Podcasts about Bucha

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Best podcasts about Bucha

Latest podcast episodes about Bucha

Talk Eastern Europe
Episode 105: Ukraine granted the EU candidate status in the shadow of war

Talk Eastern Europe

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 47:22


*** Please support us to keep bringing you in-depth coverage. Become a Patron: www.patreon.com/search?q=talk+eastern+europe The last European Union Council meeting brought a historic decision to grant Ukraine and Moldova the status of the EU candidate status. In this episode Maciek and Aga share their first reactions to the EU's decision as well as Maciek asks Maksym Kyiak, the Kyiv-based expert on international relations, about his assessment of EU Council decision. In addition Maksym provides us with an update of the general situation in Ukraine as the war continues without any prospects for rapid de-escalation. Watch the documentary movie on the city of Bucha in Ukraine, mentioned in the episode: https://www.youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&v=-RXf6REnoSsRead the latest analysis and commentary on the war and the region by visiting: www.neweasterneurope.eu

The Rights Track
Eyewitness: using digital technology to prosecute human rights abusers

The Rights Track

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 29:17


In epiosde 8 of Series 7 of The Rights Track, Todd is in conversation with Wendy Betts, Director of eyeWitness, an International Bar Association project launched in 2015 which collects verifiable video of human rights violations for use in investigations and trials. We're asking Wendy how the use of digital technology can help to hold accountable those who commit human rights crimes.   Transcript Todd Landman  0:01  Welcome to The Rights Track podcast, which gets the hard facts about the human rights challenges facing us today. In series seven, we're discussing human rights in a digital world. I'm Todd Landman, in this episode, I'm delighted to be joined by Wendy Betts. Wendy is director of eyeWitness an International Bar Association project launched in 2015, which collects verifiable video of human rights violations for use in investigations and trials. So today we're asking Wendy, how does the use of digital technology help to hold accountable those who commit human rights crimes? So Wendy, it's absolutely brilliant to have you on this episode of the right track. So welcome. Wendy Betts  0:38  Thanks, Todd. It's great to be here. Todd Landman  0:40  You and I met in Bergen in Norway, we were at the Rafto Foundation awards for the Human Rights Data Analysis Group and Human Rights Data Analysis Group have featured in previous episodes on The Rights Track. And I see there is a kind of correlation, if you will, between the work of the Human Rights Data Analysis Group and the work that you do at eyeWitness. It is just that the data you're collecting is really video files and video footage. So tell us a little bit about the work that you're doing with eyeWitness. Wendy Betts  1:08  Absolutely. So at eyeWitness, we are helping human rights defenders in conflict zones and other places that are experiencing large scale human rights violations, to collect photo and video information in a way that makes it easier to authenticate. So that footage can be used in investigations and trials. So we work with human rights defenders in three ways. First, we're providing a mobile camera app that we designed to help ensure that the footage can be easily authenticated. And then we are helping to securely store that footage and maintain the chain of custody so it can eventually be used in investigations and trials. And third, we work to then take a working copy of that footage that we catalogue and tag to make it easier for investigators to identify footage that's potentially of interest to their investigations and incorporate that into those processes. Todd Landman  2:01  Well, that's a great summary of the work that you do. I recall when I was a student at Georgetown University, I worked in the Lauinger Library. And my job was to produce photographs in the pre-digital age. So this was processing rolls of film in the old cans used to kind of shake them with the chemicals and then use an enlarger and make photographs. And that was fine for special collections and photographing books. But one day, a Jesuit priest came into the library and handed me a roll of film and said I need 10 copies of each of these pictures. And they were actually photographs from the crime scene where Jesuit priests had been murdered in El Salvador. And I'm curious that when we enlarge those pictures and submitted them back to the authorities that requested them, is that kind of evidence still considered verifiable evidence? And what is it that the digital elements all of this adds to the veracity and the verifiability of evidence collected on human rights crimes? Wendy Betts  2:58  There's a long history of photo and video being used as evidence, that photo and video in its hard copy form would need to be verified to go to court. So generally speaking, the court would want to speak with the photographer, or in the absence of photographer, somebody that could help explain that that footage is indeed an accurate portrayal of that location at that time. And what digital technology has done is expand the ability of who can be the photographer to collect that potential evidence. So with the two trends of smartphones in everyone's pocket, plus the rise of social media platforms where people can share this information, you're suddenly seeing this massive proliferation of the amount of available information that could be used as evidence. But indeed, this also will need to be verified in much the same way. But the challenges to doing that are slightly different. And then the technology that we can bring to bear to do that is slightly different. Todd Landman  3:52  Yes, I understand those differences. And so there's a lot of debate today, if we take the War in Ukraine as a good example, when it first started, there was a flurry of activity on Twitter that said, don't believe everything you see on Twitter. So there of course will be manipulated images manipulated video, I see manipulated video every day, some of it you can tell straight away, it just looks awful. It looks like a video game. Somebody's saying, look, you know, Ukrainians are taking out Russian tanks. And actually you look at the tank tracks and you can see it just looks like a photoshopped superimposed image of a tank running over some really bad terrain, to the fully verifiable accounts that we are seeing coming out of that conflict. So how are things verified? How does one dismiss imagery in one instance and accept imagery in another? What's the expertise required to give that verifiable account? Wendy Betts  4:43  I think when you're looking at verification, what you really want to know is whether that footage was taken where and when it was claimed. And if that footage has been edited, or as you note in your examples has it been photoshopped to look like something else? And then is it possible that even if it was authentic to begin with, and I accurate to begin with hasn't been changed somewhere along the way? So has it been taken down off social media and changed and reposted? And there's been two trends that have developed to address how we can do this. So one is the plethora of open source investigation techniques that have developed in terms of how can you geo locate images using satellite footage and other types of technology? How can you Chrono locate, so how can you figure out when and where that footage was taken? Can you do frame by frame analyses to determine if that footage has been edited in any way? So that was one approach. And that has become increasingly professionalised. And is really coming to the fore in Ukraine. And then the other approach is the one that eyeWitness has taken where we developed a tool that can be used to hardwire that information in the point that that footage was taken. So those are called controlled capture tools, because you're basically controlling the information and controlling that footage, keeping it in a controlled environment for its entire lifespan. So you're collecting information about where and when that footage was taken, you're ensuring that footage can be edited. And you are maintaining that footage in that secure state through its lifespan. Todd Landman  6:04  So the app itself has the technology built inside it, you've actually hardwired that programmable element to the app, and it can't be tampered with. So if I download this app as a user, and I'm travelling through the world, and I want to document something, it's easy to use on a mobile device, easy to proliferate and sort of disseminate if you will out to users. And it's easy to learn by those users. Because the technology itself has been created in a way that preserves the identity and the verifiability of the images that are captured. Wendy Betts  6:39  That's exactly it. The eyeWitness app is designed to be really easy to use to pick up and take and start using and on the surface for the user interface. It's much like standard mobile camera, so you have to open the app instead of your camera. But you're recording footage in the same way, you can enter the secure gallery where the footage is stored to see what you've taken. And you upload it to eyeWitness, this is how we maintain the chain of custody and secure that footage until it can be used. And then you have the option to share it with your social media networks, you can attach it to a WhatsApp message, you can do a variety of things with it. All of the verification aspect is intended to happen behind the scenes kind of inside the technology. So the app is designed indeed to collect information about where and when that footage was taken from three different sources, none of which are the user themselves. It's also collecting information to ensure that that footage can't be edited. So we are calculating basically a digital fingerprint at the moment that information is captured, that stays with that footage. So if any changes wherever to be made to it, you'd be able to spot that by running the algorithm for the fingerprint again, and then that footage is stored encrypted on the device, and then it's transmitted encrypted to eyeWitness so it can't be intercepted or manipulated either at rest on the phone or in transit on its way to us. Todd Landman  8:00  So you have a secure server where all these raw files are held. Is that right? Wendy Betts  8:05  Indeed. So we've been fortunate to partner on a pro bono relationship with LexisNexis legal and professional and so they host our server in their secure hosting environment that they have for litigation services for a variety of confidential evidence that's used in cases around the world. So they host our server, which allows us to scale up quickly and scale up to meet the need. And Ukraine is a perfect example. We've received more footage from Ukraine since the invasion began, then we have globally in the last two years. So that ability to scale up quickly is very important, and more importantly, it is stored securely. So they have their state of the art security around that in a way that we couldn't necessarily put around a server if we were