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  • 3,263PODCASTS
  • 4,967EPISODES
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  • Oct 14, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about visitors

Show all podcasts related to visitors

Latest podcast episodes about visitors

The Flush Podcast - Stories from the field
America's 2021 Quail Hunting Forecast

The Flush Podcast - Stories from the field

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 74:00


Tim Caughran & Andy Edwards from Quail Forever join the show to help us break down the 2021 quail hunting forecast across America. Drought, fires, & arctic winter blasts had an impact on bird numbers, but prospects for this season are still good across much of the country.  We break down each state and highlight hot spots to help you plan for your hunting season. Presented by Grain Belt Beer (https://www.grainbelt.com/,) North Dakota Tourism (https://www.legendarynd.com/,) Chief Upland (https://chiefupland.com/,) Federal Ammunition (https://www.federalpremium.com/,) Huron Chamber & Visitor's Bureau (http://www.huronsd.com/,) & OnX Maps (https://www.onxmaps.com/)

Today in San Diego
Vigil For UPS Driver Killed in Santee Plane Crash, Local Flu Cases and Texas Couple Find Surprise Visitor in Luggage

Today in San Diego

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 5:50


Vigil For UPS Driver Killed in Santee Plane Crash, S.D. County Coronavirus Update, New Data On Mix and Matching Covid Vaccines, Infertility Covid Study, Local Flu Data, Lake Tahoe Water Level, San Diego's Most Accurate Forecast, and Texas Couple Find Surprise Visitor in Luggage.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The UGASports LIVE Podcast
RUMORS vs. FACTS: Oscar Delp commits to Georgia, Visitors for Kentucky

The UGASports LIVE Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 49:35


Georgia has landed a dynamic, Top 100 prospect at tight end for the third straight class. Todd Hartley is putting in work on the trail and Oscar Delp joining Brock Bowers and Darnell Washington is going to crate as dynamic of a tight end group as there is in the country in 2022 for Georgia. The UGASports recruiting staff breaks down the commitment, highlights visitors for this coming weekend against Kentucky, and answers questions from the UGASports Vault.

EXOPOLITICS TODAY with Dr. Michael Salla
Earth Alliance Mission to Ganymede to greet ET visitors & inaugurate a Star Trek Future

EXOPOLITICS TODAY with Dr. Michael Salla

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 20:21


A fleet of spacecraft from a highly evolved group of friendly extraterrestrial visitors has arrived in our solar system and established a presence on Jupiter's moon Ganymede, according to three independent sources familiar with unfolding events in deep space. This latest intel coincides with William Shatner, globally revered for his role as Captain Kirk in the Star Trek franchise, being launched into space on October 13, a likely cover for him playing a significant role in unfolding events on Ganymede.

Real Ghost Stories Online
Visitor In The Night | Real Ghost Stories

Real Ghost Stories Online

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 39:11


What or who was the strange visitor that came to a couple late one Christmas night? Here is a preview of the story.  “I got a strange feeling that something was not right. I slowly poked my head out of the hallway and looked to my left where the front door was and that is when I saw someone with a red jacket walking out my front door! It scared me so much that I jumped back behind the wall and froze. Either I just saw Santa Clause, or someone broke into our home. I stood there silent, holding my breath and terrified. I strained to hear any more noises, but there was nothing. I did not hear the door close; I did not hear the bells move, I did not hear the deadbolt being locked, and I did not hear footsteps. After standing there in the hallway for what seemed like forever, I finally got the courage to poke my head around again. The screen door was closed and there was no one there. All was still. I walked over to the screen and saw that the deadbolt was locked. I was dumbfounded, I was sure that I saw someone walking out our door. I looked around the house to see if someone was still inside but there was no one.” To hear more real ghost stories, become a supporter of our show and get every episode, including our weekly bonus episodes at http://www.ghostpodcast.com or http://www.patreon.com/realghoststories  Watch more at: http://www.realghoststoriesonline.com/ Follow Tony: Instagram: HTTP://www.instagram.com/tonybrueski TikToc: https://www.tiktok.com/@tonybrueski Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tony.brueski If you have a real ghost story or supernatural event to report, please write into our show or call 1-855-853-4802! If you like the show, please help keep us on the air and support the show by becoming an EPP (Extra Podcast Person). We'll give you a BONUS episode every week as a "Thank You" for your support. Become an EPP here: http://www.ghostpodcast.com/?page_id=118 or at or at http://www.patreon.com/realghoststories

Queens of the Mines
The Occupation of Alcatraz - Happy Indigenous Peoples Day!

