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Best podcasts about northeast

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Latest podcast episodes about northeast

Lowlife Chopper Podcast
The Name of the Game is TWIST the Frame w/ @SteelCityBlacksmithing

Lowlife Chopper Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 125:53


This week we chop it up with the homie Josh aka @SteelCityBlacksmithing about this absolutely wild twisted steel frame for his sporty chop as well as some of the other details he's already squared away on the build. We also get into a few of his favorite blacksmithing tools and plan out a trip for him to come up here to the Northeast and show us how it's done in person in the Garage Mahal. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lowlifechopperpodcast/support

Breaking Boundaries with Brad Polumbo
We Triggered the Alt-Right, Lessons from MLK, the FBI Beclowns Itself (AGAIN), the War on the Unvaccinated Continues & Liberty Legislation Round-Up

Breaking Boundaries with Brad Polumbo

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 63:09


On this BASEDBrief, Brad & Hannah re-cap the dramatic “backlash” from the launch of BASED-Politics.com. Spoiler alert: Nationalists and some far-right Internet personalities are Big Mad. Plus, they discuss lessons from Martin Luther King Jr. and their different educational experiences on the Civil Rights Era from growing up in the South versus growing up in the Northeast. Then, Brad & Hannah tackle the FBI's latest week of absolute buffoonery and break down some disturbing polling data showing many Americans want the government to essentially wage war against the unvaccinated. To close out, they do a round-up of a bunch of great pro-liberty legislation being introduced across the country and, of course, do some hot takes and go over listener mail.  Check out the new BASEDPolitics website: based-politics.com BASEDPolitics Story Sources: https://www.based-politics.com/2022/01/18/lets-actually-follow-mlks-teachings-on-disobeying-unjust-laws/ https://www.based-politics.com/2022/01/18/federal-agency-to-begin-tracking-those-who-seek-religious-exemptions-to-bidens-vaccine-mandate/ https://www.based-politics.com/2022/01/17/martin-luther-king-jr-s-6-principles-of-non-violence-2/ https://www.based-politics.com/2022/01/17/mlk-second-amendment-his-rights-were-denied/ https://www.based-politics.com/2022/01/15/cynthia-lummis-backs-equal-act-to-end-crack-cocaine-disparity/ https://www.based-politics.com/2022/01/14/school-choice-rising/ https://www.based-politics.com/2022/01/13/the-corrupt-healthcare-law-youve-probably-never-heard-of/ https://www.based-politics.com/2022/01/13/gop-lawmaker-moves-to-abolish-virginias-government-monopoly-on-hard-liquor-sales/ Make sure to follow Hannah & Brad on other platforms and rate/review this podcast on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen. Hannah: Twitter — https://twitter.com/HannahDCox Facebook — https://www.facebook.com/hannahdaniellecox7 Instagram — https://www.instagram.com/hannahdanielle_cox6/ Substack — https://hannahcox.substack.com/ Brad: TikTok — https://www.tiktok.com/@brad_polumbo?lang=en Twitter — https://twitter.com/brad_polumbo Facebook — https://www.facebook.com/BradPolumbo Instagram — https://www.instagram.com/bradpolumbo/

BASED with Hannah Cox
We Triggered the Alt-Right, Lessons from MLK, the FBI Beclowns Itself (AGAIN), the War on the Unvaccinated Continues & Liberty Legislation Round-Up

BASED with Hannah Cox

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 63:09


On this BASEDBrief, Brad & Hannah re-cap the dramatic “backlash” from the launch of BASED-Politics.com. Spoiler alert: Nationalists and some far-right Internet personalities are Big Mad. Plus, they discuss lessons from Martin Luther King Jr. and their different educational experiences on the Civil Rights Era from growing up in the South versus growing up in the Northeast. Then, Brad & Hannah tackle the FBI's latest week of absolute buffoonery and break down some disturbing polling data showing many Americans want the government to essentially wage war against the unvaccinated. To close out, they do a round-up of a bunch of great pro-liberty legislation being introduced across the country and, of course, do some hot takes and go over listener mail.  Check out the new BASEDPolitics website: based-politics.com BASEDPolitics Story Sources: https://www.based-politics.com/2022/01/18/lets-actually-follow-mlks-teachings-on-disobeying-unjust-laws/ https://www.based-politics.com/2022/01/18/federal-agency-to-begin-tracking-those-who-seek-religious-exemptions-to-bidens-vaccine-mandate/ https://www.based-politics.com/2022/01/17/martin-luther-king-jr-s-6-principles-of-non-violence-2/ https://www.based-politics.com/2022/01/17/mlk-second-amendment-his-rights-were-denied/ https://www.based-politics.com/2022/01/15/cynthia-lummis-backs-equal-act-to-end-crack-cocaine-disparity/ https://www.based-politics.com/2022/01/14/school-choice-rising/ https://www.based-politics.com/2022/01/13/the-corrupt-healthcare-law-youve-probably-never-heard-of/ https://www.based-politics.com/2022/01/13/gop-lawmaker-moves-to-abolish-virginias-government-monopoly-on-hard-liquor-sales/ Make sure to follow Hannah & Brad on other platforms and rate/review this podcast on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen. Hannah: Twitter — https://twitter.com/HannahDCox Facebook — https://www.facebook.com/hannahdaniellecox7 Instagram — https://www.instagram.com/hannahdanielle_cox6/ Substack — https://hannahcox.substack.com/ Brad: TikTok — https://www.tiktok.com/@brad_polumbo?lang=en Twitter — https://twitter.com/brad_polumbo Facebook — https://www.facebook.com/BradPolumbo Instagram — https://www.instagram.com/bradpolumbo/

Worldwide Exchange
Oil and commodities, Bank earnings, Northeast power prices

Worldwide Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 44:53


Oil prices are climbing and climbing, now up after a missile strike against a fuel depot in Abu Dhabi. Amrita Sen of Energy Aspects joins to discuss the geopolitical impacts on oil prices, and Bank of America's Francisco Blanch joins with his outlook on oil and other commodities for the year. Plus, bank earnings continue today after a disappointing start that brought down the Dow on Friday. RJ Grant of KBW discusses the names he's watching. And Brian's RBI focuses on power prices New England, which surged this weekend to 700% more than their levels of two years ago. He breaks down why it's happening and why it matters.

World News Tonight with David Muir
Full Episode: Monday, January 17, 2022

World News Tonight with David Muir

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 24:03


Much of the Northeast and Mid Atlantic cleaning up after a winter storm made its way through the regions dropping snow, freezing rain and bitter cold temperatures. With 5G cell service set to be implemented Wednesday, the FAA warns it could cause "catastrophic disruption" to passenger flights and the supply chain. States first hit with the Omicron surge say they are turning the corner, as Doctor Anthony Fauci weighs in on whether this could be the final wave in the pandemic. New details on the intense hostage standoff synagogue in Texas and the FBI's new warning to faith-based communities nationwide of potential threats of violence. The family of Dr. Martin Luther King Junior pushing for the Senate to take up voting rights legislation, as the nation celebrates Dr. King's legacy. Growing concern over a potential Russian invasion of Ukraine. And celebrating Betty White on what would have been her 100th birthday.

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis
Year One A Disastrous Loss For Democrats, Politics Are Making Americans Ill, and Football Fans' Emotions Are Running High!

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 46:03


Tonight's rundown: The Biden administration closes out year one with a long list of failures After a Christmas surge of the omicron variant, case numbers in the Northeast seem to be subsiding  A Salt Lake City newspaper calls for National Guard to keep unvaccinated people in their homes A new study found that talking politics can lead to feeling sick and may cause harm to a person's overall health Dallas Cowboys fans get a little too rowdy during Sunday's wild card game This Day in History, 1950: Boston thieves pull off a massive robbery   Final Thought: Martin Luther King Jr. Day   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

FOX News Radio Newscast
The winter storm that brought near record snowfall to parts of the south over the weekend made its way to the northeast dumping heavy snow on parts of several states.

FOX News Radio Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 3:59


TODAY
January 17: Winter storm latest. Australian Open begins without Novak Djokovic. Prince Harry's security battle. Remembering Betty White on what would have been her 100th birthday.

TODAY

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 30:39


Winter storm slams the Northeast causing flight cancellations and knocking out power. Plus, the Australian Open begins overnight after Novak Djokovic has been deported and has lost his visa appeal. Also, Prince Harry is now challenging a decision by the British government that prevents him from paying for security when he and his family visit the UK. And, remembering Betty White on what would have been her 100th birthday.

World News Tonight with David Muir
Full Episode: Sunday, January 16, 2022

World News Tonight with David Muir

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 24:27


Winter Storm striking the South, taking aim at the Northeast; President Biden calling the terrifying Texas synagogue standoff "An Act of Terror"; Battling the Omicron surge; Novak Djokovic kicked out of Australia, losing his bid to defend his tournament title.

gone cold podcast - texas true crime
Lost in the Desert Part 2: Cheryl Lynn Vasquez-Dismukes

gone cold podcast - texas true crime

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 35:04


During the Summer of 1987, the disappearances of girls and young women were stacking up in El Paso. Though the police seemed to think most were simply runaways, they changed their tune when the bodies of two missing females were found in the city's Northeast desert on September 4th. When two more bodies were found a month and a half later, El Paso police acted fast and arrested their suspect – but he wasn't charged with the murders, rather, he was charged with the rape of a woman who he had to let go. Eventually, David Leonard Wood was convicted of a total of six Northeast El Paso murders that occurred in the summer of 87 but three area females are still missing to this day. This episode of gone cold is the further story of the Desert Killer's known victims and the third that is potentially his victim: Cheryl Lynn Vasquez-Dismukes.If you have any information about the disappearances of Melissa Alaniz or Cheryl Vasquez Dismukes, please contact the El Paso Police at 915-832-4445.If you have any information about the disappearances of Marjorie Alice Knox, please contact the Dona Ana County, New Mexico Sheriff's Office at 575-526-0795.Be sure to check out our pals over at the podcast Fort Worth Roots.Please consider donating to the Fort Worth Cold Case Support Group, a non-profit set up in hopes to fund the testing needed to give the families of Fort Worth murder victims justice. You can make an incredible impact on these folks' lives by donating. Please go to: https://haynow.appcapable.com/customerForm?paymentFormId=6169c6306671d56b5e215507&fbclid=IwAR2pnENlLwT7msIXDCF3Bot6fu0T4dLthEoMZOe4QFhDb8JClEv9KORAkv0You can donate to law enforcement investigations that need funding or upload your DNA into a database used only for law enforcement investigations at DNAsolves.comIf you don't have DNA data from a consumer testing site, you can get a kit at connect.DNAsolves.comYou can support gone cold and listen ad-free at patreon.com/gonecoldpodcastFind us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by using @gonecoldpodcast......and on YouTube at: youtube.com/c/gonecoldpodcastThe El Paso Times, The Austin Statesman, the article Memories of Angie on New Mexico State University's website, and court appeal documents were used as sources for this episode.#JusticeForCherylVasquezDismukes #JusticeForMarjorieKnox #JusticeForMelissaAlaniz #ElPaso #ElPasoTX #Texas #TX #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #TexasTrueCrime #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #Podcast #ColdCase #UnsolvedMysteries #Missing #MissingPersons #TheDesertKiller

Fox Sports Radio Weekends
Jonas Knox Previews Wild Card Weekend

Fox Sports Radio Weekends

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 97:01


Jonas Knox dives into the biggest storylines of Wild Card Weekend in the NFL! Jonas breaks down what Monday night's game means for Matt Stafford and the Rams. Jonas analyzes the matchup between the Bengals and Raiders. Jonas discusses the collapse of the Indianapolis Colts and gives his thoughts on Brian Flores getting fired by the Dolphins. Plus, the latest editions of Do You Care, Knox Locks, and a very special weather report from the Northeast from the new FSR weather correspondent Arnie Spanier! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Ski Moms Fun Podcast
Ski Vermont with Lindsay DesLauriers of Bolton Valley Resort

Ski Moms Fun Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 26:38


In this episode Nicole and Sarah host ski mom Lindsay DesLauriers, the President of Bolton Valley Resort in northern Vermont.Lindsay tells us the history of Bolton Valley Resort, founded by her father in the 1960's and all about what makes it such a special place to many loyal visitors. Bolton Valley Resort is less than 30 minutes from Burlington and is one of the few resorts in Vermont to offer night skiing making it accessible for after school and after work hours.  Bolton Valley hosts a variety of after school programs and is responsible for teaching thousands of young Vermonters to ski and ride.The base of Bolton Valley is the highest base area in the Northeast, at an elevation: 2,100 feet.  It's worth the drive up to the base village where you can find a newly renovated hotel, tavern, cafe, retail shops, rental equipment, sports center and more.Bolton Valley has a vast offering of winter activities including alpine, nordic, backcountry and night skiing making it an ideal place for a family vacation. Outside of ski season, Bolton Valley has a fantastic mountain biking program including bike rentals, instructors, kids programs, and trails for all levels.  There's also hiking, scenic chairlift rides and disc golf!Lindsay was probably most excited to talk about the Bolton Babe Force - a group of women coming together to meet new adventure buddies in a positive and welcoming environment.  The Babe Force hosts meetups, camps, and clinics throughout the year with a focus on different extreme sports including Backcountry Skiing, Mountain Biking, Rock-climbing, and more!Keep up with the latest from Bolton ValleyBolton Valley homepageBolton Valley on InstagramBolton Valley on TwitterResources:Bolton Babe Force Titon Gravity Research Film featuring Bolton ValleyMountain Biking at Bolton Valley ResortIndy PassPlease support our sponsor!Mabels Labels at www.mabelslabels.com and use code SKIMOMS for 15% off your first orderJoin the Ski Moms Fun Community!Follow us on Instagram @skimomsfunCheck out the Ski Moms Fun Store 

The Lead with Jake Tapper
Omicron Appears To Slow In Northeast

The Lead with Jake Tapper

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 76:24


The United States may be turning a corner in the pandemic as coronavirus cases could be peaking in parts of the country. Today, Dr. Anthony Fauci and the acting FDA commissioner said Omicron is so efficient at spreading that almost everyone in the United States will at least be exposed to it.  The January 6th select committee is asking top House Republican Kevin McCarthy if he would like to voluntarily cooperate. Rep. Adam Kinzinger joins to give updates on if McCarthy will provide information to the investigation. To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

TODAY
January 12: Is it time to upgrade our masks? Record breaking cold weather. Tributes continue pouring in for Bob Saget.

TODAY

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 33:11


The latest on the CDC's guidance as Covid cases and hospitalizations continue to soar — is it time to upgrade our masks? Plus, millions across the Northeast are waking up to another morning of frigid temperatures and dangerous wind chills — Al Roker has your latest forecast. Also, the latest on the sudden death of Bob Saget as loved ones continue to pay tribute to the beloved star.

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
Craig Calfee - Bicycle Industry pioneer

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 70:45


This week Randall sits down with bicycle industry pioneer, Craig Calfee. Craig has been an industry leader for decades with his work on the Calfee brand and many other collaborations throughout the industry. You cannot find someone more knowledgable about carbon (or bamboo) as a material.  Calfee Designs Website Join The Ridership Support the Podcast Automated Transcription, please excuse the typos: Craig Calfee Randall [00:00:00]  [00:00:04] Randall: Welcome to the gravel ride podcast. I'm your host Randall Jacobs and our guest today is Craig Calfee. Craig is the founder of Calfee Design, the innovator behind the first full carbon frames to race in the tour de France, the originator of numerous technologies adopted throughout the cycling industry, and on a personal note has been a generous and consistent supporter of my own entrepreneurial journey. I am grateful to have him as a friend, and I've been looking forward to this conversation for some time. So with that, Craig, Calfee welcome to the podcast. [00:00:32] Craig Calfee: Oh, thank you. Nice to be here. [00:00:34] Randall: So, let's start with, what's your background, give your own story in your own words. [00:00:40] Craig Calfee: Well, I've always written bikes. I mean, as a kid, that's how I got around. And that's, as you become an older child, you, uh, find your independence with moving about the world. And a bicycle of course, is the most efficient way to do that. And later on, I was a bike messenger in New York when I went to college and that kind of got me into bike design as much for the, uh, desire to make a bike that can withstand a lot of abuse. And later on, I used a bike for commuting to work at a job, building carbon fiber racing boats. And during that time I crashed my bike and needed a new frame. So I thought I'd make a frame at a carbon fiber, uh, tubing that I had been making at my.  [00:01:29] Randall: my job  [00:01:30] Craig Calfee: So this is back in 1987, by the way. So there wasn't a, there were no YouTube videos on how to make your own carbon bike. So I pretty much had to invent a way to build the bike out of this tubing. And at the time there were aluminum lugged bikes, and I just, I knew already aluminum and carbon fiber don't get along very well. So you have to really do a lot of things to, to accommodate that. And the existing bikes at the time were, uh, I would say experimental in the fact that they were just trying to glue aluminum to carbon and it really wasn't working. [00:02:05] So I came up with my own way and built my first bike and it turned out really well. And a lot of friends and, and bike racers who checked out the bikes that I I really should keep going with it. So I felt like I discovered carbon fiber as a, as the perfect bicycle material before anyone else. Uh, and actually, uh, right at that time, Kestrel came out with their first bike, uh, the K 1000 or something. Um, anyway that was uh, that was in 87, 88. And, uh, I felt like I should really, you know give it a go. So I moved out to California and started a bike company. [00:02:48] Randall: So just to be clear, you were actually making the tubes, you weren't buying tubes. So you're making the tubes out of the raw carbon or some pre-printed carbon. then you came up with your own way of, uh, joining those tubes. [00:03:01] Craig Calfee: Yeah. I worked on a braiding machine, so it was actually a a hundred year old, uh, shoelace braider, uh, from back in Massachusetts. There's a lot of old textile machinery braiding is, uh, you know, your braided socks and, you know, nylon rope is braided. So this is a 72 carrier braider, which means 72 spools of carbon fiber. [00:03:25] Are winding in and out braiding this tube and you just run it back and forth through this braider a few times. And now you have a thick enough wall to, uh, I developed a and tape wrapping method at that job and came up with a pretty decent way to make a bicycle tube. So that was kind of the beginning of that. [00:03:47] Uh, and since then I've explored all kinds of methods for making tubing, mainly through subcontractors who specialize in things like filament winding and roll wrapping. And, uh, pultrusion, you know, all kinds of ways to make tubing. And that does relate to kind of an inspiration for me, where I realized that, uh, carbon fiber, you know, high performance composites are relatively young and new in the world of technology where metals are, you know, the metals have been around since the bronze age. [00:04:21] I mean, literally 5,000 years of development happened with metals, carbon fiber, uh, high-performance composites have only really been around since world war two. So that's a huge gap in development that hasn't happened with composites. So that to me felt like, oh, there's some job security for a guy who likes to invent things. So that was my, a kind of full force to get me to really focus on composite materials. [00:04:51] Randall: Were you that insightful in terms of the historical context at the time, or is that kind of a retro or retrospective reflection? [00:04:58] Craig Calfee: I think, I don't know. I think I may have read about that. Um, I a friend who had a library card at MIT and I pretty much lived there for a few weeks every, uh, master's thesis and PhD thesis on bicycles that they had in their library. And I think somewhere in there was a, uh, a topic on composites and comparing the technology of composites. [00:05:23] So. I probably that from some reading I did, or maybe I did invent that out of thin air. I don't remember, uh, nonetheless, uh, the fact of it is, you know, not, not a whole lot of mental energy has been put into coming up with ways of processing fiber and resin compared to metal. So to me that just opens up a wide world of, of innovation. [00:05:49] Randall: Um, and so the first frame was that, um, you're creating essentially uniform tubes and then mitering them, joining them, wrapping them as you do with your current bamboo frames or what was happening there. [00:06:02] Craig Calfee: Uh, it's more like the, uh, our, our carbon fiber frames were laminating carbon fabric in metal dyes, and those are not mitered tubes fitting into the dyes. And that's, that's a process. I got my first patent on. And it, uh, so in the process of compressing the carbon fabric against the tubes, you're you end up with these gussets in what is traditionally the parting line of a mold and rather than trim them off completely. [00:06:31] I, I use them as reinforcing ribs. [00:06:35] Randall: Yep. Okay. So that explains the, the, that distinctive element that continues with your, um, some of your, uh, to tube, uh, currently  [00:06:48] Craig Calfee: them  [00:06:49] the hand wrapping technique from that you currently see on the bamboo bikes came from developing a tandem frame, or basically a frame whose production numbers don't justify the tooling costs. Um, so that's hand wrapped. That's just literally lashed to. Yeah. And a point of note, there is I was a boy scout growing up and, uh, there's this merit badge called pioneering merit badge. [00:07:16] And I really enjoyed pioneering merit badge because it involved lashing row, uh, poles together with rope and the pro you had to do with this one project. And I did a tower and it was this enormous structure that went just straight up like a flagpole, but it was it involved a bunch of tetrahedrons, uh, stacked on top of each other and lashed together. [00:07:41] you know, culminating in a pole that went up. I don't remember how tall it was, but it was, it was really impressive. And everybody, you know, thought, wow, this is incredible of poles and some rope. And here we have this massive tower. So anyway, I was into things together since a young age. [00:08:00] And so I immediately came up with the, uh, the last tube concept. Which is where the, now the bamboo bikes are. course there's a specific pattern to the wrapping, but, um, the concept is basically using fiber to lash stuff together, [00:08:16] Randall: When it immediately brings to mind, what's possible with current generation of additive production techniques. Uh, whereas before you could make small components and then lash them together to create structures that otherwise aren't manufacturable. [00:08:31] Now you'd be able to say, print it out though. Those, you know, those printed out materials don't have the performance characteristics of a, you know, a uni directional carbon of the sword that you're working with currently. [00:08:42] Craig Calfee: right? [00:08:43] Randall: Um, so we've gone deep nerd here. We're going to, I'm going to pull us out and say, okay, uh, lots of time for this. [00:08:49] This is going to be a double episode. Uh, so next up, let's talk about those frames, uh, saw their big debut. [00:08:59] Craig Calfee: Yeah. So, um, we started making custom geometry for a. In 1989 and selling them and so big and tall, and that the idea of custom geometry frames was, uh, you know, pretty esoteric. And the pro racers were, we're using a lot of custom frames. So Greg Lamond, uh, was in search of a carbon fiber, uh, custom frame builder in, uh, 1990. [00:09:31] And, uh, no one really was doing it. We were literally the only company making custom carbon frame bikes. So he, uh, found out about us, uh, effectively discovered us, shall we say? And, uh, it didn't take long for him to order up 18 of them for his, his, uh, team Z, uh, teammates. He was sponsoring his own team with a Lamont brand. [00:09:56] So we didn't have to sponsor him. He basically paid for the frame. Put his name on them. And, and, uh, now we're now we're on the defending champions, a tour de France team. So that was a huge break obviously. And it was really a pleasure working with Greg and getting to know the demands of the pro Peloton, uh, you know, that really launched us. [00:10:21] So that was, uh, quite a splash. And, you know, it always is a great answer to the question. Oh, so who rides your bike kind of thing. you know, you have the, the full-on best one in the world at the time. So, so that was a fun thing. [00:10:39] Randall: And the name of the company at the time was, [00:10:41] Craig Calfee: Uh, carbon frames. [00:10:42] Randall: yeah. So anyone wanting [00:10:45] dig up the historical record, [00:10:47] Craig Calfee: is this too generic? You know, the other to what you're talking about, the adventure bikes. Yeah, we had to stop. I mean, carbon frames is a terrible name because everyone started talking about all carbon fiber frames as carbon frames. So we thought that was cool, you know, like Kleenex, you know, uh, and then we came up with the adventure bike, you know, with very early, uh, adventure bike. [00:11:11] And it was just, we called it the adventure bike. And now there's a classification called adventure bikes that, you know, so, um, I think we, we, we went too generic on how we named our models. [00:11:26] Randall: I've drawn from the rich tradition, a tradition of Greek, you know, uh, philosophy for naming my own companies in the like, [00:11:35] Craig Calfee: Yeah. [00:11:36] Randall: uh, um, and then next up, uh, so you've worked with Greg Lamond on those frames. Carbon frames is up and running and you're, you're producing custom geo frames and you're starting to get at some scale at this point and some notoriety. [00:11:52] next up you were working on your bamboo bikes. When we talk about that [00:11:57] Craig Calfee: Yeah, that was say, I'm kind of at the, at the time, it was just a way to get publicity. So at the Interbike trade show, you'd have a few creative people making some wacky bikes out of beer cans or, or other just weird things just to get attention, just, just to send the media over to your booth, to take a picture of some wacky thing that you're doing. [00:12:20] yeah, we got to do something like that to get, get some attention. And the, uh, so I was looking around for some PVC pipe. Maybe I was going to do a PVC pipe bike, and I wasn't really sure, but I knew that we could just wrap any tube. Make a bike out of literally anything. So, um, my dog was playing with some bamboo behind the shop. [00:12:42] Uh, she was a stick dog, so she loved to clamp onto a stick and you could swing her around by the, by the sticks. She's a pit bull and lab mix. Anyway, we ran out of sticks. Uh, cause we only had one little tree in the back, but we did have some bamboos. So she came up with a piece of bamboo and I was her around by it, expecting it to break off in her mouth because I just wasn't aware of how strong bamboo was, but it turned out it was really quite strong. [00:13:12] And I said, oh, let's make a bike out of this stuff. And sure enough, uh, the bike was, uh, quite a attention getter. It got the quarter page and bicycling magazine so that, you know mission accomplished on that front. And, but the bike itself rode really well.  [00:13:29] Randall: well  [00:13:30] Craig Calfee: Um, when I wrote my first carbon bike, uh, the very first ride on my very first carbon bike, I was struck by how smooth it was. [00:13:38] It had this vibration damping that was, you know, just super noticeable and, and that really kind of lit a fire under my butt thinking, wow, this is really cool. When I built my first bamboo bike, I had that same feeling again, how smooth It was It was amazing for its vibration damping. So, uh, I knew I was onto something at that point. [00:14:02] Uh, that first bike was a little too flexy, but, uh, the second bike I built was significantly stiffer and was an actual, real rideable bike. So, uh, from that point, uh, we just started building a few here and there and it was still a novelty item until about, uh, 1999, 2000. When a few people who had been riding them, or like, I want another one, I I want to know mountain bike this time. [00:14:29] So as it was just starting to get known and, uh, we started selling them through dealers. And I mean there's a lot of stories I can tell on how that evolved and how people started actually believing that a bamboo bike could actually exist in the world. So it took a while though. [00:14:49] Randall: I think there's a whole thread that we could tug on maybe in a subsequent episode where we focus just on the bamboo bike revolution. [00:14:57] Craig Calfee: Yeah. Yeah. That's um, there's a lot of, lot of stuff going on there. I'm actually writing my second book on history of the bamboo bike, because there's so many interesting angles to it, particularly in the. [00:15:10] Randall: in Africa [00:15:12] I'm struck by the juxtaposition of this bleeding edge. Uh, you know, high-tech material that you pioneered and then this going back to one of the most basic building materials, uh, that we have building bikes out of that. And in fact, um, on the one hand, there's this, this extreme, know, difference in terms of the technology ization of each material. [00:15:34] But on the other hand, there's a parallel the sense that like carbon, in tubes is best, uh, you know, generally, uh, when it's you need to write. Yeah, with maybe some cross fibers in order to prevent, prevent it from separating. And bamboo also has that characteristic of having, you know, you need directional fibers that are bonded together by some, uh, you know, some other material in, in the, in the bamboo [00:15:58] Craig Calfee: Yeah. Yeah, it's very, there's a lot of similarities. I mean, bamboo is amazing just because it grows out of the ground and tubular for. And it grows a new, huge variety of diameters and wealth thicknesses. So if you're looking for tubing, I mean, you don't have to go much further. It's amazing that it literally grows out of the ground that way.  [00:16:20] Randall: paint [00:16:21] a picture for folks to, um, most of our listeners I'm guessing are in north America or, you know, other, uh, English-speaking parts of the world. I lived in China and as you've been, you see huge scaffolding, multi-story, you know, big buildings and the scaffolding isn't made out of metal. [00:16:37] It's made out of bamboo lashed together with zip ties and pieces of wire. So it really speaks to the, the structural, uh, strength of the material and reliability of the material. and you know, should instill confidence when descending down a mountain. [00:16:54] Craig Calfee: Oh yeah. No, it's, I, I remember seeing bamboo and scaffolding many, many years. And I thought, well, of course, and the other reason they use it in scaffolding is when a typhoon hits and it, it kind of messes up the scaffolding of a construction site. Um, it's, they're back to work on the bamboo construction sites, much faster than the metal scaffolding sites, they have to deal with bent and distorted metal scaffolding, um, to replace those and fix that takes a lot longer where bamboo, they just bend it back and lash it back together. [00:17:32] It's it's so much easier. [00:17:35] Randall: there's one more thing on this theme that I want to, uh, pull out before we move on, which is talk to me about the, the sustainability components of it. Um, starting with how it was done initially. [00:17:47] And then now with say like, uh, biodegradable resins or, or other materials I can, this frame can be current. [00:17:55] Craig Calfee: Uh, the short answer is yes, the frame can be composted. And the other cool thing is if you take care of it, it it'll never compost, meaning you can prevent it from being composted naturally. if you really want to, you know, uh, dispose of the frame, um, it will biodegrade much faster than any other material that bicycle frames are made of. [00:18:22] So yeah, the, the renewable aspect, the low energy content of it, it's, it's utterly the best you can imagine. And we're kind of waiting for the world to finally get serious about global warming and start to have some economic incentives for buying products that are in fact, uh, good for the environment. Uh, we haven't seen that yet, but we're kind of holding out and hoping that happens. [00:18:49] And then we'll see probably some significant growth in the bamboo adoption in the bicycling world. [00:18:57] Randall: I want to plant a seed that, that, uh, to germinate in my head, which is this idea of bamboos being the ideal material for kind of more mainstream, uh, utility bicycles and recreational bicycles. really it's a matter of the unit economics in economies of scale and consistency of material, which you could make uniform by having, uh, having controlled grow conditions and things like that. [00:19:23] Um, but it could be a very localized industry to anywhere where bamboo grows. this could be produced, which reduces transportation costs reduces, you know, issues of inventory carrying and all these things. Um, so let's, let's park that I want to ask you more about those, about the economics of bamboo in a side conversation to see if there's, you know, explore there. [00:19:45] Craig Calfee: well, there is. I mean, that's, that's what we did in Africa. Same concept is as why, why would bamboo work in Africa better than the imported bikes from China? So that was, that was the whole thing around that. [00:19:59] Randall: Ah, I love it. All right. So though, there will be a bamboo episode folks. Uh, we're going to, going to continue cause there's a lot of ground to cover here. so next steps you've done done the first carbon frame and the tour de France, uh, carbon frames is up and running. You've started getting into bamboo, what was next, [00:20:18] Craig Calfee: Um, then lots of smaller developments, which become really important to us from a business perspective, uh, fiber tandem, we built the first one of those. And then we went to a lateral list, tandem design, and it's pretty optimized at this point. So we're, I would say we are the leader in the tandem world in terms of the highest performance, tandem bikes, uh, and then re repairing of carbon frames. [00:20:47] That was a big one, uh, which we were kind of pushed into by customers. And other folks who heard that we could repair the Cathy frames and they would set a call up. And literally we had a, an in one inquiry per week, if not more, more often about like a colonoscopy that this guy wanted to repair and he heard we could do it on ours. [00:21:10] And we're like, well, by a Calfee don't, you know, I'm sorry, but we can't repair somebody else's frame. You'll have to buy one of ours. And then you'll know that you crash it, we can repair it for, he was trying to make that a, a a advantage for our brand, but we couldn't really, you know, do that. So, uh, we said, well, if we can't beat them, we'll repair them. [00:21:32] And we repaired a first and then some specialized, I think, after that. So we, we accepted repair jobs and pretty soon it became about a third of our, our business. And it's, uh, of course now lots of other people repair frames, but, uh, we started doing that in 2001 or something and, and we've been doing it ever since. [00:21:58] And it's, that part has been really interesting to see, because we get to literally see the inside of everyone else's frames and look at the weak points. You know, they often show up on, on people's frames and get asked to fix them or even redesign them at that point. So that's been really interesting to, to me as a technician, [00:22:21] Randall: and want to come back to this in a second, but before we lose it, what is a lateralis tandem design? [00:22:27] Craig Calfee: uh, that, so traditional tandems had a, a tube that went the head tube, usually straight back down towards the dropouts or or bottom bottom bracket. And it's, it's a way to stiffen up a frame. That's inherently not very stiffened torsion. But, uh, with composites, you can orient the fiber, uh, in torsion to make a tube significantly stiffer and torsion than say a metal tube of similar weight. [00:22:57] So we were able to go a little bit bigger diameter and more fiber in the helical angled orientation and make a tandem, uh, stiff enough and torsion and get rid of that tube. And for a carbon fiber frame, that it was really important because number of times you have to join the tube, the more expensive it is or the more labor content there is. So we were able to reduce our labor content, make the frame lighter and make it stiffer all at, in one design change. So that was a big, a big revelation. And now I most of them have copied that design. So it's, uh, it's, that's another time where we, we did something that, that, uh, now became the standard. [00:23:43] Randall: Yeah. One of many from what I've observed in a written the history. Uh, so around this time, or shortly after you started the repair business, you started doing some pretty, pretty wild frames in terms of pushing the limits of what was possible when we talk about that. [00:24:01] Craig Calfee: Yeah. Yeah, we did. We've done a lot of different types of frames, uh, mostly for show, but, um, like the north American handmade bike show is a great venue for just doing something way out of left field. Um, we did, uh, a bamboo bike made all out of small diameter, bamboo. Um, it's I only made one because it was a total pain in the ass to make. [00:24:26] Uh, and it was also kind of inspired by the, a request from a guy who was not only a fan of bamboo, but he was a fan of molten style bikes. Those are the trust style frames with small wheels. So we built one of those and. With the only small diameter bamboo, and we built another one that was, uh, a real art piece. [00:24:49] So just having fun with that from a, you know, completely artistic direction is a lot of fun for me because that's my formal training. I went to art school and learned about different materials and, and art and composition. Uh, and I was into the structure of materials and how they, they relate to each other. [00:25:12] And my art was more of a forum file form follows function, kind of inspiration. And, uh, so some bikes that I've made were, are not terribly practical, but just explore the, the limits of structure. So another bike I made, uh, we call it the spider web bike, which was literally a, a bike made of just carbon fiber strands. [00:25:36] No tubes. And it, it was kind of wild looking and a collector ended up buying it, which is really cool. But you look at this thing and you just couldn't imagine that it, it, you could actually ride it, but, uh, it actually does ride fairly well. It's a bit fragile if you crash it, it would be kind of dangerous, but you know, stuff like that. [00:25:55] I like to do that occasionally. [00:25:59] Randall: I think of, uh, like biomorphic design or like hyper optimized design that maybe doesn't have the resiliency, but very strict parameters will perform higher than anything else that you could, you could create. [00:26:12] Craig Calfee: absolutely. Yeah. Those are really fun. I'm really inspired by natural forms and, uh, you know, the, the, some of the new computer aided techniques we're designing are, uh, rattled in those lines. so, yeah, I follow that pretty closely. [00:26:28] Randall: a little sidebar. Um, I don't know if you've, uh, no of, uh, Nick Taylor, the guy who created the, Ibis Maximus in front of the mountain bike hall of fame. [00:26:40] Craig Calfee: Um, no, I don't think so. [00:26:43] Randall: I'll introduce you to his work at some point, but he's another one of these people who, very avid cyclist is not in the bike industry, but is. There's a lot of trail building and alike and isn't is a sculptor really focused on, the form of, uh, you know, biological shapes and materials and, and things of this sort. [00:27:02] Uh, I think that there's a lot, uh, I'm actually curious more into your, your non bike artistic work for a moment. Uh, and, and how that got infused into your work with the bike. [00:27:18] Craig Calfee: yeah, so I haven't done a lot of, you know, just pure, fine art sculpture in a long time. But when I was doing that, it was. a lot of things that would fool the eye or, um, some material and, and push it to its limit. So I was doing stuff that was, um, uh, you know, trying to create a, almost like a physical illusion, not just an optical illusion, but a, but a physical illusion or like, how could you possibly do that kind of thing? [00:27:54] And that was a theme of my sculpture shortly after Pratt. So for example, just take one example of a sculpture that I got a lot of credit for in classes at Pratt, it was a, a big block of Oak. It was a cutoff from a woodworking shop. It's about a foot in, let's say a foot cube of Oak. And I would, um, so I, I, uh, raised the grain on it with a wire brush and then I blocked printed on Oak tag page. [00:28:26] Um, some black ink on rolled onto the Oak block and made a river, basically a print off of each face of the, of the block. And then I carefully taped that paper together to simulate a paper block of the Oak chunk that I I had. now I had a super light paper version of the Oak block. And then I hung them on a balance beam, which I forged at a steel, but the hanging point was way close to the piece. [00:28:57] And if you looked at it from three feet away, just, your brain would, just hurting because you couldn't figure out how is this even possible? And because it really looked amazing, super hyper real. Anyway, it just looked amazing and it was fun to get the effect of how the hell did that. Did he do that? [00:29:18] What's what's the trick here. There's something going on. That's not real. Or it's. Uh it's not physically possible. And I kind of got that feeling with the carbon fiber bike. When we, when we built the first bike, everyone would pick it up and go, oh, that's just too light. It's not even a bike. It's a plastic bike it's going to break instantly. [00:29:39] So that was sort of a relation from, from those days to the, to the bike. [00:29:44] Randall: You ever come across Douglas Hofstadter's book, Godel, Escher Bach. [00:29:49] Craig Calfee: No, but I'd be interested to read it. [00:29:51] Randall: Definite short Lister. Um, uh, you've come across MC Escher, of Yeah. And are there any parallels or any inspiration there? [00:30:01] Craig Calfee: Um, not very direct, I'd say. Um, [00:30:08] Who  [00:30:08] Randall: your, who your inspirations or what, what would you say your creative energy is most similar to? [00:30:14] Craig Calfee: I'd probably, I'd say say Buckminster fuller. [00:30:17] Randall: Mm, [00:30:17] Craig Calfee: Yeah. I mean, I studied his work in depth, you know, not only the geodesic dome stuff, but also his vehicles, the dime on vehicle the, yeah. So there's, there's a bunch of stuff that he was involved with that I'd say, I'm parallel with as far as my interest goes, [00:30:37] Randall: what books should I read? [00:30:39] Craig Calfee: all of them. [00:30:42] Randall: Where do I start? If I have limited [00:30:44] time  [00:30:45] Craig Calfee: Yeah. It's a tough one. He's actually really difficult to read too. His writing is not that great. I pretty much look at his, uh, his design work more than His writing [00:30:56] Randall: Okay. So who's book whose book about Buckminster fuller. Should I read? [00:31:01] Craig Calfee: good question. I'll, I'll catch up with you on that later because there's few of them that they're worth. It's worth a look. [00:31:07] Randall: awesome. Awesome. Awesome. Um, let's talk about 2001. you're a dragon fly. [00:31:15] Craig Calfee: Yeah, the dragon fly was an interesting project. It was so Greg Lamanda had asked me, like, I want an even lighter bike. He was constantly pushing on the technology. And I said, well, there are some really expensive fibers that are starting to become available, but, um, you know, this would be a $10,000 bike frame and, you know, it's only going to be a half a pound lighter. [00:31:40] And he said, well, I don't care. I just, you know, I w I need it for racing. I mean, um, you know, when, when I'm climbing Alpe d'Huez with Miguel Indurain and if he's got a lighter bike than I do, then I'm just going to give up, you know, in terms of the effort. So he needs to have that technical advantage, or at least be on the same plane. [00:32:02] So the reason why he'd spend, you know, $5,000 for a half a pound, a weight savings was pretty, pretty real. So, but it took until about 2000, 2001 after he had long retired to, um, really make that happen. So the fibers I was talking about are really high modulus fiber that was very fragile, too brittle, really for any use. [00:32:29] So we came up with a way to integrate it with, um, boron fiber. Uh, it actually was a material we found, uh, special specialty composites out of, uh, out of Rhode Island. Uh, they, uh, do this co-mingled boron and carbon fiber, uh, hybrid material, which was, um, they were looking for a use cases for it and the bicycle was one of them. [00:32:58] So, uh, we built a prototype with their material and it turned out. To be not only really light and really strong, the, the boron made it really tough. So carbon fiber has, uh, the highest stiffness to weight ratio, intention of any material you can use. boron is the highest stiffness to weight ratio in compression as a, as a fibrous material that you can integrate into a composite. So when you mix them, you now have a combination of materials, that are unbeatable. [00:33:35] Randall: Like a concrete and rebar almost, or, quite. [00:33:40] Craig Calfee: I'd say that's a good, um, for composites in general, but now we're talking about the extreme edge of, of performance, where, um, looking at the, most high performance material certain conditions, versus tension. These, these are conditions that are existing in a bicycle tube all the time. [00:34:07] So one side of the tube is compressing while the other side is intention as you twist the bike, uh, and then it reverses on the, on the pedal stroke. So it has to do both now. Carbon fiber is quite good at that, but compression it suffers. And that's why you can't go very thin wall and make it, um, withstand any kind of impact because it's, it's got a weakness in it's, um, compressive. So, uh, it's, uh, it doesn't take a break very well either. So boron on, the other hand does take a break very well, and it's incredibly high compressive strength to weight ratio and compressive stiffness to weight ratio. are two different things by the way. So when you combine those into a tube, it's pretty amazing. [00:34:57] Uh, they're just really quite expensive. So we came up with the dragon fly, um, in 2001 and it was at the time the lightest production bike yet it also had the toughness of a normal frame. And that's that's right around when the Scott came out, which was a super thin wall, large diameter, uh, carbon frame that was really fragile. [00:35:23] Um, so that was sort of a similar weight, but not nearly as tough as, uh, the dragon fly. [00:35:34] Randall: For well, to go a little bit deeper on this. So what is the nature like? What is the nature of the boron? Is it a, like, is it a molecule? Is it a filament? So you have, you have carbon filaments is the boron, um, you know, is that, are you putting it into the resin? How is it? Co-mingled. [00:35:51] Craig Calfee: It's a, it's a filament, basically a super thin wire. [00:35:56] Randall: You're essentially co-mingling it in when you're creating the tubes and then using the same resin to bond the entire structure together. [00:36:04] Craig Calfee: That's right. [00:36:05] Randall: Got it. And this, so then this is, uh, if you were to add then say like to the resin separately, it would be a compounding effect. Um, I don't know if you have, uh, mean, I assume you've done some stuff with graphene. [00:36:19] Craig Calfee: Yeah. Graphing graphing is a really great material. It does improve the toughness of composites. Uh, it's again, also very expensive to use, uh, in a whole two. Usually it's used in smaller components, uh, not so much on the whole frame, uh, and it, and it's, um, it's best, uh, uses in preventing the of cracking. [00:36:46] So it stops the micro cracking that starts with a failure mode. And that that's a great, thing. But if your laminate is too thin to begin with that, all the graphing in the world, isn't going to help you. So for really minor wax it'll help, but for anything substantial, it's going to break anyway. [00:37:08] So you have to start out with a thick enough laminate get the toughness that you're looking for. Uh, graphene is really great for highly stressed areas, which might start cracking from, uh, fatigue or just the design flaw of a stress concentration. So it's got a number of purposes. Uh, it's great for, uh, like pinch clamp areas, you know, places where the mechanical, uh, stress is so high on a, on a very localized area. [00:37:37] Um, so yeah, graphene is wonderful. We didn't get into it too much because, um, it's just, it would just, wasn't practical for our applications and how we make the frames, but, uh, some companies have started using graphene and it's, it's pretty interesting stuff. [00:37:52] Randall: We did some experimentation with it early on in our looking at it for the future. my understanding is. You know, I haven't gone too deep into like the intermolecular physics, but it's essentially like you have a piece of paper and if you start tearing the paper that tear will propagate very easily. [00:38:09] then the graphene is almost like little tiny pieces of tape. Randomly distributed, evenly distributed across the material that makes it so that that fracture can no longer propagate in that direction. And it has to change direction where it bumps into another graphene molecule and the graphing, essentially when we tested it was doubling the bond strength of the resin. [00:38:30] So in terms of pulling apart different layers of laminate, then, um, increasing the toughness of say, uh, a rim made with the exact same laminate in the exact same resin with, 1% graphene per mass of resin increasing the toughness of that rim structure by 20%. [00:38:50] Which is pretty [00:38:50] Craig Calfee: That's correct. [00:38:51] Randall: The challenges that is that it lowers the temperature, uh, the, the glass suffocation points resin. so, you know, a rim is like, you know, there are, if you're gonna put it on the back of your car, you know, that's not a normal use case when you're riding, but, you know, it's, it's something that just makes it less resilient to those towards sorts of, you know, people put on the back of the car too close to the exhaust and they melt the rim. [00:39:17] So we're having to experiment with some high temperature residents that have other issues. [00:39:22] Craig Calfee: Oh, yeah. Yeah. That's rims are a great place for graphing, just cause they're in a a place where you'll have some impacts, but yeah. Temperature management is an issue. Um, yeah, that's the high temperature residents are, are another area that, that, uh, we're experimenting in, uh, wrapping electric motor, uh, rotors with, with a high temperature resonant carbon wrap. [00:39:46] that's a whole nother area, but I'm familiar with that stuff. [00:39:49] Randall: Which we'll get into in a second, park park, that one. Cause that's a fun theme. yeah. And I'm just thinking about a rim structure. It seems like boron on the inside graphing on the outside, um, deal with high compressive forces between the spokes and then the high impact forces on the external, will  [00:40:07] Craig Calfee: the material we use is called high bore. You can look that up. H Y B O R and there they're actually coming back with new marketing efforts there. They, I think the company got sold and then, um, the new buyers are, are re revisiting how to, to spread the use of it. So might be real interested in supporting a rim project. [00:40:30] Randall: mm. Uh, to be continued offline. Um, all right. So then we've got your carbon fiber repair surface. We talked about the dragon fly. Um, it's a great segue into engineering and design philosophy. let's talk about that [00:40:47] Craig Calfee: Yeah. Um, well it's, to me, it's all about form follows function and, uh, when something works so well, functionally, it's gonna look good. That's uh, that's why trees look great just by themselves, uh, that that's, you know, coming back to the natural world, you know, that's why we have a Nautilus shell for, uh, for our logo. [00:41:12] It's the form follows function. Aspect of that just makes it look beautiful. For some reason, you look at something from nature, you don't really know why is it beautiful? Well, the reason is the way it's structured, the way it's evolved over millions of years. Has resulted in the optimum structure. So for me, as a, as a human being artificially trying to recreate stuff, that's been evolved in nature. [00:41:39] Um, I look closely at how nature does it first and then I'll apply it to whatever I'm dealing with at the moment. And so that's how I, that's how I design stuff. [00:41:50] Randall: there's a, the Nautilus shell example, like, you know, the golden ratio and the way that, really complex systems tend to evolve towards very simple, fundamental, primitives of all design [00:42:04] Craig Calfee: Yeah. Yep. Yeah. There's some basic stuff that, that seemed to apply everywhere. [00:42:10] Randall: So with your carbon fiber repair service, so you started to see some of the problems with that were emerging with these, um, large tube thin wall designs that were being used to achieve a high strength or sorry, a high stiffness to weight, but then compromising in other areas. [00:42:28] So let's talk about that. [00:42:30] Craig Calfee: Yeah, it's um, you know, designing a carbon fiber bike is actually really quite difficult. There's so much going on. There's so many, uh, things you have to deal with high stress areas that you can't really get around. there's a lot of constraints to designing a good bicycle frame. Um, and then you're dealing with the tradition of, of how people clamp things on bikes, you know, stem, clamps, and seed post clamps, and, uh, you know, th that type of mentality. [00:43:04] It's still with us with the carbon, which is carbon doesn't do well with. So a lot of companies struggle with that and they'll come up with something on paper or in their CAD model. And their finite element analysis sort of works, but, and then they go into the real world and they have to deal with real situations that they couldn't predict in the, the computer. [00:43:29] And they get a problem with, uh, you know, a minor handlebar whacking, the top tube situation, which shouldn't really cause your bike to become dangerous. But in fact, that's what happens. So you've got, um, you know, uh, weak points or vulnerabilities in these really light frame. And if you're not expected to know what the vulnerability is as an end-user and you don't know that if you wack part of the bike and in a minor way that you normally wouldn't expect to cause the frame to become a weak, then the whole design is a question. So you have to consider all these things when you decide to bike. And a lot of companies have just depended on the computer and they are finite element analysis too, to come up with shapes and designs that, uh, are inherently weak. And, um, people get pretty disappointed when they're, when the minor is to of incidents causes a crack in the frame. [00:44:37] And if they keep riding the bike, the crack gets bigger. And then one day, you know, I mean, most people decide to have it fixed before it gets to be a catastrophic but, uh, you know, it gets expensive and, uh, You know, it's, sad. Actually, another motivation for getting into the repair business was to save the reputation of carbon fiber as a frame material. [00:45:03] You know, these types of things don't happen to thin wall titanium frames. You know, a thin wall titanium frame will actually withstand a whole lot more abuse than a thin wall carbon frame. So it's just hard to make diameter thin wall titanium frames that are stiff enough and not without problems of welding, you know, the heat affected zones. [00:45:26] So carbon fiber is, is a better material because it's so much easier to join and to, to mold. But if you, you have to design it properly to, to withstand normal abuse. And if you're not going to do that, then there should at least be a repair service available to keep those bikes from going to the landfill. [00:45:45] So frequent. And so that's what we do we, we offer that and we even train people how to carbon repair service. So that's, um, that's something we've done in order to keep bikes from just getting thrown away. [00:46:01] Randall: uh, I think I've shared with you, I'm in the midst of, uh, doing, uh, uh, a pretty radical ground up design, which is way off in the future. So I'll be picking your brain on that, but it immediately makes me think of the inherent. Compromises of current frame design and manufacturing techniques, including on our frame. [00:46:20] And in our case, the way we've addressed that is through not going with lower modulates carbon, you know, S T 700, maybe some T 800 in the frame, then overbuilding it order to have resiliency against impacts. But then also these sorts of, um, micro voids in other imperfections that are in inherent process of any, uh, manufacturing, uh, system that involves handling of materials in a complex, you know, eight, uh, sorry, 250 a piece, you know, layup like there's, this there's even that like human elements that you have to design a whole bunch of fudge factor into to make sure that when mistakes are made, not if, but when mistakes are made, that there's so much, uh, overbuilding that they don't end up in a catastrophic failure. [00:47:10] Craig Calfee: that's right. Yeah. Yeah. You have to have some safety margin. [00:47:15] Randall: And the Manderal spinning process that you were describing essentially eliminates a lot of that in you're starting to see, I mean, with rims, that's the direction that rims are going in, everything is going to be automated, is going to be knit like a sock and frames are a much more complex shape. Um, but you're starting to see, uh, actually probably know a lot more about the, the automation of frame design than I do. [00:47:35] Um, what do you see? Like as the, as the end point, at least with regards to the, um, like filament based carbon fiber material and frames, like where could it go with technology? [00:47:50] Craig Calfee: the, the, um, robotics are getting super advanced now and there's this technique called, um, uh, they just call it fiber placements or automated fiber placement, which is a fancy word for a robot arm, winding fiber, you know, on a mandrel or shape, uh, and then compressing that and, uh, know, molding that. [00:48:14] So it's, it's where your, a robot will orient a single filament of carbon fiber. Uh, continuously all around the, uh, the shape that you're trying to make. They do that in aerospace now for a really expensive rockets and satellite parts, but the technology is getting more accessible and, uh, so robotic trimmers are another one. [00:48:42] So we're, in fact, we're getting ready to build our own robotic arm tremor for a resin transfer, molded parts. That's where the edge of the part that you mold gets trimmed very carefully with a router. And, but imagine instead of just a router trimming an edge, you've got a robot arm with a spool of fiber on it, wrapping the fiber individually around the whole structure of the frame. [00:49:10] Uh, no, no people involved just, you know, someone to turn the machine on and then turn it off again. So that's kind of coming that that is a future. Uh, it hasn't arrived yet, certainly, maybe for simpler parts, but a frame is a very complex shape. So it'll take a while before they can get to that point. [00:49:30] Randall: It having to, yeah. Being able to Uh, spin a frame in one piece is, seems to be the ultimate end game. [00:49:43] Craig Calfee: Yeah. I think we need to, I think the, the, uh, genetically modified spiders would be a better way to [00:49:50] go  [00:49:50] Randall: Yeah, they might, they might help us the design process. [00:49:56] Craig Calfee: Yeah. Yeah. Just give them some good incentives and they'll, they'll make you set a really incredibly strong, you know, spider wound. [00:50:05] Randall: Well, it does. It speaks to the, the, the biggest challenge I see with that, which is you have to go around shape. so if you're going through a frame, like it's essentially the triangle. And so you need some way to like hand off the, the S the filament carrier from one side to the other constantly. [00:50:27] you'd just be able to spin it. You know, it would be pretty straightforward. So maybe the frame comes in a couple of different sections that get bonded, but then those don't form a ring. And so you can, you know, you can move them around instead of the machine order [00:50:41] Craig Calfee: Well, there's these things called grippers. So the robot grip sit and then another arm grip know let's go and the other arm picks it up. And then there's like in weaving, there's this thing called the flying shuttle, which invented. That's where the shuttle that, the war [00:50:59] Randall: Your ancestors were involved with flying shuttle. [00:51:02] Craig Calfee: Yeah. [00:51:02] Randall: That's one of the, uh, all right. That's, that's a whole other conversation. [00:51:07] Craig Calfee: Yeah, a really interesting, I mean, it's the Draper corporation. If you want to look it up, [00:51:13] um  [00:51:13] Randall: I  [00:51:13] Craig Calfee: know [00:51:14] they were the manufacturing made the looms back in the industrial revolution in the Northeast [00:51:21] Randall: I'm sitting currently in Waltham, which was one of the first mill cities, um, not from Lowell. [00:51:28] Craig Calfee: Yeah. So all those mills were where our customers and they would buy the Draper looms. Um, and they were automated looms with a flying shuttle was a big deal Uh back then. And so they, they made a lot of, of those looms and, and that's basically what sent me to college with a trust fund. So [00:51:49] Randall: You're a trust fund, baby. [00:51:51] Craig Calfee: Yep. [00:51:51] Yep [00:51:53] From vendors. [00:51:55] Uh [00:51:56] but that's yeah, that's the world I, I came out of. And, so the, the idea of taking a spool of material and handing it off as you wrap around something is really not that difficult. [00:52:08] Randall: Okay. So then you can do it in a way that is resilient to probably 10,000 handoffs over the course of weaving a frame and you can expect that it's not going to fail once. [00:52:19] Craig Calfee: That's right Yeah [00:52:20] It  [00:52:20] Randall: All then that, that's [00:52:22] Craig Calfee: the hard part, the hard part is dealing with the resin and the, and the, uh, forming and the getting a nice surface finish. That was where the harder. [00:52:31] Randall: Yeah. And, uh, uh, I'm thinking about, uh, space X's attempts to create a giant, uh, carbon fiber, uh, fuel tank. And they actually had to do the, um, the heating the resin at the point of, uh, depositing of the filaments. [00:52:52] And [00:52:52] you know, that's a really challenging process because you can't build an autoclave big enough to contain a fuel tank for a giant rocket bicycles don't have that issue, but [00:53:01] Craig Calfee: right. Yeah. The filament winding technique, which is how all those tanks are made is, is pretty amazing in the large scale of those, those big rockets is phenomenal. I mean, a couple of places in Utah that make those, and it's just seeing such a large things spinning and, uh, wrapping around it rapidly is quite inspiring. [00:53:26] Randall: Yeah. It's very, very cool stuff. And that's, again, a whole another thread about the, uh, the Utah based, uh, composites industry that got its start in aerospace, you know, advanced aerospace applications, which NV and others came out of. They used to be edge which you worked with. NBU designed their tubes early on. [00:53:43] Right. [00:53:44] Craig Calfee: W well, yeah, the poles history behind envy and quality composites back in late eighties, literally, uh, when I first came out to, uh, actually I was still, think I ordered them in Massachusetts and took delivery in California, but it was a quality composites and out of Utah, uh, Nancy Polish was the owner of that. [00:54:06] Also an MIT graduate who, um, who started a roll wrapping carbon fiber in tubular forum. And I'm pretty sure we were the first roll wrapped carbon tubes, uh, for bicycles that she made. And, um Uh, evolved to, uh, edge composites. So they, so quality composites became McClain quality composites, and then McLean, the guys who broke away from that went to start envy or edge, I guess, which became envy. [00:54:40] So yeah, those same guys brought that technology and we've been the customer ever since. And now there's yet another spinoff. The guys who were making the tubes at envy spun off and started their own company, uh, in a cooperative venture with envy. So let them go basically. And, uh, we're working with those guys. [00:55:01] So it's just following the, the top level of expertise. [00:55:06] Randall: very interesting stuff. Um, so, so where else do we go in terms of the, I mean, this is about as deep a composite deep nerdery, as we can get in, into composites and so on. And, uh, given that we're already here, we might as just, you know, dig ourselves deeper. [00:55:25] Craig Calfee: Yeah. Um, sir, just on the roll wrapping, the thing that, um, I remember one of the cool innovations that Nancy came up with was the double D section, um, tube where she would roll wrap two D shaped tubes, stick them together and do an outer wrap on the outside. So it was a efficient way to do a ribbed tube or a single ribs through the middle. She pretty much invented.  [00:55:53] Uh, we started doing something with that, um, change days, uh, to get more stiffness out of a change day. But, um, I just, some reason that image flashed in my mind about some of the innovative stuff that been going on that people don't really see it's. And that's what I'm saying before where the, uh, technology of composites has, um it's got a long way to go and it's, there's all kinds of stuff going on that are, are, is brand new. [00:56:23] Uh, most people people don't see it cause it's all process oriented more than product oriented. But for guys like me, it's really fast. [00:56:34] Randall: Yeah, it reminds me of, um, a technology owned by a Taiwanese carbon frame manufacturing, pretty large-scale tier one that I'd spoken to where they're doing, uh, that bracing inside of the forks. don't think they're doing anything especially advanced in terms of how it's manufactured. [00:56:54] I think they just have a, uh, the, the inner, um, you know, whether it's a bag or it's a, you know, EPS insert. And then they're just bridging, uh, between the two walls of the, uh, of the tube of the, the fork leg, uh, with another piece of carbon that gives it more lateral structure zero, uh, impact on the, um, for AFT compliance, which is a really technique. [00:57:21] Craig Calfee: that sounds like Steve Lee at [00:57:24] Randall: Uh, this was YMA. [00:57:27] Craig Calfee: Oh, okay. [00:57:28] Randall: Yeah, the gigantic folks. I haven't, I don't know if I've interacted with them yet, but, um, but yeah, well, [00:57:35] Craig Calfee: Yeah, some amazing innovation coming out of Taiwan. They're there. They're so deep into it. It's, it's a fun place to go and, and see what they're up to. [00:57:47] Randall: this actually brings me back to, um, I, I did had a conversation with over with Russ at path, less pedaled, and was asking like, you know, tell me about the quality of stuff made, made over in Asia. And I was like, well, you know, it's generally best to work with their production engineers because they're so close to the actual manufacturing techniques and they're the ones innovating on those techniques. [00:58:10] And in fact, um, you know, even specialized up until recently did not do carbon fiber in. outsource that, you know, they, they do some of the work in house, but then the actual design for manufacture and all that is being done by the factories and rightfully so the factories know it better, being close to the ground though, dealing with someone with yourself, you're someone who could go into a factory and be like, okay, let's, let's innovate on this. [00:58:35] Craig Calfee: Yeah.  [00:58:36] Yeah.  [00:58:37] Randall: so then 2011, um, first production, gravel bike. [00:58:45] Craig Calfee: Uh, yeah. Yeah. We came up with the, uh, adventure bike, we call it, um, it was also the first one that did the, uh, six 50 B uh, tire size that can be used with a 700 by 42 or So mixing, know, going bigger tire on a slightly smaller rim on the same bike as you'd run a 700 C and, uh, 35 or 40 millimeter tire. Um, yeah, so the adventure bike has been. Uh, a real fun area for us as far as, uh, just developing a, do everything. Be everything, bike [00:59:24] Randall: it's. And the geometry of that was kind of an endurance road geometry, right [00:59:28] Craig Calfee: that's [00:59:29] right. It's a road bike effectively, but with a few, a few, uh, tweaks for riding off road. [00:59:36] Randall: So then this, this word, gravel bike is kind of muddled. [00:59:39] Um, I never liked it, frankly. Uh, it's a marketing term. I remember it specialized when we were doing the, the diverse, um, you know, it was still kind of honing in on what these bikes were. Uh, but you could argue that like, you know, you know, everyone's road bike was a gravel bike. When you just put the biggest tires that would fit and write it on dirt. [00:59:57] But this concept of a one bike, it seems to be what you've planted. But you can have a single bike that will be your road, bike, perform handle, give you that, that experience when you put road wheels on, but then you can put these big six fifties on there and have a, you know, an off-road crit machine that is highly competent in, in rough terrain. [01:00:16] And so, so yeah, that, and that's very much my design philosophy as you know, as well, you know, fewer bikes that do more things. [01:00:24] Craig Calfee: Yeah. We have this. Kind of a marketing phrase for, you know, how the end plus one concept where, you know, how many bikes do you even need? Well, one more than what you've got. Well, we do the N minus one concept with our mountain bike, which can also be a gravel by ache or a bike, but it's, uh, it allows you to change the head tube angle and, and use different, uh, fork travel suspension forks on, on the same frame. [01:00:55] Uh, and of course, swapping wheels out is, is always a thing. So yeah, the end minus one concept where we just need less stuff, you know, [01:01:04] Randall: So I reinvented that when I started thesis, he used to say like, and, minus three, it replaces road, bike, your gravel bike, your road, bike, your cross bike, your, um, light duty cross country bike, uh, your adventure bike actually as well, you know, load these things up. yeah, very much a philosophy that, uh, I think it's so good that the, its efforts to come up with new, subcategories, for example, by having gravel bikes now run oversize 700 wheels and extending the geo and going with these really slack head angles in order to accommodate that wheel size. [01:01:40] I actually think that the form, the form that things want to evolve towards is actually what you created in the first place, which is the one bike that does all the things and does them well. And depending on the wheels you put on them, um, we'll do we'll, we'll transform. Uh, and you know, we've, we've talked a little bit about geo changing, um, You know, and things like this, which you have a bike that, that does that. [01:02:03] And why don't we talk a bit about that in the technology behind it? [01:02:08] Craig Calfee: The SFL, you mean we use the geometry of the head tube and the bottom bracket to, uh, to accommodate what you're using it for? Yeah, the concept there is to, if you're on a long ride to be able to change the geometry of your bike mid ride. So with an Allen wrench, you, uh, basically swap these flip plates out on your head to varia. [01:02:32] And so you climb, you can climb with one geometry with another. And to me, that's, that's really fun because the climbing, you, if you're climbing up a a long steep climb on a bike that you're going to descend back down on, uh, you really don't want the same geometry it's, you're compromising and one or the other, either climate. [01:02:55] Or it descends great. It's rarely both, or really can't possibly be both. Cause they're just doing two different things. So if you can swap out these flip plates and change the head tube angle, which is really all you need at that point, um, you have a bike that climbs great and descends. Great. So for me, that was the goal of, uh, just making a better mountain bike. Um, you know, the fact that it can be converted into other bikes for different disciplines is a whole nother angle. Uh, and you can even do that perhaps you wouldn't do it the trail, but let's say you show up, say you're on a trip, an adventure, uh, maybe out to Utah, for example, where you're riding slick rock, but you're also going to go up, you know, into the mountains. [01:03:45] Um, you'll have you, you might want to have. Different fork travels or different for, uh, options. So you can bring a couple of different forks and swap out a fork, change your flip plates and have a bike. That's awesome for slick rock. And then another one that's awesome for, for the bike parks. So, you know, to me it would, but it's only one bike and you know, you don't need, you know, three bikes. So that, that just, uh, that's the design result of a bike where you can change the head tube angle on, [01:04:21] Randall: and the, in really how much head tube angle adjustment is there on there. [01:04:25] Craig Calfee: uh, it's a or minus four degrees [01:04:28] Randall: that's, that's substantial. [01:04:30] Craig Calfee: that's a lot. [01:04:31] Randall: Yeah. [01:04:31] I mean, that's transformative really. I work in increments of, you know, half a degree.  [01:04:36] Craig Calfee: Yeah. These are half degree increments, um, right now, uh, one degree, but we can easily do half degree increments. find that one degree is, is really. Um, especially when you have the option of, of tweaking the same bike. So reason we focus on these half degree increments on a production bike is to dial in the best compromise between two, two ways that it's going to be used when you don't need to compromise, you can go a full degree in the other direction and not worry about fact that it's not going to perform as well, know, in super steep terrain because that flipped chip is not, uh, the right one for the super steep scenario. [01:05:22] Just change it out or flip it over a T when you approach the really steep stuff. So yeah. [01:05:29] Randall: applicable for mountain bikes, particularly because the, I mean, the slack, the long slack that, that have emerged in recent years make a ton of sense for mountain biking, especially descending, but when you're ascending, it ends up being so slack that you get wheel flop, you get the front end, lifting the bike naturally wants to tilt back. [01:05:49] You don't have that on a gravel bike currently. And if you don't, if you're not adding a huge suspension fork, you're never going to be descending terrain that is so technical that you need those slacked out angles. So it sounds like something that's very much could be applied to gravel bikes, but that, you know, for the mountain bike application is actually pretty game-changing. [01:06:06] Craig Calfee: Yeah, well on gravel bikes or adventure bikes, um, uh, it's actually helpful if you're, if you're, let's say you're a roadie and you're starting to go off road. And so you're driving these gravel trails and then you're starting to get into more interesting off-road excursions with that same bike, but your experience on steep terrain is limited because you're, you know, you're a roadie, you've your, all your muscle memory and all your bike handling memory comes from the road and a little bit of dirt road stuff. [01:06:39] Now you're kind of getting into serious off-road stuff and you want to try. a Uh, shortcut dissent, uh, you know, down something kind of crazy. Uh, let's say, uh, you're not very good at it in the beginning and you take your time and you, you don't have a bike that can go that fast down, such a trail, then you change it out. [01:07:00] As you get better at it, as you increase your skill level and your confidence level, might want to go a little faster. So you a bike that can go a little faster safely and go for that slack head angle, which is designed to get higher speed. So it's great for evolving skills and evolving terrain as you start exploring more radical stuff. [01:07:27] So that's the other reason to do it. [01:07:29] Randall: Yeah, that makes, that makes a lot of sense. And in fact, any, you know, what I'm working on going forward very much as a, uh, one of the core, you know, is, uh, being able to tailor the geometry, um, as close to on the fly as possible. Uh, you know, if you want it to be on the fly, you're going to add a huge amount of added structure and complexity and weight, but having it be when you swap the wheels, there's very little to do, you know, this sort of thing. [01:07:57] Craig Calfee: Yeah. So yeah, the whole idea is to, is to be able to go and have really fun adventures after all I wrote the book on adventures, see, here's, uh, this is a, this is the commercial part of our, our, uh, [01:08:10] plug [01:08:12] is, uh, this book I wrote about a trip. I took back in the, in the mid early eighties. Uh it's it's a kind of a. [01:08:20] Randall: of a  [01:08:21] Craig Calfee: It has nothing to do with bikes, except that there is a section in there where I made a canteen out of bamboo in the Congo, but it's a pretty crazy trip. And, uh, and I just called it adventures. It's on amp. anyone wants to buy it. [01:08:37] Randall: I will get a coffee. [01:08:39] Craig Calfee: Yeah. [01:08:42] Randall: Um, very, very cool. Um, we skipped over one, which is the manta, which is another interesting innovation [01:08:51] Craig Calfee: Yeah. Suspension on a road bike. I mean, that's a, I keep saying that's going to be the future and it hasn't happened yet, but I, I still believe that road bikes will be the main type of bike being written in the highest levels of racing. [01:09:08] interesting  [01:09:08] Randall: So you think suspension versus say. Um, wide tubeless, aerodynamic, the optimized rims with a 30 mil tire run at lower pressures. You think the suspension has a sufficient benefit relative to that, to offset say the structural complexity or weight? [01:09:25] Craig Calfee: Yes. So, uh, the big tire thing, trend towards bigger tires is really a trend towards suspension. It's pneumatic suspension rather than mechanical suspension. [01:09:39] Randall: Well, as our regular listeners know, this is a topic that's very much near and dear to my heart. I talk often about the benefits of pneumatic suspension, so this will be an interesting place for us to st

CBS This Morning - News on the Go
1/11: Number of kids with COVID hits all-time high as parents and teachers struggle with surge. Northeast braces for dangerously cold weather.

CBS This Morning - News on the Go

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 14:37


The number of kids with COVID hits an all-time high -- as parents and teachers struggle with the surge. More than 142,000 americans were in hospitals as of Sunday with the coronavirus, according to the federal government -- the vast majority unvaccinated. The American Academy of Pediatrics says more than 580,000 children tested positive for the virus last week -- also an all-time high. More than 10 million people in the Northeast are waking up to dangerously cold weather. Boston's high temperature today is expected to be just 12 degrees, forcing the city to close its schools due to the extreme cold. This morning, Russia's government said it would not let talks with U.S. officials drag on. The U.S. is trying to prevent a possible invasion of Ukraine, a Russian neighbor and U.S. ally. President Biden and Vice President Harris are headed to Atlanta today -- to focus on voting rights. Robert Durst, the millionaire who spent half his life as a murder suspect, died yesterday. He was 78. Turning overseas again -- North Korea fired what's believed to be its second ballistic missile in less than a week, just after the U.S. and other countries warned about its quote "destabilizing actions." Georgia fans are celebrating after the Bulldogs won their first title in 41 years, beating Alabama 33 to 18 last night.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Denver Real Estate Investing Podcast
#335: Commercial Listing: Turnkey 41- Unit Apartment Building in Northeast Denver

Denver Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 13:14


Brandon Kaufman, of Kaufman Hagan Commercial Real Estate, joins me to talk about a 41-unit apartment building for sale in Denver. This is a rare opportunity to buy an asset in Denver that will cashflow. Watch the episode to hear all the details.

TODAY
January 11: Arctic blast in Midwest and Northeast. FAA issues ground stop at the same time North Korea launched a missile test. New details on Bob Saget's death.

TODAY

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 31:45


Millions are waking up to dangerously low temperatures and wind chills in the Midwest and Northeast — Al Roker has everything you need to know. Plus breaking overnight: all flights on the West Coast temporarily grounded by the FAA at the same time North Korea fired off a missile test. Also, new details and the latest reaction on Bob Saget's sudden death — Savannah Guthrie speaks with his close friend and touring partner Mike Young.

Molecule to Market: Inside the outsourcing space
The UK's hidden life science gem

Molecule to Market: Inside the outsourcing space

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 28:22


In this episode of Molecule to Market, you'll go inside the outsourcing space of the global drug development sector with Michelle Duggan, Inward Investment Manager, Invest North East England. Your host, Raman Sehgal, discusses the pharmaceutical and biotechnology supply chain with Michelle, covering: Why is North East England becoming a UK hot spot for Health and Life Sciences. Collaborating and breaking down barriers to help create a super cluster of life sciences. The academic and industrial heartbeat that makes the region so attractive to CDMOs and major supply chain players. Michelle Duggan has been an inward investment manager at invest North East England since January 2021. In 2016 to 2020 she was previously appointed as Partnership manager of Newcastle University where she was responsible for cultivating and maintaining relationships among business partners.    Her devotion to the North East is unmatched across her extensive career. With her other previous position as economic advisor at North East Local Enterprise Partnership she helped place where businesses invest, grow and prosper - delivering more and better jobs for everyone.   Please subscribe, tell your industry colleagues and join us in celebrating and promoting the value and importance of the global life science outsourcing space. We'd also appreciate a positive rating!   Molecule to Market is funded by ramarketing. An international content, design and digital agency that helps companies in life sciences get noticed.   We are also proudly supported by Zymewire, which is the leader in actionable sales intelligence for life science Business development professionals. In fact, thousands of life science BD professionals start their day with sales signals from Zymewire. Learn more at tryzymewire.com

Gill Athletics: Track and Field Connections
#137: Latif Thomas-Complete Track and Field

Gill Athletics: Track and Field Connections

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 101:27


Today's guest has been a high school coach in the Northeast for over two decades. His story of learning how to coach from the ground up is fascinating as we talk about the importance of coaching education helped him to coach better than he was coached. Latif and our host Mike get into a lot of different topics including *understanding the 'why' of coaching *USATF coaching education program *going all in on his coaching business and more. Check him out at www.CompleteTrackAndField.com. Want to have an exploratory conversation about YOUR track equipment needs? Connect with us: Host Mike Cunningham on Twitter: @mikecunningham Email: sales@gillathletics.com Phone: 800-637-3090 Twitter: @GillAthletics Instagram: @GillAthletics1918 Facebook: facebook.com/gillathletics LinkedIn: linkedin.com/company/gillathletics/

The Climate Champions
Jack Azagury, Senior Managing Director, Northeast Market Lead, Accenture - Episode 107

The Climate Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 27:23


Jack Azagury, Senior Managing Director, Northeast Market Lead for Accenture, leading 10,000+ people in the Northeast United States. Jack is also a member of Accenture's Global Management Committee and North America Leadership Team.

World News Tonight with David Muir
Full Episode: Sunday, January 9, 2022

World News Tonight with David Muir

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 24:19


At least 19 people, including nine children, killed in a deadly five alarm fire that broke out in a high-rise apartment building in the Bronx. New York City Mayor Eric Adams called the fire "one of the worst in modern times in the city." More than 80 percent of ICU beds occupied nationwide fueled by the Omicron variant surge. This, as dozens of schools in Chicago and Philadelphia shift to remote learning due to COVID-related staffing shortages. A brutal cold front sweeping from the deep south to the Northeast. The U.S. and Russia begin diplomatic talks tomorrow focusing on the crisis in the Ukraine. And tennis star Novak Djokovic goes to court in Australia over his vaccination status.

World News Tonight with David Muir
Full Episode: Friday, January 7, 2022

World News Tonight with David Muir

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 24:18


Three white men convicted in the murder of Ahmaud Arbery while he was jogging all sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. What the judge told all three men before he handed down their sentences. Much of the Northeast cleaning up after a winter storm dumped several inches of snow and ice from Washington, D.C., to Philadelphia and New York. The CDC sounding the alarm on increasing hospitalizations among children and encouraging parents to vaccinate their kids against COVID. The President of Kazakhstan delivering "shoot to kill" orders for anti-government protesters. And remembering Sidney Poitier: the trailblazing actor who became the first Black man to win an Oscar for Best Actor. What he said is important to remember and think about before we go.

NBC Nightly News
Friday, January 7, 2022

NBC Nightly News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 16:43


Overwhelmed hospitals hit with staffing shortages as Covid cases surge, three men convicted of murdering Ahmaud Arbery sentenced to life, and millions across Northeast hit by winter storm.

FULCRUM News with David Seaman
DC / Northeast Hit By Another January Snowstorm Leg, Web3 Blockchain Societies Will Take on China's Rise - 1.7.2022

FULCRUM News with David Seaman

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022


Some updates on the ongoing winter weather in the DC / DMV area this Friday morning, plus how “Web3” blockchain-based technologies could take on the growing global dominance of China in the evolving economic order to come.Winner Take All: Bitcoin, Ether, and the Rise of New Money — https://www.amazon.com/Winner-Take-All-Bitcoin-Ether/dp/B08Z4CNTVN/ Lunar Gateway: Crypto, Elon Musk, & The Solar Economy To Come — https://www.amazon.com/Lunar-Gateway-Crypto-Solar-Economy-ebook/dp/B09C1H4889/ Cybernetic Cuneiform: Cryptocurrency, The Surveillance State, And Deep Space Travel — https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09N7YTWXP/ Full selection of FULCRUM research books and Kindle downloads: https://www.fulcrumnews.com/store-1

This Is Hardcore Podcast
Episode 63. Carter Holmes of From Within Records & Payback/Off The Tracks.

This Is Hardcore Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 142:23


Episode 63. Carter Holmes of From Within Records & Payback/Off The Tracks. I've been saying that he was a future podcast guest, and with FYA weekend upon us, no better time to bring him on. His humble beginnings finding hardcore in one of southernmost hardcore scenes in the US is already a phenomenal story, but it goes beyond that. From venturing beyond his home of Mobile, AL to hitting the road and finding hardcore friends from Florida to the Northeast and beyond, it made a lasting impression on him. He would eventually begin his label From Within helping release his friends demo tape. From Within would go quickly from a small diy label to a force to be reckoned with, releasing some of the best up and coming bands of the last few years in hardcore as well as releasing 2 of the One Scene Unity Comps which have become the Call For Unity/ Where the Wild Things Are of the modern days. His spirit and love for hardcore shines on this interview and as a younger guy whose heart and soul is put into the music and the scene, I am glad to have finally had him on the show. www.instagram.com/fromwithinrecords fromwithinrecords@gmail.com Opening Track " Detonate" by Despize .. off the Split with Deklination which is a split release between From Within and Northern Unrest. www.despizehc.bandcamp.com/ www.instagram.com/despizehardcore

The News with Shepard Smith
Snow Storm Alert, Vaccine Mandates & Remembering January 6th

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 49:19


President Joe Biden on the anniversary of the Jan. 6 Capitol riot warned that the threats to democracy witnessed during that invasion did not end when the violence stopped. Biden condemned the “web of lies” spread by former President Donald Trump, blaming him directly for fomenting the attackers who tried to overturn the 2020 election. Historian Michael Beschloss discusses the significance of the January 6th insurrection, during which supporters of former President Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol building. Business and labor attorney Seth Berenzweig discusses the Supreme Court review of challenges to the Biden administration's vaccine mandates. Accuweather meteorologist Adam del Rosso reports on the weather ahead of a major winter storm that's headed to the Northeast. Plus, CNBC's Eamon Javers reports on a record-breaking year for cryptocurrency theft. Some $3.2 billion in crypto was stolen last year.

PFAS Pulse Podcast
January 6, 2022 – Cracking Down on PFAS: Why Metal Finishers Need to Be Prepared (Webinar Alert)

PFAS Pulse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 6:46


Laurel Pickard, Senior Engineer at HRP, gives an overview of the upcoming webinar on PFAS Regulation for Metal Finishers. Click here to register for the webinar.