hosting it ourselves. Todd Landman  8:51  That's amazing. Can you tell us a little bit about the complexity of a Ukraine investigation? Let's take the case of Bucha. We know in Bucha, that there were atrocities committed of some kind, clearly there has to be an evidentiary threshold reached, there has to be a profile of perpetrators and victims, there has to be that whole disaggregation of very complex human rights events of the kinds that you and I discussed with the team from Human Rights Data Analysis Group, but what are the steps that eyeWitness takes? What's the role that you take in the preparation of, let's say, an investigation into something like the Bucha incidents that we saw? Wendy Betts  9:30  So I think if we back up to your comment earlier about just the sheer amount of footage that we've been seeing on social media, and including from places like Bucha, that I think there's a sense that there is plenty of evidence out there, and we've got everything we need. And I think what everyone needs to take step back and realise is how complex as you said these cases are. So you need information about what actually happened on the ground, what happened to these victims, and that takes the form of witness statements, it can take the form of physical evidence, it can take the form of photo and video, but we also need to know the context in which it's happening. If you want to elevate something to be a war crime, instead of a murder, you need to understand the conflict dynamic and what's happening. And then if you want to hold people at higher levels of authority responsible, and not just the people on the ground who pulled the trigger, you need to make those linkages. And that, again, is documentary evidence, it's witness evidence. So all of these pieces of this massive evidentiary puzzle have to come together. At eyeWitness, we see ourselves as one of these pieces, we are a photo video piece of evidence that can tell part of the story but has to work together with these other aspects. So we don't do full investigations ourselves and put all these pieces together, what we do is equip either civil society investigators, ordinary citizens, journalists, or others on the ground who have access to these scenes and are collecting photo and video with a tool to do it in a way that they can feed that information into investigations because it can be so easily verified, so they can contribute to this puzzle, in order to help hold the perpetrators responsible. Todd Landman  11:03  I think this whole portrayal of the contribution that you're making is really important. In our interview with the director of Human Rights State Analysis Group, Patrick Ball, the sort of data guru as it were in these areas, he said, you know, statistics are not a silver bullet. So the work that they do, would provide the statistical analysis that showed that certain things were happening that could not be explained by chance alone. But it was only ever one part of a very complex story alongside documentary evidence, alongside testimonies alongside forensic anthropology alongside many other things. And then ultimately, a determination of, let's say, genocide was a legal judgement that was either supported or not supported by the type of statistical evidence that was provided alongside other pieces of evidence. Now you're making a very similar case that whatever body is going to be prosecuting crimes, in whether it is Bucha, or the broader conflict in Ukraine, eyeWitness is only ever going to be one part of that much bigger story. Is that right? Wendy Betts  12:02  Exactly, exactly. I think all of these different strains of investigation have to work together, people collecting witness statements, the people doing open source investigation of footage and other information that was posted early on, people who have access to official documents, all of these pieces have to fit together, because as you said, in addition to showing just the baseline conduct happening on the ground, you need to show these patterns in magnitudes. And you can only do that by amassing large amounts of information that can show some of those patterns and run those types of statistical analysis that Patrick was talking about. So it all does fit together and complements each other. Todd Landman  12:42  Yeah. And you know, the conflict in Ukraine is by no means over. And you know, I read up a report, I think it was yesterday that said, there are up to 30,000 war crimes that need to be investigated. Now, each crime itself requires extensive documentation, and then you multiply that by the number of crimes. And of course, there may be future crimes committed that will need to be documented as well. So the scale of just this conflict in Ukraine, you said, you've received more images from Ukraine, and then you have in the last two years of other areas of the world, and we may get to talking about those other areas of the world. But to me, the scale of what's happening in Ukraine, and the time that's required to fully prosecute many of these crimes means that we're really going to be in this for the long haul. Wendy Betts  13:25  Justice, unfortunately, in these types of cases is definitely a long term process, and the arc of justice is quite long. And that's what we hope is part of the value added of eyeWitness and why we provide that secure storage aspect, because the photos and videos taken now may well not be involved in an investigation or a trial for years and years to come. And so we can safeguard that footage in a way that even at that time, we can hand it over and it could stand up to the scrutiny. But indeed, I think we're looking at a long term prospect for justice. Todd Landman  13:58  Yes. And outside the Ukraine context, what are some other examples of where eyeWitness has been collecting this video footage from other parts of the world? Wendy Betts  14:06  So eyeWitness launched publicly in 2015. And we really do work globally. And we respond to the inquiries and the needs of human rights defenders in various parts of the world. Now, some places we don't advertise especially where the security situation is quite serious for some of the human rights defenders using the eyeWitness app. But in other places, we have been able to be a bit more public. So we have been working actually in Ukraine since 2017. And we put out a report about shelling of civilian dwellings to the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to adequate housing. So that's one area where we've been active even before the current events. We've also recently submitted a report to the UN Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial killings related to violence occurring in the middle belt area of Nigeria between farmers and herders. We've also been active in the Palestine context with partners there using the eyeWitness app. So we've been quite broadly represented around the globe. And we review accountability broadly as well. And so that's why I'm mentioning non-judicial approaches to accountability. Any efforts that can get at this conduct and get it and investigate it and helped to hold the perpetrators responsible is what we're interested in empowering human rights defenders to do. Todd Landman  15:25  Okay. And do you provide training alongside because it's one thing just to download an app and start using it, but you might make sort of fundamental errors in using the technology from the start? So do you provide a training manual or workshops or online training for users as they download the app and then say, well, actually, this is the best way to film things? Or do you just sort of allow the technology to run in the hands of the users? Wendy Betts  15:49  Our preferred approach is to work in long term partnerships with human rights defenders that want to use the app, we very much see the app as a tool and to be used effectively, you do need to put more skill building and strengthening around that tool. So we do work hand in hand with human rights defenders, who plan to use the app on not only how to use the app, but how to incorporate photo and video into demonstrating whatever types of violations that are looking into, we can provide training on how you actually film when you're at the crime scene. We work with a lot of human rights defenders whose primary efforts have been advocacy oriented, and those are very different photos than photos you want to take for evidence. And so we work to help them make that shift as well. And so then we give them ongoing feedback. Once their footage starts coming in, we can provide tech support, if they're out in the field, and we know they're going on a documentation mission, we can be ready to answer any questions if they have any. So we really want to work with them hand in hand to not just use eyeWitness but use it effectively. Todd Landman  16:54  I understand and does the technology work in the absence of a mobile signal in the absence of a WiFi connection? Can you collect videos on a phone, outside of network, and then when it gets back into the network, you're able to upload the images and videos that have been taken to a secure server? Wendy Betts  17:11  Our goal in designing eyeWitness is to make sure that it can work in the types of environments where these human rights defenders are active. And especially when you look at conflict zones where electricity may be disrupted, internet may be disrupted, cell service may be disrupted. So the app is designed to be able to collect, not only take the photos and videos, but all of the metadata that's needed to help verify where and when it was taken while offline. So you don't need to have access to the internet. Nor do you need to have a cell subscription or any other kind of data service that will collect all of that. It's designed to store that information securely in a gallery separate from the gallery on your phone. So it's hidden in a secure gallery. The idea being that these human rights defenders may have to make their way back to their headquarters or make their way back to someplace with internet before they're able to upload it to us and then delete it off their phones. So we wanted it to remain hidden in transit during that timeframe. So it is definitely aimed at helping individuals in contexts where there's high security risks, infrastructure challenges to be able to use the app. Todd Landman  18:17  You've definitely given that a lot of thought, I guess another question that flows from that is what's the minimum viable technical requirement on a phone? Obviously, it needs to be a smartphone with a camera and a video. But how far back in time can you go in terms of the age of a device because of the availability of resources, etc in some of these conflict zones? What sort of phone is the basic unit you require to use the app? Wendy Betts  18:39  That is a really good question, because it's such an important issue in terms of access and availability of these tools to the vulnerable segments of society that need them most. First thing I should say it's designed for Android, and we don't currently have an iOS version. Part of that is because the demographics of the places where we're working is primarily Android users. So it's designed for that operating system. And we've designed it to go back to android 6.0, which I think is roughly operating systems on phones back to 2015. So it does