Podcasts about Santa Barbara

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  • 2,404PODCASTS
  • 5,338EPISODES
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  • Nov 23, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Santa Barbara

Show all podcasts related to santa barbara

Latest podcast episodes about Santa Barbara

Aca-Media Podcast - Aca-Media
PRESENTING THE PAST: EXPLORING THE AMERICAN ARCHIVE OF PUBLIC BROADCASTING, EP. 5: LATINO EMPOWERMENT THROUGH LATINO BROADCASTING, PART 2

Aca-Media Podcast - Aca-Media

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 24:47


The collaboration between Aca-Media and the American Archive of Public Broadcasting continues with episode 5 of our special series “Presenting the Past: Exploring the American Archive of Public Broadcasting.” This is Part 2 of our two-part episode on Latino Empowerment through Latino Broadcasting.The fifth episode of “Presenting the Past” explores the history of Spanish language public radio and television programming and its roots in community activism. The discussion features activists Hugo Morales, Executive Director and co-founder of Radio Bilingüe Inc., and Jesús Treviño, television director, author and creator of Latinopia.com, along with scholars Dolores Inés Casillas, Professor of Chicana and Chicano Studies and Director of the Chicano Studies Institute at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and Gabriela Rivera Marín, a doctoral student at the University of Florida studying Hispanic Linguistics and co-curator of the AAPB Latino Empowerment through Latino Public Broadcasting exhibit.To visit the exhibit on the AAPB website, go to https://americanarchive.org/exhibits/latino-empowerment.

Aca-Media Podcast - Aca-Media
PRESENTING THE PAST: EXPLORING THE AMERICAN ARCHIVE OF PUBLIC BROADCASTING, EP. 5: Latino Empowerment through Latino Broadcasting, Part 1

Aca-Media Podcast - Aca-Media

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 45:27


The collaboration between Aca-Media and the American Archive of Public Broadcasting continues with episode 5 of our special series “Presenting the Past: Exploring the American Archive of Public Broadcasting.” This is Part 1 of our two-part episode on Latino Empowerment through Latino Broadcasting.The fifth episode of “Presenting the Past” explores the history of Spanish language public radio and television programming and its roots in community activism. The discussion features activists Hugo Morales, Executive Director and co-founder of Radio Bilingüe Inc., and Jesús Treviño, television director, author and creator of Latinopia.com, along with scholars Dolores Inés Casillas, Professor of Chicana and Chicano Studies and Director of the Chicano Studies Institute at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and Gabriela Rivera Marín, a doctoral student at the University of Florida studying Hispanic Linguistics and co-curator of the AAPB Latino Empowerment through Latino Public Broadcasting exhibit.To visit the exhibit on the AAPB website, go to https://americanarchive.org/exhibits/latino-empowerment.

The Jeremiah Show
SN8 | Ep421 - Pearl Social + Miracle at the Funk Zone

The Jeremiah Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 43:54


Jeremiah explores behind the curtain with the Pearl Social Bartenders Rocke, Jason and Alex, with an exclusive from owner Sherry Villanueva! Find out what these mischievous elves are up to at Miracle at The Funk Zone! Here's the What When & Where: What? The ultimate Christmas party pop-up experience! When? November 19th through December 31st. Where? Pearl Social, 131 Anacapa Street, Suite B, SB, CA 93101 Experience the holidays in a whole new Christmas light, with over-the-top holiday decor, displays, and a cocktail menu like you've never sipped before. With merchandise—like kooky Christmas collectible ceramic cocktail vessels—and yuletide cheer aplenty, this scene is something everyone in Santa Barbara has to see to believe. Miracle's reservation-recommended experience is a must for every tinsel-loving, nostalgic Christmas fan and the ideal venue for your social or work crew to ring in the holidays with extra pizzazz. *Reservations are highly recommended but walk-ins are welcome!   For private events & large group reservations (7 people or more), please email info@pearlsocialsb.com or call (805) 284-0380. Follow @pearlsocialsb  @miraclepopup  #miraclepopup

UNPLUGGED Live Concerts
Bob Marley - Live Santa Barbara 1979 | Full Concert

UNPLUGGED Live Concerts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 58:15


Tracklist: 00:00:00 - 00:01:25 - Intro / Speech 00:01:26 - 00:06:06 - I Shot the Sheriff 00:06:07 - 00:09:55 - Ambush in the Night 00:09:56 - 00:18:04 - Running Away - Crazy Baldheads 00:18:06 - 00:22:42 - The Heathen 00:22:46 - 00:27:10 - Africa Unite 00:27:12 - 00:33:20 - Exodus 00:33:21 - 00:37:22 - Zimbabwe 00:37:24 - 00:42:22 - Jamming 00:42:23 - 00:45:56 - Kinky Reggae 00:45:57 - 00:49:36 - Stir It Up 00:49:37 - 00:58:14 - Get Up, Stand Up  

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson
Moving Past Perfectionism and Unhealthy Striving with Dr. Diana Hill

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 66:52


How can we aim high, achieve our goals, and get what we want out of life without falling prey to unhealthy striving and excessive perfectionism? Dr. Diana Hill joins Dr. Rick and Forrest Hanson to explore the costs of perfectionism, productivity anxiety, psychological flexibility, calming the threat system, and how we can go from striving to thriving. About Our Guest: Dr. Diana  Hill specializes in evidence-based and compassion-focused approaches to living well. She has a thriving private practice in Santa Barbara, CA, is the author of the ACT Daily Journal, and is one of the hosts of the Psychologists Off the Clock Podcast.Watch the Episode: Prefer watching to listening? You  can watch this episode on YouTube.Key Topics:0:00 Introduction2:00 Dr. Hill's personal journey4:40 Signs of unhealthy striving6:50 Recognizing striving in the body12:50 Signs of being in a healthier place around striving16:15 What drives perfectionism and how to develop comfort with difficult experiences22:20 Psychological flexibility and how to see your experience more clearly26:35 Social and internalized factors in the search for approval 34:55 Practical ways to develop psychological flexibility38:00 Inner freedom and choice within discomfort45:30 Exposure therapy and cognitive diffusion for releasing control and anxiety55:00 The middle way and climbing the mountains that are important to you.59:50 RecapSupport the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link.Sponsors:Find the new CBD+ performance gummies and the whole dosist health line-up today at dosisthealth.com. Use promo code BEINGWELL20 for 20% off your purchase. Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world's largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month! Want to sleep better? Try the legendary Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Connect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website 

Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina
Santa Barbara Talks Podcast 86: Virginia Alvarez

Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 53:21


One year ago Virginia Alvarez was elected to the Santa Barbara Unified School District Board of Education. In this podcast she talks about the past year, including the recent controversial teachers survey that suggested low morale among teachers and counselors, and a lack of confidence in superintendent Hilda Maldonado. Alvarez lets loose with her opinions on the turnover among district officials and administrators, and the concerns teachers feel about being overworked and not listened to during Maldonado's tenure. Alvarez also shares details about her personal story and how she overcame the obstacles after moving to the U.S. in the fourth grade. Alvarez also talks about equity and the ways the district can close the Achievement Gap. For more podcasts, visit Santa Barbara Talks on You Tube and subscribe. If you like what you hear, please consider a donation at www.santabarbaratalks.com to expand the podcast audience. Contributions go directly to the content creator.

Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina
Santa Barbara Talks Podcast 85: Jonathan Abboud

Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 55:51


Jonathan Abboud, Santa Barbara City College Trustee, and General Manager of the Isla Vista Community Services District, talks with Josh Molina about his Assembly run next year. Abboud, 29, is known for his creative ideas, work ethic and political ambition. Now he's looking to win a newly configured assembly seat. Listen to Jonathan talk about affordable housing, the state of Isla Vista, equity at Santa Barbara City College, and regionalism. He also toward the end of the podcast shares his "fun facts" about himself, including that he likes to grill, get his food from the Isla Vista Co-Op, and exercise. This is a super-interesting podcast featuring on of the county's rising political stars. SantaBarbaraTalks.com

Inside the Bunghole...A Journey through Wine

We are so excited to sit down with Dave Fraschetti, who puts on several wine events in California including Vin Diego in San Diego, Rancho Mirage Food and Wine Festival, and the Palm Springs Pinot Noir Fest.  He gives us some insight on what it takes to put on such an event and why his events have been so successful!Dave's philosophy is really about educating.  He is very selective about which wineries are invited to participate in his upcoming Passion 4 Pinot (Palm Springs Pinot Noir Fest), to be held on January 8, 2022 at the JW Marriott's Desert Springs Resort in Palm Desert, CA.  At this event you will find 60 top-tier, world-renowned wine makers from Sonoma, Santa Barbara, Napa, Lodi, Willamette Valley...all who are known for their amazing Pinot Noirs, and the perfect growing conditions for this fickle grape.A true food wine, Pinot Noir is a very special grape that is enhanced by a great meal, and a great meal makes this delicious, soft bodied wine even more magical!  Palm Springs Pinot Noir Fest is taking place in Palm Desert, CA at the beautiful JW Marriott's Desert Springs resort on January 8, 2022.  This event was a sell out in its 1st year and is sure to be a sell out in January!Want to join us?  Buy tickets at palmspringspinotfest.com and as a listener of Inside the Bunghole you will receive $10 off the ticket price!  Just add promo code BUNG when you check out!  We'd LOVE to see you there and share a glass of Pinot with you!https://palmspringspinotfest.com

The Taste with Doug Shafer

Adam Lee comes from a family of devout Texas teetotalers. In college, however, Adam not only tasted his first wine, he became passionate about it. He and then-wife Diane Novy moved to California and founded Siduri, making outstanding Pinot Noirs from vineyards site that ranged from Santa Barbara to the Willamette Valley in Oregon. After selling Siduri, Adam has gone on to start several exciting new wine projects. Enjoy!   For more visit: https://claricewinecompany.com/

PhotoWork with Sasha Wolf
Diana Markosian - Episode 34

PhotoWork with Sasha Wolf

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 50:44


In this episode of PhotoWork with Sasha Wolf, Sasha and photographer and filmmaker Diana Markosian discuss her ICP exhibition and accompanying first monograph, Santa Barbara, published by Aperture. Diana and Sasha talk about the reconstruction of Diana's childhood both in Russia and the United States in this staged and scripted documentary style project as well as the emotional experience of revisiting some painful childhood memories. https://www.dianamarkosian.com Diana Markosian (born in Moscow, 1989) takes an intimate approach to her photography and video storytelling, in work that is both conceptual and documentary. Her projects have taken her to some of the remotest corners of the world, and have been featured in The New Yorker, Vanity Fair and Vogue Magazine. She holds a Masters of Science degree from Columbia University in New York. Her work is represented by Galerie Les Filles du Calvaire in Paris, France and Rose Gallery in Los Angeles, California. Episode Notes Find out more at https://photowork.pinecast.co

The Level Up Latina Podcast
What it‘s like to be a trailblazer with California State Senator, Monique Limón, Epiosde 127

The Level Up Latina Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 44:30


In yet another super inspiring episode of the Level Up Latina podcast, today we have California State Senator Monique Limón as our guest. Monique is a native of our beloved Santa Barbara, our hometown during our college years at UCSB. Like us, Monique was also a member of Hermanas Unidas during such a formative time in our lives.  She is only the 2nd woman and 1st Latina to hold this seat in office.  We are excited to have Senator Limón, our friend and Hermana, cover a few topics of interest; such as, her trailblazing journey which includes becoming a mother in a fast-paced career, taking up space in rooms where no one looked like her, and leveling up her life from humble beginnings to policymaker and public servant. Stream this one now, you'll be ready to lead, grow, and possibly sing & dance once it's all said & done. 

The Indy
Ep 32: Chris Shiflett, the Foo Fighter and Hall of Famer from Santa Barbara

The Indy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 39:36


On this week's episode of The Indy, host Molly McAnany sits down with recent Hall of Fame inductee Chris Shiflett (@shifty71), the guitarist for the Foo Fighters, (@foofighters) to talk about his long career in music rooted in Santa Barbara. We are joined by Marko DeSantis (@markodesantis), fellow music professional, guitar player, and long-time friend to talk about their days growing up in the 80s/90s garage scene of the West Coast, their first gigs, and "making it" in the music industry.Check out "West Coast Town" by Chris Shiflett, a song inspired by his childhood in Santa Barbara. >> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8IwZlip9hhk

New Books Network
Nicole Willock, "Lineages of the Literary: Tibetan Buddhist Polymaths of Socialist China" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 70:11


What happened to the Buddhist scholars who stayed behind in Tibet and China after the Fourteenth Dalai Lama and thousands of Tibetans fled from the People's Liberation Army in 1959? In Lineages of the Literary: Tibetan Buddhist Polymaths of Socialist China (Columbia University Press 2021), Nicole Willock discovers through the stories and writings of the “Three Polymaths” (Tib. mkhas pa mi gsum) of socialist China that contrary to common assumptions, Tibetan Buddhist leaders active in the People's Republic of China were not mere political “collaborators.” Willocks reveals in the book that the three Buddhist polymaths, Tséten Zhabdrung (1910 – 1985), Mugé Samten (1914 – 1993), and Dungkar Rinpoché (1927 – 1997) alternately safeguarded, taught, adapted, celebrated, and discarded religious epistemes, practices, and institutions in a post-Cultural Revolution PRC. The title of the “Three Polymaths” is often used to refer to Mar Shakyamuni, Yo Géjung, and Tsang Rabsel, who according to Tibetan Buddhist historiography, preserved the Buddhist monastic lineage from the tyrannical king Langdarma (d. 842) one millennium ago. Willock points out that since the early 1980s, the title of the “Three Polymaths” has been passed on to the twentieth-century Buddhist scholars Tséten Zhabdrung, Mugé Samten, and Dungkar Rinpoché, who became not only heroes to many Tibetans in China but also cultural icons symbolizing both the survival and the continuance of Tibetan culture in the post-Mao era. In Lineages of the Literary, Willock explores the Three Polymaths' writings from a wide range of literary genres, including more traditional ones such as autobiographical life writing (Tib. byung ba brjod pa) and Buddhist poetry, as well as modern innovations such as encyclopedia entries (Tib. tshig mdzod) and academic essays (Tib. dpyad rtsom). Willock argues that the writings of the Three Polymaths highlight the way they adapt and disregard religious epistemes for the purposes of revitalizing Tibetan culture in their own fashion. Interestingly, the Three Polymaths' writings do not engage explicitly with the social-political contexts of their lives. What is revealed instead, Willock argues, is how these three Tibetan Buddhist leaders acted as moral agents who strategically deployed Buddhist epistemes to impart varying visions of Tibetan culture in the post-Mao era. Taking Saba Mahmood's idea of “moral agency,” Willock finds that “[T]he culturally specific disciplines and religious epistemes that [the Three Polymaths] accessed in their unique subject positions as male Géluk Buddhist elites allowed them, unlike many other leaders in post-Mao China, to cross state-imposed divides between secular and religious institutions that might otherwise have been impossible to bridge.” Daigengna Duoer is a Ph.D. student at the Religious Studies Department, University of California, Santa Barbara. Her dissertation is a digital humanities project mapping transnational and transregional Buddhist networks connecting twentieth-century Inner Mongolia, Manchuria, Republican China, Tibet, and the Japanese Empire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in East Asian Studies
Nicole Willock, "Lineages of the Literary: Tibetan Buddhist Polymaths of Socialist China" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 70:11


