family to comfortable open up about their painful past.Read The Accompanying Blog Post.Follow and Listen to the Vietnamese Boat People Podcast here.Season 7 is sponsored by Blue Dragon's Children's Foundation and Saigon Children's Foundation. Please donate if you are in a position to.Follow us on Facebook.Buy us a coffee.-------------------Theme music composed by Lewis Wright.Main Cover Art designed by Niall Mackay and Le Nguyen.Episode art designed by Niall Mackay, with pictures supplied by guests and used with permission.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/SevenMillionBikes)

AlternativeRadio
[Daniel Ellsberg] Origins of the Vietnam War

AlternativeRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 57:01


The 50th anniversary of the Pentagon Papers has brought attention once more to Daniel Ellsberg. His action in 1971 in releasing the Pentagon Papers blew the lid off of Washington's mountain of lies and deceptions about Vietnam and ultimately led to Watergate and Nixon's resignation. In this never before broadcast program we go back into history as Ellsberg describes the origins of the Vietnam War. He traces early U.S. support for the French effort to retain control of its Indochina colony. He talks about U.S. nuclear weapons policy including threats against the Soviet Union as well as Eisenhower's offer of nukes to the French to stave off defeat at Dien Bien Phu in 1954. The U.S. later totally supplanted the French and expanded the war to Laos and Cambodia. Ellsberg looks at the policy of supporting Diem's Saigon regime, first by Kennedy then Johnson. Interview by David Barsamian.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Power Line: The Crisis in Civilian-Military Relations, with Mackubin Owens (#280)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 22:10


With all the controversy over General Mark  Milley’s direct contacts with senior Chinese military leaders, his apparently extensive contacts with journalists, and the confusion or contradictions over what advice he and others gave to President Biden about our endgame in Afghanistan, I decided to reach out to Mackubin T. Owens, decorated Vietnam War vet, long […]

Power Line
E280. The Crisis in Civilian-Military Relations, with Mackubin Owens

Power Line

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 22:10


With all the controversy over General Mark  Milley’s direct contacts with senior Chinese military leaders, his apparently extensive contacts with journalists, and the confusion or contradictions over what advice he and others gave to President Biden about our endgame in Afghanistan, I decided to reach out to Mackubin T. Owens, decorated Vietnam War vet, long time friend of Power Line, professor at the Naval War College, and author of numerous articles on books on civilian-military relations. Among his books that bear on this subject include US Civil-Military Relations After 9/11: Renegotiating the Civil Military Bargain, and What Military Officers Need to Know about Civil-Military Relations (with co-author Christopher Robertson). Also not to be missed is his 2015 article in Strategic Studies Quarterly, “Military Officers: Political without Partisanship.” And above all, see his brand new article in Strategic Studies Quarterly, “Maximum Toxicity: Civil-Military Relations in the Trump Era.” Mack doesn’t mince words in this conversation, giving direct and blunt answers about Gen. Milley’s performance, as well as commenting on the case of Lt. Col. Stuart Scheller, currently in the brig awaiting court-martial.

Warriors In Their Own Words | First Person War Stories
Lt. Col. Thomas D. Ferran III: Sniping in Vietnam Part 1

Warriors In Their Own Words | First Person War Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 51:40


Lt. Col. Thomas D. Ferran III volunteered to be a part of the first group of trained Marine Corps snipers in the Vietnam War. He spent almost all his time in the field, accompanying various infantry units on their missions.  Ferran describes sniping as both an art, and a personal business. He was a co-founder and former president of the USMC Scout / Sniper association, and received two Purple Hearts, five presidential Unit Citations, and the Marine Corps Combat Action Ribbon. Learn more about Ferran, and his service, here.