stretch back a fair way, we made a decision not to go back any further. And that's because Android changed how it handles security at the 6.0 version onward. And we could harden the security of the information both to protect the user and the integrity of the information from that version onward in a way that was more difficult in previous versions. So that's when it goes back to Todd Landman  19:32  And are there any plans to make this available in iOS? Or are there sort of limitations in terms of partnering with Apple to make that happen? Wendy Betts  19:40  We regularly revisit the question and we're actually currently in the process of again, looking at if we could replicate all the functionality that we currently offer security, the anonymity those types of questions, in an iOS version and then looking at the cost compared to the potential user base are the calculations we make. So we're looking at that right now again actually. Todd Landman  20:00  But for the user, this is free. It's an app that you download for free and then use. Is that right? Wendy Betts  20:05  Exactly. It's free. That's freely available. As I said, we would like to work in partnerships. But that's not necessary. Any individual can go to the Google Play Store now and download it and start using it. We do have written instruction guides on our website, we have a short video on how to use it and some other resources that are available. Todd Landman  20:25  Great. And then I guess my final set of questions really is about how this evidence connects to what we've say different photographic evidence you made passing reference to the use of satellite imagery, which has been a very powerful tool, I think the company planet takes a picture of the entire surface of the Earth every 24 hours with its sort of flocks of satellites, then they have the system, if one satellite goes down, they can easily replace another one within the flock. And they have tremendous number of images that are very high resolution, and I should say an increasing resolution. But that's one version of what you can see from space, as it were. And what you're saying is in the hands of users and defenders, you have almost a citizen science ground truthing that can take place as well. Are there any efforts to coordinate between your organisation and some of these providers of satellite imagery, if asked to do so? You mentioned the forced deportations or the destruction of houses. The Special Rapporteur on adequate housing, for example. So you could see satellites, just, you know, images before and after a village is destroyed. But equally, you could triangulate that with your users on the ground, saying, Here's a house being destroyed, I'm hiding in a bush filming this right now is that sort of partnership and, you know, sort of holistic approach being developed in your organisation? Wendy Betts  21:38  So we have certainly used satellite footage in some of our analyses in that Ukraine one about shelling is a key example. That case we didn't establish a partnership, we used what was publicly available that we can access to help go back and look at the dates and locations of the photos we have and then go back and look at satellite footage. And we use that primarily to determine when the attack actually took place. So we have photos dated as to when they were taken. But that doesn't necessarily give you the date of when the attack was. So we use satellite footage a lot to help determine Okay, well, this building looked intact on this date, and certainly looks more like the photo that we have on this date. And then that way, we were able to determine at what point the attack probably took place. We've also worked with another organisation that was doing an investigation of environmental damage in a different location. And in that case, they were able to get the latitude and longitude of the event that they were looking at using the app. And then they were able to get historic and current satellite footage for that location to be able to trace the trends of what was happening there. So they were looking at some environmental damage. So you can help see the change in the environment based on what you're seeing in the satellite photos. That being said, there's certainly the ability to work with satellite providers to help target so I think if you're setting out to do an investigation, and you know, you're going to be in certain places at a certain time and you need some of those satellites pointed at those locations. I think those type of partnerships are indeed possible. We haven't engaged with any of those at the moment because again, we tend to be led by our human right defender users and what they want to investigate. But I think there are organisations that are engaging in those types of partnerships. Todd Landman  23:19  That's great. That's very clear in your explanation. And then I suppose a follow up question would be you've been an operation now since 2015, you've had seven years of footage coming in and the secure servers and you've supplied images to cases, can you tell us the story of success, you know, it has been successful prosecutions in your mind from a legal perspective where you think that eyeWitness has made a definitive contribution to the outcome of those cases? Wendy Betts  23:44  Absolutely. So as I mentioned, we've launched the app in 2015. And we're looking at atrocity crime. So going back to your earlier point about the long arc of justice in these crimes, we have to kind of bear that in mind at what point they might actually go to trial. So we've provided a significant amount of information to investigations at different stages of the process. And so not all of those have gone to trial yet. But indeed, we did collaborate on a case that has gone to trial and resulted in a conviction. And this was a project that we did in partnership with WITNESS, which is a group based in Brooklyn, and with TRIAL International, which is an organisation based in Switzerland, who does strategic litigation. And we then all three of us partnered with a human rights defender group on the ground in the Democratic Republic of Congo. And in that case, they were investigating a massacre that took place in 2012 in two different villages in eastern DRC. And local human rights defenders were able to use the app based on training that they received from WITNESS on filming a crime scene, and to help put it into a case that TRIAL International was helping to build and they were able to use the app to go back and collect photos that helped to actually authenticate footage that was taken contemporaneously with the massacre. But that hadn't been stored in a way to protect the chain of custody. So they were able to go back and take footage of some of the same scarring injuries on the victims to demonstrate that the ones taken at the time, were accurate, and able to take photos of the mass grave, which could be used to help determine the number of bodies based on its dimensions and how that matched up with the reports of the number of people who had been killed, and with the photos that have been taken at the time of the burials. So all of this footage was entered into evidence by the prosecutor in the case, and was accepted by the court and was noted in the judgement about the power of the footage. And indeed, the two militia leaders were convicted of crimes against humanity. Todd Landman  25:51  Right. So that's a real success story, I had the pleasure of visiting WITNESS in Brooklyn back in 2011. And I recall that it's funny when you enter their offices, they sort of have a timeline of tech sitting in their front room, you know, cameras from ages ago, up to the latest stuff, and they're very, very good at training people how to represent human rights in a slightly different way that you do it. But working together, obviously has produced a great benefit. Now, it's that timeline of tech that interests me. And my final question is that, you know, technology continues to advance at an exponential rate. And what do you see for the future in this space? What would you like to do that you can't do yet, but you think will be possible in a few years time with respect to the technology that you've been working with and developing? Wendy Betts  26:32  That's a great question. There's so many exciting things that can happen with technology. I mean, there's already it's not even in the future, it's looking at virtual reality and using that for juries to kind of put them in the place of the crime scene. And that's all based on taking a number of photos and videos that can then be put through the algorithm to be transformed into virtual reality. There's the idea of being able to take 3D photo and video that you might be able to broadcast into the courtroom. I think the interesting component of that, though, is can the courts keep up? I think the courts now are trying to determine how to best handle digital evidence that's coming out of this flood of footage over the last 10 years. So I'm not sure we're ready to start talking about how we handle 3D images that are captured on a mobile phone. Todd Landman  27:20  Yeah, absolutely. And, you know, like DNA suddenly emerged as a new thing that, you know, transformed the legal profession in terms of solid evidence about whether somebody was actually present at a crime scene, and you could re litigate cases for many years ago, you've put your finger on that challenge between the advance of technology and the ability for legal entities to keep up and courts to keep up there have to be determinations around what is an acceptable piece of evidence. And that's a very interesting challenge for the future. But you've given us so much to think about here. And I think there is this fear of technology as a fear of manipulation of images. There's also the fear of cracking an encrypted storage of these images. But you have given us assurances and confidence in the technology that you developed the way that you've partnered with organisations to help you store this information. And then, of course, this chain of custody, the chain of evidence which is unbroken, and the ways in which these images really do contribute to, as you call it, the long arc of justice. So it's a very interesting conclusion to reach, at least at this stage, in listening to you and talking about how this form of technology which is in the palm of our hands, gives us the power in the palm of our hands to defend human rights in such interesting ways. And in my view, shows us that the digital transformation and technological advance we're seeing in the world can make a positive contribution to positive social change. So Wendy Betts has just leaves me to thank you very, very much for sharing your thoughts with us today on The Rights Track. Wendy Betts  28:45  Thanks so much for having me. It was a great conversation. Christine Garrington  28:49  Thanks for listening to this episode of The Rights Track podcast, which was presented by Todd Landman and produced by Chris Garrington of Research Podcasts with funding from 3di. You can find a full transcript of this episode on the website at www.RightsTrack.org together with useful links to content mentioned in the discussion. Don't forget to subscribe wherever you listen to your podcasts to access future and earlier episodes.   Additional Links: eyeWitness app  