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 26:53


The famed Alcatraz prison on Alcatraz Island was in operation from 1934 to 1963. For most, the thought of Alcatraz may bring up a Hollywood film or some of the most notorious criminals in America. But the island carries a different symbolism to the native coastal peoples of California. The California Ohlone Mewuk which translates to coastal people, passed down an oral history that tells us that Alcatraz was used by their Native population long before  anyone else “discovered” the San Francisco Bay. Trips would be made to the island in tule boats for gathering foods, such as bird eggs and sea-life. It was also used as a place of isolation, or for punishment for naughty members of the tribe. The island was also a camping spot and hiding place for many native Americans attempting to escape the California Mission system. In 1895, the island was being used as a US fort and military prison and 19 Hopi men served time on Alcatraz for trying to protect their children from being sent to federal Indian boarding schools, which we discussed last week.    “This is Queens of the Mines, where we discuss untold stories from the twisted roots of California. This week's episode is coming out a few days early in honor of Indigenous Peoples Day. Today we will talk about The Occupation of Alcatraz and the Red Power Movement which demanded self-determination for Native Americans to better the lives of all Indian people. To make it known to the world that they have a right to use their land for their own benefit by right of discovery. We are in a time where historians and the public are no longer dismissing the “conflict history” that has been minimized or blotted out.    In 1953, U.S. Congress established a policy towards American Indians: termination. This policy eliminated most government support for indigenous tribes and ended the protected trust status of all indigenous-owned lands. It wiped out the reservations and natives had the choice to assimilate or die out. So the BIA began a voluntary urban relocation program where American Indians could move from their rural tribes to metropolitan areas, and they would give them assistance with locating housing and employment. Numerous American Indians made the move to cities, lured by the hope of a better life. It was a struggle for them. Many struggled to adjust to life in a city with these low-end jobs, they faced discrimination, they were homesickn and they totally lost their cultural identity. Giving a person a home and a job, yet taking away everything that they are, that is defining a human only in economic terms. So, after they relocated and got job and housing placement, as soon as they received their first paycheck, the assistance was done. Termination.    This Episode is brought to you by the Law Offices of CHARLES B SMITH. Are you facing criminal charges in California? The most important thing you can do is obtain legal counsel from an aggressive Criminal Defense Lawyer you can trust. The Law Office of Charles B. Smith has effectively handled thousands of cases. The Law Offices of CHARLES B SMITH do not just defend cases, they represent people. Charles is intimately familiar with the investigative techniques the police and prosecutors use and is able to look at your case and see defenses that others can, and do, miss. Visit cbsattorney.com for more information.  Even during the gold rush, no one liked attorneys, and Charles, you will love. Now, back to Alcatraz.   When Rosebud Sioux Belva Cottier heard the Alcatraz Federal Penitentiary was closing in 1963 and that the property was going to be given to the City of San Francisco, she thought of the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie. The Treaty that allowed Native Americans to appropriate surplus federal land. So, she and her cousin Richard McKenzie retrieved a copy of the treaty and thought, if the property was surplus land of the government, the Sioux could claim it.    Belva organized a demonstration to raise awareness and planned to take court action to obtain the title to the island. On March 8, 1964 her group of Sioux activists, photographers, reporters and her lawyer landed on Alcatraz. About 40 people. The demonstration lasted only four hours. It was "peaceful and in accordance with Sioux treaty rights” but the demonstrators left under the threat of felony charges. The idea of reclaiming “the Rock” became a rallying cry for the indigenous population.   Five years later, on October 10, 1969, there was a fire that destroyed the San Francisco American Indian Center. It was a detrimental loss for the native community because the center provided Native Americans with jobs, health care, aid in legal affairs, and social opportunities.    An activist group formed, known as “Indians of All Tribes” with Pipestone Indian Boarding School graduate Adam Fortunate Eagle and the handsome, Mohawk college student Richard Oakes.  Richard had co-founded the American Indian Studies Dept at SF State and worked as a bartender in the Mission District of San Francisco which brought him in contact with the local Native American communities.    The goal was to take immediate action towards claiming space for the local Indian community and they set their sights on the unused federal land at Alcatraz, which would soon be sold to a billionaire developer.   Adam and Oakes planned a takeover of the island as a symbolic act. They agreed on November 9, 1969. Richard would gather approximately 75 indigenous people and Adam would arrange transportation to the island. The boats did not show up.   Nearby, a sailor was watching the natives waiting, some wearing traditional ceremony dress and Adam Fortunate Eagle convinced him, the owner of a three-masted yacht to pass by the island with him and 4 friends on board. As the boat passed by Alcatraz, Oates and two men jumped overboard, swam to shore, and claimed the island by right of discovery. At this moment, Richard became the leader of the movement. The five men were quickly removed by the Coast Guard.    Later that night, Adam, Richard and others hired a boat, making their way back to the island again, some students stayed overnight before they were again made to leave. Richard Oakes told the San Francisco Chronicle, “If a one day occupation by white men on Indian land years ago established squatter's rights, then the one day occupation of Alcatraz should establish Indian rights to the island.”   Eleven days later on November 20, 1969, Richard and Adam met 87 native men, women and children, 50 of whom California State University students at the No Name bar in Sausalito just after closing at 2, met with some free-spirited boat owners and sailed through San Francisco Bay towards Alcatraz, not knowing if they'd be killed, ignoring warnings that the occupation of the island was illegal. Indians of All Tribes made one last attempt to seize Alcatraz and claim the island for all the tribes of North America using unarmed, body and spirit politics. As they disembarked onto the island an Alcatraz security guard yelled out, may day! May day! The Indians have landed! Three days in, it became clear - this wasn't going to be a short demonstration.    Richard Oates soon addressed the media with a manifesto titled “The Great White Father and All His People.” In it, he stated the intention was to use the island for an Indian school, cultural center and museum. Oates claimed Alcatraz belonged to the Native Americans “by right of discovery”. He sarcastically offered to buy the island back for “$24 in glass beads and red cloth”, the same price that Natives received for the island of Manhattan.    Now I'll read the manifesto   “We feel that this so-called Alcatraz Island is more than suitable as an Indian Reservation, as determined by the white man's own standards. By this we mean that this place resembles most Indian reservations, in that: It is isolated from modern facilities, and without adequate means of transportation. It has no fresh running water. The sanitation facilities are inadequate. There are no oil or mineral rights. There is no industry and so unemployment is very great. There are no health care facilities. The soil is rocky and non-productive and the land does not support game. There are no educational facilities. The population has always been held as prisoners and kept dependent upon others. Further, it would be fitting and symbolic that ships from all over the world, entering the Golden Gate, would first see Indian land, and thus be reminded of the true history of this nation. This tiny island would be a symbol of the great lands once ruled by free and noble Indians.   “We hold the Rock”   The Nixon administration sent out a negotiator, and as the two sides debated, the natives continued to settle onto their new land. Native American college students and activists flocked to join the protest, and the population of Alcatraz often swelled to more than 600 people. They moved into the old warden's house and guards' quarters and began personalizing the island with graffiti. Buildings were tagged with slogans like Home of the Free, Indian Land, Peace and Freedom, Red Power and Custer Had It Coming.   This episode is brought to you by Sonora Florist. SONORA FLORIST has been providing our community with beautiful flower arrangements for whatever the occasion since the early 1950s. You can visit sonoraflorist.com, or search Sonora Florist on Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram. There is a special website for wedding florals, visit sincerelysonoraflorist.com to see their wedding work, read reviews, or to book a consultation with one of their designers if you are getting married in the area. Thank you Sonora Florist. And if you have not checked out the mural on the side of the shop, on the corner of Washington and Bradford in downtown Sonora, in honor of the local Chinese history, do so! It was a fight to get it up, and it was worth it!   This episode was also brought to you by our main Sponsor Columbia Mercantile 1855, Columbia Historic Park's Main street grocery store. Teresa, the owner, carries a mix of quality international and local products that replicate diverse provisions of when Columbia was California's second largest city after San Francisco. I love the selection of hard kombucha, my favorite. It is common to hear, "Wow! I didn't expect to find that here in Columbia". The Columbia Mercantile 1855 is located in Columbia State Historic Park at 11245 Jackson Street and is a great place to keep our local economy moving. At a time like this, it is so important to shop local, and The Columbia Mercantile 1855 is friendly, welcoming, fairly priced and accepts EBT. Open Daily! Now, back to Alcatraz   The occupation sought to unify indigenous peoples from more than 500 nations across America, the Western Hemisphere and Pacific. Everyone on the island had a job. The island soon had its own clinic, kitchen, public relations department and even a nursery and grade school for its children. A security force sarcastically dubbed the “Bureau of Caucasian Affairs” patrolled the shoreline to watch for intruders. All decisions were made by unanimous consent of the people. A Sioux named John Trudell hopped behind the mic to broadcast radio updates from Alcatraz under the banner of “Radio Free Alcatraz.” “ We all had things to offer each other,” resident Luwana Quitquit later remembered. “Brotherhood. Sisterhood.”    The federal government initially insisted that the protestors leave the island and they placed an inadequate barricade around the island. The demonstration was a media frenzy and the protestors received an enormous amount of support. There was a call for contributions  and a mainland base was set up at San Francisco's Pier 40, near Fisherman's Wharf. Supplies such as canned goods and clothes were shipped in. Visitors and volunteers were sailing in, and thousands of dollars in cash were pouring in from donors across the country. The Black Panther Party had volunteered to help provide security and celebrities like Marlon Brando, Jane Fonda and Merv Griffin visited the island in support. The band Creedence Clearwater Revival gave the Indians of All Tribes a boat, which was christened the “Clearwater.”    Things started to change in early 1970, there was a leadership crisis.  The organizers and a majority of the college students had to return to school. Many vagrants who were not interested in fighting for the cause moved in, taking advantage of the rent free living and drugs and alcohol, which were originally banned on the island, started to move freely among a select crowd.     Then tragically, Richard and Annie Oakes's daughter Yvonne fell 5 stories to her death from one of the prison's stairwells in the guards quarters. Oakes and his wife left Alcatraz in the wake of the accident, leaving groups of warring activists to fight it out for control of the island.    In May of 1970, the Nixon administration cut the electricity to Alcatraz, hoping to force the demonstrators out. Let's face it, the government was never going to meet the demands of the Indians of All Tribes. Next, they removed the water barge which had been providing fresh water to the occupiers. Three days following the removal of the water barge, a fire was started on the island, destroying the warden's house, the inside of the lighthouse which was important for SF bay navigation and several of Alcatraz's historic buildings. No one knows who started the fire. It could have come from either side. Was it - Burn it down? Or get them out?   Two months later, President Richard Nixon gave a speech saying, “The time has come…for a new era in which the Indian future is determined by Indian acts and Indian decisions.” The U.S. government later returned millions of acres of ancestral Indian land and passed more than 50 legislative proposals supporting tribal self rule. The termination policy was terminated.   In the meantime, the FBI, Coast Guard and the Government Services Administration stayed clear of the island. While it appeared to those on the island that negotiations were actually taking place, in fact, the federal government was playing a waiting game, hoping that support for the occupation would subside and those on the island would elect to end the occupation. At one point, secret negotiations were held where the occupiers were offered a portion of Fort Miley, a 15 minute walk from the Sutro Baths, as an alternative site to Alcatraz Island.    The occupation continued into 1971. Support for the cause had diminished after the press turned against them and began publishing stories of alleged beatings and assaults; one case of assault was prosecuted. In an attempt to raise money to buy food, they allegedly began stripping copper wiring and copper tubing from the buildings and selling it as scrap metal. Three of the occupiers were arrested, tried and found guilty of selling some 600lbs of copper. In January 1971, two oil tankers collided in the entrance to the San Francisco Bay. Though it was acknowledged that the lack of an Alcatraz light or fog horn played no part in the collision, it was enough to push the federal government into action. A few holdouts continued to live on the Rock for another year. “I don't want to say Alcatraz is done with,” former occupier Adam Fortunate Eagle lamented to The San Francisco Chronicle in April 1971, “but no organized Indian groups are active there. It has turned from an Indian movement to a personality thing.”    Citing a need to restore Alcatraz's foghorn and lighthouse, President Nixon gave the go-ahead to develop a removal plan to be acted upon with as little force as possible, when the smallest number of people were on the island. The government told the remaining occupiers they would have news on the deed the following Monday morning. They were told no action would be taken until the negotiations were settled. That was a lie. On June 10, 1971 armed federal marshals, FBI agents, and special forces police descended on the island and removed five women, four children, and six unarmed men. the last of the indigenous residents. The occupation was over.   An island ledger entry reads “We are about to leave for Alcatraz, maybe for the last time, To this beautiful little Island, which means a little something, which no one will ever understand my feelings.”  It is signed by Marie B. Quitiquit of Stockton. Beneath Quitiquit's words someone wrote in capital letters “I SHALL NEVER FORGET, MY PEOPLE, MY LAND ALCATRAZ”.   Oakes, who had once proclaimed that “Alcatraz was not an island, it was an idea”, never left the idea behind and continued his resistance. As a result of his activism, he endured tear gas, billy clubs, and brief stints in jail. He helped the Pit River Tribe in their attempts to regain nearly 3 million acres of land that had been seized by Pacific Gas & Electric and had plans to create a "mobile university" dedicated to creating opportunities for Native Americans.  Soon after he left the occupation, Oates was in Sonoma where Michael Morgan, a YMCA camp manager was being accussesd as a white supremacist, and being tough with Native American children. 30 year old Oakes reportedly confronted Michael Morgan. Morgan said he was in fear for his life, when he drew a handgun and fatally shot Richard Oakes. Oakes was unarmed. Morgan was charged with voluntary manslaughter, but was acquitted by a jury that agreed with Morgan that the killing was an act of self-defense, even though Oakes was unarmed. Oakes supporters contend the shooting was an act of murder, and that Morgan received support from a racially motivated jury and district attorney.  So, over the course of the 19-month occupation, more than 10,000 indigenous people visited the island to offer support. Alcatraz may have been lost, but the occupation gave birth to political movements which continue today as injustices inflicted on indigenous people is an ongoing problem. The Rock has also continued to serve as a focal point of Native American social campaigns  and it left the demonstrators with big ideas. Indian rights organizations, many of them staffed by Alcatraz veterans, later staged occupations and protests at Plymouth Rock, Mount Rushmore, the Bureau of Indian Affairs and dozens of other sites across the country. Federal officials also started listening to calls for Indian self-determination. The occupation of Alcatraz was the first demonstration of its kind for the American Indians. It was a spiritual reawakening for the indigenous peoples and renewed interest in tribal communities. Many natives did not know what it meant to be native, and they learned of and about their heritage in light of the media attention the occupation received. It was the first chance they were able to feel proud of their indigenous background. A beginning for Native pride, the kickstarter for a move back to a traditional identity. A revival of language, traditions. Awakening the native people, the tribes, the media, the government and Americans. The “return of the buffalo”. Dr LaNada War Jack, Shoshone Bannock Tribe, one of UC Berkeley's first native students & demonstration leader tells us, “We wanted to bring to the forefront that every single one of (more than 500) treaties were broken by the fed government.” The boarding schools, genocide, relocation, termination, , everything that historically happened to American Indians — continues to impact them today. They are still here.  Now, that is a real theft of freedom. A theft of freedom from the ones who were here first. So, I do not want to hear a damn word about your loss of rights for having to wear a damn mask. You want to fight for freedom? Stand up for your local indigenous people.    Alright, love you all, be safe, get vaccinated, wear a mask, stay positive and act kind. Thank you for taking the time to listen today, subscribe to the show so we can meet again weekly, on Queens of the Mines. Queens of the Mines is a product of the “Youreka! Podcast Network” and was written, produced and narrated by Andrea Anderson. Go to queensofthemines.com for the book and more.  https://www.latimes.com/entertainment-arts/story/2020-11-19/alcatraz-occupation-indigenous-tribes-autry-museum https://www.history.com/news/native-american-activists-occupy-alcatraz-island-45-years-ago The Alcatraz Indian Occupation by Dr. Troy Johnson, Cal State Long Beach https://www.nps.gov/alca/learn/historyculture/we-hold-the-rock.htm https://www.foundsf.org/index.php?title=ALCATRAZ_Proclamation  

The E-commerce Leader: Ecommerce strategy for Amazon Private Label sellers, Shopify store owners and digital entrepreneurs!
5 Ways To Use Your Blog To Encourage Returning Site Visitors & Sales – Tip Of The Week

The E-commerce Leader: Ecommerce strategy for Amazon Private Label sellers, Shopify store owners and digital entrepreneurs!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 6:54


What is the best traffic to your site? You need all kinds of traffic and visitors, but the most profitable will be returning visitors. These are the people coming back to complete a transaction (or better yet...a returning buyer).

The Basically Good Podcast
The Bangarang Gang - Episode 13 - Unexpected Visitors

The Basically Good Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 76:02


The Bangarang Gang holds their breath and hopes to execute the plan to steal the Oliphaunt. 

The Flush Podcast - Stories from the field

Dylan Waller joins Travis Frank to break down their ptarmigan and dusky grouse hunt in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado.  Blizzard conditions in the high mountain terrain had a major impact on this hunt.  Dylan and Travis explain their journey, the hunt through brutal conditions, disappearing birds, alpine tundra habitat, a bird most hunters avoid, preparing your body for high altitude hunting, first aid, dogs, bird biology, and the success of bagging all 10 species of Colorado's upland game birds. Presented by Grain Belt Beer (https://www.grainbelt.com/,) North Dakota Tourism (https://www.legendarynd.com/,) Chief Upland (https://chiefupland.com/,) Federal Ammunition (https://www.federalpremium.com/,) Huron Chamber & Visitor's Bureau (http://www.huronsd.com/,) & OnX Maps (https://www.onxmaps.com/)

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
Limerick hospital tightens visitor restrictions amid Covid outbreak

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 5:19


Prof. Brian Lenehan, Chief Clinical Director of UL Hospitals Group, discusses the pressures on UHL hospital due to Covid outbreaks and high emergency department attendances, and the difficulties with communications at the Maternity hospital caused by a major water leak.