RedHanded
216: Episode 215 - Robert Bales: The Kandahar Massacre

RedHanded

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 83:09


In Panjwai, a district in the Kandahar Province of Afghanistan, on the 11th of March 2012, U.S Army Staff Sergeant Robert Bales committed what is considered to be the deadliest war crime blamed on a single member of the U.S Armed Forces since the Vietnam War. During this brutal massacre, Robert Bales took the lives of 16 innocent Afghan civilians – 9 of them were children. In this week's episode, Hannah and Suruthi explore the various and disturbing factors that led to this unbelievable atrocity. UK TOUR 2021 - new dates added! Get your tickets here: https://linktr.ee/RedHandedthepod Book: https://linktr.ee/RedHanded_Book Subscribe to our new YouTube Channel: YouTube - Subscribe Pre-order a copy of the book here (US & Canada): Signed copies - US & Canada Pre-order on Wellesley Books Pre-order on Amazon.com Pre-order a copy of the book here (UK, Ireland, Europe, NZ, Aus): Signed copies - UK, Ireland, Europe, NZ, Aus Pre-order on Amazon.co.uk Pre-order on Foyles Follow us on social media: Instagram Twitter Facebook Visit our website: Website Contact us: Contact

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast
Families Traumatic Escape Inspired The Vietnamese Boat People Podcast | Tracey Nguyen Mang Part 1 S7E4

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 54:27


This episode's guest, Tracey Nguyen Mang, is the founder and creator of the Vietnamese Boat People podcast, an award winning podcast which shares the stories of the Vietnamese diaspora, and something that has often been discussed with previous guests on this show. Tracey was born the youngest of seven children, in Nha Trang Vietnam before her family risked their lives to flee Vietnam.Tracey was just three when her family made it to the United States, where there were few Vietnamese people at the time. Growing up in New Orleans and North Virginia, speaking Vietnamese at home as her first language, she went to a public school where she was one of just a few minorities and in an effort to assimilate suppressing her “history and heritage to adapt and assimilate”. Partly due to the trauma of their journey and the will to fit into their new surroundings the family didn't talk about their past.Season 7 is sponsored by Blue Dragon's Children's Foundation and Saigon Children's Foundation. Please donate if you are in a position to.https://www.bluedragon.org/donate/https://www.saigonchildren.com/engage/covid-19-crisis-2/Follow us on Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/SevenMillionBikesBuy us a coffeehttps://ko-fi.com/sevenmillionbikesSupport the showhttps://www.patreon.com/AVietnamPodcast-------------------Theme music composed by Lewis Wright.Main Cover Art designed by Niall Mackay and Le Nguyen.Episode art designed by Niall Mackay, with pictures supplied by guests and used with permission.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/SevenMillionBikes)

Gettin' Salty Experience Firefighter Podcast
GETTIN SALTY EXPERIENCE PODCAST: Ep. 66 | FDNY DEPUTY CHIEF JOE DIBERNARDO

Gettin' Salty Experience Firefighter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 165:30


Our special guest will be retired 35 year FDNY veteran Deputy Chief Div 6 Commander Joe DiBernardo. After coming back from the Vietnam War in 1966 he was called and appointed to the FDNY in June 1966 and Assigned to Engine 39. In 1968 he worked in Engine 36 after a Dept wide lift order. In 1973 he was assigned to 16 Truck. Promoted to Lt. In 1975 and assigned UFO To Engine 82 in the Bronx. Was then assigned to Engine 38 in 1978. Promoted to Capt in 1979 and assigned to Engine 33. Promoted to BC in 1981 and was assigned to the 28 Battalion in 1982. Promoted to DC in 1984 and assigned to Div 6. Called to duty in Desert Storm in 1990 and after returning went back to Div 6. His son "Joey D" was one of our brothers who jumped for his life on Black Sunday. November 22, 2011, Joe passed away as a result of injuries suffered on Black Sunday. To continue his legacy, the Lieutenant Joseph P. DiBernardo Memorial Foundation was created for the charitable purpose of providing financial assistance to fire departments across America and Canada that need Personal Safety Systems. You don't want to miss this one. You can also Listen to our podcast ...we are on all the players