Volume a Volume
VaV 118 - Eyeshield 21 Vol.1

Volume a Volume

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 71:31


Volume 1 Eyeshield 21. No programa de hoje conversamos com Marcelo. @Volumea_Volume Gravação e Edição Final: Otávio Garcia. Edição: Pedro Castro e Otávio Garcia. Participação: Otávio Garcia, Vinicius Gonçalves, Marcelo Augusto e Bucha. Todas as imagens de mangás, animes, etc são marcas registradas dos seus respectivos proprietário

SBS Russian - SBS на русском языке
Maria Mykytiuk: 'I stayed in Bucha to treat people and animals' - Мария Микитюк: "Я оставалась в Буче все дни оккупации, чтобы лечить людей и животных"

SBS Russian - SBS на русском языке

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 24:59


Maria Mykytiuk, a veterinary surgeon from Bucha, stayed in the city during the occupation, as she needed to help wild animals being treated in her clinic, as well as provide medical care to people.  - Мария Микитюк, ветеринарный хирург из Бучи, оставалась в городе все дни оккупации, так как ей нужно было спасать диких животных, находящихся на лечении в ее клинике, а также оказывать медицинскую помощь людям. Каждый день она выходила из подвала и лечила людей и животных. 

The Eastern Front
Special Edition: Views of Ukraine, from Ukraine (with Amb. Dan Baer)

The Eastern Front

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 37:13


In this special edition of The Eastern Front recorded from Ukraine, Giselle interviews Iulia and Dalibor who are on the ground in Ukraine alongside Ambassador Daniel Baer, former U.S. Ambassador to the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe. This special recording includes a small audience and is hosted in a roundtable format by Jeff Gedmin, co-founder and editor-in-chief of American Purpose magazine, and moderated by The Eastern Front's very own Giselle Donnelly. Special thanks to American Purpose for convening this discussion. Part 1 of this episode involves Dalibor, Iulia, and Amb. Baer sharing their eyewitness accounts of Ukraine in wartime and their visits to Bucha, Irpin, and Kyiv. In Part 2, Giselle fields questions from the audience to Dalibor, Iulia, and Amb. Baer on a range of topics, from Ukrainian agriculture to culture to military to politics. Show notes: "https://www.aei.org/op-eds/appeasing-putin-isnt-the-answer/ (Appeasing Putin isn't the answer)" by Dalibor Rohac; "https://www.americanpurpose.com/articles/letter-from-kyiv/ (Letter from Kyiv)" by Jeffrey Gedmin.

The Eastern Front
Live from Kyiv, Ukraine (with Jeff Gedmin)

The Eastern Front

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 34:08


Dalibor and Iulia report live from Kyiv, Ukraine alongside Jeff Gedmin, co-founder and editor-in-chief of American Purpose magazine. Dalibor, Iulia, and Jeff share their astonishing eyewitness accounts from Kyiv, Bucha, and Irpin of how Ukrainian society is coping with, recovering from, and preparing for future war; Ukrainians' resolve to win the war against Russia; the brutal destruction of Ukrainian cities by Russian forces; and incredible stories of the poise, strength, and even humor of the Ukrainian people. Show notes: "https://www.americanpurpose.com/articles/letter-from-kyiv/ (Letter from Kyiv)" by Jeffrey Gedmin.

Volume a Volume
VaV 116 - Dr. Stone Vol.1

Volume a Volume

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 75:06


Volume 1 Dr. Stone. No programa de hoje conversamos com Marcelo e Bucha. @Volumea_Volume Gravação e Edição Final: Otávio Garcia. Edição: Pedro Castro e Otávio Garcia. Participação: Otávio Garcia, Vinicius Gonçalves, Marcelo Augusto e Bucha. Todas as imagens de mangás, animes, etc são marcas registradas dos seus respectivos proprietário

Ecovicentino.it - AudioNotizie
Zelensky posta foto delle città ucraine distrutte. A Bucha trovata una fosse comune di civili

Ecovicentino.it - AudioNotizie

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 1:31


Nei rifugi antiaerei dell'impianto chimico Azot di Severodonetsk, sotto costante attacco dei raid russi, ci sono ancora 540-560 civili, a comunicarlo è il capo dell'amministrazione militare-civile della città, aggiungendo che nel sito ci sono continui combattimenti e tentativi di assalto.

Heimskviður
111 | Lokaþáttur - Jón Björgvinsson

Heimskviður

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022


Það er komið að lokaþætti Heimskviða þetta misserið. Viðmælandi þáttarins er ekki af verri endanum. Sjónvarpsáhorfendur hafa séð fréttir frá Jóni Björgvinssyni frá öllum heimshornum. Jón hefur flutt fréttir frá Sómalíu, Írak, Afganistan, Kólumbíu, Nepal, Íran, Mið-Afríkulýðveldinu, Pakistan, Sýrlandi, Indónesíu, Mexíkó, Úganda, Rúanda og Líbanon, svo fátt eitt sé nefnt. Jón og félagar hans voru þeir fyrstu til að mynda fjöldagrafirnar í Bucha í Úkraínu eftir að rússneski herinn fór úr borginni. Þá var hann sömuleiðis sá fysti sem myndaði líkið af einræðisherranum Gaddafi í Líbíu árið 2011. Í viðtalinu svarar Jón því einnig hvernið það sé fyrir fréttamann að koma á stað sem allir aðrir eru að reyna að flýja frá og einnig hvernig það sé að fylgjast með og tala við fólk sem er að upplifa sínar erfiðustu stundir í lífinu. Ritstjórar og umsjónarmenn þáttarins eru Birta Björnsdóttir og Guðmundur Björn Þorbjörnsson.

Newshour
Ukraine: UN warns of dire humanitarian consequences

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 48:37


UN agencies meeting in Geneva, 100 days into Russia's invasion of Ukraine, have issued dire warnings about the war's consequences both for Ukraine and the world. Russia's blockade of Ukraine's ports has also been blamed for causing - at least in part - the worldwide rise in food prices. We have an interview with the UN's Crisis Coordinator for Ukraine, Amin Awad, who says he hopes negotiations on the resumption of food exports from Ukraine would help ease the pressure on the rest of the world. And the new US ambassador to Kyiv tells us it's not just Ukraine that's affected by the war. Also in the programme: A religious service of thanksgiving for Queen Elizabeth's 70 years on the throne but the Queen was absent; and the re-writing of a tall story - why do giraffes have such long necks? (Photo: Iryna Abramov, from Bucha, Ukraine, whose husband was killed by Russians. Credit: BBC)

Ukrainecast
War Crimes: Opposing Perspectives

Ukrainecast

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 21:03


Russia's UK ambassador calls footage a “fabrication”. In a tense BBC News interview, Andrei Kelin claims allegations of war crimes in the town of Bucha are false despite physical evidence, satellite imagery and eyewitness accounts. Meanwhile, Ukraine's chief prosecutor tells us she's investigating thousands of cases. This episode of Ukrainecast was made by Daniel Wittenberg with Chris Flynn and Clare Williamson. The technical producer was Emma Crowe. The editor is Jonathan Aspinwall. Email Ukrainecast@bbc.co.uk with your questions and comments. You can also send us a message or voice note via WhatsApp to +44 0330 1234 220.

Abandoned America
The Myths and Realities of Chernobyl and Pripyat

Abandoned America

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 82:42


Chernobyl and its neighboring city Pripyat are two of the most haunting abandoned places on earth - but what is it really like in the exclusion zone today? In this season finale we'll hear from Mykhailo "Misha" Teslenko, a Ukrainian guide who has spend years exploring the remains of the worst nuclear disaster ever. We'll talk about what the real risks of radiation exposure are, the people who still live and work in the exclusion zone, and why so many things you may assume about Chernobyl are wrong. We'll also cover the dangerous and foolish actions of the Russian soldiers who recently invaded it, and why they posed such a danger to the rest of the world. Finally, we'll discuss Misha's return to his home in Bucha after the Russian massacres there, and what it is like living through one of the most horrifying genocides in modern history. Special thanks to musician Elizaveta, who allowed us to share her beautiful song "Home" at the end of the episode. Misha's links: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter Elizaveta's links: Website | Twitch | Spotify | Twitter Save the Children Ukraine Donate to the Government of Ukraine Abandoned America's Chernobyl/Pripyat Photo Gallery --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/abandonedamerica/support

Ukrainecast
Russian Soldiers Resign

Ukrainecast

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 29:23


Stories from the front line. The BBC's Fergal Keane and Olga Ivshina hear from Russian soldiers who have risked their lives on the front line of the war. Why have some of them refused to return? The BBC's Jeremy Bowen speaks to us from a Donbas town which is within artillery range of Russian troops. And Rustik, Fergal's fixer in Bucha, discusses his first experience of conflict and how his country is changing. Today's Ukrainecast was made by Osman Iqbal and Natalie Ktena. The technical producer was Emma Crowe. The assistant editor was Sam Bonham. Both Sergey and Marina are voiced by actors. You can email Ukrainecast@bbc.co.uk with your questions and comments or send us a message or voice note via WhatsApp to +44 330 1234 220.