What happened to the Buddhist scholars who stayed behind in Tibet and China after the Fourteenth Dalai Lama and thousands of Tibetans fled from the People's Liberation Army in 1959? In Lineages of the Literary: Tibetan Buddhist Polymaths of Socialist China (Columbia University Press 2021), Nicole Willock discovers through the stories and writings of the “Three Polymaths” (Tib. mkhas pa mi gsum) of socialist China that contrary to common assumptions, Tibetan Buddhist leaders active in the People's Republic of China were not mere political “collaborators.” Willocks reveals in the book that the three Buddhist polymaths, Tséten Zhabdrung (1910 – 1985), Mugé Samten (1914 – 1993), and Dungkar Rinpoché (1927 – 1997) alternately safeguarded, taught, adapted, celebrated, and discarded religious epistemes, practices, and institutions in a post-Cultural Revolution PRC. The title of the “Three Polymaths” is often used to refer to Mar Shakyamuni, Yo Géjung, and Tsang Rabsel, who according to Tibetan Buddhist historiography, preserved the Buddhist monastic lineage from the tyrannical king Langdarma (d. 842) one millennium ago. Willock points out that since the early 1980s, the title of the “Three Polymaths” has been passed on to the twentieth-century Buddhist scholars Tséten Zhabdrung, Mugé Samten, and Dungkar Rinpoché, who became not only heroes to many Tibetans in China but also cultural icons symbolizing both the survival and the continuance of Tibetan culture in the post-Mao era. In Lineages of the Literary, Willock explores the Three Polymaths' writings from a wide range of literary genres, including more traditional ones such as autobiographical life writing (Tib. byung ba brjod pa) and Buddhist poetry, as well as modern innovations such as encyclopedia entries (Tib. tshig mdzod) and academic essays (Tib. dpyad rtsom). Willock argues that the writings of the Three Polymaths highlight the way they adapt and disregard religious epistemes for the purposes of revitalizing Tibetan culture in their own fashion. Interestingly, the Three Polymaths' writings do not engage explicitly with the social-political contexts of their lives. What is revealed instead, Willock argues, is how these three Tibetan Buddhist leaders acted as moral agents who strategically deployed Buddhist epistemes to impart varying visions of Tibetan culture in the post-Mao era. Taking Saba Mahmood's idea of “moral agency,” Willock finds that “[T]he culturally specific disciplines and religious epistemes that [the Three Polymaths] accessed in their unique subject positions as male Géluk Buddhist elites allowed them, unlike many other leaders in post-Mao China, to cross state-imposed divides between secular and religious institutions that might otherwise have been impossible to bridge.” Daigengna Duoer is a Ph.D. student at the Religious Studies Department, University of California, Santa Barbara. Her dissertation is a digital humanities project mapping transnational and transregional Buddhist networks connecting twentieth-century Inner Mongolia, Manchuria, Republican China, Tibet, and the Japanese Empire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books in Buddhist Studies
Nicole Willock, "Lineages of the Literary: Tibetan Buddhist Polymaths of Socialist China" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in Buddhist Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 70:11


What happened to the Buddhist scholars who stayed behind in Tibet and China after the Fourteenth Dalai Lama and thousands of Tibetans fled from the People's Liberation Army in 1959? In Lineages of the Literary: Tibetan Buddhist Polymaths of Socialist China (Columbia University Press 2021), Nicole Willock discovers through the stories and writings of the “Three Polymaths” (Tib. mkhas pa mi gsum) of socialist China that contrary to common assumptions, Tibetan Buddhist leaders active in the People's Republic of China were not mere political “collaborators.” Willocks reveals in the book that the three Buddhist polymaths, Tséten Zhabdrung (1910 – 1985), Mugé Samten (1914 – 1993), and Dungkar Rinpoché (1927 – 1997) alternately safeguarded, taught, adapted, celebrated, and discarded religious epistemes, practices, and institutions in a post-Cultural Revolution PRC. The title of the “Three Polymaths” is often used to refer to Mar Shakyamuni, Yo Géjung, and Tsang Rabsel, who according to Tibetan Buddhist historiography, preserved the Buddhist monastic lineage from the tyrannical king Langdarma (d. 842) one millennium ago. Willock points out that since the early 1980s, the title of the “Three Polymaths” has been passed on to the twentieth-century Buddhist scholars Tséten Zhabdrung, Mugé Samten, and Dungkar Rinpoché, who became not only heroes to many Tibetans in China but also cultural icons symbolizing both the survival and the continuance of Tibetan culture in the post-Mao era. In Lineages of the Literary, Willock explores the Three Polymaths' writings from a wide range of literary genres, including more traditional ones such as autobiographical life writing (Tib. byung ba brjod pa) and Buddhist poetry, as well as modern innovations such as encyclopedia entries (Tib. tshig mdzod) and academic essays (Tib. dpyad rtsom). Willock argues that the writings of the Three Polymaths highlight the way they adapt and disregard religious epistemes for the purposes of revitalizing Tibetan culture in their own fashion. Interestingly, the Three Polymaths' writings do not engage explicitly with the social-political contexts of their lives. What is revealed instead, Willock argues, is how these three Tibetan Buddhist leaders acted as moral agents who strategically deployed Buddhist epistemes to impart varying visions of Tibetan culture in the post-Mao era. Taking Saba Mahmood's idea of “moral agency,” Willock finds that “[T]he culturally specific disciplines and religious epistemes that [the Three Polymaths] accessed in their unique subject positions as male Géluk Buddhist elites allowed them, unlike many other leaders in post-Mao China, to cross state-imposed divides between secular and religious institutions that might otherwise have been impossible to bridge.” Daigengna Duoer is a Ph.D. student at the Religious Studies Department, University of California, Santa Barbara. Her dissertation is a digital humanities project mapping transnational and transregional Buddhist networks connecting twentieth-century Inner Mongolia, Manchuria, Republican China, Tibet, and the Japanese Empire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/buddhist-studies

New Books in Intellectual History
Nicole Willock, "Lineages of the Literary: Tibetan Buddhist Polymaths of Socialist China" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 70:11


What happened to the Buddhist scholars who stayed behind in Tibet and China after the Fourteenth Dalai Lama and thousands of Tibetans fled from the People's Liberation Army in 1959? In Lineages of the Literary: Tibetan Buddhist Polymaths of Socialist China (Columbia University Press 2021), Nicole Willock discovers through the stories and writings of the “Three Polymaths” (Tib. mkhas pa mi gsum) of socialist China that contrary to common assumptions, Tibetan Buddhist leaders active in the People's Republic of China were not mere political “collaborators.” Willocks reveals in the book that the three Buddhist polymaths, Tséten Zhabdrung (1910 – 1985), Mugé Samten (1914 – 1993), and Dungkar Rinpoché (1927 – 1997) alternately safeguarded, taught, adapted, celebrated, and discarded religious epistemes, practices, and institutions in a post-Cultural Revolution PRC. The title of the “Three Polymaths” is often used to refer to Mar Shakyamuni, Yo Géjung, and Tsang Rabsel, who according to Tibetan Buddhist historiography, preserved the Buddhist monastic lineage from the tyrannical king Langdarma (d. 842) one millennium ago. Willock points out that since the early 1980s, the title of the “Three Polymaths” has been passed on to the twentieth-century Buddhist scholars Tséten Zhabdrung, Mugé Samten, and Dungkar Rinpoché, who became not only heroes to many Tibetans in China but also cultural icons symbolizing both the survival and the continuance of Tibetan culture in the post-Mao era. In Lineages of the Literary, Willock explores the Three Polymaths' writings from a wide range of literary genres, including more traditional ones such as autobiographical life writing (Tib. byung ba brjod pa) and Buddhist poetry, as well as modern innovations such as encyclopedia entries (Tib. tshig mdzod) and academic essays (Tib. dpyad rtsom). Willock argues that the writings of the Three Polymaths highlight the way they adapt and disregard religious epistemes for the purposes of revitalizing Tibetan culture in their own fashion. Interestingly, the Three Polymaths' writings do not engage explicitly with the social-political contexts of their lives. What is revealed instead, Willock argues, is how these three Tibetan Buddhist leaders acted as moral agents who strategically deployed Buddhist epistemes to impart varying visions of Tibetan culture in the post-Mao era. Taking Saba Mahmood's idea of “moral agency,” Willock finds that “[T]he culturally specific disciplines and religious epistemes that [the Three Polymaths] accessed in their unique subject positions as male Géluk Buddhist elites allowed them, unlike many other leaders in post-Mao China, to cross state-imposed divides between secular and religious institutions that might otherwise have been impossible to bridge.” Daigengna Duoer is a Ph.D. student at the Religious Studies Department, University of California, Santa Barbara. Her dissertation is a digital humanities project mapping transnational and transregional Buddhist networks connecting twentieth-century Inner Mongolia, Manchuria, Republican China, Tibet, and the Japanese Empire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in History
Nicole Willock, "Lineages of the Literary: Tibetan Buddhist Polymaths of Socialist China" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 70:11


What happened to the Buddhist scholars who stayed behind in Tibet and China after the Fourteenth Dalai Lama and thousands of Tibetans fled from the People's Liberation Army in 1959? In Lineages of the Literary: Tibetan Buddhist Polymaths of Socialist China (Columbia University Press 2021), Nicole Willock discovers through the stories and writings of the “Three Polymaths” (Tib. mkhas pa mi gsum) of socialist China that contrary to common assumptions, Tibetan Buddhist leaders active in the People's Republic of China were not mere political “collaborators.” Willocks reveals in the book that the three Buddhist polymaths, Tséten Zhabdrung (1910 – 1985), Mugé Samten (1914 – 1993), and Dungkar Rinpoché (1927 – 1997) alternately safeguarded, taught, adapted, celebrated, and discarded religious epistemes, practices, and institutions in a post-Cultural Revolution PRC. The title of the “Three Polymaths” is often used to refer to Mar Shakyamuni, Yo Géjung, and Tsang Rabsel, who according to Tibetan Buddhist historiography, preserved the Buddhist monastic lineage from the tyrannical king Langdarma (d. 842) one millennium ago. Willock points out that since the early 1980s, the title of the “Three Polymaths” has been passed on to the twentieth-century Buddhist scholars Tséten Zhabdrung, Mugé Samten, and Dungkar Rinpoché, who became not only heroes to many Tibetans in China but also cultural icons symbolizing both the survival and the continuance of Tibetan culture in the post-Mao era. In Lineages of the Literary, Willock explores the Three Polymaths' writings from a wide range of literary genres, including more traditional ones such as autobiographical life writing (Tib. byung ba brjod pa) and Buddhist poetry, as well as modern innovations such as encyclopedia entries (Tib. tshig mdzod) and academic essays (Tib. dpyad rtsom). Willock argues that the writings of the Three Polymaths highlight the way they adapt and disregard religious epistemes for the purposes of revitalizing Tibetan culture in their own fashion. Interestingly, the Three Polymaths' writings do not engage explicitly with the social-political contexts of their lives. What is revealed instead, Willock argues, is how these three Tibetan Buddhist leaders acted as moral agents who strategically deployed Buddhist epistemes to impart varying visions of Tibetan culture in the post-Mao era. Taking Saba Mahmood's idea of “moral agency,” Willock finds that “[T]he culturally specific disciplines and religious epistemes that [the Three Polymaths] accessed in their unique subject positions as male Géluk Buddhist elites allowed them, unlike many other leaders in post-Mao China, to cross state-imposed divides between secular and religious institutions that might otherwise have been impossible to bridge.” Daigengna Duoer is a Ph.D. student at the Religious Studies Department, University of California, Santa Barbara. Her dissertation is a digital humanities project mapping transnational and transregional Buddhist networks connecting twentieth-century Inner Mongolia, Manchuria, Republican China, Tibet, and the Japanese Empire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

the only one in the room podcast
Tim Barnes Is The Only One Who Was Stabbed By A Random Stranger Episode 108

the only one in the room podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 54:46


What if you never experienced violence while growing up in your all-Black neighborhood, but when you moved to a city, which is less than 2% Black, violence found you for the first time? Tim Barnes, comedian and television writer grew up in South Central Los Angeles and was stabbed by a stranger after moving to the tony city of Santa Barbara, leaving him to wonder if it was a random stabbing or had he attacked because he was Black? But what would you do if every time you were presented with an opportunity you wondered if it was because of your qualifications or because of your race? Would you decide to play it safe and work in a world where everyone looked like you? Or would you become a writer on one of the most-watched late-night shows in history, and become the voice of the ones who aren't in the room? More From Tim Barnes: Visit: https://www.timbarnescomedy.com/ Watch: Inland Empire Read: Uncertain Life Listen: Yub Nub Finding Tim Barnes: Twitter: @TimBarnes451 Instagram: @timbarnescomedy Special thanks to our sponsors: Away: We love our new sponsor AWAY, the modern lifestyle brand that creates thoughtful products for every traveler and every kind of trip. Start YOUR 100-day trial and shop the entire Away line-up of travel essentials, including their best-selling suitcases, at AWAYTravel.com/theonlyone. Best Fiends: Join us and the millions of Americans who are already playing this game. Download Best Fiends for FREE on The Apple APP store or Google Play. That's friends without the R, Best Fiends. Voyage et Cie: Voyage et Cie's curator Melanie Apple has cultivated a passion for notable moments using the sense of smell. Voyage et Cie is the ultimate luxury blend of travel, fragrance, and design. Each original fragrance is created by Melanie, 100% organic and natural which will transport you on a journey. Visit https://www.voyageetcie.com/ and enter the code: theonlyone to get your 10% off your purchase! Cute Booty Lounge: Cute Booty Lounge is made by women and for women. There's a cute booty style for everyone! Cute Booty Lounge has you covered...Embrace Your Body, Love Your Booty! Head to Cutebooty.com or click the link here to order yours, but don't forget to enter the code theonlybooty to get 15% off your first order! Join our Patreon: Become an Only One In The Room patron by joining us on Patreon! Starting at only $5.00 per month, you'll get bonus content, access to outtakes that the general public will NEVER see, extremely cool merch, and depending on what tier you get, monthly hang time with Scott and Laura. Join our Patreon today at https://www.patreon.com/theonlyonepodcast Be sure not to miss Scott Talks on Wednesdays, our Sunday release called Sunday Edition & our brand new series On My Nightstand releasing on Fridays by subscribing to the show wherever you listen to podcasts.  Join our Only One In The Room Facebook Group if you'd like to ask a question of any of our upcoming guests for this series.  Also visit the website www.theonlyonepod.com for the latest from our host Laura Cathcart Robbins like featured articles and more. We love hearing from you in the comments on iTunes and while you're there don't forget to rate us, subscribe and share the show! All of us at The Only One In The Room wish you safety and wellness during this challenging time. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Melrose Place Podcast
S5 Ep 5 - Un-Janed Melody

The Melrose Place Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 114:38


Air Date Oct 28, 1996. After Jane inadvertently torches Alison's new apartment, she slowly goes crazy and begins to stalk and harass both Alison and Jake. Meanwhile, Amanda is in Santa Barbara on her honeymoon with Peter, while Taylor continues to peruse him. At D&D, Arthur Field, the ruthless chairman of the board, hires his equally ruthless son, Craig, as a junior associate and puts Billy in charge of showing him around. Michael becomes frustrated after Kimberly won't return his sexual advances. Sydney meets Kyle for the first time and then some. Also, Matt is committed to a rehab center and meets the owner Dr. Dan Hathaway, a former drug addict himself.Contribute to the podcast!Patreon- https://bit.ly/2pq8x1BBuy Podcast Merch! - bit.ly/melrosemerchFollow us on social media!Join our Facebook Group - https://bit.ly/MelroseFBGroupFacebook- https://facebook.com/melrosepodInstagram- https://instagram.com/melrosepodTwitter- https://twitter.com/melrosepodEmail - Melrosepod@gmail.comMore Ways to listen!Apple Podcasts - https://goo.gl/9T4WnbSpotify - http://bit.ly/melrosepodspotifyGoogle Podcasts - https://goo.gl/cxtxjTiHeart Radio - https://bit.ly/iheartradiomelrosepodStitcher - https://goo.gl/54w8PA   

Bucked Up With Sam Buck
Episode #125 - Fat Ray (of Bruiser Brigade)

Bucked Up With Sam Buck

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 62:43


Episode #125 features Fat Ray, rapper from Detroit and member of Danny Brown's "Bruiser Brigade"! He's worked with artists such as ElZhi, Black Milk & more! You can listen to his Newest album "Santa Barbara" on all DSP's! You can follow him on social media @farray1.