The Road to Now
#208 Monsanto's Past, Our Future w/ Bart Elmore

The Road to Now

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 67:13


The Monsanto Company officially ceased to exist when it was acquired by Bayer in 2018, but its legacy lives on in courtrooms, factory towns and farms across the globe. Today the company's name is most associated with the herbicide Roundup and genetically modified seeds, but Monsanto also served as a leading producer of Agent Orange during the Vietnam War, an essential supplier of caffeine and saccharin to Coca-Cola in Coke's early years, and the sole US producer of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs). In short, Monsanto's history is one that will continue to shape the US well into the future. In this episode, Bart Elmore joins Bob and Ben to talk about his new book Seed Money: Monsanto's Past and Our Future (W.W. Norton, 2021), and how a small midwestern company founded in 1901 became an agricultural powerhouse by selling solutions to the problems it helped to create. Dr. Bartow Elmore is Associate Professor of History at The Ohio State University where he specializes in Global Environmental History and the History of Capitalism. He is also the author of the award-winning book Citizen Coke: The Making of Coca-Cola Capitalism (W. W. Norton, 2015). You can follow him on twitter at @BartElmore and find out more about his work at his website, BartElmore.com. You can hear Bart's first appearance on The Road To Now in episode #140:  Citizen Coke: The History of Coca-Cola w/ Bartow Elmore. This episode was edited by Gary Fletcher. For more on The Road to Now, visit our website, www.TheRoadToNow.com. (It's great because it was designed by Seven Ages Design!)

New Books Network
Peter Cajka, "Follow Your Conscience: The Catholic Church and the Spirit of the Sixties" (U Chicago Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 46:10


What is your conscience? Is it, as Peter Cajka asks in this provocative book, “A small, still voice? A cricket perched on your shoulder? An angel and devil who compete for your attention?” Going back at least to the thirteenth century, Catholics viewed their personal conscience as a powerful and meaningful guide to align their conduct with worldly laws. But, as Cajka shows in Follow Your Conscience: The Catholic Church and the Spirit of the Sixties (U Chicago Press, 2021), during the national cultural tumult of the 1960s, the divide between the demands of conscience and the demands of the law, society, and even the church itself grew increasingly perilous. As growing numbers of Catholics started to consider formerly stout institutions to be morally hollow—especially in light of the Vietnam War and the church's refusal to sanction birth control—they increasingly turned to their own consciences as guides for action and belief. This abandonment of higher authority had radical effects on American society, influencing not only the broader world of Christianity, but also such disparate arenas as government, law, health care, and the very vocabulary of American culture. As this book astutely reveals, today's debates over political power, religious freedom, gay rights, and more are all deeply infused by the language and concepts outlined by these pioneers of personal conscience. Carlos Ruiz Martinez is a PhD student in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Iowa. He is also the Communications Assistant for the American Catholic Historical Association (ACHA). His general interest is in American religious history, especially American Catholicism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Peter Cajka, "Follow Your Conscience: The Catholic Church and the Spirit of the Sixties" (U Chicago Press, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 46:10


What is your conscience? Is it, as Peter Cajka asks in this provocative book, “A small, still voice? A cricket perched on your shoulder? An angel and devil who compete for your attention?” Going back at least to the thirteenth century, Catholics viewed their personal conscience as a powerful and meaningful guide to align their conduct with worldly laws. But, as Cajka shows in Follow Your Conscience: The Catholic Church and the Spirit of the Sixties (U Chicago Press, 2021), during the national cultural tumult of the 1960s, the divide between the demands of conscience and the demands of the law, society, and even the church itself grew increasingly perilous. As growing numbers of Catholics started to consider formerly stout institutions to be morally hollow—especially in light of the Vietnam War and the church's refusal to sanction birth control—they increasingly turned to their own consciences as guides for action and belief. This abandonment of higher authority had radical effects on American society, influencing not only the broader world of Christianity, but also such disparate arenas as government, law, health care, and the very vocabulary of American culture. As this book astutely reveals, today's debates over political power, religious freedom, gay rights, and more are all deeply infused by the language and concepts outlined by these pioneers of personal conscience. Carlos Ruiz Martinez is a PhD student in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Iowa. He is also the Communications Assistant for the American Catholic Historical Association (ACHA). His general interest is in American religious history, especially American Catholicism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in American Studies
Peter Cajka, "Follow Your Conscience: The Catholic Church and the Spirit of the Sixties" (U Chicago Press, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 46:10