ALLATRA en Español
Sobre acontecimientos y personas | NUEVA TRANSMISIÓN

ALLATRA en Español

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 61:39


Sobre los acontecimientos en Kiev, en el distrito de Bucha, a finales de marzo de 2022. Entrevista con Igor Mijáilovich Danilov. Sobre personas, tiempos y eventos.

asymmetrical haircuts
Episode 58 – War reporting with Danny Kemp

asymmetrical haircuts

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 50:35


Journalist Danny Kemp recalls finding the dead bodies in Bucha, and discusses the role journalists are playing in reporting war crimes in Ukraine.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
What the Hell Is Going On: WTH Do So Many Russians Support Putin? Ian Garner on Russian Propaganda and the War in Ukraine

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022


Do Russians really support Vladimir Putin’s aggression and war crimes in Ukraine? On the weekend of April 1st, Western media shared photos and videos of a brutal massacre in Bucha, Ukraine. The gruesome reports prompted a fresh wave of outrage over Russian war crimes. This week saw the first Ukrainian war crimes trial that ended in […]

What the Hell Is Going On
WTH Do So Many Russians Support Putin? Ian Garner on Russian Propaganda and the War in Ukraine

What the Hell Is Going On

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 43:39


Do Russians really support Vladimir Putin's aggression and war crimes in Ukraine? On the weekend of April 1st, Western media shared photos and videos of a brutal massacre in Bucha, Ukraine. The gruesome reports prompted a fresh wave of outrage over Russian war crimes. This week saw the first Ukrainian war crimes trial that ended in confession and conviction for a Russian soldier. But Russians in government and outside continue to insist that the Bucha massacre is “fake,” or “Western agenda-setting.” More troubling still are broad Russian civilian calls to annihilate the “sub-human” Ukrainians. Marc and Dany explore this disturbing trend with Ian Garner on today's episode. Garner is a historian and a translator of Russian war propaganda. His first book, Stalingrad Lives: Stories of Combat and Survival, was published in 2022.  https://www.aei.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/Ian-Garner-Transcript-Final.docx (Download the transcript here. )

Corriere Daily
Da Bucha a L'Aquila, la morte senza senso: l'Ammazzacaffè di Gramellini

Corriere Daily

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 10:47


Nuovo appuntamento con il sabato di «Corriere Daily»: l'editorialista torna sugli argomenti di cui ha scritto durante la settimana nella sua rubrica «Il Caffè», integrandoli con i commenti nel frattempo ricevuti dai lettori.Per altri approfondimenti:- La giornalista russa e la provocazione per la vittoria dell'Ucraina all'Eurovision: “Missili su Torino” https://bit.ly/387euLG- Il processo a Vadim Shishimarin, il soldato russo: “Sono colpevole”. Ma il Cremlino: “Una messinscena” https://bit.ly/3yLSfWn- Tragedia dell'asilo a L'Aquila, il papà di Tommaso: “Non portiamo rancore” https://bit.ly/3lqoRxf

Ukrainecast
Rebuilding Bucha

Ukrainecast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 28:58


Fergal Keane joins Vitaliy to talk to a member of Bucha's city council who tells us more accounts of atrocities in his city and how it can rebuild. Friend of the podcast Olga Malchevska reports from Kharkiv: the eastern border city in which Ukrainian forces pushed out Russian troops. Vitaliy and Fergal answer your questions before Vitaliy tells us about his upcoming documentary on a women's football team in Mariupol. Today's Ukrainecast was made by Estelle Doyle with Phil Marzouk and Osman Iqbal. The technical producer was Emma Crowe. The editor was Jonathan Aspinwall. Email Ukrainecast@bbc.co.uk with your questions and comments. You can also send us a message or voice note via WhatsApp to +44 0330 1234 220.

Ukrainecast
The Children's Camp

Ukrainecast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 33:53


Victoria and Vitaly speak to Sarah Rainsford who tells us about a facility in Bucha that was once a children's summer camp but has now become a crime scene after the torture and execution of five men there. We hear from NGO worker Oksana who, until recently, was living under Russian occupation in Kherson. She tells us about her colleagues who've been abducted. And NATO Ukraine officer and associate fellow at Chatham House Sam de Bendern talks through the pushback in Kharkiv and the implications of Finland and Sweden joining NATO. Today's Ukrainecast was made by Phil Marzouk, with Osman Iqbal and Chris Flynn. The technical producer was Emma Crowe. The editor was Jonathan Aspinwall.

Global News Podcast
Ukraine: the children's camp that became an execution ground

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 26:48


The authorities in Bucha accuse Russian soldiers of war crimes. Also: North Korea's leader orders his military to help respond to the Covid outbreak; and we report on how some people in the food-producing giant Brazil are struggling to get enough to eat.

Newshour
Hundreds of Ukrainians reportedly executed in Bucha

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 48:52


The BBC has learned that around 650 people were shot in what a senior police official has described as executions in the Bucha region outside Ukraine's capital Kyiv. The BBC's Sarah Rainsford has been investigating what happened. Also in the programme, the UK government is poised to introduce legislation that would allow ministers in London to override parts of the Brexit deal on Northern Ireland; and North Korea's leader Kim Jong-un has lambasted health officials and ordered the army to help distribute medicine, as a wave of Covid cases sweeps through the country. (Picture: Flowers on the ground at the site of a mass grave on May 15, 2022 in Bucha, Ukraine. Picture credit: Getty Images)

CarneCruda.es PROGRAMAS
La matanza de Bucha y la periodista asesinada en Palestina (MUNDO A DISTANCIA-CARNE CRUDA #1054)

CarneCruda.es PROGRAMAS

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 68:41


Más Juntas Emprendemos En Mundo a Distancia recorremos el mundo junto a Revista 5W para mirar a los conflictos y las guerras que siguen activas, algunas de ellas ignoradas por los grandes focos mediáticos, lugares donde la población lleva años sufriendo las consecuencias. Un recorrido que comenzamos recordando la situación en Palestina y a la periodista asesinada por Israel, Shereen Abu Aqleh. Y desde Cisjordania contamos la matanza de Bucha en la guerra de Ucrania y miramos hacia África y el conflicto en Sudán del Sur. Nos despedimos con El Hilo hablando de los feminicidios en México. Más información aquí: https://bit.ly/Mundo1054 Haz posible Carne Cruda: http://bit.ly/ProduceCC

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Europe correspondent Seamus Kearney: Eurovision, Finland's NATO bid, a Brexit-Sinn Fein row

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 12:33


Amid the gloom of war, Ukraine's Eurovision win has lifted spirits, with a decisive win for the Kalush Orchestra, with their entry 'Stefania'. The group has just released the video of their song, filmed among the ruins of Irpin and Bucha. Europe correspondent Seamus Kearney also looks to Finland, which has formally formally confirmed its intention to join NATO in light of Russia's war against Ukraine, and a Brexit row has blocked Sinn Fein - off the back of a historic election win - from appointing a First Minister for Northern Ireland.

State of Ukraine
Business owners in a suburb of Kyiv are trying to reopen as war moves east

State of Ukraine

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 4:04


As the war in Ukraine shifts east, many people are returning to the capital Kyiv. Residents in the heavily-shelled suburb of Bucha continue to clean up and businesses are starting to reopen.

Don Lemon Tonight
Key Vote To Protect Access To Abortion Fails In The Senate

Don Lemon Tonight

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 75:52


A key vote on the Women's Health Protection Act, which aims to protect access to abortion services, fails in the Senate, as President Biden Warns if SCOTUS overturns Roe v. Wade, same-sex marriage will be next. Is Putin's war backfiring on him? Ukraine pushes Russian forces out of key towns near its border, as President Zelensky says his desire to negotiate declines “With each new Bucha, with each new Mariupol”. After 10 months of investigation and nearly 1,000 interviews behind closed doors, in less than a month it will all come to light. Who will the January 6 Committee call to testify? Plus, a Florida judge hints he'll declare Ron DeSantis' new congressional map unconstitutional for diminishing black representation, and an historically black college's women's lacrosse team accuse police of racial profiling after a drug search. To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Fat Leonard
RESISTANCE Stories from Ukraine: "Thank God You Survived This Hell"

Fat Leonard

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 2:35


A new film puts a face to the devastation and resilience of everyday Ukranians finding life in the midst of war. Announcing “RESISTANCE: Returning Home”, a documentary film that gives a visual connection to the gripping stories we've been hearing across this podcast series. In the film, Laurel Chor travels to the liberated towns outside Kyiv in the days following Russia's withdrawal. It was a raw, difficult time. We witness the heartrending images of Bucha, travel with a couple from Irpin as they return home to their neighborhood for the first time, and we see the absolute destruction caused by the aerial bombardment of Borodyanka. To see the full film, visit: www.projectbrazen.com/resistance ~ “RESISTANCE: Stories from Ukraine” is a harrowing and inspirational journey across Ukraine in the first weeks of Russia's invasion. While the military wages war on the frontlines, everyday citizens are picking up whatever weapons they can, including their smartphones, computers, sewing needles, and guitars. Photojournalist Laurel Chor travels to cities across the country, finding extraordinary stories that go beyond the headlines.

