Podcasts about Vietnam War

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1955–1975 conflict in Vietnam

  • 3,581PODCASTS
  • 6,389EPISODES
  • 52mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 10, 2022LATEST
Vietnam War

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Best podcasts about Vietnam War

Show all podcasts related to vietnam war

Latest podcast episodes about Vietnam War

The Jim Hill Media Podcast Network
Looking at Lucasfilm - Episode 66 How “Return of the Jedi” is tied to the Vietnam War

The Jim Hill Media Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 62:15


Brian Gaughn & Jim Hill start off this week's episode by discussing “Star Wars: Andor.” They then look back at the production difficulties “Empire Strikes Back” experienced when that crew was shooting the Ice-Planet-of-Hoth sequences in Norway Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Veterans Chronicles
CDR Nigal Miller, U.S. Navy, Vietnam

Veterans Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 36:03


Nigal Miller grew up on the West Virginia side of the Ohio River and chose to serve his nation as a U.S. Naval aviator. He received his wings in 1961 and subsequently served three tours of duty in the Vietnam War aboard three different aircraft carriers.In this edition of "Veterans Chronicles," CDR Miller explains the exhilaration of landing on the deck of an aircraft carrier and why why he thinks the F-8 Crusader was the finest fighter plane of its generation, superior even to the Soviet MiG. Miller also describes providing close air support for American ground forces in Vietnam and serving on the admiral's staff aboard the USS Midway on his final deployment and much more.

Earth Ancients
Destiny: Jim Morris, Special Ops, LSD, and my Unlikely Path to Toltec Wisdom

Earth Ancients

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 90:32


• Explains how the author became a student of Toltec spiritual teacher don Miguel Ruiz and how he traveled the world, as well as the astral realms, undergoing a deep spiritual journey of change• Details how the author discovered LSD after the Vietnam War and even tripped while skydiving• Recounts his time as a civil rights advocate and war correspondent, and how Toltec shamanism helped prepare him to ease his wife's long end-of-life journeyDuring his third tour of duty in Vietnam where he served as a Green Beret, Jim Morris was wounded badly enough to be retired from the army. He came home bitter, angry that his career had been ended. After reading The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, he realized that many members of Ken Kesey's Merry Pranksters had also been combat officers. Following this spiritual “hint,” he spent the next couple of years as an acid head, even skydiving on LSD. Awakened by his LSD experiences, Morris immersed himself in the books of Carlos Castaneda as well as in Kriya yoga, Charismatic Christianity, and A Course in Miracles. From these experiences he was led to Toltec spiritual teacher don Miguel Ruiz and began a deep spiritual journey of change.Sharing his journey from PTSD to spiritual awakening, Morris recounts his time as a civil rights advocate for the Montagnard people in Vietnam and his years as a war correspondent at the same time he was following Castaneda's Warrior's Way. He describes his momentous meeting with don Miguel Ruiz as well as his travels around the world and in the astral realms. Sharing how his wife developed dementia and later became paralyzed, Morris explains how it required all his Toltec training, all his military training, everything he had to share her final years in a meaningful and fulfilling way.Written from a deep understanding of Toltec techniques this book shows in a heartfelt and resonant way what a spiritual path can give you.Retired U.S. Army Special Forces Major Jim Morris served three tours with the Green Berets in Vietnam. He has worked as a civil rights advocate for the mountain peoples with whom he fought, the Montagnard, and his Vietnam memoir, War Story, won the first Bernal Diaz Award for military non-fiction. He has covered wars for Rolling Stone, Soldier of Fortune, Esquire, and the Saturday Evening Post. For decades he has immersed himself in a deep study of Toltec shamanism. He lives in Bell Canyon, California.

The Opperman Report
Peter Dale Scott

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 71:41


Peter Dale Scott is a Canadian-born poet, academic, and former diplomat. A son of the Canadian poet and constitutional lawyer F. R. Scott and painter Marian Dale Scott, he is best known for his critiques of deep politics and American foreign policy since the era of the Vietnam War.

New Books in History
Grant Wiedenfeld, "Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 73:30


Through the heart of Hollywood cinema runs a surprising current of progressive politics. Sports movies, a genre that has flourished since the mid-seventies, evoke the American dream and represent the nation to itself. Once considered mere credos for Reaganism, on closer view, movies from Rocky (1976) to Ali (2001) dream of democratic participation and recognition more than individual success. In every case, off-field relationships take precedence over on-field competition.  Arranged chronologically, Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream (Oxford UP, 2022) tells the story of multiculturalism's gradual adoption. The mainstream's first minority heroes are paradoxically white ethnic, rural, working-class men, exemplified by Rocky, Slap Shot (1977) and The Natural (1984); Black, brown, and women characters follow in White Men Can't Jump (1992), A League of Their Own (1992), and Ali. But despite their insistence on community and diversity these popular dramas show limited faith in civic institutions. Hannah Arendt, Jeffrey Alexander, and others inform original analysis and commentary on the political significance of popular culture. Reading these familiar movies from another angle paints a fresh picture of how the United States has imagined democracy since its bicentennial. In this conversation with host Annie Berke, Dr. Grant Wiedenfeld explains his personal and familial connections to the book's subject matter, discusses why Hollywood sports films don't always have (or need) a "happy ending," and explains how the genre functions as a "civic screen" for the American public in the decades following the Vietnam War. Grant Wiedenfeld earned a PhD from Yale University in Comparative Literature and Film & Media Studies. He taught courses on sports and cinema in Yale's English Department and Film Studies Program before being hired at Sam Houston State University, where he is currently Associate Professor of Media and Culture. Previous publications include studies of Gustave Flaubert, D.W. Griffith, and André Bazin. Annie Berke is the Film Editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and author of Their Own Best Creations: Women Writers in Postwar Television (University of California Press, 2022). Her scholarship and criticism has been published in Feminist Media Histories, Public Books, Literary Hub, and Ms. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in American Studies
Grant Wiedenfeld, "Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 73:30


Through the heart of Hollywood cinema runs a surprising current of progressive politics. Sports movies, a genre that has flourished since the mid-seventies, evoke the American dream and represent the nation to itself. Once considered mere credos for Reaganism, on closer view, movies from Rocky (1976) to Ali (2001) dream of democratic participation and recognition more than individual success. In every case, off-field relationships take precedence over on-field competition.  Arranged chronologically, Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream (Oxford UP, 2022) tells the story of multiculturalism's gradual adoption. The mainstream's first minority heroes are paradoxically white ethnic, rural, working-class men, exemplified by Rocky, Slap Shot (1977) and The Natural (1984); Black, brown, and women characters follow in White Men Can't Jump (1992), A League of Their Own (1992), and Ali. But despite their insistence on community and diversity these popular dramas show limited faith in civic institutions. Hannah Arendt, Jeffrey Alexander, and others inform original analysis and commentary on the political significance of popular culture. Reading these familiar movies from another angle paints a fresh picture of how the United States has imagined democracy since its bicentennial. In this conversation with host Annie Berke, Dr. Grant Wiedenfeld explains his personal and familial connections to the book's subject matter, discusses why Hollywood sports films don't always have (or need) a "happy ending," and explains how the genre functions as a "civic screen" for the American public in the decades following the Vietnam War. Grant Wiedenfeld earned a PhD from Yale University in Comparative Literature and Film & Media Studies. He taught courses on sports and cinema in Yale's English Department and Film Studies Program before being hired at Sam Houston State University, where he is currently Associate Professor of Media and Culture. Previous publications include studies of Gustave Flaubert, D.W. Griffith, and André Bazin. Annie Berke is the Film Editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and author of Their Own Best Creations: Women Writers in Postwar Television (University of California Press, 2022). Her scholarship and criticism has been published in Feminist Media Histories, Public Books, Literary Hub, and Ms. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
Grant Wiedenfeld, "Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 73:30


Through the heart of Hollywood cinema runs a surprising current of progressive politics. Sports movies, a genre that has flourished since the mid-seventies, evoke the American dream and represent the nation to itself. Once considered mere credos for Reaganism, on closer view, movies from Rocky (1976) to Ali (2001) dream of democratic participation and recognition more than individual success. In every case, off-field relationships take precedence over on-field competition.  Arranged chronologically, Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream (Oxford UP, 2022) tells the story of multiculturalism's gradual adoption. The mainstream's first minority heroes are paradoxically white ethnic, rural, working-class men, exemplified by Rocky, Slap Shot (1977) and The Natural (1984); Black, brown, and women characters follow in White Men Can't Jump (1992), A League of Their Own (1992), and Ali. But despite their insistence on community and diversity these popular dramas show limited faith in civic institutions. Hannah Arendt, Jeffrey Alexander, and others inform original analysis and commentary on the political significance of popular culture. Reading these familiar movies from another angle paints a fresh picture of how the United States has imagined democracy since its bicentennial. In this conversation with host Annie Berke, Dr. Grant Wiedenfeld explains his personal and familial connections to the book's subject matter, discusses why Hollywood sports films don't always have (or need) a "happy ending," and explains how the genre functions as a "civic screen" for the American public in the decades following the Vietnam War. Grant Wiedenfeld earned a PhD from Yale University in Comparative Literature and Film & Media Studies. He taught courses on sports and cinema in Yale's English Department and Film Studies Program before being hired at Sam Houston State University, where he is currently Associate Professor of Media and Culture. Previous publications include studies of Gustave Flaubert, D.W. Griffith, and André Bazin. Annie Berke is the Film Editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and author of Their Own Best Creations: Women Writers in Postwar Television (University of California Press, 2022). Her scholarship and criticism has been published in Feminist Media Histories, Public Books, Literary Hub, and Ms. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Dance
Grant Wiedenfeld, "Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in Dance

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 73:30


Through the heart of Hollywood cinema runs a surprising current of progressive politics. Sports movies, a genre that has flourished since the mid-seventies, evoke the American dream and represent the nation to itself. Once considered mere credos for Reaganism, on closer view, movies from Rocky (1976) to Ali (2001) dream of democratic participation and recognition more than individual success. In every case, off-field relationships take precedence over on-field competition.  Arranged chronologically, Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream (Oxford UP, 2022) tells the story of multiculturalism's gradual adoption. The mainstream's first minority heroes are paradoxically white ethnic, rural, working-class men, exemplified by Rocky, Slap Shot (1977) and The Natural (1984); Black, brown, and women characters follow in White Men Can't Jump (1992), A League of Their Own (1992), and Ali. But despite their insistence on community and diversity these popular dramas show limited faith in civic institutions. Hannah Arendt, Jeffrey Alexander, and others inform original analysis and commentary on the political significance of popular culture. Reading these familiar movies from another angle paints a fresh picture of how the United States has imagined democracy since its bicentennial. In this conversation with host Annie Berke, Dr. Grant Wiedenfeld explains his personal and familial connections to the book's subject matter, discusses why Hollywood sports films don't always have (or need) a "happy ending," and explains how the genre functions as a "civic screen" for the American public in the decades following the Vietnam War. Grant Wiedenfeld earned a PhD from Yale University in Comparative Literature and Film & Media Studies. He taught courses on sports and cinema in Yale's English Department and Film Studies Program before being hired at Sam Houston State University, where he is currently Associate Professor of Media and Culture. Previous publications include studies of Gustave Flaubert, D.W. Griffith, and André Bazin. Annie Berke is the Film Editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and author of Their Own Best Creations: Women Writers in Postwar Television (University of California Press, 2022). Her scholarship and criticism has been published in Feminist Media Histories, Public Books, Literary Hub, and Ms. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/performing-arts

New Books in Popular Culture
Grant Wiedenfeld, "Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in Popular Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 73:30


Through the heart of Hollywood cinema runs a surprising current of progressive politics. Sports movies, a genre that has flourished since the mid-seventies, evoke the American dream and represent the nation to itself. Once considered mere credos for Reaganism, on closer view, movies from Rocky (1976) to Ali (2001) dream of democratic participation and recognition more than individual success. In every case, off-field relationships take precedence over on-field competition.  Arranged chronologically, Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream (Oxford UP, 2022) tells the story of multiculturalism's gradual adoption. The mainstream's first minority heroes are paradoxically white ethnic, rural, working-class men, exemplified by Rocky, Slap Shot (1977) and The Natural (1984); Black, brown, and women characters follow in White Men Can't Jump (1992), A League of Their Own (1992), and Ali. But despite their insistence on community and diversity these popular dramas show limited faith in civic institutions. Hannah Arendt, Jeffrey Alexander, and others inform original analysis and commentary on the political significance of popular culture. Reading these familiar movies from another angle paints a fresh picture of how the United States has imagined democracy since its bicentennial. In this conversation with host Annie Berke, Dr. Grant Wiedenfeld explains his personal and familial connections to the book's subject matter, discusses why Hollywood sports films don't always have (or need) a "happy ending," and explains how the genre functions as a "civic screen" for the American public in the decades following the Vietnam War. Grant Wiedenfeld earned a PhD from Yale University in Comparative Literature and Film & Media Studies. He taught courses on sports and cinema in Yale's English Department and Film Studies Program before being hired at Sam Houston State University, where he is currently Associate Professor of Media and Culture. Previous publications include studies of Gustave Flaubert, D.W. Griffith, and André Bazin. Annie Berke is the Film Editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and author of Their Own Best Creations: Women Writers in Postwar Television (University of California Press, 2022). Her scholarship and criticism has been published in Feminist Media Histories, Public Books, Literary Hub, and Ms. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/popular-culture

New Books in Film
Grant Wiedenfeld, "Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in Film

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 73:30


Through the heart of Hollywood cinema runs a surprising current of progressive politics. Sports movies, a genre that has flourished since the mid-seventies, evoke the American dream and represent the nation to itself. Once considered mere credos for Reaganism, on closer view, movies from Rocky (1976) to Ali (2001) dream of democratic participation and recognition more than individual success. In every case, off-field relationships take precedence over on-field competition.  Arranged chronologically, Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream (Oxford UP, 2022) tells the story of multiculturalism's gradual adoption. The mainstream's first minority heroes are paradoxically white ethnic, rural, working-class men, exemplified by Rocky, Slap Shot (1977) and The Natural (1984); Black, brown, and women characters follow in White Men Can't Jump (1992), A League of Their Own (1992), and Ali. But despite their insistence on community and diversity these popular dramas show limited faith in civic institutions. Hannah Arendt, Jeffrey Alexander, and others inform original analysis and commentary on the political significance of popular culture. Reading these familiar movies from another angle paints a fresh picture of how the United States has imagined democracy since its bicentennial. In this conversation with host Annie Berke, Dr. Grant Wiedenfeld explains his personal and familial connections to the book's subject matter, discusses why Hollywood sports films don't always have (or need) a "happy ending," and explains how the genre functions as a "civic screen" for the American public in the decades following the Vietnam War. Grant Wiedenfeld earned a PhD from Yale University in Comparative Literature and Film & Media Studies. He taught courses on sports and cinema in Yale's English Department and Film Studies Program before being hired at Sam Houston State University, where he is currently Associate Professor of Media and Culture. Previous publications include studies of Gustave Flaubert, D.W. Griffith, and André Bazin. Annie Berke is the Film Editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and author of Their Own Best Creations: Women Writers in Postwar Television (University of California Press, 2022). Her scholarship and criticism has been published in Feminist Media Histories, Public Books, Literary Hub, and Ms. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/film

The Real News Podcast
The Marc Steiner Show: The Weather Underground with Bill Ayers and Bernardine Dohrn

The Real News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 49:54


The Weather Underground spent nearly a decade combating the US government. From prison breaks to bombings of the Pentagon and the US Capitol, the 'Weathermen' used any means necessary to fight capitalism, end the Vietnam War, and struggle in solidarity with the Black Panthers and other organizations. A new podcast series created by Zayd Ayers-Dohrn, a child of the Weather Underground, looks back on the stories of the Weathermen and the history that made them. Zayd's parents, Bill Ayers and Bernardine Dohrn, join the Marc Steiner Show along with their son to discuss the podcast, their lifelong journeys as radicals, and what those interested in social change today can learn from the successes, history, and mistakes of the Weather Underground.Tune in for new episodes of The Marc Steiner Show every Monday on TRNN.Pre-Production/Studio: Dwayne GladdenPost-Production: Stephen FrankHelp us continue producing The Marc Steiner Show by following us and becoming a monthly sustainer:Donate: https://therealnews.com/donate-pod-mssSign up for our newsletter: https://therealnews.com/nl-pod-stGet The Marc Steiner Show updates: https://therealnews.com/up-pod-stLike us on Facebook: https://facebook.com/therealnewsFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/therealnews

In Conversation: An OUP Podcast
Grant Wiedenfeld, "Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream" (Oxford UP, 2022)

In Conversation: An OUP Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 73:30


Through the heart of Hollywood cinema runs a surprising current of progressive politics. Sports movies, a genre that has flourished since the mid-seventies, evoke the American dream and represent the nation to itself. Once considered mere credos for Reaganism, on closer view, movies from Rocky (1976) to Ali (2001) dream of democratic participation and recognition more than individual success. In every case, off-field relationships take precedence over on-field competition.  Arranged chronologically, Hollywood Sports Movies and the American Dream (Oxford UP, 2022) tells the story of multiculturalism's gradual adoption. The mainstream's first minority heroes are paradoxically white ethnic, rural, working-class men, exemplified by Rocky, Slap Shot (1977) and The Natural (1984); Black, brown, and women characters follow in White Men Can't Jump (1992), A League of Their Own (1992), and Ali. But despite their insistence on community and diversity these popular dramas show limited faith in civic institutions. Hannah Arendt, Jeffrey Alexander, and others inform original analysis and commentary on the political significance of popular culture. Reading these familiar movies from another angle paints a fresh picture of how the United States has imagined democracy since its bicentennial. In this conversation with host Annie Berke, Dr. Grant Wiedenfeld explains his personal and familial connections to the book's subject matter, discusses why Hollywood sports films don't always have (or need) a "happy ending," and explains how the genre functions as a "civic screen" for the American public in the decades following the Vietnam War. Grant Wiedenfeld earned a PhD from Yale University in Comparative Literature and Film & Media Studies. He taught courses on sports and cinema in Yale's English Department and Film Studies Program before being hired at Sam Houston State University, where he is currently Associate Professor of Media and Culture. Previous publications include studies of Gustave Flaubert, D.W. Griffith, and André Bazin. Annie Berke is the Film Editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books and author of Their Own Best Creations: Women Writers in Postwar Television (University of California Press, 2022). Her scholarship and criticism has been published in Feminist Media Histories, Public Books, Literary Hub, and Ms.

Tales of Honor Podcast
539. Bruce A Grandstaff - Medal of Honor Recipient

Tales of Honor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 4:34


On episode five hundred and thirty-nine, the story of Bruce A Grandstaff is told and episodes for all of August will be recipients from the Vietnam War. A big thank you goes out to this month's show sponsor, Motor City Munitions. Use promo code TALESOFHONOR for 5% off of your online order today! All your firearm related needs with service so fast it can only come from the Motor City: https://www.motorcitymunitions.com For the text of H.R.1808: https://www.congress.gov/bill/117th-congress/house-bill/1808 To find your state senator: https://www.senate.gov/senators/ Also want to support the show? Check out the show swag where 50% of profits get donated to the Medal of Honor Museum: https://bit.ly/TOHswag Be sure to visit our website for more information as the show goes on at: www.talesofhonorpodcast.com. Thanks for listening and be sure to share with friends and family!

Adam’s World of Darkness: Beyond the Map
The Place of Last Resort Trailer

Adam’s World of Darkness: Beyond the Map

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 2:18


We are at the fringes of the map and there's more than just dragons. Join us in a tale of unspeakable horror set during the Vietnam War. Grab the complete campaign as a digital download here or sign up as a King Subscriber on Sanspants+ to get access to several World of Darkness adventures and so much more. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Warriors Journey
Episode 141 • Returning Healthy Veterans to America

The Warriors Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 44:07


As we kick off a new series highlighting partner organizations, we welcome Major General Bob Dees (US Army, Ret.) back to the podcast, who serves as President of the Board for the National Center for Healthy Veterans. Our veterans have pledged their lives for our freedom, security, and prosperity. Healthy veterans are productive members of society, good employees, and positive role models, but not all of our veterans are healthy – more veterans have committed suicide in the past 10 years than the number of combat deaths in the Vietnam War. Our veterans need America, and America needs healthy veterans. The National Center for Healthy Veterans is a comprehensive scalable solution and a unique strategic initiative that will have national impact and return healthy veterans to America. Bob served thirty-one years as an infantry officer, a senior military leader and strategist, and Commander of the 2d Infantry Division in Korea, and the US-Israeli Combined Task Force for Missile Defense.  Following the military, he served in business at Microsoft, in non-profit leadership, and in academia as a VP for military outreach at Liberty University and founder of the Liberty Institute for Military Resilience. In 2015 and 2016, he served as national security advisor and chairman for Dr. Ben Carson's Presidential Campaign. Bob has authored five books including the Resilience Trilogy and the Resilience God Style series. He was also featured as one of 30 “Master Leaders in America” by noted author George Barna and was awarded the Council for National Policy George Washington Military Leadership Award in 2018. To find out more about Bob's work at the National Center for Healthy Veterans, visit https://www.healthyveterans.org/, and to hear more from Bob, check out Episodes 49 and 50 of the podcast! Find more information online at https://www.thewarriorsjourney.org/podcast Follow us on Facebook • Instagram • Twitter

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - RANDAL LEIGH BROWN, (aka Jason Leigh) - Highly Unlikely UFO Sighting in Cleburne, Texas

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 51:54


Jason Leigh is a member of 'The International Space Sciences Organization,' 'The UFO Scientific Research Center' and 'The American Legion.' He has been a UFO/Paranormal Investigator for over 30 years and worked in Broadcast TV-news and Production for almost 20 years as a live cameraman, editor, writer, ENG photographer and director. His film production company, Workhorse Productions, filmed the famed 1994, "Checks, Crooks and Counterfeits" (c) by Jason Leigh, which was used as a training film by National Food store chains, FDIC Banks and Law Enforcement Agencies in training to detect counterfeits and made National media news. It remains the ONLY such commercial training film in the world. Jason dabbled in acting, having served one year on the stage with The Repertory Theatre, completed Dr. Joe Siefifth's School for Southern Gentlemen and having a 'supporting cast part' in Clint Eastwood's movie, "The Beguiled," directed by the late and great, Mr. Don Siegel. Jason worked as a very young man in the writing of television and radio commercials as well as recording 'voice overs' of accented parts--at minimum wage. He attended various Universities and City Colleges throughout the USA, making the Dean's List for Academics and was the Editor of the Student Newspaper. He worked for NASA in the Top Security Level 'Final Testing' of the Space Shuttle Project, until a serious on-the-job injury ended his career. He is an Honorably Discharged U.S. Navy Veteran of the Vietnam War, having worked with the Navy SeaLs and assigned to the Hawaiian Armed Services Police. Jason Leigh is a 'proven clairvoyant,' of which ability, he attributes as a 'God-given-gift.' (for documents of proof). He is an Award Winning writer, Poet and Songwriter - with his website winning the acclaimed 'Golden Web Award' for seven (7) straight years. His sighting and videotaping of an 'undisputed' Broad-daylight UFO over Cleburne, Texas of June 11, 1995, remains "the Best Documented" case in the annals of Ufology and of scientific study. His published book (CD and e-book), "PowerGlide" details his lifelong experiences of clairvoyance and UFO sightings and contains this entire website and all published research papers and documents. He has been the guest of many of the leading radio talk show Hosts discussing paranormal topics for over 10 years.

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - GRANT CAMERON - UFOlogy - Inspirations and Downloads

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 56:01


UFOlogy - Inspirations and Downloads - Grant Cameron became involved in Ufology as the Vietnam War ended in May 1975 with personal sightings of an object which locally became known as Charlie Red Star. The sightings occurred in Carman, Manitoba about 25 miles north of the Canada-US border. The story has been optioned for a movie that will be released in 2016. These sightings led to a decade of early research done by the Canadian government into the flying saucer phenomena. Cameron is the authority on Wilbert B. Smith who headed up the Canadian government program. This led almost two decades of research into the role of the President of the United States in the UFO mystery. In the past few years Cameron has turned his research interests to the role of consciousness in the UFO phenomena, the possible involvement of extraterrestrials in modern music, and in the phenomena of inspirations and downloads in science, inventions, Nobel Prizes, music, art, books, near death experience, meditation, and with individuals known as savants and prodigies. Cameron co-authored books on the government UFO cover-up called “UFOs, MJ-12, and the Government” along with “UFO's, Area 51, and Government Informants.” He has just released the book, “The Alien Bedtime Story Book” and is about to release “Inspirations and Downloads: Where Good Ideas Come From.”. www.presidentialufo.com

Rich Zeoli
China Could Hit Back Over Pelosi's Taiwan Visit (Full Show 080322)

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 196:50


China Could Hit Back Over Pelosi's Taiwan Visit Rich discussed Nancy Pelosi's Taiwan visit early this week. This visit was to prevent defiance of Chinese threats and prevent a future war. Rich expressed how President Biden's poll numbers continue to drop after the Taiwan visit. Let's go to The Beach! What's the best choice to eat on the beach? Rich and Greg discussed the best foods to eat on the beach.  Monkeypox Czar Amid Criticism of Federal Response President Biden on Tuesday appointed a national monkeypox response coordinator, a bid to improve the federal government's response to the outbreak. FEMA regional administrators will seek to increase the availability of tests, drugs, and vaccines. Is the Biden Admin afraid of China?  Supreme Court Ruling on Mail in Ballet Linda Kerns joined the show to discuss the recent change to the mail-in ballet by the supreme court in Pennsylvania.  Can't Afford The Fight? Than You Pay Rich discussed how the IRS and Democrats increased taxes on you. These new regulations are to make the upper working class pay more taxes despite not targeting the upper class to avoid lawsuits. What's on the cut sheet part 1.  Children Cartoon Characters Racist? Rich and Greg discussed their opinions on amusement parks and children's cartoon character mascots' interaction with kids at the park   John Siegfried, an author, and military historian joins the show to discuss his new book No Greater Love: The Story of Michael Crescenz, Philadelphia's Only Medal of Honor Recipient of the Vietnam War, and provide his insights on military history.  Chuck Schumer and Senators have reached a deal to pass veterans' health care legislation despite receiving controversy for this new bill. License Plate lawsuit A local Delaware citizen is suing their state because her license plate has an “Inappropriate Phrase”  Sylvester Stallone calls for ownership of ‘Rocky' Philly's all-time fictional movie hero actor Sylvester Stallone calls out the production company of the Rocky franchise for not having any ownership of the Philadelphia classic boxing Franchise despite being a key successor in all the boxing movies. Rich expresses his concern about the situation. What's on the Cut Sheet part 2.

Rich Zeoli
Greater Love The Story of Michael Crescenz

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 13:42


John Siegfried, an author and military historian joins the show to discuss his new book No Greater Love: The Story of Michael Crescenz, Philadelphia's Only Medal of Honor Recipient of the Vietnam War, and provide his insights on military history. 

You Just Have To Laugh
269. Shot down 16 times in the helicopter he flew during the Vietnam War. Lieutenant Colonel Hugh Mills shares his fascinating and patriotic story with some great humor too.

You Just Have To Laugh

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 69:48


     Lieutenant Colonel Hugh L. Mills Jr. is a retired United States Army officer who served in the Vietnam War. In the United States Army, U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Air Force and U.S. Space Force, lieutenant colonel is a field-grade officer rank, just above the rank of major and just below the rank of colonel. It is equivalent to the naval rank of commander in the other uniformed services. He flew over 2000 combat hours in the OH-6 and more than 1300 combat hours in the AH-1 in Vietnam. He was shot down 16 times, 15 times in the OH-6       In 1975 Bill received a Bachelor of Arts in aeronautical studies from Embry–Riddle Aeronautical University. After retiring from the Army in 1993 he co-wrote the book Low Level Hell about his experiences as a scout pilot in South Vietnam. Hugh worked for Cedar Fair for 15 years as director of general services. He also flew helicopters for the Kansas City Police Department. He later became Undersheriff with the Jackson County Missouri Sheriff's office. His decorations include the Silver Star, Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross, Bronze Star, Purple Heart, Air Medal, Gallantry Cross with Silver Star and Palm, Armed Forces Honor Medal First Class and the Civil Actions Medal First Class. In 2011 he was inducted into the Army Aviation Hall of Fame. In 2013 he was added to the Arkansas Walk of Fame. Hugh Mills was one of four children Hot Springs Arkansas and his next-door neighbor was Bill Clinton.  

Rich Zeoli
Chuck Schumer and Senators New Bill

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 40:31


In hour three, John Siegfried, an author, and military historian joins the show to discuss his new book No Greater Love: The Story of Michael Crescenz, Philadelphia's Only Medal of Honor Recipient of the Vietnam War, and provide his insights on military history.  Chuck Schumer and Senators have reached a deal to pass veterans' health care legislation despite receiving controversy for this new bill.

Tales of Honor Podcast
538. Raymond R Wright - Medal of Honor Recipient

Tales of Honor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 6:49


On episode five hundred and thirty-eight, the story of Raymond R Wright is told and episodes for all of August will be recipients from the Vietnam War. A big thank you goes out to this month's show sponsor, Motor City Munitions. Use promo code TALESOFHONOR for 5% off of your online order today! All your firearm related needs with service so fast it can only come from the Motor City: https://www.motorcitymunitions.com For Edward Byers' story: https://www.talesofhonorpodcast.com/stories/edward-c-byers-jr For the text of H.R.1808: https://www.congress.gov/bill/117th-congress/house-bill/1808 To find your state senator: https://www.senate.gov/senators/ Also want to support the show? Check out the show swag where 50% of profits get donated to the Medal of Honor Museum: https://bit.ly/TOHswag Be sure to visit our website for more information as the show goes on at: www.talesofhonorpodcast.com. Thanks for listening and be sure to share with friends and family!

Vietnam Veteran News with Mack Payne
Episode 2361 – Four more Vietnam War snipers highlighted

Vietnam Veteran News with Mack Payne

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 14:50


Episode 2361 of the Vietnam Veteran News Podcast will feature a story about four exceptional American snipers from the Vietnam War. The featured story comes from The War History Online website and is titled: The Vietnam War Featured Four Exceptional … Continue reading → The post Episode 2361 – Four more Vietnam War snipers highlighted appeared first on .

The Kyle Carpenter Podcast
#7 - Gary Sinise

The Kyle Carpenter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 109:10


Kyle sits down with Gary to discuss his family's journey to America in 1891, the founding of Chicago's Steppenwolf Theatre, his iconic role as Lieutenant Dan Taylor, in the film Forrest Gump, and his lifelong mission of giving back to veterans and first responders.Gary Sinise is an award-winning actor, musician and a passionate philanthropist. In 1974, at 18 years old, he co-founded Chicago's Steppenwolf Theatre Company. Today, his film and television works include Apollo 13, Ransom, Snake Eyes, The Green Mile, Mission to Mars and hit tv series Criminal Minds: Beyond Borders and nine seasons of CSI: NY. His most notable role came, in 1994, when he played Vietnam War veteran Lt. Dan Taylor, in the global film sensation Forrest Gump.  His role as Lt. Dan formed a deep and enduring connection with servicemen and women throughout the military community and in 2003, after several USO handshake tours, he formed the “Lt. Dan Band” and began entertaining troops at home and abroad. Over the years, the 13-piece cover band has performed hundreds of shows for charities and fundraisers supporting wounded heroes and troops around the world. In 2011, to expand upon his individual efforts, he established the Gary Sinise Foundation with the mission to serve and honor America's defenders, veterans, first responders, Gold Star families and those in need. In 2019, Gary released his New York Times Bestselling autobiography, Grateful American: A Journey from Self to Service.  

q: The Podcast from CBC Radio
[Full episode] Jully Black, Clarke Peters, Bettye LaVette, Stephanie Fisher

q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 67:52


Canadian singer-songwriter Jully Black looks back on her journey in music and how her mom shaped the artist she is today. Actor Clarke Peters talks about Spike Lee's Vietnam War film Da 5 Bloods and how little has changed for Black Americans today. Singer-songwriter Bettye LaVette reflects on her career and her latest album Blackbirds — a compilation of songs made famous by Black women. Video game researcher Stephanie Fisher tells us how the University of Toronto Mississauga's Syd Bolton Collection — one of the largest collections of video games in North America — could inspire more diversity and equity in the video game industry.

The Mark White Show
Patriotic Alabama Community Honors Fallen Vietnam Heroes

The Mark White Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 38:07


A very important aspect of my trip to Andalusia, Alabama, last week was to cover the The Vietnam Traveling Memorial Wall hosted by Covington Veterans Foundation. At the opening ceremony, family members who had lost loved ones during the Vietnam War, were asked to stand up. For those family members it was a time to stand proudly, knowing that we were honoring the sacrifice of their loved ones. Before the ceremony, I had the opportunity to speak with men who played an important role in this past week's events, including having Lee Greenwood during July Jamz. As we all know, these events don't just happen by “osmosis” (that was something my granddaddy used to say). On today's show, I have CCB Community Bank CEO Michael Andrews to share about the importance of their bank being able to support community efforts like this past week's effort in Andalusia. After that, I have three more guests from Covington Veterans Foundation! They are Andalusia Councilman Terry Powell (CVF Chaplain), Covington County Circuit Judge Ben Bowden (CVF President), & John Vick (CVF Chairman). I hope you will take a listen as we honor our Vietnam fallen heroes and share our great appreciation for their service and sacrifice. Please share.

Booknotes+
Ep. 73 Carl Foster, Director of the Little Blue House

Booknotes+

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 66:25


In the heart of Washington, DC, is a unique place for kids. It's called the Little Blue House. For 31 years, it's been the first love of its director, a man named Carl Foster. On the website of the Little Blue House, it says that there is a single core mission: "to foster the development of vulnerable and at-risk children and youth in the District in a safe, stable, and healthy environment." Carl Foster, a Vietnam War veteran, says that for over 30 years, the Little Blue House "has provided whatever service was needed by our kids to give them a chance to become self-sufficient adults."  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Echoes of the Vietnam War
Vietnam Goes to Hollywood

Echoes of the Vietnam War

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 45:43


Captain Dale Dye served 20 years in the Marine Corps including three tours and 31 major combat operations in Vietnam. In 1985 he founded Warriors, Inc. to help Hollywood do a better job of depicting American fighting men and women. He has worked with some of the biggest names in the business — Steven Spielberg, Tom Hanks, and Oliver Stone, among others — and has appeared as an actor in dozens of films, including "Platoon", "Saving Private Ryan", and "Mission: Impossible."

Fresh Air
Xenophobia & The Klan On The Texas Gulf Coast

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 44:55 Very Popular


Kirk Wallace Johnson tells the story of a bitter conflict that arose along the Gulf Coast of Texas when Vietnam War refugees began trawling for shrimp in the area. His book is The Fishermen and the Dragon.

Power, Poverty & Politics
Taiwan - China's Next Conquest

Power, Poverty & Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 53:48


The past year has contributed far too many deeply concerning news stories from around the globe. The debacle that was the withdrawal from Afghanistan, the ongoing Russian invasion of Ukraine. Now, we hear that tensions are rising with China as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi plans a trip to Taiwan.  Meanwhile, military leaders sound the alarm that recruitment numbers are down. So far down that they're comparable to low recruitment following the Vietnam War. George Landrith, President of Frontiers of Freedom, joins to dive into the issues affecting our military and the threats arising abroad. Richard Manning, President of Americans for Limited Government, picks back up from our conversation last week, and Jonathan Alexandre and Alfonso Aguilar are back, as we analyze and discuss the relentless drive to enforce conformity to a leftist narrative within the military and where we stand with our national security in the midst of a weak presidency.

Hades Base Channeling Network
The Other Taal and the Families of Sirius- Part 1

Hades Base Channeling Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 44:14


Greetings in love, light, and wisdom as one.    For the channeling session for August, we are departing from the legacy series this month. This one is from 1998 and thus is one of the clearest sounding recordings we've posted recently. Kiri starts things off by informing us that Tia wasn't on the base and she had requested that one of her assistants take over in her stead. The gentleman chosen got the assignment due to his research into the subject being discussed. We find out his name is Taal, just like the Wing Commander but this Taal is Sirian and not one of the pilots. His English skills are comparable to the Wing Commander's. He reveals these approximately 500 years old and new Kiri and Karra's father as well as them when they were very young. Much of what he goes over is the Defcon status which is what the base was using to determine the status quo of the planet much as NORAD would. Kiri comes back on and we learn that only Oath Keepers like Lyka eat meat among the Sirians. She also begins to explain relationships on a higher dimension and would be expanding on the subject significantly when she would speak at the end of the tape. Omal takes questions and one that had been going around recently in the news was on the Tailwind incident which involved a government cover-up about Sarin gas used by the US during the Vietnam War. Also, we get to hear about the odds of a comet hitting our planet due to a movie that had come out called "Armageddon". Mark and Kiri's son Leonedies finishes up the side with an address he'd like passed on to the other races taking part in the intergalactic conference being organized. He may be only three years old, but he's a super operant and supremely intelligent. The note on the person that we discuss in Northern California on side two is that she is a channel for Ashtar Athena who has spoken once in a channeling session of ours. Now we were looking at enlisting her help to see if her participation might be included. Side two notes include as well Karra coming on to help out our female guest with a woman to woman chat. Karra had been doing some research on drugs and alcohol and had some great information to pass on to our guest about those subjects as they had been a problem until recently. This is the first time we would hear about the population of Sirius being about 15 to 20 million. An amazingly small number of people for an entire planet. To expand on that subject, Kiri now explains the sexual side of being higher dimensional. She goes into depth about the difference between sex and making love. The short version is that one is spiritual and one is not.   August gives us an opportunity to leave the legacy series of channeling sessions and go back to a session from 1998 and with it, the clarity we saw with the better recording equipment of the later years. It also introduces us to a new speaker we don't have an image to add to his profile as he only spoke the one time. He is an assistant to Tia enlisted to take her place while she is away from the base. He covers topics of a similar nature starting with the wildfires that were taking place in Florida. What we discover in our discussion with him is that is over five hundred years old and a skier on the base team. Skiing is the thread that connects him to the Tanaka family as he recalls times when he knew Kiri and Karra's dad before having daughters was even considered.He recalls as well seeing both girls as they were just learning how to ski. From him we change speakers over to Omal who is familiar with the topic brought up which was called the Tailwind incident which happened during the Vietnam War. It had made news so Omal helps debunk the latest rumors. We move on to a movie recently released called "Armageddon" and his knowledge of spacial dynamics allows him to spell out what would happen with a comet of a similar size. It is a sad state the world is left in with survivors facing a grim future. With odds of a thousand to one, that is odds that can help a person sleep at night. We end with his explanation to a question about keywords where he reminds us that both he and Korton are using them already and to look to their past conversations to spot them. We end the side with Kiri and Mark's infant son who is more university professor than a three-year-old child. While not a regular speaker, when he did join it was to help with the organization of the intergalactic Conference being organized that would bring together all the races involved with our planet and people. In this appearance, he lays out a challenge to the other races to demonstrate their willingness to participate in the talks.    For full transcripts of this session and more information about Hades Base and the 6th dimension, please visit our website:  http://hadesbasenews.com    The sessions lasted from 1992 to 2001 with this one being taped on 07/07/1998. Side one includes:   1.)(3:18)- Taal, an assistant of Tia's, come on to take her place is discussing the status of the Earth. We also discover that he is old enough to have known both Kiri and Karra as well as their dad as youngsters.  2.)(5:37)-  Kiri explains why only Oath Keepers eat meat and how the relationships between those of a higher dimension are not restricted to the taboos of same sex relationships found on this dimension. 3.)(25:15)-  Omal discusses a current Government scandal from the Vietnam era that threatened to advance the Defcon level the base had in place. The movie "Armageddon" lets Omal give us the odds. 4.)(41:58)-  Three-year-old Leonedies comes on to add some impetus to the intergalactic Conference being planned in the form of a challenge to the other races that were expected to participate through channels.

Harry Potter and the Sacred Text
Revisionist History: I Was A Stranger And You Welcomed Me

Harry Potter and the Sacred Text

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 34:11


We're excited to share this special preview of Revisionist History with you today! In this episode Malcolm Gladwell tells the story of how his parents and their friends sponsored three Vietnamese refugees, in the aftermath of the Vietnam War. And wonders: do we underestimate the value of ordinary acts of kindness?You can hear the full episode, and more from Revisionist History, wherever you get your podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Fresh Air
Xenophobia & The Klan On The Texas Gulf Coast

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 44:55


Kirk Wallace Johnson tells the story of a bitter conflict that arose along the Gulf Coast of Texas when Vietnam War refugees began trawling for shrimp in the area. His book is The Fishermen and the Dragon.

Tales of Honor Podcast
537. Leonard B Keller - Medal of Honor Recipient

Tales of Honor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 8:42


On episode five hundred and thirty-seven, the story of Leonard B Keller is told and episodes for the rest of July and all of August will be recipients from the Vietnam War. A big thank you goes out to this month's show sponsor, Motor City Munitions. Use promo code TALESOFHONOR for 5% off of your online order today! All your firearm related needs with service so fast it can only come from the Motor City: https://www.motorcitymunitions.com For the text of H.R.1808: https://www.congress.gov/bill/117th-congress/house-bill/1808 To find your state senator: https://www.senate.gov/senators/ Also want to support the show? Check out the show swag where 50% of profits get donated to the Medal of Honor Museum: https://bit.ly/TOHswag Be sure to visit our website for more information as the show goes on at: www.talesofhonorpodcast.com. Thanks for listening and be sure to share with friends and family!

Uncovering The Truth
40% of Americans Stay Silent in the Rise of Fascism (with 'Won't Be Silent')

Uncovering The Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 36:10


TikTok phenomenon Abe Gurko of "Won't Be Silent" joins Dash to challenge the Democrats' lack of aggression in their messaging efforts to combat a growing Fascist movement. Democrats' policies align with the everyday man, but still, something must be causing over 40% of Americans to stay home and refrain from the ballot box in the midst of a democratic crisis. The '60s and '70s saw waves of protests over the Vietnam War - but in 2022, the political fight appears to have shifted online. For the best?

Parrish The Thought
Episode 113: Dale Oilar | This bullet had my name on it. What I saw in the Vietnam war.

Parrish The Thought

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 103:06


Back in 1970, my next guest, Dale Oilar, now 71 years old, was drafted into the US Army at the ripe old age of 19. He said it's the only lottery he ever won. He served two years in the miltary and one of those years was in the Vietnam War. Join us as we do a deep dive into the life of an infantry sniper, the things he saw, the things he endured, the things he had to do to survive while fighting the dark side of communism. We talk about the horrors of war, the amazing men he served with and the damage the media, hollywood and politicians did to these great American heros. Books and Memorials Dale recommends: Chickenhawk - https://www.amazon.com/Chickenhawk-Robert-Mason-audiobook/dp/B0141Z5LPI/ref=sr_1_1?crid=172RQ135ZEWRA&keywords=chickenhawk+vietnam&qid=1659250432&s=books&sprefix=chicken+hawk%2Cstripbooks%2C113&sr=1-1 Through The Valley - https://www.amazon.com/Through-Valley-1967-1968-James-Humphries/dp/1555878210/ref=sr_1_1?crid=AXMXXAX9Q821&keywords=through+the+valley+humphries&qid=1659250672&s=audible&sprefix=through+the+valley+humphries%2Caudible%2C98&sr=1-1 Vietnam War Memorial, Washington DC - https://www.nps.gov/vive/index.htm/index.htm Vietnam Veterans Memorial - Angel Fire , NM - https://www.vietnamveteransmemorial.org/ #Vietnam #VietnamVeteran #WarIsHell #Sniper #VietnamSniper and #VietnamInfantry #Drafted #ChickenHawkBook #VietnamWarMemorial #VietnamVetransMemorial #AngelFireNM #BrothersInArms #TheyWereNotBabyKillers #MamaSan --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/parrishthethought/message

BookSpeak Network
Robert Harder, Author of "First Crossing" on the Sunbury Press Books Show!`

BookSpeak Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 35:00


Charles Lindbergh was not the first to fly across the Atlantic, non-stop--two British officers, largely lost to history did it eight years before. Robert Harder tells the story of Captain John Alcock and Lieutenant Arthur Whitten Brown, who made it from St.  Johns, Newfoundland to Cliveden, Ireland on June 14-15, 1919. At a time when aviation was beginning to capture the public's imagination, and technological advances allowed for records to be broken in quick succession, Alcock and Brown undertook the dangerous passage. Flying a wood and fabric Vickers Vimy, with minimal instruments and difficult to control, Harder chronicles the adventure, and gives Alcock and Brown their place in history back with "First Crossing." A freelance writer, Robert O. Harder served in the US Air Force Strategic Air Command during the Cold War years, a B-52D air crewman who flew 145 combat missions during the Vietnam War. Rated as a Navigator and Radar Bombardier, Harder flew nuclear training sorties and also stood Pad Alert. He later became a commercial pilot and flight instructor. His other books include "Flying from the Black Hole: The B-52 Navigator Bombardiers of Vietnam" and "The Three Musketeers of the Army Air Forces." He lives in Chicago.

Danger Close
Danger Close: The Battle of Long Tan (2019)

Danger Close

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 108:01


This film has been requested many times; usually by our Aussie and Kiwi listeners, and occasionally by people who think our podcast is entirely dedicated to this one film from 2019. Well-known down under, but not as much in the rest of the world, this is the story of one of the most famous battles Anzac troops fought in the Vietnam War. They were outnumbered between 10 and 20-to-1, and had it not been for their tactical decision-making, the fight could have had a very different outcome. We've done films “based on true events” (and people) many times before; how does this one compare to We Were Soldiers or The Outpost? Did they do justice to the real soldiers who fought in this battle? Join us on Danger Close: A War Film Podcast, and find out! Next Episode: The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957) Feel free to contact us with any questions or comments! Our website: www.dangerclosepod.com Join our Facebook group at: Danger Close - Podcast Discussion Group (https://www.facebook.com/groups/1442264899493646/) If you like the show, please leave us a review on Apple Podcasts or Spotify! If you would like to support the show and get extra episodes where we discuss sci-fi, fantasy, and comedy war movies, join our Patreon for only $4 a month at: www.dangerclosepod.com/support warmovies #warfilms #war #film #films #movies #history #cinema #ANZAC #Vietnam

Late Night History
Episode 14: Jim Hawes

Late Night History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 53:23


Episode 14 of the Late Night History podcast, your host Matt Fratus interviews former Navy SEAL officer Jim Hawes. About a year and some change ago, I interviewed Jim while he was in Botswana on business. The connection was spotty at best, so we re-recorded this episode here and mostly discuss Jim's career where he had a cup of coffee at SEAL Team 2 before he took an assignment with MACV-SOG during the Vietnam War. We touch on going through BUD/S — then called UDT/R with class 29 on the East Coast — and early SEAL history. We also briefly covered smokejumpers in Vietnam who were recruited by the CIA to perform resupply missions. Afterward, we go into Jim's unique role in the Congo during the Cold War. While working with the CIA, Jim had the difficult task of recruiting a mercenary navy. He pulled prime talent from brutal British soldiers of fortune underneath the famed Mike Hoare. He also received assistance from the heroic Cuban veterans from Brigade 2506 who participated in the failed Bay of Pigs. This mission ultimately chased Cuban revolutionary Che Guevara out of Africa. Jim is the first Navy SEAL officer to appear on the Late Night History podcast — although he certainly won't be the last. For 50 years, Jim never spoke publicly about his time in the Congo as the mission remained classified until the 2010s. In 2018, he authored Cold War Navy SEAL: My Story of Che Guevara, War in the Congo, and the Communist Threat in Africa. Follow @LateNightHistory on Instagram for nightly stories about war, people, food, crime, sports, and culture!

Revisionist History
“I Was A Stranger and You Welcomed Me”

Revisionist History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 33:47 Very Popular


Malcolm tells the story of how his parents and their friends sponsored three Vietnamese refugees, in the aftermath of the Vietnam War. And wonders: do we underestimate the value of ordinary acts of kindness? If you'd like to keep up with the most recent news from this and other Pushkin podcasts, be sure to sign up for our email list at Pushkin.fm. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Tales of Honor Podcast
536. Kenneth E Stumpf - Medal of Honor Recipient

Tales of Honor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 5:53


On episode five hundred and thirty-six, the story of Kenneth E Stumpf is told and episodes for the rest of July and all of August will be recipients from the Vietnam War. A big thank you goes out to this month's show sponsor, Motor City Munitions. Use promo code TALESOFHONOR for 5% off of your online order today! All your firearm related needs with service so fast it can only come from the Motor City: https://www.motorcitymunitions.com For Leroy's story: https://www.talesofhonorpodcast.com/stories/leroy-a-petry Also want to support the show? Check out the show swag where 50% of profits get donated to the Medal of Honor Museum: https://bit.ly/TOHswag Be sure to visit our website for more information as the show goes on at: www.talesofhonorpodcast.com. Thanks for listening and be sure to share with friends and family!

New Books in Southeast Asian Studies
Duy Lap Nguyen, "The Unimagined Community: Imperialism and Culture in South Vietnam" (Manchester UP, 2019)

New Books in Southeast Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 49:18


Duy Lap Nguyen's book The Unimagined Community: Imperialism and Culture in South Vietnam (Manchester UP, 2019) proposes a reexamination of the Vietnam War from a perspective that has been largely excluded from historical accounts of the conflict, that of the South Vietnamese. Challenging the conventional view of the conflict as a struggle on the part of the Vietnamese people against US imperialism and its puppets, the study presents a wide-ranging investigation of South Vietnamese culture, from political philosophy and psychological warfare to popular culture and film. Beginning with a genealogy of the concept of a Vietnamese "culture," as it emerged as a product of modern print media in the context of European imperialism, the book concludes with a reflection on the rise of urban mass culture during the period of the American intervention. In addition, the study provides an extended analysis of one of the most remarkable, but least understood aspects of this particular history of imperialism and culture: the attempt by the early South Vietnamese state to overcome the Communist Revolution by carrying its own "Personalist revolution" in the countryside. Contrary to the conventional view of Vietnamese Personalism as a religious and authoritarian ideology, the study contends that the latter was in fact an anticolonial form of communitarian socialism, derived from the Marxist theology developed by the French philosopher, Emmanuel Mounier. Reexamining the war from the South Vietnamese perspective, The unimagined community pursues the provocative thesis that the conflict, in this early stage, was not an anti-communist crusade, but a struggle between two competing versions of anticolonial communism. Duy Lap Nguyen is Assistant Professor at the University of Houston in their School of World Cultures and Literatures and holds a PhD in Comparative Literature from UC Irvine. His research interests include Critical theory, visual Studies, Vietnamese studies, world cinema and literature Thomas Kingston is an incoming Berkeley Fellow in South and Southeast Asian Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. His PhD research looks at the intellectual history and political economy of Southeast Asia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/southeast-asian-studies