What is your conscience? Is it, as Peter Cajka asks in this provocative book, “A small, still voice? A cricket perched on your shoulder? An angel and devil who compete for your attention?” Going back at least to the thirteenth century, Catholics viewed their personal conscience as a powerful and meaningful guide to align their conduct with worldly laws. But, as Cajka shows in Follow Your Conscience: The Catholic Church and the Spirit of the Sixties (U Chicago Press, 2021), during the national cultural tumult of the 1960s, the divide between the demands of conscience and the demands of the law, society, and even the church itself grew increasingly perilous. As growing numbers of Catholics started to consider formerly stout institutions to be morally hollow—especially in light of the Vietnam War and the church's refusal to sanction birth control—they increasingly turned to their own consciences as guides for action and belief. This abandonment of higher authority had radical effects on American society, influencing not only the broader world of Christianity, but also such disparate arenas as government, law, health care, and the very vocabulary of American culture. As this book astutely reveals, today's debates over political power, religious freedom, gay rights, and more are all deeply infused by the language and concepts outlined by these pioneers of personal conscience. Carlos Ruiz Martinez is a PhD student in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Iowa. He is also the Communications Assistant for the American Catholic Historical Association (ACHA). His general interest is in American religious history, especially American Catholicism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

The John Batchelor Show
1712: C. Vann Woodward on the liberal internationalism national myths that inspired the Vietnam War tragedy. Anatol Lieven, @QuincyInsy HFN

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 15:20


Photo: Vietnam war. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow .C. Vann Woodward on the liberal internationalism national myths that inspired the Vietnam War tragedy. Anatol Lieven, @QuincyInst HFN https://quincyinst.org/2021/09/16/vindicating-realist-internationalism/

War Stories by Preston Stewart
156: A Deadly Fight in a Confusing War - Hamburger Hill

War Stories by Preston Stewart

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 54:18


Today I'm joined by Leon Schwartz to talk broadly about the Vietnam War and more specifically the Battle of Hamburger Hill. Leon helps provide some insight into the history of Vietnam that is hard to find when just studying it from military history perspective here in the US. We talk about the Soldiers interactions with locals, some terms they may have picked up along the way, how the war is viewed in Vietnam today and a quite a bit more. - Brief background on Vietnam pre-1969 - NVA vs. VC - Body count strategy - Devastation on both sides on Hill 937 (Hamburger Hill) - Walking away, giving the hill back after that victory - Public perception changing in the US Leon was a History and English teacher for 10 years in Asia and the United States. He lived and taught in South Korea and Vietnam from 2011-2016. After teaching, Leon has worked in the maritime industry as a stevedore. Although he no longer works as a teacher, he maintains a strong interest and passion in all things history. He is from Baltimore County, MD but currently resides in Smithfield, VA.

upNXT: The Unofficial NXT Podcast
TURNING HEELS: Ep. 6 ”House Show”

upNXT: The Unofficial NXT Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 41:05