Petit Journal
BP 272 - Os xamãs russos; acorda Mario Draghi!

Petit Journal

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 33:34


Quer saber tudo o que aconteceu nas últimas 24 horas na política internacional e na economia? Vem ouvir o Bate-Papo 272, com os professores Tanguy Baghdadi e Daniel Sousa. Hoje falamos sobre a visita da ministra das relações exteriores da Alemanha a Kiev e Bucha, Mario Draghi perdido, o novo pacote de ajuda dos EUA à Ucrânia, a fase difícil da China, o novo Ferdinando Marcos nas Filipinas, a Polônia sem freio e os xamãs russos. Se você quiser contribuir com o nosso projeto em reais, acesse: https://escute.orelo.audio/petit/apoios Se você vive no exterior: https://www.patreon.com/petitjournal Prefere fazer o Pix? A chave é o e-mail: petitjournal.pj@gmail.com Que tal um PicPay? Link: picpay.me/daniel.henrique.sousa Aos nossos apoiadores, nosso muitíssimo obrigado!

Soda-Pop Chronicles: A Wacky Podcast About Vintage America
Killing In The Name Of: The War in Ukraine

Soda-Pop Chronicles: A Wacky Podcast About Vintage America

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 4:55


Rage Against The Machine's famous hit, but lyrics were changed. This is about Putin's aggression and the atrocities seen in Bucha.

La ContraCrónica
Crímenes sin castigo

La ContraCrónica

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 43:20


Hace poco más de un mes, el 4 de abril, Joe Biden calificó al presidente ruso, Vladimir Putin, de “criminal de guerra” en respuesta a las imágenes que mostraban los cadáveres de civiles en la ciudad ucraniana de Bucha, una pequeña ciudad a las afueras de Kiev. Las unidades militares rusas que se habían retirado de las regiones colindantes con la capital y las ciudades de Chernígov y Járkov dejaron a su paso un panorama desolador perfectamente compatible con los crímenes de guerra. Biden prometió que tales crímenes serían juzgados en el futuro, pero no precisó como se llevará eso a cabo. De suceder harán falta muchos años y tienen que darse antes una serie de circunstancias políticas como que el régimen de Putin se desintegre y, tras ello, el nuevo Gobierno ruso decida entregarle al Tribunal Penal Internacional. Esto se antoja complicado porque el apoyo que tiene hoy en día Putin en Rusia es muy amplio. La invasión de Ucrania es, en definitiva, muy popular y la mayor parte de los rusos la apoyan. Esto, claro está, podría cambiar en el futuro, pero para que el Tribunal Penal Internacional incoe un proceso contra los responsables de las atrocidades que se están perpetrando en Ucrania hace falta mucho más. Es necesario documentar de forma muy cuidadosa esas atrocidades, algo que puede llevar años porque la extensión e intensidad del conflicto es muy grande. El Gobierno ucraniano se encuentra en estos momentos recopilando información y tratando de documentarla lo mejor posible con ayuda de especialistas de la Unión Europea y Naciones Unidas, pero es un trabajo arduo que se puede demorar mucho tiempo. Pero, aunque todo quede perfectamente acreditado con testimonios, fotografías y material de vídeo, el problema más peliagudo es cómo capturar al responsable último de estos crímenes y sentarle frente a los jueces del Tribunal Penal Internacional. Esto último tiene también una derivada política. Se corre el riesgo politizar el tribunal de La Haya y que parezca que se está pidiendo el enjuiciamiento de Putin para provocar un cambio de régimen en Rusia. Esto pone al Tribunal de La Haya ante una posición difícil La función de este Tribunal no es meterse en política ni opinar sobre la naturaleza de tal o cual Gobierno, sino dilucidar si se están cometiendo delitos de lesa humanidad en la guerra de Ucrania y castigar a quienes los han perpetrado. Hay motivos para el optimismo, pero también para el pesimismo. Desde los juicios de Núremberg sólo se ha juzgado a un jefe de Estado por crímenes de guerra, el ex presidente de Liberia Charles Taylor, condenado por el Tribunal Especial para Sierra Leona, a 50 años de cárcel por crímenes de guerra y contra la humanidad. El presidente serbio Slobodan Milosevic no llegó a ser condenado porque murió de un infarto durante el juicio. Estos son los dos precedentes más inmediatos, pero se trata de dos países pequeños y sólo se pudo juzgar a los criminales después de que hubiesen salido del poder y con la ayuda de los Gobiernos locales. Que esto último se produzca en Rusia es algo complicado. En La ContraRéplica: - La 'okupación' de la sede de UGT - Bilingüismo en la escuela - La revolución naranja “La ContraHistoria de España. Auge, caída y vuelta a empezar de un país en 28 episodios”… https://amzn.to/3kXcZ6i >>> “Lutero, Calvino y Trento, la Reforma que no fue”… https://amzn.to/3shKOlK Apoya La Contra en: · Patreon... https://www.patreon.com/diazvillanueva · iVoox... https://www.ivoox.com/podcast-contracronica_sq_f1267769_1.html · Paypal... https://www.paypal.me/diazvillanueva Sígueme en: · Web... https://diazvillanueva.com · Twitter... https://twitter.com/diazvillanueva · Facebook... https://www.facebook.com/fernandodiazvillanueva1/ · Instagram... https://www.instagram.com/diazvillanueva · Linkedin… https://www.linkedin.com/in/fernando-d%C3%ADaz-villanueva-7303865/ · Flickr... https://www.flickr.com/photos/147276463@N05/?/ · Pinterest... https://www.pinterest.com/fernandodiazvillanueva Encuentra mis libros en: · Amazon... https://www.amazon.es/Fernando-Diaz-Villanueva/e/B00J2ASBXM #FernandoDiazVillanueva #Putin #Rusia Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast
The Story of a Russian War Crime

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 27:47


The small city of Bucha, not far from Kyiv, has experienced some of the worst atrocities of the Russian invasion so far. It's understood that hundreds of civilians have been tortured, raped and murdered by Russian forces. Yogita Limaye has been hearing the story of one woman who experienced this horror first hand. The war in Ukraine has caused particular worry in Finland, which shares a long border - and turbulent history - with Russia. Finland only became independent from Russia in 1917, and, historically, the price of sustaining that independence was neutrality. Joining other European countries in NATO was out of the question - and by and large, most Finns were not interested anyway. But what a difference a few weeks make, as Allan Little found. As far as Singapore's prosecutors were concerned, he was a drug smuggler, pure and simple. His mother though insisted he was a victim, a man of limited intelligence, who'd been tricked into carrying a small amount of heroin across the border from his home in Malaysia. Whatever the truth, the execution of Nagaenthran Dharmalingam was provided a moment of reflection in Singapore when it comes to the country's tough justice system, reports Suranjana Tewari. Journalism has long been a risky business in The Philippines - nearly a hundred journalists have been murdered there in the past decade. So when one receives a death threat there, they know it's to be taken seriously. And that's what happened to Howard Johnson, as the country's presidential election starts to heat up. He has found himself under fire from internet trolls who have taken exception to his attempt to pose the tough questions to election front-runner Bong Bong Marcos - son of the late dictator, Ferdinand Marcos. Somalia is a country which has suffered its fair share of problems – and to outsiders, it is seen perhaps as a country savaged by war. And yet, there is a side to Somalia and Somalian people which we never get to see, says Mary Harper. For a start, she says, wherever they settle, one thing you can be sure of is there'll be a place to get a bit of personal pampering – and with it, the chance to learn more about the reality of Somalian culture.