The Official BNI Podcast
Episode 727: Visitor Contact and Experience

The Official BNI Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 12:40


Jenni Butz shares best practices for BNI visitor hosts, with a timeline and touch points to help visitors have a better experience.

Don't Drink and Dungeons & Dragons
Ep. 38: Darkness, Awoken

Don't Drink and Dungeons & Dragons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 89:53


Blaise and co. have found themselves in a bit of hot water...or gas? Or is it solid? Whatever this multi-mattered being is, it isn't playing around and could be the death of them all. Can they defeat it? What even is it? Will they make it out alive? Music/Sound Effects include: A Spoken Battle/Theme by Hannah Tobias, Censor Beep Sound Effect at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aIpOnR7zpmg, Dragon and Toast by Kevin MacLeod at incompetech.filmmusic.io, success by grunz at freesound.org, Jelly Sneakers by Hannah Tobias, Killers by Kevin MacLeod at incompetech.filmmusic.io, Stormfront by Kevin MacLeod at incompetech.filmmusic.io, Supernatural by Kevin MacLeod at incompetech.filmmusic.io, Showdown by Kevin MacLeod at incompetech.filmmusic.io, Apex by Alexander Nakarada at filmmusic.io, Trial of Thorns by Alexander Nakarada at filmmusic.io, Future Gladiator by Kevin MacLeod, I Can Feel It Coming by Kevin MacLeod, Junkyard Tribe by Kevin MacLeod at incompetech.filmmusic.io, Wind Chimes, A by InspectorJ at Freesound.org, Clash Defiant by Kevin MacLeod at incompetech.filmmusic.io, Visitors in the Night by Rafael Krux at filmmusic.io, Bleeping Demo by Kevin MacLeod at incompetech.filmmusic.io, Fireplace by inchadney at Freesound.org, Floating Cities by Kevin MacLeod at incompetech.fimmusic.io, Crack_glass.wav by 13FPanska_Cerny_Jan at Freesound.org, Steel Rods by Kevin MacLeod at incompetech.fimmusic.io, Glass Breaking.mp3 by justBrando at Freesound.org, and Shattering Chandelier.mp3 by matt_ratz at Freesound.org

Reddit Explains Conspiracy & the Unknown
Submitted Stories: Unseen Visitor | White Ghost

Reddit Explains Conspiracy & the Unknown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 8:24


In the first story, OP heard a noise coming from their hallway and assumed it was their mother walking around. They kept hearing the noise, but when they checked to see, there was no one there and the motion sensor didn't turn the light on. In the second story, a girl in high school was waiting for her boyfriend when she felt a sudden chill come down her spine. She decided to look down the hall when she spotted something disturbing. Submit your stories: popmediaagency@gmail.com

Plus
Hovory: Filmy se zrychlují a blíží se videohrám. Češi ale technologie využívají málo, kritizuje mladý filmař

Plus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 23:52


Krátkometrážní studentský horor Visitor mu pootevřel dveře do velkého filmařského světa. Ceny sbíral například v Torontu, Hollywoodu, Coloradu či Istanbulu. „Je to určitě můj největší úspěch ve světě, nicméně v mém srdci zůstal krátký dokument Život hledáčkem Petra Bruknera, který byl úspěšný v Česku,“ přiznává mladý filmař Pavel Bartovský. Dokumentární film o legendárním herci Divadla Járy Cimrmana natáčel ve druhém ročníku Filmové akademie Miroslava Ondříčka v Písku.

The New Century Multiverse
Stonespring Maidens: Chapter 23 – An Unexpected Visitor

The New Century Multiverse

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 20:22


Penny picks over her immense decision, and is blindsided with horrifying news. · Attar Reubens performed by Orion Richardson · Captain Tress performed by Tanja Milojevic · Donna Madrigal performed by Shanta Parasuraman · Ganymede Feron performed by Felix Quist · Penthessily Renwick performed by Theo Leigh · The Visitor performed by Sharon Shaw · Narration by Alex Shaw Make your decision by Dan Phillipson of Shockwave Sound Dawn composed and performed by Ross Bugden Stonespring Maidens Theme: Far Destiny composed and performed by I Sazonov of Shockwave Sound Many soundscapes including Orbital Platform, New Orleans Noir, Neon Drive, The Orrery, Icebound Town and Submerged by Tabletop Audio The New Century Multiverse is funded by Patreon. Our $15 sponsors get credit every episode so thank you to: Aaron Lacluyze, Abel Savard, Alex Outridge, Angus Lee, Benjamin Hofer, Bryan Novak, Cassandra Newman, Chris Finik, Christopher Wolfe, Ciaran Dachtler, Conar Kennedy, Dan Mayer, Daniel Salgueiro, Dan Hoeppner, Dave Hickman, David Shealy, Duran Barnett, Finbar Nicholl, Frankie Punzi, Greg Downing, Jamas Enright, Jesse Ferguson, Joe Crow, Joel Robinson, Johan Claesson, Joe G, Josh Wasta, Kevin Veighy, Lorraine Chisholm, Marc Lucksch, Martie Hooie, Matthew A. Seibert, Matthew Webb, Michael Hasko, Robbie Crow, Sarah Montgomery, Tim Rozenski, Timothy Green, Toby Jungius, Tom Painter, Tre Contreras and Valencia Burns.

Conversations With Warrior Women Podcast
Becoming a Visionary Woman with Angella Nazarian

Conversations With Warrior Women Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 49:24


Today we're going to learn what it takes to be a visionary woman from a woman who continues to evolve, grow and expand. Angella Nazarian is a best selling author, speaker and the creator of Visionary Women, a non-profit leadership organization. Angella and I talk about why she created visionary women, the incredible women she has met and interviewed, and how she has evolved, reinvented and thrived within her career and her 33 year marriage, as a feminist. Show Notes: Author of 4 Books & the newly released: “ Creative Couples : Collaborations that Changed History” Angella Nazarian https://www.assouline.com/products/creative-couples-collaborations-that-changed-history www.angellanazarian.com Co-founder of Visionary Women Nonprofit www.visionarywomen.com Instagram: Visionary Women: https://www.instagram.com/visionarywomen/ Angella Nazarian: https://www.instagram.com/angellanazarian/ Guest Bio: Angella Nazarian is a best selling author and a noted speaker. She has been conducting workshops and seminars on topics related to women's personal growth and innovation and leadership, and has been a keynote speaker at various national events and conferences. Angella has lead panels at the Milken Global Conference on Visionary Women Entrepreneurs and Visionary Women in Social Enterprise. She served as a delegate at Newsweek & The Daily Beast's Women in the World conference and was a speaker for the World Leadership Forum Mexico City. Angella is the co-founder and President of VISIONARY WOMEN, a non-profit women's leadership organization in Los Angeles that brings together some of the most dynamic thought leaders in the country together for in depth conversations. She is also an advisory board member of the Iranian American Women's Leadership Conference. All three of her books, “Visionary Women”, “Life as a Visitor” and “Pioneers of the Possible: Celebrating Visionary Women of the World” have become bestsellers for the publisher, and have garnered glowing reviews from: Arianna Huffington, Tina Brown, Martha Stewart, Diane von Furstenberg, Ambassador Melanne Verveer. Angella Nazarian lives in Los Angeles with her husband and sons.

The Bike Shed
310: Schedule Shut Down, Complete

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 39:16


Chris talks feature flags featuring Flipper (Say that 3x fast!), and Steph talks reducing stress by a) having a work shutdown ritual and b) the fact that thoughtbot is experimenting with half-day Fridays. (Fri-yay?) Flipper (https://featureflags.io/2016/04/08/flipper-a-feature-flipper-feature-toggle-library/) Drastically Reduce Stress with a Work Shutdown Ritual (https://www.calnewport.com/blog/2009/06/08/drastically-reduce-stress-with-a-work-shutdown-ritual/) Iceland's Journey to a Short Working Week (https://autonomy.work/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/ICELAND_4DW.pdf) Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle (https://www.burnoutbook.net/) Transcript: STEPH: Hey, do you know that we could have an in-person recording at the end of October? CHRIS: I do. Yes, I'm planning. That is in the back of my head. I guess I hadn't said that to you yet. But I'm glad that we have separately had the same conversation, and we've got to figure that out, although I don't know how to do noise cancellation and whatnot in the room. [laughs] How do we...we'll have to figure it out. Like, put a blanket in between us but so that we can see across it, but it absorbs sound in the middle. It's weird. I don't know how to do stuff. Just thinking out loud here. STEPH: We'll just be in the same place but still different rooms. So it'll feel no different. [laughter] Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. Hey, Chris, what's new in your world? CHRIS: Feature flags. Feature flags are an old favorite, but they have become new again in the application that I'm working on. We had a new feature that we were building out. But we assumed correctly that it would be nice to be able to break it apart into smaller pieces and sort of deliver it incrementally but not necessarily want to expose that to our end users. And so, we opted with that ticket to bring along the feature flag system. So we've introduced Flipper, in particular, which is a wonderful gem; it does the job. We're using the ActiveRecord adapter. All that kind of makes sense, happy about that. And so now we have feature flags. But it was one of those mindset shifts where the minute we got feature flags, I was like, yes, okay, everything behind a feature flag. And we've been leaning into that more and more, and it really is so nice and so freeing, and so absolutely loving it so far. STEPH: I'm intrigued. You said, "Everything behind a feature flag." Like, is it really everything or? Yeah, tell me more. CHRIS: Not everything. But at this point, we're still very early on in this application, so there are fundamental facets of the platform, different areas of what users can do. And so the actual stuff that works and is wired up is pretty minimal, but we want to have a little more surface area built out in the app for demo purposes, for conversations that are happening, et cetera. And so, we built out a bunch of new pages to represent functionality. And so there are sidebar links, and then the actual page itself, and routing, and all of the things that are associated with that, and so all of those have come in. I think there are five new top-level nav sections of the platform that are all introduced behind a feature flag right now. And then there's some new functionality within existing pages that we've put behind feature flags. So it's not truly every line of code, but it's basically the entry point to all new major features we're putting behind a feature flag. STEPH: Okay, cool. I'm curious. How are you finding that in terms of does it feel manageable? Do you feel like anybody can go into the UI and then turn on feature flags for demos and feel confident that they know what they're turning on and off? CHRIS: We haven't gotten to that self-serve place. At this point, the dev team is managing the feature flags. So on production, we have an internal group configured within Flipper. So we can say, "Ship this feature for all internal users so that we can do testing." So there is a handful of us that all have accounts on production. And then on staging, we have a couple of representative users that we've been just turning everything on for so that we know via staging we can act as that user and then see the application with all of the bells and whistles. Down the road, I think we're going to get more intentional with it, particularly the idea of a demo account. That's something that we want to lean into. And for that user, we'll probably be turning on certain subsets of the feature flags. I think we'll get a little more granular in how we think about that. For now, we're not as detailed in it, but I think that is something that we want to expand as we move forward. STEPH: Nice. Yeah, I was curious because feature flags came up in our recent retro with the client team because we've gotten to a point where our feature flags feel complex enough that it's becoming challenging and not just from the complexity of the feature flags but also from the UI perspective. Where it feels challenging for users to understand how to turn a feature on, exactly what that impacts, and making sure that then they're not changing developer-focused feature flags, so those are the feature flags that we're using to ship a change but then not turn it on until we're ready. It is user-facing, but it's something that should be managed more by developers as to when we turn it on or off. So I was curious to hear that's going for you because that's something that we are looking into. And funnily enough, you asked me recently, "Why aren't y'all using Flipper?" And I didn't have a great answer for you. And that question came up again where we looked at each other, and we're like, okay, we know there was a really good reason we didn't use Flipper when we first had this discussion. But none of us can remember, or at least the people in that conversation couldn't remember. So now we're asking ourselves the question of we've made it this far. Is it time to bring in Flipper or another service? Because we're getting to the point that we're starting to build too much of our own feature flag system. CHRIS: So did you uncover an answer, or are you all just agreeing that the question makes sense? STEPH: Agreeing that the question makes sense. [laughs] CHRIS: That's the first step on a long journey to switching from internal tooling to somebody else managing that for you. STEPH: Yeah, because none of us could remember exactly. But it was funny because I was like, am I just forgetting something here when you asked me that? So I felt validated that others were like, "Oh yeah, I remember that conversation. But I too can't recall why we didn't want to use Flipper in the moment or a similar service." CHRIS: I'll definitely be interested to hear if you do end up trying to migrate off to another system or find a different approach there or if you do stick with the current configuration that you have. Because those projects they're the sort of sneaky ones that it's like, oh, we've been actually relying on this for a while. It's a core part of our infrastructure, and how we do the work, and the process, and how we deploy. That's a lot. And so, to switch that out in-flight becomes really difficult. It's one of those things where the longer it goes on, the harder it is to make that change. But at some point, you sometimes make the decision to make it. So I will be very interested to hear if you do make that decision and then, if so, what that changeover process looks like. STEPH: Yeah, totally. I'll be sure to keep you up to date as we make any progress or decisions around feature flags. CHRIS: But yeah, your questions around management and communication of it that is a thing that's in the back of my mind. We're still early enough in our usage of it, and just broadly, how we're working, we haven't really felt that pain yet, but I expect it's coming very soon. And in particular, we have functionality now that is merged and is part of the codebase but isn't fully deployed or fully released rather. That's probably the correct word. We have not fully released this functionality, and we don't have a system right now for tracking that. So I'm thinking right now we're using Trello for product management. I'm thinking we want another column that is not entirely done but is tracking the feature flags that are currently in flight and just use that as a place to gather communication. Do we feel like this is ready? Let's dial this up to 50%, or let's enable it for this beta group or whatever it is to sort of be able to communicate that. And then ideally, also as a way to track these are the ones that are active right now. You know what? We feel like this one's ready. So do the code change so that we no longer use the feature flag, and then we can actually turn it off. Currently, I feel like I can defer that for a little while, but it is something that's in the back of my mind. And then, of course, I nerd sniped myself, and I was like, all right, how do I grep the codebase for all the feature flags that we're using? Okay. There are a couple of different patterns as to how we're using…You know what? I think I actually need an AST-based parser here, and I need to use the Visitor...You know what? Never mind. Stop it. Stop it. [laughs] It was one of those where I was like...I was doing this not during actual work hours. It was just a question in my mind, and then I started to poke at it. I was like, oh, this could be fun. And then I was like, no, no, no, stop it. You need to go read a book or something. Calm down. STEPH: As part of the optimization around our feature flag system that we've created, we've added a few enhancements, which I think is also one of the reasons we're starting to question how far we want to go in this direction. One of them is we want a very easy way to track what's turned on and what's turned off for an environment. So we have a task that will easily check, or it prints out a really nice list of these are all your flags, and this is the state that they're in. And by using the system that we have, we have one file that represents...well, you mentioned migration because we're migrating from the old system to this new one. So it's still a little bit in that space of where we haven't fully moved over. So now, moving over to a third thing like Flipper will be even more interesting because of that. But the current system, we have a file that lists all the feature flags and a really nice description that goes with it, which I know is supported by Flipper and other services as well. But having that one file does make it nice where you can just scan through there and see what's in use. I really think it's the UI and the challenges that the users are facing and understanding what a feature flag does, and which ones they should turn off, and which ones they shouldn't touch that that's the point where we started questioning okay, we need to improve the UI. But to improve the UI, do we really want to fully embrace our current system and make those improvements, or is now that time that we should consider moving to something else? Because Flipper already has a really nice UI. I think there is a free tier and a paid tier with Flipper, and the paid tier has a UI that ships. CHRIS: There's definitely a distinct thing, Flipper Cloud, which is their hosted enterprise-y solution, and that's the paid offering. But Flipper just the core gem there's also Flipper web, I want to say is what it is, or Flipper UI. And I think it's an engine that you mount within your Rails app and that displays a UI so that you can manage things, add groups and teams. So we're definitely using that. I've got my eye on Flipper Cloud, but I have some fundamental questions around I like to keep my data in the system, and so this is an external other thing. And what's the synchronization? I haven't really even looked into it like that. But I love that Flipper exists within our application. One of the niceties that Flipper Cloud does have is an audit history, which I think is interesting just to understand over time who changed what for what reasons? It's got the ability to roll back and maintain versions and whatnot. So there are some things in it that definitely look very interesting to me. But for now, the open-source, free version of Flipper plus Flipper UI has been plenty for us. STEPH: That's cool. I didn't know about the audit feature. CHRIS: Yeah. It definitely feels like one of those niceties to have for a more enterprise offering. So I could see myself talking me into it at some point but not quite yet. On that note though, so feature flags we introduced a week and a half, something like that, ago, and we've been leaning into them more and more. But as part of that, or in the back of my mind, I've wanted to go to continuous deployment. So we had our first official retro this week. The project is growing up. We're becoming a lot of things. We used retro to talk about continuous deployment, all of these things that feel very real. Just to highlight it, retro is super important. And the fact that we haven't had one until now is mainly because up till now, it's been primarily myself and another developer. So we've been having essentially one-on-ones but not a more formal retro that involves others. At this point, we now have myself and two other developers that are working on the project, as well as someone who's stepped into the role of product manager. So we now have communication collaboration. How are we doing the work? How are we shipping features and communicating about bugs and all of that? So now felt like the right time to start having that more formal process. So now, every two weeks, we're going to have a retro, and hopefully, through that, retro will do the magic that retro can do at its best which is help us get better at all the things that we're doing. But yeah, one of the core things in this particular one was talking about moving to continuous deployment. And so I am super excited to get there because I think, much like test-driven development, it's one of those situations where continuous deployment puts a lot of pressure on the development process. Everything that is being merged needs to be ready to go out into production. And honestly, I love that as a constraint because that will change how you build things. It means that you need to be a little more cautious. You can put something behind a feature flag to protect it. You decouple the idea of merging and deploying from releasing. And I like that distinction. I think that's a really meaningful distinction because it makes you think about what's the entry point to this feature within the codebase? And it's, I think, actually really nice to have fewer and more intentional entry points into various bits of functionality such that if you actually want to shut it off in production, you can do that. That's more straightforward. I think it encourages an intentional coupling, maybe not a perfect decoupling but an intentional coupling within the system. So I'm very excited to explore it. I think feature flags are going to be critical for it, and I think also observability, and monitoring, and logging, and all those things. We need to get really good at them so that if anything does go wrong when we just merge and deploy, we want to know if anything goes wrong as quickly as possible. But overall, I'm super excited about all of the other niceties that fall out of it. STEPH: [singing] I wanna know what's turned on, and I want you to show me. Is that the song you're singing to Flipper? [laughs] CHRIS: [laughs] STEPH: Sorry, friends. I just had to go there. CHRIS: That was just in your head. You had that, and you needed to get it out. I appreciate it. [laughter] Again, I got Flipper UI, so that's not the question I'm asking. I think that's the question you have in your heart. STEPH: [laughs] Mid-roll Ad And now we're going to take a quick break to tell you about today's sponsor, Orbit. Orbit is mission control for community builders. Orbit offers data analytics, reporting, and insights across all the places your community exists in a single location. Orbit's origins are in the open-source and developer relations communities. And that continues today with an active open-source culture in an accessible and documented API. With thousands of communities currently relying on Orbit, they are rapidly growing their engineering team. The company is entirely remote-first with team members around the world. You can work from home, from an Orbit outpost in San Francisco or Paris, or find yourself a coworking spot in your city. The tech stack of the main orbit app is Ruby on Rails with JavaScript on the front end. If you're looking for your next role with an empathetic product-driven team that prides itself on work-life balance, professional development, and giving back to the larger community, then consider checking out the Orbit careers page for more information. Bonus points if working in a Ruby codebase with a Ruby-oriented team gives you a lot of joy. Find out more at orbit.love/weloveruby. STEPH: That's funny about the CI deployment adding pressure to the development process because you're absolutely right. But I see it as such a positive and improvement that I don't really think about the pressure that it's adding. And I just think, yes, this is awesome, and I want this to happen and if there are steps that we have to take in that direction. It dawned on me that what you said is very true, but I've just never really thought about it from that perspective about the pressure. Because I think the thing that does add more pressure for me is figuring out what can I deploy, or do I need to cherry-pick commits? What does that look like? And going through that whole cycle and stress is more stressful to me than figuring out how do we get to continuous deployments and making sure that everything is in a safe space to be deployed? CHRIS: That's the dream. I'm going to see if I can live it. I'll let you know how it goes. But yeah, that's a bit of what's up in my world. What else is going on in your world other than some lovely singing? STEPH: Oh, there's always lots of singing. It's been an interesting week. It's been a mix of some hiring work. Specifically, we are helping our client team build their development team. So we have been helping them implement a hiring process. And then also going through technical interviews and then going through different stages of that interview process. And that's been really nice. I haven't done that specifically for a client team where I helped them build a hiring pipeline from scratch and then also conduct those interviews. And one thing that stood out to me is that rotations are really important to me and specifically that we don't ask for volunteers. So as we were having candidates come through and then they were ready to schedule an interview, then we are reaching out to the rest of the development team and saying, "Hey, we have this person. They're going to be scheduled at this time. Who's available? Who's interested? I'm looking for volunteers." And that puts pressure on people, especially someone that may be more empathetic to feel the need to volunteer. So then you can end up having more people volunteer than others. So we've established a rotation to make sure that doesn't happen, and people are assigned as it becomes their next turn to conduct an interview. So that's been a lot of fun to refine that process and essentially make it easier. So the rest of the development team doesn't have to think about the hiring. But it still has an easy way of just saying, "Hey," and tapping someone to say, "Hey, it's your turn to run an interview." The other thing I've been working out is figuring out how to measure an experiment. So we at thoughtbot are running an experiment where we're looking to address some of the concerns around sustainability and people feeling burned out. And so we have introduced half-day Fridays, more specifically 3.5 Fridays, as our half-day Fridays just to help everybody be certain about what a half-day looks like. And then also, you can choose your half-day. Everybody works different schedules. We're across different time zones, so just to make sure it's really clear for folks and that they understand that they don't need to work more than those hours, and then they should have that additional downtime. And that's been amazing. This is the second Friday of the experiment, and we're doing this for nine Fridays straight. And one of the questions that came up was, well, how do we know we did a good thing? How do we know that we helped people in terms of sustainability or addressing some of the feelings that they're having around burnout? And so I've collaborated with a couple of other thoughtboters to think through of a way to measure it. It turns out helping someone measure their wellness is incredibly complex. And so we went for a fairly simple approach where we're using an anonymous survey with a number of questions. And those questions aren't really meant to stand up to scientific scrutiny but more to figure out how the team is feeling at the time that they fill out the survey and then also to understand how the reduced weekly hours have impacted their schedule. And are people working extra hours to then accommodate the fact that we now have these half Fridays? So do you feel pressured that because you can't work a full day on Friday that you are now working an extra hour or two Monday through Thursday to accommodate that time off? So that survey just went out today. And one of the really interesting parts (I just haven't had to create content for a survey in a while.) was making sure that I'm not introducing leading questions or phrasing things in a very positive or negative light since that is a bias that then people will pick up on. So instead of saying, "I find it easy to focus at work," and then having like a multiple choice of true, always, never, that kind of thing, instead rephrasing the question to be, "Are you able to focus during work hours?" And then you have a scale there. Or instead of asking someone how much energy they have, maybe it's something like, "Do you experience fatigue during the day?" Or instead of asking someone, "Are you stressed at work?" because that can have a more negative connotation. It may lead someone to feel more negatively as they are assessing that question. Then you can say, "How do you feel when you're at work?" And then you can provide those answers of I'm stressed, slightly stressed, neutral, slightly relaxed, and relaxed. So it generated some interesting conversations around the importance of how we phrase questions and how we collect feedback. And I really enjoyed that process, and I'm really looking forward to seeing what folks have to say. And we're going to have three surveys total. So we have one that's early on in the experiment since we're only two Fridays in. We'll have one middle experiment survey go out, and then we'll have one at the end once we're done. And then hopefully, everybody's responses will then help us understand how the experiment went and then make a decision going forward. I'll be honest; I'm really hoping that this becomes a trend and something that we stick with. It is a professional goal of mine to slowly reduce the hours that I work each week or quickly; it doesn't have to be slowly. But I really like the four-day workweek. It's something that I haven't done, but I've been reading about it a fair amount lately. I feel like I've been seeing more studies conducted recently becoming published, and it's just very interesting to me. I had some similar concerns of how am I still going to be productive? My to-do list hasn't changed, but my hours are changing. So how am I still going to get everything done? And does it make sense for me to still get paid the same amount of money if I'm only working four out of the five days? And I had lots of questions around that, and the studies have been very enlightening and very positive in the outcome of a reduced workweek, not just for the individuals but for the companies as well. CHRIS: It's such an interesting space and exploration. The way that you're framing the survey sounds really great. It sounds like you're trying to be really intentional around the questions that you're asking and not being leading and whatnot. That said, it is one of the historically hard problems trying to quantify this and trying to actually boil it down. And there are so many different axes even that you're measuring on. Is it just increased employee happiness? Is it retention that you're talking about? Is it overall revenue? There are so many different things, and it's very tricky. I'm super interested to hear the results when you get those. So you're doing what sounds like more of a qualitative study like, how are you feeling? As opposed to a more quantitative sort of thing, is that right? STEPH: Yes, it's more in the realm of how are you feeling? And are you working extra hours, or are you truly taking the time off? CHRIS: Yeah, I think it's really hard to take something like this and try and get it into the quantitative space, even though like, oh yeah, if we could have a number, if it used to be two and now it's four, fantastic. We've doubled whatever that measure is. I don't know what the unit would be on this arbitrary number I made up. But again, that's the hard thing and probably not feasible at all. And so it makes sense the approach that you're taking. But it's super difficult. So I'm very interested to hear how that goes. More generally, the four-day workweek thing is such a nice idea. We should do that more. I'm trying to think how long I did that. So during the period that I was working freelance, I think there were probably at least five months where I did just a true four-day workweek. Fridays were my own. It was fantastic. Granted, I recorded the podcast with you. But that day was mine to shape as I wanted. And I found it was a really nice decompression period having that for a number of weeks in a row. And just getting to take care of personal stuff that I hadn't been and just having that extra little bit of space and time. And it really was wonderful. Now I'm working full five days a week, and my Fridays aren't even investment days, so I don't know what I'm doing over here. But I agree. I really like that idea, and I think it's a wonderful thing. And it's, I don't know, sort of the promise of this whole capitalism adventure we're supposed to go on, increasing productivity. And wasn't this the promise the whole time, everybody, so I am intrigued to see it being explored more, to see it being discussed. And what you're talking about of it's not just good for the employees, but it's also great for the companies. You're getting people that are more engaged on the days that they're working, which feels very true to me. Like, on a great day, I can do some amazing work. On a terrible day, I can do mediocre to bad work. It is totally possible for me to do something that is actively detrimental. Like, I introduce a bug that is going to impact a bunch of customers. And the remediation of that is going to take many more hours. That is totally a realistic thing. I think we often think of productivity in terms of are you at zero or some amount more than zero? But there is definitely another side of that. And so the cost of being not at your best is extremely high in my mind. And so anything we can do to improve that. STEPH: There's a recent study from a non-profit company called Autonomy that published some research called Going Public: Iceland's Journey to a Shorter Working Week. It's very interesting. And a number of people in my social circle have shared it. And that's one of the reasons that I came across it. And they commented in there that one of the reasons...I hope I'm getting this right, but we'll link to it in case I've gotten it a bit wrong. But one of the reasons that Iceland was interested or open to this idea of moving workers to a shorter workweek is because they were struggling with productivity and where people were working a lot of hours, but it still felt like their productivity was dropping. So then Autonomy ran this study to help figure out are there ways to improve productivity? Will shortening a workweek actually lead to higher productivity? And there was a statement in there that I really liked where it talks about the more hours that we work; we're actually lowering our per hour productivity which rings so true for me. Because I am one of those individuals where I'm very stubborn, and so if I'm stuck on something, I will put so many hours into trying to figure it out. But at some point, I have to just walk away, and if I do, I will solve it that much faster. But if I just try to use hours as my way to chip away at a problem, then that's not going to solve it. And my ability to solve that problem takes exponentially more time than if I had just walked away and then come back to the problem fresh and engaged. And some of the case studies I admired the way that they tackled the problem. They would essentially pay the company. So the company could reduce the hours for certain employees so then they could run the experiment. So if they reduced employees to say 32 hours but the company didn't actually want to stop working at 32 hours and they wanted to keep going, so then they brought in other people to work the remaining eight hours. Then as part of that study, they would pay the company to help them stay at their current level of productivity or current level of hours. This way, they could conduct the study. And I thought that was a really neat idea. I do have lots of questions still around the approach itself because it is how do you reduce your to-do list, essentially? So just because you dropped to a four-day workweek. So essentially, you have to just say less stuff gets done. Or, as these case studies promise, they're saying you're actually going to be more productive. So you will still continue to get a lot of your work done. I'm curious about that. I'd like to track my own productivity and see if I feel similarly. And then also, who is this for? Is this for everybody? Does everybody get to move to a four-day workweek? Is this for certain companies? Is it for certain jobs? Ideally, this is for everybody because there are so many health benefits to this, but I'm just intrigued as to who this is for, who it impacts, how can we make it available for everyone? And is the dream real that I can work four days a week and still feel as productive, if not more productive, and healthier, and happier as I do when working five days a week? Mid-roll Ad And now a quick break to hear from today's sponsor, Scout APM. Scout APM is leading-edge application performance monitoring that's designed to help Rails developers quickly find and fix performance issues without having to deal with the headache or overhead of enterprise platform feature bloat. With a developer-centric UI and tracing logic that ties bottlenecks to source code, you can quickly pinpoint and resolve those performance abnormalities like N+1 queries, slow database queries, memory bloat, and much more. Scout's real-time alerting and weekly digest emails let you rest easy knowing Scout's on watch and resolving performance issues before your customers ever see them. Scout has also launched its new error monitoring feature add-on for Python applications. Now you can connect your error reporting and application monitoring data on one platform. See for yourself why developers call Scout their best friend and try our error monitoring and APM free for 14 days; no credit card needed. And as an added-on bonus for Bike Shed listeners, Scout will donate $5 to the open-source project of your choice when you deploy. Learn more at scoutapm.com/bikeshed. That's scoutapm.com/bikeshed. CHRIS: I remember there was an extended period where working remote was this unique benefit that some organizations had. They had adopted that mode. They were async, and remote, and all of these wonderful things. And it became this really interesting selling point for those companies. Now the pandemic obviously pushed public opinion and everything on that in a pretty significant way such that it's a much more common thing. And so, as a result, I think it's less of a differentiator now. It used to be a way to help with recruiting. I wonder if there are organizations that are willing to take this, try it out, see that they are still close to as productive. But if it means that hiring is twice as easy, that is absolutely...especially if it is able to double your ability to hire, that is incredibly valuable or retention similarly. If you can increase retention or if you can make it easier to hire, the value of that is so, so high. And it's interesting in my mind because there's sort of a gold rush on that. That's only true for as long as a four-day workweek is a unique benefit of working at the organization. If this is actually the direction that everything's going and eventually everyone's going to settle to that, then if you wait too long to get there, then you're going to miss all the benefits. You're going to miss that particular benefit of it. And so I do wonder, would it be advantageous to organizations...I'm thinking about this now. Maybe this is the thing I have to do. But would it be advantageous to be that organization as early on as possible and try to get ahead of the curve and use that to hire more easily, retain more easily? Now that I say it all out loud, I'm sold. All right. I got to do this. STEPH: Yeah, I think that's a great comparison of where people are going to start to look for those types of benefits. And so, if you are one of the early adopters and you have the four-day workweek or a reduced workweek in general, then people will gravitate towards that benefit. And it's something that people can use to really help with hiring and retention. And yeah, I love it. You are CTO. So you have influence within your company that you could push for the four-day workweek if you think that's what you want to do. And I would be really intrigued to hear how that goes and how you feel if you...well, you've done it before where you've worked four days a week. So applying that to your current situation, how does that feel? CHRIS: Now you're actually holding me accountable to the things that I randomly said in passing. But it's interesting. So we're so early stage, and there's so much small work to do. There's all…oh, got to set up a website. We've got to do this. We've got to build that integration. There's just kind of scrambling to be done. And so there's a certain version in my mind that maybe we're in a period of time where additional hours are actually useful. There's a cost to them. Let's be clear about that. And so how long that will remain true, I'm not sure. I could see a point perhaps down the road where we achieve a little bit closer to steady-state maybe, who knows? It depends on how fast growth is and et cetera, a lot of other things. So I'm not sure that I would actually lead with this experiment myself, given where the organization is at right now. But I could see an organization that's at a little bit more of a steady-state, that's growing more incrementally, that is trying to think really hard about things like hiring and retention. If those were bigger questions in my mind, then I think I would be considering this more pointedly. But for now, I'm like, I kind of just got to do a bunch of stuff. And so my brain is telling me a different story, but it is interesting. I want to interrogate that and be like, brain, why is that the story you have there, huh? Huh? STEPH: I really appreciate what you're saying, though, because that makes sense to me. I understand when you are in that earlier stage, there's enough to do that that feels correct. Versus that added benefit of having a reduced workweek does benefit or could benefit larger companies who are looking to hire more heavily, or they're also concerned about retention or just helping their people address feelings of burnout. So I really appreciate that perspective because that also rings true. So along this whole conversation around wellness and how we can help people work more sustainable hours, there's a particular book that I've read that I've been really excited to share and chat with you about. It's called Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle. It's written by two sisters, Emily and Amelia Nagoski. And they really talk through the impact that stress has on us and then ways to work through that. And specifically, they talk about completing the stress cycle. And I found this incredibly useful for me because I have had weeks where I have just worked hard Monday through Friday. I've gotten to the end of my day Friday, and I'm like, great, I'm done. I've made it. I can just relax. And I walk away from work, and I can't relax. And I'm just like, I feel sick. I feel not good. Like, I thought I would walk away from work, and I would just suddenly feel this halo of relaxation, and everything would be wonderful. But instead, I just feel a bit ill, and I've never understood that until I was reading their book about completing the stress cycle. Have you ever had moments like that? CHRIS: It has definitely happened to me at various points, yes. STEPH: That makes me feel better because I haven't really chatted about this with someone. So until I read this book and I was like, oh, maybe this is a thing, and it's not just me, and this is something that people are experiencing. So to speak more about completing the stress cycle, they really highlight that stress and feelings, capital F feelings, can cause physiological symptoms. And so it's not just something that we are mentally processing, but we are physically processing the stress that we feel. And there's a really big difference between stressors and stress. So a stressor could be something like an unmeetable deadline. It could be family. It could be money concerns. It could be your morning commute, anything that increases your stress level. And during that, there's a very physical process that happens to your body anytime there's a perceived threat. And it's really helpful to us because it's frankly what triggers our fight, flight, or freeze response. And our bodies receive a rush of adrenaline and cortisol, which essentially, if we're using that flight response, that's going to help us run. And a number of the processes in our system will essentially go into a state of hibernation because everything in our body is very focused on helping us run or do the thing that we think is going to save our life in that moment. The problem is our body doesn't know the difference between what's more of a mental threat versus what is a truly physical threat. So this is the difference between your stress and your stressors. So in more of a physical threat, if there's a lion that you are running from, that is the stressor, but then the stress is everything that you still feel after you have run from that lion. So you encounter a lion, you run. You make it back to your group of people where you are safe, and you celebrate, and you dance, and you hug. And that is completing the stress cycle because you are essentially processing all of that stress. And you are telling your body in a body-focused language that I am safe now, and everything is fine. So you can move back, and anything that was in a hibernation state, all of that dump of adrenaline and cortisol can be worked out of your system, and everything can go back to a normal state. Most of us aren't encountering lions, but we do encounter jerks in meetings or really stressful commutes. And whenever we have survived that meeting, or we've gotten through our commute to the other side, we don't have that moment of celebration where we really let our body know that hey, we've made it through that moment of stress, and we are away from that stressor, and we can actually process everything. So if you're interested in this, the book's really great. It talks about ways that you can process that stress and how important it is to do so. Otherwise, it will literally build up in your system, and it can make you sick. And it will manifest in ways that will let us know that we haven't dealt with that stress. And one of the top methods that they recommend is exercise and movement. That's a really great way to let your body know that you are no longer in an unsafe state, and your body can start to relax. There's also a lot of other great ways. Art is a really big one. It could be hugging someone. It could be calling someone that you love. There are a number of ways that you can process it. But I hadn't recognized how important it is that once you have removed yourself from a stressor, that doesn't necessarily just mean you're done, and you can relax. You actually have to go through that physical process, and then you can relax. So I started incorporating that more into my day that when I'm done with work, I always find something to do, and it's typically to go for a walk, or it's go for a run. And I have found that now I really haven't felt that ill-feeling where I'm trying to relax, but I just feel sick. Saying that out loud, I feel like I'm a mess on Fridays. [chuckles] CHRIS: I feel like you're human. It was interesting when you asked the question at the beginning. You were like, "Is this a thing that other people experience?" And my answer was certainly, yes; I have experienced this. I think there's something about me that I think is useful where I don't think I'm special at all on any axis whatsoever. And so whenever there's something that's going on, I'm like, I assume that this is just normal human behavior, which is useful because most of the time it is. And this is the sort of thing where if I'm having a negative experience, I will look to the external world to be like, I'm sure other people have experienced this, and let me pull that in. And I've found that really useful for myself to just be like, I'm not special. There's nothing particularly special about me. So let me go look from the entirety of the internet where people have almost certainly talked about this. And I've not read the book that you're describing here, but it does sound like it does a great job of describing this. There is a blog post that I found that has stayed in the back of my mind and informed a little bit of my day-to-day approach to this sort of thing which is a blog post by Cal Newport, who I think at this point we've mentioned him a handful of times on the show. But the title of the post is Drastically Reduce Stress with a Work Shutdown Ritual. And it's this very interesting little post where he talks about at the end of your day; you want to close the book on it. I think this is especially pointed now that many of us are working from home. For me, this is a new thing. And so, I've been very intentional with trying to put walks at the beginning and end of my day. But in this particular blog post, he describes a routine that he does where he tidies things up and makes his list for the next day. And then he has a particular phrase that he says, which is "schedule shut down, complete." And it's a sort of nonsense phrase. It doesn't even quite make sense grammatically, but it's his phrase that he internalized, and somehow this became his almost mantra for the end of the day. And now when he does it, that's like his all right, okay, turned off the brain, and now I can walk away. I know that I've said the phrase, and I only say the phrase when I have properly set things up. And so it's this weird structure that he's built in his mind. But it totally works to quiet those voices that are like, yeah, but what about…Do we think about…Do we complete…And he's got now this magic phrase that he can say. And so I've really loved that. For myself, I haven't gotten quite to that level, but I've definitely built the here's how I wind down at the end of the day. Here's what I do with lists and what I do so that I can ideally walk away comfortably. Again, this is one of those situations where I sound like I know what I'm doing or have my act together. This is aspirational me. Day-to-day me is a hot mess like everybody else. [laughs] And this is just what I...when I do this, I feel better. Most of the time, I don't do this because I forget it, or because I'm busy, or because I'm stressed, [chuckles], and so I don't do the thing that reduces stress, you know, human stuff. But I really enjoyed that post. STEPH: I haven't heard that one. I like a lot of Cal Newport's work, but I haven't read that particular blog post. Yeah, I think the idea of completing the stress cycle has helped me tremendously because by giving it a name like completing the stress cycle has been really helpful for me because working out is important to me. It's something that I enjoy, but it's also one of those things that's easy to get bumped. It is part of my wellness routine. And so, if I'm really busy, then I will bump it from the list. And then it's something that then doesn't get addressed. But recognizing that this is also important to my productivity, not to just this general idea of wellness, has really helped me recenter how important this is and to make sure that I recognize hey, it's been a stressful day. I need to get up and move. That is a very important part of my day. It is not just part of an exercise routine, but this is something that I need to do to close out my day to then make sure I have a great day tomorrow. So bringing it back, it's been a week that's been filled with a lot of discussions around burnout and then ways that we can measure it and then also address it. And I've really enjoyed reading this book. So I'll be sure to drop a link in the show notes. On that note, shall we wrap up? CHRIS: Schedule shut down, complete. The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. STEPH: This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. CHRIS: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review in iTunes, as it really helps other folks find the show. STEPH: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me on Twitter @SViccari. CHRIS: And I'm @christoomey STEPH: Or you can reach us at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. CHRIS: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. All: Byeeeeeeeeeee!!! Announcer: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

Otter Creek Sermons
Represent: A Visitor Comes in the Night (Audio)

Otter Creek Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021


Off Track - ABC RN
The river visitor making a splash

Off Track - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 25:19


Melbourne's Yarra river has an unexpected inhabitant, and its bringing joy to people in the locked-down city and beyond.

New Books in History
Marnie Hughes-Warrington and Anne Martin, "Big and Little Histories: Sizing Up Ethics in Historiography" (Routledge, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 62:39


Big and Little Histories: Sizing Up Ethics in Historiography (Routledge, 2021) introduces students to ethics in historiography through an exploration of how historians in different times and places have explained how history ought to be written and how those views relate to different understandings of ethics. No two histories are the same. The book argues that this is a good thing because the differences between histories are largely a matter of ethics. Looking to histories made across the world and from ancient times until today, readers are introduced to a wide variety of approaches to the ethics of history, including well-known ethical approaches, such as the virtue ethics of universal historians, and utilitarian approaches to collective biography writing while also discovering new and emerging ideas in the ethics of history. Through these approaches, readers are encouraged to challenge their ideas about whether humans are separate from other living and non-living things and whether machines and animals can write histories. The book looks to the fundamental questions posed about the nature of history making by Indigenous history makers and asks whether the ethics at play in the global variety of histories might be better appreciated in professional codes of conduct and approaches to research ethics management. Opening up the topic of ethics to show how historians might have viewed ethics differently in the past, the book requires no background in ethics or history theory and is open to all of those with an interest in how we think about good histories. Marnie Hughes-Warrington is Deputy-Vice Chancellor Research and Enterprise at the University of South Australia and Visitor at the School of History, Australian National University, Australia. She is the author of several historiography texts, including Fifty Key Thinkers on History (three editions), History Goes to the Movies (2007) and History as Wonder (2018). Anne Martin is Director of the Tjabal Indigenous Higher Education Centre at the Australian National University, Australia. She is an Aboriginal rights activist and educator who is dedicated to changing the future for our next generation of leaders. Alexandra Ortolja-Baird is Lecturer in Digital History and Culture at the University of Portsmouth. She tweets at @timetravelallie. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Marnie Hughes-Warrington and Anne Martin, "Big and Little Histories: Sizing Up Ethics in Historiography" (Routledge, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 62:39


Big and Little Histories: Sizing Up Ethics in Historiography (Routledge, 2021) introduces students to ethics in historiography through an exploration of how historians in different times and places have explained how history ought to be written and how those views relate to different understandings of ethics. No two histories are the same. The book argues that this is a good thing because the differences between histories are largely a matter of ethics. Looking to histories made across the world and from ancient times until today, readers are introduced to a wide variety of approaches to the ethics of history, including well-known ethical approaches, such as the virtue ethics of universal historians, and utilitarian approaches to collective biography writing while also discovering new and emerging ideas in the ethics of history. Through these approaches, readers are encouraged to challenge their ideas about whether humans are separate from other living and non-living things and whether machines and animals can write histories. The book looks to the fundamental questions posed about the nature of history making by Indigenous history makers and asks whether the ethics at play in the global variety of histories might be better appreciated in professional codes of conduct and approaches to research ethics management. Opening up the topic of ethics to show how historians might have viewed ethics differently in the past, the book requires no background in ethics or history theory and is open to all of those with an interest in how we think about good histories. Marnie Hughes-Warrington is Deputy-Vice Chancellor Research and Enterprise at the University of South Australia and Visitor at the School of History, Australian National University, Australia. She is the author of several historiography texts, including Fifty Key Thinkers on History (three editions), History Goes to the Movies (2007) and History as Wonder (2018). Anne Martin is Director of the Tjabal Indigenous Higher Education Centre at the Australian National University, Australia. She is an Aboriginal rights activist and educator who is dedicated to changing the future for our next generation of leaders. Alexandra Ortolja-Baird is Lecturer in Digital History and Culture at the University of Portsmouth. She tweets at @timetravelallie. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Intellectual History
Marnie Hughes-Warrington and Anne Martin, "Big and Little Histories: Sizing Up Ethics in Historiography" (Routledge, 2021)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 62:39


Big and Little Histories: Sizing Up Ethics in Historiography (Routledge, 2021) introduces students to ethics in historiography through an exploration of how historians in different times and places have explained how history ought to be written and how those views relate to different understandings of ethics. No two histories are the same. The book argues that this is a good thing because the differences between histories are largely a matter of ethics. Looking to histories made across the world and from ancient times until today, readers are introduced to a wide variety of approaches to the ethics of history, including well-known ethical approaches, such as the virtue ethics of universal historians, and utilitarian approaches to collective biography writing while also discovering new and emerging ideas in the ethics of history. Through these approaches, readers are encouraged to challenge their ideas about whether humans are separate from other living and non-living things and whether machines and animals can write histories. The book looks to the fundamental questions posed about the nature of history making by Indigenous history makers and asks whether the ethics at play in the global variety of histories might be better appreciated in professional codes of conduct and approaches to research ethics management. Opening up the topic of ethics to show how historians might have viewed ethics differently in the past, the book requires no background in ethics or history theory and is open to all of those with an interest in how we think about good histories. Marnie Hughes-Warrington is Deputy-Vice Chancellor Research and Enterprise at the University of South Australia and Visitor at the School of History, Australian National University, Australia. She is the author of several historiography texts, including Fifty Key Thinkers on History (three editions), History Goes to the Movies (2007) and History as Wonder (2018). Anne Martin is Director of the Tjabal Indigenous Higher Education Centre at the Australian National University, Australia. She is an Aboriginal rights activist and educator who is dedicated to changing the future for our next generation of leaders. Alexandra Ortolja-Baird is Lecturer in Digital History and Culture at the University of Portsmouth. She tweets at @timetravelallie. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

The Flush Podcast - Stories from the field
America's 2021 Pheasant Hunting Forecast

The Flush Podcast - Stories from the field

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 79:07


Tom Carpenter from Pheasants Forever joins the show to help us break down a state-by-state outlook for the 2021 pheasant hunting season.  How bad did the drought hurt pheasant numbers?  Which areas saw an increase in bird numbers?  Are there locations to avoid this year?  We'll answer those questions, and share a few sleeper pheasant hunting spots. https://www.pheasantsforever.org/Presented by Grain Belt Beer (https://www.grainbelt.com/,) North Dakota Tourism (https://www.legendarynd.com/,) Chief Upland (https://chiefupland.com/,) Federal Ammunition (https://www.federalpremium.com/,) Huron Chamber & Visitor's Bureau (http://www.huronsd.com/,) & OnX Maps (https://www.onxmaps.com/)

The Flush Podcast - Stories from the field
North Dakota's 2021 Upland Forecast

The Flush Podcast - Stories from the field

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 64:35


Mike Jensen works for the state of North Dakota.  Mike joins the show to break down North Dakota's updated 2021 bird counts and their upland bird hunting outlook for this season.  We dig into the roadside counts for pheasants, as well as sharptailed grouse, and Hungarian partridge.  We also talk about the waterfowl numbers across the state and the effects of the drought on the landscape.  Mike explains North Dakota's new trespass laws and the steps hunters must take this season to stay on the right side of property boundaries.  Plus, Mike shares a few of his sleeper spots in North Dakota and under the radar ruffed grouse hunting haunts. Presented by Grain Belt Beer (https://www.grainbelt.com/,) North Dakota Tourism (https://www.legendarynd.com/,) Chief Upland (https://chiefupland.com/,) Federal Ammunition (https://www.federalpremium.com/,) Huron Chamber & Visitor's Bureau (http://www.huronsd.com/,) & OnX Maps (https://www.onxmaps.com/)

Duluth News Tribune Minute
Hospital visitor restrictions return as COVID-19 cases increase

Duluth News Tribune Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 6:09


Today is Thursday, Sept. 16, 2021. Here's a look at the top headlines from around the Northland. The Duluth News Tribune Minute is a product of Forum Communications Company and is brought to you by reporters at the Duluth News Tribune, Superior Telegram and Cloquet Pine Journal. Find more news throughout the day at duluthnewstribune.com.

RNZ: Morning Report
Covid-19: Auckland Hospital reduces visitor numbers

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 3:36


Auckland Hospital is now only allowing patient visits on compassionate grounds and all visits must be pre-arranged and approved. The move comes after nurses took legal action against the district health board over concern for the safety of staff. Auckland DHB provider services director Dr Mike Shepherd said the visitor policy has been tightened because the controls that were in place weren't working. He spoke to Susie Ferguson.

Le Grand Fromage
Ep. Quarante-six: The onions, like a bad French visitor, came back to say hello.

Le Grand Fromage

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 55:19


This was a a very revealing show. Vincent thinks soup is underrated. Breakfast is John's favorite meal of the day. And Quinno doesn't like cloudy beer. Now you know!

Unlocking the Bible: Today's Key on Oneplace.com
God Will No Longer Be a Visitor

Unlocking the Bible: Today's Key on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 0:59


The Lord calls all people everywhere to come to him. Won't you do so today?

OTR Detective – The Great Detectives of Old Time Radio
EP3554s: The Saint: The Case of the Previewed Crime and the Saint and Barrie Craig: Visitor at Midnight (Twice Told Tale)

OTR Detective – The Great Detectives of Old Time Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 61:37


A man claiming to be an autho Read more ...

The Flush Podcast - Stories from the field
The Flush Pheasant Hunt Invitation

The Flush Podcast - Stories from the field

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 55:02


Scott Fransen joins this week's show to invite listeners on a wild bird pheasant hunt this fall at Browns Hunting Ranch in South Dakota.  Scott will host a group of hunters at camp while filming the hunt for a future episode of The Flush television show.  Scott explains why losing his dog to cancer inspired him to host this hunt, plus we talk about the excitement around opening days and a new season with a young puppy. Sign up at https://www.brownshuntingranch.com/ or (605) 765-9150. Presented by North Dakota Tourism (https://www.legendarynd.com/,) Chief Upland (https://chiefupland.com/,) Federal Ammunition (https://www.federalpremium.com/,) Huron Chamber & Visitor's Bureau (http://www.huronsd.com/,) & OnX Maps (https://www.onxmaps.com/)

RNZ: Morning Report
Covid-19: Junior doctors want change to ADHB visitor policy

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 3:38


Junior doctors are demanding that the Auckland District Health Board go back to the drawing board again over its hotly debated visitor policy. Following criticism by nurses, staff and patients, on Thursday the DHB tightened its rules governing visitors to Auckland City Hospital. It was allowing two visitors per patient but changed that to one per patient - and for no more than two hours. It's still too risky says Dr Deborah Powell of the junior doctors' union. She spoke to Guyon Espiner.

Raising The Nuts
A Surprise Visitor

Raising The Nuts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 58:10


On today's episode of Raising The Nuts, Jody and Trevor discuss their trip to San Diego and an unwelcome visitor to the house upon their return. They also have a fun "Jody thinks" segment with some strong Jody rage for the first time in season 3. Finally, they give their health and mindset suggestions in the "Just the Tips" segment. 

The Flush Podcast - Stories from the field

We're back in the field, celebrating Montana's upland opener.  George Lyall joins the show to help us relive our opening week successes and failures.  We'll talk bird numbers, drought conditions, dog's point, porcupines, public lands, big sky country, losing a dog in the field, blue-green algae, first aid in the field, cowboy hats train bird dogs, and are bird dogs selfish, or do they have the biggest hearts? Presented by North Dakota Tourism (https://www.legendarynd.com/,) Chief Upland (https://chiefupland.com/,) Federal Ammunition (https://www.federalpremium.com/,) Huron Chamber & Visitor's Bureau (http://www.huronsd.com/,) & OnX Maps (https://www.onxmaps.com/)

Visionaries Global Media
Brain Buster Boys #35: All Out Of Excuses

Visionaries Global Media

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 83:08


The BBBs cap off the summer with the phenomenal All Out pay-per-view, while the Greg Goldman saga takes an unexpected turn. In this episode, Brett and Beaumont talk about: Fox Monroe Checks In With Brett (0:00) Bryan Danielson & Adam Cole Debuts/Cincy Dynamite/Monroe Money (4:09) Beaumont Calls Greg Goldman (13:55) AEW All Out 2021 (17:32) Greg Gets a Visitor (65:43) If You Recall – WWE SummerSlam 2013, Daniel Bryan vs John Cena (71:33) The Greg Goldman Report (80:12) Follow @BrainBusterBoys on Twitter and Instagram Brought to you by Visionaries Global Media

Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show
Are The Buckeyes Close To Adding Florida Standouts? Massive Visitor List For Oregon Game

Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 26:16


In this special mid-day bonus episode of The Morning Scoop podcast, BuckeyeScoop.com's Florida insider, Dominique Smith, joins host Tom Orr to discuss some of Ohio State's top recruiting targets in the Sunshine State.From the running back who just earned an offer yesterday, to a massive offensive lineman who could anchor Ohio State in the trenches for years, to a 5-star skill player off to an incredible start this fall, there's a lot to talk about. Plus, a look at some of the biggest names visiting Ohio Stadium this weekend for the Buckeyes' massive showdown with the Oregon Ducks.

The Classic Red Green show Podcast
The Classic Red Green Show Podcast - Episode 16 - “Lodge Visitor” and other stories

The Classic Red Green show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 72:56


Today's episode is Episode 16 - Lodge Visitor. We had to remove episodes on Podbean (and attached accounts) due to funding....So check out our sponsor - Rail Line Designs. Sorry about the clicking - we are going to be fixing this audio in future pods. On this episode, we still have no Male Call segment but do have The news again! We talk Canadian Content rules, how RGS was able to make money from international sales and legendary show Comedy at Club 54. How does this all tie in together? Listen to find out. We also highlight actor Mark Wilson in celebration of his first appearance on the show. And of course the episode of the week https://jefff380.wixsite.com/raillinedesigns Check us out online - Classic Red Green Show Page

Seminole Wrap: A Florida State Football Podcast
FSU recruiting: Notre Dame recruit visitor list breakdown

Seminole Wrap: A Florida State Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 42:38


This weekend has been circled on the calendars of Florida State Seminoles football fans since its announcement. A prime time game against the Notre Dame Fighting Irish, and a chance to prove that Florida State's back. But the recruiting staff has this weekend circled for other reasons. The Three Stars are back with their second podcast of the week. Why so soon? Because like the recruiting staff, we've had this weekend circled, as well. Tallahassee will be Ground Zero for many of the top high school players in the nation. With 50+ prospects expected, FSU has a chance to add or solidify its highly-ranked recruiting class, while also building future bonds. Who's going to be in town? Will FSU add any commits? Tune into the Florida State of Recruiting podcast for all the latest news. The Florida State of Recruiting (FSoR) Podcast features the Three Stars: Josh Pick, Tim Alumbaugh, and David Stout. But the fun doesn't (shouldn't) stop there. Get even more Florida State in your earbuds with our “Everything Noles” podcast family, home of FSoR, Triple Option and more. As always, check out the latest recruiting updates in our Official Tomahawk Nation Recruiting Thread. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/tomahawknation/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tomahawknation/support

The Flush Podcast - Stories from the field

Ben Brettingen from OnX Hunt joins the show to help us count down the last remaining hours before America's first upland openers kick-off.  We'll discuss new features just released on the OnX Hunt app that will help you become better hunters in the field this fall, plus we'll talk about hunting with young bird dogs, do-it-yourself bird hunts, and so much more. Presented by North Dakota Tourism (https://www.legendarynd.com/,) Chief Upland (https://chiefupland.com/,) Federal Ammunition (https://www.federalpremium.com/,) Huron Chamber & Visitor's Bureau (http://www.huronsd.com/,) & OnX Maps (https://www.onxmaps.com/)

Real Ghost Stories Online
We Have A Visitor | Best of RGSO

Real Ghost Stories Online

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 33:04


We Have A Visitor Two teens struggle to understand and deal with the ghostly activity around them as they realize they have an uninvited visitor. Here is a preview of the story. ". I don't know why and neither did the woman. We shrugged it off, turned it on, and she went inside, shutting the door. I sat on the bed, cameras in hand, taking pictures. My phone was video recording in hopes of a spirit of some kind. As I sat there, "A" screamed, and I jumped off the bed hollering "What is it?!" "You turned off the damn light! Mary, you better turn it on, or I am going to punch you!" She hollered I argued with her, back and forth. "I am on the bed," I repeated, looking at the switch in the down position "TURN IT ON!" She screamed as I jumped up again and switched it on I looked back at the bed, towards the door where I noticed a shadow was walking. It wasn't outside; it was inside with us. My heart thumped, and I opened the bathroom and stared at her. As sisters, we took showers together, so seeing her there using the toilet didn't faze us. "What is it?" She asked me, annoyed as I tried to speak "I think we have a visitor," I could only whisper as she laughed." To hear more real ghost stories, become a supporter of our show and get every episode, including our weekly bonus episodes at http://www.ghostpodcast.com or http://www.patreon.com/realghoststories Watch more at: http://www.realghoststoriesonline.com/ If you have a real ghost story or supernatural event to report, please write into our show or call 1-855-853-4802! If you like the show, please help keep us on the air and support the show by becoming an EPP (Extra Podcast Person). We'll give you a BONUS episode every week as a "Thank You" for your support. Become an EPP here: http://www.ghostpodcast.com/?page_id=118 or at or at http://www.patreon.com/realghoststories

The Flush Podcast - Stories from the field

Brittany French works for Pass it On – Outdoor Mentors.  Brittany explains how the organization began, their mission, and how they successfully take hundreds of new hunters into the field each year.  She relives important hunting memories, shares how she's working on more than 300 upcoming hunts this season, roll call for mentors, plus we discuss how each hunter can make an impact in simple yet meaningful ways this hunting season to help Pass it On! Presented by North Dakota Tourism (https://www.legendarynd.com/,) Chief Upland (https://chiefupland.com/,) Federal Ammunition (https://www.federalpremium.com/,) Huron Chamber & Visitor's Bureau (http://www.huronsd.com/,) & OnX Maps (https://www.onxmaps.com/)

The SeedPod for Kids
A Night Visitor Part 6

The SeedPod for Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 16:18


We have a very exciting story about a prison escape! But it's not just any prison escape, it's only one that God could orchestrate!Year C Quarter 3 Week 34All Bible verses are from the NKJV.Podcast produced by: Katie ChitwoodIf you have enjoyed this program and would like to know more, go to our website: www.startingwithjesus.comWrite to Ms. Katie at seedpod@startingwithjesus.com to let me know how much you are enjoying this podcast!The Bible story material used in today's devotional podcast has been used with permission from My Bible First. If you would like your own copy, please visit My Bible First's website or call 1-877-242-5317.If you would like to purchase your own Memory Verse CD or Songbook, go to Ouchita Hills Store (https://www.ouachitahillsacademy.org/store?page=1&store_category_id=0&sort_by=title&is_ascending=1&search=).Special thanks to: Bible Readings this week: Jace and SummerSingers for this Quarter: Tory, Caleb, and Enoch Hall, Michael and Amy NelsonOutro: Pastor Jonathan ChitwoodLindsey Mills: Theme Music, www.lindseymillsmusic.com

The SeedPod for Kids
A Night Visitor Part 5

The SeedPod for Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 12:31


We have a very exciting story about a prison escape! But it's not just any prison escape, it's only one that God could orchestrate!Year C Quarter 3 Week 34All Bible verses are from the NKJV.Podcast produced by: Katie ChitwoodIf you have enjoyed this program and would like to know more, go to our website: www.startingwithjesus.comWrite to Ms. Katie at seedpod@startingwithjesus.com to let me know how much you are enjoying this podcast!The Bible story material used in today's devotional podcast has been used with permission from My Bible First. If you would like your own copy, please visit My Bible First's website or call 1-877-242-5317.If you would like to purchase your own Memory Verse CD or Songbook, go to Ouchita Hills Store (https://www.ouachitahillsacademy.org/store?page=1&store_category_id=0&sort_by=title&is_ascending=1&search=).Special thanks to: Bible Readings this week: Jace and SummerSingers for this Quarter: Tory, Caleb, and Enoch Hall, Michael and Amy NelsonOutro: Pastor Jonathan ChitwoodLindsey Mills: Theme Music, www.lindseymillsmusic.com

The SeedPod for Kids
A Night Visitor Part 4

The SeedPod for Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 13:07


We have a very exciting story about a prison escape! But it's not just any prison escape, it's only one that God could orchestrate!Year C Quarter 3 Week 34All Bible verses are from the NKJV.Podcast produced by: Katie ChitwoodIf you have enjoyed this program and would like to know more, go to our website: www.startingwithjesus.comWrite to Ms. Katie at seedpod@startingwithjesus.com to let me know how much you are enjoying this podcast!The Bible story material used in today's devotional podcast has been used with permission from My Bible First. If you would like your own copy, please visit My Bible First's website or call 1-877-242-5317.If you would like to purchase your own Memory Verse CD or Songbook, go to Ouchita Hills Store (https://www.ouachitahillsacademy.org/store?page=1&store_category_id=0&sort_by=title&is_ascending=1&search=).Special thanks to: Bible Readings this week: Jace and SummerSingers for this Quarter: Tory, Caleb, and Enoch Hall, Michael and Amy NelsonOutro: Pastor Jonathan ChitwoodLindsey Mills: Theme Music, www.lindseymillsmusic.com

The Big Dave Show Podcast
Visitor Rescued Handler From Darthgater - Here's What's Snappenin'

The Big Dave Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 3:06


A Utah reptile center employee named AMY is recovering after an alligator yanked her into its enclosure during a presentation at a birthday party, thrashing her around before a fast-acting visitor leapt inside and helped free her from its jaws.

The SeedPod for Kids
A Night Visitor Part 3

The SeedPod for Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 14:48


We have a very exciting story about a prison escape! But it's not just any prison escape, it's only one that God could orchestrate!Year C Quarter 3 Week 34All Bible verses are from the NKJV.Podcast produced by: Katie ChitwoodIf you have enjoyed this program and would like to know more, go to our website: www.startingwithjesus.comWrite to Ms. Katie at seedpod@startingwithjesus.com to let me know how much you are enjoying this podcast!The Bible story material used in today's devotional podcast has been used with permission from My Bible First. If you would like your own copy, please visit My Bible First's website or call 1-877-242-5317.If you would like to purchase your own Memory Verse CD or Songbook, go to Ouchita Hills Store (https://www.ouachitahillsacademy.org/store?page=1&store_category_id=0&sort_by=title&is_ascending=1&search=).Special thanks to: Bible Readings this week: Jace and SummerSingers for this Quarter: Tory, Caleb, and Enoch Hall, Michael and Amy NelsonOutro: Pastor Jonathan ChitwoodLindsey Mills: Theme Music, www.lindseymillsmusic.com

The SeedPod for Kids
A Night Visitor Part 2

The SeedPod for Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 15:09


We have a very exciting story about a prison escape! But it's not just any prison escape, it's only one that God could orchestrate!Year C Quarter 3 Week 34All Bible verses are from the NKJV.Podcast produced by: Katie ChitwoodIf you have enjoyed this program and would like to know more, go to our website: www.startingwithjesus.comWrite to Ms. Katie at seedpod@startingwithjesus.com to let me know how much you are enjoying this podcast!The Bible story material used in today's devotional podcast has been used with permission from My Bible First. If you would like your own copy, please visit My Bible First's website or call 1-877-242-5317.If you would like to purchase your own Memory Verse CD or Songbook, go to Ouchita Hills Store (https://www.ouachitahillsacademy.org/store?page=1&store_category_id=0&sort_by=title&is_ascending=1&search=).Special thanks to: Bible Readings this week: Jace and SummerSingers for this Quarter: Tory, Caleb, and Enoch Hall, Michael and Amy NelsonOutro: Pastor Jonathan ChitwoodLindsey Mills: Theme Music, www.lindseymillsmusic.com

The SeedPod for Kids
A Night Visitor Part 1

The SeedPod for Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 15:48


We have a very exciting story about a prison escape! But it's not just any prison escape, it's only one that God could orchestrate!Year C Quarter 3 Week 34All Bible verses are from the NKJV.Podcast produced by: Katie ChitwoodIf you have enjoyed this program and would like to know more, go to our website: www.startingwithjesus.comWrite to Ms. Katie at seedpod@startingwithjesus.com to let me know how much you are enjoying this podcast!The Bible story material used in today's devotional podcast has been used with permission from My Bible First. If you would like your own copy, please visit My Bible First's website or call 1-877-242-5317.If you would like to purchase your own Memory Verse CD or Songbook, go to Ouchita Hills Store (https://www.ouachitahillsacademy.org/store?page=1&store_category_id=0&sort_by=title&is_ascending=1&search=).Special thanks to: Bible Readings this week: Jace and SummerSingers for this Quarter: Tory, Caleb, and Enoch Hall, Michael and Amy NelsonOutro: Pastor Jonathan ChitwoodLindsey Mills: Theme Music, www.lindseymillsmusic.com

The Flush Podcast - Stories from the field
Gun Care, Mountain Birds, Family Road Trip

The Flush Podcast - Stories from the field

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 67:10


Fred Bohm is a diehard upland bird hunter that owns the company Sage & Braker.  Fred joins the show to talk about the importance of gun cleaning and maintenance, then we discuss his passion for hunting upland birds in the mountains.  Fred explains how and where to find Dusky grouse and Ptarmigan in Colorado, along with a simple approach to exploring new public lands.  Fred also explains the upland bird hunting roadtrip that he's taking his family on this season, beginning in October and running through February, plus we discuss making a hunting lifestyle a normal part of family life. Presented by North Dakota Tourism (https://www.legendarynd.com/,) Chief Upland (https://chiefupland.com/,) Federal Ammunition (https://www.federalpremium.com/,) Huron Chamber & Visitor's Bureau (http://www.huronsd.com/,) & OnX Maps (https://www.onxmaps.com/)

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show ON DEMAND
The Day We Had A Visitor

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show ON DEMAND

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 120:12


Elvis Duran and The Morning Show kick off Wednesday! The show welcomes their first instudio guest , Bobby Flay! We actually have a celebrity for our version of 'Match Game' Our listener Jamie had a HUGE problem with a cicada and needs some help!.Our very own Diamond did something "Off The Grid" for the very first time! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Ben Maller Show
07/26/2021 - Hour 1 - Unexpected Visitor

The Ben Maller Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 43:31


Ben Maller talks about Deshaun Watson making a surprising appearance at Houston Texans training camp and if it will lead to him being added to the commissioner's exempt list, MLB Pick'em, and much more! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com