John Siino & B Detroit are here with another installment of Turning Heels, discussing episode six, "House Show". It's the day of Big Jim's baby's baptism and a new beginning for everyone in Duffy. Meanwhile, Jack's running around town prepping and promoting the upcoming match at the fair. In this episode we get a cameo from Mick Foley as Dickie Valentine and his No Questions Barred podcast, we see Ace Spade trying to patch things up with Bobby and Crystal, Gully trying to recruit Rooster to come to Florida Wrestling Dystopia, Staci having enough of Jack and cutting a promo on gerbils, fireflies and squirrels. Plus, Diego & Apocalypse discussing Vietnam War and nipples and we dig deeper into the history of Wild Bill and Willie Day. Cno & B also discuss the upcoming AEW Grand Slam, episode four of Wu-Tang: An American Saga, their familiarity with cornhole and if ranch on top of barbeque is allowed. You can now join in our LIVE POST Shows, WatchAlongs and watch us game at Twitch.tv/upNXTPodcast  Monday: Turning Heels - Ep 6 w/ John Siino & B Detroit (Free Show) Tuesday: upNXT - NXT Review (Free Show/Twitch) Wednesday: Shot In The Dark w/ John Siino (Free Show) Wednesday: BDElite - AEW Dynamite Review (Free Show/Twitch) Sunday 26th: WWE Extreme Rules 2021 WatchAlong (Twitch) But wait! There's more! On the upNXT Patreon, Braden and Davie do retro NXT reviews, Best Match Ever, Top 5, Reviews from the 6ix, and tons more. This week's schedule: Thursday 23rd: upYOURS w/ Matty B - Heavyweights (1995) Saturday 25th: Reviews From The 6ix - ECW One Night Stand (2006) Last week's shows included Best Match Ever - The Brain Busters (Arn & Tully), wasNXT: May 22nd 2013, and more! Only $5 for NA tier to access all these shows and everything in back catalogue!  Photo Courtesy: Starz You can also check out video versions of our reviews on YouTube at YouTube.com/upNXT upNXT Theme by: Warren-D, PXCH and Shaheen Abdi and The Bray D Subscribe: https://www.postwrestling.com/subscribe Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/upNXT YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/upNXT Twitch: https://twitch.tv/upNXTpodcast T-Shirts: https://www.prowrestlingtees.com/upnxt Discuss: https://forum.postwrestling.com Twitter/Facebook/Instagram: @upNXTpodcast

Hell & High Water with John Heilemann

In which John Heilemann talks with documentarian Ken Burns, whose new four-part series, Muhammad Ali, premiered this week on PBS. Heilemann and Burns discuss Ali's life and legacy as the most important athlete of the 20th century, in particular how his story transcends sports, intersecting with the defining issues of his era (race, religion, politics, protest) and illuminating much about the American experience in the convulsive Sixties and Seventies; Burns's prodigious body of work, which has earned him two Academy Award nominations, 15 Emmys, and two Grammys, and has made him the dominant practitioner of his art form over the past 40 years; the landmark films within his oeuvre — multi-part television events such as The Civil War, Baseball, Jazz, and The Vietnam War, some running nearly 20 hours in length — and how Burns found himself imbued with the power to get such sprawling projects made; and the central role that race has occupied in his work, and in the American story. Burns also reflects on his childhood and how it inspired his career, and what it was like to co-direct the Ali series with his oldest daughter Sarah and her husband. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

American Prestige
Bonus - Coffee Counter Culture w/ David Parsons (PREVIEW)

American Prestige

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 3:50


Danny is joined by David Parsons of Nostalgia Trap to discuss the GI coffee houses that emerged during the Vietnam War and served as important sites of debate about the war and US empire. Danny and David discuss a variety of issues, from culture's role in shaping history to the failures and successes of the coffee house movement and what these might teach us today. Grab a copy of David's book here: https://bit.ly/2Xs9cEE Become a patron today! www.patreon.com/americanprestige

War College
UNLOCKED: The Drones of the Vietnam War

War College

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 36:36


A special production of Angry Planet and David Axe explores how a group of scruffy contractors pioneered the use of drones during the Vietnam War.Axe's book, Drone War Vietnam, is out now. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

It Was Said
Muhammad Ali and the Making of a New World

It Was Said

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 23:35


Heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali was perhaps the most famous man on Earth, and not only for his epic skill in the ring. In this episode, Doc Rivers is joined by legendary sportscaster Al Michaels and longtime sports journalist Michael Wilbon to discuss Ali's powerful and revolutionary words about race, politics, culture, and sport, especially during the height of the civil rights movement and the Vietnam War. His words made their mark then--and live on now.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2673 - How American Efforts to Humanize War Dehumanize It Even Further w/ Samuel Moyn

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 70:56


Sam and Emma host Samuel Moyn, Professor of History at Yale University, to discuss his recent book Humane: How the United States Abandoned Peace and Reinvented War, on how the evolving face of the American Empire has changed the way we perceive war, and what we can do to get the conversation back on track. Starting all the way back in the mid-19th Century, Professor Moyn dives into the first Geneva Convention and the attempt by the Swiss to make war more humane, as well as the response by some like Leo Tolstoy who worried that it might, in fact, further legitimize war. He, Sam, and Emma then situate the role of America in all of this, jumping off of the massacres of the Vietnam War and the changes both in Geneva law – focused around civilians and collateral damage – and in the perspective of the US military, that it inspired, before moving back to how the two World Wars and transatlantic combat put the US at the warfront of the western empires, locking them into brutal wars to “keep the peace” ever since. Next, they look into why the backlash to the brutalities of Vietnam was so much more severe than that of the war on terror, situating the former within a pre-existing anti-war movement, and then jump into the role of Barack Obama in really cementing the ideology of the “humane” war through public declarations of both the need for constant warfare, and the need for humane warfare. They wrap up the interview with a conversation on the role of technology in bolstering the Rumsfeldian light warfare, and summarize the evolution of, and what we could see next from, the American empire. Emma and Sam also touch on Manchin's mumbling maneuvers to avoid getting too into the numbers of the Infrastructure Package, despite his recent complaints about the numbers. And in the Fun Half: Gabe from Ontario calls in to get out the vote for the NDP in the upcoming Canadian election, Sandy from Ontario boosts that message before getting a warm thank you for her incredible gift to the MR studio, and Nicholas from St. Louis converses with Sam and Emma on the differences in pushing for individual lifestyle changes (veganism) and pushing for actual policy change. The MR crew also explores the social (rather than immune) boost Joe Rogan got from ivermectin, discusses the recent and growing legitimization of George W. Bush and his administration's war crimes, and reflects on the disasters of Rudy Giuliani past, present, and future. They wrap up the fun half with Tucker Carlson finally speaking on a topic he has expertise in (lying and using your power to protect the powerful) and the progression of recent anti-Mask Mandates, plus, your calls and IMs! Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here. Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) You can now watch the livestream on Twitch Check out today's sponsors: LiquidIV: The hot summer months are here and we need to be proactive to keep our body fueled up & hydrated. Liquid I.V. contains 5 essential vitamins—more Vitamin C than an orange and as much potassium as a banana. Healthier than sugary sports drinks, there are no artificial flavors or preservatives and less sugar than an apple. Grab your Liquid I.V. in bulk nationwide at Costco or you can get 25% off when you go to liquidIV.com and use code MAJORITYREP at checkout. That's 25% off ANYTHING you order when you get better hydration today using promo code MAJORITYREP at liquidIV.com. Wordtune is the first AI-powered, online writing tool that understands meaning, so you can feel confident that what you're writing is as smart as you are every time. Wordtune understands what you're trying to say and suggests ways to make your writing more clear, compelling, and authentic.  MR listeners can try Wordtune for free at wordtune.com/majority. Honey is the FREE shopping tool that scours the internet for promo codes and applies the best one it finds to your cart. Honey supports over 30,000 stories online – ranging from sites that have tech and gaming products to popular fashion brands. . even food delivery! If you don't already have Honey, you could be straight up missing out on free savings. It's literally FREE and installs in a few seconds. Get Honey for FREE at joinhoney.com/MAJORITY. That's joinhoney.com/MAJORITY. Support the St. Vincent Nurses today as they continue to strike for a fair contract! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Check out The Nomiki Show live at 3 pm ET on YouTube at patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Matt's podcast, Literary Hangover, at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover, or on iTunes. Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada, at patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop