Podcasts about Rio Grande

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

River forming part of the US-Mexico border

  • 1,426PODCASTS
  • 3,618EPISODES
  • 38mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 23, 2021LATEST
Rio Grande

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Rio Grande

Show all podcasts related to rio grande

Latest podcast episodes about Rio Grande

The FitMind Podcast: Mental Health, Neuroscience & Mindfulness Meditation

Dr. Sidarta Ribeiro is an award-winning neuroscientist, author, and Founder of the Brain Institute at Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte in Brazil, where he is also a professor of neuroscience. In this episode, we discuss how dreams have influenced human evolution, the connection between sleep and learning, and how to cultivate a rich dream life. He gives his top tips for how to get a better night's sleep and stresses the importance of sharing our dreams with others. FitMind Neuroscience-Based App: http://bit.ly/afitmind Website: www.fitmind.co Show Notes 0:00 | Introduction to Sidarta Ribeiro, PhD 3:09 | History of Sleep and Dreams 5:56 | Problem with Not Paying Attention to Dreams 7:27 | Purpose of Dreams 13:45 | How Sleep Made Humans a Dominate Species 22:17 | How to Cultivate a Dream Life 27:38 | Interpreting Meaning of Dreams 36:23 | Collective Dreams Have Changed During Covid 37:48 | Sleep Tips - How to Get a Better Night's Sleep 41:43 | Are Naps Good? 42:55 | Connection Between Sleep, Memory and Learning 46:13 | Too Much Sleep? 49:51 | Rapid Fire Questions

Colunistas Eldorado Estadão
Cantanhêde analisa fiasco do PSDB e aplicação do Enem

Colunistas Eldorado Estadão

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 19:37


O governador de São Paulo, João Doria, e o ex-senador Arthur Virgílio defenderam neste domingo que as prévias do PSDB sejam adiadas em uma semana. Em nota conjunta, ambos disseram que querem o "dia 28 de novembro, próximo domingo, para que o processo de prévias se encerre de forma rápida, eficiente e justa". Mais tarde, durante entrevista coletiva, o paulista acusou o seu principal adversário na disputa, o governador do Rio Grande do Sul, Eduardo Leite, de querer "melar" a disputa, já que não concorda com a proposta. O gaúcho nega e pede a extensão do prazo de votação para mais 48 horas. O primeiro dia de provas do Exame Nacional do Ensino Médio (Enem), neste domingo teve 26% de abstenção. Compareceram à prova apenas 2,3 milhões de candidatos - em edições anteriores, o Enem recebia o dobro de candidatos. Os dados foram apresentados pelo ministro da Educação, Milton Ribeiro, que negou interferência do governo no conteúdo prova. Para ele, se houvesse interferência, algumas questões poderiam nem estar no teste. O primeiro dia de provas teve questões sobre luta de classes, desigualdade de gênero, racismo e povos indígenas. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dice Tower News
Dice Tower Now 760: November 22, 2021

Dice Tower News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 25:23


This week, the Tiny Towns designer harnesses the power of gravity, Rio Grande watches the Watch, CMoN teases the biggest Kickstarter ever, and UNO plus motor oil and a dash of eSports equals $50,000   TOP STORIES (1:45) Asmodee licenses books, puzzles, housewares and more New edition of Dungeon Bowl coming from Games Workshop Wormholes coming from AEG and Peter McPherson Gangster title Wise Guys coming from Gale Force 9 Watch from designer Daniel Newman and Rio Grande Games Digital Version of Empires of the Void II coming to Steam CMoN teases a Marvel title for its 50th Kickstarter First UNO championships held in Las Vegas   CROWDFUNDING (9:20) Honey Buzz: Fall Flavors from Elf Creek Games and designer Paul Salomon Snake: The Board Game from Maarten Krijgsman Hanamikoji: Geisha's Road by Jerry Chiang and Eros Lin with EmperorS4 Railways, City Planner, and Empire by designer Alban Viard and Nano9Games Karigar-E-Taj: Artisans of the Taj Mahal by designer Amit Ghadge Star Fighters from designers Michael Dunsmore and Jordan Nichols with Alley Cat Games   SPONSOR UPDATE (16:55) Black Friday Sale at Lucky Duck   NEW RELEASES (18:50) Marvel Champions: War Machine from Fantasy Flight Games Rush Out by Thomas Dupont and publisher Sit Down! Clank! In! Space! Adventures: Pulsarcade by Paul Dennen and Evan Lorentz, published by Dire Wolf and Renegade Cuphead: Fast Rolling Dice Game from TheOP and designer Patrick Marino Coded Chronicles - The Goonies: Escape with One-Eyed Willy's Rich Stuff by Jay Cormier and Sen-Foong Lim, published by TheOP EXIT: The Game - Kidnapped in Fortune City by Inka and Markus Brand, published by Kosmos Machi Koro 2 from designer Masao Suganuma and Pandasaurus Games     CONNECT: Follow our Twitter newsfeed: twitter.com/dicetowernow Dig in with Corey at DiceTowerDish.com. Have a look-see at Barry's wares at BrightBearLaser.com.

Eu tava lá
FUI EXPULSO DE UMA RÁDIO EVANGÉLICA (com Rodrigo Cosma) - Eu Tava Lá #193

Eu tava lá

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 74:38


O Rodrigo Cosma já participou do Eu Tava Lá muitas vezes mas as histórias dele não acabam nunca, hoje ele tá aqui pra nos contar sobre um ménage patrocinado pela RBS TV, sobre a diferença entre os Esquerdo-machos e os Feministos, sobre o universo das "Soberanas" das festas do Rio Grande do Sul e muitas outras coisas, como o dia em que ele foi expulso de uma rádio evangélica...

Of Dice And Men
November 20th - Cataclysms and Colonies

Of Dice And Men

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 49:49


Adam, Chad and Ryan do a deep dive into Beyond the Sun, the tech-tree-focused space exploration game published by Rio Grande. We share our first impressions followed by a post-game wrap up after playing on BoardGameArena - find out what we thought! Afterwards we discuss a few recent plays, including Dungeon Degenerates and We're Doomed.

Heartland POD
The Flyover View, November 19, 2021 - Heartland News & Views

Heartland POD

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 18:44


MO COVID cases | Immigration advocates fight for work permits in spending bill | Microsoft and Bayer investing in Ag Tech infrastructure | TX Democrats on Defense in Rio Grande valley | MO Farm Bureau sues Biden Administration over vaccine rules | Fmr CO House Speaker tapped by Biden for EPA post | EV Tax Breaks in $2T spending bill | Rabbis ask KS GOP to cool it with the Hitler stuff

Rádio Gaúcha
Maicon Lemos, pres do Conselho das Secretarias Municipais de Saúde do Rio Grande do Sul - 16/11/2021

Rádio Gaúcha

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 18:33


Maicon Lemos, presidente do Conselho das Secretarias Municipais de Saúde do Rio Grande do Sul. Novas orientações do Ministério da Saúde incluem dose de reforço para maiores de 18 anos que se imunizaram há cinco meses, além de segunda dose para quem tomou a vacina da Jansen.

Congressional Dish
CD242 The Offshore Drilling Police

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 95:22


On October 1, 2021 an oil pipeline that was likely struck by a cargo ship's anchor leaked tens of thousands of gallons of oil into the ocean and onto the beaches of Orange County, CA. In this episode, examine how the oil spill happened by listening to testimony provided to both the U.S. Congress and the California State Senate, and learn about the disturbing lack of policing that is taking place under the sea. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Articles and Documents Nicole Charky. April 7, 2021. “LA City Council Urges Newsom To Close Playa Del Rey Oil Storage.” Patch. Nicole Charky. March 23, 2021. “Is It Time To Shut Down The Playa Del Rey Oil Storage Facility?” Patch. U.S. Government Accountability Office. Offshore Oil and Gas: Updated Regulations Needed to Improve Pipeline Oversight and Decommissioning. GAO-21-293. Jen's Highlighted PDF Heal the Bay. June 24, 2015 . “Confirmed: L.A. Tar Balls Linked to Santa Barbara Spill.” planetexperts.com Heal the Bay. August 20, 2012. “What Are Those Black Clumps on the Beach?” Sarah S. Elkind. June 1, 2012. “Oil in the City: The Fall and Rise of Oil Drilling in Los Angeles.” The Journal of American History, Volume 99, Issue 1. Tom Fowler. February 21, 2012. “U.S., Mexico Sign Deal on Oil Drilling in Gulf.“ The Wall Street Journal. APPEL News Staff. May 10, 2011. “Academy Case Study: The Deepwater Horizon Accident Lessons for NASA.” APPEL News, Volume 4, Issue 1. Offshore Technology. “Projects: Macondo Prospect, Gulf of Mexico.” Bureau of Ocean Energy Management. November 23, 1970. Treaty to Resolve Pending Boundary Differences and Maintain the Rio Grande and Colorado River as the International Boundary. Open Secrets Profiles Rep. Yvette Herrell - New Mexico District 02 Rep. Paul Gosar - Arizona District 04 Rep. Bruce Westerman - Arkansas District 04 Rep. Katie Porter - California District 45 Rep. Pete Stauber - Minnesota District 08 Images Playa del Ray in the 1920s 2021 Huntington Bay Oil Spill Image 1. CA State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Informational Hearing Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions. 2021Huntington Bay Oil Spill Image 2 CA State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Informational Hearing Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions. Mileage of Decommissioned Pipelines Removed Relative to Those Left in Place. GAO Analysis of Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement Data, GAO-21-293. Potential Effects of Currents on Pipeline Leak Identification. GAO-21-293. Hearings Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions California State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Thursday, October 28, 2021 Witnesses: Chuck Bonham Head of California Department of Fishing and Wildlife Tom Cullen Administrator of OSPR (Offshore Spill Prevention and Response) Kim Carr Mayor Pro Tem, City of Huntington Beach Brian Nowicki California Climate Policy Director at the Center for Biological Diversity Pete Stauffer Environmental Director for the Surfrider Foundation Jennifer Lucchesi State Lands Commission Clips 3:44 Senator Henry Stern: But the pipeline that runs to Amplify and Beta Offshore's platform is the source of the oil production that runs through the pipeline in question. That pipeline is in federal jurisdiction but it brings that produced oil onshore into the state waters and eventually on state lands. 21:05 Chuck Bonham: What we now know is about four and a half miles offshore, so in federal waters, there's a pipeline that runs from one platform, which is a collection of three platforms operated by a company called Beta Offshore, owned by a company called Amplify Energy. That last platform, Ellie, has a pipeline which delivers the product 17.7 miles inland, where the pipe comes on shore just below the Queen Mary more or less, to land based infrastructure. That pipe had a rupture in it. And we now know based on visual and diver and other evidentiary efforts, that about 4000 feet of that pipeline was moved about 105 feet off of center. And in that stretch is about a 13 inch horizontal, almost like a hairline fracture. If you could imagine a bone break in a pipe, which is, I think, about 13 inches in diameter, concrete on the outside and metal on the inside. That's the likely source of the leak. 22:25 Chuck Bonham: From the very beginning moments, all of us involved assumed a worse case. At that moment in time we had a planning number of a spill of about 3,134 Barrels which is 131,000 gallons rounding as a maximum worst case. 30:59 Chuck Bonham: A month later we now think the likely spill number is 24,696 gallons 41:13 Chuck Bonham: Fortunately given the size of the spill, there were not as many wildlife casualties as could have occurred during a higher migration cycle. 1:25:47 Mayor Kim Carr: So starting off on Saturday, October 2, it's been brought up that yes, we did have a very large air show happening that day. About 1.5 million people were on the beach that day to see the Pacific Air Show. And around nine o'clock that morning, there were city personnel that heard an announcement on VHF channel 16 by the Coast Guard of a possible oil spill in the area, but nothing very specific. At that time, no major details, it wasn't anything to really worry about. By 10:30 in the morning, the Coast Guard had advised us that the spill was larger than originally thought. However, we didn't have a whole lot of information as to where the location of the spill was nor of the scope of the situation. By 11 o'clock that same day, the Coast Guard had announced that it was now going to be a major spill, and that the incident management team was being activated. 1:28:00 Mayor Kim Carr: At two o'clock, the Coast Guard had advised us that the oil spill would not be reaching the shores of Huntington Beach until Monday, October 4. And again, we didn't have a whole lot of information as to where the spill was. We knew it was off our coast, but we didn't know exactly where or exactly how large the spill was. But then interestingly enough, just a half hour later, we started to receive messages that there were boats that were experiencing oil damage just outside of the air show flight box. And so that became a concern for our city. So then we activated our fire crews, our hazmat team, or the oil spill response trailer and started to do the mitigation efforts. Then this is where it gets to be very, very interesting. At 2:45 the city was notified by the Newport Beach rescue vessel that there were private contractors conducting oil spill cleanups outside of the air show flight box. 1:32:42 Mayor Kim Carr: What we could have done better, what would have been an opportunity was perhaps if the Coast Guard had some sort of awareness, the night before or when that nine o'clock notification came through, we could have been even more proactive because as I said before, every hour during these crises matters. 1:34:00 Mayor Kim Carr: The Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve was spared. The Talbert Marsh does have oil damage and again looking back, if we could have had maybe a few more hours notice, we probably could have mitigated that damage even more than what we did. 1:43:17 Brian Nowicki: Like all of you, we at the Center for Biological Diversity are heartbroken by every oil and seabird and are alarmed at the miles of marshes and coastline that will be poisoned for years by this bill. We're angry that yet again, the oil industry has proven its inability to contain its toxic pollution. The structure of pipeline funding to beach proves yet again, that every piece of fossil fuel infrastructure is yet another disaster waiting to happen. And there is a lot of that infrastructure in California. It's increasingly old, outdated in disrepair and poorly located, like the 40 year old pipeline that gave us this most recent spill, all of which makes it increasingly dangerous. Looking beyond the nine oil platforms and islands in state water, there are 23 platforms in federal waters off California. But the fact that those 23 platforms are a little farther from shore should not give us much comfort. First, because oil spills from those operations still end up in our water, our beaches and our wildlife. But also as we've heard today, further from shore also means longer stretches of aging and dangerously vulnerable infrastructure, like the 17 mile long pipeline we're discussing today are clean, reliable federal regulations to protect us from oil spills in federal waters. Federal regulators continue to prove that they are perfectly willing to allow those platforms to continue operating to the last drop of oil despite the mounting dangers of decaying infrastructure well beyond its intended lifespan, outdated drilling plans, numerous violations and insufficient bonds to pay for decommissioning. 1:45:15 Brian Nowicki: But I want to be clear that this is not a problem unique to offshore platforms. At the exact same time that 10s of thousands of gallons of oil were rolling up onto beaches and marshes in Orange County, there was an oil spill in Kern County that is now approaching 5 million gallons of fluid, a mixture of crude oil, toxic wastewater, that includes 600,000 gallons of crude. In fact, in just the last few years, there have been many oil spills in California greater than the spill off Huntington Beach. In the Cymric field alone there were three huge spills in 2019 at 550,000 gallons, 836,000 and 1.2 million gallons respectively. 159,000 in Midway in 2019, 250,000 at McKittrick in 2020. There is another ongoing spill at a separator plant in Cymric that has been leaking since 2003 and has reportedly released as much as 84 million gallons of fluid to date. Now these numbers reflect total combined volumes of crude and produced water and mud, which constitute a toxic mix. As state agencies have testified before this legislature in the past, these dangerous onshore oil operations have contaminated groundwater, land, and wildlife. 1:46:32 Brian Nowicki: After more than 150 years of the oil industry drilling at will in California, the oil is gone and the bottom of the barrel that's left is harder and more dangerous to extract. There's also some of the most carbon polluting crude in the world. With the easy stuff taken, the oil industry is in decline in California, with production down 68% since 1985. The only question is how much more damage will this dying industry do on its way out? 1:49:10 Pete Stauffer: Now with the oil deposit seen as far south as the Mexico border, there are concerns that San Diego wetlands are also being impacted. Moreover, while birds, fish and marine mammals have been the most visibly impacted, the full scale of the ecological damage will take some time to become clear. In the week since the spill event, the oil slick has transformed into an incalculable number of tar balls in the ocean, while tar balls typically float, they can also find their way into underwater sediment or near shore habitats where their impacts on ecological health and wildlife may persist for years or even decades. 1:52:51 Pete Stauffer: According to the federal government there have been at least 44 oil spills since 1969 that have each released more than 10,000 barrels of oil into US waters 2:02:36 Mayor Kim Carr: Just to give you an idea of how much TOT we do receive in Huntington Beach, we receive about $16 million a year. We don't receive anything from those offshore platforms, nothing. And as far as the drilling that we currently have here in Huntington Beach, it's less than $700,000 a year. 2:05:54 Brian Nowicki: What I can't say though, for sure is that it's going to take longer than one season to see what the full impacts are to the local wildlife. And of course, it is wetlands and marshes that often are the most difficult and take the longest to recover from the sorts of impacts. 2:21:11 Jennifer Lucchesi: In 1921, the legislature created the first tidelands oil and gas leasing program. The existing offshore leases the commission is responsible for managing today were issued over a 30 year period between 1938 and 1968. Importantly, I want to highlight a specific act in 1995. The Cunningham shell Act, which serves as a foundational law for the existing legacy oil and gas leases the commission currently manages. Importantly, this Act required the commission to issue oil and gas leases for term not based on years, but for so long as oil and gas is produced in paying quantities. Essentially, this means that Alessi can produce oil and gas pursuant to their state lease indefinitely as long as it is economic for them to do so. 2:58:13 Jennifer Lucchesi: For pipelines that are solely within state waters and under lease with the State Lands Commission, we require the pipelines to be externally and internally inspected annually. And we have engineers on staff that review those inspections and consult with the fire marshal as well with our federal partners on any type of remedial action that needs to happen based on the results of those inspections. For those pipelines that cross both federal and state waters our authority is more limited because the federal government's regulatory authority takes precedence. And PHMSA (Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration) is the primary federal agency that regulates those interstate pipelines. They require inspections externally and internally every two years. And that's what this pipeline at issue was subjected to, the platform Elly pipeline. 03:01:20 Senator Dave Min: Let's say you have a pipe and the lease term ends. What powers do you have? What are the considerations you have to follow either statutory or contractually to renew those permits, issue a new permit? Or alternatively, do you have any leeway contractually, statutorily to end those permits prematurely and say, you know, we don't think that, you know, the upkeep is appropriate, you're violating certain provisions, we're just gonna take away your permit prematurely. Do you have any leeway like that? So I'm just trying to get a sense of your flexibility, both in issuing new right of way permits, but also yanking away existing permits. Jennifer Lucchesi: Certainly. So I can give an example of our lease compliance and enforcement actions most recently, with a pipeline that served platforms Hogan and Houchin in the Santa Barbara Channel. Those are two federal platforms in federal waters, that pipeline that served those platforms did cross into state waters and connected on shore. That pipeline lessee of ours was not compliant with our lease terms and the commission took action to terminate those leases based on non compliance and default in breach of the lease terms. And essentially, that did terminate production on those two federal platforms. And they are part of the eight federal platforms that BOEM just announced they were going to be looking at as part of a programmatic EIS for decommissioning. The Commission does not have the authority to unilaterally terminate an existing valid lease absent any evidence of a breach or non compliance SOUTHERN CA OIL LEAK: INVESTIGATING THE IMMEDIATE EFFECTS ON COMMUNITIES, BUSINESSES, AND ENVIRONMENT House Committee On Natural Resources, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations and the Subcommittee October 18, 2021 Witnesses: Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi Director, Oiled Wildlife Care Network Executive Director, One Health Institute, School of Veterinary Medicine, UC Davis Scott Breneman Commercial Fishing, Retail Market, and Restaurant Owner Newport Beach, CA Vipe Desai Founding Member, Business Alliance for Protecting the Pacific Coast Dr. David L. Valentine Norris Presidential Chair, Earth Science Professor of Marine Science, UC Santa Barbara Clips 15:44 Rep. Katie Porter: As of October 10, workers had recovered 250,000 pounds of oily debris and 14 barrels full of tar balls from the Orange County shorelines. That is a small fraction, though, of the oil that was released, most of which is being distributed in the ocean, making its way into the food chain or falling to the ocean floor. Some of that oil is now heading south. And we will not learn the long term consequences on the environment for many years to come. 17:39 Rep. Katie Porter: The witnesses here with us today will reveal a different kind of subsidy for oil and gas companies, an involuntary subsidy that occurs when the community bears the costs of oil drilling's pollution. When a locally owned business like Mr Brennaman that has been in the family for four generations loses tens of thousands of dollars because of the leak. That's his subsidies to oil and gas. When a hotel loses its bookings overnight. That's its subsidy for oil and gas. When the fragile decades-long effort to recover a species under the Endangered Species Act is finally showing progress, but an oil spill puts it all at risk. That's a cost of oil and gas to these subsidies and so many others are the reasons that oil wells like the ones behind this leak are still active. Getting rid of the subsidies is the first step to get rid of the problem. 27:52 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): We know that the spill was not reported by the responsible oil company until the next day, despite the company's knowledge. We also know that Orange County residents recognize that there was a problem in part due to the smell caused by this bill and actually reported it before the oil company did so, clearly something wrong with that. 28:35 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): In my congressional district, which is just the south of here, the spill shutdown businesses and beaches in Dana Point in San Clemente. Tarballs that are likely caused by the spill have also been found as far south in my district as Oceanside, Carlsbad, Encinitas and Del Mar in San Diego County. 29:03 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): It'll come as no surprise that more than $2 billion in wages and $4 billion in gross domestic product are generated by Orange County's ocean and marine economy, including tourism. So we have a lot to lose every time there's a spill, not just to our beaches but to our economy. 39:30 Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi: In Birds, the primary issue we are concerned mostly about are the acute effects due to hypothermia. If you think of feathers almost as a dry suit in animals, if oil gets on that dry suit, it creates a hole that allows cold water to seep next to the skin. Birds can get very cold in the environment and start to waste away, they have to come ashore to stay warm, but they can no longer eat. So these birds actually can waste away in a matter of days unless proactive capture occurs. There can also be chronic effects in animals as well due to printing of oil off of the feathers or ingestion in their food items. Those chronic effects can include, in essence, effects on every organ system in an animal's body from reproductive effects liver, kidney, respiratory tracts, depending on the dose and the exposure and the toxin itself. 42:50 Scott Breneman: We were fishing on Friday, October 1, and we were coming in the harbor and I detected a distinct odor of oil and it was about midnight we're heading in. Kind of search around the boat. I thought maybe it was a spill on the boat or a hose broke. I went in the engine room, searched all the hatches where I keep all my extra fluids and everything, didn't find anything. Come the next day the press released that there was an actual oil spill, and my fish sales and my fish market, once that was released, they dropped drastically down, 90% this past few weeks since it was released. I've seen the same effect -- my family's been fishing for four generations and in the 90s my dad went through the oil spill that was off Seal Beach, in our fish market, the same exact response from the public scared, worried the products contaminated. A huge ripple effect all the way up to the wholesalers I deal with outside of Orange County there. They had concerns from their customers, their restaurants. And to rebuild that business when it happened in the 90s, I watched my dad struggle for months to get back to back to where it was and it's...I'm seeing the same exact thing happen here. A couple of days after the oil spill they had closed Newport Harbor. And so my boat was actually trapped inside of the harbor so I wasn't even able to go service my accounts. And it's just been, to tell you the truth, a very difficult couple of weeks and I'm not sure how long this is going to last. I'm not sure how the public's going to respond to it long term if there's still going to have some fear that the fish is contaminated. 46:20 Vipe Desai: In fact between 2007 and 2018 there were over 7000 oil spills in federal waters, an average of about two every day. 46:50 Vipe Desai: The first impact came from the much anticipated Pacific Air Show. As oil began to wash ashore, beaches were deemed unsafe for activity. On Saturday October 2nd, 1.5 million visitors saw the show from Huntington Beach, but the show's triumphant conclusion on Sunday was cancelled with little fanfare. Cancellations hit hotels and resorts almost immediately and their surrounding retail and restaurants suffered. Wing Lam, co-founder of Wahoo's Fish tacos, informed me that the Saturday before the oil spill felt like a busy summer day. But the following day, once word got out about the spill, it was a ghost town. In addition, as the spill moved south, their locations in Laguna Beach and San Clemente started to feel the impacts. Bobby Abdel, owner of Jack's Surfboards, had a similarly bleak weekend. He told me that once the oil spill was announced customer traffic plummeted. Their stores are facing a stockpile of unsold inventory from the US Open of Surfing and the Pacific Air Show. All nine of Jack's Surfboards locations were impacted in some form or another because of the spill. Later in the week, I received a call from a colleague, Wendy Marshall, a full time hard working mother of two who shared with me that her upcoming Airbnb reservations, a form of income to help her offset college tuition costs for her children, had mostly been cancelled. From Dana Point though dolphin and whale capital of the world and the first whale Heritage Site in the Americas. Giselle Anderson from local business Captain Dave's Dolphin and Whale Watching Safari shared losses from trips and bookings into November could be down as much as 74% because of the oil spill. 52:15 Dr. David L. Valentine: I want to invoke my privilege as a university professor to start with a little bit of a history lesson. Many people think that the largest spill in US history occurred in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. This is not correct. The largest spill in US history occurred in California. It was not the October 2021 spill that we're here to talk about today. Nor was it the 2015 refugio beach pipeline rupture on the gaviota coast. It was not the 2007 Cosco, Busan spill and San Francisco Bay. And it was not the 1997 platform Irene pipeline rupture of Annenberg Air Force Base. It was not the 1990 American traders spill off the coast of Huntington Beach. It was not the 1969 platform, an oil spill off of Santa Barbara, the one that helped spawn the environmental movement. Nor was it the sinking of the SS Montebello, an oil freighter that was hit by a Japanese torpedo off the coast of Cambria and World War Two. It was called the Lakeview Gusher. It occurred in Kern County, and it's estimated to have released around 380 million gallons of oil over an 18 month period starting in 1910. And I tell you this bit of California history because it punctuates five important points. First, oil production carries inherent risk. Second, California has suffered more than its fair share of spills. Third, the size of a spill is only one factor in determining its impact. Fourth, responsiveness and context matter. And fifth, every spill is different and that includes the impacts. 54:24 Dr. David L. Valentine: For the current spill, I have honed in on three key modes of exposure that concern me most: floating oil slicks that can impact organisms living at or near the sea surface, coastline areas such as wetlands where oil can accumulate and persist, and the sea floor, where oil can easily hide from view but may still pose longer term risks. Among these three, the fate of impacts of submerged oil is especially relevant to California, is the least well understood, and requires additional research effort. 59:40 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): So recently I asked the Department of Interior about the specific kinds of subsidies that Beta Operating received. Beta is a subsidiary of Amplify Energy, and that's the company that owns the platforms and the pipelines that leaked off our coast. It turns out that they got nearly $20 million from the federal government, specifically because the oil wells are at the end of their lives and are not producing much oil, which makes them less profitable. So taxpayers are being asked to pay to encourage oil production in the Pacific Ocean by giving oil companies millions of dollars to do it. 1:00:39 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): Beta operating is in line to get another $11 million to drill for new wells off the coast because that $11 million is needed, in their words, “to make production economic.” So taxpayers are being asked to pay Beta to drill new wells. That means wells that would otherwise not be drilled without our taxpayer subsidy. 01:02:52 Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi: What we have found, during and after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, is that dolphins can be significantly impacted by oil, primarily through inhalation of the fumes at the surface and ingestion of the oil substances themselves. What we found is that it affects their immune system, it affects their reproductive tract, and it affects their gastrointestinal tract, so very significant changes. And that's information that is just now starting to come out in the publications from the Deepwater Horizon incident. 1:06:51 Vipe Desai: Had this oil spill moved north, it would have impacted two of the busiest ports in the nation, which account for billions of dollars of goods flowing in and out of both ports of LA and Long Beach. And that would have had an even larger impact to other communities across the US. 1:08:21 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): The annual oil production off the coast of California is about 1/3 of what our nation produces in a single day. So it really is a drop in the bucket when you consider the overwhelming potential for economic damage for environmental damage, the risks simply aren't worth it. 1:09:34 Vipe Desai: California's ocean economy generates $54.3 billion in revenue and supports 654,000 jobs. 1:25:15 Dr. David L. Valentine: In Orange County, the areas that I would look at most closely as being especially vulnerable on the environmental side would be the wetland environments. Places like Talbert Marsh where oil can surge in with the tide. And it can get trapped in those environments and it can get stuck and it won't come back out when the tide recedes. Those are especially vulnerable because they're these rich, diverse ecosystems. They provide a whole host of different services, whether it's flyways, or fisheries, or in keeping the nutrient levels moderated in coastal waters. And that oil can stick there and it can have a long term impact. And furthermore, cleanup in those cases can be very difficult because getting into a marsh and trying to clean it up manually can cause as much damage as oil can cause. 1:26:24 Dr. David L. Valentine: And then the other environment that I worry a lot about is the environment we can't see, that is what's going on under the surface of the ocean. And in that case, we can have oil that comes ashore and then gets pulled back offshore but is now denser because it's accumulated sand and other mineral matter. And that can be sticking around in the coastal ocean. We don't really understand how much of that there is or exactly where it goes. And that concerns me. 1:29:18 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): But Dr. Valentine, how concerned Do you think California should be that companies that own the offshore platforms, wells and pipelines might go bankrupt and pass decommissioning costs on to taxpayers? Dr. David L. Valentine: I think that we need to be very concerned. And this is not just a hypothetical, this is already happening. There are two instances that I can tell you about that I've been involved with personally. The first stems from the pipeline 901 rupture, also known as the Refugio, a big oil spill that happened in 2015. When that pipeline ruptured, it prevented oil from being further produced from platform Holley, off the coast of Santa Barbara just a few miles from my home. That platform when it was completely shut in, all 30 wells, was unable to produce any oil and the company, a small operator, went bankrupt. And then shortly thereafter, they went bankrupt again. And this time, they just gave up and they did something called quit claiming their lease back to the state of California. Meaning that the plugin abandonment and property commissioning fell into the lap of the State of California in that case, and that is an ongoing, ongoing saga. The second example I would give you is in Summerland. In 1896, the first offshore oil wells in this country were drilled from piers in Summerland. Those have been leaking over the years. And as recently as last year, there were three leaky oil wells coming up in Summerland. The state of California has found money to try alternative plug in abandonment strategies because anything traditional is not going to work on something that is 125 some odd years old. So that would be the second example where this is now falling into the taxpayers lap yet again. IMPACTS OF ABANDONED OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS INFRASTRUCTURE AND THE NEED FOR STRONGER FEDERAL OVERSIGHT House Committee on Natural Resources: Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources. October 14, 2021 Witnesses: Dr. Donald Boesch Professor and President Emeritus, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Dr. Greg Stunz Endowed Chair for Fisheries and Ocean Health, and Professor of Marine Biology Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies Texas A&M University Robert Schuwerk Executive Director, North America Office Carbon Tracker Initiative Ms. Jacqueline Savitz Chief Policy Officer, Oceana Clips 10:34 Rep. Pete Stauber (R-MN): I can certainly provide a summary of things that will help keep energy prices down: issue onshore and offshore lease sales; reinstate the Presidential permit for the Keystone XL Pipeline; renew our commitment to exporting American energy, instead of importing foreign energy; reform a broken permitting process; and stop burdening domestic producers. 16:08 Dr. Donald Boesch: Oil and gas production from wells in less than 1000 feet of water declined as fuels discovered in the 80s and even earlier were depleted. Crude oil production in these relatively shallow waters declined by over 90% both in the Gulf and and in Southern California. Natural gas production in the OCS, which mainly came from the shallow water wells, declined by 80%. Offshore fossil energy production is now dominated in the deep water off the Gulf of Mexico, up to 7500 feet deep. Deepwater production grew by 38% just over the last 10 years since the Deepwater Horizon disaster. 17:05 Dr. Donald Boesch: Since the lifting of the crude oil export ban in 2016, last year there was 78% more crude oil exported from Gulf terminals, exported overseas, than actually produced in the US OCS and three times as much natural gas exported, than produced offshore. 18:06 Dr. Donald Boesch: So, the depletion of shallow water gas has left this legacy of old wells and declining resources and the infrastructure requires decommissioning and removal. Much of this infrastructure is not operated by the original leaseholders, but by smaller companies with lesser assets and technical and operational capacity. 18:40 Dr. Donald Boesch: Off Southern California there are 23 platforms in federal waters, eight of which are soon facing decommissioning. In the Gulf, on the other hand, there are 18,162 platforms and about 1000 of them will probably be decommissioned within this decade. 19:46 Dr. Donald Boesch: According to the GAO, as you pointed out, there are 600 miles of active pipelines in federal waters of the Gulf, and 18,000 miles of abandoned plant pipelines. The GAO found the Department of the Interior lacks a robust process for addressing the environmental and safety risk and ensuring clean up and burial standards are met. And also monitoring the long term fate of these, these pipelines. 20:54 Dr. Donald Boesch: At recent rates of production of oil and gas, the Gulf's crude oil oil reserves will be exhausted in only six or seven years. That is the proven reserves. Even with the undiscovered and economically recoverable oil that BOEM (Bureau of Ocean Energy Management) estimates in the central and western Gulf, we would run out of oil about mid century. So unless some miracle allows us to capture all of the greenhouse gases that would be released, we really can't do that and achieve net zero emissions, whether it be by resource depletion, governmental or corporate policy, or investor and stockholder decisions. Offshore oil and gas production is likely to see it see a steep decline. So the greenhouse gas emissions pathway that we follow and how we deal with the legacy and remaining infrastructure will both play out over the next decade or two. 25:16 Dr. Greg Stuntz: In fact, these decades old structures hold tremendous amounts of fish biomass and our major economic drivers. A central question is, how do these structures perform in relation to mother nature or natural habitat and I'm pleased to report that in every parameter we use to measure that success. These artificial reefs produce at least as well are often better than the natural habitat. We observe higher densities of fish, faster growth and even similar output. Thus, by all measures, these data show artificial reefs are functioning at least equivalent on a per capita basis to enhance our marine resources. 28:54 Rob Schuwerk: When a company installs a platform and drills well, it creates an ARO, an obligation to reclaim that infrastructure when production ends. This costs money. But companies aren't required to get financial assurance for the full estimated costs today. Money to plug in active wells today comes from cash flows from oil and gas production. But what happens when that stops? The International Energy Agency sees peak oil and gas demand as early as 2025. This will make it harder to pay for decommissioning from future cash flows. Decommissioning is costly. The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) data indicate that offshore AROs could range from $35 to over $50 billion while financial assurance requirements are about $3.47 billion. That is less than 10% of expected liability. The GAO believes these figures may actually underestimate the true costs of retiring the remaining deepwater infrastructure. 30:05 Rob Schuwerk: Only about a third of the unplug wells in the Gulf of Mexico have shown any production in the last 12 months. Why haven't the other two thirds already been retired? Because of uncertainty as to when to close and poor incentives. Infrastructure should be decommissioned when it's no longer useful. But the regulator has difficulty making that determination. This uncertainty explains why BSEE waits five years after a well becomes inactive to deem it no longer useful for operations with years more allowed for decommissioning. These delays increase the risk that operators will become unable to pay or simply disappear. We've seen this already with a variety of companies including Amplify Energy's predecessor Beta Dinoco off California and Fieldwood recently with Mexico. 30:55 Rob Schuwerk: There's also a problem of misaligned economic incentives. As it is virtually costless to keep wells unplugged, companies have no incentive to timely plug them. AROs are like an unsecured, interest free balloon loan from the government with no date of maturity. There's little incentive to save for repayment because operators bear no carrying cost and no risk in the case of default. If the ARO loan carried interest payments commensurate with the underlying non performance risk, producers would be incentivized to decommission non economic assets. The solution is simple, require financial assurance equivalent to the full cost of carrying out all decommissioning obligations. This could take the form of a surety bond, a sinking fund or some other form of restricted cash equivalent. If wells are still economic to operate, considering the carrying cost of financial assurance, the operator will continue production, if not they'll plug. In either case, the public is protected from these costs. 32:11 Rob Schuwerk: A key risk here is operator bankruptcy that causes liabilities to be passed on to others. And we could see this in the recent Fieldwood bankruptcy. Fieldwood was formed in 2012 and in 2013 acquired shallow water properties from Apache Corporation. It went through chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2018, and then undeterred, acquired additional deepwater platforms from Noble Energy. Fieldwood returned to bankruptcy in 2020. It characterized the decommissioning costs it shared with Apache as among the company's most significant liabilities. The bankruptcy plan created new companies to receive and decommission certain idle offshore assets. If they failed, prior operators and lessors would have to pay. Several large oil and gas companies objected to this proposal. They were concerned that if Fieldwood couldn't pay they would. Ultimately the plan was proved. The case illustrates a few key dynamics. First, if bankrupt companies cannot pay, others, including taxpayers, will. How much of the possibly $50 billion in offshore decommissioning liability is held by companies that are only a dragged anchor, a hurricane a leaking pipeline or oil price shock away from default? And second, as detailed in my written testimony, private companies who face liability risks understand them better than the government does. When they transfer wells, they demand financial protections that are in fact greater than what the government requires today. 36:02 Jacqueline Savitz: Supplemental bonds are necessary to protect taxpayers from the risk of spills but BOEM is overusing the waiver provisions that allow a financial strength test to waive requirements for supplemental bonds. BOEM regulations require that lessees furnish a relatively small general bond and while BOEM has discretion to acquire supplemental bonds, it generally waives those. General bonds that lessees are required to furnish don't come close to covering the cost of decommissioning and haven't been updated since 1993. Since that year, the cost of decommissioning has gone up in part because development has moved into deeper waters, only about 10% of offshore oil production in the Gulf was in deepwater in 1993. But by 2014, that figure rose to 80%. Regulations need to be updated to ensure the federal government and taxpayers are not left picking up the tab on decommissioning. According to GAO, only 8% of decommissioning liabilities in the Gulf of Mexico were covered by bonds or other financial assurance mechanisms, with the other 92% waived or simply unaccounted for. 38:06 Jacqueline Savitz: BSEE does not conduct oversight over decommissioning activities underway and it does not inspect decommissioned pipelines so the Bureau can't ensure that the industry has complied with required environmental mitigation. 38:17 Jacqueline Savitz: Leak detection technologies that the oil and gas industry touts as safer have not been proven to prevent major leaks. All pipelines in the Pacific region are reportedly equipped with advanced leak detection equipment. Though two weeks ago we saw exactly what can happen even with the so-called “Best Technology.” 42:00 Dr. Donald Boesch: In Hurricane Ida, all of a sudden appeared an oil slick, and it lasted for several days. And apparently it was traced to an abandoned pipeline that had not been fully cleared of all the residual oil in it so that all that oil leaked out during that incident. 47:59 Dr. Donald Boesch: One of the challenges though, is that this older infrastructure is not operating in the same standards and with the same capacity of those of the major oil companies that have to do that. So for example, when I noted that they detected this methane being leaked, they didn't detect it from the new offshore deepwater platforms which have all the right technology. It's in the older infrastructure that they're seeing. 54:14 Rob Schuwerk: There's actually one thing that exists offshore, joint and several liability, that only exists in certain jurisdictions onshore. So in some ways the situation onshore is worse. Because in some states like California you can go after prior operators if the current operator cannot pay, but in many jurisdictions you cannot. And our research has found that there is about $280 billion in onshore liability, and somewhere around 1% of that is covered by financial assurance bonds so, there is definitely an issue onshore rather than offshore. 55:04 Rob Schuwerk: The issue is just really giving them a financial incentive to be able to decommission. And that means they have to confront the cost of decommissioning and internalize that into their decision on whether continuing to produce from a well is economic or not. And so that means they need to have some kind of financial insurance in place that represents the actual cost. That could be a surety bond where they go to an insurer that acts as a guarantor for that amount. It could be a sinking fund, like we have in the context of nuclear where they go start putting money aside at the beginning, and it grows over time to be sufficient to plug the well at the end of its useful life. And there could be other forms of restricted cash that they maintain on the balance sheet for the benefit of these liabilities. 1:15:38 Jacqueline Savitz: Remember, there is no shortage of offshore oil and gas opportunity for the oil industry. The oil industry is sitting on so many, nearly 8.5 million acres of unused or non producing leases, 75% of the total lease acreage in public waters. They're sitting on it and not using it. So even if we ended all new leasing, it would not end offshore production. 1:22:35 Rob Schuwerk: Typically what we'll see as well to do companies will transfer these assets into other entities that have less financial means and wherewithal to actually conduct the cleanup. Rep. Katie Porter: So they're moving once they've taken the money, they've made the profit, then they're giving away they're basically transferring away the unprofitable, difficult, expensive part of this, which is the decommissioning portion. And they're transferring that. Are they transferring that to big healthy companies? Rob Schuwerk: No, often they're transferring it to companies that didn't exist even just prior to the transfer. Rep. Katie Porter: You mean a shell company? Rob Schuwerk: Yes. Rep. Katie Porter: Like an entity created just for the purpose of pushing off the cost of doing business so that you don't have to pay it even though you've got all the upside. Are you saying that this is what oil and gas companies do? Rob Schuwerk: We've seen this, yes. Rep. Katie Porter: And how does the law facilitate this? Rob Schuwerk: Well, I suppose on a couple of levels. On the one hand, there's very little oversight of the transfer. And so there's very little restriction from a regulatory standpoint, this is true, offshore and also onshore. So we see this behavior in both places. And then secondary to that there are actions that companies can take in bankruptcy that can effectively pass these liabilities on to taxpayers eventually and so some of it is to be able to use that event, the new company goes bankrupt. 1:25:01 Rob Schuwerk: Certainly no private actor would do what the federal government does, which is not have a security for these risks. MISUSE OF TAXPAYER DOLLARS AND CORPORATE WELFARE IN THE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY House Committee on Natural Resources: Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations May 19, 2021 Witnesses: Laura Zachary Co-Director, Apogee Economics & Policy Tim Stretton Policy Analyst, Project on Government Oversight (POGO) Clips 27:10 Laura Zachary: There have long been calls for fiscal reforms to the federal oil and gas program. Compared to how states managed oil and gas leasing, the federal government forgoes at least a third of the revenue that could have been captured for taxpayers 27:25 Laura Zachary: On January 27 of this year, the Biden administration signed Executive Order 14008 that pauses issuing new federal oil and gas leases. And importantly, the language implies a temporary pause, only on issuing new leases, not on issuing drilling permits. This is a critical distinction for what the impacts of a pause could be. Very importantly, federal permitting data confirms that to date, there has been no pause on issuing drilling permits for both onshore and offshore. And in fact, since the pause began, Department of Interior has approved drilling permits at rates in line with past administrations. 37:08 Tim Stretton: Because taxpayers own resources such as oil and gas that are extracted from public lands, the government is legally required to collect royalties for the resources produced from leases on these lands. Project on Government Oversight's investigations into the federal government's oversight of the oil, gas and mining industries have uncovered widespread corruption that allows industry to cheat U.S. taxpayers out of billions of dollars worth of potential income. Given the amount of money at stake and the oil and gas industry's history of deliberately concealing the value of the resources they've extracted with the intent of underpaying royalties, the government should be particularly vigilant in ensuring companies pay their fair share for the resources they extract. 46:28 Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): We are here today for the majority's attempt, which I believe is more of a publicity stunt to criticize the oil and gas industry than to talk about real facts and data. The playbook is a simple one: recycled talking points to vilify the industry and to paint a distorted picture of so-called good versus evil. I'm sure that we'll hear more about corporate subsidies that aren't. We'll hear about unfair royalty rates that aren't and we'll hear many other meme worthy talking points that fail the logic test. 47:35_ Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): What we're -really talking about today is an industry that provides reliable and affordable energy to our nation. This isan industry that contributes to almost 10 million jobs and plays a vital role in our daily lives. In fact, we cannot conduct virtual hearings like this without the fossil fuel industry. And of course, when myself and my colleagues travel to Washington, DC, we rely on this industry to fly or to drive here. 49:33 Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): But they ignore the real world consequences of demonizing this industry. The results are devastating job loss and the loss of public education funding to name just a few. 54:05 Rep. Pete Stauber (R-MN): I also had a roundtable discussion and learned how New Mexico schools received nearly $1.4 billion in funding from oil and gas just last year. 55:08 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): Mr. Stretton, how long has your organization been conducting oversight of oil and gas production on federal lands? Tim Stretton: For decades, I mean, we started doing this work in the early 90s. And actually, some of our earliest work in the space was uncovering in excess of a billion dollars in unpaid royalties to your home state of California. Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): And you mentioned, what are some of the patterns? You've been doing this for decades? What are some of the patterns that you observe over time? Tim Stretton: The oil and gas industry working with each other to really undervalue the resources they were selling, fraudulently telling the government the value of those resources, which left billions of dollars in unpaid revenue going to the federal government. 1:01:09 Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ): There are some people who have made environmentalism a religion. Rather than focus on solutions that can make lives better for people, some would prefer to vilify an industry that provides immeasurable benefits to people's livelihood in the function of modern day society. 1:04:21 Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ): The other side looks at globalism, you know this environmental movement globally. So it makes more sense to me at least and folks I come from that we produce it cleaner more efficiently than anybody else in the world. And so that geopolitical application, if you're an environmentalist, you would want more American clean oil and gas out there versus Russian dirty or Chinese dirty gas. 02:37:23 Rep. Blake Moore (R-UT): In January state education superintendents in Wyoming, Miami, North Dakota, Alaska, and Utah submitted a letter to President Biden outlining their concerns with the administration's oil and gas ban which has reduced funding used to educate our rising generation. 02:43:35 Rep. Yvette Herrell (R-NM): I'm glad to be able to highlight the true success story of the oil and gas industry in my home state of New Mexico. To put it simply, the oil and gas industry is the economic backbone of New Mexico and has been for decades. The industry employs 134,000 People statewide and provides over a billion dollars each year to fund our public education. 02:44:30 Rep. Yvette Herrell (R-NM): Many of my Democratic colleagues have stated that green energy jobs can replace the loss of traditional energy jobs, like the 134,000 Oil and Gas jobs in my state. Many also say that we need to be transitioning to a completely carbon free energy grid. Can you tell me and the committee why both of those ideas are completely fantasy? Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

los angeles japanese russian bay university long beach chinese california american project mexico natural surfing north world war ii state utah congress money nasa energy california department professor pacific dc meaning democratic alaska federal washington presidential gulf oil act birds places gas school southern california san francisco bay new mexico carlsbad fish deepwater horizon police journal beach businesses miami wyoming donations interior airbnb safety americas san diego fishing us open patch american history currents cambria eis orange county commission crude wall street journal north dakota apache amplify joe biden investigations beta holley bureau tom fowler hogan importantly heal cunningham coast guard santa barbara dolphin midway hwy barrels san clemente infrastructure tot protecting maintain san diego county california state senate summerland deep water rio grande emeritus music alley treaty sarahs oceanside regulations marine science busan alessi offshore refugio aro surfboards fisheries subcommittee michael h encinitas colorado river huntington beach newport beach laguna beach pacific ocean queen mary david l maryland center vhf wahoo aros santa barbara channel captain dave del mar seal beach cosco keystone pipeline ocean health executive orders ocs gao oversight veterinary medicine decommissioning elkind cancellations mileage offshore oil bsee dana point endangered species act oil drilling wing lam congressional dish international energy agency mineral resources boem ocean energy management offshore drilling government accountability office kern county business alliance newport harbor noble energy government oversight cover art design biological diversity heritage site best technology david ippolito crestview
TechNation Radio Podcast
Episode 443: Episode 21-46 Neuroscience and Dreaming

TechNation Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 59:00


On this week's Tech Nation, Moira speaks with Dr. Sidarta Ribeiro, Deputy Director of the Brain Institute at the Unversidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte in Brazil. His book is “The Oracle of Night … The History and Science of Dreams”. Then, a potential new treatment for a side effect of chemotherapy: Hand-Foot Skin Reaction and Hand-Foot Syndrome. Dr. Michael McCullar, the CEO of OnQuality Pharmaceuticals talks about their new drug candidate which has just finished Phase II clinical trials.

Thoughts on Record: Podcast of the Ottawa Institute of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

Dreams have long been a source of fascination, mystery & intrigue, yet there is now an abundance of scientific evidence to shed light on the origins, nature, and purpose of this captivating aspect of the human experience.  Sleep neuroscientist Dr. Sidarta Ribeiro, joins host Dr. Pete Kelly, C.Psych for an in-depth consideration of many of the themes explored in his book The Oracle of Night: The History & Science of Dreaming.  In this discussion they cover:      what led Dr. Ribeiro to write The Oracle of Night and the meaning behind the titlethe definition of a "dreaming" and the functions dreaming may servethe underlying neuroscience of dreaming parallels between dreams and what is experienced during psychedelic experienceswhy emotions in dreams can feel so incredibly intense compared to that which is experienced when awakethe science behind lucid dreaming and tips on how to become proficient in lucid dreamingthe symbolic meaning and utility of dreams, both individually and collectively the evolutionary significance of dreaming and why has it created an adaptive advantagethe negative impact of modernity on the quality and nature of dreams and our ability to recall/utilize dream contenthow to better remember dreams and become attuned to dream content how acute sleep deprivation can act as an "anti-depressant" in the context of severe depressionthe importance of REM sleep for emotion regulationDr. Ribeiro's thoughts on the biggest unanswered questions in the field of dream study, including how dream content is selected by the brain Dr. Sidarta Ribeiro is a founder and vice director of the Brain Institute at Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte in Brazil, where he is also a professor of neuroscience. He received a PhD in animal behavior from The Rockefeller University. Sidarta is the author of The Oracle of Night: The History and Science of Dreaming, his fifth book, and a contributor for Folha de S.Paulo, Brazil´s largest newspaper.  He is a Member of the Latin American Academy of Sciences (ACAL) since 2016, he is associate editor of the journals PLoS One, Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience and Frontiers In Psychology - Language Sciences. He is a member of the Steering Committee of the Latin American School for Educational, Cognitive and Neural Sciences and the Center for Research, Innovation and Education in Neuromathematics (NeuroMat). He served as secretary of the Brazilian Society of Neuroscience and Behavior (SBNeC) from 2009-2011 and was a member of the Brazilian committee of the Pew Latin American Fellows Program in the Biomedical Sciences between 2011 and 2015.

Ludology
Ludology 262 - This Guilty Podcast

Ludology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 60:57


Erica and Gil are delighted to welcome designer Amabel Holland of Hollandspiele, known for making games with challenging themes using an unconventional publishing model.  SHOW NOTES 0m58s: Supply Lines of the American Revolution, Table Battles, Irish Gauge, This Guilty Land, Nicea, The Vote. 7m08s: Amabel is talking about her forthcoming game Eyelet. 15m02s: This is Geoff's game Versailles 1919, co-designed with Mark Herman. 17m28s: Benedict Arnold 18m34s: The Shackleton Expedition 21m16s: The Vote 28m22s: Nicea 31m38s: Irish Gauge, Northern Pacific, Iberian Gauge 32m29s: Winsome, Rio Grande 34m23s: Chicago Express 34m55s: Meltwater, An Infamous Traffic 36m11s: RIBBIT: The Jump, Move, and Block Game, Table Battles 38m51s: New Mill 43m45s: Westphalia 48m18s: Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae 49m52s: Cheapass Games 53m46s: Tobacco misinformation campaign 54m37s: Gil was thinking of Brandolini's Law, aka the BS Asymmetry Principle. 57m55s: Horse & Musket 59m03s: Deinocheirus, Pterodactyl, Therizinosaurus

Talk'n Throws- Texas Style
2009 Nike Shot Put Indoor National Champion 71.5, 2009 Texas Shot Put State Champion and 2nd in Discus from Rio Grande City HS, 5X All American at Auburn University, Multiple time SEC National Champion in Shot Put, 2012 NCAA Runner-up in Shot Put

Talk'n Throws- Texas Style

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 105:32


Talk'n Throws Texas Style with Stephen Saenz- 2009 Nike Shot Put Indoor National Champion 71.5, 2009 Texas Shot Put State Champion and 2nd in Discus from Rio Grande City HS, 5X All American at Auburn University,  Multiple time SEC National Champion in Shot Put, 2012 NCAA Runner-up in Shot Put, 2012 represented Mexico in London Olympics, 2021 Current Track and Field Coach at Reagan HS in San AntonioTexas Track and Field Association Informative website for all things Texas Track and Field4Throws.com Family owned business offering all quality implements at reasonable prices. Code Talkinthrows10ReadyUp Athletic Development ReadyUP offers team consulting, semi-private & private strength and conditioning in the Austin area.Porta-Circle Making Throwing more accessible. Use the code“TEXAS4EVER” for 10% off.Big Frog of Colleyville Handles all printing and embroidery. FiberSport Discus We are taking the guess work out of discus selection. It is not just about rim weight.

Mais Que 8 Minutos - Podcast
#132 - Duda Garbi

Mais Que 8 Minutos - Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 67:31


Hoje recebemos o Duda Garbi, resenheiro nato e amigo de todos os boleiros do Rio Grande do Sul, um papo muito bacana!

Texas Standard » Typewriter Rodeo

From the Red River to the Rio Grande — it’s a Texas high school tradition that’s… *grown over the years. This Typewriter Rodeo poem came by request from Texas Standard listener Linda Newman. She observed homecoming mums used to be real and about the size of a grapefruit. Now, she says they’re artificial and bigger […]

Opplysningen 99,3
Explainer: Aktiv Dødshjelp

Opplysningen 99,3

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 9:20


Reporter Benjamin Nordtømme beskriver alle aspektene ved aktiv dødshjelp og oppfordrer deg til å gjøre opp din egen mening omkring dette vanskelige temaet. Lyden i innslaget er hentet fra Sessions.blue og Wikimedia commons. Bilde: 'Governo do Estado do Rio Grande do Sol' på flickr

Nature Notes from Marfa Public Radio
From Mighty to Muted: the Secret History of the Big Bend Rio Grande

Nature Notes from Marfa Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021


Big Bend residents who’ve taken visitors to the Rio Grande have heard some version of the wisecrack: “What’s so ‘grand’ about this river?” You explain that flowing water – in any quantity – is the pearl of great price in … Continue reading → Hosted by for KRTS

Christmas Clatter Podcast
Every Time A Bell Rings: The Zuzu Bailey Interview

Christmas Clatter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 56:21


“Look, Daddy! Teacher says that every time a bell rings, an angel gets its wings!” - Zuzu Bailey.In this very special edition of Christmas Clatter, Todd is accompanied by film critic and author Alonso Duralde as they sit and talk with Karolyn Grimes actress who played Zuzu Bailey in “Its A Wonderful Life.” Karolyn discusses Jimmy Stewart and her time on the set filming “It's A Wonderful Life.” She also talks about Carey Grant and being a part of “The Bishop's Wife” (1947) and being cast in westerns such as “ Rio Grande” (1950).Zuzu Bailey's It's A Wonderful Cook Book by Karolyn Grimes & Franklin DohanyosI'll Be Home For Christmas Movies by Brandon Gray, Daniel Pandolph & Daniel Thompson w/ Alonso DuraldeHave Yourself A Movie Little Christmas by Alonso DuraldeFollow Karoly Grimes on her websiteFollow Alonso on TwitterChristmas Clatter MerchBuy Me A Coffee-----Affiliate Links-----Podcast Host-BuzzsproutEquipment Used In Video-Sony ZV-E10 (Amazon)-Rode Podmic (Amazon)-Rodecaster Pro (Amazon)-Rode PSA 1 Mic Arm (Amazon)Affiliate links mean I earn a commission from qualifying purchases. This helps support my channel at no additional cost to you.

KERA's Think
The science of your dreams

KERA's Think

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 33:20


Each night when we sleep, we dream. Have you ever wondered why? Sidarta Ribeiro is founder and vice director of the Brain Institute at Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte in Brazil, where he is also a professor of neuroscience. He joins host Krys Boyd to discuss how dreams are connected to how we learn and even how we understand our existence. His book is called “The Oracle of Night: The History and Science of Dreams.”

Levante Ideias de Investimento
MORNING CALL - Levante 25/Out

Levante Ideias de Investimento

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 64:35


Hypera divulga resultados A Hypera Pharma (HYPE3) apresentou resultados fortes no terceiro trimestre de 2021, com crescimento de 50% da receita líquida em comparação com o ano anterior, somando R$ 1,6 bilhão. O lucro líquido da companhia no período foi de R$ 464 milhões, alta de 33% na comparação anual. A companhia também realizou aquisições relevantes no período, comprando parte do portfólio da Takeda e a família Buscopan. Cosan adquire a Sulgás O Grupo Cosan (CSAN3), por meio de sua subsidiária Compass, venceu o leilão de privatização da Companhia de Gás do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul (Sulgás), adquirindo a estatal por R$ 928 milhões. O valor corresponde à aquisição de 51% do capital social da companhia. Paypal nega interesse no Pinterest A empresa de pagamentos norte-americana Paypal (PYPL) comunicou que não tem interesse na aquisição da plataforma de mídias sociais Pinterest (PINS), contradizendo a informação divulgada pela Bloomberg na quarta-feira. Segundo a notícia divulgada, o Pinterest seria adquirido por US$ 45 bilhões.

Total Media - Podcast
Main Street TV: Benjy Davies

Total Media - Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 62:46


Today on the show we welcome Benjy Davies. Benjy is a former professor at the University of Rio Grande and the current Associate Dean at Pikes Peak Community College in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Benjy will be returning to Rio Grande for and exhibition of over 400 of his drawings at the Greer Gallery later this fall. A reception will be held on Thursday, November 4, 2021, from 5-7pm.

Rádio Gaúcha
João Augusto Godoy Chagas Machado - 24/10/2021

Rádio Gaúcha

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 13:43


vice-presidente de Relações externas da Associação Brasileira das Agências de Viagens no Rio Grande do Sul

Rádio Gaúcha
Deivid Pereira, presidente do São Paulo de Rio Grande - 24/10/2021

Rádio Gaúcha

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 6:36


Deivid Pereira, presidente do São Paulo de Rio Grande - 24/10/2021 by Rádio Gaúcha

BMJ Consultoria
Auxílio Brasil, CPI da Pandemia e Presidenciáveis do PSDB

BMJ Consultoria

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 39:29


Prestes a finalizar o pagamento das últimas parcelas do Bolsa Família, o governo Bolsonaro tenta implementar o Auxílio Brasil, mas o novo programa ainda não saiu do papel. Um dos principais entraves é o financiamento e encaixe das despesas no Orçamento de 2022, que se tornou um problema para o Ministro da Economia, Paulo Guedes. Neste episódio, nossos consultores Eduardo Martins, Gabriela Bolcero, Lucas Fernandes e Nicholas Borges analisam o impasse sobre o Auxílio Brasil de R$400 reais prometidos pelo Presidente Jair Bolsonaro e a pressão contra Paulo Guedes para alterações no teto de gastos que garantam o valor. Confira também o saldo deixado pela CPI da Pandemia, que teve seu relatório final lido nesta semana e indiciou sessenta e seis pessoas, incluindo o Presidente Jair Bolsonaro. No total, foram nove acusações formais contra Bolsonaro, apresentadas pelo relator da CPI, senador Renan Calheiros (MDB-AL). Saiba mais detalhes da lista de indiciados e quais as expectativas para a votação e próximos passos do relatório. Nossos especialistas também comentam o debate entre os candidatos presidenciáveis do PSDB. O evento contou com a participação do ex-prefeito de Manaus, Arthur Virgílio; do governador do Rio Grande do Sul, Eduardo Leite; e do governador de São Paulo, João Doria. Doria e Leite foram questionados sobre o apoio ao Presidente Jair Bolsonaro e responderam em tom de mea-culpa.

Museum of South Texas History
African American Perspectives in South Texas: Sabrina Walker-Hernandez and Al Gatling

Museum of South Texas History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 45:41


In the fourth season of "Stories from the Rio Grande," the local nonprofit Village in the Valley shares how it was created and its missions to "[elevate] and [unite] the Black community while connecting cultures in the Rio Grande Valley." Through this virtual platform, MOSTHistory will use the terms African American and Black interchangeably. In this final episode, Sabrina Walker-Hernandez and Al Gatling, both Valley transplants, discuss why they moved to the Rio Grande Valley, and why it's home. Both are board members of Village in the Valley and will share the future vision of the organization. Learn more about Village in the Valley by visiting the website at https://villageinthevalley.org and following the organization on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/Villageinthevalleyrgv) and/or Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/vivargv). This podcast was made possible by the Betty Stieren Kelso Foundation. Thanks for listening to "Stories from the Rio Grande," a podcast by MOSTHistory. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mosthistory/message

E Tem Mais
Caatinga sob ameaça: processo de desertificação coloca bioma em risco

E Tem Mais

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 20:51


Neste episódio do E Tem Mais, Carol Nogueira apresenta um panorama sobre o processo de desertificação da Caatinga. O único bioma exclusivamente brasileiro já perdeu cerca de 15 milhões de hectares da sua vegetação primária, entre os anos de 1985 e 2020, segundo dados do Mapbiomas, projeto de mapeamento do uso e cobertura da terra no Brasil. A  região tem enfrentado um aumento significativo do número de queimadas. O cenário ameaça a preservação da vegetação da Caatinga, que é mais eficiente em absorver o CO2 da atmosfera do que florestas úmidas como a Amazônica. Para falar sobre a importância do bioma e descrever as possíveis consequências deste processo de desertificação, participa deste episódio o ecólogo Carlos Roberto Fonseca, professor do departamento de geografia da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN). Com apresentação deCarol Nogueira, este podcast é produzido pela Maremoto para a CNN Brasil. Você também pode ouvir o E Tem Mais no site da CNN Brasil. E aproveite para conhecer os nossos outros programas em áudio. Acesse: cnnbrasil.com.br/podcasts.

Americas 360
Haitian Migration through the Americas

Americas 360

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 32:45


Disturbing images of Haitian migrants being mistreated by U.S. Border Patrol agents as they attempted to cross the Rio Grande has put the Haitian issue at the center of debate over the U.S. immigration system. The arrival of thousands of Haitians at the U.S. border calls attention to Haiti's chronic political turmoil, economic insecurity, and the impact of natural disasters. In this episode, Latin American Program Fellow Niambi Carter joins us to discuss the root causes of Haitian migration.

On Point
The life, culture and politics of voters across the Rio Grande Valley

On Point

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 47:24


Texas's Rio Grande Valley is diverse and politically powerful. Until recently, the nation's two political parties saw the voters of the Rio Grande as a monolith. But that's been changing over the past two election cycles. We look at why Republicans and Democrats are working to woo voters along the Rio Grande. Cynthia Villarreal, Xavier Villarreal, Michael Rodriguez, Rogelio Nuñez and Perla Bazan join Meghna Chakrabarti.

Rádio Gaúcha
Alberto Franco, Procurador do Tribunal de Justiça Desportiva do Rio Grande do Sul - 18/10/2021

Rádio Gaúcha

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 5:38


Alberto Franco, Procurador do Tribunal de Justiça Desportiva do Rio Grande do Sul - 18/10/2021 by Rádio Gaúcha

Alexandre Garcia - Vozes - Gazeta do Povo
Quem mais saiu ganhando com as vacinas?

Alexandre Garcia - Vozes - Gazeta do Povo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 5:00


No nosso encontro de hoje, eu vou perguntar quem mais saiu ganhando com as vacinas. Vou falar também do caso do Rio Grande do Sul, que adota o passaporte da vacina por ordem de uma única pessoa. Vou falar ainda sobre o fisco da CPI, desde o início, passando pelo meio e chegando ao fim.

Braincast
Expedições Brasileiras — Ep. 2: Do sertão nordestino ao espaço sideral

Braincast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 27:16


A minissérie Expedições Brasileiras vai te levar pelo sertão do Nordeste, pela Mata Atlântica e pelo gelo da Antártica para explorar as grandes descobertas da ciência brasileira. E dessa vez, vamos apertar os cintos e embarcar nos novos voos da ciência astronômica brasileira, que tem na região Nordeste o seu principal pólo astronômico. Vem com a gente nessa viagem até as obras da Radiotelescópio Bingo, na Paraíba, e conhecer uma estação espacial analógica no Rio Grande do Norte. O que esse pólo nordestino significa para o Brasil? Expedições Brasileiras é uma minissérie do Braincast em parceria com a Petrobras. _____ PETROBRAS A Petrobras é movida por uma fonte de energia inesgotável e muito poderosa: a inovação. E essa vocação não é de hoje: está enraizada na sua história e faz parte do seu DNA. A companhia acredita no poder da inovação, do conhecimento e da tecnologia para transformar a sociedade, sempre em parceria com universidades, centros de pesquisas, startups e outras empresas que integram o ecossistema de inovação. É essa energia inventiva que transforma o impossível em realidade. Que transforma conhecimento em valor. Porque é assim, com colaboração e tecnologia, que a Petrobras constrói o seu futuro. Petrobras: Energia para Transformar. _____ FICHA TÉCNICA Expedições Brasileiras é uma produção do B9 em parceria com a Petrobras. Apresentação de Carlos Merigo. Coordenação Geral Ju Wallauer, Cris Bartis e Carlos Merigo. Quem coordenou essa produção foi a Beatriz Souza. Pesquisa e reportagem de Guilherme Eler e Ana Pinho. Roteiro de Ana Pinho. Agradecimento especial ao Professor Luciano Barosi, coordenador do projeto BINGO na Paraíba. Nesse episódio, usamos trechos de áudios do canal da TV Unesp e do History Channel Brasil. A Edição é de Gabriel Pimentel com a supervisão de Alexandre Potascheff. Apoio de edição e trilhas sonoras de Angie Lopez. Identidade Visual: Johnny Brito. A publicação ficou por conta do Agê Barros. Coordenação digital de Pedro Strazza e Matheus Fiore. Atendimento: Rachel Casmala, Camila Mazza, Luzi Santana, Greyce Lidiane e Telma Zennaro.

Museum of South Texas History
African American Perspectives in South Texas: Matthew Pollock

Museum of South Texas History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 19:12


In the fourth season of "Stories from the Rio Grande," the local nonprofit Village in the Valley shares how it was created and its missions to "[elevate] and [unite] the Black community while connecting cultures in the Rio Grande Valley." Through this virtual platform, MOSTHistory will use the terms African American and Black interchangeably. In this episode, Matthew Pollock discusses how he became part of the grassroots effort to establish the Village in the Valley organization--and teaching his children to become multicultural. Learn more about Village in the Valley by visiting the website at https://villageinthevalley.org and following the organization on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/Villageinthevalleyrgv) and/or Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/vivargv). This podcast was made possible by the Betty Stieren Kelso Foundation. Thanks for listening to "Stories from the Rio Grande," a podcast by MOSTHistory. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mosthistory/message

E Tem Mais
Corte de verbas para ciência: o impacto da falta de recursos para pesquisas

E Tem Mais

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 26:44


Neste episódio do E Tem Mais, Carol Nogueira apresenta um panorama dos impactos da decisão do governo federal de remanejar parte da verba destinada à área da ciência e tecnologia para outros setores. O valor de pouco mais de R$ 650 milhões previsto para financiar bolsas e projetos de pesquisa científica acabou reduzido para R$ 89,8 milhões. Entidades que compõem a Iniciativa para a Ciência e Tecnologia no Parlamento (ICTP) se manifestaram em carta ao Congresso para pedir a reversão da medida e defendendo que o corte ameaça a sobrevivência da ciência e da inovação no país. O ministro da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação, Marcos Pontes, alegou ter sido pego de surpresa pela notícia e garantiu que vai atuar junto ao governo para recompor o orçamento da pasta. Para falar sobre a importância do investimento em ciência no Brasil, participam deste episódio o advogado Paulo Almeida, diretor executivo do Instituto Questão de Ciência, e o pesquisador Luís da Cunha Lamb, PhD em ciência da computação e secretário estadual de Inovação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Rio Grande do Sul. Com apresentação deCarol Nogueira, este podcast é produzido pela Maremoto para a CNN Brasil. Você também pode ouvir o E Tem Mais no site da CNN Brasil. E aproveite para conhecer os nossos outros programas em áudio. Acesse: cnnbrasil.com.br/podcasts.

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 10-15-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 5:25


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots for October 15th, 2021. A major study shows infections among school-aged children in England are “high and rising.” That probably ups the intensity of the debate over kids and vaccines. The reproduction rate of those aged 17 and younger was 1.18, meaning on average every 10 infected young people are passing it on to about 12 others. From the gee I wish we'd known this earlier department, two new international studies show the immune protection from two doses of Pfizer drops off after a mere two months. One study found the drop especially true for men, people 65 and older, and those with immunosuppression. The study also found immunity lasts longer from a vaccination if you've already had a natural case of COVID-19. Penn State College of Medicine researchers found more than half of the 236 million people diagnosed with COVID-19 worldwide since December 2019 will experience post-COVID symptoms for up to six months after recovering. These include tiredness, difficulty breathing, chest pain, sore joints and loss of taste or smell. The research team said healthcare officials should get ready for all those survivors who'll need care for psychological and physical conditions. How do airline passengers feel about vaccine mandates to fly? Well, it's America, so the answer is, it's split. That's according to the travel website Skift's poll. 45% definitely want a mandate, 23% don't care either way, and 33% are against it. The older the person, the more likely they are to be in favor of requiring vaccinations to fly. With all the stories of overworked nurses with PTSD and of nurses who are getting fired or quitting because of vaccine mandates, you'd think it wouldn't be a very alluring occupation right now. But applications to nursing schools are actually rising. Up 5.6% in 2020 according to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and number are also trending up in 2021. The reasons; unprecedented career opportunities, the challenge, and many people have been inspired by healthcare workers over the past couple of years. In the United States cases were down 22%, deaths are down 5%, and hospitalizations are down 21% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending down since September 13. There are 9,702,828 active cases in the United States. With not all states reporting daily numbers, the five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: Michigan 26%, Minnesota 21%. North Dakota 16%, Montana 13%, and Pennsylvania 11%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Bethel Census Area, AK. Stark, ND. Goshen, WY. Kenai Peninsula Borough, AK. Lewis, KY. Lake, MT. Nome Census Area, AK. Rio Grande, CO. Matanuska-Susitna Borough, AK. And Whitley, KY. There have been at least 720,482 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont unchanged at 70.3%, Connecticut unchanged at 69.6%, and Rhode Island at 69.5%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia still unchanged at 40.7%, Idaho unchanged at 42.5%, and Wyoming at 42.7%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is unchanged at 56.5%. The five countries with the biggest 24-hour increases in the number of fully vaccinated people: Cambodia, New Zealand, Australia, Thailand, and Oceana all up 2%. Globally, cases were down 14% and deaths were down 15% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending down since August 26. There are 17,809,484 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 99,775. The U.K. 42,606. Turkey 31,248. Russia 28,717. And India... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Vanishing Postcards
14. Postcards from Ghosts - "Weeping Women and the Ghoulish Side of Galveston"

Vanishing Postcards

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 31:03


It deserves mentioning that today's episode features visits to not one but two haunted houses, a cat that's likely lived more than nine lives, and the tale of a spirit that's rumored to wander the banks of the Rio Grande. Whether you're a skeptic or a believer, the adrenaline we experience when hearing spooky tales has a magical way of bringing us closer. Beyond this, ghost stories also often provide reminders of our history, and enable some to confront the fears and demons that lurk in our own imaginations. Many of these elements are at work in the fables featured in today's episode. Above all else, they're also pretty darned fun... Historic Galveston Ghost Tours Charles Adams Mansion Xavier Garza --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/evan-stern1/message

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 10-14-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 5:09


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots for October 14th, 2021. After a 19-month freeze, the United States will open its land borders with Canada and Mexico to non-essential travel. Fully vaccinated foreign nationals can enter the U.S. for whatever reason starting early November. Travelers will be asked about their vaccination status as part of the standard Customs and Border Protection admissions process, and no testing will be required to enter by land or sea. Despite full steam ahead by the U.S. administration and other countries, the Director General of the World Health Organization called booster shots while initial inoculations lag in some countries is "immoral, unfair, and unjust.” He went on to say, "To start boosters is really the worst we can do as a global community." A federal judge ruled the state of New York can't impose a vaccine mandate on healthcare workers and not allow their employers to consider religious exemption requests. The judge said the vaccination requirement conflicted with the workers' federally protected right to seek religious accommodations from their employers. The Governor vowed to fight the decision. At least 24 states have imposed vaccine requirements on workers, usually in healthcare. Boeing told employees they have to be vaccinated and if they don't, they might get fired. Deadline is December 8 and the company said compliance is a condition of employment. This affects about 125,000 U.S.-based employees. The International Association of Machinists union said it's their responsibility to defend and advocate for members, but the fact is the membership is polarized on the issue. So can you get a booster from a different vaccine than your original doses? A new NIH study found yes, it's safe and effective. However, Moderna and Pfizer were found to spark a stronger immune system response than Johnson & Johnson. The study found those that got J&J got stronger antibody levels after getting a Moderna or Pfizer booster, compared to another J&J shot. In the United States cases were down 21%, deaths are down 4%, and hospitalizations are down 20% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending down since September 13. There are 9,695,293 active cases in the United States. With not all states reporting daily numbers, the five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: Michigan 23%, Minnesota 18%. North Dakota and Pennsylvania 12%. And Montana 10%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Karnes, TX. Bethel Census Area, AK. Lewis, KY. Stark, ND. Kenai Peninsula Borough, AK. Knox, IN. Goshen, WY. Rio Grande, CO. Clay, TX. And Nome Census Area, AK. There have been at least 717,812 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont at 70.3%, Connecticut at 69.6%, and Rhode Island at 69.4%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia still unchanged at 40.7%, Idaho at 42.5%, and Wyoming at 42.6%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 56.5%. The five countries with biggest 24-hour increases in the number of fully vaccinated people: Taiwan up 5%. And South Korea, New Zealand, Australia, and Oceana 2%. Globally, cases were down 13% and deaths were down 14% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending down since August 26. There are 17,774,995 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 84,154. The U.K. 38,076. Turkey 33,860. Russia 28,190. And Romania 16,743. There have been at least 4,870,663 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Daily Sun-Up
New carpool apps aim to address traffic on I-70 during ski season; The Rio Grande, Pagosa & Northern Railroad

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 11:34


With the return of snow to the mountains comes the return of another Colorado winter tradition: gridlocked traffic on I-70, as weekend warriors make their way to ski areas in the high country. But how much of that gridlock is composed of people driving solo? Colorado Sun outdoors reporter Jason Blevins found some enterprising Coloradans are hoping to boost the practice of carpooling to the slopes with a slate of new apps. But getting them up and rolling has proved to be a bumpy ride.  For more information on all of these stories, visit our website, www.coloradosun.com. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Real World Podcast
Immigration Crisis

Real World Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 56:42


Bobbi and Bryan sit down to discuss the issues regarding immigration in the United States and the current border crisis. How do we best love immigrants? Do we have the capacity to accept everyone who wants to come here? Join us in our discussion today. Please send your feedback and topic suggestions to realworldpod@gmail.com.

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 10-13-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 5:26


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots for October 13th, 2021. The British government didn't get a very good report card from Parliament on how it handled COVID. A critical report said the country waited too long to impose a lockdown in the early days, and that missed a chance to contain the disease and led to thousands of unnecessary deaths. The delay attributed to a dangerous level of “groupthink” that caused dismissal of more aggressive strategies. The committees did praise the government's early focus on vaccines and vaccine development. A French study of 22.6 million people over 50 found vaccination reduces the risk of dying or being hospitalized by 90%. It also found vaccines appear to protect against the worst effects of Delta. The study's authors said, “This means those vaccinated are nine times less at risk of being hospitalized or dying from Covid than those unvaccinated.” Explosive accusations against Prevent Senior, which operates 10 hospitals in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Whistleblowing doctors testified the hospitals enlisted participants to test unproven drugs without proper consent and forced doctors to prescribe unproven drugs touted by Brazil's President. Some senators say it also looks like the system falsified death certificates to omit COVID as cause of death. The FDA declined to take a stand on whether it should back booster shots of Moderna's vaccine, mostly because data shows two doses are still enough to protect against severe disease and death in the U.S. They also didn't take a stand on Pfizer's booster shots last month and rejected Pfizer's original plan to distribute boosters to everyone 16 and older. A national poll by NPR find the pandemic put Americans increasingly behind the economic 8-ball. More are experiencing serious financial problems, rent's overdue, evictions are looming, two-thirds of parents say their kids fell behind in school, and one in five households say someone in the home couldn't get medical care for a serious condition. All this while billions of dollars in government relief money have gone out. 19% of U.S. households report losing all their savings during the pandemic and have no savings to fall back on. Add to that, half of households report at least one person in the home has had serious problems with depression, anxiety, stress or sleep in recent months. In the United States cases were down 24%, deaths are down 10%, and hospitalizations are down 20% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending down since September 13. There are 9,757,409 active cases in the United States. With not all states reporting daily numbers, the five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: Michigan 21%, Minnesota 17%. Pennsylvania 13%. North Dakota 12%. And Montana 9%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Bethel Census Area, AK. Knox, IN. Lewis, KY. Kenai Peninsula Borough, AK. Stark, ND. McCreary, KY. Kodiak Island Borough, AK. Rio Grande, CO. Clay, TX. And Martin, MN. There have been at least 715,413 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated were all unchanged: Vermont at 70.2%, Connecticut at 69.4%, and Rhode Island at 69.3%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states, also unchanged, are West Virginia at 40.7%, and Wyoming and Idaho at 42.4%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 56.4%. The five countries with biggest 24-hour increases in the number of fully vaccinated people: Oceana up 3%. Cambodia, Australia, and Kosovo 2%. And Ukraine 1%. Globally, cases were down 12% and deaths were down 14% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending down since August 26. There are... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Ideias Gazeta do Povo
Ideias #208 - A mentalidade conservadora de Russell Kirk

Ideias Gazeta do Povo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 83:27


Até pouco tempo, a palavra “conservadorismo” era um desses bichos papões usados para apavorar criancinhas nas universidades, no debate público e nas redes sociais. De uns anos para cá, a coisa mudou de figura. Mesmo assim, continua a ser bem complicado definir o que significa ser conservador para além dos perfis do Twitter, especialmente quando tanta gente que diz que quer preservar as coisas importantes da vida, pouco faz nesse sentido. Para começar essa discussão a sério, o podcast Ideias fala sobre um dos maiores intelectuais do conservadorismo do século XX, autor de um livro cujo título bastante sugestivo será o norte deste episódio. Não é por acaso que “A mentalidade conservadora”, de Russell Kirk, é considerado um clássico moderno e tem muita nos ensinar sobre o assunto. Neste episódio, a jornalista Maria Clara Vieira conversa com Alex Catharino, que é editor, professor de Filosofia Política e autor do livro "Russell Kirk- O Peregrino na Terra Desolada" e Marcus Boeira, que é Pós doutor em Filosofia pela Pontificia Università Gregoriana em Roma e Professor de Lógica e Filosofia do Direito na Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Tenha acesso a conteúdos exclusivos! Assine: bit.ly/2t5mxEe Escolha seu app favorito e receba uma seleção com as principais notícias do dia ou da semana no seu celular: leia.gp/2MTnyrS Acompanhe a editoria Ideias nas redes sociais: Facebook: www.facebook.com/ideiasgazetadopovo/ Twitter: twitter.com/ideias_gp Canal no Telegram: t.me/ideiasgazetadopovo

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast
A Haitian Odyssey Across The Americas

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 28:42


In recent weeks, images of thousands of Haitian migrants living in squalid conditions in a temporary camp in Texas have caused widespread shock and anger in the United States. US Border patrol agents on horseback forced many of them back across the Rio Grande into Mexico. Thousands more were deported back to Haiti, which is in the grip of its deepest economic and political crisis for years. The US Special Envoy to Haiti, Daniel Foote, resigned last month in protest at the Biden Administration's deportations policy, which he described as “inhumane” and “counterproductive”. Some of the migrants say it was also arbitrary, with no clarity about the process deciding who made it into the US and who was sent home. Will Grant met two families, at the US-Mexico border and in Haiti, whose journeys north came to very different ends: Last year, Thailand was rocked by student-led protests, which for the first time broke a taboo on criticising the monarchy. But the Thai government led by General Prayuth Chan-ocha fought back, using a raft of repressive laws to prosecute the protest leaders. Together with a rapid rise in Covid infections, that appeared to put a stop to the street rallies. The protest gatherings have now resumed but on a smaller scale. As Jonathan Head has been finding out, the heady optimism of the students last year has been replaced by a harder-edged realism over just how long it might take to reform Thailand's politics. Last weekend, thousands of people from 150 towns and cities across Brazil joined street protests against its President, Jair Bolsonaro. Many of them were angry about his handling of the pandemic which has killed at least 600,000 Brazilians so far. Not all the criticism is centred on Covid, though. Some of his former supporters are now calling for his resignation too – and their concerns are more ideological. The President is as combative as ever – and he still has control of Congress, though his public support has slumped to its lowest level yet in opinion polls. Katy Watson reports from Sao Paulo. Questions about the future of coal have caused some of the deepest divisions in modern Australia. The debate may soon get even sharper as COP26 and other climate-change summits try to push rich nations to set a faster pace in giving up fossil fuels. Australia still uses coal to generate about 70% of its electricity, making it the most carbon-polluting nation per person in the world. As Phil Mercer explains, the country's vast natural resources help fuel its domestic politics, as well as its power stations. And the BBC's new Middle East correspondent Anna Foster offers some personal first impressions of settling in to her posting to the Lebanese capital, Beirut - and of the extraordinary resilience which keeps the city's people going. Producer: Polly Hope

Radio Diaries
When Borders Move

Radio Diaries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 14:26


Ever since Texas became a state, the Rio Grande has been the border between the U.S. and Mexico. But rivers can move — and that's exactly what happened in 1864, when torrential rains caused it to jump its banks and go south. Suddenly the border was in a different place, and Texas had gained 700 acres of land called the Chamizal, named after a plant that grew in the area. The Chamizal was a thorn in the side of U.S.–Mexico relations for a century until Sept. 25, 1964, when the U.S. finally gave part of the land back to Mexico. But by that time, roughly 5,000 people had moved to the area and made it their home. This is their story. ***** This story was supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities and listeners like you. To support our work, go to www.radiodiaries.org/donate. This episode has support from Article Furniture. Get $50 your first purchase of $100 or more by going to www.article.com/diaries.

Fronteiras da Ciência
T12E31 - Devolvam o Ubirajara!

Fronteiras da Ciência

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021


Uma batalha midiática, diplomática e jurídica vem sendo travada pela comunidade paleontológica brasileira, mas não só, para repatriar o importante fóssil do Ubirajara jubatus. O fato de ter sido retirado ilegalmente do Brasil acabou gerando, recentemente, a retratação do artigo no qual ele havia sido descrito e nomeado. Os convidados são a Aline Ghilardi, do Departamento de Geologia da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), e o Juan Cisneros, da Universidade Federal do Piauí (UFPI). Conversam com eles, Jeferson Arenzon e Carolina Brito, ambos do Departamento de Física da UFRGS. Produção e edição: Jeferson Arenzon Créditos da Imagem: Luis Rey - https://luisvrey.wordpress.com/2020/12/15/having-fun-with-the-new-revolutionary-ubirajara-jubatus/

the only one in the room podcast
SUNDAY EDITION: MJ Fievre Is The Only One Who Saw A Man Burned Alive

the only one in the room podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 38:33


Right now there are thousands of Haitian immigrants encamped at Del Rio, Texas after entering the U.S. through the Rio Grande who are awaiting either deportation from U.S. authorities or a decision to stay put and seek asylum. Here to speak with us today is M.J. Fievre who grew up in Haiti and now lives in the US. M.J. has authored nine books in French that are widely read in Europe and the French Antilles. She works with underserved populations in need of writing as a form of therapy—even if they don't realize that they need writing or therapy.    Visit: https://www.badassblackgirl.com & https://mjfievre.com Instagram: @badassblackgirlbooks LinkedIn: M.J. Fievre Books: Badass Black Girl book  Empowered Black Girl book Raising Confident Black Kids book Resilient Black Girl  For those who want to help Haiti, here are two options for two different solid organizations: Ayiti Community Trust and Fokal. Special thanks to our sponsors: Voyage et Cie: Voyage et Cie's curator Melanie Apple has cultivated a passion for notable moments using the sense of smell. Voyage et Cie is the ultimate luxury blend of travel, fragrance, and design. Each original fragrance is created by Melanie, 100% organic and natural which will transport you on a journey. Visit https://www.voyageetcie.com/ and enter the code: theonlyone to get your 10% off your purchase! Cute Booty Lounge is made by women and for women. There's a cute booty style for everyone! Cute Booty Lounge has you covered...Embrace Your Body, Love Your Booty! Head to Cutebooty.com or click the link here to order yours, but don't forget to enter the code theonlybooty to get 15% off your first order!  Be sure not to miss our weekly full episodes on Tuesdays, Scott Talks on Wednesdays and our brand new series On My Nightstand on Fridays by subscribing to the show wherever you listen to podcasts.  Join our Only One In The Room Facebook Group if you'd like to ask a question of any of our upcoming guests for this series.  Also visit the website www.theonlyonepod.com for the latest from our host Laura Cathcart Robbins like featured articles and more. We love hearing from you in the comments on iTunes and while you're there don't forget to rate us, subscribe and share the show! All of us at The Only One In The Room wish you safety and wellness during this challenging time. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human
#1445 A Crisis For Haitians, Not the US, on the Border

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 73:40


Air Date 9/29/2021 Today we take a look at the so-called "crisis" on the border involving Haitians attempting to cross into the United States. Some say it's a crisis the US is dealing with, others say it's inappropriate to call human beings a crisis. We humbly suggest that these human beings, not the US, are EXPERIENCING a crisis and the US is exacerbating it. And Biden, by following Trump's policies, is creating a political crisis for himself. Be part of the show! Leave us a message at 202-999-3991 or email Jay@BestOfTheLeft.com  Transcript BestOfTheLeft.com/Support (Get AD FREE Shows & Bonus Content) BestOfTheLeft.com/Refer Sign up, share widely, get rewards. It's that easy! Check out Unf*cking the Republic! BestOfTheLeft.com/Advertise Sponsor the show! SHOW NOTES Ch. 1: Border Crisis: Thousands Of Haitians Flown to Haiti Against Their Will - Consider This - Air Date 9-23-21 Thousands of Haitan migrants who were camping out under a bridge in a Texas border town seeking to cross the Rio Grande and find refuge in the US are now being forced back to their home country. Ch. 2: Psaki Disingenuous When Grilled About Horseback Border Patrol Agents Whipping Haitian Migrants - The Majority Report - Air Date 9-21-21 Psaki cites title 42, a Trump administration rule program allowing the government to expel refugees under the cover of preventing Covid-19 from spreading in the US. The MR crew discusses how disingenuous it is of the Biden Administration Ch. 3: Not a Humane System - In The Thick - Air Date 9-24-21 Maria and Julio dive deep into the violent border enforcement we witnessed in Del Rio, Texas where thousands of Haitian refugees were being held and turned away. They discuss the horrifying images of Border Patrol agents attacking Haitian iimmigrants. Ch. 4: Coronavirus-fuelled racism adds to Haitians' plight in Chile - Al Jazeera English - Air Date 5-7-20 Haitians in Chile - the largest migrant community in Latin America - are underpaid and often live in dire conditions. Ch. 5: What Does Haiti Actually Need? Part 1 - What Next - Air Date 8-25-21 The compounding crises in Haiti aren't a product of bad luck. They are the result of hundreds of years of international interference and poorly-designed aid programs. Ch. 6: Haiti Needs a New Narrative - On the Media - Air Date 8-4-21 In the wake of the assassination of Haiti's President Jovenel Moïse on July 7th, international media rushed to cover Haiti's latest political crisis—painting a familiar picture of a nation in turmoil, Haitians in need. Ch. 7: What Does Haiti Actually Need? Part 2 - What Next - Air Date 8-25-21 The compounding crises in Haiti aren't a product of bad luck. They are the result of hundreds of years of international interference and poorly-designed aid programs. MEMBERS-ONLY BONUS CLIP(S) Ch. 8: Wash. Rinse. Repeat. Haiti and International Aid - The United States of Anxiety - Air Date 8-23-21 After a 7.2 magnitude earthquake rocked Haiti's southwestern region, many of us were left wondering -- what does it mean to best support Haiti through disaster? And if the global community has donated so much humanitarian aid, why does it keep happening? FINAL COMMENTS Ch. 9: Final comments on viral images from the border and why truth is at a structural disadvantage MUSIC (Blue Dot Sessions): Opening Theme: Loving Acoustic Instrumental by John Douglas Orr  Voicemail Music: Low Key Lost Feeling Electro by Alex Stinnent Activism Music: This Fickle World by Theo Bard (https://theobard.bandcamp.com/track/this-fickle-world) Closing Music: Upbeat Laid Back Indie Rock by Alex Stinnent   Produced by Jay! Tomlinson Visit us at BestOfTheLeft.com Listen Anywhere! BestOfTheLeft.com/Listen Listen Anywhere! Follow at Twitter.com/BestOfTheLeft Like at Facebook.com/BestOfTheLeft Contact me directly at Jay@BestOfTheLeft.com

The John Batchelor Show
1712: Ebrahim "Hanging Judge" Raisi at the UNGA: meet the new boss. Behnam Ben Taleblu

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 10:45


Photo:  Old saloon in which the famous Texas "hanging judge," Roy Bean, dispensed "law west of the Pecos" along the Rio Grande in a desolate stretch of the Chihauhuan Desert in the "Trans-Pecos" region of Texas. (His grandson, a distinguished man, practices the law in Roswell, New Mexico.) Ebrahim "Hanging Judge" Raisi at the UNGA: meet the new boss. Behnam Ben Taleblu @FDD, https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/sep/21/iran-claims-it-will-be-ready-for-nuclear-deal-talks-in-next-few-weeks Behnam Ben Taleblu, @FDD, research Fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, focussed on Iranian security and political issues.

Consider This from NPR
Border Crisis: Thousands Of Haitians Flown to Haiti Against Their Will

Consider This from NPR

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 14:10


Thousands of Haitan migrants who were camping out under a bridge in a Texas border town seeking to cross the Rio Grande and find refuge in the US are now being forced back to their home country.

Post Reports
An immigration crisis in Del Rio, Tex.

Post Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 19:48


Thousands of mostly Haitian migrants are crossing into the U.S. from the southwest border of Texas. When they arrive, they face rough territory: hostile law enforcement, mass airlifts for deportations, and a squalid, overcrowded migrant camp in the U.S.Read more:Crossing the Rio Grande into Texas as a Haitian migrant is a treacherous journey. That became apparent after images came out of U.S. Border Patrol agents using whips and horses to police the border.Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has also made it clear that there will be law and order conditions where agents are seeing an influx of travelers. This also comes at a time when the Biden administration has begun deporting Haitian nationals in droves.Arelis R. Hernández covers the southern U.S. border for The Post. She reports from the Rio Grande, giving a glimpse into what life is like on the border and explaining the Trump-era policy under which mass expulsions are taking place.To learn more about Title 42, the public health order that President Biden has kept in place to expel migrants out of the United States, listen to “Marooned in Matamoros,” a two-part documentary series from Hernández and Post Reports editor Ted Muldoon. It's about a woman's treacherous journey from El Salvador to the Matamoros encampment in Mexico.

Human Events Daily with Jack Posobiec
Human Events Daily - Sep 20 2021 - Haitian Migrant Crisis On The Southern Border

Human Events Daily with Jack Posobiec

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 21:57


Shocking images and videos coming out from the Rio Grande where Haitian migrants are swarming in, a huge leftist plan to issue 8 million green cards in spending bill was blocked in the senate, and it's being revealed that General Milley downplayed the BLM riots to prevent Trump from invoking the Insurrection Act.Plus…did the feds just arrest a fed at the capitol riots?Here's your Daily dose of Human Events with @JackPosobiec 

Human Events Daily with Jack Posobiec
Human Events Daily - Sep 17 2021 - Clinton Lawyer Charged in Phony Russiagate Hoax

Human Events Daily with Jack Posobiec

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 22:02


Jack breaks down the Alfa Bank / Russiagate Hoax, how a top White House official, Michael Sussman, has been indicted by John Durham and the Justice Department. Jake Sullivan, a lawyer for the Clintons has ALSO been charged regarding the phony Russiagate allegations he made as well as creating fraudulent documents. Additionally, 10,000+ Haitian & Cuban Migrants recognized America's weak border security and have amassed themselves along the Rio Grande down in Del Rio, Texas. President Joe Biden is actively politicizing this virus, by CUTTING the supply of antibody treatments to states in the South. Here's your Daily dose of Human Events with @JackPosobiec 

Death of a Starlet
Introducing: WITNESSED - BORDERLANDS

Death of a Starlet

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 6:25


The tall-but-true tale of a charismatic outlaw, an iconic small-town sheriff, and the record-setting drug bust that ensnared them both. Set in the rugged Texas borderlands, host Rob D'Amico transports listeners back to U.S. side of the border for the opening salvo of the War on Drugs … where so much dirty money was swirling across the Rio Grande that even the most incorruptible citizens would be tempted. In the tradition of films like No Country for Old Men and Charles Portis novels, Witnessed: Borderlands mashes up the shockingly real and the deeply surreal, chronicling not just the events of a crime, but digging deep into the mystery and aura of one of America's most myth-soaked regions.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.