World News Tonight with David Muir
Full Episode: Tuesday, January 4, 2022

World News Tonight with David Muir

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 24:22


Drivers trapped on I-95 near Virginia for over 24 hours following a paralyzing winter storm. Hundreds trapped with no food, water and gas running low after an accident involving several tractor trailers. The latest on two new winter storms that could bring more freezing rain to I-95 tomorrow morning, followed by another storm that could hit the Northeast, including Philadelphia and New York City, by the end of the week. The CDC under growing scrutiny over its revised isolation guidance: what their now saying about testing after five days of isolation. The continuing fallout involving Jeffrey Epstein as a New York City judge hears a legal challenge from Prince Andrew's attorneys on a lawsuit filed by one of his accusers. The January 6 House Select Committee requests to speak with Fox News host Sean Hannity just days before the one-year anniversary of the Capitol insurrection. And the reigning Jeopardy champ who says she was robbed.

Grumpy Old Geeks
535: Consider Your Risk Appetite

Grumpy Old Geeks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 70:36


2022, here we go again; the case against crypto; feels like a sea change against crypto & NFTs; the metaverse still doesn't exist; decentralized Web3 is, you guessed it, centralized; DoorDash requires engineers to deliver goods once a month; Uber launching driverless food delivery; everyone's delaying returns to the office, again; Grand Tour; Hannah; Red Notice; Don't Look Up; the Matrix; Salvation; Hawkeye; Free Guy; Jungle Cruise; South Park; Star Trek's feelings; Twetch; Catatouille & the Catellite Dish; the Book of Boba Fett; anything exciting happen over the break?Show notes at https://gog.show/535 FOLLOW UPFrom Bitcoin Obituaries - "Bitcoin is Dead" Declared 400+ TimesThe Case Against Crypto by Stephen DiehlBrian Eno is not a fan of NFTsThe Future Is Not Only Useless, It's ExpensiveIn 2021, tech talked up ‘the metaverse.' One problem: It doesn't exist.Fortune Favours the Brave | Crypto.comweb3 is Centralized by Wesley Aptekar-CasselsIN THE NEWSSan Francisco-based DoorDash is requiring engineers to deliver food — and they're furiousUber will launch driverless food deliveries in California in 2022Autonomous car developers lobby to defang safety data regulationsApple joins the ranks of companies delaying their return to officeComcast won't enforce Northeast data caps until 2023 at the earliestAT&T and Verizon settle FCC 911 outage investigationsVerizon and AT&T Decline Regulators' Request to Delay New 5G ServicesMEDIA CANDYThe WitcherNetflix drops a surprise teaser for its 'Witcher' prequelThe Grand Tour Presents... Carnage a TroisHannah Season 3Red NoticeThe Matrix ResurrectionsDon't Look Up!SalvationHawkeyeFree GuyJungle CruiseSouth Park: Post CovidAPPS & DOODADSTwetchHalide for iPhoneFiLMic ProFiLMiC Creator BundleDJI Osmo Pocket 2Your cat could burn your house down, Korean officials warn after 107 fires sparked by felinesElon Musk's Starlink Internet Dishes Are Attracting CatsAT THE LIBRARYFan Fiction: A Mem-Noir: Inspired by True Events by Brent SpinerQuantum of Nightmares (Laundry Files Book 11) by Charles StrossEscape from Yokai Land (Laundry Files Book 12) by Charles StrossThe Kaiju Preservation Society by John ScalziJanuary 1, 2022, is Public Domain Day: Works from 1926 are open to all, as is a cornucopia of recorded music: an estimated 400,000 sound recordings from before 1923!SECURITY HAH!The CyberWireDave BittnerHacking HumansCaveatRecorded FutureThe Book of Boba Fett'The Book of Boba Fett' premiere is an abysmal failure on every levelCLOSING SHOUT-OUTSWhat Happens When You Quit Alcohol?See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

CBN.com - NewsWatch - Video Podcast
CBN NewsWatch AM: January 4, 2022

CBN.com - NewsWatch - Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 28:30


Newswatch AM January 4th: winter storm hits Northeast and Washington DC, along with parts of the South; FDA approves Covid booster shots for 12 to 15 year olds; Israeli warplanes struck Gaza Sunday following Hamas missile launches, and Jonathan ...

TODAY
January 4: Winter storm slams East Coast, impacting travel. Spike in pediatric Covid cases. Elizabeth Holmes found guilty of defrauding investors.

TODAY

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 31:18


A massive winter storm has slammed into the Northeast with snow, wind and cold weather causing flight cancellations and standstill traffic — we talk to NBC's Josh Lederman, stuck on the road for over 11 hours. And, Al Roker has everything you need to know. Plus, there is new data on the number of children now being infected with Covid and hospitalized — this as schools reopen. Also, Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes has been found guilty on four out of 11 charges of fraud and conspiracy.

Joe & Joe Weather Show
Joe & Joe Weather Show LIVE 11am Winter Storm Developing for Parts of the East Sunday Night Monday

Joe & Joe Weather Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 58:34


The Joe & Joe Weather Show is LIVE 11am as we have one more gloomy day in the Eastern US to get through before we finally see colder weather and actually sunshine for the first time since before Christmas. Winter Storm Warnings & Winter Weather Advisories are up from the Tennessee Valley to the Mid Atlantic as a storm develops for Sunday night and Monday. The long range pattern is evolving into a more wintry one in the Northeast and Mid Atlantic states and it should be more favorable for snow chances beginning late this week. Omni True Value Hardware has everything you need to get you through the winter. They have the best prices on rock salt and other snow removal products. http://omnitruevalue.com You can support this podcast by subscribing to Patreon for full weather coverage. https://patreon.com/meteorologistjoecioffi --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/joe-cioffi/support

Real Estate Espresso
Bob Couture

Real Estate Espresso

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 12:43


Bob Couture lives in Los Angeles and invests in the North East. Not a typical situation. This is a fascinating story of remote investing with a twist. There are some excellent lessons on the importance of team in today's conversation. To learn more or to connect with Bob, he can be found at cp-propertygroup.com -------------- Host: Victor Menasce email:podcast@victorjm.com

Louisiana Anthology Podcast
450. Ashley Steenson, part 2

Louisiana Anthology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022


450. Part 2 of our interview with Ashley Steenson. Ashley has been researching Teddy Roosevelt in Louisiana. He came here frequently to hunt, and he set up the first national park in Louisiana, Breton Island Reservation, on November 31, 1905. "I'm a PhD student in American intellectual and political history (1850-1950) at The University of Alabama. I completed my MA in history at the University of Mississippi in May 2020. My research considers the connections between political ideologies in the South and the Northeast, primarily during the early twentieth century. I received a graduate minor in gender studies from the Sarah Isom Center in 2020 and serve as a graduate student council member for the Southern Historical Association (2021-2023)." This week in Louisiana history. January 1, 1954. KSLA TV channel 12 in Shreveport, LA (CBS) begins broadcasting   This week in New Orleans history. The first Sugar Bowl game was played there on January 1, 1935, against the Philadelphia Temple Owls. The last was on December 31, 1974 when Nebraska beat Florida 14-10. This week in Louisiana. Situated on the west bank of the Mississippi River directly across from New Orleans, the city of Gretna boasts a quaint, small-town environment within its 4.5 square miles that includes a cultural district and two nationally-recognized historic districts. More than one hundred years since its incorporation in 1913, the city continues to emulate a streetscape of small-town America from long ago, while simultaneously embracing the future with its first female mayor, Belinda C. Constant. Experience Gretna's charm and rich history as you stroll through its landmarks and enjoy the good food, friendly faces, and exciting seasonal activities.  You will find Gretna a delight for all ages. Postcards from Louisiana. Lauren Sturm / Alizah Star. Listen on iTunes.Listen on Google Play.Listen on Google Podcasts.Listen on Spotify.Listen on Stitcher.Listen on TuneIn.The Louisiana Anthology Home Page.Like us on Facebook. 

Cultra Trail Running
168: Bad Ultrarunning Advice Gets Even Worse

Cultra Trail Running

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 120:47


What an action-packed episode we got coming at you this week, our last of 2021. We touch on Ryan Hall's huge gainz, Fred has a poignant and amazing story of a runner getting lost for 36 hours in Florida. Art does an awesome job mentioning that he has in fact done a 419 mile bike ride almost entirely across NY state, and the long way not the "easy" north-south route, you chickens! Seriously, this year can fuck right off. But on another entirely related note: Jimmy is an obvious troll- this episode he starts shit with about 11 different demographic groups. Weightlifters? Check. People from Massachusettes? Yep. THE BRITISH? Holy fuck he went in HARD on those bitches. Will we lose listeners as a result? Art says "I hope not" but I think you're all batshit for even listening to one episode. Psyche, I'm grateful you listen. You're crazy and I like you. You're like "hold up a boombox outside my window" crazy tho, not like "kill my family's rabbit" crazy, thank you very much for the nightmares Glenn Fucking Close.  Okay, let's do 2022 now. All the books we mentioned: Pfitz's Advanced Marathoning Jack Daniels' Running Formula Running with Lydiard Run Faster with Brad Hudson   We're on Spotify! https://open.spotify.com/show/44etXyR0WbJtmKRKrP7V6M We're on iTunes! https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/cultra-trail-running/id1446356779   Please support Cultra Trail Running Podcast Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/CultraTrailRunning Strava: https://www.strava.com/clubs/CULTRA Twitter: https://twitter.com/blueblazerunner Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cultratrailrunning/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CultraTrailRunning/ Call the Karaoke Line at 203-DOG GENT   Intro Guitar by Nick, Vocals Jack Byram, and beats Jack Sevigny beatstars.com/sev_beats

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha
Welcome to Episode 40 of “COVID: What comes next,” an exclusive weekly Providence Journal/USA TODAY NETWORK podcast featuring Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health and an internationally respected expert on pandemic resp

COVID: What comes next - With Dr. Ashish Jha

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 11:22


PROVIDENCE – As difficult as COVID-19 has made this December with omicron now the dominant variant, “we are looking toward a month of January when we're just going to see an extraordinary number of infections across all of the country,” Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of Brown University's School of Public Health, said on Tuesday.  “As it has been throughout, the pandemic is going to hit different parts of the country at different times,” jha said. “We're seeing pretty substantial increases in the Northeast. We're seeing Florida's numbers just skyrocket. We're seeing this really in Los Angeles. New York City has been one of the epicenters in the U.S. So we're really seeing this across the country.”  Jha said that while the number of reported new cases has hit record levels, the true numbers are likely even higher.  “I actually think we're way under-counting,” he said. “Because of the holidays, people are not testing. Lot of states are not reporting. So I would argue that right now, we have more people infected in America than at any moment during the entire pandemic, no question about it. In my mind, this is pretty staggering. And we are not anywhere near peak infection.”  According to The New York Times on Monday, 543,415 new cases were reported in the U.S. based on the latest data, with a daily average of 243,099. Rhode Island, according to The Times, had a daily average of 1,382 new cases with a positivity rate of 130 per 100,000, fifth highest in the nation, after Washington, D.C., New York, New Jersey and Puerto Rico.  https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/us/covid-cases.html In Rhode Island, as elsewhere in the nation, the strain on hospitals concerns Jha, who spoke during recording of the latest “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast.  “All of our major hospitals are incredibly stressed largely because of staffing shortages, because of nursing shortages,” Jha said. “So I am very worried about both the cases we saw just before Christmas and what will happen over the Christmas and New Year's holidays in terms of the number of new infections. Even if it turns out that Omicron is milder, which it probably is, there will still be enough new infections to really cause a serious problem.”  https://www.providencejournal.com/story/news/coronavirus/2021/12/11/covid-fourth-wave-rhode-island-hospitals-short-staffed-omicron-ri/6461357001/    Jha and others on many occasions have urged people to get vaccinated and boosted when eligible. Experts also have repeatedly advised people to wear masks in many settings, particularly indoors; limit the size of gatherings; make provisions for proper ventilation, and continue hand-washing. These measures can also help prevent influenza and other diseases.  Isolation after testing positive has also been advised -- and on Monday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued new guidelines. Among them is shortening the time that infected patients should isolate from ten to five days after a positive result.   https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/health/2021/12/27/omicron-airlines-cancel-flights-covid-updates/9021308002/    Overall, Jha said he agrees with the new guidance.  “I'm in favor of the CDC changes, but I understand that not everybody loves them,” he said.   Looking deeper into 2022 and beyond, Jha said “there is no question in my mind that COVID-19 is going to be with us, probably forever but certainly for a very, very long time.”  The question then becomes, he said, “How do we manage our lives with the virus?”   Similar to “the way we manage our lives with lots of other respiratory viruses” such as flu, which has never disappeared, he said.  “We've got to figure out how to really lower the virulence, the way in which this virus gets people sick,” the scientist said.  Progress has already been made, according to Jha.  “Vaccines are going to be our primary tool,” Jha said. “We're also going to have therapies that will lower the severity of the disease, such as monoclonal [antibody therapy], oral pills like PAXLOVID from Pfizer. There will be hopefully others. It's going to become something that we manage and live with.”  https://www.providencejournal.com/story/news/coronavirus/2021/12/12/monoclonal-antibodies-hasbro-childrens-hospital-treat-covid-at-risk-kids/6478053001/   Jha foresees seasonality, just as with flu.  “We'll see surges maybe even in the summer in the south, in the winter in the north, and that will become a feature of this virus,” he said.  But the bottom line, according to the scientist, is that COVID-19 “It will not continue to torture us the way it has so far.”    This is the 40th episode of the “COVID: What Comes Next” podcast, begun in October 2020 and available exclusively from The Providence Journal and the USA TODAY NETWORK. It is hosted by G. Wayne Miller, health reporter for The Providence Journal. 

Wet Fly Swing Fly Fishing Podcast
WFS 275 - Fly Fishing Long Island with Tom McCoy and Co-Host Michael Barger

Wet Fly Swing Fly Fishing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 55:16


Show Notes: https://wetflyswing.com/275 I had the pleasure of sitting down with Tom McCoy along with a good friend of mine, Michael Barger who was a co-host on this episodes.  Tom and Michael go back and fourth on fishing Long Island, what makes it special and the history behind a unique part of the country. Show Notes with Tom McCoy - Sweet Grass Fly Rods is owned by Jerry Kustich, a huge guru of fly fishing in the Northeast. - Rob Snowhite was on the podcast in Episode 12 and we dug into the Salmon River.  Rob is the host of the Fly Fishing Consultant Podcast. - Phil Monohan was on the podcast in episode 259 here and covered his role as the editor of the Orvis Blog. - Nimblewill Nomad hiked the Appalachian trail at 83 years old. - Tom's presentation with the Art Flick Trout Unlimited Chapter:  Connetquot River State Park - A Fly Fishing Tour: - Gil Bergen was a key player in the area and influenced many in the country. You can find Tom on Facebook here:   facebook.com/tom.mccoy.583 The Joe Stack -photo via: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jo-EvKnMriU Resources on Fishing Long Island Letters to Mac by Tom McCoy Fishing Long Island Conclusion with Tom McCoy Tom McCoy shared his experience on fishing Long Island and a number of books he has written in the area.  We also dig into a few of the big names in the NE including the great Art Flick who influenced many around the country. Show Notes: https://wetflyswing.com/275

All Things Star Wars
Episode 227 - Dexter: An original series retrospective

All Things Star Wars

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 64:14


This week, Dave is roaming around the Northeast and enjoying his holiday vacation, however the show must go on! Mr. Roskam is joined by new the new CFO of the Sidebar Cantina and they discuss the new Patreon tiers as well as discuss the Showtime show, Dexter! Patreon: patreon.com/thesidebarcantina Our Linktree: https://linktr.ee/thesidebarcantina Red 5 Network : https://bio.link/red5 Dave: @phillydave75 Mr. Roskam: @darthroskam

Football Daily
COVID crisis, goals galore & a Conte Christmas

Football Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 48:02


Joining Jeanette Kwakye and Ben Haines to dissect the Boxing Day fixtures are former West Ham and Aston Villa midfielder Nigel Reo-Coker and the Telegraph's North-East correspondent Luke Edwards. With COVID continuing to cause postponements, is a break in the fixture least inevitable. If not, is it fair to continue and could the health and safety of players be at risk? There was love across North London with wins for Tottenham and Arsenal - so have Antonio Conte and Mikel Arteta turned things around? Hear from both managers. With the January transfer window set to open in less than a week, all eyes are on Newcastle. But who should Eddie Howe be looking at bringing to the club? And postponements aside, we are at the halfway point in this Premier League season, which means it's time to make some predictions. TOPICS: 0'40 How have the team spent Christmas? 5'00 What next for football given the current COVID situation? 13'50 Man City top on Boxing Day - how significant it that? 18'00 Have West Ham overperformed so far this season? 21'40 Antonio Conte interview and Tottenham turned around? 27'40 Arsenal - have we seen the end of 'Arteta Out'? 30'00 Mikel Arteta interview 35'20 January transfer window - are all eyes on Newcastle? 43'40 Predictions for the rest of the season

The Native Plant Podcast
Ruth Rogers Clausen & Gregg Tepper on their new book "Deer resistant Native Plants for the Northeast"

The Native Plant Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 81:26


Two friends of ours have joined forces to give us all some great suggestions for deer resistant plants for the Northeast United States.  Gregg Tepper has been on the podcast before, but this time he brings one of our favorite gardening authors; Ruth Rogers Clausen.  The two have combined their knowledge and poured it all into this wonderful book.

Ron Ananian The Car Doctor
The Car Doctor - 12/25/2021 - Proving An Overheat In December

Ron Ananian The Car Doctor

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 54:27


Ron starts this episode talking about his Santa trip this year, and proving an overheat in December in the Northeast : takes a call on an 06 Accord with a possible transmission problem, also asking for Ron's opinion on the Mazda 2.5 Liter engine with cylinder deactivation : talks with Robert McBride of All Data discussing ADAS : goes back to the previous caller with a follow up on a P0401 code he had a few months back : and ends the hour talking about the end of On-Star. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Louisiana Anthology Podcast
449. Ashley Steenson, part 1

Louisiana Anthology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021


449. Part 1 of our interview with Ashley Steenson about Teddy Roosevelt in Louisiana. "I'm a PhD student in American intellectual and political history (1850-1950) at The University of Alabama. I completed my MA in history at the University of Mississippi in May 2020. My research considers the connections between political ideologies in the South and the Northeast, primarily during the early twentieth century. I received a graduate minor in gender studies from the Sarah Isom Center in 2020 and serve as a graduate student council member for the Southern Historical Association (2021-2023). I have experience in public history through the Chancellor's Advisory Committee on History and Context and the Alabama Memory Project. My writing has been featured in publications like History Today and The Washington Post." This week in Louisiana history. December 26, 1971. Jared Leto from Bossier City was born. He is an actor and singer-songwriter for the band Thirty Seconds to Mars who won an Oscar for Best Supporting Actor for his role in Dallas Buyers Club. This week in New Orleans history. Born in New Orleans on December 25, 1878, Louis Cottrell was an influential American jazz drummer. "Old Man" Cottrell was the father of Louis Cottrell, Jr. and great-grandfather of New Orleans jazz drummer Louis Cottrell. He played with John Robichaux's orchestra in 1909 and with the Olympia Orchestra in New Orleans from 1900 to 1915. From 1916 to 1918 he played in Chicago with Manuel Perez, then played with A.J. Piron up until the time of his death. "Old Man" Cottrell has been credited as the innovator of the press roll in jazz drumming, and was a significant influence on most New Orleans drummers, having taught Baby Dodds, Paul Barbarin, Louis Barbarin, Freddie Kohlman, Cie Frazier and Alfred Williams. He died in New Orleans on October 17, 1927. This week in Louisiana.While in NOLA, plan a trip to Celebration in the Oaks, where City Park is transformed into 25 acres of dazzling Christmas fun. The Park, Botanical Garden, Storyland and Carousel Gardens Amusement Park are loaded with hundreds of thousands of lights to create a drive-through winter wonderland in the Big Easy.Postcards from Louisiana. David Middleton reads "The Shepherd: A Play."Listen on iTunes.Listen on Google Play.Listen on Google Podcasts.Listen on Spotify.Listen on Stitcher.Listen on TuneIn.The Louisiana Anthology Home Page.Like us on Facebook.   

Sassquad Trail Runners
Art Byram - CULTRA & CUT112

Sassquad Trail Runners

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 89:44


Art Byram is the host of the weekly podcast, CULTRA. CULTRA is a "weekly podcast that shares the unique perspective of the North East, Beast Coast Ultra running scene: raw, impulsive, and irreverent. The Cultra Trail Running Podcast is a place where we can get together and discuss all the fun stuff that happens on the trails that most normal people don't care about. Join the Cult! or maybe you already have without realizing it... resistance is futile." Art is also the mastermind behind the annual CUT 112 fat ass event.

VPR News Podcast
Reporter debrief: Massachusetts governor issues mask advisory, calls on National Guard as COVID surges

VPR News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 4:37


COVID cases are surging across the Northeast and hospitalizations in New England are on the rise.In Massachusetts on Tuesday, Republican Gov. Charlie Baker issued a mask advisory and activated up to 500 National Guard members to help alleviate pressure for health care facilities in the state.

Farming Today
22/12/21 - Puffin wrecks, Norwegian cod quotas and honey mead

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 13:32


Dead and dying puffins have been washing up on beaches from Shetland down to the North East of England. Puffins are on the RSPB's red list of birds with the highest conservation priority and this kind of mortality rate is highly unusual for this time of year. The UK and Norway have agreed a new deal for fishing in each other's waters in 2022. This year there's been no deal. The new agreement will see UK boats and Norwegian boats both able to catch up to 30 thousand tonnes of white fish in each others' waters. There's an additional UK quota for 500 tonnes of cod - that means that in total UK boats can catch more than 7000 tonnes of cod in the Arctic, because of a separate allocation of the fish around Svalbard. The government says it will provide fishing opportunities that will benefit both the fishing industry and the protection of the marine environment. But Jane Sandell from UK Fisheries, which owns the Kirkella, a huge Hull based trawler with a hundred strong crew, says the cod quota the Government has negotiated is paltry. And mead is a festive tipple but the market for this ancient honey-based drink is growing and not just at this time of year. In the US there's a mead renaissance - the American Mead Makers Association says hundreds of craft producers have set up business over the last two decades. We meet a mead maker in Wales, who's hoping that trend will spread. Presented by Caz Graham Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Heather Simons

The Football Ramble
The Best of the Football Ramble 2021

The Football Ramble

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 51:17


To round off the year, we're looking back on some of our favourite moments from this year's Football Ramble! We relive the trauma of the European Super League, revel in our Euros fairytale and celebrate the Hamilton Accies commentator and his wee jobby. We even find time for an extended visit to the North-East for plenty of Keggy, Brucey and takeover-related nonsense. It's been a turbulent year but we've had a great laugh making the show every day and hope you've had a cracking time listening in - thanks so much for your support throughout 2021.Tweet us @Football Ramble and email us here: show@footballramble.com.***Please take the time to rate and review us on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your pods. It means a great deal to the show and will make it easier for other potential listeners to find us. Thanks!*** See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

247Sports Football Recruiting Podcast

247Sports National Recruiting Analyst Brian Dohn joins Lance Glinn to break down four-star Enai White's commitment to Texas A&M! They break down what the Aggies are getting in the talented recruit, how Jimbo Fisher and staff have made a footprint in the Northeast, and more! Host: Lance Glinn Guests: Brian Dohn Follow or Subscribe to the 247Sports Football Recruiting podcast feed on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. Find the 247Sports podcast for your favorite team here! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Hunting Public
#188 - Hunting The Northeast Before Snow

The Hunting Public

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 72:17


In the last episode, we talked about tracking in the big timber of the northeast. But the opportunity to hunt snowy conditions can be limited. So in this episode, Zach has a conversation with the same  group of hunters from the northeast discussing different strategies that they use during the rut. Brett, Jon, Cori, Bailey, and Jake all hunt different areas of the northeast and have some cool strategies that you may be able to try out in future hunts! Topics Include:  -early season bowhunting in the northeast -the best dates of the rut in the northeast -finding terrain and habitat features that funnel deer by during the rut OPTICS - 10% off Vortex Optics w/code THP10 - https://bit.ly/3AOdKDQ THP MERCH - https://bit.ly/30ZC1rm - Get 10% off THP Merch w/Code THPPODCAST DEER CALLS - Get 10% off Woodhaven Calls w/coupon code - THP2018 - http://bit.ly/2IagiSe MAPPING - Get 20% Off OnX Hunt! Use promo code THP: https://bit.ly/3qCKryJ BOW ACCESSORIES - Get 20% off TROPHY RIDGE products w/code - THP21 - http://bit.ly/2Lol7Yx BOWS - Save 10% off all Bear Equipment w/code THP10 - http://bit.ly/2JW7OzP DEER CALLS - Get 10% off Woodhaven Calls w/coupon code - THP2018 - http://bit.ly/2IagiSe TICK REPELLANT - Learn about all Sawyer outdoor products - https://sawyer.com/lyme-disease/ TRAIL CAMERAS - Get 10% off Exodus Trail Cameras w/ code - THP10 - https://bit.ly/3lwNlpE GAME PROCESSING - MEAT! products - Free shipping on orders over $99 w/code - THP10 - https://bit.ly/2DzgTQ8v TREE SADDLES - Check out Tethrd saddles and platforms! - http://bit.ly/2Td2Wcr Follow us on Facebook at The Hunting Public Follow us on Instagram at The Hunting Public

Football Daily
Top three saved by penalties

Football Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 47:50


Ben Haines is joined by former Hull City midfielder Alex Bruce and North East correspondent for The Telegraph Luke Edwards to look back on Saturday's action. We saw six penalties in four games, which earned Man City, Liverpool and Chelsea crucial wins and points in the title race. Man United also grabbed a winner from the penalty spot - but were they all a bit soft? The guys debate the role of VAR and whether or not the standard of officiating needs to improve. Mikel Arteta dropped Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang from the Arsenal squad for "a disciplinary breach" and Arsenal went on to win comfortably against Southampton. The right decision from the manager? Harry Symeou from 'Chronicles of a Gooner' joins the pod to give his thoughts. And ahead of Leicester v Newcastle we ask if it is worrying times for Brendan Rodgers, as his side sit in 12th. At this stage of the last two seasons - they were second. Also, Alex gives us an update on his dad and whether he's itching to get back into management. Plus the guys reveal their approach to Christmas shopping. TOPICS: 1'00 Christmas shopping 3'30 Penalties for the top 3 20'00 Arsenal, Aubameyang & Arteta 31'00 Leicester v Newcastle