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams
DAY 465: New trove of Meadows texts released

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 43:04


A new batch of Mark Meadows' text messages reveal how closely he worked with Fox News host Sean Hannity to push Trump's big lie. Meantime, a judge rejected the former President's bid to end a $10k daily fine in the NY attorney general's investigation. Plus, the Pentagon Press Secretary John Kirby gets emotional discussing the atrocities in Bucha. And a former U.S. Marine dies fighting alongside Ukrainian forces. Peter Baker, Harry Litman, Luke Broadwater, Gen. Barry McCaffrey, Ivo Daalder, Mara Gay, Tim Miller and Dr. Irwin Redlener join.

The News with Shepard Smith
Russian Missiles Strike Kyiv During U.N. Secretary-General's Visit to the City 4/28/22

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 49:48


Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy says the Russian attack on Kyiv today was an attempt by Putin to “humiliate the U.N. and everything the organization represents.” Cal Perry reports live from Kyiv after Ukraine filed the first war crimes charges against Russian soldiers for what they did in Bucha. Plus, Meg Tirrell on Moderna announcing it asked U.S. regulators to authorize its two dose covid vaccine for kids six months through five-years-old. And Perry Russom has an update following the murder of a 10-year-old girl in Wisconsin after a coroner confirmed her cause of death was a homicide. Also, NYU responds to Taylor Swift fans trying to crash the university's 2022 commencement, where she is set to speak and get an honorary degree.

Newshour
UN chief visits mass graves in Bucha

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 48:42


The secretary general of the United Nations, Antonio Guterres, has called on Russia to cooperate with the International Criminal Court in its investigations into alleged war crimes carried out by Russian forces in Ukraine. Also on the programme, protesters calling for the government of Sri Lanka to step down as the country faces the worst crisis since independence. And, scientists say that a tooth from a 205 million-year old sea creature may change our understanding of the earth's earliest predators. (Photo: UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres visits Ukraine 28/04/2022 Reuters)

Post Reports
On the front lines in Ukraine

Post Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 25:52


On today's show we take you on the ground in Bucha, where Russian forces have left a trail of devastation. Then we head east, where we hear from refugees who have escaped the embattled port city of Mariupol. Read more:In the suburb of Bucha, Russian forces have left a trail of violent devastation. Post journalists spent a week reporting from the area and counted more than 200 bodies. Foreign correspondent Louisa Loveluck says the actual number of dead is believed to be much higher. “It's very unusual to walk into a scene where the evidence is still fresh on the ground. And it was truly, incredibly shocking.” And to the east in the Donbas region, Loveluck takes us to a center to which Mariupol residents have escaped. We hear some of their stories. While Russian President Vladimir Putin has told the United Nations he agrees to a humanitarian corridor “in principle,” Loveluck says that, “as someone who's been standing at that evacuation point for days, I can tell you that is not the case.”

CNN News Briefing
9 AM ET: Trevor Reed freed, TN transgender law, recession prediction & more

CNN News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 4:20


Moscow says it has released American citizen and former marine Trevor Reed in a prisoner exchange. Meanwhile, CNN has obtained footage showing Russian military vehicles and troops on a street in Bucha, strewn with civilian bodies. In the US, we'll explain a new law in Tennessee that threatens schools funding if students' birth sex isn't checked for sports. Deutsche Bank is predicting a major recession for the American economy - we'll give you the details. Derek Chauvin is appealing his conviction for George Floyd's murder. And, Myanmar's former leader has been found guilty in the first of a string of corruption cases. To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

The John Batchelor Show
#Ukraine: Prosecuting the 64th Motor Rifle Brigade for alleged war crimes at Bucha. Ivana Stradner @ivanastradner @FDD

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 13:55


 Photo:  Russian soldier #Ukraine: Prosecuting the 64th Motor Rifle Brigade for alleged war crimes at Bucha. Ivana Stradner  @ivanastradner @FDD https://www.thedailybeast.com/vladimir-putin-honors-russian-unit-64th-motor-rifle-brigade-accused-of-gruesome-war-crimes-in-bucha-ukraine https://www.fdd.org/analysis/2022/04/11/uyghur-tribunal-model-war-crimes-ukraine/ Ivana Stradner @ivanastradner ,  advisor to @FDD  Eastern Europe, cybersecurity, information operations, Russia's reflexive control, int'l law.

The Sean Hannity Show
Evidence of War Crimes - April 13th, Hour 3

The Sean Hannity Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 35:43


Dan Hoffman, Fox News Contributor and a 30 Year CIA Operations Officer talks to us about the atrocities in Bucha, the threat of more attacks and the embarrassment that Joe Biden is to the world with his inaction. Russia is reacting to Biden's comments yesterday that the attacks are a genocide on the people of Ukrain Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Ezra Klein Show
A Ukrainian Philosopher on What Putin Never Understood About Ukraine

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 47:55


Russia's invasion of Ukraine is only getting more brutal: We've seen the bodies of civilians strewn in the streets in Bucha, the city of Mariupol almost leveled and, just a few days ago, a Russian missile attack on a crowded train station in Kramatorsk killing at least 50 people. The United Nations has confirmed 1,793 civilian deaths in Ukraine, though the actual number is thought to be far higher.Russia's viciousness in this campaign makes Ukraine's resilience all the more remarkable. Ukrainians have defied expectations in staving off Russia's far larger army and holding cities like Kyiv that some believed might fall within days of an invasion. Much of the commentary in recent weeks has revolved around what this war has revealed about Russia: its myths, its military, its leadership, its threat. What's no less important, though, is what this war has revealed about Ukraine.Ukrainians have modeled a deep commitment to self-determination and shown how far they would go to protect it. The Ukrainian philosopher and editor Volodymyr Yermolenko has written that “freedom is the key trait of Ukraine's identity as a political nation,” and Ukraine's resistance testifies to how deep that trait runs.Yermolenko is a philosopher, the editor in chief of UkraineWorld and the editor of the essay collection “Ukraine in Histories and Stories.” I invited Yermolenko onto the show to help me understand how Ukraine has defined itself in relation to the political behemoths to its east and west: Russia and Europe. Our conversation also explores what it has felt like to be in Kyiv as Russian troops have shelled the city, how definitions of time and home change during war, what has — and hasn't — surprised Yermolenko about the Ukrainian resistance, what people in the West may not understand about the cultural differences between Ukraine and Russia, why Ukraine's political structure makes it so difficult to conquer, how Ukraine is reminding the West why its republican and humanistic values matter, what Yermolenko would say to President Biden if he could and more.Mentioned:“Volodymyr Yermolenko, a Ukrainian philosopher, considers his national identity” by Volodymyr Yermolenko“Dreams of Europe” by Volodymyr YermolenkoBook Recommendations:“Ukraine in Histories and Stories” by Volodymyr Yermolenko“The Gates of Europe” by Serhii Plokhy“Lost Kingdom” by Serhii Plokhy“Chernobyl” by Serhii Plokhy“Blood of Others” by Rory FinninThoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at ezrakleinshow@nytimes.com.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of “The Ezra Klein Show” at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.“The Ezra Klein Show” is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris, Kate Sinclair and Mary Marge Locker; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

How It Happened
Putin's Invasion Part IV: The view from Russia

How It Happened

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 26:00


In part four of How It Happened: Putin's Invasion, Axios World editor Dave Lawler digs into polling indications that Russians are rallying around their president even as Western sanctions and global condemnations escalate. This episode features interviews with a top political opposition leader, the director of the leading independent polling firm in Russia, a prominent sociologist from the Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences and a journalist on the ground in Moscow.  Across these interviews, Lawler sets out to learn why the more horrific the allegations against Russia — such as the apparent massacre of civilians in Bucha— the stronger the impulse seems to be to reject them as lies.  Credits: This episode of Putin's Invasion was reported by Dave Lawler, Alison Snyder, and Naomi Shavin. Sara Fischer and Emily Peck contributed reporting. It was produced by Naomi Shavin. Alison Snyder is the series editor. Sara Kehaulani Goo is the Editor-in-Chief. Ben O'Brien is the mix engineer. Mixing, sound design, and music supervision by Alex Sugiura. Theme music and original score by Michael Hanf. Special thanks to Axios co-founders Mike Allen, Jim VandeHei and Roy Schwartz.

The Ezra Klein Show
Fiona Hill on Whether Ukraine Can Win — and What Happens if Russia Loses

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 47:32


The Russia-Ukraine war has changed considerably in recent weeks. Vladimir Putin is no longer talking explicitly about regime change in Ukraine. The Russian military has shifted its focus away from taking Kyiv and toward making territorial gains in Ukraine's east. The prospect of an outright Ukrainian victory is no longer out of the question. And negotiations between the parties over a possible settlement appear to be making some progress.There's been a darker turn as well: Over the weekend, images surfaced of atrocities committed by the Russian military against Ukrainian civilians. And Western leaders are considering expanding military aid to Ukraine, initiating war crimes investigations and placing harsher sanctions on Russia in response.Fiona Hill served as deputy assistant to the president and senior director for European and Russian affairs on the National Security Council under Donald Trump and as a national intelligence officer for Russia and Eurasia under Barack Obama and George W. Bush. I had her on the show a few weeks ago to help me make sense of the Russia-Ukraine conflict as it was developing at the time, and it was one of the most illuminating perspectives I'd heard on the topic. So I invited her back to discuss how the situation has changed, where we are now and what the conflict could look like.We discuss why Hill has become pessimistic about the possibility of a peace deal, how the carnage in Bucha could alter the course of the conflict, why Russia has been so much weaker on the battlefield than expected, whether Ukraine can achieve an outright victory, why this war is making Putin more popular in Russia (not less), what else the West could be doing to support Ukraine, why Hill thinks we're entering a “much darker” phase of the conflict, what role China could play in bringing about a negotiated settlement, what a renewed framework for European security could look like and more.Book Recommendations:The Art of War by Sun TzuThoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at ezrakleinshow@nytimes.com.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of “The Ezra Klein Show” at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.“The Ezra Klein Show” is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris, Kate Sinclair and Mary Marge Locker; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Our executive producer is Irene Noguchi. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Kristina Samulewski.

The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell
Ron Klain: Biden kept his promise with Judge Jackson

The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 42:30


Tonight on the Last Word: The Senate votes 53-47 to confirm Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to the Supreme Court. Also, Sen. Mitch McConnell threatens to not confirm any more Supreme Court justices if Republicans retake the Senate. And Ukrainian President Zelenskyy warns that other areas of the country are “much worse” than Bucha. Ron Klain, Caroline Randall Williams, Charles Blow and Ali Arouzi join Lawrence O'Donnell.

Global News Podcast
Russia is suspended from UN's Human Rights Council

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 28:15


Ukraine's ambassador to the UN Sergiy Kyslytsya accused Russia of “horrific” abuses – raising the issue of alleged civilian killings in the city of Bucha. Also: The US senate has confirmed America's first black female Supreme Court Judge, and Taylor Swift lyrics as you've never heard them before- translated into Latin.

Deadline: White House
“Just doesn't fly on any kind of logical basis"

Deadline: White House

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 92:43


Nicolle Wallace discusses the Justice Department's deepening investigation into Jan. 6th. Plus, new sanctions on Russia, the horrors of Bucha, Republicans vote against a resolution affirming support for NATO, and the House prepares a vote to hold two former Trump aides in contempt. Joined by: Luke Broadwater, Jackie Alemany, Neal Katyal, Jason Johnson, Courtney Kube, John Brennan, Nathan Rott, John Kirby, Matthew Dowd, David Jolly, Ryan Reilly, Harry Litman, and Garrett Haake

The Daily
Why Proving War Crimes Is Difficult and Rare

The Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 31:59


This episode details graphic scenes. Many around the world are calling the indiscriminate attacks on civilians in Bucha, a suburb northwest of the Ukrainian capital, Kyiv, a war crime.But investigating such atrocities is painstakingly complicated. Could one case that resulted in convictions — the genocide in Bosnia in the 1990s — offer lessons on how to proceed?Guest: Roger Cohen, the Paris bureau chief for The New York Times.Want more from The Daily? For one big idea on the news each week from our team, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: With Russian forces retreating, Ukrainians in Bucha are finding scores of bodies in yards and on the roads amid mounting evidence of intentional and indiscriminate killings.The images from Bucha spurred Western leaders to promise even tougher sanctions against Russia.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

Start Here
Surviving Bucha

Start Here

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 26:07


As human rights observers arrive in Bucha, Ukraine, survivors describe executions by Russian troops. The U.S., along with the U.K. and Australia, say they're developing hypersonic missiles to keep up with China. And the FDA meets to discuss a "variant-specific" COVID booster.  We need your help! “Start Here” is up for two Webby Awards: “Best News & Politics Podcast – General Series” and “Best News & Politics Podcast – Individual Episode” for our coverage of the January 6 insurrection. Click the links to cast your vote and help us get the wins! Plus, check out the other Webby-nominated shows from ABC Audio: “The Dropout: Elizabeth Holmes on Trial” – Nominated for Best Crime & Justice Podcast – General Series and Best Crime & Justice Podcast - Individual Episode “The View: Behind the Table” – Nominated for Best Limited-Series & Specials, Entertainment

The Argument
Why Russian Sanctions Won't Stop Putin

The Argument

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 37:00


The Russian invasion of Ukraine is entering its sixth week. Atrocities committed by Russian troops have reached new levels; in Bucha, recent photos show dead, unarmed civilians lining the streets. The harrowing scenes have prompted NATO leaders to consider taking new measures against Russia, namely to equip Ukraine with more weapons and impose more sanctions on Russia.But will those measures be enough? With President Biden now calling the atrocities “war crimes” and Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki of Poland “acts of genocide,” what more should NATO do to help protect Ukraine and its sovereignty?On today's episode of “The Argument,” host Jane Coaston calls upon the former NATO top commander Gen. Philip Breedlove to give context and answers to these large questions. Breedlove is now the distinguished chair of the Frontier Europe Initiative at the Middle East Institute, and he has a lot to say about the alliance's approach to Russia. “There are people in our government and people in NATO that believe if we keep doing nothing and we just keep doing what we're doing, supplying them, that the risk will not grow. I'm here to tell you the risk is growing every day,” he says.(A full transcript of the episode will be available midday on the Times website.)

What A Day
Not Ready, Not Set, Redistricting

What A Day

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 28:35


Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky gave an emotional address to the United Nations Security Council on Tuesday after his visit to Bucha. In his speech, Zelensky accused Russian troops of atrocities, which included violent murder, rape, and a number of horrific acts. There are a number of states fighting over redrawing their maps even as the midterm elections inch closer. Michael Li, senior counsel for the Brennan Center's Democracy Program, joins us to break down some of the states that are knee-deep in this issue right now. And in headlines: Oklahoma's Legislature passed a near-total ban on abortion, China recorded its highest number of COVID cases in a single day, and the Biden administration plans to extend the payment pause for federal student loan debt to August. Show Notes: Vote Save America's Midterm Madness – https://votesaveamerica.com/midterm-madness/ Follow us on Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/whataday/ For a transcript of this episode, please visit crooked.com/whataday Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Hold These Truths with Dan Crenshaw
It's Time to Debunk the Pro-Russia Talking Points | Dr. Thomas Rid

Hold These Truths with Dan Crenshaw

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 52:16


Putin's de-nazification narrative, weaponized biolabs, and conspiracy theories about the atrocities in Bucha are just a few examples of the Russian disinformation campaign that a shocking number of Americans on the left and right are falling for. National security expert Thomas Rid joins us to explain the history of Russian propaganda and the current tactics used by the Putin regime to commit disinformation and political warfare. Dr. Thomas Rid is the author of "Active Measures: The Secret History of Disinformation and Political Warfare" and the Professor of Strategic Studies at Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies. Follow him on Twitter at @RidT.

What A Day
Joe Time Like The Present To Forgive Student Loans

What A Day

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 22:36


Signs of a massacre in Bucha, a town near Kyiv, have intensified calls for investigations into possible war crimes by Russia. Footage and photographs from Bucha show the corpses of at least twenty men strewn across the streets. The town's mayor has said the victims included men and women and at least one child, and that they've already buried 280 people in mass graves. Today, hundreds of people are assembling at the U.S. Department of Education in D.C. to urge President Biden to cancel all federal student debt. The pause on payments is currently slated to end on May 1st, and Biden has yet to announce either another extension or any kind of relief for borrowers. Braxton Brewington, the press secretary for The Debt Collective, joins us to discuss why debt needs to be canceled rather than paused. And in headlines: Six people are dead after a mass shooting in Sacramento, Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan dissolved the country's parliament, and Amazon workers at a warehouse in New York voted to form the company's first union in the U.S. Show Notes: The Debt Collective – https://debtcollective.org/ Washington Post: “What the student loan payment pause has meant to Black women” – https://wapo.st/3K5SjTH Follow us on Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/whataday/ For a transcript of this episode, please visit crooked.com/whataday Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices