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Best podcasts about goducks

Latest podcast episodes about goducks

IE Sports Radio
Northwest Territory Sports - Episode 12: Geno Smith time; Kraken unleashed!

IE Sports Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 56:56


Follow the show on Twitter! @NWTSportsIE and host Brad Buckingham @BeardedEmerald With Russell Wilson being placed in injured reserve, Geno Smith make his first NFL start in 4 years for the Seahawks. Do we believe in Geno, and the rest of the team to win? The Seattle Kraken wrapped up their first week of NHL action as the newest franchise in the league. How exciting is it to watch this team, and what are we learning?

Quack Talk
Episode 88: Sore Mouth

Quack Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 86:42


On this week's episode we discuss the latest Oregon news, Oregon vs Cal preview, Devin's betting segment, and in OT the normal plane into the side of a mountain. See you next week.     GO DUCKS!!

IE Sports Radio
Northwest Territory Sports - Episode 11: It's time to address some tough questions about the Seahawks

IE Sports Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 59:54


Follow the show on Twitter! @NWTSportsIE and host Brad Buckingham @BeardedEmerald With the Seahawks falling 2-3 on the season, it's time for an intervention about this team. Brad is going to ask some tough questions and do his best to be postive throughout the show.

IE Sports Radio
Northwest Territory Sports - Episode 10: Will the Mariners reach the playoffs!? Seahawks looking to bounce back; Oregon Ducks gets upset

IE Sports Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 54:20


Follow the show on Twitter! @NWTSportsIE and host Brad Buckingham @BeardedEmerald. The MLB regular season is coming to an end, but the Mariners have an opportunity to play in the postseason. Brad will go over their playoff chance scenario, and talk about the tremedous season that they have had in 2021. The Seahawks are struggling as they fall 1-2 on the season and the conversation is now focused on if there is a coacing problem, or a talent problem. Plus, with Oregon losing for the first time this year, what is the state of PAC12 football now?

Talkin' Ducks
Jordan Kent joins Sasha Spencer to wrap-up 10 years of Talkin' Ducks

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 31:30


Jordan Kent joins Sasha Spencer to wrap-up the Talkin' Ducks Podcast reliving some of his favorite memories from his time covering the Oregon Ducks for the last 10 years on the show. Also, Jordan dives into his career at Oregon, how it led to broadcasting, and the importance of staying authentic.2:00 The first time Jordan sat in the chair to host Talkin' Ducks 10 years ago4:00 Jordan Kent relives his career while at Oregon6:30 Why Jordan's favorite sport was basketball while at Oregon11:00 Takeaways from being coached by your father at the collegiate level 17:00 When Jordan knew broadcasting was in his future19:00 How Jordan watches Oregon athletics21:00 The Kent household balancing sports and life23:00 Staying authentic and making it your identity27:00 Most memorable interviews on Talkin' DucksSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

IE Sports Radio
Northwest Territory Sports - Episode 9: Can the Seahawks bounce back after a brutal loss? Recap of PNW NCAAF; Mariners still alive!

IE Sports Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 54:45


Follow the show on Twitter @NWTSportsIE and host Brad Buckingham @BeardedEmerald. After a tough loss against the Titans last week, Brad looks at this next game against the Vikings as a must win. The Mariners are still alive in the Wild Card race, and the Ducks, Beavers, and Huskies come out victorious for the first week of PAC12 play.

Talkin' Ducks
Catching up with Oregon's newest commit Isaiah Sategna shares

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 27:19


Oregon commit Isaiah Sategna joins Sasha Spencer to discuss his love of track and football. Also, he shares his path to becoming a Duck, finishing high school, and why Isaiah chose Oregon.1:00 Versatility in Track and Football1:45 When Football became a real dream to chase after4:00 Transitioning from track to football5:40 Getting compared to Odell Beckham and other fast receivers 6:50 Raw talent vs trained talent 7:45 What the list of colleges looked like and why Oregon12:00 Impression of Robert Johnson and the track program16:00 Being present and in the moment in High School20:00 Preparation to be able to play at the college level22:00 NIL's Impact on the future25:00 Excitement for Oregon See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

IE Sports Radio
Northwest Territory Sports - Episode 8: The 12's are back at Lumen Field! Huskies bounce back; Mariners playoff chances over?

IE Sports Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 46:36


Follow the show on twitter! @NWTSportsIE and host Brad Buckingham @BeardedEmerald The Seahawks face the Tennessee Titans for their home opener at Lumen Field, and of course the 12's will be LOUD. Brad talks about the week 1 victory over the Colts and preview their next matchup against the Titans. Also, some conversation about the Huskies first victory of the year, and the Mariners playoff chances that aren't looking to good.

The Onside Zone with Big O
Podcast Friday - Mario Cristobal Go Ducks 09 17 2021

The Onside Zone with Big O

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 7:14


Big O takes a look at Mario Cristobal joining a radio show & his great comments Go Ducks!

James Crepea Show
James Crepea Show 9/15/21: Who in the Pac-12 needs a win most this week? Colorado reporter Brian Howell, Arizona State reporter Michelle Gardner, Mario Cristobal says Go Ducks to USC, Washington reporter Mike Vorel, UCLA reporter James Williams

James Crepea Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 94:10


On Wednesday's edition of The James Crepea Show on Fox Sports Eugene, James discusses who in the Pac-12 needs a win most this week, Colorado beat reporter Brian Howell of the Boulder Daily Camera recaps the Buffs' loss to Texas A&M and previews the matchup with Minnesota, Arizona State beat reporter Michelle Gardner of the Arizona Republic previews the Sun Devils at BYU, Mario Cristobal says Go Ducks to USC specualation, Washington beat reporter Mike Vorel of the Seattle Times recaps the Huskies' 0-2 start, UCLA reporter James H. Williams previews the Bruins matchup with Fresno State

Quack 12 Podcast
Quack Recap: Ohio State

Quack 12 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 25:50


Adam does another quick breakdown of the game in this solo recap. Can you believe we finally got the Buckeyes off our back?!?! GO DUCKS! GO CRISTOBAL!Check out our patreon for Duck-related content. Please, give us a five-star rating and review on apple podcasts!Follow us on twitter! @quack12podcastAnd our Youtube Channel!

IE Sports Radio
Northwest Territory Sports - Episode 7: Seahawks season begins! Oregon upsets Ohio St; Mariners still in the wild card race

IE Sports Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 59:47


The Seahawks regular season has kicked off! Brad discusses the curent matchup against the Indianapolis Colts and shares the five thing he wants to see from the team this season. Brad talks about the week 2 games in college football, and also gives an update on the Mariners current wild card standings

Talkin' Ducks
Previewing Oregon's big game against Ohio State

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 29:19


Host Sasha Spencer talks football, football and more football in the latest edition of the Talkin' Ducks Podcast. This week we look back at the 31-24 victory over the Fresno State Bulldogs and look forward to the huge early season matchup against No. 3 The Ohio State University. Sasha is joined by University of Oregon Hall of Famer Anthony Newman, former Duck QB Joey Harrington and current Big Ten Network analyst, and former Buckeye, Joshua Perry. Topics covered are the play of quarterback Anthony Brown, the importance of Kayvon Thibodeaux and how the Ducks defense stacks up against the Ohio State receivers.1:52 – Anthony Newman on the 34-21 victory over the Fresno State Bulldogs3:08 – Newman on Anthony Brown's decision making at QB4:54 – Importance of getting game reps in Saturday's victory over Fresno State6:01 – Newman on the how disruptive Justin Flowe and Noah Sewell are for the Ducks7:45 – How important a healthy Kayvon Thibodeaux will be to the Ducks against the Buckeyes9:48 – What is Coach Cristobal telling the players as they head into a hostile environment like the Horseshoe11:23 – Keys to victory for the Ducks13:39 – How the defense will prepare for Ohio State16:26 – Former Ducks QB Joey Harrington on Anthony Brown and Kayvon Thibodeaux24:39 – Big Ten analyst Joshua Perry on what to expect in the Week 2 matchup26:47 – Sasha's key elements that will help dictate the gameSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

IE Sports Radio
Northwest Territory Sports - Episode 6: College Football season opener; Mariners update; Seahawks roster and schedule breakdown

IE Sports Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 60:35


The NCAA football season has started, and Brad recaps the action that happened with the Ducks, Huskies, Cougars, and Beavers. Brad gives an update on the Mariners wild card chase and gives thoughts on the contract extensions of GM Jerry Dipoto and manager Scott Servais. With the NFL regular season beginning next week for the Seahawks, Brad breaksdown the final 53-man roster and shares his honest, unbiased prediction of the 17-game schedule.

Talkin' Ducks
Silver medalist Scott McGough shares his Olympic experience in Japan

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 39:49


Scott McGough, former Oregon Duck's Baseball Pitcher, joins Sasha Spencer to discuss his experience in the Olympic games this year and shares his excitement for winning silver with team USA. Also, Scott dives into his time in the Nippon Professional Baseball league in Japan and looks back at some of his favorite memories from playing with Ducks Baseball.1:30 Excitement around getting picked to play for team USA3:00 Getting the call to play in the MLB and getting to the next level4:30 Picking Oregon to play in college7:45 First rivalry game Scott participated in10:00 Experience on the Collegiate National Team 14:00 Spending three years at Oregon and choosing college baseball18:30 Staying motivated on the path to playing baseball in Japan20:00 Favorite Olympic moments and memories 23:00 Effect of no fans at the Olympics26:00 Path to the final game for Gold33:00 Connection to Japan and the people of JapanSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

MEMIC Safety Experts
How Workplace Safety Influenced Labor Day - Celebrating the American Worker with Randy Klatt

MEMIC Safety Experts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 55:37


Back in 1892, President Grover Cleveland signed a law making the first Monday in September of each year the Labor Day holiday.  Do you know the history and the struggle of the American worker that pre-dates this historic day?  On this podcast, Randy Klatt, Director or Region 2 Loss Control here at MEMIC helps me explore what it was like to be a worker in the late eighteen and early nineteen hundreds and workplace injuries, fatalities, child labor, and deplorable conditions were the catalysts for fair wages, the 8 hour workday, and workplace safety. Wage Trends, 1800-1900 (nber.org)   Age of workers Lewis Hine - Photographer These Appalling Images Exposed Child Labor in America - HISTORY The Photographs of Lewis Hine: The Industrial Revolution and Child Laborers [Photo Gallery] | EHS Today Teaching With Documents: Photographs of Lewis Hine: Documentation of Child Labor | National Archives Search Results: "Hine, Lewis Wickes, 1874-1940" - Prints & Photographs Online Catalog (Library of Congress) (loc.gov) Search Results: "" - Prints & Photographs Online Catalog (Library of Congress) (loc.gov)   Achievements in Public Health, 1900-1999: Improvements in Workplace Safety -- United States, 1900-1999 (cdc.gov) History of Workplace Safety — SafetyLine Lone Worker Deadliest Workplace Accidents | American Experience | Official Site | PBS Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire - HISTORY Child Workers and Workplace Accidents: What was the Price Paid for Industrializing America? – Our Great American Heritage (1857) Frederick Douglass, "If There Is No Struggle, There Is No Progress" • (blackpast.org) Haymarket Riot - HISTORY https://www.dol.gov/general/laborday/history Labor Day 2021: Facts, Meaning & Founding - HISTORY History of Labor Day | U.S. Department of Labor (dol.gov) Deadliest Workplace Accidents | American Experience | Official Site | PBS History of the Holidays: Labor Day | History #82 - Comparative wages, prices, and cost of living : (from the Sixteenth ... - Full View | HathiTrust Digital Library History of The US Minimum Wage - From The Very First Minimum Wage (bebusinessed.com) Profile of work injuries incurred by young workers (bls.gov) History of Workplace Safety in the United States, 1880-1970 (eh.net) Peter Koch: [00:00:04] Hello, listeners, and welcome to the MEMIC Safety Experts podcast. I'm your host, Peter Koch, as we're about to celebrate Labor Day. I expect that you're getting up and gearing up for family and friends around the pool, the barbecue, the yard, getting people together, trying to enjoy that day off. Well, while you're doing that? Have you ever thought about where we get the Labor Day holiday from, where did it hey come from? Why do we have it? Why was it even started in the first place? So for today's episode, how workplace safety influenced Labor Day and vice versa. Celebrating the American worker. I'm speaking with Randy Klatt, CSP director of Region two, lost control here at MEMIC. Randy leads a team of consultants serving the central and southern Maine area. So, Randy, welcome back to the podcast. I'm excited to have you on to talk about Labor Day today. Randy Klatt: [00:00:55] Thank you, Peter. It's always great to talk to you. Happy holiday. Peter Koch: [00:00:59] Yeah, it's coming [00:01:00] right up here. And, you know, I was thinking about, well, the podcast and MEMIC and what our mission is to get out there and to work with companies to help keep workers safe. And I was thinking about the Labor Day holiday. And I'm like, you know what? I've enjoyed the Labor Day holiday now. I've enjoyed time off or on the Labor Day holiday. But what is it? Where to come from? And that got me to thinking having a conversation with you actually around. Well, what was it like to be a worker? Well, before our time being a worker, before our parents, and probably before our grandparents, maybe around the time of our great grandparents, because prior to, you know, the early nineteen hundreds. Labor Day didn't exist. And I think we kind of take it for granted. So let's talk about that. What was it like to be a worker in, say, the late eighteen hundreds and what were the conditions? What was going on? And I know [00:02:00] you've been doing a little bit of reading. I've been doing some reading, too. We certainly don't have any firsthand experience, even though we're both a little grayer than we were last year. We're not that gray yet. But there are some fascinating history about work in the late eighteen hundreds. What do you think it was like out there? Randy Klatt: [00:02:18] Oh, I think it was pretty horrible, quite frankly. And there is plenty of gray. In fact, I am all gray now. So thanks for the plug. But that's the way it is. Yeah, it we when we think of the industrial revolution, we sometimes think about progress and automation and heavy machinery and, you know, the wonderful products and everything that we developed and could put out there. What we don't really think about often enough is the workers who actually made all that happen. And often the horrendous conditions that they had to work under and for what we would really call minimal pay and no benefits whatsoever. [00:03:00] Peter Koch: [00:03:01] So some of the benefits you got to go home maybe at the end of the day. Randy Klatt: [00:03:06] Yeah, that was your benefit. Maybe one day off a week and maybe enough money to put a little food on the table and keep a roof over your head, if you were lucky. It was really quite horrendous. If you look at some of the statistics regarding how much people were paid in your average manufacturing facility and, you know, the textile mills or the steel mills. It's an eye opener, even in today's standards, if you adjust these things for inflation and when you're when you're making 55 cents an hour in 1860, I'm sorry, per day. That's easy to confuse, isn't it? Fifty five cents a day. Not per hour. You know, bring that to today's standards. It's still poultry. It's just amazing. [00:04:00] Peter Koch: [00:04:00] Yeah. It's really hard to think that you could live on that. And I think that's why you had multiple people in the same family, from dad to mom many times, all the way down to the kids going out and getting a job instead of going to school or maybe after school if they had the opportunity to go to school, because, you know, you add 55 cents a day up and it doesn't go very far when you've got to purchase food and pay for rent and mend clothes and all of the things that come with just the daily burden of life. Randy Klatt: [00:04:39] Right. And you add to that the strenuous physical labor that was involved in most cases, and then the hazardous conditions. We go into manufacturing facilities today and we see some things that are well in our world. They're pretty scary. Oh, my gosh. You really need a guard on that in [00:05:00] running nip point. Well, take that back a hundred and twenty years ago, and there were things spinning and turning and pulling every which way all over the building, and no one gave it a second thought. And you sent people in there to work in close proximity to all of that every day and just accept it, because if you don't want this job for fifty five cents a day, then someone else will. Yeah. So you're almost a commodity to me is if you're not going to work, then we'll find someone else who will. Because these are good jobs. Fifty five cents a day. Oh, my goodness. Peter Koch: [00:05:38] And really, some of the only jobs, you know, when we started to see the advent of us moving from that agrarian society to the advent of the industrial revolution and people moving into cities and towns to be closer to where the work is, because they couldn't find jobs or the jobs were too taxing in the agrarian culture, [00:06:00] in agriculture and farming, getting those better jobs in manufacturing and textiles and steel and construction and carpentry, just kind of looking more at some of those wages. You know, the difference in that that textile manufacturing, daily wage of 55 cents in 1860, you could make a whole dollar, 40 a day as a skilled carpenter. Just a few years later, in in the later eighteen hundreds. So depending on what job you had, I mean, you could you could earn some decent wages rather than just being a farmhand for a while or again, dealing with all the hazards that we knew about within the agricultural society and working on a farm, getting kicked by a cow or getting caught up in some of the horse or ox driven equipment to plow the fields and the hours that were there moving into the or moving into the cities. Sometimes, [00:07:00] you know, you're trading maybe one evil for another, but you're getting paid more for it. Randy Klatt: [00:07:08] Yeah. And if not more, you're actually being paid if you work a full day in most cases. Anyway, you were actually paid for that day. When you're on the farm, any farmer out there today understands this. Clearly, it's still the case. Mother Nature rules the day. And you just might not have the crop this fall or to harvest. And you don't have enough to feed your family, much less to sell to actually make a living. So seeing these jobs was an attraction for people. Nevertheless, it was still not what we would call desirable in the way of a job today. I was interested how Andrew Carnegie got his start. Most people know who Andrew Carnegie was. And, you know, the forerunner to U.S. Steel Corporation, my gosh, in [00:08:00] the railroads and all kinds of industry. And at one point was the richest man in America. He actually started his first job in this country in 1848 at the ripe old age of 12. And he was a bobbin boy, changing the spools of thread in a cotton mill. And he had to work 12 hours a day, six days a week. So he did have one day off. And for that, what, 72 hours of labor for a 12 year old boys starting wage was a dollar twenty per week. So even adjusted to it by inflation or with inflation over the years, that equal that's equivalent to about thirty six dollars in today's numbers. Can you imagine telling a 12 year old today that I'd like you to work 72 hours this week and I'm going to pay you thirty six dollars to do it? Peter Koch: [00:08:59] I think the conversation [00:09:00] would have stopped at work. Randy Klatt: [00:09:04] Well, quite possibly. Peter Koch: [00:09:06] Good. And then you get into all the rest of the reasons you don't want to work is the limited wage. And how come I don't have a day off and. Well, you have one day off but it's not enough days off. And yeah, there's a lot of challenges out there. Randy Klatt: [00:09:20] Yeah, you probably have to pay your babysitter thirty six dollars to watch your kids for a couple, two or three hours when you go out for an evening. Peter Koch: [00:09:27] For sure. Randy Klatt: [00:09:28] Can you imagine that Peter Koch: [00:09:31] You had mentioned this just a bit ago, too, about the conditions that you'd work in. And I doing some research for this looking or you can find so many different really amazing images of workers from this time frame. And one of the most prolific photographers that were out there is Louis Hine. And some of the most famous pictures that he has are from like the steelworkers having lunch [00:10:00] on the suspended beam. Therefore, I'm not sure what they were building, you remember what they were building in that particular picture, I can't recall. Randy Klatt: [00:10:08] I don't remember which building it was. I believe it was New York City. Peter Koch: [00:10:11] Yeah, I think it was to regardless. But that's the picture that people think of when they think of Louis Hines. However, when you start to look at other photos that he took, it's really representative of the American worker in the late. Eighteen hundreds, early nineteen hundreds. And there are thousands of photos which depict kids, really young kids, women, children, men all working together in some very dangerous occupations, whether it be textiles or in the fishing industry or in some of the other manufacturing industries where, you know, those in running nip points, you're surrounded by in running nip points. There's one of those photos we were talking about earlier [00:11:00] where there's a couple of kids standing on a mechanical loom right next to all the bobbins. And the caption is, they had to stand on the loom because they weren't tall enough to reach the bobbins that they had to change out. Randy Klatt: [00:11:17] Yeah, exactly. So eight year olds, nine year olds working these 60, 70 hour weeks around this equipment with absolutely no regard to their safety, simply get the job done. And we see that mentality some today. You know, we've got to get the job done. So we bypassed some things, but certainly not to the scale that we were doing back then, and not just with adults, but with children full time employed as fish cutters. And yeah, they cut their hands a lot. But, you know, that's part of the job. We're going to just overlook that piece because we're paying them by box. [00:12:00] So, you know, piecework was also something that was fairly prevalent, too. So it simply encouraged people to do things quicker, faster, which, of course, is often less safe. But as long as they got the job done, then they were happy to go home with their twenty five cents because they were able to get four boxes of fish cut for the day and they were paid five cents a box. So woohoo. Yeah. And you just Peter Koch: [00:12:26] Bring that extra money home to help the family get by for the week. And in those photos, you know, you often see adults with bandages or with a missing limb or a digit. And kids as well. There's a couple of images that I saw where, you know, it's captioned. You know, they're talking about the kid who has a big bandage on his hand, one of those fish cutters. And there's another photo there of all of the fish cutters, all the kids that were probably in one particular factory. And they all had knives [00:13:00] and some of the knives were as big as a kid's forearm, for crying out loud as long as the kids for he's holding this enormous knife out there. And you would be scared and today to hand a kid a knife like that. But if the kid came to work and he was part of the workforce, here you go. And the kids were proud of what they did. I mean, you can't take that away from the kids those days. I mean, they were working for their family. They were working for the wage. They were trying to do the best they can in some fairly deplorable conditions. Really challenging conditions. Randy Klatt: [00:13:35] Absolutely. And it wasn't just the manufacturing facilities either. There some great photos of the newsies. You know, there was one of the most enjoyable musicals I've seen in the theater was newsies about a young boy selling newspapers. But the reality is you have seven and eight year olds out running around the streets before dawn trying to sell newspapers, and they're getting [00:14:00] paid pennies to do so. So industry during these this time and we're talking anywhere from eighteen fifties or sixties up through the turn of the century into 1920s, it was pretty darn brutal for most people in most occupations. Not to say that it was everyone, but a lot of people made some money. Mm hmm. Including Mr. Andrew Carnegie. There is a reason he became a multimillionaire and the richest man in America. Peter Koch: [00:14:39] Certainly. And I think that's part of what we're celebrating today is we are celebrating. You know, the labor that the American worker, that through the courage and determination in some of those really challenging places allowed our country to be where it is today. And granted, we [00:15:00] are not in. The best place all the time, but we can certainly look at, especially around work, the work that we do and the innovations that have come out of the American worker and the labor force that's there. There's a lot that they've done and a lot that they've allowed us to do. And that we take for granted today. A lot of those things that we take for granted today, whether it be a day off or equal wage or a living wage, are things that came out of the labor force and is part of what Labor Day really is. And we'll talk about more of that kind of later on as we go, because we certainly didn't end with a photographer taking pictures of kids with bandages on their hands. That got us to Labor Day because there were you know, there were injuries and there are definitely fatalities that occurred. And individual fatalities happened probably more frequently than we thought. They're doing a little research. Again, there's [00:16:00] the death calendar. If you if you want to look it up and talking about an article about from achievements in public health. Nineteen hundred through 1999 and improvements in workplace safety. So there's a death calendar in industry. So all industries for Allegheny County. And it has the months of July through June in that order. And they have little red x's in each of the boxes where somebody has died. And sometimes there's one, sometimes there's multiple. And this is just one county where it occurred. And there are very few days that are blank or that do not have a red X in that calendar. It's a fairly stunning graphic to think about that back in that back in that time frame, Randy Klatt: [00:16:49] I was really impressed with the impact that that calendar has. Well, first of all, how many times have we ever seen a death calendar? [00:17:00] I mean, that's just the topic. The title itself is pretty indicative of disaster. But nineteen O' six July through nineteen O' seven and June five hundred and twenty six workers. And you're right, it's hard to find a date there where there's no red X and many of them have multiple. That's just inconceivable. And that's, like you said, one county, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Oh, my goodness. Peter Koch: [00:17:31] There's one week, August 19. Oh six where? Twenty one through twenty four. Those three days in there. Four days in there. There's an average, I think of probably four X's in each of those days, if I can peer through some of the blurriness of the reproduced image. So like one week you're talking close to 20 people, 20 people, different days, probably different occupations passed. [00:18:00] And never came back home from work. So there's that part again, where, you know, you have that that vision of leaving for work, kissing the family goodbye, saying goodbye to your girlfriend, your wife, kissing the kids, whatever, with the intent that you're going to be able to come back home and enjoy something of your labors for that day and your family to for you to come back home to. And you never do. Five hundred and twenty six people in that year in that county didn't come back in 1906, 1907. Randy Klatt: [00:18:36] Yeah. When we look at the Bureau of Labor Statistics, as you alluded to earlier, statistics weren't well, they certainly weren't to the point where they are today. So much of it was manual and so much of this was undocumented. So who knows really how many people died. Those, I guess, are the ones that were identified. It could have been a whole lot more. But [00:19:00] we're talking twenty three thousand people a year, in some cases, working out through an equivalent of somewhere around sixty one deaths per 100000 workers. Today's rate is somewhere just over three. So we have certainly come a long, long way since those days. Peter Koch: [00:19:24] Yeah, I think so. And you bring up a really good point around, you know, injuries, statistics being important because, you know, individual injuries and even individual fatalities will have you know, people will get focused on that and then you'll move off to the next thing. It was one person who got injured. It was one person who didn't come home. And it is a tragedy. But we don't tend to look at those individual incidences as critical. But only when you start to pull all of those statistics [00:20:00] together and you look at it as a whole. Did they become really powerful like the image that we were just talking about? So if you get a chance, go up and Google, search that death calendar for an industry for Allegheny County, and it'll pop up and you'll take a look at. And that's a really powerful image when you see all of those red Xs, because we live in an age where information is plentiful and it's easy to pull that trend together. It wasn't always that easy like you talked about before. And sometimes it really took like a mass casualty incident for workplace injuries or fatalities to get noticed beyond the immediate family and friends and the workers that it truly affected. Peter Koch: [00:20:38] And our history of work is really riddled with those issues. And again, we didn't start keeping good records probably until the eighteen hundreds and into the nineteen hundreds. But you get back you know, there are some statistics back there from a website [00:21:00] called The Deadliest Workplace Accidents in the American Experience. So back in the late 60s in Lawrence, Massachusetts, the Pemberton mill, large cotton goods factory collapsed without warning and it killed one hundred and forty five workers and injuring another one hundred and sixty six. And again, an injury back in 1860 is not like an injury. It is today in two thousand twenty one. We're going to go to the doctor, going to get good treatment. Chances that you're going to make it out of the hospital whole and return to the workforce is pretty high. Back then, you had an injury. There's a good chance you never return to the workforce. And then instead of being part of the family growing, you became a burden because they needed to support you and you could no longer go back to work. Randy Klatt: [00:21:49] Yeah. At that point, you became a real liability for everyone else, right? Yeah. We weren't talking about days of health insurance and disability insurance [00:22:00] and EMS coverage for your community. So you have emergency responders and fully manned fire departments. And we just that wasn't there. You get hurt. What are the odds that that's going to become infected or you're not going to get the right care? It could have been treated properly and you might get back to work, but there was no way to access the care. So you ended up with a disability for the rest of your life and no way to be compensated for that. It really is a sad part of this industrial revolution that we don't often think about. What did it really take and what are those mass casualty incidents that we really should know about? And then on Labor Day, look back and appreciate what people went through to get to where we are today. Peter Koch: [00:22:53] Yeah, because even after Labor Day was thought about and initially [00:23:00] celebrated, Labor Day, initially was celebrated in the late eighteen hundreds, so 1882 was that first Labor Day celebration in New York. And there's a couple of myths out there, not myths, but stories out there about competing people who suggested that you gather the laborers together to celebrate labor and to hear people talk about labor and organized labor and what you could do as a as a community of laborers. Well, yeah, that's the first the first celebration, 1882. And they talk about Peter J. Maguire being from the Carpenters Union and then Matthew Maguire from the Machinists Union were the two guys that are credited with first bringing Labor Day into the forefront here in the Americas. Randy Klatt: [00:23:50] Which obviously came from labor. And this wasn't recognized by anyone else, by the federal government or state government [00:24:00] or any other organization. It was the laborers who actually took the day off in 1882 unpaid to parade, to celebrate their accomplishments or to at least try to make people aware of the significant contribution they have. Peter Koch: [00:24:16] Yeah, so and the power that you have together that the power that you have as a group to recognize that there are some challenges out there and to really fight for the rights of the American worker back then. And there was a lot to fight for back then. And still even after they celebrated Labor Day. And again, you alluded to it took the day off, not were given the day paid to have off and celebrate Labor Day with your family. The first labor days were people didn't go to work. It was almost like a protest. They didn't show up that day. They went to New York and they marched the Labor Day parade to go to Union Square in New York City and march, [00:25:00] almost in protest. So, yeah, it's an interesting piece. We celebrate Labor Day today as a holiday or as an opportunity. And they celebrated Labor Day really as a chance back then, which is pretty interesting. Randy Klatt: [00:25:15] Indeed it is. And we're talking 1882. But if you look up some of the worst disasters in history and you started to read some of those, at least one of those on that list, there are all many years after those first Labor Day celebrations and even after it was actually a recognized federal holiday. So there were still a lot of struggles to be had down the road by workers to reach that equitable pay and equitable treatment and safer workplaces and all those things of the livable wage you mentioned earlier. Peter Koch: [00:25:54] Yeah, Randy Klatt: [00:25:54] It was still worth fighting for. And you still [00:26:00] had a pretty good chance of not coming home after going to work, especially if you were in heavy industry is still working in mining in particular. Oh, my gosh. Imagine being underground in a mine with the conditions they were in around the turn of the century. Peter Koch: [00:26:18] Oh, my gosh. No, I can't. And some of those pictures from Lewis Hine were showed groups of boys, young boys who were working in the mines. And you read some of those descriptions and what they did and they were they were the ones that went places in the mines that are grown adult couldn't go. So not only were they exposed to all of the same exposures that are hazards that an adult would be in a mine, which back then was a myriad of things that weren't controlled, everything from air quality issues to explosives to all sorts of things that never really came into play until labor [00:27:00] started to look into it and say, we need to do something about this. But the boys were then, for like I guess lack of a better term, allowed to go wiggle their way in the places and place charges and find different passages where a full grown adult couldn't go. Being a little claustrophobic myself, I'm not sure that I could do that. Randy Klatt: [00:27:22] Yeah, that wouldn't be on my list of to dos, that's for sure. And the worst mining disaster in American history occurred in nineteen O' seven. So just a few years after the turn of the century. And the wording just kind of gets to me when it describes this, the underground explosion. This was in West Virginia that kills three hundred and sixty two out of the three hundred and eighty men and boys working that day.  Oh, my goodness. Peter Koch: [00:27:55] That's it's almost a whole a whole community of people that were wiped out. You [00:28:00] know, it's three hundred men and boys, three hundred men and boys that, you know, had families to go back to. You've just cut out half of the population of probably a mining town, you know, within that one particular event that occurred. Randy Klatt: [00:28:16] Exactly. Peter Koch: [00:28:17] And it didn't stop there. And it wasn't just in the mines where things were really challenging. And we found a lot of a lot of people getting injured or killed. We talk about this often, especially if we're talking about the history of OSHA and where OSHA came out of and safety in America. One of the watershed moments, I think, in workplace safety came out of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire disaster that happened back in or on March 25th in 1911, which the history of that particular fire. Not even looking at pictures, just reading a [00:29:00] description of it can almost cause nightmares. It's pretty can be pretty scary. Randy Klatt: [00:29:04] It sure can. And a well known incident that we've learned a lot about being in the worker's comp industry and knowing that this was one of the key moments that brought forth the need for some sort of compensation for injured and fatally injured workers. But I agree. You read the read the description of what happened when this factory started to burn and where the people attempted to evacuate when there are 600 workers in this building. And of course, the fire hoses weren't working because they were rotted and the bowels were rusted shut. And so their panic ensued as they tried to get out and only a few people could fit into the elevator at a time. So, of course, eventually that broke down with many people still trapped in the building. So many fell to [00:30:00] their deaths in the elevator shafts, trying to somehow escape the floor that was on fire. And so many died in the building. But then just to learn that there were 58 people who died jumping to the sidewalks from the building, it's just that is horrifying to think about the loss, a total of a hundred and forty six people. Peter Koch: [00:30:22] Yeah, and in those the conditions in in how this all came about is the tragedy. I mean, I think I know when I've described part of this in a class before, people immediately think about 9/11 and those iconic images of people plummeting from the Twin Towers. And, you know, that's that is a horrible image to have fixed in your mind. And it is a horrible reason for those things to happen, to have a plane, a terrorist attack happen on our home soil [00:31:00] for that to occur. But in the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, we did this to ourselves. Right. So the doors the exit doors were chained closed because management didn't want people taking breaks when they shouldn't be taking breaks. You know, I guess having someone work 12 hours a day, six days a week just isn't enough. Right. So. Got to make sure that they're not taking a break when they shouldn't. You know, the fire started in a rag bin. Right. So we look at this often. We go different places and we see a bin full of used oily rags in a maintenance facility. And we talk to people about, hey, this is going to combust at some point in time, like, yeah, we'll take care of it. We'll take care of it at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, something that we take for granted, the exit routes. Right. So your fire escapes were too narrow. There wasn't enough room on the fire escape to handle the occupancy [00:32:00] of the floor of the building. So when people went out to the fire escape, the fire escape collapsed. So consider that like oh fire. Right. So I'm going to go out and I'm going to go out. What I know is the fire escape, and I'm going to walk onto that. And I'm assuming that fire escape is going to hold me and it doesn't. And it collapses and prevents everyone else from escaping. And then considering the response and you said this early on, like we didn't we had some organized EMS, we had some especially in the cities, there was fire response. A lot of it was volunteer, some of it was professional. But the fire occurred on the eighth floor. The hoses only reached to the seventh floor like. So that math just doesn't add up. Right. So there's lots of things that we take for granted today that came out of these. Disasters. [00:33:00] One of those is workplace safety. In a in a focus on workplace safety, another one is building code and making sure that the building is able to support the number of people and what they're doing in there and how do they get out in the in the event of an emergency. And we tend to forget that these rules aren't there just so that our jobs can be more annoying. But they're there because there has been substantial issues. And they talk about this in the history of Triangle Shirtwaist, too, with like 18 minutes from the time of the fire to the time that was all done and all. One hundred and forty six people died. Eighteen minutes. That's crazy to think that that many people would die almost in an instant. Peter Koch: [00:33:47] Let's take a quick break. Maybe you didn't know, but MEMIC is committed to making workers' comp work better for everyone. It's been our hallmark since day one. And through compassion, partnerships and a relentless commitment to workplace [00:34:00] safety, we make an impact, whether it's our claim specialist, connecting injured workers with the best medical care and helping them understand the worker's comp system or our safety specialist conducting training for frontline staff and workplace assessments with your supervisors. We understand your industry and how a robust safety program is a pillar of any successful company. Already a MEMIC policyholder. Then reach out to your MEMIC safety management consultant for more information about resources that can help. And if not, and you're interested in how MEMIC can partner with you for workplace safety. Contact your independent insurance agent. Now, let's get back to today's episode. Randy Klatt: [00:34:45] It is crazy. And as you said, self-induced. And we see that to some degree in business today when we do mention something about the regs or the exit was partially blocked or you can't get to the fire [00:35:00] extinguisher. And, you know, those sorts of things that we always point out. And it's the overriding philosophy of, yeah, we'll get to it, but really, we have to do business first and it's not going to happen. What are the odds? Right. What are the odds that this building is going to catch on fire, that we're going to have a problem and that's not the right way to look at workplace safety. And we should have learned from these incidents. Every manager, every supervisor, every business owner should have a real good appreciation of history. So we don't repeat it. Peter Koch: [00:35:39] It's that's a very good point. There's a phrase out there for those who don't know their history are destined to step in it again. Right. Or fall into it again, or however you want to finish that particular phrase. And there's an author out. There was this quote came out of another website that we're looking through, the [00:36:00] article called Child Workers and Workplace Accidents. What's the price paid for Industrializing America? They talk about how between the years of 1830 to 1880, there's this overworks generation of Americans that reached adulthood with hunchbacked weakness, both legs, damaged pelvises, missing limbs from working in those conditions for so long. And you have a generation that has human damage that doesn't allow them to interact in the same way with everyone else that we take for granted today. And I thought it was an interesting connection, because if we just take the example of how industrial technology back in the eighteen hundreds changed a generation and moved that same phrase to today and how technology take the industrial out of it, technology has changed a generation. What kind of injuries [00:37:00] are we seeing in a lot of young people today? And it might not always be work related. It might be just someone going to the doctor because they've got aches and pains, but it's neck injuries, it's wrist injuries, it's overexertion injuries. And most of it's coming from the phone posture. The technology posture of the hunched back, the rounded shoulders, the hands together, typing with their thumbs, staring at a small screen for hours a day. And you're seeing injuries or challenges to people that are really we saw similar things from introduction of technology back in the eighteen hundreds to. So, again, that whole concept of we need to understand our history to be able to see our current day and possibly even the effect of the current day on the future accurately, too. So there's a lot in this history that we can really take forward. [00:38:00] Randy Klatt: [00:38:00] Right. That's those are great points. It's all about those musculoskeletal disorders that take place over time and know. One hundred and fifty years ago, it was manual labor in horrible conditions and long hours and no days off. That resulted in these injuries and these long term problems that people had today. We still have a lot of people working in industry and construction and such. But you're right, there are a lot more people using the computer or using a phone or a tablet. And we actually have young people who are starting to grow spines out of their cervical spine. So like bone spurs that are developing, which is not that uncommon with elderly people because you do have to hold your head up. Right. The human head weighs 12 pounds, 15 pounds, give or take. And [00:39:00] that takes some effort to hold up. We don't really think about it until we put our head down looking at the phone. Then after a few hours, our neck really starts to hurt and we ignore it. And over time, we forget the pain and we just deal with it. And we're actually starting to grow these things out of our spine that are being found in teenagers when normally they wouldn't be found until you're in your 70s. So there are workplace challenges today that we really need to face that are, you know, from different causal factors. But again, looking at history, we should be able to learn from them and find a better way. And let's listen to your safety consultant when they make recommendations. Gosh darn it, Peter Koch: [00:39:50] Every once in a while. Don't delete the email. Read it through. Think about it before you delete it, possibly, right? Randy Klatt: [00:39:55] That's right. We know what we're talking about. So interesting [00:40:00] that that even in 1911, we see this disaster and it did spur a lot of work in building codes and, you know, the sort of standards for the workplace. But it was still another 60 years before OSHA was founded. The Occupational Safety and Health Act was founded. So it took a long time even to get to that point where we actually had federal regulations about workplace safety. Peter Koch: [00:40:35] Yeah. And even beyond or even before that. So OSHA, from a workplace safety standpoint, which is near and dear to our hearts, but just from a fair labor part, like what's fair, what's fair work, what constitutes fair work that even get passed until 1938, the Fair Labor Standards Act, where they addressed child labor and they addressed [00:41:00] the workday and they addressed fair wages and living wages, all which kind of come together to help the American worker be a more valuable component of the success of America. Randy Klatt: [00:41:13] It did take a long time, way too long. Peter Koch: [00:41:17] Way too long. And, you know, like we said it before, our current workplaces aren't free from problems. They're not free from hazards or free from people getting injured. We have come, like you said, we've come a long way. But the way there was really hard won. And whenever you've got struggle, there's going to be some progress. And to flip that around, Frederick Douglas, it's a quote that comes out of the, uh, around 1857. If there is no struggle, there is no progress. So you look at all the challenges that occurred back there and that started the labor union. It started to pull organized the different factions, not [00:42:00] factions, but the different groups from the different industries to come together and start to advocate for better conditions in the workplace. And those unions came forward and they fought for better hours, equal pay and safer working conditions. And actually, you know, Randy, when you think about it, that's somewhat on how MEMIC was actually formed and not on that, you know, not out of that particular quote. But really, there was a struggle in Maine in the early 1980s through the early nineteen nineties and through those struggles MEMIC was actually formed. It was it didn't come out of it wasn't somebody's brainchild because they thought it would be an awesome idea. It was a response to a crisis like a lot of this. Right. So the [00:43:00] the Labor Standards Act and the building codes and OSHA you hear many times that OSHA standards were written in blood because they were there's every standard in that OSHA standards book is because there's somebody or some body part that's attached to that, that didn't make it home or didn't make it home with the person after the incident occurred. Randy Klatt: [00:43:27] Yeah. And then early 1990s, Maine had one of the worst, if not the worst, workplace injury records. Our injury rate was really high and worker's compensation insurance was extremely expensive. And insurers were, in fact, withdrawing from the state. And we got to a real crisis point with the businesses in Maine and something had to be done. So thank goodness MEMIC was founded. An initial [00:44:00] mission statement really did talk about not only providing great insurance and great safety services, but we wanted to promote fair and equitable treatment for all workers. And that's still true today. We've updated the mission statement and our vision and values and all that along the way. But that's still at the core of what we do is taking care of people. And ideally, we take care of people before there's an injury. That's our role as a safety consultant, is to get out there and find those issues, find those emergency exits that are blocked and make sure that they're taken care of. So in the event of a disaster, we actually get people out of the building instead of trapping them inside. But when injuries do occur, MEMIC is also there to provide the insurance benefits and medical care so that people can get back to work healthy and happy as soon as possible. So it is an important mission. I never conceived of myself [00:45:00] working for an insurance company. I know I don't like to pay insurance premiums any more than anybody else does. But this is an important piece of every worker's life, and it is important. Peter Koch: [00:45:14] Yeah. And we're not saying that, you know, MEMIC was formed so that you could celebrate Labor Day, but I think it fits within the whole the whole thought of, you know, Labor Day came out of a struggle. And there's good things that come out of a struggle. And we have a long history of struggling for things and to things in America. You know, after those first two celebrations in New York in 1882, it still wasn't a national holiday like you didn't once. They all met together and had the parade in New York and they figured out which McGuire was the one to recognize as the person who suggested Labor Day still wasn't a national thing. I mean, that was [00:46:00] just New York City. And it took five more years for the first state in the Union to actually recognize Labor Day as an official holiday. And I don't have a lot of information about that. But Oregon was the first state back in 1887 to make Labor Day an official holiday. So I'd be curious if we can go back in time and kind of look at that first Labor Day. And was it just the day off or was it like our current Labor Day and certain companies you get that benefit of having a paid day off. So I'm not sure all of the labor in Oregon were paid for that first Labor Day holiday, but that was the first state to declare Labor Day a holiday. Oregon in 1887. Randy Klatt: [00:46:50] Oh, go Oregon. Peter Koch: [00:46:51] There you go. Randy Klatt: [00:46:52] Go Ducks! Peter Koch: [00:46:52] And even after that, it still didn't catch on. It's still a number of years, another five or six years [00:47:00] for more states to sign things into law. There again, seven more years. Grover Cleveland, are the president at the time finally signed the Labor Day holiday into law. So then it was a national holiday. And prior to that, in between 1887 and 94, 23 other states had adopted the holiday. And then Grover Cleveland signed it into law because it was becoming a trend, I guess, across the nation. Randy Klatt: [00:47:32] Ya he saw the inevitable, huh? Yeah. Yeah. Looked at it, decided to do the right the right thing for a change. Peter Koch: [00:47:38] And that's even that's an interesting history, because there, you know, prior to that, in that same year was the Pullman strike where the railroad workers were on went on strike for two, almost three months. And it was pretty nasty. There was a lot of violence and [00:48:00] some deaths, both on the strikers side and on the government side that tried to break it up. But ultimately, the labor won it out, but it was still, you know, still a violent part of our history. So, you know, again, 1894, a watershed time in our history to signing Labor Day as a holiday into law. But there is still a lot of struggle around that just to make it happen. Randy Klatt: [00:48:30] Yeah. Can you imagine having to riot and to get into gunfights on the streets and calling in the Pinkerton agents to protect your facility and all those kinds of things just because you're not willing to pay a fair wage or workers are complaining of unsafe working conditions? Peter Koch: [00:48:54] Sure, I don't think I can. I don't think I can. And I think it [00:49:00] highlights, you know, as we think about Labor Day and we think about the roots of Labor Day, it highlights, again, the need for both parties to come to the table rationally to talk about what's right and not what's just good for the one, but what's good for more than just the one. How are we going to be successful as a company as well as be successful as the individual? Because, you know, there are many cases where when you just focus on the company being successful and not the workers being successful, you're not going to end up being successful as a company. And we've talked about a lot of challenges, there's hundreds, if not thousands of companies out there that have not been able to be successful for one reason or the other, and sometimes it is because they didn't have the right priorities in mind when they started looking at labor. Randy Klatt: [00:49:59] After [00:50:00] all, who is the company? We want to make the company successful. And I don't know of any company that will be successful if their workforce isn't successful. They're the ones that make it happen. So protecting those workers is not only the right thing to do from an ethical standpoint, but certainly the right thing to do from an economic standpoint. We all know just the small part of that whole pie being the worker's compensation insurance premium and how much that costs of business. And just like any insurance, the more you use it, the more it costs. So you can drive those direct costs of an injury through the roof pretty darn quickly. And it would be far less expensive to get ahead of the game and take care of those workers in the first place so that that doesn't happen. Safety is always a pay me now or pay me later proposal and [00:51:00] now is going to be a lot less expensive than later. It's just that's the way it always works. Peter Koch: [00:51:06] It always does. And we can be really short sighted. And think about the not putting out a little bit now, but it's like you said, it's going to come around later. Back to you. Well, so we've been talking about Labor Day here for almost an hour. And I think it's good for us to recognize. Right. So back before 1994 or excuse me, back before 1894, even farther than 1994, right back before 1894, Labor Day didn't exist. We didn't recognize the success of and the input of the American worker, that construction worker, the textile worker, the manufacturing person, the firefighter, the police officer, the nurse, the doctor, the whoever it is, the [00:52:00] American labor, the person that's out there doing things and making things for to make America successful and then to try to be successful on their own. That symbiotic relationship between the work that needs to be done and the worker that's going to do it. And the history of Labor Day is just filled with struggle, courage, defiance, injuries. And as we've talked about, even death out there today, we celebrate Labor Day on the first Monday of September. And most of us will enjoy a day off from work sharing time and maybe a meal with friends and family. Peter Koch: [00:52:34] And it's become the last hurrah before summer ends and the school year starts in earnest. So people are celebrating a lot of things. And when we do it, it's easy to forget the history of our modern workplace and how we got the eight hour workday overtime pay holidays or even machine guards, air quality monitoring respirators, lock out tag out, fall protection, all of the tools and standards [00:53:00] that give us the opportunity to come home after work and see those friends and family. So when you're celebrating, don't forget the thousands of workers out there in retail, hospitality, food service, emergency services and health care that are going to celebrate Labor Day by working for us or in some cases with one of our loved ones. So this Labor Day, remember that it's not just a holiday from work, but it's a holiday about work. And without the lives and the limbs of the workers that came before us and the unions and officials that spoke out, we would not have the day to celebrate. There's a good chance more of us would be spending this first Monday of September in the hospital or worse yet, in the morgue. Peter Koch: [00:53:49] Thanks again to everyone for joining us. And today on the MEMIC Safety Experts podcast. We've been speaking about the history of Labor Day and how it has influenced safety with Randy Klatt, director of Region two here at MEMIC. If you have any suggestions for a safety related podcast [00:54:00] topic or we'd like to hear more about a topic we've touched on. Email me at podcast@MEMIC.com Also, check out our show notes for today's podcast at MEMIC.com/podcast where you can find links to the articles and resources we used for today and our entire podcast archive. And while you're there, sign up for our safety net blog so you never miss any of our articles and safety news updates. And if you haven't done so already, I'd appreciate it if you took a few minutes to review us on Stitcher, iTunes or whichever podcast service that you found us on. If you've already done that. Thanks. Hope you've subscribed because it really helps us spread the word. Please consider sharing this show. With a business associate friend or a family member who you think will get something out of it. And as always, thank you for the continued support. And until next time, this is Peter Koch reminding you that listening to the MEMIC Safety Experts podcast is good, but using what you learned here is even [00:55:00] better.  

Talkin' Ducks
Janie Reed's path to the Tokyo Olympics women's softball team

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 33:29


Janie Reed, former Ducks women's softball player, joins Sasha Spencer to discuss what it took to become an Olympic athlete and getting to fulfill her childhood dreams. Also, Janie dives into her time at Oregon and what her plans are for after softball.2:30 Getting onto the Olympics softball team4:20 When Softball became something Janie would be dedicated to7:00 The jump to collegiate softball9:45 Balancing parenting and coaching11:45 Softball in the PAC-1213:40 Oregon Softball's dream of making it to the world series16:00 Faith and expectation's role in Janie's success18:30 Softball vs Baseball20:00 Choosing to play for team USA24:00 International Softball differences26:30 Significance of getting to play in Tokyo, Japan28:00 Maintaining a connection with University of Oregon31:30 The future after softballSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Talkin' Ducks
Kenjon Barner discusses Herbert's impressive rookie season and the 2011 Oregon Ducks

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 15:21


Kenjon Barner joins Jordan Kent to share his excitement for year 3 in the NFL, and what it is like playing with Tom Brady. Also. Kenjon discusses his thoughts on Justin Herbert's rookie season and his favorite memories playing for the University of Oregon.2:15 Excitement for year 3 in the NFL4:00 Playing with Tom Brady5:50 Thoughts on Justin Herbert's impressive rookie season10:00 Greatest Oregon team of all-time11:30 Favorite memories playing for the University of Oregon12:50 Cardboard sign secret13:30 Thoughts on Cristobal and the current DucksSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Talkin' Ducks
Mike Yam joins Jordan Kent to discuss expectations for the Ducks' upcoming season

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 11:58


Mike Yam, from the NFL Network and SiriusXM Host, joins Jordan Kent to discuss the latest news around the PAC-12 conference realignment and how it impacts the Ducks. Also, the two dive into the expectation for the Oregon Ducks this season, and look ahead to the Ohio State game.1:00 Mike Yam's wine suggestions for the Summer2:30 Pac-12 Conference realignment 4:20 Oregon Ducks team identity 6:45 Previewing Oregon vs Ohio State9:15 Expectations for Justin Herbert in year 2See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Talkin' Ducks
Dr. Courtney Cox discusses how sports, gender, and social science work together

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 49:24


Dr. Courtney Cox, an Assistant Professor in Indigenous, Race, and Ethnic Studies at the University of Oregon, joins Sasha Spencer Atwood to discuss how sports, gender and social science all work together. The two also dive into the mental health of athletes and the relationships that athletes have with teams and the fans they represent.1:00 Excitement around the Olympics 2:15 How sports, race, and social science all work together5:00 Balancing fandom and research7:00 The important role that sports play in society10:00 Mental health of athletes15:00 The relationship between athletes and the fans they represent18:20 The challenges female athletes face around pregnancy 21:40 Technologies role in sports and advance analytics28:00 Training is becoming more scientific to max out the potential of athletes33:00 How the work Courtney does impacts the culture and life of the athletic department35:00 Care for the athlete39:00 Care for female and non-binary athletes vs care for male athletes42:00 Importance of athletes using their platforms for social changeSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Talkin' Ducks
Tiana Tozer: making an impact as a Paralympian & humanitarian

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 43:43


Former Oregon rugby player Tiana Tozer share her story of how she went from a rugby player at the University of Oregon, to a wheelchair basketball star and an advocate for people with disabilities.2:35 Tiana shares her story about how she was hit by a drunk driver and lost the use of her legs when she was a sophomore at the University of Oregon.6:20 Tiana says she was recruited to play wheelchair basketball while she was in the ICU.10:45 Learning to play wheelchair basketball.13:50 On not receiving special treatment despite her disability and learning that her disability could not be an excuse.19:40 How she got involved in overseas work.26:10 How much of Tozer's work is with disabled people and how much of it is with able-bodied people.40:00 The growing popularity of the Paralympics and growth of the Paralympic Games.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Talkin' Ducks
Tiana Tozer: making an impact as a Paralympian & humanitarian

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 43:43


Former Oregon rugby player Tiana Tozer share her story of how she went from a rugby player at the University of Oregon, to a wheelchair basketball star and an advocate for people with disabilities.2:35 Tiana shares her story about how she was hit by a drunk driver and lost the use of her legs when she was a sophomore at the University of Oregon.6:20 Tiana says she was recruited to play wheelchair basketball while she was in the ICU.10:45 Learning to play wheelchair basketball.13:50 On not receiving special treatment despite her disability and learning that her disability could not be an excuse.19:40 How she got involved in overseas work.26:10 How much of Tozer's work is with disabled people and how much of it is with able-bodied people.40:00 The growing popularity of the Paralympics and growth of the Paralympic Games.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Talkin' Ducks
Kayvon Thibodeaux part II: The legacy he'll leave behind

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 20:26


In part two of our conversation with Ducks defensive end Kayvon Thibodeaux, he discusses his life beyond football and the legacy he hopes to leave behind at the University of Oregon.2:00 How transferring high schools helped prepare him for life.3:45 Lessons learned from mentors along the way that Kayvon still uses today.6:30 A special lesson Kayvon's mom taught him about knowing the answers to questions before asking them.9:00 Kayvon talking about his love of chess.10:30 The things that Kayvon is working on as a player for his final season at Oregon.11:40 How he keeps from buying into the hype surrounding him.14:20 Kayvon says the most important thing about this year's opponents is that the Ducks continue to play their game.15:00 Discussing other leaders on the U of O Football team.16:30 What Kayvon will most cherish about his teammates at Oregon.18:05 Wanting to start charter school for high school and middle school kids.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Talkin' Ducks
Kayvon Thibodeaux part II: The legacy he'll leave behind

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 20:26


In part two of our conversation with Ducks defensive end Kayvon Thibodeaux, he discusses his life beyond football and the legacy he hopes to leave behind at the University of Oregon.2:00 How transferring high schools helped prepare him for life.3:45 Lessons learned from mentors along the way that Kayvon still uses today.6:30 A special lesson Kayvon's mom taught him about knowing the answers to questions before asking them.9:00 Kayvon talking about his love of chess.10:30 The things that Kayvon is working on as a player for his final season at Oregon.11:40 How he keeps from buying into the hype surrounding him.14:20 Kayvon says the most important thing about this year's opponents is that the Ducks continue to play their game.15:00 Discussing other leaders on the U of O Football team.16:30 What Kayvon will most cherish about his teammates at Oregon.18:05 Wanting to start charter school for high school and middle school kids.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Talkin' Ducks
Kayvon Thibodeaux has hopes for the Heisman in year three

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 22:14


Oregon defensive lineman Kayvon Thibodeaux joins this week's podcast to discuss the new changes to the NCAA's rules on name, image and likeness, leadership and what he hopes to accomplish in year three with the Ducks.1:50 Kayvon's collaboration with Tinker Hatfield and Phil Knight.2:30 Kayvon's feelings the rule changes on name, image and likeness are finally coming to fruition.7: 45 Thoughts on whether more kids will be willing to stay in school longer now that they have the opportunity to make money while in school.9:35 Why Kayvon chose Oregon.11:00 What do he likes about Tim DeRuyter's defense.12:00 Thibodeaux thinks this will be Oregon's best team ever, except for maybe the team with Mariota that went to the National Championship Game.12:45 Why he playa so well in the Pac 12 Championship Game.16:30 Talking about playing against Justin Herbert when he was a freshman.19:40 Kayvon's goals for year 3 with the Ducks.21:00 How much motivation for this season is based on losing most of the season last year.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Talkin' Ducks
Kayvon Thibodeaux has hopes for the Heisman in year three

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 22:14


Oregon defensive lineman Kayvon Thibodeaux joins this week's podcast to discuss the new changes to the NCAA's rules on name, image and likeness, leadership and what he hopes to accomplish in year three with the Ducks.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Talkin' Ducks
Devon Allen details NIL changes & his return to the Olympics

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 37:36


Former Ducks track and football star Devon Allen joins this week's podcast to discuss returning for his second Olympics in Tokyo and the landmark ruling that will allow NCAA athletes to make money off their name, image and likeness.2:00 How this year's Olympic Trials compared to the prior Trials 7:10 How Devon's approach to the hurdles has changed since the 2016 Trials14:45 The possibility of not having fans in the arena in Tokyo17:30 Devon's favorite piece of Olympic gear20:00 The Allen family plan for watching Devon compete at the Olympics23:00 What it was like competing in the re-imagined Hayward Field25:00 Devon weighs in on the new NCAA rules that allow athletes to profit off their name, image and likenessSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Talkin' Ducks
Devon Allen details NIL changes & his return to the Olympics

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 37:36


Former Ducks track and football star Devon Allen joins this week's podcast to discuss returning for his second Olympics in Tokyo and the landmark ruling that will allow NCAA athletes to make money off their name, image and likeness.2:00 How this year's Olympic Trials compared to the prior Trials 7:10 How Devon's approach to the hurdles has changed since the 2016 Trials14:45 The possibility of not having fans in the arena in Tokyo17:30 Devon's favorite piece of Olympic gear20:00 The Allen family plan for watching Devon compete at the Olympics23:00 What it was like competing in the re-imagined Hayward Field25:00 Devon weighs in on the new NCAA rules that allow athletes to profit off their name, image and likenessSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Talkin' Ducks
Raevyn Rogers details her path from Oregon to the Olympics

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 48:56


Oregon Women's Track and Field great Raevyn Rogers joins this week's podcast to discuss her incredible Oregon career and journey to being a member of the 2021 Tokyo Olympics.1:15 What it's been like since earning a spot in the Olympics2:30 Making the Olympic team was a huge goal of Raevyn's5:30 What does it mean to you to "Be Raevyn?"8:40 Having to re-prepare for her race during the Trials knowing it would be postponed several hours12:15 The different resources available to athletes in college vs. in the pros.17:30 What went into the decision to go pro28:30 Running the anchor leg of the relay during her Triple Crown Year.32:30 Being a member of the Hayward Field Tower -- alongside Steve Prefontaine, Ashton Eaton, Bill Bowerman and Otis Davis.40:00 Making the Olympic team with Devon Allen, and Jenna Prandini. 44:00 What are the things you are taking from Oregon and bringing them to Tokyo as a member of the Olympic team.Privacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.

Talkin' Ducks
Raevyn Rogers details her path from Oregon to the Olympics

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 48:56


Oregon Women's Track and Field great Raevyn Rogers joins this week's podcast to discuss her incredible Oregon career and journey to being a member of the 2021 Tokyo Olympics.1:15 What it's been like since earning a spot in the Olympics2:30 Making the Olympic team was a huge goal of Raevyn's5:30 What does it mean to you to "Be Raevyn?"8:40 Having to re-prepare for her race during the Trials knowing it would be postponed several hours12:15 The different resources available to athletes in college vs. in the pros.17:30 What went into the decision to go pro28:30 Running the anchor leg of the relay during her Triple Crown Year.32:30 Being a member of the Hayward Field Tower -- alongside Steve Prefontaine, Ashton Eaton, Bill Bowerman and Otis Davis.40:00 Making the Olympic team with Devon Allen, and Jenna Prandini. 44:00 What are the things you are taking from Oregon and bringing them to Tokyo as a member of the Olympic team.Privacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.

Quack Talk
Episode 77: Oh No Not A Dixon Again......

Quack Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 175:21


On this week's episode we have a special guest host, we discuss the latest Oregon news, Devin's betting segment, Top-5, and in OT the normal plane into the side of a mountain. See you in two weeks.     GO DUCKS!!

Talkin' Ducks
Megan Reyes: Advocating for more diverse voices in sports

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 46:45


Megan Reyes of More Diverse Voices in Sports joins Sasha to discuss her time working at UofO, challenges she's faced as a woman working in sports and how she developed the More Diverse Voices brand.2:23 - On forging a career path coming out of college6:00 - Megan reflects on her time working as an account executive at the University of Oregon21:15 - Tips and tricks on how to disconnect from social media29:58 - Challenges that Megan and Sasha have faced as women while working in sports39:45 - How Megan developed the More Diverse Voices in Sports brandPrivacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.

Talkin' Ducks
Megan Reyes: Advocating for more diverse voices in sports

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 46:45


Megan Reyes of More Diverse Voices in Sports joins Sasha to discuss her time working at UofO, challenges she's faced as a woman working in sports and how she developed the More Diverse Voices brand.2:23 - On forging a career path coming out of college6:00 - Megan reflects on her time working as an account executive at the University of Oregon21:15 - Tips and tricks on how to disconnect from social media29:58 - Challenges that Megan and Sasha have faced as women while working in sports39:45 - How Megan developed the More Diverse Voices in Sports brandPrivacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.

Talkin' Ducks
Carmela Cardema Baez on NCAA Championships & the Tokyo Olympics

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2021 33:52


Fresh off of winning the 10,000 meter women's national title at the NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championships, Oregon senior Carmela Cardema Baez joins Sasha to discuss the big race, her upbringing in Spain and her special relationship with associate head coach Helen Lehman-Winters.2:25 - How Carmela prepared for the 2021 NCAA National Championships8:46 - Falling in love with running while growing up in Spain12:00 - When becoming an NCAA athlete became a reality21:08 - Staying emotionally and mentally strong during the COVID shutdown24:45 - What it will take to represent Spain in the Tokyo Olympics27:47 - What Carmela will remember most about her time at the University of OregonPrivacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.

Talkin' Ducks
Carmela Cardema Baez on NCAA Championships & the Tokyo Olympics

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2021 33:52


Fresh off of winning the 10,000 meter women's national title at the NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championships, Oregon senior Carmela Cardema Baez joins Sasha to discuss the big race, her upbringing in Spain and her special relationship with associate head coach Helen Lehman-Winters.2:25 - How Carmela prepared for the 2021 NCAA National Championships8:46 - Falling in love with running while growing up in Spain12:00 - When becoming an NCAA athlete became a reality21:08 - Staying emotionally and mentally strong during the COVID shutdown24:45 - What it will take to represent Spain in the Tokyo Olympics27:47 - What Carmela will remember most about her time at the University of Oregon

Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show
Can The Oregon Defense Contain Ohio State's Loaded Offense?

Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 25:30


The second half of our season preview on the Oregon Ducks examines their talented defense. Mario Cristobal has brought in elite players like Kayvon Thibodeaux and Noah Sewell, and Justin Flowe, and new defensive coordinator Tim DeRuyter may present Ohio State and their young starting quarterback with some looks that they haven't seen before. Can the Ducks slow down the Buckeyes enough to pull off a big upset win in the Horseshoe?James Crepea, the Ducks beat writer for the Oregonian and the host of the James Crepea show joins host Tom Orr for part two of their season preview for the 2021 Oregon Ducks football team.

Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show
Veteran Oregon Offense Will Challenge Young Ohio State Defense

Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 17:47


It's a year later than initially planned, but Ohio State and Oregon are set to kick off one of 2021's most-anticipated non-conference matchups this September at Ohio Stadium. The Ducks will have a new starting quarterback this fall, but return most of the rest of the offense from their 2020 Pac-12 championship team. Will that be enough to put up big numbers against a largely unproven back seven for Ohio State?Oregonian beat writer James Crepea joins host Tom Orr to break down the Ducks' crazy 2020 season, and what this year's Oregon team could look like on offense. It's the first of a two-part series previewing the 2021 Oregon Ducks football team. That series will conclude tomorrow with a look at the Oregon defense.

Talkin' Ducks
Talking track with U of O Sports Hall of Famer Melissa Gergel

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 36:19


Oregon track and field great Melissa Gergel joins this week's podcast to discuss her time at Oregon, her journey to becoming a physician's assistant and why pole vaulters have the best personalities.1:30 What was Melissa's crowning achievement at Oregon.5:20 What it was like to train with Stacey Dragila.7:00 Why pole vaulters have the most fun.9:40 How Melissa began learning to pole vault.15:30 Melissa's injuries collegiate injuries.24:00 Experience working in the Medical Field.32:00 Melissa's thoughts on the new look of Hayward Field.

Talkin' Ducks
Talking track with U of O Sports Hall of Famer Melissa Gergel

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 36:19


Oregon track and field great Melissa Gergel joins this week's podcast to discuss her time at Oregon, her journey to becoming a physician's assistant and why pole vaulters have the best personalities.1:30 What was Melissa's crowning achievement at Oregon.5:20 What it was like to train with Stacey Dragila.7:00 Why pole vaulters have the most fun.9:40 How Melissa began learning to pole vault.15:30 Melissa's injuries collegiate injuries.24:00 Experience working in the Medical Field.32:00 Melissa's thoughts on the new look of Hayward Field.Privacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.

Oregon Sports Network
Duck Insider 06-02-21

Oregon Sports Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 59:51


Joey Mac and GoDucks.com editor-in-chief Rob Moseley discuss baseball ahead of Friday's start to the Eugene regional and more. Plus, women's golf head coach Derek Radley joins the show recapping his squad's historic season. #GoDucksPrivacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.

Talkin' Ducks
Melody Fairchild: Ducks legend and mentor

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2021 34:15


University of Oregon Sports Hall of Famer Melody Fairchild joins this week's podcast to discuss the pressures of being named the best female high school distance runner in history, her love for the Ducks and how she's working to help shape young girls' lives today.2:00 On being named the best female high school distance runner in history.8:00 The innocence she had as a high school runner vs. the high schoolers today.13:00 Her struggles her first two years at Oregon.14:40 Winning the Indoor National Championship.16:05 Her decision to start a running club for girls in 2007.20:40 Her book "Girls Running" and the issues of injuries for young women.24:50 Her favorite moment at Oregon.32:00 She hopes to run the New York City marathon later this year.

Oregon Sports Network
Duck Insider 05-28-21

Oregon Sports Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2021 59:51


Following last night’s 11-5 win, Oregon baseball is two wins away from clinching a share of the Pac-12 title. Head coach Mark Wasikowski breaks down the game and Joey Mac joins the show from Berkeley ahead of tonight’s 6pm first pitch. Plus, Terry Jonz sits down with women’s basketball head coach Kelly Graves for a wide-ranging off-season check-in. #GoDucks

Oregon Sports Network
Duck Insider 05-27-21

Oregon Sports Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2021 59:56


Head coach Mark Wasikowski, pitcher Andrew Mosiello and shortstop Josh Kasevich preview the final regular season series for Duck baseball that begins tonight at 6. Plus, Joey Mac joins the show from Cal and Janice Tjen makes history for women’s tennis. #GoDucks

Talkin' Ducks
Paul Swangard talks new era of Hayward Field + 2021 Olympics

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2021 52:51


The Voice of Hayward Field, Paul Swangard joins this week's Talkin' Ducks podcast to discuss his career announcing track at the iconic Hayward Field, his excitement for the new era at Hayward & the great news that he will be a part of the 2021 Olympics coverage.

Oregon Sports Network
Duck Insider 03-26-21

Oregon Sports Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2021 59:50


Full preview of track and field’s first day in the west prelims and baseball’s big series at Cal that begins tomorrow. Plus, GoDucks.com editor-in-chief Rob Moseley joins the show and part two of Joey Mac’s chat with head softball coach Melyssa Lombardi recapping the season. #GoDucks

Talkin' Ducks
Ben Andrews: from U of O track to successful businessman

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021 30:00


Former Oregon Track and Field runner Ben Andrews joins this week's podcast to discuss his time at Oregon and his success in the business world.1:26 Ben talking about his first time in the new Hayward Field last weekend.2:16 Petitioning the NCAA for a fifth year of high school eligibility.3:20 Meeting Bill Dellinger for the first time.11:00 When Ben gave up running to start coaching runners.18:35 The qualities Ben looks for in his prospective employees?21:00 How far track and field has evolved since his time at Oregon.25:15 Talking about his book "The Long Run"

Talkin' Ducks
Devon Allen talks track, football and D.K. Metcalf

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2021 38:12


Former Oregon football and track star Devon Allen joins this week's pod to discuss his time at Oregon, D.K. Metcalf's track training and his upcoming season as he prepares for the Olympics.2:00 Devon talks about competing at the new Hayward Field.7:10 If he considered himself a football recruit or track recruit when he was in college.13:40 On winning the Olympic Trials in 2016.15:00 Devon's 2016 Olympics experience.17:15 What the past year has been like with no Olympics.23:00 Putting aside the fears of injury aside when playing football.24:20 D.K. Metcalf racing at the Mt. Sac Relays34:00 The upcoming season as Devon prepares for the Olympics.

Talkin' Ducks
Ducks to Celtics: Amanda Pflugrad's journey through media

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2021 37:51


Former Oregon cheerleader Amanda Pflugrad joins this week's podcast to discuss her time at Oregon and her journey to becoming a reporter and host for the Boston Celtics.

Talkin' Ducks
Derrick Malone Jr: football player and mental health advocate

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2021 31:23


Former Ducks linebacker Derrick Malone joins this week's podcast to discuss his time at Oregon, his battle with mental health and his new children's book: Why Don't Big Boys Cry?

Talkin' Ducks
Robert Johnson: Furthering the excellence of track at Oregon

Talkin' Ducks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2021 39:55


Oregon Track and Field coach Robert Johnson joins this week's pod to discuss how his time time at Oregon nearly didn't happen and what it's like to see the new Hayward Field in action.3:30 How he got involved in coaching.5:41 His early coaching days at UCLA. 11:35 Says he originally turned down the Oregon assistant job, but Vin Lananna came back with a second offer.16:00 Coach Johnson knew he wanted to be more than just a coach holding a clipboard on the sideline.18:24 Things he didn't know about intercollegiate athletics before becoming the Director of Track and Field at the University of Oregon.21:00 The pros and cons of being the Director of Track and Field at the University of Oregon.22:00 How the team is more than just a distance-running program, as it was known in the past.27:00 Coach Johnson says he is going to remember the 2020 team for all the adversity they faced.30:10 The new Hayward Field.33:00 How excited are you to lead Hayward Field to these other big time events?