Congressional Dish
CD242 The Offshore Drilling Police

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 95:22


On October 1, 2021 an oil pipeline that was likely struck by a cargo ship's anchor leaked tens of thousands of gallons of oil into the ocean and onto the beaches of Orange County, CA. In this episode, examine how the oil spill happened by listening to testimony provided to both the U.S. Congress and the California State Senate, and learn about the disturbing lack of policing that is taking place under the sea. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Articles and Documents Nicole Charky. April 7, 2021. “LA City Council Urges Newsom To Close Playa Del Rey Oil Storage.” Patch. Nicole Charky. March 23, 2021. “Is It Time To Shut Down The Playa Del Rey Oil Storage Facility?” Patch. U.S. Government Accountability Office. Offshore Oil and Gas: Updated Regulations Needed to Improve Pipeline Oversight and Decommissioning. GAO-21-293. Jen's Highlighted PDF Heal the Bay. June 24, 2015 . “Confirmed: L.A. Tar Balls Linked to Santa Barbara Spill.” planetexperts.com Heal the Bay. August 20, 2012. “What Are Those Black Clumps on the Beach?” Sarah S. Elkind. June 1, 2012. “Oil in the City: The Fall and Rise of Oil Drilling in Los Angeles.” The Journal of American History, Volume 99, Issue 1. Tom Fowler. February 21, 2012. “U.S., Mexico Sign Deal on Oil Drilling in Gulf.“ The Wall Street Journal. APPEL News Staff. May 10, 2011. “Academy Case Study: The Deepwater Horizon Accident Lessons for NASA.” APPEL News, Volume 4, Issue 1. Offshore Technology. “Projects: Macondo Prospect, Gulf of Mexico.” Bureau of Ocean Energy Management. November 23, 1970. Treaty to Resolve Pending Boundary Differences and Maintain the Rio Grande and Colorado River as the International Boundary. Open Secrets Profiles Rep. Yvette Herrell - New Mexico District 02 Rep. Paul Gosar - Arizona District 04 Rep. Bruce Westerman - Arkansas District 04 Rep. Katie Porter - California District 45 Rep. Pete Stauber - Minnesota District 08 Images Playa del Ray in the 1920s 2021 Huntington Bay Oil Spill Image 1. CA State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Informational Hearing Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions. 2021Huntington Bay Oil Spill Image 2 CA State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Informational Hearing Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions. Mileage of Decommissioned Pipelines Removed Relative to Those Left in Place. GAO Analysis of Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement Data, GAO-21-293. Potential Effects of Currents on Pipeline Leak Identification. GAO-21-293. Hearings Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions California State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Thursday, October 28, 2021 Witnesses: Chuck Bonham Head of California Department of Fishing and Wildlife Tom Cullen Administrator of OSPR (Offshore Spill Prevention and Response) Kim Carr Mayor Pro Tem, City of Huntington Beach Brian Nowicki California Climate Policy Director at the Center for Biological Diversity Pete Stauffer Environmental Director for the Surfrider Foundation Jennifer Lucchesi State Lands Commission Clips 3:44 Senator Henry Stern: But the pipeline that runs to Amplify and Beta Offshore's platform is the source of the oil production that runs through the pipeline in question. That pipeline is in federal jurisdiction but it brings that produced oil onshore into the state waters and eventually on state lands. 21:05 Chuck Bonham: What we now know is about four and a half miles offshore, so in federal waters, there's a pipeline that runs from one platform, which is a collection of three platforms operated by a company called Beta Offshore, owned by a company called Amplify Energy. That last platform, Ellie, has a pipeline which delivers the product 17.7 miles inland, where the pipe comes on shore just below the Queen Mary more or less, to land based infrastructure. That pipe had a rupture in it. And we now know based on visual and diver and other evidentiary efforts, that about 4000 feet of that pipeline was moved about 105 feet off of center. And in that stretch is about a 13 inch horizontal, almost like a hairline fracture. If you could imagine a bone break in a pipe, which is, I think, about 13 inches in diameter, concrete on the outside and metal on the inside. That's the likely source of the leak. 22:25 Chuck Bonham: From the very beginning moments, all of us involved assumed a worse case. At that moment in time we had a planning number of a spill of about 3,134 Barrels which is 131,000 gallons rounding as a maximum worst case. 30:59 Chuck Bonham: A month later we now think the likely spill number is 24,696 gallons 41:13 Chuck Bonham: Fortunately given the size of the spill, there were not as many wildlife casualties as could have occurred during a higher migration cycle. 1:25:47 Mayor Kim Carr: So starting off on Saturday, October 2, it's been brought up that yes, we did have a very large air show happening that day. About 1.5 million people were on the beach that day to see the Pacific Air Show. And around nine o'clock that morning, there were city personnel that heard an announcement on VHF channel 16 by the Coast Guard of a possible oil spill in the area, but nothing very specific. At that time, no major details, it wasn't anything to really worry about. By 10:30 in the morning, the Coast Guard had advised us that the spill was larger than originally thought. However, we didn't have a whole lot of information as to where the location of the spill was nor of the scope of the situation. By 11 o'clock that same day, the Coast Guard had announced that it was now going to be a major spill, and that the incident management team was being activated. 1:28:00 Mayor Kim Carr: At two o'clock, the Coast Guard had advised us that the oil spill would not be reaching the shores of Huntington Beach until Monday, October 4. And again, we didn't have a whole lot of information as to where the spill was. We knew it was off our coast, but we didn't know exactly where or exactly how large the spill was. But then interestingly enough, just a half hour later, we started to receive messages that there were boats that were experiencing oil damage just outside of the air show flight box. And so that became a concern for our city. So then we activated our fire crews, our hazmat team, or the oil spill response trailer and started to do the mitigation efforts. Then this is where it gets to be very, very interesting. At 2:45 the city was notified by the Newport Beach rescue vessel that there were private contractors conducting oil spill cleanups outside of the air show flight box. 1:32:42 Mayor Kim Carr: What we could have done better, what would have been an opportunity was perhaps if the Coast Guard had some sort of awareness, the night before or when that nine o'clock notification came through, we could have been even more proactive because as I said before, every hour during these crises matters. 1:34:00 Mayor Kim Carr: The Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve was spared. The Talbert Marsh does have oil damage and again looking back, if we could have had maybe a few more hours notice, we probably could have mitigated that damage even more than what we did. 1:43:17 Brian Nowicki: Like all of you, we at the Center for Biological Diversity are heartbroken by every oil and seabird and are alarmed at the miles of marshes and coastline that will be poisoned for years by this bill. We're angry that yet again, the oil industry has proven its inability to contain its toxic pollution. The structure of pipeline funding to beach proves yet again, that every piece of fossil fuel infrastructure is yet another disaster waiting to happen. And there is a lot of that infrastructure in California. It's increasingly old, outdated in disrepair and poorly located, like the 40 year old pipeline that gave us this most recent spill, all of which makes it increasingly dangerous. Looking beyond the nine oil platforms and islands in state water, there are 23 platforms in federal waters off California. But the fact that those 23 platforms are a little farther from shore should not give us much comfort. First, because oil spills from those operations still end up in our water, our beaches and our wildlife. But also as we've heard today, further from shore also means longer stretches of aging and dangerously vulnerable infrastructure, like the 17 mile long pipeline we're discussing today are clean, reliable federal regulations to protect us from oil spills in federal waters. Federal regulators continue to prove that they are perfectly willing to allow those platforms to continue operating to the last drop of oil despite the mounting dangers of decaying infrastructure well beyond its intended lifespan, outdated drilling plans, numerous violations and insufficient bonds to pay for decommissioning. 1:45:15 Brian Nowicki: But I want to be clear that this is not a problem unique to offshore platforms. At the exact same time that 10s of thousands of gallons of oil were rolling up onto beaches and marshes in Orange County, there was an oil spill in Kern County that is now approaching 5 million gallons of fluid, a mixture of crude oil, toxic wastewater, that includes 600,000 gallons of crude. In fact, in just the last few years, there have been many oil spills in California greater than the spill off Huntington Beach. In the Cymric field alone there were three huge spills in 2019 at 550,000 gallons, 836,000 and 1.2 million gallons respectively. 159,000 in Midway in 2019, 250,000 at McKittrick in 2020. There is another ongoing spill at a separator plant in Cymric that has been leaking since 2003 and has reportedly released as much as 84 million gallons of fluid to date. Now these numbers reflect total combined volumes of crude and produced water and mud, which constitute a toxic mix. As state agencies have testified before this legislature in the past, these dangerous onshore oil operations have contaminated groundwater, land, and wildlife. 1:46:32 Brian Nowicki: After more than 150 years of the oil industry drilling at will in California, the oil is gone and the bottom of the barrel that's left is harder and more dangerous to extract. There's also some of the most carbon polluting crude in the world. With the easy stuff taken, the oil industry is in decline in California, with production down 68% since 1985. The only question is how much more damage will this dying industry do on its way out? 1:49:10 Pete Stauffer: Now with the oil deposit seen as far south as the Mexico border, there are concerns that San Diego wetlands are also being impacted. Moreover, while birds, fish and marine mammals have been the most visibly impacted, the full scale of the ecological damage will take some time to become clear. In the week since the spill event, the oil slick has transformed into an incalculable number of tar balls in the ocean, while tar balls typically float, they can also find their way into underwater sediment or near shore habitats where their impacts on ecological health and wildlife may persist for years or even decades. 1:52:51 Pete Stauffer: According to the federal government there have been at least 44 oil spills since 1969 that have each released more than 10,000 barrels of oil into US waters 2:02:36 Mayor Kim Carr: Just to give you an idea of how much TOT we do receive in Huntington Beach, we receive about $16 million a year. We don't receive anything from those offshore platforms, nothing. And as far as the drilling that we currently have here in Huntington Beach, it's less than $700,000 a year. 2:05:54 Brian Nowicki: What I can't say though, for sure is that it's going to take longer than one season to see what the full impacts are to the local wildlife. And of course, it is wetlands and marshes that often are the most difficult and take the longest to recover from the sorts of impacts. 2:21:11 Jennifer Lucchesi: In 1921, the legislature created the first tidelands oil and gas leasing program. The existing offshore leases the commission is responsible for managing today were issued over a 30 year period between 1938 and 1968. Importantly, I want to highlight a specific act in 1995. The Cunningham shell Act, which serves as a foundational law for the existing legacy oil and gas leases the commission currently manages. Importantly, this Act required the commission to issue oil and gas leases for term not based on years, but for so long as oil and gas is produced in paying quantities. Essentially, this means that Alessi can produce oil and gas pursuant to their state lease indefinitely as long as it is economic for them to do so. 2:58:13 Jennifer Lucchesi: For pipelines that are solely within state waters and under lease with the State Lands Commission, we require the pipelines to be externally and internally inspected annually. And we have engineers on staff that review those inspections and consult with the fire marshal as well with our federal partners on any type of remedial action that needs to happen based on the results of those inspections. For those pipelines that cross both federal and state waters our authority is more limited because the federal government's regulatory authority takes precedence. And PHMSA (Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration) is the primary federal agency that regulates those interstate pipelines. They require inspections externally and internally every two years. And that's what this pipeline at issue was subjected to, the platform Elly pipeline. 03:01:20 Senator Dave Min: Let's say you have a pipe and the lease term ends. What powers do you have? What are the considerations you have to follow either statutory or contractually to renew those permits, issue a new permit? Or alternatively, do you have any leeway contractually, statutorily to end those permits prematurely and say, you know, we don't think that, you know, the upkeep is appropriate, you're violating certain provisions, we're just gonna take away your permit prematurely. Do you have any leeway like that? So I'm just trying to get a sense of your flexibility, both in issuing new right of way permits, but also yanking away existing permits. Jennifer Lucchesi: Certainly. So I can give an example of our lease compliance and enforcement actions most recently, with a pipeline that served platforms Hogan and Houchin in the Santa Barbara Channel. Those are two federal platforms in federal waters, that pipeline that served those platforms did cross into state waters and connected on shore. That pipeline lessee of ours was not compliant with our lease terms and the commission took action to terminate those leases based on non compliance and default in breach of the lease terms. And essentially, that did terminate production on those two federal platforms. And they are part of the eight federal platforms that BOEM just announced they were going to be looking at as part of a programmatic EIS for decommissioning. The Commission does not have the authority to unilaterally terminate an existing valid lease absent any evidence of a breach or non compliance SOUTHERN CA OIL LEAK: INVESTIGATING THE IMMEDIATE EFFECTS ON COMMUNITIES, BUSINESSES, AND ENVIRONMENT House Committee On Natural Resources, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations and the Subcommittee October 18, 2021 Witnesses: Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi Director, Oiled Wildlife Care Network Executive Director, One Health Institute, School of Veterinary Medicine, UC Davis Scott Breneman Commercial Fishing, Retail Market, and Restaurant Owner Newport Beach, CA Vipe Desai Founding Member, Business Alliance for Protecting the Pacific Coast Dr. David L. Valentine Norris Presidential Chair, Earth Science Professor of Marine Science, UC Santa Barbara Clips 15:44 Rep. Katie Porter: As of October 10, workers had recovered 250,000 pounds of oily debris and 14 barrels full of tar balls from the Orange County shorelines. That is a small fraction, though, of the oil that was released, most of which is being distributed in the ocean, making its way into the food chain or falling to the ocean floor. Some of that oil is now heading south. And we will not learn the long term consequences on the environment for many years to come. 17:39 Rep. Katie Porter: The witnesses here with us today will reveal a different kind of subsidy for oil and gas companies, an involuntary subsidy that occurs when the community bears the costs of oil drilling's pollution. When a locally owned business like Mr Brennaman that has been in the family for four generations loses tens of thousands of dollars because of the leak. That's his subsidies to oil and gas. When a hotel loses its bookings overnight. That's its subsidy for oil and gas. When the fragile decades-long effort to recover a species under the Endangered Species Act is finally showing progress, but an oil spill puts it all at risk. That's a cost of oil and gas to these subsidies and so many others are the reasons that oil wells like the ones behind this leak are still active. Getting rid of the subsidies is the first step to get rid of the problem. 27:52 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): We know that the spill was not reported by the responsible oil company until the next day, despite the company's knowledge. We also know that Orange County residents recognize that there was a problem in part due to the smell caused by this bill and actually reported it before the oil company did so, clearly something wrong with that. 28:35 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): In my congressional district, which is just the south of here, the spill shutdown businesses and beaches in Dana Point in San Clemente. Tarballs that are likely caused by the spill have also been found as far south in my district as Oceanside, Carlsbad, Encinitas and Del Mar in San Diego County. 29:03 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): It'll come as no surprise that more than $2 billion in wages and $4 billion in gross domestic product are generated by Orange County's ocean and marine economy, including tourism. So we have a lot to lose every time there's a spill, not just to our beaches but to our economy. 39:30 Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi: In Birds, the primary issue we are concerned mostly about are the acute effects due to hypothermia. If you think of feathers almost as a dry suit in animals, if oil gets on that dry suit, it creates a hole that allows cold water to seep next to the skin. Birds can get very cold in the environment and start to waste away, they have to come ashore to stay warm, but they can no longer eat. So these birds actually can waste away in a matter of days unless proactive capture occurs. There can also be chronic effects in animals as well due to printing of oil off of the feathers or ingestion in their food items. Those chronic effects can include, in essence, effects on every organ system in an animal's body from reproductive effects liver, kidney, respiratory tracts, depending on the dose and the exposure and the toxin itself. 42:50 Scott Breneman: We were fishing on Friday, October 1, and we were coming in the harbor and I detected a distinct odor of oil and it was about midnight we're heading in. Kind of search around the boat. I thought maybe it was a spill on the boat or a hose broke. I went in the engine room, searched all the hatches where I keep all my extra fluids and everything, didn't find anything. Come the next day the press released that there was an actual oil spill, and my fish sales and my fish market, once that was released, they dropped drastically down, 90% this past few weeks since it was released. I've seen the same effect -- my family's been fishing for four generations and in the 90s my dad went through the oil spill that was off Seal Beach, in our fish market, the same exact response from the public scared, worried the products contaminated. A huge ripple effect all the way up to the wholesalers I deal with outside of Orange County there. They had concerns from their customers, their restaurants. And to rebuild that business when it happened in the 90s, I watched my dad struggle for months to get back to back to where it was and it's...I'm seeing the same exact thing happen here. A couple of days after the oil spill they had closed Newport Harbor. And so my boat was actually trapped inside of the harbor so I wasn't even able to go service my accounts. And it's just been, to tell you the truth, a very difficult couple of weeks and I'm not sure how long this is going to last. I'm not sure how the public's going to respond to it long term if there's still going to have some fear that the fish is contaminated. 46:20 Vipe Desai: In fact between 2007 and 2018 there were over 7000 oil spills in federal waters, an average of about two every day. 46:50 Vipe Desai: The first impact came from the much anticipated Pacific Air Show. As oil began to wash ashore, beaches were deemed unsafe for activity. On Saturday October 2nd, 1.5 million visitors saw the show from Huntington Beach, but the show's triumphant conclusion on Sunday was cancelled with little fanfare. Cancellations hit hotels and resorts almost immediately and their surrounding retail and restaurants suffered. Wing Lam, co-founder of Wahoo's Fish tacos, informed me that the Saturday before the oil spill felt like a busy summer day. But the following day, once word got out about the spill, it was a ghost town. In addition, as the spill moved south, their locations in Laguna Beach and San Clemente started to feel the impacts. Bobby Abdel, owner of Jack's Surfboards, had a similarly bleak weekend. He told me that once the oil spill was announced customer traffic plummeted. Their stores are facing a stockpile of unsold inventory from the US Open of Surfing and the Pacific Air Show. All nine of Jack's Surfboards locations were impacted in some form or another because of the spill. Later in the week, I received a call from a colleague, Wendy Marshall, a full time hard working mother of two who shared with me that her upcoming Airbnb reservations, a form of income to help her offset college tuition costs for her children, had mostly been cancelled. From Dana Point though dolphin and whale capital of the world and the first whale Heritage Site in the Americas. Giselle Anderson from local business Captain Dave's Dolphin and Whale Watching Safari shared losses from trips and bookings into November could be down as much as 74% because of the oil spill. 52:15 Dr. David L. Valentine: I want to invoke my privilege as a university professor to start with a little bit of a history lesson. Many people think that the largest spill in US history occurred in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. This is not correct. The largest spill in US history occurred in California. It was not the October 2021 spill that we're here to talk about today. Nor was it the 2015 refugio beach pipeline rupture on the gaviota coast. It was not the 2007 Cosco, Busan spill and San Francisco Bay. And it was not the 1997 platform Irene pipeline rupture of Annenberg Air Force Base. It was not the 1990 American traders spill off the coast of Huntington Beach. It was not the 1969 platform, an oil spill off of Santa Barbara, the one that helped spawn the environmental movement. Nor was it the sinking of the SS Montebello, an oil freighter that was hit by a Japanese torpedo off the coast of Cambria and World War Two. It was called the Lakeview Gusher. It occurred in Kern County, and it's estimated to have released around 380 million gallons of oil over an 18 month period starting in 1910. And I tell you this bit of California history because it punctuates five important points. First, oil production carries inherent risk. Second, California has suffered more than its fair share of spills. Third, the size of a spill is only one factor in determining its impact. Fourth, responsiveness and context matter. And fifth, every spill is different and that includes the impacts. 54:24 Dr. David L. Valentine: For the current spill, I have honed in on three key modes of exposure that concern me most: floating oil slicks that can impact organisms living at or near the sea surface, coastline areas such as wetlands where oil can accumulate and persist, and the sea floor, where oil can easily hide from view but may still pose longer term risks. Among these three, the fate of impacts of submerged oil is especially relevant to California, is the least well understood, and requires additional research effort. 59:40 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): So recently I asked the Department of Interior about the specific kinds of subsidies that Beta Operating received. Beta is a subsidiary of Amplify Energy, and that's the company that owns the platforms and the pipelines that leaked off our coast. It turns out that they got nearly $20 million from the federal government, specifically because the oil wells are at the end of their lives and are not producing much oil, which makes them less profitable. So taxpayers are being asked to pay to encourage oil production in the Pacific Ocean by giving oil companies millions of dollars to do it. 1:00:39 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): Beta operating is in line to get another $11 million to drill for new wells off the coast because that $11 million is needed, in their words, “to make production economic.” So taxpayers are being asked to pay Beta to drill new wells. That means wells that would otherwise not be drilled without our taxpayer subsidy. 01:02:52 Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi: What we have found, during and after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, is that dolphins can be significantly impacted by oil, primarily through inhalation of the fumes at the surface and ingestion of the oil substances themselves. What we found is that it affects their immune system, it affects their reproductive tract, and it affects their gastrointestinal tract, so very significant changes. And that's information that is just now starting to come out in the publications from the Deepwater Horizon incident. 1:06:51 Vipe Desai: Had this oil spill moved north, it would have impacted two of the busiest ports in the nation, which account for billions of dollars of goods flowing in and out of both ports of LA and Long Beach. And that would have had an even larger impact to other communities across the US. 1:08:21 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): The annual oil production off the coast of California is about 1/3 of what our nation produces in a single day. So it really is a drop in the bucket when you consider the overwhelming potential for economic damage for environmental damage, the risks simply aren't worth it. 1:09:34 Vipe Desai: California's ocean economy generates $54.3 billion in revenue and supports 654,000 jobs. 1:25:15 Dr. David L. Valentine: In Orange County, the areas that I would look at most closely as being especially vulnerable on the environmental side would be the wetland environments. Places like Talbert Marsh where oil can surge in with the tide. And it can get trapped in those environments and it can get stuck and it won't come back out when the tide recedes. Those are especially vulnerable because they're these rich, diverse ecosystems. They provide a whole host of different services, whether it's flyways, or fisheries, or in keeping the nutrient levels moderated in coastal waters. And that oil can stick there and it can have a long term impact. And furthermore, cleanup in those cases can be very difficult because getting into a marsh and trying to clean it up manually can cause as much damage as oil can cause. 1:26:24 Dr. David L. Valentine: And then the other environment that I worry a lot about is the environment we can't see, that is what's going on under the surface of the ocean. And in that case, we can have oil that comes ashore and then gets pulled back offshore but is now denser because it's accumulated sand and other mineral matter. And that can be sticking around in the coastal ocean. We don't really understand how much of that there is or exactly where it goes. And that concerns me. 1:29:18 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): But Dr. Valentine, how concerned Do you think California should be that companies that own the offshore platforms, wells and pipelines might go bankrupt and pass decommissioning costs on to taxpayers? Dr. David L. Valentine: I think that we need to be very concerned. And this is not just a hypothetical, this is already happening. There are two instances that I can tell you about that I've been involved with personally. The first stems from the pipeline 901 rupture, also known as the Refugio, a big oil spill that happened in 2015. When that pipeline ruptured, it prevented oil from being further produced from platform Holley, off the coast of Santa Barbara just a few miles from my home. That platform when it was completely shut in, all 30 wells, was unable to produce any oil and the company, a small operator, went bankrupt. And then shortly thereafter, they went bankrupt again. And this time, they just gave up and they did something called quit claiming their lease back to the state of California. Meaning that the plugin abandonment and property commissioning fell into the lap of the State of California in that case, and that is an ongoing, ongoing saga. The second example I would give you is in Summerland. In 1896, the first offshore oil wells in this country were drilled from piers in Summerland. Those have been leaking over the years. And as recently as last year, there were three leaky oil wells coming up in Summerland. The state of California has found money to try alternative plug in abandonment strategies because anything traditional is not going to work on something that is 125 some odd years old. So that would be the second example where this is now falling into the taxpayers lap yet again. IMPACTS OF ABANDONED OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS INFRASTRUCTURE AND THE NEED FOR STRONGER FEDERAL OVERSIGHT House Committee on Natural Resources: Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources. October 14, 2021 Witnesses: Dr. Donald Boesch Professor and President Emeritus, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Dr. Greg Stunz Endowed Chair for Fisheries and Ocean Health, and Professor of Marine Biology Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies Texas A&M University Robert Schuwerk Executive Director, North America Office Carbon Tracker Initiative Ms. Jacqueline Savitz Chief Policy Officer, Oceana Clips 10:34 Rep. Pete Stauber (R-MN): I can certainly provide a summary of things that will help keep energy prices down: issue onshore and offshore lease sales; reinstate the Presidential permit for the Keystone XL Pipeline; renew our commitment to exporting American energy, instead of importing foreign energy; reform a broken permitting process; and stop burdening domestic producers. 16:08 Dr. Donald Boesch: Oil and gas production from wells in less than 1000 feet of water declined as fuels discovered in the 80s and even earlier were depleted. Crude oil production in these relatively shallow waters declined by over 90% both in the Gulf and and in Southern California. Natural gas production in the OCS, which mainly came from the shallow water wells, declined by 80%. Offshore fossil energy production is now dominated in the deep water off the Gulf of Mexico, up to 7500 feet deep. Deepwater production grew by 38% just over the last 10 years since the Deepwater Horizon disaster. 17:05 Dr. Donald Boesch: Since the lifting of the crude oil export ban in 2016, last year there was 78% more crude oil exported from Gulf terminals, exported overseas, than actually produced in the US OCS and three times as much natural gas exported, than produced offshore. 18:06 Dr. Donald Boesch: So, the depletion of shallow water gas has left this legacy of old wells and declining resources and the infrastructure requires decommissioning and removal. Much of this infrastructure is not operated by the original leaseholders, but by smaller companies with lesser assets and technical and operational capacity. 18:40 Dr. Donald Boesch: Off Southern California there are 23 platforms in federal waters, eight of which are soon facing decommissioning. In the Gulf, on the other hand, there are 18,162 platforms and about 1000 of them will probably be decommissioned within this decade. 19:46 Dr. Donald Boesch: According to the GAO, as you pointed out, there are 600 miles of active pipelines in federal waters of the Gulf, and 18,000 miles of abandoned plant pipelines. The GAO found the Department of the Interior lacks a robust process for addressing the environmental and safety risk and ensuring clean up and burial standards are met. And also monitoring the long term fate of these, these pipelines. 20:54 Dr. Donald Boesch: At recent rates of production of oil and gas, the Gulf's crude oil oil reserves will be exhausted in only six or seven years. That is the proven reserves. Even with the undiscovered and economically recoverable oil that BOEM (Bureau of Ocean Energy Management) estimates in the central and western Gulf, we would run out of oil about mid century. So unless some miracle allows us to capture all of the greenhouse gases that would be released, we really can't do that and achieve net zero emissions, whether it be by resource depletion, governmental or corporate policy, or investor and stockholder decisions. Offshore oil and gas production is likely to see it see a steep decline. So the greenhouse gas emissions pathway that we follow and how we deal with the legacy and remaining infrastructure will both play out over the next decade or two. 25:16 Dr. Greg Stuntz: In fact, these decades old structures hold tremendous amounts of fish biomass and our major economic drivers. A central question is, how do these structures perform in relation to mother nature or natural habitat and I'm pleased to report that in every parameter we use to measure that success. These artificial reefs produce at least as well are often better than the natural habitat. We observe higher densities of fish, faster growth and even similar output. Thus, by all measures, these data show artificial reefs are functioning at least equivalent on a per capita basis to enhance our marine resources. 28:54 Rob Schuwerk: When a company installs a platform and drills well, it creates an ARO, an obligation to reclaim that infrastructure when production ends. This costs money. But companies aren't required to get financial assurance for the full estimated costs today. Money to plug in active wells today comes from cash flows from oil and gas production. But what happens when that stops? The International Energy Agency sees peak oil and gas demand as early as 2025. This will make it harder to pay for decommissioning from future cash flows. Decommissioning is costly. The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) data indicate that offshore AROs could range from $35 to over $50 billion while financial assurance requirements are about $3.47 billion. That is less than 10% of expected liability. The GAO believes these figures may actually underestimate the true costs of retiring the remaining deepwater infrastructure. 30:05 Rob Schuwerk: Only about a third of the unplug wells in the Gulf of Mexico have shown any production in the last 12 months. Why haven't the other two thirds already been retired? Because of uncertainty as to when to close and poor incentives. Infrastructure should be decommissioned when it's no longer useful. But the regulator has difficulty making that determination. This uncertainty explains why BSEE waits five years after a well becomes inactive to deem it no longer useful for operations with years more allowed for decommissioning. These delays increase the risk that operators will become unable to pay or simply disappear. We've seen this already with a variety of companies including Amplify Energy's predecessor Beta Dinoco off California and Fieldwood recently with Mexico. 30:55 Rob Schuwerk: There's also a problem of misaligned economic incentives. As it is virtually costless to keep wells unplugged, companies have no incentive to timely plug them. AROs are like an unsecured, interest free balloon loan from the government with no date of maturity. There's little incentive to save for repayment because operators bear no carrying cost and no risk in the case of default. If the ARO loan carried interest payments commensurate with the underlying non performance risk, producers would be incentivized to decommission non economic assets. The solution is simple, require financial assurance equivalent to the full cost of carrying out all decommissioning obligations. This could take the form of a surety bond, a sinking fund or some other form of restricted cash equivalent. If wells are still economic to operate, considering the carrying cost of financial assurance, the operator will continue production, if not they'll plug. In either case, the public is protected from these costs. 32:11 Rob Schuwerk: A key risk here is operator bankruptcy that causes liabilities to be passed on to others. And we could see this in the recent Fieldwood bankruptcy. Fieldwood was formed in 2012 and in 2013 acquired shallow water properties from Apache Corporation. It went through chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2018, and then undeterred, acquired additional deepwater platforms from Noble Energy. Fieldwood returned to bankruptcy in 2020. It characterized the decommissioning costs it shared with Apache as among the company's most significant liabilities. The bankruptcy plan created new companies to receive and decommission certain idle offshore assets. If they failed, prior operators and lessors would have to pay. Several large oil and gas companies objected to this proposal. They were concerned that if Fieldwood couldn't pay they would. Ultimately the plan was proved. The case illustrates a few key dynamics. First, if bankrupt companies cannot pay, others, including taxpayers, will. How much of the possibly $50 billion in offshore decommissioning liability is held by companies that are only a dragged anchor, a hurricane a leaking pipeline or oil price shock away from default? And second, as detailed in my written testimony, private companies who face liability risks understand them better than the government does. When they transfer wells, they demand financial protections that are in fact greater than what the government requires today. 36:02 Jacqueline Savitz: Supplemental bonds are necessary to protect taxpayers from the risk of spills but BOEM is overusing the waiver provisions that allow a financial strength test to waive requirements for supplemental bonds. BOEM regulations require that lessees furnish a relatively small general bond and while BOEM has discretion to acquire supplemental bonds, it generally waives those. General bonds that lessees are required to furnish don't come close to covering the cost of decommissioning and haven't been updated since 1993. Since that year, the cost of decommissioning has gone up in part because development has moved into deeper waters, only about 10% of offshore oil production in the Gulf was in deepwater in 1993. But by 2014, that figure rose to 80%. Regulations need to be updated to ensure the federal government and taxpayers are not left picking up the tab on decommissioning. According to GAO, only 8% of decommissioning liabilities in the Gulf of Mexico were covered by bonds or other financial assurance mechanisms, with the other 92% waived or simply unaccounted for. 38:06 Jacqueline Savitz: BSEE does not conduct oversight over decommissioning activities underway and it does not inspect decommissioned pipelines so the Bureau can't ensure that the industry has complied with required environmental mitigation. 38:17 Jacqueline Savitz: Leak detection technologies that the oil and gas industry touts as safer have not been proven to prevent major leaks. All pipelines in the Pacific region are reportedly equipped with advanced leak detection equipment. Though two weeks ago we saw exactly what can happen even with the so-called “Best Technology.” 42:00 Dr. Donald Boesch: In Hurricane Ida, all of a sudden appeared an oil slick, and it lasted for several days. And apparently it was traced to an abandoned pipeline that had not been fully cleared of all the residual oil in it so that all that oil leaked out during that incident. 47:59 Dr. Donald Boesch: One of the challenges though, is that this older infrastructure is not operating in the same standards and with the same capacity of those of the major oil companies that have to do that. So for example, when I noted that they detected this methane being leaked, they didn't detect it from the new offshore deepwater platforms which have all the right technology. It's in the older infrastructure that they're seeing. 54:14 Rob Schuwerk: There's actually one thing that exists offshore, joint and several liability, that only exists in certain jurisdictions onshore. So in some ways the situation onshore is worse. Because in some states like California you can go after prior operators if the current operator cannot pay, but in many jurisdictions you cannot. And our research has found that there is about $280 billion in onshore liability, and somewhere around 1% of that is covered by financial assurance bonds so, there is definitely an issue onshore rather than offshore. 55:04 Rob Schuwerk: The issue is just really giving them a financial incentive to be able to decommission. And that means they have to confront the cost of decommissioning and internalize that into their decision on whether continuing to produce from a well is economic or not. And so that means they need to have some kind of financial insurance in place that represents the actual cost. That could be a surety bond where they go to an insurer that acts as a guarantor for that amount. It could be a sinking fund, like we have in the context of nuclear where they go start putting money aside at the beginning, and it grows over time to be sufficient to plug the well at the end of its useful life. And there could be other forms of restricted cash that they maintain on the balance sheet for the benefit of these liabilities. 1:15:38 Jacqueline Savitz: Remember, there is no shortage of offshore oil and gas opportunity for the oil industry. The oil industry is sitting on so many, nearly 8.5 million acres of unused or non producing leases, 75% of the total lease acreage in public waters. They're sitting on it and not using it. So even if we ended all new leasing, it would not end offshore production. 1:22:35 Rob Schuwerk: Typically what we'll see as well to do companies will transfer these assets into other entities that have less financial means and wherewithal to actually conduct the cleanup. Rep. Katie Porter: So they're moving once they've taken the money, they've made the profit, then they're giving away they're basically transferring away the unprofitable, difficult, expensive part of this, which is the decommissioning portion. And they're transferring that. Are they transferring that to big healthy companies? Rob Schuwerk: No, often they're transferring it to companies that didn't exist even just prior to the transfer. Rep. Katie Porter: You mean a shell company? Rob Schuwerk: Yes. Rep. Katie Porter: Like an entity created just for the purpose of pushing off the cost of doing business so that you don't have to pay it even though you've got all the upside. Are you saying that this is what oil and gas companies do? Rob Schuwerk: We've seen this, yes. Rep. Katie Porter: And how does the law facilitate this? Rob Schuwerk: Well, I suppose on a couple of levels. On the one hand, there's very little oversight of the transfer. And so there's very little restriction from a regulatory standpoint, this is true, offshore and also onshore. So we see this behavior in both places. And then secondary to that there are actions that companies can take in bankruptcy that can effectively pass these liabilities on to taxpayers eventually and so some of it is to be able to use that event, the new company goes bankrupt. 1:25:01 Rob Schuwerk: Certainly no private actor would do what the federal government does, which is not have a security for these risks. MISUSE OF TAXPAYER DOLLARS AND CORPORATE WELFARE IN THE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY House Committee on Natural Resources: Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations May 19, 2021 Witnesses: Laura Zachary Co-Director, Apogee Economics & Policy Tim Stretton Policy Analyst, Project on Government Oversight (POGO) Clips 27:10 Laura Zachary: There have long been calls for fiscal reforms to the federal oil and gas program. Compared to how states managed oil and gas leasing, the federal government forgoes at least a third of the revenue that could have been captured for taxpayers 27:25 Laura Zachary: On January 27 of this year, the Biden administration signed Executive Order 14008 that pauses issuing new federal oil and gas leases. And importantly, the language implies a temporary pause, only on issuing new leases, not on issuing drilling permits. This is a critical distinction for what the impacts of a pause could be. Very importantly, federal permitting data confirms that to date, there has been no pause on issuing drilling permits for both onshore and offshore. And in fact, since the pause began, Department of Interior has approved drilling permits at rates in line with past administrations. 37:08 Tim Stretton: Because taxpayers own resources such as oil and gas that are extracted from public lands, the government is legally required to collect royalties for the resources produced from leases on these lands. Project on Government Oversight's investigations into the federal government's oversight of the oil, gas and mining industries have uncovered widespread corruption that allows industry to cheat U.S. taxpayers out of billions of dollars worth of potential income. Given the amount of money at stake and the oil and gas industry's history of deliberately concealing the value of the resources they've extracted with the intent of underpaying royalties, the government should be particularly vigilant in ensuring companies pay their fair share for the resources they extract. 46:28 Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): We are here today for the majority's attempt, which I believe is more of a publicity stunt to criticize the oil and gas industry than to talk about real facts and data. The playbook is a simple one: recycled talking points to vilify the industry and to paint a distorted picture of so-called good versus evil. I'm sure that we'll hear more about corporate subsidies that aren't. We'll hear about unfair royalty rates that aren't and we'll hear many other meme worthy talking points that fail the logic test. 47:35_ Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): What we're -really talking about today is an industry that provides reliable and affordable energy to our nation. This isan industry that contributes to almost 10 million jobs and plays a vital role in our daily lives. In fact, we cannot conduct virtual hearings like this without the fossil fuel industry. And of course, when myself and my colleagues travel to Washington, DC, we rely on this industry to fly or to drive here. 49:33 Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): But they ignore the real world consequences of demonizing this industry. The results are devastating job loss and the loss of public education funding to name just a few. 54:05 Rep. Pete Stauber (R-MN): I also had a roundtable discussion and learned how New Mexico schools received nearly $1.4 billion in funding from oil and gas just last year. 55:08 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): Mr. Stretton, how long has your organization been conducting oversight of oil and gas production on federal lands? Tim Stretton: For decades, I mean, we started doing this work in the early 90s. And actually, some of our earliest work in the space was uncovering in excess of a billion dollars in unpaid royalties to your home state of California. Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): And you mentioned, what are some of the patterns? You've been doing this for decades? What are some of the patterns that you observe over time? Tim Stretton: The oil and gas industry working with each other to really undervalue the resources they were selling, fraudulently telling the government the value of those resources, which left billions of dollars in unpaid revenue going to the federal government. 1:01:09 Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ): There are some people who have made environmentalism a religion. Rather than focus on solutions that can make lives better for people, some would prefer to vilify an industry that provides immeasurable benefits to people's livelihood in the function of modern day society. 1:04:21 Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ): The other side looks at globalism, you know this environmental movement globally. So it makes more sense to me at least and folks I come from that we produce it cleaner more efficiently than anybody else in the world. And so that geopolitical application, if you're an environmentalist, you would want more American clean oil and gas out there versus Russian dirty or Chinese dirty gas. 02:37:23 Rep. Blake Moore (R-UT): In January state education superintendents in Wyoming, Miami, North Dakota, Alaska, and Utah submitted a letter to President Biden outlining their concerns with the administration's oil and gas ban which has reduced funding used to educate our rising generation. 02:43:35 Rep. Yvette Herrell (R-NM): I'm glad to be able to highlight the true success story of the oil and gas industry in my home state of New Mexico. To put it simply, the oil and gas industry is the economic backbone of New Mexico and has been for decades. The industry employs 134,000 People statewide and provides over a billion dollars each year to fund our public education. 02:44:30 Rep. Yvette Herrell (R-NM): Many of my Democratic colleagues have stated that green energy jobs can replace the loss of traditional energy jobs, like the 134,000 Oil and Gas jobs in my state. Many also say that we need to be transitioning to a completely carbon free energy grid. Can you tell me and the committee why both of those ideas are completely fantasy? Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

los angeles japanese russian bay university long beach chinese california american project mexico natural surfing north world war ii state utah congress money nasa energy california department professor pacific dc meaning democratic alaska federal washington presidential gulf oil act birds places gas school southern california san francisco bay new mexico carlsbad fish deepwater horizon police journal beach businesses miami wyoming donations interior airbnb safety americas san diego fishing us open patch american history currents cambria eis orange county commission crude wall street journal north dakota apache amplify joe biden investigations beta holley bureau tom fowler hogan importantly heal cunningham coast guard santa barbara dolphin midway hwy barrels san clemente infrastructure tot protecting maintain san diego county california state senate summerland deep water rio grande emeritus music alley treaty sarahs oceanside regulations marine science busan alessi offshore refugio aro surfboards fisheries subcommittee michael h encinitas colorado river huntington beach newport beach laguna beach pacific ocean queen mary david l maryland center vhf wahoo aros santa barbara channel captain dave del mar seal beach cosco keystone pipeline ocean health executive orders ocs gao oversight veterinary medicine decommissioning elkind cancellations mileage offshore oil bsee dana point endangered species act oil drilling wing lam congressional dish international energy agency mineral resources boem ocean energy management offshore drilling government accountability office kern county business alliance newport harbor noble energy government oversight cover art design biological diversity heritage site best technology david ippolito crestview
Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina
Santa Barbara Talks Podcast: Giana Magnoli Talks Santa Barbara's Noozhawk

Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 55:48


In this video, Giana Magnoli pulls back the curtain on Noozhawk.com and how the organization gathers news. Among some of the highlights: 1:26: The role Noozhawk plays in the local media landscape 3:32: Why Giana chose Noozhawk over other options 5:05: Giana talks original team, Lara Cooper, Noozhawk's beginnings on Gutierrez Street 6:30: Early feelings on working for just-launched startup 9:05: Josh talks working at the San Jose Mercury News and living at the Extended Stay for 6 months 9:40: Giana explains what life was like growing up in Silicon Valley 16:30: Giana talks Noozhawk's legacy projects, including her series on opioid addiction in Santa Barbara and District Elections series 20:19: How Noozhawk changed during the COVID-19 pandemic 29:04: Challenges of being a woman in journalism: Hint: (no one tries to hug Josh) 32:33: What Noozhawk does well and its growth areas 39:53: How Giana responds to story takedown request and headline, copy changes after publication 47:49: Giana explains why Noozhawk does not endorse candidates 49:49: Giana talks about her goals at Noozhawk and as a journalist

Reading McCarthy
Episode 19: Meanderings with Peter Josyph, Part 2

Reading McCarthy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 47:41


This episode is Part TWO of my excellent wandering conversation with the energetic and versatile Peter Josyph.  Author, Actor, Artist, Auteur, and more, Peter Josyph's books include The Wrong Reader's Guide to Cormac McCarthy: All the Pretty Horses; Adventures in Reading Cormac McCarthy; Cormac McCarthy's House: Reading McCarthy Without Walls; Liberty Street: Encounters at Ground Zero; The Way of the Trumpet; What One Man Said to Another: Talks With Richard Selzer; and The Wounded River, which was a New York Times Notable Book of 1993. His films include the award-winning Liberty Street: Alive at Ground Zero; Shakespeare in New York; Hell; Bardtalk; A Few Things Basquiat Did in School; and Acting McCarthy: The Making of Billy Bob Thornton's All the Pretty Horses. As a painter his McCarthy-related exhibitions have shown around the world, including Luleo, Sweden; Coventry, England; Sydney, Australia; and here in the states in in Berea, Kentucky; in El Paso; and in Santa Barbara. As an actor he has played, among many other roles, the character of White in The Sunset Limited at the Weisiger Theatre at Centre College in Danville, Kentucky. He is a frequent keynote speaker for the Cormac McCarthy Society, and he currently lectures on film for the Frick Estate Lectures at Nassau County Museum of Art on Long Island.Peter's songs with band Corporeal Punishment, “Wesley's Song” and “Suttree's Song,” from his McCarthy Variations, are included in the show.  The intro and outro songs and other pieces are, as always, composed, performed, and produced by Thomas Frye.  The views of the host and his guests do not necessarily reflect the views of their home institutions or the Cormac McCarthy Society.  We are on Twitter and may be reached at Readingmccarthy@gmail.com. 

Cork & Taylor Wine Podcast
Episode 35: Aaron Pott (Winemaker/Pott Wines)

Cork & Taylor Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 31:27


The last episode of my Santa Barbara, Paso Robles and Napa trek ends with one of my favorite winemakers, Aaron Pott. Great stories behind a remarkable career and did I mention delicious wines. Stunning views surrounded us and a little windy at times.Don't forget to Subscribe, Rate and Review! Also, follow us on our Facebook @corkandtaylor and Instagram accounts @corkandtaylorpodcast.Also, Please consider supporting the show as it would be appreciated. This helps me offset  expenses to continue to run and grow the Cork & Taylor Wine Podcast. Thanks! Lukehttps://www.patreon.com/corkandtaylor​Check out our Cork and Taylor Wine Collection by going to the link below. We have partnered with some awesome wineries to bring wine country to your door. Remember to use CorkTaylor when you check out at each of their shops!https://www.corkandtaylor.com/winecollection

A Quest for Well-Being
How To Deepen The Love In Your Life

A Quest for Well-Being

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 46:09


— Dr. Ronald L. Mann provides individuals the tools to move beyond the limitations of body identification with the more limited definition of self that is defined by one's thoughts, feelings, emotions, and physicality. Being “awake” has a much more profound meaning than just getting up in the morning after a night's rest, drinking a cup of coffee, and getting started with your day's activities. It is realizing a more expanded state of self beyond the limited “ego” to a higher sense of Self or the soul. Consciousness wants to evolve through us. We are all on a journey of returning to the source of Love. On our way, we can either coast along with the current or use a paddle to speed our journey. We are all going home. Valeria Teles interviews Dr. Ronald Mann — the author of “Sacred Healing: Integrating Spirituality with Psychotherapy.” Dr. Mann has been helping people awaken their consciousness for over forty years. His presence and depth of intuitive insight, along with his psychological training, give him a unique expertise in the field of spiritual development. Dr. Mann obtained a Master's Degree in Educational Psychology from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1971, and a Doctor of Philosophy from the California School of Professional Psychology, Los Angeles in 1974. He obtained post-graduate training in Executive Coaching and Organization Development from the William James Institute of the Professional School of Psychology. He practiced as a licensed psychologist from 1976-2002. He has appeared on Fox Sports Network, Fox Boston 25 Morning News, the Gary Collins Show, Good Morning America and numerous radio interview shows. Dr. Mann has written six books, including an LA Times bestseller: “The Yoga of Golf; Bouncing Back: How to Recover When Life Knocks You Down,” “The Making Of A Champion: Success is an Inconvenience” (written for and with Head Football Coach Joseph Taylor,”  “Learning to Win: The Coaches Guide for Mastering the Mental Game of Golf,” and “Bouncing Back: 2017 in Crisis!: How to Prepare for and Recover From Life's Greatest Threats.” He has also developed and produced a variety of audio programs for meditation, self-healing, and stress reduction. To learn more about Dr. Ronald Mann and his work, please visit: ronmann.com & lovefactorinventory.com     — This podcast is a quest for well-being, a quest for a meaningful life through the exploration of fundamental truths, enlightening ideas, insights on physical, mental, and spiritual health. The inspiration is Love. The aspiration is to awaken new ways of thinking that can lead us to a new way of being, being well. 

The Real News Podcast
‘Nicaragua presents a challenge to the international left'

The Real News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 47:01


On Nov. 7, Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega secured a fourth consecutive term in the country's latest round of national elections with Rosario Murillo, Ortega's wife, serving as Vice President. Prior to his current run as President, which began in 2007, Ortega had headed the government throughout the 1980s, first through the Junta of National Reconstruction after the Sandinista National Liberation Front ousted the right-wing Somoza dictatorship in 1979, and then as President from 1985 to 1990. Nicaragua's electoral authority has said that voter turnout in this week's elections reached 65% and that Ortega's Sandinista alliance secured about 75% of votes cast. The United States is currently leading an international chorus rejecting the legitimacy of the elections and condemning the Ortega-Murillo government, with President Joe Biden threatening action against Nicaragua. “What Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega and his wife, Vice President Rosario Murillo, orchestrated today was a pantomime election that was neither free nor fair, and most certainly not democratic,” Biden's official statement says. The “United States, in close coordination with other members of the international community, will use all diplomatic and economic tools at our disposal to support the people of Nicaragua and hold accountable the Ortega-Murillo government and those that facilitate its abuses.”The aggressive posture and threats of sanctions (or worse) from President Biden follow a well-worn path of flexed imperialist might, political and even military intervention, and self-serving definitions of democracy that the US has often deployed against left-wing governments throughout Latin America. In response, leftists of different stripes in North America and beyond have denounced President Biden's threat while also claiming that accusations of rigged elections in Nicaragua or doubts about the leftist bonafides of Ortega's government are entirely unfounded. But there is a lot more context that needs to be unpacked here, and doing so from a historically honest and anti-imperialist perspective is vital to understanding the very real political crisis in Nicaragua. In this interview, TRNN Editor-in-Chief Maximillian Alvarez speaks with professor and Latin American specialist William I. Robinson about the deeper historical context surrounding Nicaragua's elections, the very real political crisis that many are not seeing, and the need for the internationalist left to oppose US imperialism while soberly assessing the abuses of the Ortega-Murillo government.William I. Robinson is Distinguished Professor of Sociology, Global, and Latin American Studies at the University of California at Santa Barbara. He worked in Managua with the Nicaragua News Agency and the Nicaragua Foreign Ministry in the 1980s and was affiliated faculty with the Central American University in Managua until 2001. Along with authoring a series of analyses of the 2021 Nicaraguan elections for the North American Congress on Latin America, Robinson has authored, co-authored, and edited numerous books, including Global Capitalism and the Crisis of Humanity; David and Goliath: The U.S. War Against Nicaragua; The Global Police State; and A Faustian Bargain: U.S. Intervention in the Nicaraguan Elections and American Foreign Policy in the post-Cold War Era.Pre-Production/Studio/Post Production: Cameron GranadinoHelp us continue producing radically independent news and in-depth analysis by following us and becoming a monthly sustainer: Donate: https://therealnews.com/donate-podSign up for our newsletter: https://therealnews.com/newsletter-podLike us on Facebook: https://facebook.com/therealnewsFollow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/therealnews

Ventura County Works
E19: Ventura County Youth Careers Program

Ventura County Works

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 12:15


Youth are the future workforce and make up a large portion of the service industry and entry-level employees. During this pandemic, youth are the most impacted population with about 17% receiving unemployment. Since the beginning of the pandemic in Ventura County, according to data from the State of California Employment Development Department (EDD), 60,530 youth ages 18-24 applied for Unemployment Insurance in Ventura County. The number of youth unemployment insurance claims represents nearly 17% of the whole county's total claims. For this reason and many more, it's important to outreach to the youth in our community. Joining the program to talk about Ventura County Youth Careers Program are Alex Renteria, Sr. Mission Services Manager, Goodwill Industries of Ventura and Santa Barbara Counties and Patty Cervantes: Mission Services Supervisor, Goodwill Industries of Ventura and Santa Barbara . 

Dante Elephante Podcast

Find foamboy: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/foamboyband/ Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/1JuU4GHSf0kmi5dOCm1BeS?si=-nQLSfamTFy5ubOS2iyaTg Dante Elephante is on tour! Get your tickets at www.danteelephante.com/tour 12/2 Pheonix - VALLEY BAR 12/3 San Diego - SODA BAR 12/4 Los Angeles – JAM IN THE VAN 12/5 San Francisco – BOTTOM OF THE HILL 12/7 Sacramento, CA – THE STARLET 12/9 Eugene, OR – SESSIONS LOUNGE 12/12 Seattle, WA – HIGH DIVE 12/14 Spokane, WA – LUCKY YOU 12/15 Boise, ID – SHREDDER 12/16 Salt Lake City, UT – KILBY COURT 12/18 Denver, CO – HI-DIVE 2022 Dates: 1/11 Albuquerque, NM – SISTER 1/13 Dallas, TX – RUINS 1/14 Houston, TX – WHITE OAK MUSIC HALL 1/15 Bryan, TX – GRAND STAFFORD THEATRE 1/16 Austin, TX – EMPIRE CONTROL ROOM 1/18 Lawrence, KS – BOTTLENECK 1/19 Davenport, IA – RACCOON MOTEL1/20 Milwaukee, WI – X-RAY 1/21 Minneapolis, MN – 7TH STREET ENTRY 1/22 Chicago, IL – TOMORROW NEVER KNOWS FEST 1/25 Cleveland, OH – MAHALL'S 1/26 Columbus, OH – RUMBA 1/27 Pittsburgh, PA – CRAFTHOUSE 1/28 Pontiac, MI – PIKE ROOM 1/29 Grand Rapids, MI – CALVIN COLLEGE 1/30 Nashville, TN – THE END 2/1 Omaha, NE – REVERB LOUNGE Find Dante Elephante: www.danteelephante.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DanteElephante/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dante_Elephante Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/danteelephante Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/3RdlkFPALHduIIZSinXgJZ

KeeKee's Big Adventures Family Travel Podcast
Family Adventures at California Wineries

KeeKee's Big Adventures Family Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 15:50


We're exploring family adventures at California Wineries with Jeanne Sullivan from the California Wine Institute in this episode. From the top to the bottom of the state, there are great winery experiences to enjoy with your family.

Overheard at National Geographic
When Family Secrets (And Soap Operas) Fuel Creativity

Overheard at National Geographic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 24:02


National Geographic photographer Diana Markosian tells us about her remarkable childhood and how her career as a photographer led her into the war in Chechnya—and eventually to her long-lost father's doorstep in Armenia. For more info on this episode, visit natgeo.com/overheard Want More?   Check out Diana's film Santa Barbara, which is showing at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art until Dec. 12 and the International Center of Photography until Jan. 10. Read her account of finding her father, grandfather, and a piece of herself in Armenia.  And to see more of her photos, follow her on Instagram @markosian. For subscribers:  See Diana's photographs showing how a Wisconsin high school graduated its seniors in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. And her portraits of a small town in Oregon that was destroyed by wildfires in September 2020 and a resident who lost her home.   If you like what you hear and want to support more content like this, please consider a National Geographic subscription. Go to natgeo.com/explore to subscribe today.

Nobody Listens to Paula Poundstone
Ep 174 - Our Ethics Investigation

Nobody Listens to Paula Poundstone

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 82:59


Yes, your favorite podcast is caught up in an ethics investigation… in that we are investigating ethics! UCLA Philosophy Professor Pamela Hieronymi is here to discuss where our ideas of Right and Wrong come from, and what to do with those ideas once we have ‘em. Also - at long last, we're done with “Eat, Pray, Love” - join us for the thrilling conclusion! Plus, Bonnie and Toni offer an oral report on Eritrea. Why? Well, we have to find new listeners somewhere, right? GUEST Dr. Pamela Hieronymi Professor in the Department of Philosophy, UCLA HOUSE BAND Matt Evans from Santa Barbara, CA Marimba & Electric Bass Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Marketing The Invisible
How to Get Better Clients Through Assessment – In Just 7 Minutes with Natasha Todorovic

Marketing The Invisible

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 8:22


 Discover how assessment can level up your coaching sessions and guarantee you better clients Learn why it's more important to form pre-client relationships before diving into actual coaching or consulting sessions Find out why you should stop asking more questions towards your clients Resources/Links: Wanting to Know How to Be a Better You to Get Better Clients? Learn more on what's your coaching superpower for a better coaching session: bit.ly/CoachingKryptonite Summary Have you felt like clients have been ghosting you, and ditching your coaching sessions? Do you ever wonder what's wrong? Is it your clients, your coaching sessions, or you, yourself? Are you ready to know how to get your clients to stick with you through the promising effect of assessments? Natasha Todorovic-Cowan is the CEO and co-founder of the National Values-Center Consulting (and owner of SPIRAL DYNAMICS® brand). Natasha's expertise includes unravelling the people side of organizational challenges from C-Suite to shop floor using a proven human systems approach. In this episode, Natasha shares the importance and benefits of doing an assessment in the long run for your coaching and consulting sessions. She also talks about the right and promising strategy that will guarantee you a deeper and better relationship with your clients. Check out these episode highlights: 01:33 - Natasha's ideal client: “Business and organizational consultants and coaches who are helping their clients with changing transformation.” 01:47- Problem Natasha helps solve: “They're generally struggling with why their clients ghost them, why their clients aren't getting the changes or transformations that they're looking for. And some of them are trying to struggle with not getting clients at all, or not getting enough clients.” 02:31- Typical symptoms that clients do before reaching out to Natasha: “Well, a lot of coaches and consultants get this feeling of, "You know, I've done a whole lot of stuff, but I've plateaued", or they're looking around, and they're looking at their clients and going, "I don't like these people. I want to up life, but I don't know how!" 03:29 - Common mistakes that people make before they find Natasha's solution: “One of the common mistakes, particularly for coaches, is they keep asking more questions. So, they start pushing clients, which is the exact wrong strategy! And what they do is they double down on their training, and that pushes clients away, as well.” 04:52 - Natasha's Valuable Free Action (VFA): “What we recommend that most consultants, particularly coaches, do is use assessment as a bridged strategy. And there are two reasons for that. Number one is you get to know the client more quickly and more deeply.” 06:07 - Natasha's Valuable Free Resource (VFR): Check out Natasha's FREE Quiz: bit.ly/CoachingKryptonite 07:10 - Q: Why do service providers miss so much on their clients? A: Because we have so many cognitive biases that keep us from seeing ourselves. Let alone what's alive and true in the client who is emerging to the next iteration of who it is they're becoming. Tweetable Takeaways from this Episode: “Clients actually open up and become more real and authentic when they feel seen, heard, and understood.” -Natasha TodorovicClick To Tweet Transcript (Note, this was transcribed using a transcription software and may not reflect the exact words used in the podcast) Tom Poland 00:09 Greetings, everyone, and a warm welcome to another edition of Marketing the Invisible. My name is Tom Poland beaming out to you from little Castaways Beach in Queensland, Australia, joined today by Natasha Todorovic. Natasha, good day! A very warm welcome. Where are you hanging out? Natasha Todorovic 00:24 Hi. I am hanging out in Santa Barbara, California today, Tom.

Fight Back
Want to Get Fit? How Do You Choose a Personal Trainer or Fitness Coach—the Dos and Don'ts

Fight Back

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 30:02


In this episode of Fight Back, we talk about the benefits of using a physical trainer. We welcome our special guest, Nicholas Andrus. A gifted athlete, Nick was selected for the junior Olympic soccer team and attended the University of California, Santa Barbara, on a soccer scholarship. He also has won numerous bodybuilding competitions. With this background, he entered the physical trainer profession. As a certified physical trainer, he works with clients virtually and in-person across the country and world.Nick will share with us his insights and experiences into how to find a physical trainer best suited for your desired outcomes, the importance of a collaborative trainer-client relationship, the positive mental and physical health benefits of a training program, and more.   

Point of Inquiry
David McAfee - Hi, I'm an Atheist!

Point of Inquiry

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 51:12


On today's episode we introduce the show's new guest host, Julia Sweeney and her interview with author David G. McAfee on his new book, Hi, I'm an Atheist!: What That Means and How to Talk About It with Others. McAfee and Sweeney speak about the new book, how it helped Sweeney get back in touch with her atheism roots, his journey being raised in a religious household and becoming a non-believer, his challenges as an atheist in a Religious Studies program, what he sees in the bible from a literary perspective rather than from the perspective of a devout christian, and the role religion has in society. David G. McAfee is a journalist, religious studies scholar, and author of Disproving Christianity and other Secular Writings, as well as a contributor to American Atheist magazine. McAfee attended University of California, Santa Barbara, and graduated with a dual-degree in English and Religious Studies with an emphasis on Christianity and Mediterranean religions. He lives in California. Julia Sweeney is known for her work on Saturday Night Live and as a pioneer for atheism. Her inspiring one-person stage show, Letting Go of God, chronicles her personal journey from Catholicism to atheism. In addition to being an actress Sweeney is a new addition to the Center for Inquiry board.

Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina
Santa Barbara Talks 83: James Joyce III and Wade Cowper

Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 52:36


James Joyce III nearly shocked the world on Election Night in Santa Barbara when he placed second, winning 7,125 votes in his bid for mayor. He finished in second, far ahead of incumbent mayor Cathy Murillo. While Joyce did not win the top spot, he showed that there was a lot of buzz and excitement around his campaign. Joyce was outspent heavily by his opponent, yet only finished 3,000 votes behind the top vote-getter Randy Rowse. In this podcast, Joyce talks about his campaign, the strategy, what worked and what didn't. He is joined by Wade Cowper, his political consultant, who talks breaks down the strategy for victory. Joyce also responds to critics who say he cost Cathy Murillo, another Democrat, the election. He also talks about Daraka Larimore-Hall, and responds to the criticisms of his candidacy. Joyce and Cowper join Josh Molina in his kitchen for a conversation unlike any other. Joyce also talks about his future in politics. Unfiltered. Uncensored. Unapologetic. If you like podcasts like, please subscribe to my You Tube Channel at Santa Barbara Talks and consider a donation directly at my www.santabarbaratalks.com web site.

This is Democracy
This is Democracy – Episode 171: Work and Labor in America Today

This is Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021


In this episode, Jeremi and Zachary are joined by Dr. Nelson Lichtenstein to discuss the history of work and labor organization in the United States. Zachary sets the scene with his poem entitled "Soon to be But Not Yet" Nelson Lichtenstein is Distinguished Professor of History at the University of California, Santa Barbara. There he directs the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy, which he founded in 2004 to train a new generation of labor intellectuals. A historian of labor, political economy, and ideology, he is the author or editor of 16 books, including a biography of the labor leader Walter Reuther and State of the Union: A Century of American Labor. His most recent books are Achieving Workers' Rights in the Global Economy (2016); The Port Huron Statement: Sources and Legacies of the New Left's Founding Manifesto (2015); The ILO From Geneva to the Pacific Rim (2015); A Contest of Ideas: Capital, Politics, and Labor (2013); The Right and Labor in America: Politics, Ideology, and Imagination (2012); The Retail Revolution: How Wal-Mart Created a Brave New World of Business (2009); and American Capitalism: Social Thought and Political Economy in the Twentieth Century (2006). Lichtenstein is currently writing a history of economic thought and policymaking in the administration of Bill Clinton. With Gary Gerstle and Alice O'Connor he has edited Beyond the New Deal Order: From the Great Depression to the Great Recession. He writes for Dissent, Jacobin, New Labor Forum, and American Prospect. Lichtenstein recently published an article in Dissent: "Is This A Strike Wave," (October 25, 2021). This episode of This is Democracy was mixed and mastered by Karoline Pfeil and Morgan Honaker.

The Jeremiah Show
SN8 | Ep420 - The Lark | Featured in Our Fall Restaurant Series 2021 | Part I

The Jeremiah Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 52:43


The TJS Radio Restaurant Series, Part I - The Lark I think that it has been well established at this point that I'm a big fan of the fall season. For all of the right reasons: Friday night football games under a blanket in the bleachers, under the bright lights, in the chilled fall air, sounds of laughter, cheers, happiness. For when the sun is further from home and the shadows are long, and the light is weak during the vibrant early morning and sunset evening walks For the trees changing their leaves. For the harvest. Wine country and Wine Harvest festivals. Coffee, fires, good conversation with friends around the table in my favorite neighborhood joint. For the holidays, the excitement is in the air. Friends and family and the hope for a prosperous new year for all of us. And I'm excited for this: This is the Fall Restaurant Series. Like nearly every business, the past few years have been really, really hard on our friends in the restaurant business. But that's not what this special restaurant series is about…This series is cheering on and supporting those who have survived the years by highlighting their accomplishments and reminding all of us about what makes each restaurant special. It reminds all of us, including the restaurateurs, sometimes why our neighborhood restaurants and staff are so important to our social wellbeing. They continue to be a part of our lives. Restaurants will forever remain our happy gathering place for life's most important celebrations, or simply just to connect with friends at the end of a long week. This year we kick off the fall restaurant series with our friends from Acme Hospitality. They live for their restaurants and their guests, and they follow my favorite personal rule: Get better every day. I'm going to let them tell you why they love their restaurants. If you haven't been, go. If you've been, you will fall in love with your Acme Hospitality restaurants all over again. If you love restaurants and are curious about what happens behind the curtain, then sit back and just enjoy. And then go. - - - - First, I sit down with SHERRY VILLANUEVA Sherry is a longtime resident of Santa Barbara. She is the founder and Managing Partner of Acme Hospitality, she owns and operates eight successful restaurants in Santa Barbara including The Lark, Lucky Penny, Pearl Social, Helena Avenue Bakery, Santa Barbara Wine Collective, Loquita, Tyger Tyger, and La Paloma Café. In 2019, Sherry launched Acme Lodging, a hotel development, and management company with two historic boutique properties in California Gold Country. Both National and California Historic Landmarks, The National Exchange Hotel in Nevada City, and the Holbrooke Hotel in Grass Valley recently coming up in future episodes. Sherry's commitment to the local Santa Barbara community is reflected in the numerous volunteer positions and board roles she has held that include Direct Relief, Storyteller Children's Center, Santa Barbara FoodBank, Santa Barbara Middle School, and Santa Barbara High School Education Foundation.  Sherry lives between Los Olivos and downtown Santa Barbara with Jim, her husband of 33 years. They are the proud parents of two adult daughters, Annie and Katy. Sherry has received numerous awards and recognition for her contributions to the Santa Barbara business community including: “2021 Executive of the Year” from the South Coast Business & Technology Awards “2020 Honoree and Keynote Speaker for Top Women in Business” by the Pacific Coast Business Times “2019 (Acme Hospitality) Large Business of the Year” from the Santa Barbara Regional Chamber of Commerce “2018 (The Lark) Small Business of the Year” from the Santa Barbara Regional Chamber of Commerce Yeah, she's cool. http://www.acmehospitality.com www.thelarksb.com

Take Nothing When I Die
S2, E11: What We Care for Cares for Us with Davion Ziere

Take Nothing When I Die

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 71:46


You know the feeling you get after it has rained and everything is quiet and calmness envelops you? That's what it's like to speak with Davion Ziere! Born in Santa Barbara, CA and raised a global citizen between Oakland, Atlanta, Mississippi, South Africa and more, Davion Ziere is focused on being present and practicing holistic embodiment of the world we wish to live in. Ziere is a multi-instrumental artist, speaker, writer, bridge builder and serial post-growth entrepreneur cultivating visions and systems that value and respect all forms of life. He is the oldest of 9 siblings and loves his family, community, travel and exploring all that we don't know. Join us as we speak about: How Elders spoke to him about the importance of prayer, rest and meditation When he found himself with air bags deployed while experiencing a spiritual awakening The expansion of awareness What happened when Ziere began speaking his truth The importance of slowing down, being still and listening to your internal self and spirit Why our breath is proof of our life The word he uses to remind himself he is part of a collective Follow Ziere in these following spaces: IG: https://www.instagram.com/zithestarchild/ LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/davionz Medium: https://medium.com/@zierethestarchild Coaching Offering: https://manifestoperation.com/mentors/davion-ziere/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJF5ACzGAFUFcOMuoBa22jw Community Text: (808) 999-7733 Honorable Mentions: Lessons From Whale-Whispering with Michaela Harrison https://www.michaelaharrison.org/ https://asknature.org/

Vedanta and Yoga
Reflections on the Gita 44

Vedanta and Yoga

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 55:12


Lecture by Pravrajika Vrajaprana (Sarada Convent, Vedanta Society of Southern California, Santa Barbara), given on October 31, 2021, at the Ramakrishna Vedanta Society, Boston, MA.

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK
California's Collapse into Poverty and Despair is a Cautionary Tale for America

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 59:03


From skyrocketing crime to rampant homelessness and poverty, from frequent power blackouts to uncontrolled forest fires, the once Golden State is fast becoming the nation's basket case with more Californians fleeing the region than ever before. This week, Dr. Jay Lehr and Tom Harris are joined by Andy Caldwell, Executive Director of Coalition of Labor, Agriculture and Business (COLAB) Santa Barbara County in California. COLAB acts as both a government watchdog and promoter of these sectors in Santa Barbara. Mr. Caldwell discusses the growing problems of California, his once-wealthy and beautiful state. The Andy Caldwell Show airs from 3 - 5 pm Pacific Time on AM 1240 KSMA in Santa Maria, on AM1290 in Santa Barbara, and FM 98.5 in San Luis Obispo. It is the only local talk show to cover the entire California Central Coast. As a strong conservative in a very liberal county, Andy ran as a Republican for the district's Seat (District 24) in the U.S. House of Representatives in the 2020 election. He pulled in a respectable 43.1% of the vote before eventually losing to the Democrat incumbent. Join Dr. Jay Lehr, Tom Harris, and guest Andy Caldwell in this week's episode of The Other Side of the Story to learn how bad California's problems have become and how the state can still be saved.  References relevant to this show: The Andy Caldwell Show, AM 1240 KSMA in Santa Maria, AM1290 in Santa Barbara, and FM 98.5 in San Luis Obispo, California COLAB, Santa Barbara County, California The latest (October 2021) COLAB monthly newsletter “Andy Caldwell's California is No Longer the Golden State,” by Dr. Jay Lehr and Tom Harris, October 26, 2021, America Out Loud

Husband Material
How Jesus Reverses The Curse

Husband Material

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 44:42


If you feel unworthy or unlovable, please listen to this episode. It's a sermon—the same one I preached at the recent Husband Material Retreat in Santa Barbara. My text is John 21, looking at how Jesus brought repair and redemption to Peter, and what that means for us, especially in times of relapse.Join our private community at https://www.husbandmaterial.co/

New Books in Psychology
Jonathan Schooler, “Mind-Wandering and Meta-Awareness” (Open Agenda, 2021)

New Books in Psychology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 102:01


Mind-Wandering & Meta-Awareness is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Jonathan Schooler, Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences at the University of California, Santa Barbara. This wide-ranging conversation examines how mind-wandering can serve as a window into the psychological world of meta-awareness. further topics include the nature of consciousness, mindfulness, creativity, free will, verbal overshadowing and more. Howard Burton is the founder of the Ideas Roadshow, Ideas on Film and host of the Ideas Roadshow Podcast. He can be reached at howard@ideasroadshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/psychology

New Books Network
Jonathan Schooler, “Mind-Wandering and Meta-Awareness” (Open Agenda, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 102:01


Mind-Wandering & Meta-Awareness is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Jonathan Schooler, Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences at the University of California, Santa Barbara. This wide-ranging conversation examines how mind-wandering can serve as a window into the psychological world of meta-awareness. further topics include the nature of consciousness, mindfulness, creativity, free will, verbal overshadowing and more. Howard Burton is the founder of the Ideas Roadshow, Ideas on Film and host of the Ideas Roadshow Podcast. He can be reached at howard@ideasroadshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina
Santa Barbara Talks Podcast 82: Former Santa Barbara Mayor Sheila Lodge

Santa Barbara Talks with Josh Molina

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 57:40


Former Mayor Sheila Lodge has endorsed Randy Rowse in the 2021 Santa Barbara mayoral race, in somewhat of a political shocker. Lodge has thrown her credibility behind Kristen Sneddon in her re-election campaign. Lodge also talks about why she is not a fan of councilwoman Meagan Harmon, whom she calls "calculating." Lodge also pivots from politics to talk about local issues and her book, Santa Barbara: An Uncommonplace American Town. At 91 years old, Lodge is still going strong and one of the most important figures in Santa Barbara politics and preservationist worlds.

#AmWriting
I Have This Idea...Structuring Non-fiction and Memoir: Episode 287 Coaching Call with Emily Henderson

#AmWriting

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 45:18


The hardest part about writing a book is … all of it. Or, arguably, whichever part you’re doing. For our guest on this episode, listener Emily Henderson, it’s something like “I know what I want to write about, but I don’t know how.Structuring memoir or non-fiction (or, for that matter, fiction) is hard, y’all. And I think it gets talked about less in many ways that other elements of craft. We have this illusion that you come up with an idea and then you write it and it’s the writing that’s hard. But taking that idea and even getting it into a writeable shape is also hard. Are you writing a how-to book? A chronological story? A series of essays? An exploration of a big idea through a smaller lens?You may not know until you try. We talk about exploring all the iterations and then—ironically, since what Emily hopes to do is explore her “Covid project” of running every street in Santa Barbara—we helped Emily build a NaNoWriMo-style “project” around finding her book’s structure and getting some words on the page. In the process, we talked structural failures, revisions and the importance of choosing a book and topic that you want to live with for a few years.Talked about on the pod (again): The Art of the Book Proposal by Eric Maisel#AmReadingEmily: Sue Grafton’s alphabet series C is for CorpseShoulder Season by Christina ClancyKJ: Carnival of Snackery by David SedarisTheft By Finding also by David SedarisJess: The Secret History by Donna TarttBoyfriend by Sarina Bowen (and then we list all of our favorite Sarina Bowen books and discuss the importance of finding a book that’s your particular flavor of ice cream)Find Emily: emilykathleenwrites.com IG: @EmilykathleenwritesWant a “coaching call” of your own? Email us at amwriting@substack.com. We can’t promise to respond to every email, but we might answer your question on an upcoming episode—or invite you into the hotseat like Emily.Think you’d be pretty good on the other end of a coaching call? Then you should consider becoming a certified book coach through Author Accelerator’s book coach training program. It’s everything you need to know to begin working with clients on writing, planning, revising and querying (and then learning more and getting better with every new client and with Author Accelerator’s support and team behind you). Choose a fiction or nonfiction specialty, study with a cohort and design a new business or side-gig that works for you. Learn more at bookcoaches.com. This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at amwriting.substack.com/subscribe

The John Batchelor Show
1803: Anti-semitism on campus. Malcolm Hoenlein, @Mhoenlein1, @Conf_of_Pres

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 10:50


Photo: Among hundreds of incidents nationally, in October 2014 fliers were handed out in the University of California in Santa Barbara that claimed "9/11 Was an Outside Job" with a large blue Star of David. Here:  UCSB. Anti-semitism on campus.  Malcolm Hoenlein, @Mhoenlein1, @Conf_of_Pres https://nypost.com/2021/09/09/anti-semitism-on-college-campuses-on-the-rise-report-finds/ Malcolm Hoenlein, @Mhoenlein1, @Conf_of_Pres, Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations executive vice chairman for three decades.   .. More than one-quarter of undergraduate respondents describe hostility toward Israel on campus by their peers as a “fairly” or “very” big problem and nearly 15% perceive this same level of hostility toward Jews.

Who? Weekly
Freida Pinto, Chloe Bailey & Crystal Blease?

Who? Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 68:36


Is that sound of wedding bells? After you pick up tickets to our SF, Seattle and LA shows this week, head on over to Santa Barbara because Tarek just finally flipped her last name — ugh! But Freida Pinto got married at the Honda Center in Anaheim! Lala and Emmett (allegedly) split, JoJo and Kylie split :( and a sweaty guy on TikTok claims that Olivia Munn and John Mulaney have (allegedly) split, too. Chloe Bailey and Gunna sit next to a bottle of Dasani court side, Lori Harvey launches a skincare line, Lori Loughlin gets back on TV (but it's GAC Family?!?), Polo G's baby mama, Crystal, ditches him for a woman who goes by Lil Perfect. Plus, an Australian influencer mows her lawn. Call 619.WHO.THEM to leave questions, comments & concerns, and we may play your call on a future episode. Support us and get a ton of bonus content over on Patreon.com/WhoWeekly and come see us on tour! Get your tickets at WhoWeekly.us/live. Please! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Vedanta and Yoga
Learning from Nature

Vedanta and Yoga

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 50:21


Lecture by Pravrajika Vrajaprana (Sarada Convent, Vedanta Society of Southern California, Santa Barbara), given on October 23, 2021, at the Ramakrishna Vedanta Society, Boston, MA.

Madigan's Pubcast
Episode 61: Halloween Bratwurst, The Real Hidden Valley Ranch & St. Louis vs The NFL

Madigan's Pubcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 84:27


Kathleen opens the show drinking an Outboard Cream Ale from the Milwaukee Brewing Company, discussing her recent shows at the Pabst Theatre in Milwaukee and The Chicago Theatre. “GOOD BAD FOOD”: In her quest for new and delicious not-so-nutritious junk food AND in continuing her search for the best Ranch, Kathleen samples Hostess ScaryCakes in honor of Halloween, which she likes since they are just a festive chocolate cupcake. She then tastes Spooky Jr. Mints, which have black and orange mint flavoring but taste the same as the regular version, and Tessamae's Cilantro Lime Ranch, which she would only recommend to those Termites who don't want actual Ranch dressing. Kathleen gives a shoutout to Collectivo Coffee's Blue Healer blend, and to her lifelong love of Miracle Whip over mayonnaise. UPDATE ON KATHLEEN'S QUEEN'S COURT: Kathleen provides an update on the Court, reporting that Queen Dolly has recorded a duet of “Does She Love You,” with Reba. Queen Cher is suing Sonny Bono's widow over royalties for Sonny & Cher songs including “I Got You Babe.”UPDATES: Kathleen provides updates on the Missouri Cannibal, Banksy's “Girl With Balloon” sells for $25.4M, the Elizabeth Holmes trial continues to unveil the fraudulent nature of the Theranos technology in court. HALLOWEEN BRATWURST: Kathleen reports on a Madison WI butcher who east have created “Spook-toberfest” brats, which are cooked in local beer and dotted with candy corn. Kathleen is heading to Green Bay this weekend and is on the hunt for the festive brats. ALLIGATOR GAR CAUGHT: Kathleen reads an article from Kansas, where a fisherman has recently caught a 4.5 foot, 39.5-pound Alligator Gar. The catch is perplexing to local wildlife officials, since this horrifyingly ugly species of Gar are not native to Kansas. TENNESSEE TOWN FOR SALE: Kathleen reads a listing for a 7-acre Tennessee town that has hit the market for $725,000. According to the realtor tasked with selling the property, Water Valley has tremendous potential and is likened to the town mentioned the Schitt's Creek television series.MORE SNAKE NEWS: Kathleen reads an article detailing where a California woman found more than 90 rattlesnakes under her home, and another article where a Mississippi woman found a blond rattlesnake with rare pigmentation. ST LOUIS vs THE NFL: Kathleen reviews the current status of a lawsuit filed by her hometown of St. Louis against the NFL after the league allowed the Rams to move to Los Angeles. STL officials are seeking financial damages, and NFL lawyers are trying to get the Jan 2022 trial moved out of St. Louis. THE BIRTH OF HIDDEN VALLEY RANCH: Kathleen shares the story of how Hidden Valley Ranch was born through the work of a retired plumbing contractor and his wife. The Henson's purchased a 120-acre ranch in Santa Barbara, CA known then as Sweetwater Ranch, changing the name to Hidden Valley Ranch and creating a “California steak sauce” that is now commonly known as Ranch dressing. WHAT TO WATCH THIS WEEK: Kathleen recommends watching “Succession” on HBO, and “Bad Sport” on Netflix.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

BEHIND THE VELVET ROPE
EILEEN DAVIDSON (on RHOBH, Rinna, Erika, Denise & Being a Soap Legend!!!)

BEHIND THE VELVET ROPE

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 65:48


Eileen Davidson steps Behind The Rope. Actress, Author, Model, Two Time Emmy Winner, Wife, Mother, Soap Legend, and last, but certainly not least, Real Housewife - Eileen Davidson! Eileen first came into our lives four decades ago through her Iconic role as Ashley Abbott on “The Young and The Restless”, a role which she is still playing today. Eileen chats about her entire Soap career which has included not only Y & R, but Santa Barbara, The Bold and The Beautiful and Days of Our Lives, the last including a record breaking five different roles, all off which has lead to two Daytime Emmy's for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series. Eileen chats about her various other films and projects including, a highlight for us, The Last Sharknado. Of course we chat with Eileen about her RHOBH career as a full time Diamond Holder over three epic seasons which included "run ins” with the likes of Brandi Glanville, Lisa Vanderpump and Kim Richards, one of the most iconic RHOBH cast trips ever involving smashed glass and Harry Hamlin and the world learning the meaning of “Munchausen's Syndrome”. Eileen chats about the status of her many RHOBH relations today, the legal troubles friend Erika Jayne (hey, we would like a part on Y & R too!) is going through, and the just completed season - more Erika, Hello Kathy Hilton and more! We discuss the unprecedented move by Bravo to hire actresses as Housewives the season Eileen and Lisa Rinna were hired, whether that formula works, and discuss others who have come and stayed or gone - Garcelle Beauvais, Denise Richards, Kim Fields (ALT Anyone?). Eileen has said in the past that she has “a lot less stress” in her life since RHOBH so we have to ask, would you ever go back and who on casts past or current would you not work with? Finally, Eileen chats about what it's like to be married to Hollywood Royalty Husband Vince Van Patten, the secrets to a successful happy marriage in Hollywood and what projects are next up for this class act of an Icon!!! @eileendavidsonofficial @behindvelvetrope @davdyontef Bonus Episodes Available at - https://www.patreon.com/behindthevelvetrope Brought to you by THIRDLOVE - http://www.thirdlove.com/velvet (20% Off First Purchase) Brought to you by SIMPLISAFE - https://www.simplisafe.com/velvetrope (20% Off Entire New System & First Month Free) Merch Available at - https://www.teepublic.com/stores/behind-the-velvet-rope?ref_id=13198 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices